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Sample records for protein 1b tumor

  1. Evolutionarily Conserved Binding of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein to Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1B*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. PMID:25635048

  2. The E1B 19,000-molecular-weight protein of group C adenoviruses prevents tumor necrosis factor cytolysis of human cells but not of mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, L R; Aquino, L; Duerksen-Hughes, P J; Day, D; Horton, T M; Yei, S P; Wold, W S

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a multifunctional immunoregulatory protein that is secreted by activated macrophages and is believed to have antiviral activities. We reported earlier that when mouse C3HA fibroblasts are infected with human adenoviruses, the 289R and 243R proteins encoded by region E1A render the cells susceptible to lysis by TNF, and a 14,700-molecular-weight protein (14.7K protein) encoded by region E3 protects the cells against lysis by TNF. We now report that the 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) (176R) protein encoded by the E1B transcription unit can protect human HEL-299 fibroblasts and human ME-180 cervical carcinoma cells against lysis by TNF. This was determined by infecting cells with adenovirus double mutants that lack region E3 and do or do not express the E1B-19K protein and by measuring cytolysis by using a short-term (18-h) 51Cr-release assay. Under these assay conditions, the 51Cr release was specific to TNF and was not a consequence of the cyt phenotype associated with E1B-19K protein-negative mutants. Also, by using virus double mutants that lack E3 in combination with other early regions, we found that E1A, the E1B-55K protein-encoding gene, E3, and E4 are not required to protect HEL-299 cells against TNF cytolysis. Three additional human cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT8, and RC29) and a simian virus 40-transformed WI38 cell line (VA-13) also required E1B for protection against TNF cytolysis, indicating that the E1B-19K protein is required to protect many if not all human cell types against lysis by TNF when infected by adenovirus. The E1B-19K protein was not able to protect six different adenovirus-infected mouse cell lines against TNF lysis, even though the protein was shown to be efficiently expressed in one of the cell lines. HEL-299 or ME-180 cells infected by a mutant that lacks the E1B-19K protein but retains region E3 were not lysed by TNF, indicating that one or more of the E3 proteins can protect these cells against TNF lysis

  3. Human adenovirus 2 E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens: antipeptide antibodies targeted to the NH2 and COOH termini.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Kramer, T A

    1983-01-01

    The human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) transforming region is located in the left 11.1% of the viral genome and encodes two early transcription units, E1A and E1B. Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from the Ad2 E1B DNA sequence (Gingeras et al., J. Biol. Chem. 257:13475-13491, 1982), we have prepared antibodies against synthetic peptides, 8 to 16 amino acids in length, encoded at the NH2 and COOH termini of the major E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens. The antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated the targeted E1B-19K or E1B-53K tumor antigens from extracts of Ad2-infected cells. The specificity of the peptide competition studies. Antipeptide antibodies directed to the NH2 and COOH termini immunoprecipitated the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens from two Ad2-transformed rat cell lines, F17 and F4, providing evidence that identical tumor antigens are synthesized in Ad2-infected and Ad2-transformed cells. These results show that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K T antigens are not processed proteolytically at either the NH2 or COOH terminus. Our data provide strong evidence at the protein level that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens partially overlap in DNA sequence, with the E1B-19K initiating translation at the first ATG at nucleotide 1711 in translation reading frame 1 and the E1B-53K tumor antigen initiating translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 in reading frame 3. This confirms the results of others on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of E1B-19K and theoretical deductions based on the DNA sequence. Our findings prove that the large E1B-53K T antigen initiates translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 and not at equally plausible initiation codons located farther downstream at nucleotides 2202 and 2235. Thus, the E1B-53K T antigen is another example of a protein which initiates translation at an internal ATG rather than at the 5'-proximal ATG. Images PMID:6632083

  4. Down-regulated expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Long-Yi; Zhou, Dong-Xun; Lu, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Zou, Da-Jin

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTP1B protein showed decreased expression in 67.79% of the HCC patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression predicts poor prognosis of HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression is correlated with expansion of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of PTP1B is associated with activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling. -- Abstract: The protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a classical non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in metabolic signaling and can exert both tumor suppressing and tumor promoting effects in different cancers depending on the substrate involved and the cellular context. However, the expression level and function of PTP1B in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, PTP1B expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in normal liver tissue (n = 16) and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 169). The correlations between PTP1B expression level and clinicopathologic features and patient survival were also analyzed. One hundred and eleven of 169 HCC patients (65.7%) had negative or low PTP1B expression in tumorous tissues, whereas normal tissues always expressed strong PTP1B. Decreased PTP1B expression was significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry also showed that low PTP1B expression level was correlated with high percentage of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) and high frequency of nuclear {beta}-Catenin expression in HCC specimens. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the loss of inhibitory effect of PTP1B may contribute to progression and invasion of HCC through activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling and expansion of liver T-ICs. PTP1B may serve as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target in HCC.

  5. Specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with a biarsenical probe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver B.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key regulator of the insulin-receptor and leptin-receptor signaling pathways, and it has therefore emerged as a critical anti-type-II-diabetes and anti-obesity drug target. Toward the goal of generating a covalent modulator of PTP1B activity that can be used for investigating its roles in cell signaling and disease progression, we report that the biarsenical probe FlAsH-EDT2 can be used to inhibit PTP1B variants that contain cysteine point mutations in a key catalytic loop of the enzyme. The site-specific cysteine mutations have little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the absence of FlAsH-EDT2. Upon addition of FlAsH-EDT2, however, the activity of the engineered PTP1B is strongly inhibited, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that the cysteine-rich PTP1B variants can be targeted with the biarsenical probe in either whole-cell lysates or intact cells. Together, our data provide an example of a biarsenical probe controlling the activity of a protein that does not contain the canonical tetra-cysteine biarsenical-labeling sequence CCXXCC. The targeting of “incomplete” cysteine-rich motifs could provide a general means for controlling protein activity by targeting biarsenical compounds to catalytically important loops in conserved protein domains. PMID:22263876

  6. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  7. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression is induced by inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum; Welsh, Laura A; Kershaw, Erin E; Neel, Benjamin G; Kahn, Barbara B

    2008-05-23

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin and leptin sensitivity. PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of humans and rodents may contribute to insulin resistance and obesity. The mechanisms mediating PTP1B overexpression in obese and diabetic states have been unclear. We find that adipose tissue inflammation and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) regulate PTP1B expression in vivo. High fat feeding of mice increased PTP1B expression 1.5- to 7-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. PTP1B overexpression in high fat-fed mice coincided with increased adipose tissue expression of the macrophage marker CD68 and TNFalpha, which is implicated in causing obesity-induced insulin resistance. TNFalpha increased PTP1B mRNA and protein levels by 2- to 5-fold in a dose- and time-dependent manner in adipocyte and hepatocyte cell lines. TNFalpha administration in mice increased PTP1B mRNA 1.4- to 4-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and PTP1B protein 2-fold in liver. Actinomycin D treatment blocked, and high dose salicylate treatment inhibited by 80%, TNFalpha-induced PTP1B expression in adipocyte cell lines, suggesting TNFalpha may induce PTP1B transcription via nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from adipocyte cell lines and liver of mice demonstrated TNFalpha-induced recruitment of NFkappaB subunit p65 to the PTP1B promoter in vitro and in vivo. In mice with diet-induced obesity, TNFalpha deficiency also partly blocked PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue. Our data suggest that PTP1B overexpression in multiple tissues in obesity is regulated by inflammation and that PTP1B may be a target of anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:18281274

  8. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pires, Eusebio S; D'Souza, Ryan S; Needham, Marisa A; Herr, Austin K; Jazaeri, Amir A; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J; Bruns, David E; Pollok, Brian A; Herr, John C

    2015-10-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes.

  9. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Needham, Marisa A.; Herr, Austin K.; Jazaeri, Amir A.; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H.; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L.; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J.; Bruns, David E.; Pollok, Brian A.; Herr, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes. PMID:26327203

  10. Pancreatic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Deficiency Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Sastre, Juan; Haj, Fawaz G

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity. The disease starts as local inflammation in the pancreas that may progress to systemic inflammation and complications. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in inflammatory signaling, but its significance in AP remains unclear. To investigate whether PTP1B may have a role in AP, we used pancreas PTP1B knockout (panc-PTP1B KO) mice and determined the effects of pancreatic PTP1B deficiency on cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. We report that PTP1B protein expression was increased in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. In addition, histological analyses of pancreas samples revealed enhanced features of AP in cerulein-treated panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Moreover, cerulein- and arginine-induced serum amylase and lipase were significantly higher in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Similarly, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Furthermore, panc-PTP1B KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-κB inflammatory response accompanied with increased mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Notably, these effects were recapitulated in acinar cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of PTP1B. These findings reveal a novel role for pancreatic PTP1B in cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:27461362

  11. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Oncogene-Driven Changes in Metabolism Reveals Broad Dysregulation of PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kohnz, Rebecca A.; Mulvihill, Melinda M.; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Sorrentino, Antonio; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Goga, Andrei; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting dysregulated metabolic pathways is a promising therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer. Understanding how frequently altered oncogenes regulate metabolic enzyme targets would be useful in identifying both broad-spectrum and targeted metabolic therapies for cancer. Here, we used activity-based protein profiling to identify serine hydrolase activities that were consistently upregulated by various human oncogenes. Through this profiling effort, we found oncogenic regulatory mechanisms for several cancer-relevant serine hydrolases and discovered that platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 and 1B3 (PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3) activities were consistently upregulated by several oncogenes, alongside previously discovered cancer-relevant hydrolases fatty acid synthase and monoacylglycerol lipase. While we previously showed that PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 were important in breast cancer our most recent profiling studies have revealed that these enzymes may be dysregulated broadly across many types of cancers. Here, we find that pharmacological blockade of both enzymes impairs cancer pathogenicity across multiple different types of cancer cells, including breast, ovarian, melanoma, and prostate cancer. We also show that pharmacological blockade of PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 cause unique changes in lipid metabolism, including heightened levels of tumor-suppressing lipids. Our results reveal oncogenic regulatory mechanisms of several cancer-relevant serine hydrolases using activity-based protein profiling and we show that PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 are important in maintaining cancer pathogenicity across a wide spectrum of cancer types. PMID:25945974

  12. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  14. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  15. PTP1B is an androgen receptor-regulated phosphatase associated with tumor-promoting functions in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Laurent; Labbé, David P.; Deblois, Geneviève; Bégin, Louis R.; Hardy, Serge; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Saad, Fred; Trotman, Lloyd; Giguère, Vincent; Tremblay, Michel L.

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR)-signaling axis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. The identification of AR targets contributing to prostate tumorigenesis is thus critical for the development of more effective therapies. Herein, we examined whether the AR could regulate classical protein tyrosine phosphatases, a family of enzymes increasingly associated with oncogenic processes. We found that protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a well-established regulator of metabolic signaling, was induced after androgenic stimulation of AR-expressing prostate cancer cells. This effect was observed both at the mRNA and protein levels, and translated into increased PTP1B activity. High-resolution location analyses on tiled array covering chromosome 20q revealed the recruitment of the AR to two response elements located within the first intron of the PTP1B gene (PTPN1) and correlated with an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment to the transcriptional start site of PTPN1. Analysis of copy number alterations revealed that both PTPN1 and AR genes are co-amplified in metastatic tumors, and that PTPN1 amplification is associated with a subset of high-risk primary tumors. At the functional level, PTP1B depletion significantly delayed LNCaP tumor growth in vivo, and impaired androgen-induced cell migration and invasion in vitro. Importantly, androgen-independent cells also required PTP1B for optimal cell migration. Collectively, our results establish the AR as a transcriptional regulator of PTPN1 transcription, and suggest that PTP1B plays a tumor-promoting role in prostate cancer. This has important implications for prostate cancer biology, and supports the pre-clinical testing of PTP1B inhibitors for the treatment of the disease. PMID:22282656

  16. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  17. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  18. Small molecules as potent protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors documented in patents from 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Wang, Shuai-Yu; Shi, Da-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (2-DM) are the main threats to human health in the worldwide. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a promising molecular level legitimate therapeutic target in the effective management of 2-DM. For the search of potent PTP1B inhibitors, much investigation has revealed a large number of small-molecule compounds obtained from natural sources or prepared by synthesis/semi-synthesis with various skeletons and promising anti-PTP1B activities in the treatment of 2-DM. Although some reviews on the development of PTP1B inhibitors have been published, they were mainly concentrated on the results reported in journal articles. In this review, we will provide an overview of the developments of the potent PTP1B inhibitors claimed in recent patents during the past five years (2009-2013) with their structural features and biological features, as well as the structure-activity relationships (SARs) and strategies for finding potent and specific PTP1B inhibitors. This paper will provide valuable information for understanding the current anti-PTP1B investigation and developing potent PTP1B inhibitors as treating 2-DM drugs. PMID:25643610

  19. Phosphorylation of SRSF1 by SRPK1 regulates alternative splicing of tumor-related Rac1b in colorectal cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vânia; Henriques, Andreia F A; Henriques, Andreia; Pereira, Joana F S; Pereira, Joana; Neves Costa, Ana; Moyer, Mary Pat; Moita, Luís Ferreira; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The premessenger RNA of the majority of human genes can generate various transcripts through alternative splicing, and different tissues or disease states show specific patterns of splicing variants. These patterns depend on the relative concentrations of the splicing factors present in the cell nucleus, either as a consequence of their expression levels or of post-translational modifications, such as protein phosphorylation, which are determined by signal transduction pathways. Here, we analyzed the contribution of protein kinases to the regulation of alternative splicing variant Rac1b that is overexpressed in certain tumor types. In colorectal cells, we found that depletion of AKT2, AKT3, GSK3β, and SRPK1 significantly decreased endogenous Rac1b levels. Although knockdown of AKT2 and AKT3 affected only Rac1b protein levels suggesting a post-splicing effect, the depletion of GSK3β or SRPK1 decreased Rac1b alternative splicing, an effect mediated through changes in splicing factor SRSF1. In particular, the knockdown of SRPK1 or inhibition of its catalytic activity reduced phosphorylation and subsequent translocation of SRSF1 to the nucleus, limiting its availability to promote the inclusion of alternative exon 3b into the Rac1 pre-mRNA. Altogether, the data identify SRSF1 as a prime regulator of Rac1b expression in colorectal cells and provide further mechanistic insight into how the regulation of alternative splicing events by protein kinases can contribute to sustain tumor cell survival.

  20. Implication of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in MCF-7 cell proliferation and resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, Christophe; Karouri, Salah-Eddine; Issad, Tarik

    2009-10-02

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) were initially thought to be mainly anti-oncogenic. However, overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP has been observed in human tumors, and recent studies have demonstrated that PTP1B contributes to the appearance of breast tumors by modulating ERK pathway. In the present work, we observed that decreasing the expression of TC-PTP or PTP1B in MCF-7 cells using siRNA reduced cell proliferation without affecting cell death. This reduction in proliferation was associated with decreased ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, selection of tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells, by long-term culture in presence of 4-OH tamoxifen, resulted in cells that display overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP, and concomitant increase in ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation. siRNA experiments showed that PTP1B, but not TC-PTP, is necessary for resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen. Therefore, our work indicates that PTP1B could be a relevant therapeutic target for treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers.

  1. Integrative Bioinformatics Links HNF1B with Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tumor-Associated Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Justin; Salari, Keyan; Clarke, Nicole; Esheba, Ghada E.; Forster, Andrew D.; Huang, Stephanie; West, Robert B.; Higgins, John P.; Longacre, Teri A.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histologically distinct carcinoma subtype that arises in several organ systems and is marked by cytoplasmic clearing, attributed to abundant intracellular glycogen. Previously, transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta (HNF1B) was identified as a biomarker of ovarian CCC. Here, we set out to explore more broadly the relation between HNF1B and carcinomas with clear cell histology. HNF1B expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry, was significantly associated with clear cell histology across diverse gynecologic and renal carcinomas (P<0.001), as was hypomethylation of the HNF1B promoter (P<0.001). From microarray analysis, an empirically-derived HNF1B signature was significantly enriched for computationally-predicted targets (with HNF1 binding sites) (P<0.03), as well as genes associated with glycogen metabolism, including glucose-6-phophatase, and strikingly the blood clotting cascade, including fibrinogen, prothrombin and factor XIII. Enrichment of the clotting cascade was also evident in microarray data from ovarian CCC versus other histotypes (P<0.01), and HNF1B-associated prothrombin expression was verified by immunohistochemistry (P = 0.015). Finally, among gynecologic carcinomas with cytoplasmic clearing, HNF1B immunostaining was linked to a 3.0-fold increased risk of clinically-significant venous thrombosis (P = 0.043), and with a 2.3-fold increased risk (P = 0.011) in a combined gynecologic and renal carcinoma cohort. Our results define HNF1B as a broad marker of clear cell phenotype, and support a mechanistic link to glycogen accumulation and thrombosis, possibly reflecting (for gynecologic CCC) derivation from secretory endometrium. Our findings also implicate a novel mechanism of tumor-associated thrombosis (a major cause of cancer mortality), based on the direct production of clotting factors by cancer cells. PMID:24040285

  2. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  3. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B targets PITX1/p120RasGAP thus showing therapeutic potential in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hao-Wei; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chen, Li-Ju; Chang, Mao-Ju; Hsieh, Feng-Shu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Jui-Wen; Lin, Chih-Lung; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Kuo, Zong-Keng; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Yang, Shung-Haur; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is known to promote the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity by negatively regulating insulin and leptin pathways, but its role associated with colon carcinogenesis is still under debate. In this study, we demonstrated the oncogenic role of PTP1B in promoting colon carcinogenesis and predicting worse clinical outcomes in CRC patients. By co-immunoprecipitation, we showed that PITX1 was a novel substrate of PTP1B. Through direct dephosphorylation at Y160, Y175 and Y179, PTP1B destabilized PITX1, which resulted in downregulation of the PITX1/p120RasGAP axis. Interestingly, we found that regorafenib, the approved target agent for advanced CRC patients, exerted a novel property against PTP1B. By inhibiting PTP1B activity, regorafenib treatment augmented the stability of PITX1 protein and upregulated the expression of p120RasGAP in CRC. Importantly, we found that this PTP1B-dependant PITX1/p120RasGAP axis determines the in vitro anti-CRC effects of regorafenib. The above-mentioned effects of regorafenib were confirmed by the HT-29 xenograft tumor model. In conclusion, we demonstrated a novel oncogenic mechanism of PTP1B on affecting PITX1/p120RasGAP in CRC. Regorafenib inhibited CRC survival through reserving PTP1B-dependant PITX1/p120RasGAP downregulation. PTP1B may be a potential biomarker predicting regorafenib effectiveness, and a potential solution for CRC. PMID:27752061

  5. Novel chemical scaffolds of the tumor marker AKR1B10 inhibitors discovered by 3D QSAR pharmacophore modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Son, Minky; Bavi, Rohit; Lee, Yuno; Park, Chanin; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Hyong-ha; Suh, Jung-keun; Kim, Yong-seong; Kwon, Yong Jung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) may be a potential diagnostic or prognostic marker of human tumors, and that AKR1B10 inhibitors offer a promising choice for treatment of many types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify novel chemical scaffolds of AKR1B10 inhibitors using in silico approaches. Methods: The 3D QSAR pharmacophore models were generated using HypoGen. A validated pharmacophore model was selected for virtual screening of 4 chemical databases. The best mapped compounds were assessed for their drug-like properties. The binding orientations of the resulting compounds were predicted by molecular docking. Density functional theory calculations were carried out using B3LYP. The stability of the protein-ligand complexes and the final binding modes of the hit compounds were analyzed using 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Results: The best pharmacophore model (Hypo 1) showed the highest correlation coefficient (0.979), lowest total cost (102.89) and least RMSD value (0.59). Hypo 1 consisted of one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one ring aromatic and one hydrophobic feature. This model was validated by Fischer's randomization and 40 test set compounds. Virtual screening of chemical databases and the docking studies resulted in 30 representative compounds. Frontier orbital analysis confirmed that only 3 compounds had sufficiently low energy band gaps. MD simulations revealed the binding modes of the 3 hit compounds: all of them showed a large number of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with the active site and specificity pocket residues of AKR1B10. Conclusion: Three compounds with new structural scaffolds have been identified, which have stronger binding affinities for AKR1B10 than known inhibitors. PMID:26051108

  6. Intranuclear location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J K; Young, M A; Flint, S J

    1990-01-01

    The intracellular location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton (kDa) protein, particularly the question of whether it is associated with nuclear pore complexes, was examined. Fractionation of adenovirus type 5-infected HeLa cell nuclei by an established procedure (N. Dwyer and G. Blobel, J. Cell. Biol. 70:581-591, 1976) yielded one population of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules released by digestion of nuclei with RNase A and a second population recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Free and E1B 55-kDa protein-bound forms of the E4 34-kDa protein (P. Sarnow, C. A. Sullivan, and A. J. Levine, Virology 120:387-394, 1982) were largely recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Nevertheless, the association of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules with this nuclear envelope fraction did not depend on interaction of the E1B 55-kDa protein with the E4 34-kDa protein. Comparison of the immunofluorescence patterns observed with antibodies recognizing the E1B 55-kDa protein or cellular pore complex proteins and of the behavior of these viral and cellular proteins during in situ fractionation suggests that the E1B 55-kDa protein does not become intimately or stably associated with pore complexes in adenovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2143545

  7. Tumor-related alternatively spliced Rac1b is not regulated by Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitors and exhibits selective downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Matos, Paulo; Collard, John G; Jordan, Peter

    2003-12-12

    Rac1 is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, which control signaling pathways that regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics and gene transcription. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and inactivated by GTPase-activating proteins. In addition, Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitors (Rho-GDIs) can inhibit Rac1 by sequestering it in the cytoplasm. We have found previously that colorectal tumors express an alternatively spliced variant, Rac1b, containing 19 additional amino acids following the switch II region. Here we characterized the regulation and downstream signaling of Rac1b. Although little Rac1b protein is expressed in cells, the amount of activated Rac1b protein often exceeds that of activated Rac1, suggesting that Rac1b contributes significantly to the downstream signaling of Rac in cells. The regulation of both Rac1 and Rac1b activities is dependent on guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, but the difference in their activation is mainly determined by the inability of Rac1b to interact with Rho-GDI. As a consequence, most Rac1b remains bound to the plasma membrane and is not sequestered by Rho-GDI in the cytoplasm. Unlike Rac1, activated Rac1b is unable to induce lamellipodia formation and is unable to bind and activate p21-activated protein kinase nor activate the downstream protein kinase JNK. However, both Rac1 and Rac1b are able to activate NFkappaB to the same extent. These data suggest that alternative splicing of Rac1 leads to a highly active Rac variant that differs in regulation and downstream signaling.

  8. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines – putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) – are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent

  9. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines - putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) - are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent of

  10. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines - putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) - are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent of

  11. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R; Court, Felipe A; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  12. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R.; Court, Felipe A.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  13. The protein hSnm1B is stabilized when bound to the telomere-binding protein TRF2.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Counter, Christopher M

    2008-08-29

    hSnm1B is member of the SNM family of exonucleases involved in DNA processing and is known to be localized to telomeres via binding to the telomere-binding protein TRF2. Here we demonstrate that the C terminus of hSnm1B facilitates the concentration of hSnm1B on telomeres by promoting ubiquitin-mediated degradation of hSnm1B that is not localized to telomeres, as well as by blocking protein degradation and fostering localization to telomeres via binding of TRF2. Finally, a mutant of hSnm1B stabilized independently of exogenous TRF2-induced cell death. Taken together, we speculate that sequestering hSnm1B at telomeres by a combination of stabilizing the protein when bound to telomeres and degrading it when not bound to telomeres may be a means to prevent potentially lethal effects of unregulated hSnm1B activity.

  14. NY-ESO-1 (CTAG1B) expression in mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed

    Endo, Makoto; de Graaff, Marieke A; Ingram, Davis R; Lim, Simin; Lev, Dina C; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; Somaiah, Neeta; Bovée, Judith V M G; Lazar, Alexander J; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2015-04-01

    New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 1 (NY-ESO-1, CTAG1B) is a cancer-testis antigen and currently a focus of several targeted immunotherapeutic strategies. We performed a large-scale immunohistochemical expression study of NY-ESO-1 using tissue microarrays of mesenchymal tumors from three institutions in an international collaboration. A total of 1132 intermediate and malignant and 175 benign mesenchymal lesions were enrolled in this study. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on tissue microarrays using a monoclonal antibody for NY-ESO-1. Among mesenchymal tumors, myxoid liposarcomas showed the highest positivity for NY-ESO-1 (88%), followed by synovial sarcomas (49%), myxofibrosarcomas (35%), and conventional chondrosarcomas (28%). Positivity of NY-ESO-1 in the remaining mesenchymal tumors was consistently low, and no immunoreactivity was observed in benign mesenchymal lesions. On the basis of these findings, nearly 90% of myxoid liposarcomas, as well as a significant proportion of synovial sarcomas, myxofibrosarcomas, and conventional chondrosarcomas are good candidates for immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1.

  15. Calpain-catalyzed cleavage and subcellular relocation of protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Frangioni, J V; Oda, A; Smith, M; Salzman, E W; Neel, B G

    1993-01-01

    The non-transmembrane phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) is an abundant enzyme, normally localized to the cytosolic face of the endoplasmic reticulum via a C-terminal targeting sequence. We have found that agonist-induced platelet activation results in proteolytic cleavage of PTP-1B at a site upstream from this targeting sequence, causing subcellular relocation of its catalytic domain from membranes to the cytosol. PTP-1B cleavage is catalyzed by the calcium-dependent neutral protease calpain and is a general feature of platelet agonist-induced aggregation. Moreover, PTP-1B cleavage correlates with the transition from reversible to irreversible platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma. Engagement of gpIIb-IIIa is necessary for inducing PTP-1B cleavage, suggesting that integrins regulate tyrosine phosphatases as well as tyrosine kinases. PTP-1B cleavage is accompanied by a 2-fold stimulation of its enzymatic activity, as measured by immune complex phosphatase assay, and correlates with discrete changes in the pattern of tyrosyl phosphorylation. Cleavage and subcellular relocation of PTP-1B represents a novel mechanism for altering tyrosyl phosphorylation that may have important physiological implications in cell types other than platelets. Images PMID:8223493

  16. Altered motor activity of alternative splice variants of the mammalian kinesin-3 protein KIF1B.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Ruri; Mitsui, Keiji; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Several mammalian kinesin motor proteins exist as multiple isoforms that arise from alternative splicing of a single gene. However, the roles of many motor protein splice variants remain unclear. The kinesin-3 motor protein KIF1B has alternatively spliced isoforms distinguished by the presence or absence of insertion sequences in the conserved amino-terminal region of the protein. The insertions are located in the loop region containing the lysine-rich cluster, also known as the K-loop, and in the hinge region adjacent to the motor domain. To clarify the functions of these alternative splice variants of KIF1B, we examined the biochemical properties of recombinant KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. In a microtubule-dependent ATPase assay, KIF1B variants that contained both insertions had higher activity and affinity for microtubules than KIF1B variants that contained no insertions. Mutational analysis of the K-loop insertion revealed that variants with a longer insertion sequence at this site had higher activity. However, the velocity of movement in motility assays was similar between KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. Our results indicate that splicing isoforms of KIF1B that vary in their insertion sequences have different motor activities.

  17. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  18. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B involves a sulphenyl-amide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Salmeen, Annette; Andersen, Jannik N; Myers, Michael P; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Hinks, John A; Tonks, Nicholas K; Barford, David

    2003-06-12

    The second messenger hydrogen peroxide is required for optimal activation of numerous signal transduction pathways, particularly those mediated by protein tyrosine kinases. One mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide regulates cellular processes is the transient inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases through the reversible oxidization of their catalytic cysteine, which suppresses protein dephosphorylation. Here we describe a structural analysis of the redox-dependent regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which is reversibly inhibited by oxidation after cells are stimulated with insulin and epidermal growth factor. The sulphenic acid intermediate produced in response to PTP1B oxidation is rapidly converted into a previously unknown sulphenyl-amide species, in which the sulphur atom of the catalytic cysteine is covalently linked to the main chain nitrogen of an adjacent residue. Oxidation of PTP1B to the sulphenyl-amide form is accompanied by large conformational changes in the catalytic site that inhibit substrate binding. We propose that this unusual protein modification both protects the active-site cysteine residue of PTP1B from irreversible oxidation to sulphonic acid and permits redox regulation of the enzyme by promoting its reversible reduction by thiols.

  19. SMC1B is present in mammalian somatic cells and interacts with mitotic cohesin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Amato, Clelia; Tinti, Mara; Tana, Luigi; Frattini, Annalisa; Delia, Domenico; Krantz, Ian D.; Jessberger, Rolf; Musio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin is an evolutionarily conserved protein complex that plays a role in many biological processes: it ensures faithful chromosome segregation, regulates gene expression and preserves genome stability. In mammalian cells, the mitotic cohesin complex consists of two structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, SMC1A and SMC3, the kleisin protein RAD21 and a fourth subunit either STAG1 or STAG2. Meiotic paralogs in mammals were reported for SMC1A, RAD21 and STAG1/STAG2 and are called SMC1B, REC8 and STAG3 respectively. It is believed that SMC1B is only a meiotic-specific cohesin member, required for sister chromatid pairing and for preventing telomere shortening. Here we show that SMC1B is also expressed in somatic mammalian cells and is a member of a mitotic cohesin complex. In addition, SMC1B safeguards genome stability following irradiation whereas its ablation has no effect on chromosome segregation. Finally, unexpectedly SMC1B depletion impairs gene transcription, particularly at genes mapping to clusters such as HOX and PCDHB. Genome-wide analyses show that cluster genes changing in expression are enriched for cohesin-SMC1B binding. PMID:26673124

  20. SMC1B is present in mammalian somatic cells and interacts with mitotic cohesin proteins.

    PubMed

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Amato, Clelia; Tinti, Mara; Tana, Luigi; Frattini, Annalisa; Delia, Domenico; Krantz, Ian D; Jessberger, Rolf; Musio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin is an evolutionarily conserved protein complex that plays a role in many biological processes: it ensures faithful chromosome segregation, regulates gene expression and preserves genome stability. In mammalian cells, the mitotic cohesin complex consists of two structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, SMC1A and SMC3, the kleisin protein RAD21 and a fourth subunit either STAG1 or STAG2. Meiotic paralogs in mammals were reported for SMC1A, RAD21 and STAG1/STAG2 and are called SMC1B, REC8 and STAG3 respectively. It is believed that SMC1B is only a meiotic-specific cohesin member, required for sister chromatid pairing and for preventing telomere shortening. Here we show that SMC1B is also expressed in somatic mammalian cells and is a member of a mitotic cohesin complex. In addition, SMC1B safeguards genome stability following irradiation whereas its ablation has no effect on chromosome segregation. Finally, unexpectedly SMC1B depletion impairs gene transcription, particularly at genes mapping to clusters such as HOX and PCDHB. Genome-wide analyses show that cluster genes changing in expression are enriched for cohesin-SMC1B binding.

  1. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  2. In vitro effects of cinnamic acid derivatives on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Pongsuwan, Jirawan; Wungcharoen, Chompunut; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn

    2013-10-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin signaling pathways. Finding selective PTP1B inhibitors from natural sources has been widely recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity. In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid derivatives against PTP1B in vitro. Among 14 cinnamic acid derivatives and related compounds, the most potent inhibitor PTP1Bs were o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, which had IC50 values of 137.67 ± 13.37 and 181.60 ± 9.34 µM, respectively. The kinetics analysis revealed that PTP1B was inhibited by o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid in a non-competitive manner. o-Hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM) and p-hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM), in combination with sodium orthovanadate (0.0125 μM), demonstrated a synergistic effect to inhibit PTP1B activity. In conclusion, the findings provide a new insight into naturally occurring PTP1B inhibitors that could be useful for treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  3. Myelin protein zero gene sequencing diagnoses Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1B disease

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Zhang, H.; Madrid, R.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, affects about 1 in 2600 people in Norway and is found worldwide. CMT Type 1 (CMT1) has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. Autosomal dominant CMT Type 1B (CMT1B) results from mutations in the myelin protein zero gene which directs the synthesis of more than half of all Schwann cell protein. This gene was mapped to the chromosome 1q22-1q23.1 borderline by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The first 7 of 7 reported CMT1B mutations are unique. Thus the most effective means to identify CMT1B mutations in at-risk family members and fetuses is to sequence the entire coding sequence in dominant or sporadic CMT patients without the CMT1A duplication. Of the 19 primers used in 16 pars to uniquely amplify the entire MPZ coding sequence, 6 primer pairs were used to amplify and sequence the 6 exons. The DyeDeoxy Terminator cycle sequencing method used with four different color fluorescent lables was superior to manual sequencing because it sequences more bases unambiguously from extracted genomic DNA samples within 24 hours. This protocol was used to test 28 CMT and Dejerine-Sottas patients without CMT1A gene duplication. Sequencing MPZ gene-specific amplified fragments identified 9 polymorphic sites within the 6 exons that encode the 248 amino acid MPZ protein. The large number of major CMT1B mutations identified by single strand sequencing are being verified by reverse strand sequencing and when possible, by restriction enzyme analysis. This protocol can be used to distringuish CMT1B patients from othre CMT phenotypes and to determine the CMT1B status of relatives both presymptomatically and prenatally.

  4. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  5. α1B-Adrenergic Receptors Differentially Associate with Rab Proteins during Homologous and Heterologous Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A.; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B.; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A.; Romero-Ávila, M. Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  6. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  7. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors from the Stems of Akebia quinata.

    PubMed

    An, Jin-Pyo; Ha, Thi Kim Quy; Kim, Jinwoong; Cho, Tae Oh; Oh, Won Keun

    2016-01-01

    PTP1B deficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-NeuNT transgenic mice inhibited the onset of MMTV-NeuNT-evoked breast cancer, while its overexpression was observed in breast cancer. Thus, PTP1B inhibitors are considered chemopreventative agents for breast cancer. As part of our program to find PTP1B inhibitors, one new diterpene glycoside (1) and 13 known compounds (2-14) were isolated from the methanol extract of the stems of Akebia quinata. All isolates were identified based on extensive spectroscopic data analysis, including UV, IR, NMR and MS. Compounds 2, 3, 6, 8 and 11 showed significant inhibitory effects on the PTP1B enzyme, with IC50 values ranging from 4.08 ± 1.09 to 21.80 ± 4.74 μM. PTP1B inhibitors also had concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects on breast cancer cell lines, such as MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 (MCF7/TAMR) (IC50 values ranging from 0.84 ± 0.04 to 7.91 ± 0.39 μM). These results indicate that compounds 6 and 8 from Akebia quinata may be lead compounds acting as anti-breast cancer agents. PMID:27548130

  8. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  9. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  10. Structural basis for midbody targeting of spastin by the ESCRT-III protein CHMP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Rimanchi, Neggy; Renvoise, Benoit; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Blackstone, Craig; Hurley, James H.

    2009-01-15

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, including ESCRT-III, localizes to the midbody and participates in the membrane-abscission step of cytokinesis. The ESCRT-III protein charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) is required for recruitment of the MIT domain-containing protein spastin, a microtubule-severing enzyme, to the midbody. The 2.5-{angstrom} structure of the C-terminal tail of CHMP1B with the MIT domain of spastin reveals a specific, high-affinity complex involving a noncanonical binding site between the first and third helices of the MIT domain. The structural interface is twice as large as that of the MIT domain of the VPS4-CHMP complex, consistent with the high affinity of the interaction. A series of unique hydrogen-bonding interactions and close packing of small side chains discriminate against the other ten human ESCRT-III subunits. Point mutants in the CHMP1B binding site of spastin block recruitment of spastin to the midbody and impair cytokinesis.

  11. Pterocarpans with inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B from Erythrina lysistemon Hutch.

    PubMed

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Kang, Keon Wook; Na, MinKyun; Ndinteh, Derek Tantoh; Mbafor, Joseph Tanyi; Oh, Won Keun

    2009-12-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract of the stem bark of Erythrina lysistemon Hutch. resulted in isolation of pterocarpans (1-3), named erylysins A-C, along with nine known pterocarpans (4-12). Their structures were determined to be 3''-hydroxy-2',2'-dimethylpyrano[6',5':3,4]-2'',2''-dimethyldihydropyrano[6'',5'':9,10]pterocarpan (1), furano[5',4':3,4]-9-hydroxy-10-prenylpterocarpan (2), and 8-formyl-3,9-dihydroxy-4,10-diprenylpterocarpan (3), based on spectroscopic analyses. All the isolates, with the exception of 3, 6, and 11, strongly inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity in an in vitro assay, with IC(50) values ranging from 1.01+/-0.3 to 18.1+/-0.9 microg/mL. This is the first report showing the potential of prenylated pterocarpans as a class of natural PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:19833362

  12. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-09-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells.

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors from Morinda citrifolia (Noni) and their insulin mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Yang, Jun-Li; Uddin, Mohammad N; Park, So-Lim; Lim, Seong-Il; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Oh, Won-Keun

    2013-11-22

    As part of our ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of Morinda citrifolia showed potential stimulatory effects on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this active extract yielded two new lignans (1 and 2) and three new neolignans (9, 10, and 14), as well as 10 known compounds (3-8, 11-13, and 15). The absolute configurations of compounds 9, 10, and 14 were determined by ECD spectra analysis. Compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values of 21.86 ± 0.48, 15.01 ± 0.20, 16.82 ± 0.42, and 4.12 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed strong stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. This study indicated the potential of compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 as lead molecules for antidiabetic agents.

  14. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  15. The PCNA-associated factor KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF} binds the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Fiona; Lammerts van Bueren, Kelly; Butterfield, Natalie; Bennetts, Jennifer S.; Bowles, Josephine; Adolphe, Christelle; Simms, Lisa A.; Young, Joanne; Walsh, Michael D.; Leggett, Barbara; Fowles, Lindsay F.; Wicking, Carol . E-mail: C.Wicking@imb.uq.edu.au

    2006-01-01

    The KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF}/OEATC-1 protein was initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binding partners, and was shown to bind PCNA competitively with the cell cycle regulator p21{sup WAF}. PCNA is involved in DNA replication and damage repair. Using polyclonal antisera raised against a p15{sup PAF} fusion protein, we have shown that in a range of mammalian tumor and non-tumor cell lines the endogenous p15{sup PAF} protein localises to the nucleus and the mitochondria. Under normal conditions no co-localisation with PCNA could be detected, however following exposure to UV it was possible to co-immunoprecipitate p15{sup PAF} and PCNA from a number of cell lines, suggesting a UV-enhanced association of the two proteins. Overexpression of p15{sup PAF} in mammalian cells was also found to protect cells from UV-induced cell death. Based on similarities between the behaviour of p15{sup PAF} and the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b, we have further shown that these two proteins interact in the same complex in cell cultures. This suggests that p15{sup PAF} forms part of a larger protein complex potentially involved in the regulation of DNA repair, apoptosis and cell cycle progression.

  16. Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Is Affected by the Guard Cell Protein Kinase APK1b

    PubMed Central

    Elhaddad, Nagat S.; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure. PMID:24828466

  17. Light-induced stomatal opening is affected by the guard cell protein kinase APK1b.

    PubMed

    Elhaddad, Nagat S; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure.

  18. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 (IRS2)-Deficient Mice Show Sensorineural Hearing Loss That Is Delayed by Concomitant Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) Loss of Function

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Camarero, Guadalupe; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; de la Rosa, Lourdes Rodríguez; Burks, Deborah J; Avendaño, Carlos; Valverde, Ángela M; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins are key mediators of insulin and insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-1B dephosphorylates and inactivates both insulin and IGF-1 receptors. IRS2-deficient mice present altered hepatic insulin signaling and β-cell failure and develop type 2–like diabetes. In addition, IRS2 deficiency leads to developmental defects in the nervous system. IGF1 gene mutations cause syndromic sensorineural hearing loss in humans and mice. However, the involvement of IRS2 and PTP1B, two IGF-1 downstream signaling mediators, in hearing onset and loss has not been studied. Our objective was to study the hearing function and cochlear morphology of Irs2-null mice and the impact of PTP1B deficiency. We have studied the auditory brainstem responses and the cochlear morphology of systemic Irs2−/−Ptpn1+/+, Irs2+/+Ptpn1−/−and Irs2−/−Ptpn1−/− mice at different postnatal ages. The results indicated that Irs2−/−Ptpn1+/+ mice present a profound congenital sensorineural deafness before the onset of diabetes and altered cochlear morphology with hypoinnervation of the cochlear ganglion and aberrant stria vascularis, compared with wild-type mice. Simultaneous PTP1B deficiency in Irs2−/−Ptpn1−/− mice delays the onset of deafness. We show for the first time that IRS2 is essential for hearing and that PTP1B inhibition may be useful for treating deafness associated with hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22160220

  19. Phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus of the 55-kilodalton adenovirus type 5 E1B protein regulates transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Halliday, T; Whalen, S G; Takayesu, D; Graham, F L; Branton, P E

    1994-01-01

    The 55-kDa product of early region 1B (E1B) of human adenoviruses is required for viral replication and participates in cell transformation through complex formation with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53. We have used both biochemical and genetic approaches to show that this 496-residue (496R) protein of adenovirus type 5 is phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues near the carboxy terminus within sequences characteristic of substrates of casein kinase II. Mutations which converted serines 490 and 491 to alanine residues decreased viral replication and greatly reduced the efficiency of transformation of primary baby rat kidney cells. Such mutant 496R proteins interacted with p53 at efficiencies similar to those of wild-type 496R but only partially inhibited p53 transactivation activity. These results indicated that phosphorylation at these carboxy-terminal sites either regulates the inhibition of p53 or regulates some other 496R function required for cell transformation. Images PMID:8289381

  20. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26547960

  1. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  2. Ring1B Contains a Ubiquitin-Like Docking Module for Interaction with Cbx Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bezsonova, Irina; Walker, John R.; Bacik, John P.; Duan, Shili; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2010-04-19

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are a special set of repressive transcription factors involved in epigenetic modifications of chromatin. They form two functionally distinct groups of catalytically active complexes: Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and 2 (PRC2). The PRC1 complex is an important yet poorly characterized multiprotein histone ubiquitylation machine responsible for maintaining transcriptionally silent states of genes through histone H2A K119 modification. The Ring domain containing subunits of PRC1 also have substrate-targeting domains that interact with Cbx proteins, which have been implicated in chromatin and RNA binding. In this work, we present a high resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of Ring1B, revealing a variant ubiquitin-like fold with a distinct conserved surface region. On the basis of crystal structure and mutational analysis of this domain we show that the conserved surface is responsible for interaction with Cbx members of the PRC1 and homodimer formation. These data suggest a mechanism by which Ring1B serves as an adaptor that mediates binding between the members of the PRC1 complex and the nucleosome.

  3. Regulation of growth hormone induced JAK2 and mTOR signalling by hepatic protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Owen, C; Lees, E K; Mody, N; Delibegović, M

    2015-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) regulates various signalling pathways including insulin, leptin, IGF-1 and growth hormone (GH) signalling. Transmission of the GH signal depends on Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), which is how PTP1B is thought to modulate GH signalling in the liver, based on studies utilising global PTP1B knockout mice (Ptp1b(-/-)). Here, we investigated the liver-specific role of PTP1B in GH signalling, using liver-specific Ptp1b(-/-) mice (alb-crePtp1b(-/-)), under physiological (chow) or insulin resistant (high-fat diet [HFD]) feeding conditions. Body weight and adiposity were comparable between female alb-crePtp1b(-/-) and Ptp1b(fl/fl) control mice. On chow diet, under 48-hour fasting GH-resistant conditions, GH stimulation in vivo led to a robust stimulation of the JAK-STAT signalling pathway. Alb-crePtp1b(-/-) mice exhibited significantly higher GH-induced JAK2 phosphorylation and SOCS3 gene expression post-GH stimulation. However, STAT3, STAT5 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and SOCS2 gene expression were similar between groups. Interestingly, GH-induced mTOR phosphorylation was significantly higher in alb-crePtp1b(-/-) mice 5-min post-GH stimulation compared to controls, revealing this part of the pathway under direct control of PTP1B. Under ad lib HFD-fed conditions, GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation significantly increased in alb-crePtp1b(-/-) mice only, with no alterations in the controls. Overall, our data demonstrate that liver-specific PTP1B deletion leads to significant alterations in GH signalling with increased JAK2, STAT5 and mTOR phosphorylation and SOCS3 gene expression.

  4. Structure and Configuration of Phosphoeleganin, a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor from the Mediterranean Ascidian Sidnyum elegans.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Concetta; Luciano, Paolo; Aiello, Anna; Vitalone, Rocco; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Li, Jia; Guo, Yue-W; Menna, Marialuisa

    2016-04-22

    A new phosphorylated polyketide, phosphoeleganin (1), has been isolated from the Mediterranean ascidian Sidnyum elegans. Its structure and configuration have been determined by extensive use of 2D NMR and microscale chemical degradation and/or derivatization. Phosphoeleganin (1) inhibited the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. PMID:27064611

  5. Structural analysis of anti-tumor heteropolysaccharide GFPS1b from the cultured mycelia of Grifola frondosa GF9801.

    PubMed

    Cui, F J; Tao, W Y; Xu, Z H; Guo, W J; Xu, H Y; Ao, Z H; Jin, J; Wei, Y Q

    2007-01-01

    A 21-kDa heteropolysaccharide, coded as GFPS1b, was obtained from the cultured mycelia of Grifola frondosa GF9801 by hot-water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and fractioned by DEAE Sepharose Fast-flow, followed by the purification with Sephadex G-100 column chromatography using an AKTA purifier. It exhibited more potent anti-proliferative activity on MCF-7 cells than other polysaccharide fractions. GFPS1b was an acidic polysaccharide with approximately 16.60% protein and 4.3% uronic acid. Gas chromatography of absolute acid hydrolysate of GFPS1b suggested that it was composed of D-glucose, D-galactose, and L-arabinose with a molar ratio of 4:2:1. Periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, partial acid hydrolyzation, methylation analysis, FT-IR, and (1)H, (13)C NMR spectroscopy analysis revealed that GFPS1b had a backbone consisting of alpha-(1-->4)-linked D-galacopyranosyl and alpha-(1-->3)-linked D-glucopyranosyl residues substituted at O-6 with glycosyl residues composed of alpha-L-arabinose-(1-->4)-alpha-D-glucose (1--> linked residues. PMID:16459075

  6. The neurofilament antibody RT97 recognises a developmentally regulated phosphorylation epitope on microtubule-associated protein 1B

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSTONE, MANDY; GOOLD, ROBERT G.; FISCHER, ITZHAK; GORDON-WEEKS, PHILLIP R.

    1997-01-01

    Microtubules are important for the growth and maintenance of stable neuronal processes and their organisation is controlled partly by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). MAP 1B is the first MAP to be expressed in neurons and plays an important role in neurite outgrowth. MAP 1B is phosphorylated at multiple sites and it is believed that the function of the protein is regulated by its phosphorylation state. We have shown that the monoclonal antibody (mAb) RT97, which recognises phosphorylated epitopes on neurofilament proteins, fetal tau, and on Alzheimer's paired helical filament-tau, also recognises a developmentally regulated phosphorylation epitope on MAP 1B. In the rat cerebellum, Western blot analysis shows that mAb RT97 recognises the upper band of the MAP 1B doublet and that the amount of this epitope peaks very early postnatally and decreases with increasing age so that it is absent in the adult, despite the continued expression of MAP 1B in the adult. We confirmed that mAb RT97 binds to MAP 1B by showing that it recognises MAP 1B immunoprecipitated from postnatal rat cerebellum using polyclonal antibodies to recombinant MAP 1B proteins. We established that the RT97 epitope on MAP 1B is phosphorylated by showing that antibody binding was abolished by alkaline phosphatase treatment of immunoblots. Epitope mapping experiments suggest that the mAb RT97 site on MAP 1B is near the N-terminus of the molecule. Despite our immunoblotting data, immunostaining of sections of postnatal rat cerebellum with mAb RT97 shows a staining pattern typical of neurofilaments with no apparent staining of MAP 1B. For instance, basket cell axons and axons in the granule cell layer and white matter stained, whereas parallel fibres did not. These results suggest that the MAP 1B epitope is masked or lost under the immunocytochemical conditions in which the cerebellar sections are prepared. The upper band of the MAP 1B doublet is believed to be predominantly phosphorylated by

  7. Analysis of adenovirus transforming proteins from early regions 1A and 1B with antisera to inducible fusion antigens produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, K R; Rosser, D S; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid vectors were constructed which expressed three adenovirus tumor antigens fused to a portion of the trpE protein of Escherichia coli. Insertion of adenovirus type 2 DNA from early region 1A (E1A) into such a plasmid led to a fusion protein which contained the C-terminal 266 amino acids of the 289-amino acid protein encoded by the viral 13S mRNA. Similarly, insertion of adenovirus type 5 DNA corresponding to the E1B 55- and 21-kilodalton proteins led to production of fusion proteins containing amino acid sequences from these proteins. After induction with indoleacrylic acid, fusion proteins accumulated stably in the E. coli cells. By using a simple extraction of insoluble protein, 1 to 10 mg of fusion protein per liter of culture was obtained. The fusion proteins were purified on preparative polyacrylamide gels and used to immunize rabbits. Specific antisera for the E1A 289- and closely related 243-amino acid proteins and the E1B 55- and 21-kilodalton proteins were obtained. These sera were used to immunoprecipitate the tumor antigens in cells infected with wild-type and various mutants of adenovirus or to analyze them by an immunoblotting procedure. Mutant E1A proteins in which the C-terminal 70 amino acids are deleted were phosphorylated to much lower extents than the wild-type E1A proteins. This indicates that the deleted region is important for the process of phosphorylation. The E1A proteins were extracted, sedimented in glycerol gradients, analyzed by immunoprecipitation, and found to sediment primarily as monomers. Images PMID:6361277

  8. Phosphonate monoesters on a thiacalix[4]arene framework as potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Trush, Viacheslav V; Kharchenko, Sergiy G; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Kalchenko, Vitaly I; Vovk, Andriy I

    2015-09-01

    Monoester derivatives of thiacalix[4]arene tetrakis(methylphosphonic) acid were found to be capable of inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. In addition, these compounds can strongly bind to human serum albumin. PMID:26205135

  9. Activation of brain B-Raf protein kinase by Rap1B small GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, T; Shimizu, K; Yamamori, B; Kuroda, S; Takai, Y

    1996-01-19

    Rap1 small GTP-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence at its effector domain as that of Ras. Rap1 has been shown to antagonize the Ras functions, such as the Ras-induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells and the Ras-induced activation of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in Rat-1 cells, whereas we have shown that Rap1 as well as Ras stimulates DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. We have established a cell-free assay system in which Ras activates bovine brain B-Raf protein kinase. Here we have used this assay system and examined the effect of Rap1 on the B-Raf activity to phosphorylate recombinant MAP kinase kinase (MEK). Recombinant Rap1B stimulated the activity of B-Raf, which was partially purified from bovine brain and immunoprecipitated by an anti-B-Raf antibody. The GTP-bound form was active, but the GDP-bound form was inactive. The fully post-translationally lipid-modified form was active, but the unmodified form was nearly inactive. The maximum B-Raf activity stimulated by Rap1B was nearly the same as that stimulated by Ki-Ras. Rap1B enhanced the Ki-Ras-stimulated B-Raf activity in an additive manner. These results indicate that not only Ras but also Rap1 is involved in the activation of the B-Raf-dependent MAP kinase cascade.

  10. Essential role of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B in the modulation of insulin signaling by acetaminophen in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mobasher, Maysa Ahmed; de Toro-Martín, Juan; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Ramos, Sonia; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Muntané, Jordi; Álvarez, Carmen; Valverde, Ángela M

    2014-10-17

    Many drugs are associated with the development of glucose intolerance or deterioration in glycemic control in patients with pre-existing diabetes. We have evaluated the cross-talk between signaling pathways activated by acetaminophen (APAP) and insulin signaling in hepatocytes with or without expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and in wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice chronically treated with APAP. Human primary hepatocytes, Huh7 hepatoma cells with silenced PTP1B, mouse hepatocytes from wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice, and a mouse model of chronic APAP treatment were used to examine the mechanisms involving PTP1B in the effects of APAP on glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin signaling. In APAP-treated human hepatocytes at concentrations that did not induce death, phosphorylation of JNK and PTP1B expression and enzymatic activity were increased. APAP pretreatment inhibited activation of the early steps of insulin signaling and decreased Akt phosphorylation. The effects of APAP in insulin signaling were prevented by suramin, a PTP1B inhibitor, or rosiglitazone that decreased PTP1B levels. Likewise, PTP1B deficiency in human or mouse hepatocytes protected against APAP-mediated impairment in insulin signaling. These signaling pathways were modulated in mice with chronic APAP treatment, resulting in protection against APAP-mediated hepatic insulin resistance and alterations in islet alpha/beta cell ratio in PTP1B(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate negative cross-talk between signaling pathways triggered by APAP and insulin signaling in hepatocytes, which is in part mediated by PTP1B. Moreover, our in vivo data suggest that chronic use of APAP may be associated with insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:25204659

  11. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism.

  12. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen‐Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  13. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  14. Essential Role of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase 1B in the Modulation of Insulin Signaling by Acetaminophen in Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Mobasher, Maysa Ahmed; de Toro-Martín, Juan; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Ramos, Sonia; Letzig, Lynda G.; James, Laura P.; Muntané, Jordi; Álvarez, Carmen; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2014-01-01

    Many drugs are associated with the development of glucose intolerance or deterioration in glycemic control in patients with pre-existing diabetes. We have evaluated the cross-talk between signaling pathways activated by acetaminophen (APAP) and insulin signaling in hepatocytes with or without expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and in wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice chronically treated with APAP. Human primary hepatocytes, Huh7 hepatoma cells with silenced PTP1B, mouse hepatocytes from wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice, and a mouse model of chronic APAP treatment were used to examine the mechanisms involving PTP1B in the effects of APAP on glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin signaling. In APAP-treated human hepatocytes at concentrations that did not induce death, phosphorylation of JNK and PTP1B expression and enzymatic activity were increased. APAP pretreatment inhibited activation of the early steps of insulin signaling and decreased Akt phosphorylation. The effects of APAP in insulin signaling were prevented by suramin, a PTP1B inhibitor, or rosiglitazone that decreased PTP1B levels. Likewise, PTP1B deficiency in human or mouse hepatocytes protected against APAP-mediated impairment in insulin signaling. These signaling pathways were modulated in mice with chronic APAP treatment, resulting in protection against APAP-mediated hepatic insulin resistance and alterations in islet alpha/beta cell ratio in PTP1B−/− mice. Our results demonstrate negative cross-talk between signaling pathways triggered by APAP and insulin signaling in hepatocytes, which is in part mediated by PTP1B. Moreover, our in vivo data suggest that chronic use of APAP may be associated with insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:25204659

  15. Probing the Determinants of Diacylglycerol Binding Affinity in C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Morgan, Brittany; Massi, Francesca; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains are independently folded modules that are responsible for targeting their parent proteins to lipid membranes containing diacylglycerol (DAG), a ubiquitous second messenger. The DAG-binding affinities of C1 domains determine the threshold concentration of DAG required for the propagation of the signaling response and the selectivity of this response among the DAG receptors in the cell. The structural information currently available for C1 domains offers little insight into the molecular basis of their differential DAG-binding affinities. In this work, we characterized the C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα (C1Bα) and its diagnostic mutant, Y123W, using solution NMR methods and molecular dynamics simulations. The mutation did not perturb the C1Bα structure or sub-nanosecond dynamics of the protein backbone, but resulted in a >100-fold increase of DAG binding affinity and substantial change in μs-timescale conformational dynamics, as quantified by NMR rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion methods. The differences in the conformational exchange behavior between the wild-type and Y123W C1Bα were localized to the hinge regions of ligand-binding loops. Molecular dynamics simulations provided insight into the identity of the exchanging conformers and revealed the significance of a particular residue, Gln128, in modulating the geometry of the ligand-binding site. Taken together with the results of binding studies, our findings suggest that the conformational dynamics and preferential partitioning of the tryptophan sidechain into the water-lipid interface are important factors that modulate the DAG-binding properties of C1 domains. PMID:21419781

  16. A covalently dimerized recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-15 variant identifies bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B as a key cell surface receptor on ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Minna M; Mottershead, David G; Pasternack, Arja H; Muggalla, Pranuthi; Ludlow, Helen; van Dinther, Maarten; Myllymaa, Samu; Koli, Katri; ten Dijke, Peter; Laitinen, Mika; Ritvos, Olli

    2012-03-01

    Genetic studies have identified bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP15) as an essential regulator of female fertility in humans and in sheep. Oocyte-derived BMP15 is a noncovalently linked dimeric growth factor mediating its effects to ovarian somatic cells in a paracrine manner. Although receptor ectodomains capable of binding BMP15 have previously been reported, no cell surface receptor complex involved in BMP15 signaling has previously been characterized. Here we have expressed and purified recombinant human BMP15 noncovalent and covalent dimer variants. The biological effects of these BMP15 variants were assessed in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells or COV434 granulosa cell tumor cells using BMP-responsive transcriptional reporter assays and an inhibin B ELISA. Biochemical characterization of ligand-receptor interactions was performed with affinity-labeling experiments using [(125)I]iodinated BMP15 variants. Both ligand variants were shown to form homodimers and to stimulate Smad1/5/8 signaling and inhibin B production in human granulosa cells in a similar manner. [(125)I]Iodination of both ligands was achieved, but only the covalent dimer variant retained receptor binding capacity. The [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant bound preferentially to endogenous BMP receptor 1B (BMPR1B) and BMPR2 receptors on COV434 cells. Binding experiments in COS cells with overexpression of these receptors confirmed that the [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant binds to BMPR1B and BMPR2 forming the BMP15 signaling complex. The results provide the first direct evidence in any species on the identification of specific cell surface receptors for a member of the GDF9/BMP15 subfamily of oocyte growth factors. The fact that BMP15 uses preferentially BMPR1B as its type I receptor suggests an important role for the BMPR1B receptor in human female fertility. The result is well in line with the demonstration of ovarian failure in a recently reported human subject with a homozygous BMPR1B loss

  17. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μM. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:23774838

  18. Role of polycomb proteins Ring1A and Ring1B in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Generation of cell diversity depends on epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are central components of epigenetic regulation in metazoans. The system, initially associated with transcriptional program stability during development, is also involved in the regulation of other processes, such as maintenance of stem cell pluripotency and cell proliferation. PcG regulation involves chromatin modifications through covalent histone modifications. One of these modifications, the monoubiquitylation of the H2A histone, depends on Ring1 proteins, which are essential for development in insects and mammals. In murine embryonic stem cells, Ring1A and Ring1B-dependent ubiquitylation of H2A is linked to repression of transcriptional initiation. Studies in mammalian cells have found a multiplicity of protein complexes containing Ring1A and Ring1B, suggesting an expanded regulatory role for Ring1A, Ring1B proteins in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  19. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Dias, Joao D.; Nokisalmi, Petri; Sloniecka, Marta; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Rajecki, Mari; Dobner, Thomas; Tenhunen, Mikko; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Ahtiainen, Laura Ph.D.; Hemminki, Akseli

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  20. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Shannon K.; Oudin, Madeleine J.; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A.; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S.; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2015-01-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express MenaINV, which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we report that Mena associates constitutively with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and mediates a novel negative feedback mechanism that attenuates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. On EGF stimulation, complexes containing Mena and PTP1B are recruited to the EGFR, causing receptor dephosphorylation and leading to decreased motility responses. Mena also interacts with the 5′ inositol phosphatase SHIP2, which is important for the recruitment of the Mena-PTP1B complex to the EGFR. When MenaINV is expressed, PTP1B recruitment to the EGFR is impaired, providing a mechanism for growth factor sensitization to EGF, as well as HGF and IGF, and increased resistance to EGFR and Met inhibitors in signaling and motility assays. In sum, we demonstrate that Mena plays an important role in regulating growth factor–induced signaling. Disruption of this attenuation by MenaINV sensitizes tumor cells to low–growth factor concentrations, thereby increasing the migration and invasion responses that contribute to aggressive, malignant cell phenotypes. PMID:26337385

  1. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Oudin, Madeleine J; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2015-11-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express Mena(INV), which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we report that Mena associates constitutively with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and mediates a novel negative feedback mechanism that attenuates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. On EGF stimulation, complexes containing Mena and PTP1B are recruited to the EGFR, causing receptor dephosphorylation and leading to decreased motility responses. Mena also interacts with the 5' inositol phosphatase SHIP2, which is important for the recruitment of the Mena-PTP1B complex to the EGFR. When Mena(INV) is expressed, PTP1B recruitment to the EGFR is impaired, providing a mechanism for growth factor sensitization to EGF, as well as HGF and IGF, and increased resistance to EGFR and Met inhibitors in signaling and motility assays. In sum, we demonstrate that Mena plays an important role in regulating growth factor-induced signaling. Disruption of this attenuation by Mena(INV) sensitizes tumor cells to low-growth factor concentrations, thereby increasing the migration and invasion responses that contribute to aggressive, malignant cell phenotypes.

  2. Adenovirus early region 4 34-kilodalton protein directs the nuclear localization of the early region 1B 55-kilodalton protein in primate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrum, F D; Shenk, T; Ornelles, D A

    1996-01-01

    The localization of the adenovirus type 5 34-kDa E4 and 55-kDa E1B proteins was determined in the absence of other adenovirus proteins. When expressed by transfection in human, monkey, hamster, rat, and mouse cell lines, the E1B protein was predominantly cytoplasmic and typically was excluded from the nucleus. When expressed by transfection, the E4 protein accumulated in the nucleus. Strikingly, when coexpressed by transfection in human, monkey, or baby hamster kidney cells, the E1B protein colocalized in the nucleus with the E4 protein. A complex of the E4 and E1B proteins was identified by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected HeLa cells. By contrast to the interaction observed in primate and baby hamster kidney cells, the E4 protein failed to direct the E1B protein to the nucleus in rat and mouse cell lines as well as CHO and V79 hamster cell lines. This failure of the E4 protein to direct the nuclear localization of the E1B protein in REF-52 rat cells was overcome by fusion with HeLa cells. Within 4 h of heterokaryon formation and with protein synthesis inhibited, a portion of the E4 protein present in the REF-52 nuclei migrated to the HeLa nuclei. Simultaneously, the previously cytoplasmic E1B protein colocalized with the E4 protein in both human and rat cell nuclei. These results suggest that a primate cell-specific factor mediates the functional interaction of the E1B and E4 proteins of adenovirus. PMID:8709260

  3. Identification of adenovirus type 2 early region 1B proteins that share the same amino terminus as do the 495R and 155R proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1987-01-01

    Adenovirus type 2 early region 1B (E1B) proteins synthesized in vitro were fractionated chromatographically and characterized by peptide and sequence analysis and by reaction with peptide-specific antisera targeted to either the N or C terminus of either of two overlapping E1B reading frames (175 or 495 codons). In addition to the previously identified E1B-495R, E1B-175R, and E1B-155R species, two other E1B proteins of similar electrophoretic mobility to the 175R protein were identified. E1B-82R is an abundant product in vitro and in vivo that has the same N terminus as that of the 495R and 155R proteins but a different C terminus. The structure of 82R is predicted by the structure of the abundant 13S (1.02-kilobase) E1B mRNA. E1B-168R is a novel minor species consisting of the 24 amino-terminal residues of the 495R protein fused to the entire polypeptide IX sequence. An additional, minor 16,000-molecular-weight polypeptide was detected that may correspond to a predicted 92R E1B protein, but definitive identification was not possible. These observations establish that the leftmost portion (78 codons) of the 495-codon reading frame, which overlaps the right half of the 175-codon reading frame, is expressed as an abundant protein that does not contain other 495R sequences. This region, which may participate in the regulation of region E1A expression, may thus constitute a functional domain distinct from the rightward portion of the 495R protein. Images PMID:2960832

  4. Development of Novel Triazolo-Thiadiazoles from Heterogeneous "Green" Catalysis as Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baburajeev, C P; Dhananjaya Mohan, Chakrabhavi; Ananda, Hanumappa; Rangappa, Shobith; Fuchs, Julian E; Jagadish, Swamy; Sivaraman Siveen, Kodappully; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Ali Alharbi, Sulaiman; Zayed, M E; Zhang, Jingwen; Li, Feng; Sethi, Gautam; Girish, Kesturu S; Bender, Andreas; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2015-09-21

    Condensed-bicyclic triazolo-thiadiazoles were synthesized via an efficient "green" catalyst strategy and identified as effective inhibitors of PTP1B in vitro. The lead compound, 6-(2-benzylphenyl)-3-phenyl-[1,2,4]triazolo[3][1,3,4]thiadiazole (BPTT) was most effective against human hepatoma cells, inhibits cell invasion, and decreases neovasculature in HUVEC and also tumor volume in EAT mouse models. This report describes an experimentally unidentified class of condensed-bicyclic triazolo-thiadiazoles targeting PTP1B and its analogs could be the therapeutic drug-seeds.

  5. Development of Novel Triazolo-Thiadiazoles from Heterogeneous “Green” Catalysis as Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baburajeev, C. P.; Dhananjaya Mohan, Chakrabhavi; Ananda, Hanumappa; Rangappa, Shobith; Fuchs, Julian E.; Jagadish, Swamy; Sivaraman Siveen, Kodappully; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Ali Alharbi, Sulaiman; Zayed, M. E.; Zhang, Jingwen; Li, Feng; Sethi, Gautam; Girish, Kesturu S.; Bender, Andreas; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2015-01-01

    Condensed-bicyclic triazolo-thiadiazoles were synthesized via an efficient “green” catalyst strategy and identified as effective inhibitors of PTP1B in vitro. The lead compound, 6-(2-benzylphenyl)-3-phenyl-[1,2,4]triazolo[3][1,3,4]thiadiazole (BPTT) was most effective against human hepatoma cells, inhibits cell invasion, and decreases neovasculature in HUVEC and also tumor volume in EAT mouse models. This report describes an experimentally unidentified class of condensed-bicyclic triazolo-thiadiazoles targeting PTP1B and its analogs could be the therapeutic drug-seeds. PMID:26388336

  6. The 4.1B cytoskeletal protein regulates the domain organization and sheath thickness of myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Einheber, Steven; Meng, Xiaosong; Rubin, Marina; Lam, Isabel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Shrager, Peter; Kissil, Joseph; Maurel, Patrice; Salzer, James L

    2013-02-01

    Myelinated axons are organized into specialized domains critical to their function in saltatory conduction, i.e., nodes, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes. Here, we describe the distribution and role of the 4.1B protein in this organization. 4.1B is expressed by neurons, and at lower levels by Schwann cells, which also robustly express 4.1G. Immunofluorescence and immuno-EM demonstrates 4.1B is expressed subjacent to the axon membrane in all domains except the nodes. Mice deficient in 4.1B have preserved paranodes, based on marker staining and EM in contrast to the juxtaparanodes, which are substantially affected in both the PNS and CNS. The juxtaparanodal defect is evident in developing and adult nerves and is neuron-autonomous based on myelinating cocultures in which wt Schwann cells were grown with 4.1B-deficient neurons. Despite the juxtaparanodal defect, nerve conduction velocity is unaffected. Preservation of paranodal markers in 4.1B deficient mice is associated with, but not dependent on an increase of 4.1R at the axonal paranodes. Loss of 4.1B in the axon is also associated with reduced levels of the internodal proteins, Necl-1 and Necl-2, and of alpha-2 spectrin. Mutant nerves are modestly hypermyelinated and have increased numbers of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, increased expression of 4.1G, and express a residual, truncated isoform of 4.1B. These results demonstrate that 4.1B is a key cytoskeletal scaffold for axonal adhesion molecules expressed in the juxtaparanodal and internodal domains that unexpectedly regulates myelin sheath thickness.

  7. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  8. Antibody directed to a synthetic peptide encoding the NH2-terminal 16 amino acids of the adenovirus type 2 E1B-53K tumor antigen recognizes the E1B-20K tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1984-01-15

    A peptide, H2N-Glu-Arg-Arg-Asn-Pro-Ser-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Pro-Ala-Gly-Phe-Ser-Gly-(Cys )COOH, containing the amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) E1B-coded large T antigen (E1B-53K) has been synthesized. Anti-peptide antibody was generated in rabbits and used to immunoprecipitate Ad T antigens from Ad2 early infected cell extracts. In addition to the expected E1B-53K T antigen, anti-peptide antibody precipitated the Ad2 E1B-20K T antigen that was previously shown to be related to E1B-53K (M. Green, K.H. Brackmann, M.A. Cartas, and T. Matsuo, J. Virol. 42, 30-41, 1982). Anti-peptide prepared against the COOH terminus of the E1B-53K T antigen or against the NH2 terminus of the E1B-19K T antigen did not precipitate the E1B-20K T antigen. These data suggest that the Ad2 E1B-20K T antigen initiates translation at nucleotide 2016 in reading frame 3, as does E1B-53K. The viral mRNA that encodes the E1B-20K T antigen has not been identified.

  9. Pathogenesis-related protein 1b1 (PR1b1) is a major tomato fruit protein responsive to chilling temperature and upregulated in high polyamine transgenic genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. A group of commonly found metabolites implicated in protection against stresses such as chilling stress constitute ubiquitous biogenic amines calle...

  10. Light-switched inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B based on phosphonocarbonyl phenylalanine as photoactive phosphotyrosine mimetic.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Schütz, Anja; Rademann, Jörg

    2015-06-15

    Phosphopeptide mimetics containing the 4-phosphonocarbonyl phenylalanine (pcF) as a photo-active phosphotyrosine isoster are developed as potent, light-switchable inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B. The photo-active inhibitors 6-10 are derived from phosphopeptide substrates and are prepared from the suitably protected pcF building block 12 by Fmoc-based solid phase peptide synthesis. All pcF-containing peptides are moderate inhibitors of PTP1B with KI values between 10 and 50μM. Irradiation of the inhibitors at 365nm in the presence of the protein PTP1B amplify the inhibitory activity of pcF-peptides up to 120-fold, switching the KI values of the best inhibitors to the sub-micromolar range. Photo-activation of the inhibitors results in the formation of triplet intermediates of the benzoylphosphonate moiety, which deactivate PTP1B following an oxidative radical mechanism. Deactivation of PTP1B proceeds without covalent crosslinking of the protein target with the photo-switched inhibitors and can be reverted by subsequent addition of reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT).

  11. Stimulation of the alveolar macrophage respiratory burst by ADP causes selective glutathionylation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Torres, Martine; Forman, Henry Jay

    2006-07-01

    H(2)O(2) produced by stimulation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase is involved both in bacterial killing and as a second messenger in these cells. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are targets for H(2)O(2) signaling through oxidation of their catalytic cysteine, resulting in inhibition of their activity. Here, we show that, in the rat alveolar macrophage NR8383 cell line, H(2)O(2) produced through the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst induces the formation of a disulfide bond between PTP1B and GSH that was detectable with an antibody to glutathione-protein complexes and was reversed by DTT addition. PTP1B glutathionylation was dependent on H(2)O(2) as the presence of catalase at the time of ADP stimulation inhibited the formation of the conjugate. Interestingly, other PTPs, i.e., SHP-1 and SHP-2, did not undergo glutathionylation in response to ADP stimulation of the respiratory burst, although glutathionylation of these proteins could be shown by reaction with 25 mM glutathione disulfide in vitro. While previous studies have suggested the reversible oxidation of PTP1B during signaling or showed PTP1B glutathionylation in vitro, the present study directly demonstrates that physiological stimulation of H(2)O(2) production results in PTP1B glutathionylation in intact cells, which may affect downstream signaling.

  12. Acute exercise decreases PTP-1B protein level and improves insulin signaling in the liver of old rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now commonly accepted that chronic inflammation associated with obesity during aging induces insulin resistance in the liver. In the present study, we investigated whether the improvement in insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling, mediated by acute exercise, could be associated with modulation of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) in the liver of old rats. Aging rats were subjected to swimming for two 1.5-h long bouts, separated by a 45 min rest period. Sixteen hours after the exercise, the rats were sacrificed and proteins from the insulin signaling pathway were analyzed by immunoblotting. Our results show that the fat mass was increased in old rats. The reduction in glucose disappearance rate (Kitt) observed in aged rats was restored 16 h after exercise. Aging increased the content of PTP-1B and attenuated insulin signaling in the liver of rats, a phenomenon that was reversed by exercise. Aging rats also increased the IRβ/PTP-1B and IRS-1/PTP-1B association in the liver when compared with young rats. Conversely, in the liver of exercised old rats, IRβ/PTP-1B and IRS-1/PTP-1B association was markedly decreased. Moreover, in the hepatic tissue of old rats, the insulin signalling was decreased and PEPCK and G6Pase levels were increased when compared with young rats. Interestingly, 16 h after acute exercise, the PEPCK and G6Pase protein level were decreased in the old exercised group. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which exercise restores insulin signalling in liver during aging. PMID:23442260

  13. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors: a molecular level legitimate approach for the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thareja, Suresh; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Bhardwaj, T R; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease responsible for morbidity in the western world and is gradually becoming prevalent in developing countries too. The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly increasing in industrialized countries and type 2 diabetes accounts for 90% of the disease. Insulin resistance is a major pathophysiological factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, occurring mainly in muscle, adipose tissues, and liver leading to reduced glucose uptake and utilization and increased glucose production. The prevalence and rising incidence of diabetes emphasized the need to explore new molecular targets and strategies to develop novel antihyperglycemic agents. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) has recently emerged as a promising molecular level legitimate therapeutic target in the effective management of type 2 diabetes. PTP 1B, a cytosolic nonreceptor PTPase, has been implicated as a negative regulator of insulin signal transduction. Therefore, PTP 1B inhibitors would increase insulin sensitivity by blocking the PTP 1B-mediated negative insulin signaling pathway and might be an attractive target for type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. With X-ray crystallography and NMR-based fragment screening, the binding interactions of several classes of inhibitors have been elucidated, which could help the design of future PTP 1B inhibitors. The drug discovery research in PTP 1B is a challenging area to work with and many pharmaceutical organizations and academic research laboratories are focusing their research toward the development of potential PTP 1B inhibitors which would prove to be a milestone for the management of diabetes.

  15. New hippolide derivatives with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity from the marine sponge Hippospongia lachne.

    PubMed

    Piao, Shu-Juan; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Yang, Fan; Yi, Yang-Hua; Di, Ying-Tong; Han, Bing-Nan; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Five new sesterterpenoids, compounds 1-5, have been isolated from the sponge Hippospongia lachne off Yongxing Island in the South China Sea. The structures of compounds 1-5 were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HRMS, 1D, and 2D NMR experiments. The stereochemistry, including absolute configurations of these compounds, was determined by spectroscopic, chemical, and computational methods. Compounds 1 and 5 showed moderate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 5.2 μM and 8.7 μM, respectively, more potent than previously reported hippolides.

  16. Statil suppresses cancer cell growth and proliferation by the inhibition of tumor marker AKR1B10.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Zhou, Boping; Chen, Xinchun; Huang, Dan; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Ziqi; Huang, Hua; Wang, Yuhong; Cao, Deliang

    2014-09-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is an oncogenic carbonyl reductase that eliminates α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds/lipid peroxides and mediates retinoic acid signaling. Targeted inhibition of AKR1B10 activity is a newly emerging strategy for cancer therapy. This study evaluated the inhibitory activity of a small chemical statil towards AKR1B10 and tested its antiproliferative activity in breast (BT-20) and lung (NCI-H460) cancer cells that express AKR1B10. Experimental results showed that statil inhibited AKR1B10 enzyme activity efficiently, with an IC50 at 0.21±0.06 µmol/l. Exposing BT-20 and NCI-H460 cells to statil and diclofenac, a selective AKR1B10 inhibitor, led to dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and proliferation and plating efficiency. At higher doses (50 µmol/l or higher), statil induced cell death with apoptotic characteristics, such as DNA fragmentation and Annexin-V staining. Furthermore, statil enhanced the susceptibility of cells to acrolein, an active substrate of AKR1B10. Taken together, these data suggest that statil possesses potent antiproliferative activity by inhibiting AKR1B10 activity.

  17. Artifactual processing of penicillin-binding proteins 7 and 1b by the OmpT protease of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, T A; Dombrosky, P M; Young, K D

    1994-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) were visualized in strains of Escherichia coli that carried mutations in one or more of the following protease genes: tsp, degP, ptr, and ompT. In the absence of a functional ompT gene, PBPs 1b alpha and 7 were not processed to the shortened forms 1b beta and 8, respectively. Cleavage of PBPs 1b alpha and 7 could be restored by introduction of a plasmid carrying the wild-type ompT gene. These PBPs were processed only after cell lysis or after membrane perturbation of whole cells by freeze-thaw, suggesting that the cleavage was a nonspecific artifact due to contact with OmpT, an outer membrane protease, and that such processing was not biologically significant in vivo. The degradation of other PBPs during purification or storage may also be effected by OmpT. Images PMID:8282705

  18. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  19. ER-Bound Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B Interacts with Src at the Plasma Membrane/Substrate Interface

    PubMed Central

    Burdisso, Juan E.; Conde, Cecilia; Cáceres, Alfredo; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2012-01-01

    PTP1B is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchored enzyme whose access to substrates is partly dependent on the ER distribution and dynamics. One of these substrates, the protein tyrosine kinase Src, has been found in the cytosol, endosomes, and plasma membrane. Here we analyzed where PTP1B and Src physically interact in intact cells, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in combination with temporal and high resolution microscopy. We also determined the structural basis of this interaction. We found that BiFC signal is displayed as puncta scattered throughout the ER network, a feature that was enhanced when the substrate trapping mutant PTP1B-D181A was used. Time-lapse and co-localization analyses revealed that BiFC puncta did not correspond to vesicular carriers; instead they localized at the tip of dynamic ER tubules. BiFC puncta were retained in ventral membrane preparations after cell unroofing and were also detected within the evanescent field of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM) associated to the ventral membranes of whole cells. Furthermore, BiFC puncta often colocalized with dark spots seen by surface reflection interference contrast (SRIC). Removal of Src myristoylation and polybasic motifs abolished BiFC. In addition, PTP1B active site and negative regulatory tyrosine 529 on Src were primary determinants of BiFC occurrence, although the SH3 binding motif on PTP1B also played a role. Our results suggest that ER-bound PTP1B dynamically interacts with the negative regulatory site at the C-terminus of Src at random puncta in the plasma membrane/substrate interface, likely leading to Src activation and recruitment to adhesion complexes. We postulate that this functional ER/plasma membrane crosstalk could apply to a wide array of protein partners, opening an exciting field of research. PMID:22701734

  20. The Adaptor Protein-1 μ1B Subunit Expands the Repertoire of Basolateral Sorting Signal Recognition in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Mattera, Rafael; Ren, Xuefeng; Chen, Yu; Retamal, Claudio; González, Alfonso; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An outstanding question in protein sorting is why polarized epithelial cells express two isoforms of the μ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex: the ubiquitous μ1A and the epithelial-specific μ1B. Previous studies led to the notion that μ1A and μ1B mediate basolateral sorting predominantly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes, respectively. Using improved analytical tools, however, we find that μ1A and μ1B largely colocalize with each other. They also colocalize to similar extents with TGN and recycling endosome markers, as well as with basolateral cargoes transiting biosynthetic and endocytic-recycling routes. Instead, the two isoforms differ in their signal-recognition specificity. In particular, μ1B preferentially binds a subset of signals from cargoes that are sorted basolaterally in a μ1B-dependent manner. We conclude that expression of distinct μ1 isoforms in epithelial cells expands the repertoire of signals recognized by AP-1 for sorting of a broader range of cargoes to the basolateral surface. PMID:24229647

  1. liver-enriched gene 1a and 1b Encode Novel Secretory Proteins Essential for Normal Liver Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Changqing; Hu, Minjie; Zhu, Zhihui; Lo, Li Jan; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2011-01-01

    liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is a liver-enriched gene in zebrafish and encodes a novel protein. Our preliminary data suggested that Leg1 is probably involved in early liver development. However, no detailed characterization of Leg1 has been reported thus far. We undertook both bioinformatic and experimental approaches to study leg1 gene structure and its role in early liver development. We found that Leg1 identifies a new conserved protein superfamily featured by the presence of domain of unknown function 781 (DUF781). There are two copies of leg1 in zebrafish, namely leg1a and leg1b. Both leg1a and leg1b are expressed in the larvae and adult liver with leg1a being the predominant form. Knockdown of Leg1a or Leg1b by their respective morpholinos specifically targeting their 5′-UTR each resulted in a small liver phenotype, demonstrating that both Leg1a and Leg1b are important for early liver development. Meanwhile, we found that injection of leg1-ATGMO, a morpholino which can simultaneously block the translation of Leg1a and Leg1b, caused not only a small liver phenotype but hypoplastic exocrine pancreas and intestinal tube as well. Further examination of leg1-ATGMO morphants with early endoderm markers and early hepatic markers revealed that although depletion of total Leg1 does not alter the hepatic and pancreatic fate of the endoderm cells, it leads to cell cycle arrest that results in growth retardation of liver, exocrine pancreas and intestine. Finally, we proved that Leg1 is a secretory protein. This intrigued us to propose that Leg1 might act as a novel secreted regulator that is essential for liver and other digestive organ development in zebrafish. PMID:21857963

  2. The Polycomb group protein RING1B is overexpressed in ductal breast carcinoma and is required to sustain FAK steady state levels in breast cancer epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Almudena; Panoutsopoulou, Konstantina; Corominas, Josep Maria; Gimeno, Ramón; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Morales, Saleta; Lobato, Tania; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Farias, Eduardo F.; Mayol, Xavier; Cano, Amparo; Hernández-Muáoz, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    In early stages of metastasis malignant cells must acquire phenotypic changes to enhance their migratory behavior and their ability to breach the matrix surrounding tumors and blood vessel walls. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression allows the acquisition of these features that, once tumoral cells have escape from the primary tumor, can be reverted. Here we report that the expression of the Polycomb epigenetic repressor Ring1B is enhanced in tumoral cells that invade the stroma in human ductal breast carcinoma and its expression is coincident with that of Fak in these tumors. Ring1B knockdown in breast cancer cell lines revealed that Ring1B is required to sustain Fak expression in basal conditions as well as in Tgfβ-treated cells. Functionally, endogenous Ring1B is required for cell migration and invasion in vitro and for in vivo invasion of the mammary fat pad by tumoral cells. Finally we identify p63 as a target of Ring1B to regulate Fak expression: Ring1B depletion results in enhanced p63 expression, which in turns represses Fak expression. Importantly, Fak downregulation upon Ring1B depletion is dependent on p63 expression. Our findings provide new insights in the biology of the breast carcinoma and open new avenues for breast cancer prognosis and therapy. PMID:24742605

  3. Mutational analysis of the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1B

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, B.B.; Warner, L.E.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The MPZ gene that maps to chromosome 1q22q23 encodes myelin protein zero, which is the most abundant peripheral nerve myelin protein that functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule in myelin compaction. Association of the MPZ gene with the dysmyelinating peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B) and the more severe Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) was previously demonstrated by MPZ mutations identified in CMT1B and in rare DSS patients. In this study, the coding region of the MPZ gene was screened for mutations in a cohort of 74 unrelated patients with either CMT type 1 or DSS who do not carry the most common CMT1-associated molecular lesion of a 1.5 Mb DNA duplication on 17p11.2-p12. Heteroduplex analysis detected base mismatches in ten patients that were distributed over three exons of MPZ. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA identified a de novo MPZ mutation associated with CMT1B that predicts an Ile(135)Thr substitution. This finding further confirms the role of MPZ in the CMT1B disease process. In addition, two polymorphisms were identified within the Gly(200) and Ser(228) codons that do not alter the respective amino acid residues. A fourth base mismatch in MPZ exon 3 detected by heteroduplex analysis is currently being characterized by direct sequence determination. Previously, four unrelated patients in this same cohort were found to have unique point mutations in the coding region of the PMP22 gene. The collective findings on CMT1 point mutations could suggest that regulatory region mutations, and possibly mutations in CMT gene(s) apart from the MPZ, PMP22 and Cx32 genes identified thus far, may prove to be significant for a number of CMT1 cases that do not involve DNA duplication.

  4. Identification of New Substrates of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B by Bayesian Integration of Proteome Evidence*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Emanuela; Tinti, Michele; Costa, Stefano; Corallino, Salvatore; Nardozza, Aurelio Pio; Chatraryamontri, Andrew; Ceol, Arnaud; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tyrosine phosphatases display an intrinsic enzymatic preference for the sequence context flanking the target phosphotyrosines. On the other hand, substrate selection in vivo is decisively guided by the enzyme-substrate connectivity in the protein interaction network. We describe here a system wide strategy to infer physiological substrates of protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we integrate, by a Bayesian model, proteome wide evidence about in vitro substrate preference, as determined by a novel high-density peptide chip technology, and “closeness” in the protein interaction network. This allows to rank candidate substrates of the human PTP1B phosphatase. Ultimately a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches were used to verify the prediction that the tyrosine phosphorylation levels of five high-ranking substrates, PLC-γ1, Gab1, SHP2, EGFR, and SHP1, are indeed specifically modulated by PTP1B. In addition, we demonstrate that the PTP1B-mediated dephosphorylation of Gab1 negatively affects its EGF-induced association with the phosphatase SHP2. The dissociation of this signaling complex is accompanied by a decrease of ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation. PMID:21123182

  5. Strongylophorines, new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors, from the marine sponge Strongylophora strongilata collected at Iriomote Island.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-09-15

    A new meroditerpene, 26-O-ethylstrongylophorine-14 (1), was isolated from the Okinawan marine sponge Strongylophora strongilata together with six known strongylophorines: 26-O-methylstrongylophorine-16 (2) and strongylophorines-2 (3), -3 (4), -8 (5), -15 (6), and -17 (7). The structure of 1 was assigned on the basis of its spectroscopic data. Compound 1 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with an IC50 value of 8.7 μM, while known compounds 2-8 gave IC50 values of 8.5, >24.4, 9.0, 21.2, 11.9, and 14.8 μM, respectively. Oleanolic acid, a positive control, inhibited PTP1B activity at 0.7 μM (IC50). The inhibitory activities of strongylophorines possessing the acetal moiety at C-26 (1, 2, and 6) were stronger than those of the lactone derivatives (3 and 5). This is the first study to demonstrate that meroditerpenes inhibit PTP1B activity.

  6. Isopetrosynol, a New Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor, from the Marine Sponge Halichondria cf. panicea Collected at Iriomote Island.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly Booby; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-01-01

    A new polyacetylene compound, isopetrosynol (1), was isolated from the Okinawan marine sponge Halichondria cf. panicea together with petrosynol (2), adociacetylene D (3), (5R)-3,15,27-triacontatriene-1,29-diyn-5-ol (4), and petrosterol (5). The structure of 1 was assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data for 1 and 2. Compound 1 inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity with an IC50 value of 8.2±0.3 µM, while compound 2, a diastereomer of 1, showed only 28.9±4.5% inhibition at 21.6 µM. The IC50 values of compounds 3 and 4 were 7.8±0.5 and 12.2±0.5 µM, respectively. Oleanolic acid, a positive control, inhibited PTP1B activity at 0.7±0.1 µM (IC50) in the same experiment. The inhibitory activity of 1 was stronger than that of its diastereomer (2). This is the first study to show the inhibitory effects of polyacetylene compounds on PTP1B. PMID:27373628

  7. Synthesis and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibition activities of two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongchao; Shi, Dayong; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2011-11-01

    3-bromo-4,5-bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl)-1,2-benzenediol ( 1) is a natural bromophenol isolated from the red algae Rhodomela confervoides that exhibits significant inhibition against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Based on its activity, we synthesized two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives from vanillin using the structure of natural bromophenol 1 as a scaffold. The structures of these bromophenols were elucidated from 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and high resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry as 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 2), 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 3), 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 4) and 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 5). PTP1B inhibition activities of these compounds were evaluated using a colorimetric assay, and compounds 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting activity against PTP1B.

  8. SAS1B Protein [Ovastacin] Shows Temporal and Spatial Restriction to Oocytes in Several Eutherian Orders and Initiates Translation at the Primary to Secondary Follicle Transition

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S; Hlavin, Callie; Macnamara, Ellen; Ishola-Gbenla, Khadijat; Doerwaldt, Christa; Chamberlain, Catherine; Klotz, Kenneth; Herr, Austin K.; Khole, Aalok; Chertihin, Olga; Curnow, Eliza; Feldman, Sandford H; Mandal, Arabinda; Shetty, Jagathpala; Flickinger, Charles; Herr, John C

    2014-01-01

    Background Sperm Acrosomal SLLP1 Binding (SAS1B) protein (ovastacin) is an oolemmal binding partner for the intra-acrosomal sperm protein SLLP1. Results Immunohistochemical localization revealed that SAS1B translation is restricted among adult tissues to the ovary and oocytes, SAS1B appearing first in follicles at the primary-secondary transition. Quiescent oocytes within primordial follicles and primary follicles did not stain for SAS1B. Examination of neonatal rat ovaries revealed SAS1B expression first as faint signals in postnatal day 3 oocytes, with SAS1B protein staining intensifying with oocyte growth. Irrespective of animal age or estrus stage, SAS1B was seen only in oocytes of follicles that initiated a second granulosa cell layer. The precise temporal and spatial onset of SAS1B expression was conserved in adult ovaries in 7 eutherian species, including non-human primates. Immunoelectron micrographs localized SAS1B within cortical granules in MII oocytes. A population of SAS1B localized on the oolemma predominantly in the microvillar region anti-podal to the nucleus in ovulated MII rat oocytes and on the oolemma in macaque GV oocytes. Conclusions The restricted expression of SAS1B protein in growing oocytes, absence in the ovarian reserve, and localization on the oolemma suggest this zinc metalloprotease deserves consideration as a candidate target for reversible female contraceptive strategies. PMID:24038607

  9. Chemical constituents of Blumea balsamifera of Indonesia and their protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Saifudin, Azis; Tanaka, Ken; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A methanol extract of the leaves of Blumea balsamifera (L.) DC. (Asteraceae) afforded a new guaian-type sesquiterpene, epiblumeaene K (1), together with four known guaian-type sesquiterpenes (2-5), three known sesquiterpenes (6-8), and nine known flavonoids (9-17) by a combination of chromatography and preparative TLC techniques. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods and comparison with the literature data. Among the isolated compounds, a known sesquiterpene, beta-caryophyllene 8R,9R-oxide (6), exhibited a significant PTP1B inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 25.8 microM (5.62 microg/mL). PMID:22908553

  10. Degradation of p53 by adenovirus E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins occurs via a novel mechanism involving a Cullin-containing complex.

    PubMed

    Querido, E; Blanchette, P; Yan, Q; Kamura, T; Morrison, M; Boivin, D; Kaelin, W G; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W; Branton, P E

    2001-12-01

    Although MDM2 plays a major role in regulating the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, other poorly understood MDM2-independent pathways also exist. Human adenoviruses have evolved strategies to regulate p53 function and stability to permit efficient viral replication. One mechanism involves adenovirus E1B55K and E4orf6 proteins, which collaborate to target p53 for degradation. To determine the mechanism of this process, a multiprotein E4orf6-associated complex was purified and shown to contain a novel Cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that is (1) composed of Cullin family member Cul5, Elongins B and C, and the RING-H2 finger protein Rbx1(ROC1); (2) remarkably similar to the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and SCF (Skp1-Cul1/Cdc53-F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes; and (3) capable of stimulating ubiquitination of p53 in vitro in the presence of E1/E2 ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating enzymes. Cullins are activated by NEDD8 modification; therefore, to determine whether Cullin complexes are required for adenovirus-induced p53 degradation, studies were conducted in ts41 Chinese hamster ovary cells that are temperature sensitive for the NEDD8 pathway. E4orf6/E1B55K failed to induce the degradation of p53 at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, our results identify a novel role for the Cullin-based machinery in regulation of p53. PMID:11731475

  11. Degradation of p53 by adenovirus E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins occurs via a novel mechanism involving a Cullin-containing complex

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Emmanuelle; Blanchette, Paola; Yan, Qin; Kamura, Takumi; Morrison, Megan; Boivin, Dominique; Kaelin, William G.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Branton, Philip E.

    2001-01-01

    Although MDM2 plays a major role in regulating the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, other poorly understood MDM2-independent pathways also exist. Human adenoviruses have evolved strategies to regulate p53 function and stability to permit efficient viral replication. One mechanism involves adenovirus E1B55K and E4orf6 proteins, which collaborate to target p53 for degradation. To determine the mechanism of this process, a multiprotein E4orf6-associated complex was purified and shown to contain a novel Cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that is (1) composed of Cullin family member Cul5, Elongins B and C, and the RING-H2 finger protein Rbx1(ROC1); (2) remarkably similar to the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and SCF (Skp1–Cul1/Cdc53–F-box) E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes; and (3) capable of stimulating ubiquitination of p53 in vitro in the presence of E1/E2 ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating enzymes. Cullins are activated by NEDD8 modification; therefore, to determine whether Cullin complexes are required for adenovirus-induced p53 degradation, studies were conducted in ts41 Chinese hamster ovary cells that are temperature sensitive for the NEDD8 pathway. E4orf6/E1B55K failed to induce the degradation of p53 at the nonpermissive temperature. Thus, our results identify a novel role for the Cullin-based machinery in regulation of p53. PMID:11731475

  12. IL1B genetic variation and plasma C-reactive protein level among young adults: The CARDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Rice, Kenneth; Williams, O. Dale; Williams, Michelle A.; Gross, Myron D.; Lewis, Cora E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-1B (IL1B) modulates C-reactive protein (CRP) expression. However, whether IL1B genetic variation is associated with CRP level is unknown. Further, obesity, a state of low-grade inflammation that influences cellular IL-1 functions may modify this association. Methods and results Study participants (N = 3289), 48% blacks and 52% whites, had CRP level measurements at year 7 and year 15 examinations as part of the CARDIA study. Ten tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that characterize common IL1B gene variation were genotyped. In SNP analysis, no significant associations with either level or change in time CRP were observed after multiple testing adjustments. However, global ILIB gene variation was associated with year 7 to year 15 change in CRP (global nominal p = 0.004, multiple testing corrected p = 0.048) among obese blacks. Compared to the commonest haplotype, a common haplotype that includes the SNP rs1143642 was associated with greater increases in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among obese blacks and whites while another common haplotype that includes the SNP rs3917356 was associated with decreased change in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among obese blacks. The rare alleles of ILIB SNPs, SNP 7114 (rs1143642) and SNP 3298 (rs3917356), were associated with greater increases and decreases in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among blacks, respectively, compared to their common variants. Conclusion IL1B genetic variation may have a role in CRP level regulation and this association may be modified by obesity. PMID:18573495

  13. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  14. Verruculides A and B, two new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from an Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Wataru; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Izumikawa, Yuta; Iwasaki, Kohei; Toraiwa, Kengo; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-08-15

    Two new merosesquiterpenes, verruculides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a culture broth of the Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum TPU1311, together with three known congeners, chrodrimanins A (3), B (4), and H (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, UV, CD, and IR). Compound 2 had a linear sesquiterpene moiety and was considered to be the derivative of the biosynthetic precursor for 1 and 3-5. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 8.4, 8.5, and 14.9 μM, respectively. Compound 2 showed 40% inhibition at 23.1 μM, while 4 was not active at 20.7 μM. PMID:26115570

  15. Verruculides A and B, two new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from an Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Wataru; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Izumikawa, Yuta; Iwasaki, Kohei; Toraiwa, Kengo; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-08-15

    Two new merosesquiterpenes, verruculides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a culture broth of the Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum TPU1311, together with three known congeners, chrodrimanins A (3), B (4), and H (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, UV, CD, and IR). Compound 2 had a linear sesquiterpene moiety and was considered to be the derivative of the biosynthetic precursor for 1 and 3-5. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 8.4, 8.5, and 14.9 μM, respectively. Compound 2 showed 40% inhibition at 23.1 μM, while 4 was not active at 20.7 μM.

  16. Triterpenoids from the leaves of Diospyros kaki (persimmon) and their inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Thuong, Phuong Thien; Lee, Chul Ho; Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Kim, Wan Gi; Lee, Sang Jun; Oh, Won Keun

    2008-10-01

    Phytochemical study on a methanol-soluble extract of the leaves of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) resulted in the isolation of two new ursane-type triterpenoids, 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12,20(30)-dien-24,28-dioic acid (1) and 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12-en-24,28-dioic acid (2), together with 12 known ursane- and oleanane-type triterpenoids (3-14). Triterpenoids with a 3beta-hydroxy group were found to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity, with IC50 values ranging from 3.1+/-0.2 to 18.8+/-1.3 microM, whereas those with a 3alpha-hydroxy moiety were not active.

  17. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Repulsive axon guidance by Draxin is mediated by protein Kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and microtubule-associated protein 1B.

    PubMed

    Meli, Rajeshwari; Weisová, Petronela; Propst, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Draxin is an important axon guidance cue necessary for the formation of forebrain commissures including the corpus callosum, but the molecular details of draxin signaling are unknown. To unravel how draxin signals are propagated we used murine cortical neurons and genetic and pharmacological approaches. We found that draxin-induced growth cone collapse critically depends on draxin receptors (deleted in colorectal cancer, DCC), inhibition of protein kinase B/Akt, activation of GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β) and the presence of microtubule-associated protein MAP1B. This study, for the first time elucidates molecular events in draxin repulsion, links draxin and DCC to MAP1B and identifies a novel MAP1B-depenent GSK-3β pathway essential for chemo-repulsive axon guidance cue signaling.

  19. Low-Level Expression of the E1B 20-Kilodalton Protein by Adenovirus 14p1 Enhances Viral Immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Yong, Sherri L; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus 14p1 (Ad14p1) is an emergent variant of Ad serotype 14 (Ad14) that has caused increased severity of respiratory illnesses during globally distributed outbreaks, including cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome and death. We found that human cell infection with Ad14p1 results in markedly decreased expression of the E1B 20-kilodalton (20K) protein compared to that with infection with wild-type (wt) Ad14. This reduced Ad14p1 E1B 20K expression caused a loss-of-function phenotype of Ad-infected cell corpses that, in contrast to cells infected with wt Ad14, either failed to repress or increased NF-κB-dependent, proinflammatory cytokine responses of responder human alveolar macrophages. A small-animal model of Ad14-induced lung infection was used to test the translational relevance of these in vitro observations. Intratracheal infection of Syrian hamsters with Ad14p1 caused a marked, patchy bronchopneumonia, whereas hamster infection with wt Ad14 caused minimal peribronchial inflammation. These results suggest that this difference in E1B 20K gene expression during Ad14p1 infection and its modulating effect on the interactions between Ad14-infected cells and the host innate immune response could explain the increased immunopathogenic potential and associated increase in clinical illness in some people infected with the Ad14p1 outbreak strain.IMPORTANCE We previously reported that Ad-infected human cells exhibit E1B 19K-dependent repression of virally induced, NF-κB-dependent macrophage cytokine responses (J. R. Radke, F. Grigera, D. S. Ucker, and J. L. Cook, J Virol 88:2658-2669, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02372-13). The more virulent, emergent strain of Ad14, Ad14p1, causes increased cytopathology in vitro, which suggested a possible E1B 20K defect. Whether there is a linkage between these observations was unknown. We show that there is markedly reduced expression of E1B 20K in Ad14p1-infected human cells and that this causes an increased

  20. Low-Level Expression of the E1B 20-Kilodalton Protein by Adenovirus 14p1 Enhances Viral Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Sherri L.; Cook, James L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus 14p1 (Ad14p1) is an emergent variant of Ad serotype 14 (Ad14) that has caused increased severity of respiratory illnesses during globally distributed outbreaks, including cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome and death. We found that human cell infection with Ad14p1 results in markedly decreased expression of the E1B 20-kilodalton (20K) protein compared to that with infection with wild-type (wt) Ad14. This reduced Ad14p1 E1B 20K expression caused a loss-of-function phenotype of Ad-infected cell corpses that, in contrast to cells infected with wt Ad14, either failed to repress or increased NF-κB-dependent, proinflammatory cytokine responses of responder human alveolar macrophages. A small-animal model of Ad14-induced lung infection was used to test the translational relevance of these in vitro observations. Intratracheal infection of Syrian hamsters with Ad14p1 caused a marked, patchy bronchopneumonia, whereas hamster infection with wt Ad14 caused minimal peribronchial inflammation. These results suggest that this difference in E1B 20K gene expression during Ad14p1 infection and its modulating effect on the interactions between Ad14-infected cells and the host innate immune response could explain the increased immunopathogenic potential and associated increase in clinical illness in some people infected with the Ad14p1 outbreak strain. IMPORTANCE We previously reported that Ad-infected human cells exhibit E1B 19K-dependent repression of virally induced, NF-κB-dependent macrophage cytokine responses (J. R. Radke, F. Grigera, D. S. Ucker, and J. L. Cook, J Virol 88:2658–2669, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02372-13). The more virulent, emergent strain of Ad14, Ad14p1, causes increased cytopathology in vitro, which suggested a possible E1B 20K defect. Whether there is a linkage between these observations was unknown. We show that there is markedly reduced expression of E1B 20K in Ad14p1-infected human cells and that this causes an

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and insulin resistance: role of endoplasmic reticulum stress/reactive oxygen species/nuclear factor kappa B axis.

    PubMed

    Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Ren, Jun; Nair, Sreejayan

    2013-01-01

    Obesity-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been proposed as an important pathway in the development of insulin resistance. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a negative regulator of insulin signaling and is tethered to the ER-membrane. The aim of the study was to determine the mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between ER-stress and PTP1B. PTP1B whole body knockout and C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a high-fat or normal chow-diet for 20 weeks. High-fat diet feeding induced body weight gain, increased adiposity, systemic glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis were attenuated by PTP1B deletion. High-fat diet- fed PTP1B knockout mice also exhibited improved glucose uptake measured using [(3)H]-2-deoxy-glucose incorporation assay and Akt phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle tissue, compared to their wild-type control mice which received similar diet. High-fat diet-induced upregulation of glucose-regulated protein-78, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-2 were significantly attenuated in the PTP1B knockout mice. Mice lacking PTP1B showed decreased expression of the autophagy related protein p62 and the unfolded protein response adaptor protein NCK1 (non-catalytic region of tyrosine kinase). Treatment of C2C12 myotubes with the ER-stressor tunicamycin resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the activation of protein expression of PTP1B. Furthermore, tunicamycin-induced ROS production activated nuclear translocation of NFκB p65 and was required for ER stress-mediated expression of PTP1B. Our data suggest that PTP1B is induced by ER stress via the activation of the ROS-NFκB axis which is causes unfolded protein response and mediates insulin resistance in the skeletal muscle under obese condition.

  2. Adenovirus type 5 early region 1b gene product is required for efficient shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Babiss, L E; Ginsberg, H S

    1984-01-01

    To determine the role adenovirus 5 early region 1b-encoded 21- and 55-kilodalton proteins play in adenovirus productive infection, mutants have been isolated which were engineered to contain small deletions or insertions at 5.8, 7.9, or 9.6 map units. By using an overlap recombination procedure involving H5dl314 (delta 3.7 to 4.6 map units) DNA cleaved at 2.6 map units with ClaI and the adenovirus 5 XhoI-C (0 to 15.5 map units) fragment containing the desired mutation, viral mutants were isolated by their ability to produce plaques on KB cell line 18, which constitutively expresses only viral early region 1b functions (Babiss et al., J. Virol. 46:454-465, 1983). DNA sequence analysis of the viral mutants isolated (H5dl118, H5dl110, H5in127, and H5dl163) indicates that all of the viruses contain mutations which affect the 55-kilodalton protein, whereas dl118 should also produce a truncated form of the 21-kilodalton protein. When analyzed for their replication characteristics in HeLa cells, all of the mutant viruses exhibited extended eclipse periods and effected yields that were reduced to 10% or less of that produced by H5sub309 (parent virus of the mutants which is phenotypically identical to wild-type adenovirus 5). When compared with characteristics of sub309, the early and late transcription and DNA replication of the mutants were similar, but synthesis of late polypeptides and late cytoplasmic mRNAs was greatly reduced. Quantitation of mutant virus-specific late mRNAs associated with polysomes revealed a threefold reduction when compared with that of sub309. Analysis of infected cell extracts further revealed that these mutants were incapable of efficiently shutting off host cell protein synthesis, suggesting that the 55-kilodalton protein plays a role in this process. These data suggest that early region 1b products may function by interacting with additional viral or host cell macromolecules to modulate host cell shutoff or that some late viral mRNA or

  3. Pharmacological analysis of G-protein activation mediated by guinea-pig recombinant 5-HT1B receptors in C6-glial cells: similarities with the human 5-HT1B receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Petrus J; Wurch, Thierry; Palmier, Christiane; Colpaert, Francis C

    1998-01-01

    The guinea-pig recombinant 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (gp 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by monitoring G-protein activation in a membrane preparation with agonist-stimulated [35S]-GTPγS binding. The intrinsic activity of 5-HT receptor ligands was compared with that determined previously at the human recombinant 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions.Membrane preparations of C6-glial/gp 5-HT1B cells exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and [3H] - N- [4-methoxy-3,4 - methylpiperazin-1-yl) phenyl] -3 - methyl - 4-(4 - pyridinyl)benzamide (GR 125743) binding sites with a pKd of 9.62 to 9.85 and a Bmax between 2.1 to 6.4 fmol mg−1 protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined with [3H]-5-CT and [3H]-GR 125743 were similar. Ligand affinities were comparable to and correlated (r2: 0.74, P<0.001) with those determined at the recombinant h 5-HT1B receptor.[35S]-GTPγS binding to membrane preparations of C6-glial/gp 5-HT1B cells was stimulated by the 5-HT receptor agonists that were being investigated. The maximal responses of naratriptan, zolmitriptan, sumatriptan, N-methyl-3-[pyrrolidin-2(R)-ylmethyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethylsulphonamide (CP122638), rizatriptan and dihydroergotamine were between 0.76 and 0.85 compared to 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2: 0.72, P=0.015) with their potency at the recombinant h 5-HT1B receptor. 1-naphthylpiperazine, (±)-cyanopindolol and (2′-methyl-4′-(5-methyl[1,2,4] oxadiazole-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (GR 127935) elicited an even smaller response (Emax: 0.32 to 0.63).The ligands 1′-methyl-5-(2′-methyl-4′-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole-3-yl) biphenyl-4-carbonyl)-2,3,6,7-tetrahydrospiro [furo[2,3-f]indole-3-spiro-4′-piperidine] (SB224289), methiothepin and ritanserin displayed inhibition of basal [35S

  4. Pharmacological analysis of G-protein activation mediated by guinea-pig recombinant 5-HT1B receptors in C6-glial cells: similarities with the human 5-HT1B receptor.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Wurch, T; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C

    1998-01-01

    1. The guinea-pig recombinant 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (gp 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by monitoring G-protein activation in a membrane preparation with agonist-stimulated [35S]-GTPgammaS binding. The intrinsic activity of 5-HT receptor ligands was compared with that determined previously at the human recombinant 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions. 2. Membrane preparations of C6-glial/gp 5-HT1B cells exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and [3H]-N-[4-methoxy-3,4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(4-pyridinyl)benzamide (GR 125743) binding sites with a pKd of 9.62 to 9.85 and a Bmax between 2.1 to 6.4 fmol mg(-1) protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined with [3H]-5-CT and [3H]-GR 125743 were similar. Ligand affinities were comparable to and correlated (r2: 0.74, P<0.001) with those determined at the recombinant h 5-HT1B receptor. 3. [35S]-GTPgammaS binding to membrane preparations of C6-glial/gp 5-HT1B cells was stimulated by the 5-HT receptor agonists that were being investigated. The maximal responses of naratriptan, zolmitriptan, sumatriptan, N-methyl-3-[pyrrolidin-2(R)-ylmethyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulphonamide (CP 122638), rizatriptan and dihydroergotamine were between 0.76 and 0.85 compared to 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2: 0.72, P=0.015) with their potency at the recombinant h 5-HT1B receptor. 1-naphthylpiperazine, (+/-)-cyanopindolol and (2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl[1,2,4] oxadiazole-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (GR 127935) elicited an even smaller response (Emax: 0.32 to 0.63). 4. The ligands 1'-methyl-5-(2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole-3-yl) biphenyl-4-carbonyl)-2,3,6,7tetrahydrospiro [furo[2,3-f]indole-3-spiro-4'-piperidine] (SB224289), methiothepin and ritanserin displayed inhibition of basal [35S]-GTPgammaS binding at concentrations

  5. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology

    PubMed Central

    GHEORGHE, SIMONA ROXANA; CRĂCIUN, ALEXANDRA MĂRIOARA

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  6. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Simona Roxana; Crăciun, Alexandra Mărioara

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity of Indonesian herbal medicines and constituents of Cinnamomum burmannii and Zingiber aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Saifudin, Azis; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    We screened water and methanol extracts of 28 Indonesian medicinal plants for their protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activities. Nine water extracts, i.e., Alstonia scholaris leaf, Blumea balsamifera, Cinnamomum burmannii, Cymbopogon nardus, Melaleuca leucadendra, Phyllanthus niruri, Piper nigrum, Syzygium aromaticum, and Sy. polyanthum, exhibited ≥70 % inhibition at 25 μg/mL, whereas 11 methanol extracts, i.e., Als. scholaris, Andrographis paniculata, B. balsamifera, Ci. burmannii, Curcuma heyneana, Glycyrrhiza glabra, M. leucadendra, Punica granatum, Rheum palmatum, Sy. polyanthum, and Z. aromaticum, exhibited ≥70 % inhibition at 25 μg/mL. Water extracts of B. balsamifera (IC50, 2.26 μg/mL) and M. leucadendra (IC50, 2.05 μg/mL), and methanol extracts of Ci. burmannii (IC50, 2.47 μg/mL), Pu. granatum (IC50, 2.40 μg/mL), and Sy. polyanthum (IC50, 1.03 μg/mL) exhibited strong inhibitory activity, which was comparable with that of the positive control, RK-682 (IC50, 2.05 μg/mL). The PTP1B inhibitory activity of the constituents of Ci. burmannii and Z. aromaticum was then evaluated. 5'-Hydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-4″,5″-methylenedioxy-1,2,3,4-dibenzo-1,3,5-cycloheptatriene (2; IC50, 29.7 μM) and trans-cinnamaldehyde (5; IC50, 57.6 μM) were the active constituents of Ci. burmannii, while humulatrien-5-ol-8-one (21; IC50, 27.7 μM), kaempferol-3,4'-di-O-methyl ether (32; IC50, 17.5 μM), and (S)-6-gingerol (33; IC50, 28.1 μM) were those of Z. aromaticum. These results suggest that these medicinal plants may contribute to the treatment and/or prevention of type II diabetes and/or obesity through PTP1B inhibition. PMID:22645080

  8. Sesquiterpene Hydroquinones with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activities from a Dysidea sp. Marine Sponge Collected in Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-07-22

    Three new sesquiterpene hydroquinones, avapyran (1), 17-O-acetylavarol (2), and 17-O-acetylneoavarol (3), were isolated from a Dysidea sp. marine sponge collected in Okinawa together with five known congeners: avarol (4), neoavarol (5), 20-O-acetylavarol (6), 20-O-acetylneoavarol (7), and 3'-aminoavarone (8). The structures of 1-3 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with IC50 values of 11, 9.5, and 6.5 μM, respectively, while known compounds 4-8 gave IC50 values of 12, >32, 10, 8.6, and 18 μM, respectively. In a preliminary investigation on structure-activity relationships, six ester and methoxy derivatives (9-14) were prepared from 4 and 5.

  9. Sesquiterpene Hydroquinones with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activities from a Dysidea sp. Marine Sponge Collected in Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-07-22

    Three new sesquiterpene hydroquinones, avapyran (1), 17-O-acetylavarol (2), and 17-O-acetylneoavarol (3), were isolated from a Dysidea sp. marine sponge collected in Okinawa together with five known congeners: avarol (4), neoavarol (5), 20-O-acetylavarol (6), 20-O-acetylneoavarol (7), and 3'-aminoavarone (8). The structures of 1-3 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with IC50 values of 11, 9.5, and 6.5 μM, respectively, while known compounds 4-8 gave IC50 values of 12, >32, 10, 8.6, and 18 μM, respectively. In a preliminary investigation on structure-activity relationships, six ester and methoxy derivatives (9-14) were prepared from 4 and 5. PMID:27336796

  10. Acylation of the 176R (19-kilodalton) early region 1B protein of human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, C J; Tremblay, M L; Yee, S P; Ross, R; Branton, P E

    1987-01-01

    Antipeptide sera were prepared in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted amino and carboxy termini of the early region 1B 176R (19-kilodalton [kDa]) protein of human adenovirus type 5. Both antisera specifically immunoprecipitated the 19- and 18.5-kDa forms of the 176R protein observed previously with antitumor sera. These data suggested that both species are full-length molecules of 176 residues. To identify posttranslational modifications that could explain the formation of these multiple species and possibly their known association with membranes, studies were carried out to determine whether they are glycosylated or acylated. Neither the 19- nor the 18.5-kDa species appeared to be a glycoprotein, however, they were labeled with [3H]palmitate and [3H]myristate, indicating that both species are acylated. Thus, whereas acylation does not appear to be the cause of the multiple species, it could play a role in the membrane association of these viral proteins. The acylation of 176R was found to be unusual. The fatty acid linkage was resistant to treatment with hydroxylamine or methanol-KOH, suggesting that acylation was through an amide bond. In addition, both palmitate and myristate were present in 176R, suggesting either a lack of specificity in the acylation reaction or the existence of more than one acylation site. Images PMID:2957509

  11. Protein kinase A alterations in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Espiard, S; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP pathway by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is essential for adrenal cortex maintenance, glucocorticoid and adrenal androgens synthesis, and secretion. Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cAMP pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway. Molecular alterations of PKA subunits have been observed in adrenocortical tumors. PKA molecular defects can be germline in hereditary disorders or somatic in sporadic tumors. Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) can be observed in patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Germline gene duplication of the catalytic subunits Cα (PRKACA) has been observed in patients with PPNAD. Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed recently activating somatic mutations of PRKACA in about 40% of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies help in the progress to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical tumors development due to PKA regulatory subunits alterations. All these alterations are observed in benign oversecreting tumors and are mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. On the long term, unraveling these alterations will open new strategies of pharmacological treatment targeting the cAMP pathway in adrenal tumors and cortisol-secretion disorders. PMID:25105543

  12. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b in proopiomelanocortin neurons reduces neurogenic control of blood pressure and protects mice from leptin- and sympatho-mediated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Butler, Benjamin R; Herren, David J; Brands, Michael W; Bence, Kendra K; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (Ptp1b), which represses leptin signaling, is a promising therapeutic target for obesity. Genome wide deletion of Ptp1b, increases leptin sensitivity, protects mice from obesity and diabetes, but alters cardiovascular function by increasing blood pressure (BP). Leptin-control of metabolism is centrally mediated and involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Whether these neurons contribute to leptin-mediated increases in BP remain unclear. We hypothesized that increasing leptin signaling in POMC neurons with Ptp1b deletion will sensitize the cardiovascular system to leptin and enhance neurogenic control of BP. We analyzed the cardiovascular phenotype of Ptp1b+/+ and POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice, at baseline and after 7 days of leptin infusion or sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. POMCPtp1b deletion did not alter baseline cardiovascular hemodynamics (BP, heart rate) but reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade and plasma catecholamine levels that suggests a decreased neurogenic control of BP. In contrast, POMC-Ptp1b deletion increased vascular adrenergic reactivity and aortic α-adrenergic receptors expression. Chronic leptin treatment reduced vascular adrenergic reactivity and blunted diastolic and mean BP increases in POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice only. Similarly POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice exhibited a blunted increased in diastolic and mean BP accompanied by a gradual reduction in adrenergic reactivity in response to chronic vascular sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. Together these data rule out our hypothesis but suggest that deletion of Ptp1b in POMC neurons protects from leptin- and sympatho-mediated increases in BP. Vascular adrenergic desensitization appears as a protective mechanism against hypertension, and POMC-Ptp1b as a key therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  13. Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein-3 knockdown enables growth of breast cancer metastases in the lung, liver, and bone.

    PubMed

    Manka, David; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2005-12-15

    The mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4T07, and 67NR are highly tumorigenic but vary in metastatic potential: 4T1 widely disseminates, resulting in secondary tumors in the lung, liver, bone, and brain; 4T07 spreads to the lung and liver but is unable to establish metastatic nodules; 67NR is unable to metastasize. The Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein-3 (Bnip-3) was recently shown to be absent after hypoxia in pancreatic cancer cell lines whereas its overexpression restored hypoxia-induced cell death. We found that Bnip-3 expression increased after 6 hours of hypoxia in all cell lines tested but was highest in the nonmetastatic 67NR cells and lowest in the highly metastatic 4T1 cells. Hypoxia-induced expression of Bnip-3 in the disseminating but nonmetastatic 4T07 cells was intermediate compared with 4T1 and 67NR cells. Cleaved caspase-3, a key downstream effector of cell death, increased after 6 hours of hypoxia in the 67NR and 4T07 cells by 1.9- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Conversely, cleaved caspase-3 decreased by 45% in the highly metastatic 4T1 cells after hypoxia. Small interfering RNA oligonucleotides targeting endogenous Bnip-3 blocked cell death and increased clonigenic survival after hypoxic challenge in vitro and increased primary tumor size and enabled metastasis to the lung, liver, and sternum of mice inoculated with 4T07 cells in vivo. These data inversely correlate the hypoxia-induced expression of the cell death protein Bnip-3 to metastatic potential and suggest that loss of Bnip-3 expression is critical for malignant and metastatic evasion of hypoxia-induced cell death. PMID:16357180

  14. Association of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes polymorphisms and secondary protein structure changes with reproduction traits in Mehraban ewes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, R; Zamani, P; Deljou, A; Rezvan, H

    2013-07-25

    BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes are well known due to their important effects on litter size and mechanisms controlling ovulation rate in sheep. In the present study, polymorphisms of BMPR-1B gene exon 8 and GDF9 gene exon 1 were detected by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing methods in 100 Mehraban ewes. The PCR reaction forced to amplify 140 and 380-bp fragments of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes, respectively. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS) were identified in two different SSCP patterns of BMPR-1B gene (CC and CA genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchange. Also, two SNPS were identified in three different SSCP patterns of GDF9 gene (AA, AG and GG genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchanges. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for BMPR-1B exon 8, but the secondary protein structures predicted for GDF9 exon 1 were similar together. The evaluation of the associations between the SSCP patterns and the protein structure changes with reproduction traits showed that BMPR-1B exon 8 genotypes have significant effects on some of reproduction traits but the GDF9 genotypes did not have any significant effect. The CA genotype of BMPR-1B exon 8 had a significant positive effect on reproduction performance and could be considered as an important and new mutation, affecting the ewes reproduction performance. Marker assisted selection using BMPR-IB gene could be noticed to improve the reproduction traits in Mehraban sheep.

  15. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B): Importance of steric and electronic effects on the unusual cyclization of the sulfenic acid intermediate to a sulfenyl amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2013-09-01

    The redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) via the unusual transformation of its sulfenic acid (PTP1B-SOH) to a cyclic sulfenyl amide intermediate is studied by using small molecule chemical models. These studies suggest that the sulfenic acids derived from the H2O2-mediated reactions o-amido thiophenols do not efficiently cyclize to sulfenyl amides and the sulfenic acids produced in situ can be trapped by using methyl iodide. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most stable conformer of such sulfenic acids are stabilized by nO → σ*S-OH orbital interactions, which force the -OH group to adopt a position trans to the S⋯O interaction, leading to an almost linear arrangement of the O⋯S-O moiety and this may be the reason for the slow cyclization of such sulfenic acids to their corresponding sulfenyl amides. On the other hand, additional substituents at the 6-position of o-amido phenylsulfenic acids that can induce steric environment and alter the electronic properties around the sulfenic acid moiety by S⋯N or S⋯O nonbonded interactions destabilize the sulfenic acids by inducing strain in the molecule. This may lead to efficient the cyclization of such sulfenic acids. This model study suggests that the amino acid residues in the close proximity of the sulfenic acid moiety in PTP1B may play an important role in the cyclization of PTP1B-SOH to produce the corresponding sulfenyl amide.

  16. RNA Binding Proteins RZ-1B and RZ-1C Play Critical Roles in Regulating Pre-mRNA Splicing and Gene Expression during Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Zhu, Danling; Lin, Xiaoya; Miao, Jin; Gu, Lianfeng; Deng, Xian; Yang, Qian; Sun, Kangtai; Zhu, Danmeng; Cao, Xiaofeng; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Dean, Caroline; Aoyama, Takashi; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins are involved in various aspects of RNA metabolism, which in turn modulates gene expression. However, the functions of nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins in plants are poorly understood. Here, we report the functions of two proteins containing RNA recognition motifs, RZ-1B and RZ-1C, in Arabidopsis thaliana. RZ-1B and RZ-1C were localized to nuclear speckles and interacted with a spectrum of serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins through their C termini. RZ-1C preferentially bound to purine-rich RNA sequences in vitro through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif. Disrupting the RNA binding activity of RZ-1C with SR proteins through overexpression of the C terminus of RZ-1C conferred defective phenotypes similar to those observed in rz-1b rz-1c double mutants, including delayed seed germination, reduced stature, and serrated leaves. Loss of function of RZ-1B and RZ-1C was accompanied by defective splicing of many genes and global perturbation of gene expression. In addition, we found that RZ-1C directly targeted FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), promoting efficient splicing of FLC introns and likely also repressing FLC transcription. Our findings highlight the critical role of RZ-1B/1C in regulating RNA splicing, gene expression, and many key aspects of plant development via interaction with proteins including SR proteins.

  17. Optimised purification and characterisation of lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b from barley malt.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Melanie; Lombard, Nicolaas; Rautenbach, Marina

    2014-08-15

    In beer brewing, brewers worldwide strive to obtain product consistency in terms of flavour, colour and foam. Important proteins contributing to beer foam are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), in particular LTP1 and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b, which are known to transport lipids in vivo and prevent lipids from destabilising the beer foam. LTP1 and LTP1b were successfully purified using only five purification steps with a high purified protein yield (160 mg LTP1 and LTP1b from 200 g barley). Circular dichroism of LTP1 and LTP1b confirmed that both proteins are highly tolerant to high temperatures (>90 °C) and are pH stable, particularly at a neutral to a more basic pH. Only LTP1 exhibited antiyeast and thermo-stable lytic activity, while LTP1b was inactive, indicating that the fatty acid moiety compromised the antimicrobial activity of LTP1. This lack in antiyeast activity and the positive foam properties of LTP1b would benefit beer fermentation and quality.

  18. Protein 4.1B associates with both Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2 at paranodes and juxtaparanodes of myelinated fibres.

    PubMed

    Denisenko-Nehrbass, Natalia; Oguievetskaia, Ksénia; Goutebroze, Laurence; Galvez, Thierry; Yamakawa, Hisashi; Ohara, Osamu; Carnaud, Michèle; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2003-01-01

    Caspr/paranodin, a neuronal transmembrane glycoprotein, is essential for the structure and function of septate-like paranodal axoglial junctions at nodes of Ranvier. A closely related protein, Caspr2, is concentrated in juxtaparanodal regions where it associates indirectly with the shaker-type potassium channels. Although ultrastructural studies indicate that paranodal complexes are linked to the cytoskeleton, the intracellular partners of Caspr/paranodin, as well as those of Caspr2, are poorly characterized. We show that the conserved intracellular juxtamembrane regions (GNP motif) of Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2 bind proteins 4.1R and 4.1B. 4.1B is known to be enriched in paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions. 4.1B immunoreactivity accumulates progressively at paranodes and juxtaparanodes during postnatal development, following the concentration of Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2, respectively, in central and peripheral myelinated axons. These two proteins coimmunoprecipitated with 4.1B in brain homogenates. Our results provide strong evidence for the association of 4.1B with Caspr/paranodin at paranodes and with Caspr2 at juxtaparanodes. We propose that 4.1B anchors these axonal proteins to the actin-based cytoskeleton in these two regions. PMID:12542678

  19. Expression profiling of 519 kinase genes in matched malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor/plexiform neurofibroma samples is discriminatory and identifies mitotic regulators BUB1B, PBK and NEK2 as overexpressed with transformation.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Thomas P; Henriksen, Kammi J; Tonsgard, James H; Montag, Anthony G; Krausz, Thomas N; Pytel, Peter

    2013-07-01

    About 50% of all malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) arise as neurofibromatosis type 1 associated lesions. In those patients malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are thought to arise through malignant transformation of a preexisting plexiform neurofibroma. The molecular changes associated with this transformation are still poorly understood. We sought to test the hypothesis that dysregulation of expression of kinases contributes to this malignant transformation. We analyzed expression of all 519 kinase genes in the human genome using the nanostring nCounter system. Twelve cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising in a background of preexisting plexiform neurofibroma were included. Both components were separately sampled. Statistical analysis compared global changes in expression levels as well as changes observed in the pairwise comparison of samples taken from the same surgical specimen. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on tissue array slides to confirm expression of selected proteins. The expression pattern of kinase genes can separate malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and preexisting plexiform neurofibromas. The majority of kinase genes is downregulated rather than overexpressed with malignant transformation. The patterns of expression changes are complex without simple recurring alteration. Pathway analysis demonstrates that differentially expressed kinases are enriched for kinases involved in the direct regulation of mitosis, and several of these show increased expression in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Immunohistochemical studies for the mitotic regulators BUB1B, PBK and NEK2 confirm higher expression levels at the protein level. These results suggest that the malignant transformation of plexiform neurofibroma is associated with distinct changes in the expression of kinase genes. The patterns of these changes are complex and heterogeneous. There is no single unifying alteration. Kinases involved

  20. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  1. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  2. The cytoskeletal adaptor protein band 4.1B is required for the maintenance of paranodal axoglial septate junctions in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-06-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B-null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axoglial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in the study by Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after 1 year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at ∼ 1 year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  3. The Cytoskeletal Adaptor Protein Band 4.1B is Required for the Maintenance of Paranodal Axo-Glial Septate Junctions in Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axo-glial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after one year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at about one year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  4. The light chains of microtubule-associated proteins MAP1A and MAP1B interact with α1-syntrophin in the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Noiges, Rainer; Descovich, Luise; Fischer, Irmgard; Albrecht, Douglas E; Nothias, Fatiha; Froehner, Stanley C; Propst, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins of the MAP1 family (MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) share, among other features, a highly conserved COOH-terminal domain approximately 125 amino acids in length. We conducted a yeast 2-hybrid screen to search for proteins interacting with this domain and identified α1-syntrophin, a member of a multigene family of adapter proteins involved in signal transduction. We further demonstrate that the interaction between the conserved COOH-terminal 125-amino acid domain (which is located in the light chains of MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) and α1-syntrophin is direct and occurs through the pleckstrin homology domain 2 (PH2) and the postsynaptic density protein 95/disk large/zonula occludens-1 protein homology domain (PDZ) of α1-syntrophin. We confirmed the interaction of MAP1B and α1-syntrophin by co-localization of the two proteins in transfected cells and by co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mouse brain. In addition, we show that MAP1B and α1-syntrophin partially co-localize in Schwann cells of the murine sciatic nerve during postnatal development and in the adult. However, intracellular localization of α1-syntrophin and other Schwann cell proteins such as ezrin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) and the localization of the axonal node of Ranvier-associated protein Caspr1/paranodin were not affected in MAP1B null mice. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that classical MAPs are likely to be involved in signal transduction not only by directly modulating microtubule function, but also through their interaction with signal transduction proteins. PMID:23152929

  5. The Light Chains of Microtubule-Associated Proteins MAP1A and MAP1B Interact with α1-Syntrophin in the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Descovich, Luise; Fischer, Irmgard; Albrecht, Douglas E.; Nothias, Fatiha; Froehner, Stanley C.; Propst, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins of the MAP1 family (MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) share, among other features, a highly conserved COOH-terminal domain approximately 125 amino acids in length. We conducted a yeast 2-hybrid screen to search for proteins interacting with this domain and identified α1-syntrophin, a member of a multigene family of adapter proteins involved in signal transduction. We further demonstrate that the interaction between the conserved COOH-terminal 125-amino acid domain (which is located in the light chains of MAP1A, MAP1B, and MAP1S) and α1-syntrophin is direct and occurs through the pleckstrin homology domain 2 (PH2) and the postsynaptic density protein 95/disk large/zonula occludens-1 protein homology domain (PDZ) of α1-syntrophin. We confirmed the interaction of MAP1B and α1-syntrophin by co-localization of the two proteins in transfected cells and by co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mouse brain. In addition, we show that MAP1B and α1-syntrophin partially co-localize in Schwann cells of the murine sciatic nerve during postnatal development and in the adult. However, intracellular localization of α1-syntrophin and other Schwann cell proteins such as ezrin and dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) and the localization of the axonal node of Ranvier-associated protein Caspr1/paranodin were not affected in MAP1B null mice. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that classical MAPs are likely to be involved in signal transduction not only by directly modulating microtubule function, but also through their interaction with signal transduction proteins. PMID:23152929

  6. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.

  7. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex.more » We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.« less

  8. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. Here we report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. These results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens. PMID:25775123

  9. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5GTP-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation. PMID:27411398

  10. A Nucleolar Protein, Ribosomal RNA Processing 1 Homolog B (RRP1B), Enhances the Recruitment of Cellular mRNA in Influenza Virus Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Shih-Feng; Lee, Yi-Yuan; Jeng, King-Song

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) undergoes RNA transcription by a unique capped-mRNA-dependent transcription, which is carried out by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), consisting of the viral PA, PB1, and PB2 proteins. However, how the viral RdRp utilizes cellular factors for virus transcription is not clear. Previously, we conducted a genome-wide pooled short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen to identify host factors important for influenza A virus replication. Ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) was identified as one of the candidates. RRP1B is a nucleolar protein involved in ribosomal biogenesis. Upon IAV infection, part of RRP1B was translocated from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, where viral RNA synthesis likely takes place. The depletion of RRP1B significantly reduced IAV mRNA transcription in a minireplicon assay and in virus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that RRP1B interacted with PB1 and PB2 of the RdRp and formed a coimmunoprecipitable complex with RdRp. The depletion of RRP1B reduced the amount of capped mRNA in the RdRp complex. Taken together, these findings indicate that RRP1B is a host factor essential for IAV transcription and provide a target for new antivirals. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is an important human pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality and threatens the human population with epidemics and pandemics every year. Due to the high mutation rate of the virus, antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins might ultimately lose their effectiveness. An alternative strategy that explores the genetic stability of host factors indispensable for influenza virus replication would thus be desirable. Here, we characterized the rRNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) protein as an important cellular factor for influenza A virus transcription. We showed that silencing RRP1B hampered viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity, which is responsible for virus transcription and replication. Furthermore, we

  11. Rosiglitazone ameliorates abnormal expression and activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in the skeletal muscle of fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Ouyang, Jing Ping; Wu, Ke; Wang, Shi Shun; Wen, Chong Yuan; Xia, Zheng Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) acts as a physiological negative regulator of insulin signaling by dephosphorylating the activated insulin receptor (IR). Here we examine the role of PTP1B in the insulin-sensitizing action of rosiglitazone (RSG) in skeletal muscle and liver. Fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated rats (10-week-old), an animal model of type II diabetes, and age-matched, nondiabetic controls were treated with RSG (10 μmol kg−1 day−1) for 2 weeks. After RSG treatment, the diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity. Diabetic rats showed significantly increased levels and activities of PTP1B in the skeletal muscle (1.6- and 2-fold, respectively) and liver (1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively), thus diminishing insulin signaling in the target tissues. We found that the decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (55%), tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits (48%), and IR substrate-1 (IRS-1) (39%) in muscles of diabetic rats were normalized after RSG treatment. These effects were associated with 34 and 30% decreases in increased PTP1B levels and activities, respectively, in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. In contrast, RSG did not affect the increased PTP1B levels and activities or the already reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis and tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits and IRS-2 in livers of diabetic rats. RSG treatment in normal rats did not significantly change PTP1B activities and levels or protein levels of IRβ, IRS-1, and -2 in diabetic rats. These data suggest that RSG enhances insulin activity in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats possibly by ameliorating abnormal levels and activities of PTP1B. PMID:15997237

  12. A polybromodiphenyl ether from an Indonesian marine sponge Lamellodysidea herbacea and its chemical derivatives inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, an important target for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Sumilat, Deiske A; Kanno, Syu-ichi; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2013-10-01

    The ethanol extract of an Indonesian marine sponge Lamellodysidea herbacea inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an important target enzyme for the treatment of type II diabetes. Bioassay-guided isolation yielded a known polybromodiphenyl ether (1) as a sole bioactive component. The structure of 1 was confirmed by spectroscopic data for 1 and its methyl ether derivative (2). Compound 1 markedly inhibited the PTP1B activity (IC₅₀ = 0.85 μM) and showed a moderate cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines, HCT-15 (colon) and Jurkat (T-cell lymphoma) cells. On the other hand, compound 2 maintained potent inhibitory activity against PTP1B (IC₅₀ = 1.7 μM) but did not show apparent cytotoxicity at 18 μM against these cancer cells. Four ester derivatives [acetyl (3), butyryl (4), hexanoyl (5), and benzoyl (6)] were prepared from 1 and their activities evaluated against PTP1B and two cancer cell lines to investigate the structure-activity relationships. Although compounds 3-6 exhibited potent inhibitory effects against PTP1B activity, cytotoxicity against HCT-15 and Jurkat cells was observed as a similar efficacy to that of 1. From these results, compound 2 was found to be the best inhibitor of PTP1B with no apparent cytotoxicity. Therefore, 2 may be a lead compound for making a new type of PTP1B inhibitor. Moreover, compound 2 did not inhibit the cell growth of Huh-7 cells (hepatoma). Hepatocytes are one of the locations of PTP1B, and Huh-7 cells are used to study the mechanism of action of compound 2. PMID:23274914

  13. Construction and characterization of infectious hepatitis C virus chimera containing structural proteins directly from genotype 1b clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Tao, Wanyin; Li, Rui; Xiang, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Xiang, Xiaogang; Xie, Qing; Zhong, Jin

    2013-08-15

    HCV genotype is a major determinant of clinical outcome, and GT1b HCV infection is the most difficult to treat and also the predominant genotype in East Asia and Europe. We developed 1b/JFH-1 inter-genotypic recombinants containing the structural genes (Core, E1, E2), p7 and the 1stTMD of NS2 directly from GT1b clinical isolates. Through a cloning selection strategy, we obtained 4 functional clones from 3 cases of GT1b patients' sera, which could produce infectious viruses in Huh7.5.1 cells. Sequencing analysis of recovered viruses from serial passage and reverse genetics revealed that adaptive mutations in the GT1b-originated region were enough for the enhancement of infectivity. A monoclonal antibody to E2 and original patient sera could efficiently block 3 of the viruses (26C3mt, 52B6mt and 79L9) while had little effect on 26C6mt viruses. The availability of 1b/JFH-1 chimeric viruses will be important for studies of isolate-specific neutralization and useful in evaluating antiviral therapies.

  14. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL), spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  15. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Linlin; Liu, Ziwen; Yan, Ruilan; Johnson, Stephen; Zhao, Yupei; Fang, Xiubin; Cao, Deliang

    2009-09-18

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 {mu}M, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 {mu}M, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 {mu}M, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 {mu}M, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 {mu}M (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  16. The V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b mediates dorsal forerunner cell proliferation and left-right asymmetry in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gokey, Jason J; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric fluid flows generated by motile cilia in a transient 'organ of asymmetry' are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryonic development. The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) proton pump has been identified as an early factor in the LR pathway that functions prior to cilia, but the role(s) for V-ATPase activity are not fully understood. In the zebrafish embryo, the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b is maternally supplied and expressed in dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) that give rise to the ciliated organ of asymmetry called Kupffer's vesicle (KV). V-ATPase accessory proteins modulate V-ATPase activity, but little is known about their functions in development. We investigated Atp6ap1b and V-ATPase in KV development using morpholinos, mutants and pharmacological inhibitors. Depletion of both maternal and zygotic atp6ap1b expression reduced KV organ size, altered cilia length and disrupted LR patterning of the embryo. Defects in other ciliated structures-neuromasts and olfactory placodes-suggested a broad role for Atp6ap1b during development of ciliated organs. V-ATPase inhibitor treatments reduced KV size and identified a window of development in which V-ATPase activity is required for proper LR asymmetry. Interfering with Atp6ap1b or V-ATPase function reduced the rate of DFC proliferation, which resulted in fewer ciliated cells incorporating into the KV organ. Analyses of pH and subcellular V-ATPase localizations suggested Atp6ap1b functions to localize the V-ATPase to the plasma membrane where it regulates proton flux and cytoplasmic pH. These results uncover a new role for the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b in early development to maintain the proliferation rate of precursor cells needed to construct a ciliated KV organ capable of generating LR asymmetry.

  17. Subcellular Partitioning of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Depends Sensitively on the Composition of Its Tail Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Julia; Egorov, Mikhail V.; Walther, Kirstin A.; Sabet, Ola; Mallah, Jana; Grabenbauer, Markus; Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling networks. PTP1B has long been thought to exert its influence solely from its perch on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, an additional subpopulation of PTP1B has recently been detected in mitochondria extracted from rat brain tissue. Here, we show that PTP1B’s mitochondrial localization is general (observed across diverse mammalian cell lines) and sensitively dependent on the transmembrane domain length, C-terminal charge and hydropathy of its short (≤35 amino acid) tail anchor. Our electron microscopy of specific DAB precipitation revealed that PTP1B localizes via its tail anchor to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy establishing that this OMM pool contributes to the previously reported cytoplasmic interaction of PTP1B with endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptor. We additionally examined the mechanism of PTP1B’s insertion into the ER membrane through heterologous expression of PTP1B’s tail anchor in wild-type yeast and yeast mutants of major conserved ER insertion pathways: In none of these yeast strains was ER targeting significantly impeded, providing in vivo support for the hypothesis of spontaneous membrane insertion (as previously demonstrated in vitro). Further functional elucidation of the newly recognized mitochondrial pool of PTP1B will likely be important for understanding its complex roles in cellular responses to external stimuli, cell proliferation and diseased states. PMID:26431424

  18. ACVR1B (ALK4, activin receptor type 1B) gene mutations in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gloria H.; Bansal, Ravi; Murphy, Kathleen M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Yeo, Charles J.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kern, Scott E.

    2001-01-01

    DPC4 is known to mediate signals initiated by type β transforming growth factor (TGFβ) as well as by other TGFβ superfamily ligands such as activin and BMP (bone morphogenic proteins), but mutational surveys of such non-TGFβ receptors have been negative to date. Here we describe the gene structure and novel somatic mutations of the activin type I receptor, ACVR1B, in pancreatic cancer. ACVR1B has not been described previously as a mutated tumor-suppressor gene. PMID:11248065

  19. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B rescues against myocardial anomalies in high fat diet-induced obesity: Role of AMPK-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kandadi, Machender R; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Roe, Nathan D; Nair, Sreejayan; Hu, Dahai; Sun, Aijun

    2015-02-01

    Obesity-induced cardiomyopathy may be mediated by alterations in multiple signaling cascades involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is an important negative regulator of insulin signaling. This study was designed to evaluate the role of PTP1B in high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile anomalies. Wild-type and PTP1B knockout mice were fed normal (10%) or high (45%) fat diet for 5months prior to evaluation of cardiac function. Myocardial function was assessed using echocardiography and an Ion-Optix MyoCam system. Western blot analysis was employed to evaluate levels of AMPK, mTOR, raptor, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II. RT-PCR technique was employed to assess genes involved in hypertrophy and lipid metabolism. Our data revealed increased LV thickness and LV chamber size as well as decreased fractional shortening following high fat diet intake, the effect was nullified by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet intake compromised cardiomyocyte contractile function as evidenced by decreased peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, intracellular Ca²⁺ release as well as prolonged duration of relengthening and intracellular Ca²⁺ decay, the effects of which were alleviated by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet resulted in enlarged cardiomyocyte area and increased lipid accumulation, which were attenuated by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet intake dampened myocardial autophagy as evidenced by decreased LC3-II conversion and Beclin-1, increased p62 levels as well as decreased phosphorylation of AMPK and raptor, the effects of which were significantly alleviated by PTP1B knockout. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK using compound C disengaged PTP1B knockout-conferred protection against fatty acid-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Taken together, our results suggest that PTP1B knockout offers cardioprotection against high fat diet intake through activation of AMPK. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  20. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A Cooperate in Cell Cycle–Associated Replication of Peroxisomes[W

    PubMed Central

    Lingard, Matthew J.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J.; Mullen, Robert T.; Trelease, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle–associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in ∼40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells. PMID:18539750

  1. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A cooperate in cell cycle-associated replication of peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Lingard, Matthew J; Gidda, Satinder K; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J; Mullen, Robert T; Trelease, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle-associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in approximately 40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells.

  2. The dual effect of adenovirus type 5 E1A 13S protein on NF-kappaB activation is antagonized by E1B 19K.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M L; Indorf, A; Limbourg, F P; Städtler, H; Traenckner, E B; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of human adenoviruses encode several regulatory proteins, including the two differentially spliced gene products E1A and E1B. Here, we show that the 13S but not the 12S splice variant of E1A of adenovirus type 5 can activate the human transcription factor NF-kappaB in a bimodal fashion. One mode is the activation of NF-kappaB containing the p65 subunit from the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB-IkappaB complex. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates and the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at serines 32 and 36, followed by IkappaBalpha degradation and the nuclear uptake of NF-kappaB. In addition, 13S E1A stimulated the transcriptional activity of the C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 at a core promoter with either a TATA box or an initiator (INR) element. The C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 were found to associate with E1A in vitro. The activation of NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene transcription by E1A was potently suppressed upon coexpression of the E1B 19-kDa protein (19K). E1B 19K prevented both the activation of NF-kappaB and the E1A-mediated transcriptional enhancement of p65. These inhibitory effects were not found for the 55-kDa splice variant of the E1B protein. We suggest that the inductive effect of E1A 13S on the host factor NF-kappaB, whose activation is important for the transcription of various adenovirus genes, must be counteracted by the suppressive effect of E1B 19K so that the adenovirus-infected cell can escape the immune-stimulatory and apoptotic effects of NF-kappaB. PMID:8754803

  3. Chicken Y-box proteins chk-YB-1b and chk-YB-2 repress translation by sequence-specific interaction with single-stranded RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Swamynathan, S K; Nambiar, A; Guntaka, R V

    2000-01-01

    Y-Box proteins comprise a large family of multifunctional proteins with a wide spectrum of activities in both transcription and translational regulation of gene expression. Earlier, we have reported on the involvement of chk-YB-2 in transcriptional regulation of Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeats and the involvement of chk-YB-1b in transcriptional regulation of alpha1(I) collagen genes. Here, we have investigated the potential role of chk-YB-2 and chk-YB-1b in RNA metabolism. We report that chk-YB-2 and chk-YB-1b are localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and that they both can bind single-stranded RNA in a sequence-specific and reversible manner. Well-conserved cold-shock domain, N-terminal proline-rich domain and the alternating clusters of acidic and basic amino acids located in the C-terminal ends of these two proteins were all found to be necessary for their RNA-binding ability. Further, we demonstrate that these two proteins inhibit translation in vitro and that binding to RNA is required for this inhibition. The significance of these results is discussed. PMID:10816422

  4. Interaction of 5-HT1B/D ligands with recombinant h 5-HT1A receptors: intrinsic activity and modulation by G-protein activation state.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Palmier, C; Dupuis, D S; Colpaert, F C

    1998-05-01

    Many 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands have affinity for 5-HT1A receptors. In the present study, the intrinsic activity of a series of 5-HT1B/D ligands was investigated at human 5-HT1A (h 5-HT1A) receptors by measuring G-protein activation in recombinant C6-glial and HeLa membranes, using agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding. In these two membrane preparations, the density of h 5-HT1A receptors (i.e., 246 to 320 fmol mg(-1) protein) and of their G-proteins, and the receptor: G-protein density ratio (0.08 to 0.18) appeared to be similar. It was found that: (i) the maximal [35S]GTPgammaS binding responses induced by the 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands in the HeLa preparation at 30 microM GDP were comparable to that of the native agonist 5-HT; (ii) as compared to 5-HT (1.00), similar potencies but lower maximal responses were observed in the C6-glial preparation at 0.3 microM GDP for zolmitriptan (0.89), dihydroergotamine (0.81), rizatriptan (0.71), CP122638 (0.69), naratriptan (0.60) and sumatriptan (0.53); and that (iii) maximal [35S]GTPgammaS binding responses induced by 5-HT1B/D ligands in the C6-glial preparation were either unaffected or significantly enhanced by increasing the GDP concentration from 0.3 to 30 microM and higher concentrations. These features differ from those observed with 5-HT1A receptor agonists; the latter display the same rank order of potency and efficacy in both membrane preparations, and increasing the amount of GDP with C6-glial membranes results in an attenuation of both the agonist's maximal effect and the apparent potency of partial agonists. The differential regulation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/D agonist responses by GDP suggests that different G-protein subtypes are involved upon 5-HT1A receptor activation by 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/D agonists. PMID:9650800

  5. Identification of secreted proteins that reflect autophagy dynamics within tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kraya, Adam A; Piao, Shengfu; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Gao; Herlyn, Meenhard; Gimotty, Phyllis; Levine, Beth; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy, a catabolic process of cellular self-digestion, is an important tumor cell survival mechanism and a potential target in antineoplastic therapies. Recent discoveries have implicated autophagy in the cellular secretory process, but potential roles of autophagy-mediated secretion in modifying the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. Furthermore, efforts to inhibit autophagy in clinical trials have been hampered by suboptimal methods to quantitatively measure tumor autophagy levels. Here, we leveraged the autophagy-based involvement in cellular secretion to identify shed proteins associated with autophagy levels in melanoma. The secretome of low-autophagy WM793 melanoma cells was compared to its highly autophagic metastatic derivative, 1205Lu in physiological 3-dimensional cell culture using quantitative proteomics. These comparisons identified candidate autophagy biomarkers IL1B (interleukin 1, β), CXCL8 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8), LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor), FAM3C (family with sequence similarity 3, member C), and DKK3 (dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3) with known roles in inflammation and tumorigenesis, and these proteins were subsequently shown to be elevated in supernatants of an independent panel of high-autophagy melanoma cell lines. Secretion levels of these proteins increased when low-autophagy melanoma cells were treated with the autophagy-inducing tat-BECN1 (Beclin 1) peptide and decreased when ATG7 (autophagy-related 7) was silenced in high-autophagy cells, thereby supporting a mechanistic link between these secreted proteins and autophagy. In addition, serum from metastatic melanoma patients with high tumor autophagy levels exhibited higher levels of these proteins than serum from patients with low-autophagy tumors. These results suggest that autophagy-related secretion affects the tumor microenvironment and measurement of autophagy-associated secreted proteins in plasma and possibly in tumors can serve as

  6. Regulation of p53-dependent apoptosis, transcriptional repression, and cell transformation by phosphorylation of the 55-kilodalton E1B protein of human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    The adenovirus type 5 55-kDa E1B protein (E1B-55kDa) cooperates with E1A gene products to induce cell transformation. E1A proteins stimulate DNA synthesis and cell proliferation; however, they also cause rapid cell death by p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis. It is believed that the role of the E1B-55kDa protein in transformation is to protect against p53-dependent apoptosis by binding to and inactivating p53. It has been shown previously that the 55-kDa polypeptide abrogates p53-mediated transactivation and that mutants defective in p53 binding are unable to cooperate with E1A in transformation. We have previously mapped phosphorylation sites near the carboxy terminus of the E1B-55kDa protein at Ser-490 and Ser-491, which lie within casein kinase II consensus sequences. Conversion of these sites to alanine residues greatly reduced transforming activity, and although the mutant 55-kDa protein was found to interact with p53 at normal levels, it was somewhat defective for suppression of p53 transactivation activity. We now report that a nearby residue, Thr-495, also appears to be phosphorylated. We demonstrate directly that the wild-type 55-kDa protein is able to block E1A-induced p53-dependent apoptosis, whereas cells infected by mutant pm490/1/5A, which contains alanine residues at all three phosphorylation sites, exhibited extensive DNA fragmentation and classic apoptotic cell death. The E1B-55kDa product has been shown to exhibit intrinsic transcriptional repression activity when localized to promoters, such as by fusion with the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, even in the absence of p53. Such repression activity was totally absent with mutant pm490/1/5A. These data suggested that inhibition of p53-dependent apoptosis may depend on the transcriptional repression function of the 55-kDa protein, which appears to be regulated be phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus. PMID:9094635

  7. Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes and the elongation factor 1B gene show coordinate developmental regulation which is under post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Blumberg, D D

    1999-06-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental program in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum [19, 20]. One of the earliest developmental events is the decline in ribosomal protein synthesis [2, 17, 29, 30]. The ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes with 20 min to 1 h following the removal of nutrients, and their mRNA levels decline sharply at about 9 h into the 24-h developmental cycle [28, 31, 35, 36]. It has been generally assumed that the decline in r-protein mRNA levels during late development reflected a decline in the transcription rate [12, 32, 43]. Here we demonstrate that this is not the case. The transcription rates of three ribosomal protein genes, rpL11, rpL23 and rpS9 as well as an elongation factor 1B gene have been determined during growth and development in Dictyostelium. Throughout growth and development the transcription rate of the ribosomal protein genes remains relatively constant at 0.2%-0.5% of the rate of rRNA transcription while the elongation factor 1B gene is transcribed at 0.4%-0.6% of the rRNA rate. This low but constant transcription rate is in contrast to a spore coat protein gene Psp D, which is transcribed at 6% of the rRNA rate in late developing cells. The elongation factor 1B gene appears to be co-regulated with the ribosomal protein genes both in terms of its transcription rate and mRNA accumulation. Dictyostelium has been a popular model for understanding signal transduction and the growth to differentiation transition, thus it is of significance that the regulation of ribosome biosynthesis in Dictyostelium resembles that of higher eukaryotes in being regulated largely at the post-transcriptional level in response to starvation as opposed to yeasts where the regulation is largely transcriptional [27]. PMID:10374261

  8. Autism and Intellectual Disability-Associated KIRREL3 Interacts with Neuronal Proteins MAP1B and MYO16 with Potential Roles in Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying F.; Sowell, Sarah M.; Luo, Yue; Chaubey, Alka; Cameron, Richard S.; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Srivastava, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily play critical roles in brain development, as well as in maintaining synaptic plasticity, the dysfunction of which is known to cause cognitive impairment. Recently dysfunction of KIRREL3, a synaptic molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily, has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental conditions including intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and in the neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome. However, the molecular mechanisms of its physiological actions remain largely unknown. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the KIRREL3 extracellular domain interacts with brain expressed proteins MAP1B and MYO16 and its intracellular domain can potentially interact with ATP1B1, UFC1, and SHMT2. The interactions were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization analyses of proteins expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, mouse neuronal cells, and rat primary neuronal cells. Furthermore, we show KIRREL3 colocalization with the marker for the Golgi apparatus and synaptic vesicles. Previously, we have shown that KIRREL3 interacts with the X-linked intellectual disability associated synaptic scaffolding protein CASK through its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we found a genomic deletion encompassing MAP1B in one patient with intellectual disability, microcephaly and seizures and deletions encompassing MYO16 in two unrelated patients with intellectual disability, autism and microcephaly. MAP1B has been previously implicated in synaptogenesis and is involved in the development of the actin-based membrane skeleton. MYO16 is expressed in hippocampal neurons and also indirectly affects actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with WAVE1 complex. We speculate KIRREL3 interacting proteins are potential candidates for intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Moreover, our findings provide further insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying

  9. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  10. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia.

  11. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia. PMID:25907369

  12. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  13. Inhibitory evaluation of oligonol on α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, cholinesterase, and β-secretase 1 related to diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Bhakta, Himanshu Kumar; Fujii, Hajime; Min, Byung-Sun; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2016-03-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol that is derived from lychee fruit extract and contains catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins. This study investigates the anti-diabetic activities of oligonol via α-glucosidase and human recombinant protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) assays, as well as its anti-Alzheimer activities by evaluating the ability of this compound to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Oligonol exhibited potent concentration-dependent anti-diabetic activities by inhibiting α-glucosidase and PTP1B with IC50 values of 23.14 µg/mL and 1.02 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, a kinetics study revealed that oligonol inhibited α-glucosidase (K i = 22.36) and PTP1B (K i = 8.51) with characteristics typical of a mixed inhibitor. Oligonol also displayed potent concentration-dependent inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 4.34 µg/mL and 2.07 µg/mL, respectively. However, oligonol exhibited only marginal concentration-dependent BACE1 inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 130.45 µg/mL. A kinetics study revealed mixed-type inhibition against AChE (K i = 4.65) and BACE1 (K i = 58.80), and noncompetitive-type inhibition against BChE (K i = 9.80). Furthermore, oligonol exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. These results indicate that oligonol has strong preventative potential in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26724817

  14. Molecular Analysis of Aedes aegypti Classical Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Uncovers an Ortholog of Mammalian PTP-1B Implicated in the Control of Egg Production in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Debora Monteiro; Ahuja, Lalima Gagan; Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato Oliveira; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Jablonka, Willy; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Senna, Raquel; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Hartfelder, Klaus; Capurro, Margareth; Atella, Georgia Correa; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that catalyze phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation and modulate cell differentiation, growth and metabolism. In mammals, PTPs play a key role in the modulation of canonical pathways involved in metabolism and immunity. PTP1B is the prototype member of classical PTPs and a major target for treating human diseases, such as cancer, obesity and diabetes. These signaling enzymes are, hence, targets of a wide array of inhibitors. Anautogenous mosquitoes rely on blood meals to lay eggs and are vectors of the most prevalent human diseases. Identifying the mosquito ortholog of PTP1B and determining its involvement in egg production is, therefore, important in the search for a novel and crucial target for vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an analysis to identify the ortholog of mammalian PTP1B in the Aedes aegypti genome. We identified eight genes coding for classical PTPs. In silico structural and functional analyses of proteins coded by such genes revealed that four of these code for catalytically active enzymes. Among the four genes coding for active PTPs, AAEL001919 exhibits the greatest degree of homology with the mammalian PTP1B. Next, we evaluated the role of this enzyme in egg formation. Blood feeding largely affects AAEL001919 expression, especially in the fat body and ovaries. These tissues are critically involved in the synthesis and storage of vitellogenin, the major yolk protein. Including the classical PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or the PTP substrate DiFMUP in the blood meal decreased vitellogenin synthesis and egg production. Similarly, silencing AAEL001919 using RNA interference (RNAi) assays resulted in 30% suppression of egg production. Conclusions/Significance The data reported herein implicate, for the first time, a gene that codes for a classical PTP in mosquito egg formation. These findings raise the possibility that this class of enzymes may be used as novel

  15. The IRE1/bZIP60 pathway are activated by potexvirus and potyvirus small membrane binding proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endoplasmic reticulum provides an environment for protein synthesis, folding and distribution to all corners of the cell. With respect to protein synthesis and folding, quality production is central to maintaining homeostasis. When conditions occur that disrupt the folding capacity of the ER cau...

  16. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a

  17. The structure of apo protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B C215S mutant: More than just an S → O change

    PubMed Central

    Scapin, Giovanna; Patel, Sangita; Patel, Vira; Kennedy, Brian; Asante-Appiah, Ernest

    2001-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters via a two-step mechanism involving a covalent phospho-enzyme intermediate. Biochemical and site-directed mutagenesis experiments show that the invariant Cys residue present in the PTPase signature motif (H/V)CX5R(S/T) (i.e., C215 in PTP1B) is absolutely required for activity. Mutation of the invariant Cys to Ser results in a catalytically inactive enzyme, which still is capable of binding substrates and inhibitors. Although it often is assumed that substrate-trapping mutants such as the C215S retain, in solution, the structural and binding properties of wild-type PTPases, significant differences have been found in the few studies that have addressed this issue, suggesting that the mutation may lead to structural/conformational alterations in or near the PTP1B binding site. Several crystal structures of apo-WT PTP1B, and of WT- and C215S-mutant PTP1B in complex with different ligands are available, but no structure of the apo-PTP1B C215S has ever been reported. In all previously reported structures, residues of the PTPase signature motif have an identical conformation, while residues of the WPD loop (a surface loop which includes the catalytic Asp) assume a different conformation in the presence or absence of ligand. These observations led to the hypothesis that the different spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of the mutant protein may be the result of a different conformation for the WPD loop. We report here the structure of the apo-PTP1B C215S mutant, which reveals that, while the WPD loop is in the open conformation observed in the apo WT enzyme crystal structure, the residues of the PTPases signature motif are in a dramatically different conformation. These results provide a structural basis for the differences in spectroscopic properties and thermodynamic parameters in inhibitor binding observed for the wild-type and mutant enzymes. PMID:11468356

  18. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". PMID:24269475

  19. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  20. Down-regulation of membrane immunoglobulin-associated proteins, MB-1, B29 and Lyn, in AIDS-lymphomas and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Takanashi, M; Shiota, M; Choi, S H; Yamanashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Koike, M

    1994-01-01

    B-lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can proliferate in immunocompromised hosts to form lymphomas (MLs). Similar MLs are produced in mice with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) by transfusion of human lymphocytes infected with EBV (SCID-EBV-positive BML). Mb-1 and B29 are recently found transmembrane proteins associated with membrane immunoglobulins (mIg) on the surface of B cells. Lyn is a src family gene product expressed in B cells submembranously, in association with mIg, possibly through Mb-1/B29 heterodimer. These mIg-associated proteins (Mb-1, B29 and Lyn) are known to mediate antigenic stimulation through mIgs. We noted recently that Lyn is decreased selectively in around a half of SCID-EBV-positive BMLs. We extended this line of investigation to other mIg-associated proteins. Five acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-MLs and ten SCID-EBV-positive BMLs were first analysed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of Mb-1, B29 and Lyn. It was found that in AIDS-MLs, all the mIg-associated proteins were heavily down-regulated. In SCID-EBV-positive BMLs, Mb-1 was down regulated in six of ten, B29 in nine of ten and Lyn in six of ten, whereas no down-regulation was noted in eight EBV-free B MLs that were also maintained in SCID mice. An additional flow-cytometric study of two SCID-EBV-positive and two EBV-negative BMLs showed similar down-regulation in the former cases exclusively. Whereas mIg was also decreased in three of five SCID-EBV positive BMLs, it did not necessarily match the decrease of mIg-associated proteins, which contrasts with the recent finding that mIgs coexist with Mb-1 or B29. Some EBV-encoded proteins may activate host molecules located downwardly; this, in turn, may lead to the suppression of these upwardly-located mIg-associated proteins.

  1. SWI/SNF factors required for cellular resistance to DNA damage include ARID1A and ARID1B and show interdependent protein stability.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Reiko; Ui, Ayako; Kanno, Shin-Ichiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Nagase, Takahiro; Kohno, Takashi; Yasui, Akira

    2014-05-01

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling family contains various protein complexes, which regulate gene expression during cellular development and influence DNA damage response in an ATP- and complex-dependent manner, of which details remain elusive. Recent human genome sequencing of various cancer cells revealed frequent mutations in SWI/SNF factors, especially ARID1A, a variant subunit in the BRG1-associated factor (BAF) complex of the SWI/SNF family. We combined live-cell analysis and gene-suppression experiments to show that suppression of either ARID1A or its paralog ARID1B led to reduced nonhomologous end joining activity of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), decreased accumulation of KU70/KU80 proteins at DSB, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation, as well as to cisplatin and UV. Thus, in contrast to transcriptional regulation, both ARID1 proteins are required for cellular resistance to various types of DNA damage, including DSB. The suppression of other SWI/SNF factors, namely SNF5, BAF60a, BAF60c, BAF155, or BAF170, exhibits a similar phenotype. Of these factors, ARID1A, ARID1B, SNF5, and BAF60c are necessary for the immediate recruitment of the ATPase subunit of the SWI/SNF complex to DSB, arguing that both ARID1 proteins facilitate the damage response of the complex. Finally, we found interdependent protein stability among the SWI/SNF factors, suggesting their direct interaction within the complex and the reason why multiple factors are frequently lost in parallel in cancer cells. Taken together, we show that cancer cells lacking in the expression of certain SWI/SNF factors, including ARID1A, are deficient in DNA repair and potentially vulnerable to DNA damage.

  2. The Indeterminate Domain Protein ROC1 Regulates Chilling Tolerance via Activation of DREB1B/CBF1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Mingzhu; Cheng, Shuai; Zhao, Baotian; Xuan, Yuanhu; Shao, Minglong

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress, including salinity, drought and cold, severely affect diverse aspects of plant development and production. Rice is an important crop that does not acclimate to cold; therefore, it is relatively sensitive to low temperature stress. Dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 1s (DREB1s)/C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are well known for their function in cold tolerance, but the transcriptional regulation of CBFs remains elusive, especially in rice. Here, we performed a yeast one-hybrid assay using the promoter of CBF1, a cold-induced gene, to isolate transcriptional regulators of CBF1. Among the seven candidates identified, an indeterminate domain (IDD) protein named ROC1 (a regulator of CBF1) was further analyzed. The ROC1 transcript was induced by exogenously-treated auxin, while it was not altered by cold or ABA stimuli. ROC1-GFP was localized at the nucleus, and ROC1 showed trans-activation activity in yeast. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ChIP analyses revealed that ROC1 directly bound to the promoter of CBF1. Furthermore, ROC1 mutants exhibited chilling-sensitive symptoms and inhibited cold-mediated induction of CBF1 and CBF3, indicating that ROC1 is a positive regulator of cold stress responses. Taken together, this study identified the CBF1 regulator, and the results are important for rice plant adaptation to chilling stress. PMID:26927068

  3. Effect on transformation of mutations in the early region 1b-encoded 21- and 55-kilodalton proteins of adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Babiss, L E; Fisher, P B; Ginsberg, H S

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that the adenovirus 5 genes responsible for the initiation and maintenance of the transformed cell reside in the early region 1a and 1b genes, but it remains unclear how the polypeptides encoded in these genes mediate their functions. To probe the function of the early region 1b-encoded 55- and 21-kilodalton (kd) polypeptides during this process, a series of viral mutants was engineered so that they contained deletions or insertions at 5.4, 5.7, 7.9, or 9.6 map units. By means of either an overlap recombination procedure involving H5dl314 (delta 3.7 to 4.6 map units) cleaved with ClaI, or a marker rescue procedure involving H5dl312 (delta 1.2 to 3.8 map units), viral mutants were isolated by their ability to produce plaques on KB cell line 18 cells, which constitutively express only viral early region 1b functions. DNA sequence analysis confirmed that the series of mutants generated differed in their abilities to express the 21- or the 55-kd polypeptides, or both. Upon infection of cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells with viruses containing mutations affecting the 55-kd protein, the transformation frequency decreased as the size of the predicted truncated polypeptide decreased. Although all of the foci generated by the 55-kd protein mutants were indistinguishable from the foci induced by wild-type virus, they displayed an inefficient ability to grow in soft agar, again in relation to the size of the truncated polypeptide. In contrast, if cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells were transfected with viral DNA, the defectiveness in transformation observed after infection with virions was not as dramatic. However, all of the viruses containing 21-kd mutations were transformation defective, regardless of the mode by which the viral nucleic acid was introduced into the cell. Images PMID:6333514

  4. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  5. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  6. Ternary oxovanadium(IV) complexes with amino acid-Schiff base and polypyridyl derivatives: synthesis, characterization, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Yue, Jinjun; Yuan, Caixia; Zhu, Miaoli; Han, Hong; Liu, Zhiwei; Guo, Maolin

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the structure-activity relationship of vanadium complexes in inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase1B (PTP1B), eight mixed-ligand oxovanadium(IV) complexes, [V(IV)O(SalAla)(NN)] (H(2)SalAla for salicylidene alanine, NN for N,N'-donor heterocyclic base, namely, 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 3), dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 4)), [V(IV)O(SalLys)(dpq)] (5), [V(IV)O(SalLys)(dppz)] (6), [V(IV)O(SalAsp)(dppz)], (7) and [V(IV)O(SalTrp)(dppz)] (8)), of which 3-8 are new, have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, UV-visible, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and conductivity. The molar conductance data confirmed the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes in DMSO solution. The coordination in [V(IV)O (SalAla)(phen)] (2) was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis. The oxidation state of V(IV) with d(1) configuration in 2 was confirmed by EPR. The speciation of VO-SalAla-phen in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. The results indicate that the main species are two ternary complexes at the pH range 7.0-7.4. Biochemical assays demonstrate that the mixed-ligand oxovanadium(IV) complexes are potent inhibitors of PTP1B with IC(50) values in the range of 62-597nM, approximately 3-10 fold weaker in potency than those of similar mixed-ligand oxovanadium(IV) complexes of salicylidene anthranilic acid (SAA) derivative with polypyridyl ligands, except complex 8, which exhibits comparable or better inhibition activity than those of the mixed-ligand oxovanadium(IV) complexes of SAA derivative with polypyridyl ligands. The results demonstrate that the structures of vanadium complexes influence the PTP1B inhibition activity. Kinetics assays reveal that complex 2 inhibits PTP1B in a competitive manner.

  7. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Against CREPT, a Novel Protein Highly Expressed in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fangli; Wang, Ruoke; Zhang, Yanquan; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yinyin; Hu, Jim; Zhang, Linqi

    2014-01-01

    CREPT (cell-cycle related and expression-elevated protein in tumor), a novel gene also called RPRD1B and C20ORF77, was recently identified to promote tumorigenesis through up-regulation of the expression of genes related to cell cycle. The previous study demonstrated that CREPT is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and enhances the expression of Cyclin D1 by promoting the formation of a chromatin loop. To study the correlation of CREPT expression with clinical factors in different tumors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (3E10) using purified recombinant human GST-CREPT protein as an antigen. In this study, we characterized the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and cloned the gene encoding the antibody for preparation of industrial production. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 3E10 was sensitive and specific to recognize human endogenous CREPT protein. We have mapped the epitope of the antibody and cloned the variable region sequence of the gene encoding the antibody. We confirmed that the cloned gene produced an equivalent antibody as that produced by the original hybridoma. This study provided a basis for large-scale production of the CREPT antibody, which will be useful for the study of the role of CREPT in different tumors. PMID:25545209

  8. Overexpression of OATP1B3 confers apoptotic resistance in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooin; Belkhiri, Abbes; Lockhart, A. Craig; Merchant, Nipun; Glaeser, Hartmut; Harris, Elizabeth I.; Washington, M. Kay; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Zaika, Alex; Kim, Richard B.; El-Rifai, Wael

    2008-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3, SLCO1B3) is normally expressed in hepatocytes. In this study, we demonstrated frequent overexpression of OATP1B3 in colorectal adenocarcinomas. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 17 colon tumors indicated tumoral overexpression of OATP1B3 by ~100 fold, compared to 20 normal colon samples (p<0.0001). Using immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 93 evaluable colon tumor specimens, we detected immunostaining of OATP1B3 in 75 colon adenocarcinomas (81%) and no immunostaining in normal samples. To determine the functional effects of OATP1B3 expression on drug-induced apoptosis, we used camptothecin and oxaliplatin on a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines stably overexpressing OATP1B3. The results indicated that OATP1B3 overexpression enhanced cell survival in RKO, HCT-8 and HCT116p53+/+ cells that harbor wildtype p53 but not in Caco-2 and HCT116p53-/- cells that lack p53, compared to the respective empty vector controls (p<0.01). The TUNEL assay confirmed that HCT116p53+/+ cells overexpressing OATP1B3 had significantly lower apoptotic levels compared to empty vector control (P<0.001). The overexpression of OATP1B3 reduced the transcriptional activity of p53, with subsequent reductions in transcript and protein levels of its downstream transcription targets (P21WAF1 and PUMA). Overexpression of a point mutation (G583E) variant of OATP1B3 lacking transport activity did not confer an antiapoptotic effect or affect p53 transcriptional activity, suggesting that the antiapoptotic effect of OATP1B3 may be associated with its transport activity. Taken together, our results suggest that OATP1B3 overexpression in colorectal cancer cells may provide a survival advantage by altering p53-dependent pathways. PMID:19074900

  9. Unclassified pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with metanephric stromal tumor and solitary fibrous tumor with diffuse S-100 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Franca; Gurrera, Alessandra; Bisceglia, Michele; Alaggio, Rita; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Magro, Gaetano

    2011-11-15

    Metanephric stromal tumor (MST) is a rare pediatric neoplasm unique to the kidneys that is currently included in the spectrum of metanephric tumors, along with metanephric adenoma and adenofibroma. We herein report an unusual case of pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with MST and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Histologically, the tumor was composed of bland-looking spindle to stellate cells embedded in a fibro-sclerotic stroma that focally surrounded native entrapped renal tubules or blood vessels with abortive rings or collarettes. Alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas and a focal hemangiopericytomatous-like vascular pattern imparted to the tumor a resemblance to SFT. Angiodysplasia of intratumoral arterioles was also observed, but juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia was not a feature. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells showed a polyphenotypic profile, including diffuse expression of vimentin and CD34, and focal immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin, EMA, and CD99. However, the most striking finding was diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of S-100 protein. Although this protein has been reported to stain the heterologous glial and/or cartilaginous components that can be occasionally encountered in MST, this marker has not been previously reported in the fibroblastic component of MST. Pathologist should be aware of similar unusual unclassified tumors to avoid potential confusion with other benign or malignant S-100 protein-positive tumors.

  10. Distinct tumor protein p53 mutants in breast cancer subgroups.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Anne; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Wittmer, Evelyne; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Bertheau, Philippe; Espié, Marc; Plassa, Louis-François; Cottu, Paul; Marty, Michel; André, Fabrice; Sotiriou, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-03-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is mutated in approximately 30% of breast cancers, but this frequency fluctuates widely between subclasses. We investigated the p53 mutation status in 572 breast tumors, classified into luminal, basal and molecular apocrine subgroups. As expected, the lowest mutation frequency was observed in luminal (26%), and the highest in basal (88%) tumors. Luminal tumors showed significantly higher frequency of substitutions (82 vs. 65%), notably A/T to G/C transitions (31 vs. 15%), whereas molecular apocrine and basal tumors presented much higher frequencies of complex mutations (deletions/insertions) (36 and 33%, respectively, vs. 18%). Accordingly, missense mutations were significantly more frequent in luminal tumors (75 vs. 54%), whereas basal tumors displayed significantly increased rates of TP53 truncations (43 vs. 25%), resulting in loss of function and/or expression. Interestingly, as basal tumors, molecular apocrine tumors presented with a high rate of complex mutations, but paradoxically, these were not associated with increased frequency of p53 truncation. As in luminal tumors, this could reflect a selective pressure for p53 gain of function, possibly through P63/P73 inactivation. Collectively, these observations point not only to different mechanisms of TP53 alterations, but also to different functional consequences in the different breast cancer subtypes.

  11. Geranylated 2-arylbenzofurans from Morus alba var. tatarica and their α-glucosidase and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Long; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wan, Chuan-Xing; Zhou, Zhong-Bo; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Ten new geranylated 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives, including two monoterpenoid 2-arylbenzofurans (1 and 2), two geranylated 2-arylbenzofuran enantiomers (3a and 3b), and six geranylated 2-arylbenzofurans (4-9), along with four known 2-arylbenzofurans (10-13) were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba var. tatarica. Their structures and relative configurations were established on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. Compounds 3-7 with one asymmetric carbon at C-7″ were supposed to be enantiomeric mixtures confirmed by chiral HPLC analysis, and the absolute configurations of each enantiomer in 3-7 were determined by Rh2(OCOCF3)4-induced CD and Snatzke's method. The enantiomers with the substituting group at C-2' exhibited better resolutions on a Chiralpak AD-H column than those with the substituting group at C-4'. Compounds 1-7, 10, 11 and 13, showed α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 11.9-131.9 μM, and compounds 1 and 9-13 inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 7.9-38.1 μM. PMID:24216050

  12. Chimeric design, synthesis, and biological assays of a new nonpeptide insulin-mimetic vanadium compound to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Guevara-García, José Antonio; Melendez, FJ; Abdallah, Hassan H; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Bernard, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Prior to its total synthesis, a new vanadium coordination compound, called TSAG0101, was computationally designed to inhibit the enzyme protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). The PTP1B acts as a negative regulator of insulin signaling by blocking the active site where phosphate hydrolysis of the insulin receptor takes place. TSAG001, [VVO2(OH)(picolinamide)], was characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; IR: ν/cm−1 3,570 (NH), 1,627 (C=O, coordinated), 1,417 (C–N), 970/842 (O=V=O), 727 δ̣ (pyridine ring); 13C NMR: 5 bands between 122 and 151 ppm and carbonyl C shifted to 180 ppm; and 1H NMR: 4 broad bands from 7.6 to 8.2 ppm and NH2 shifted to 8.8 ppm. In aqueous solution, in presence or absence of sodium citrate as a biologically relevant and ubiquitous chelator, TSAG0101 undergoes neither ligand exchange nor reduction of its central vanadium atom during 24 hours. TSAG0101 shows blood glucose lowering effects in rats but it produced no alteration of basal- or glucose-induced insulin secretion on β cells during in vitro tests, all of which excludes a direct mechanism evidencing the extrapancreatic nature of its activity. The lethal dose (LD50) of TSAG0101 was determined in Wistar mice yielding a value of 412 mg/kg. This value is one of the highest among vanadium compounds and classifies it as a mild toxicity agent when compared with literature data. Due to its nonsubstituted, small-sized scaffold design, its remarkable complex stability, and low toxicity; TSAG0101 should be considered as an innovative insulin-mimetic principle with promising properties and, therefore, could become a new lead compound for potential nonpeptide PTP1B inhibitors in antidiabetic drug research. In view of the present work, the inhibitory concentration (IC50) and extended solution stability will be tested. PMID:20957214

  13. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Is a Novel Biological Target for Neurofibromatosis Type 1-associated Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Daiki; Hirayama, Mio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuguchi, Souhei; Wilson Morifuji, Masayo; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeya, Motohiro; Kuramochi, Akira; Araki, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease that predisposes individuals to develop benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Due to the lack of information on the molecular mechanism of NF1-associated tumor pathogenesis or biomarkers/therapeutic targets, an effective treatment for NF1 tumors has not been established. In this study, the novel NF1-associated protein, translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified by integrated proteomics and found to be up-regulated via activated MAPK/PI3K-AKT signaling in response to growth factors in NF1-deficient Schwann cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of NF1-associated tumors revealed that the TCTP expression level correlated with tumorigenicity. In NF1-deficient MPNST cells, TCTP protein but not mRNA was down-regulated by NF1 GTPase-activating protein-related domain or MAPK/PI3K inhibitors, and this correlated with suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin also down-regulated TCTP protein expression, whereas knockdown or overexpression of TCTP suppressed or activated mTOR signaling, respectively, and affected cell viability. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between TCTP and mTOR contributes to NF1-associated tumor formation. Last, the anti-tumor effect of artesunate, which binds to and degrades TCTP, was evaluated. Artesunate significantly suppressed the viability of MPNST cells but not normal Schwann cells, and the TCTP level inversely correlated with artesunate sensitivity. Moreover, combinational use of artesunate and rapamycin enhanced the cytotoxic effect on MPNST cells. These findings suggest that TCTP is functionally implicated in the progression of NF1-associated tumors and could serve as a biological target for their therapy. PMID:25092287

  14. Periostin, a multifunctional matricellular protein in inflammatory and tumor microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Allan Yi; Zheng, Hong; Ouyang, Gaoliang

    2014-07-01

    The behavior and fate of cells in tissues largely rely upon their cross-talk with the tissue microenvironment including neighboring cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and soluble cues from the local and systemic environments. Dysregulation of tissue microenvironment can drive various inflammatory diseases and tumors. The ECM is a crucial component of tissue microenvironment. ECM proteins can not only modulate tissue microenvironment but also regulate the behavior of surrounding cells and the homeostasis of tissues. As a nonstructural ECM protein, periostin is generally present at low levels in most adult tissues; however, periostin is often highly expressed at sites of injury or inflammation and in tumors within adult organisms. Current evidence demonstrates that periostin actively contributes to tissue injury, inflammation, fibrosis and tumor progression. Here, we summarize the roles of periostin in inflammatory and tumor microenvironments.

  15. High-throughput screen for inhibitors of transglycosylase and/or transpeptidase activities of Escherichia coli penicillin binding protein 1b.

    PubMed

    Chandrakala, B; Shandil, Radha K; Mehra, Upasana; Ravishankar, Sudha; Kaur, Parvinder; Usha, Veeraraghavan; Joe, Bina; deSousa, Sunita M

    2004-01-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 1b of Escherichia coli has both transglycosylase and transpeptidase activities, which are attractive targets for the discovery of new antibacterial agents. A high-throughput assay that detects inhibitors of the PBPs was described previously, but it cannot distinguish them from inhibitors of the MraY, MurG, and lipid pyrophosphorylase. We report on a method that distinguishes inhibitors of both activities of the PBPs from those of the other three enzymes. Radioactive peptidoglycan was synthesized by using E. coli membranes. Following termination of the reaction the products were analyzed in three ways. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated scintillation proximity assay (SPA) beads were added to one set, and the same beads together with a detergent were added to a second set. Type A polyethylenimine-coated WGA-coated SPA beads were added to a third set. By comparison of the results of assays run in parallel under the first two conditions, inhibitors of the transpeptidase and transglycosylase could be distinguished from inhibitors of the other enzymes, as the inhibitors of the other enzymes showed similar inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) under both conditions but the inhibitors of the PBPs showed insignificant inhibition in the absence of detergent. Furthermore, comparison of the results of assays run under conditions two and three enabled the distinction of transpeptidase inhibitors. Penicillin and other beta-lactams showed insignificant inhibition with type A beads compared with that shown with WGA-coated SPA beads plus detergent. However, inhibitors of the other four enzymes (tunicamycin, nisin, bacitracin, and moenomycin) showed similar IC(50)s under both conditions. We show that the main PBP being measured under these conditions is PBP 1b. This screen can be used to find novel transglycosylase or transpeptidase inhibitors. PMID:14693515

  16. Unfolded-protein response-associated stabilization of p27(Cdkn1b) interferes with lens fiber cell denucleation, leading to cataract.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lei; Whitcomb, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Shuhong; Chang, Min-Lee; Gu, Yumei; Duncan, Melinda K; Cvekl, Ales; Wang, Wei-Lin; Limi, Saima; Reneker, Lixing W; Shang, Fu; Du, Linfang; Taylor, Allen

    2016-03-01

    Failure of lens fiber cell denucleation (LFCD) is associated with congenital cataracts, but the pathobiology awaits elucidation. Recent work has suggested that mechanisms that direct the unidirectional process of LFCD are analogous to the cyclic processes associated with mitosis. We found that lens-specific mutations that elicit an unfolded-protein response (UPR) in vivo accumulate p27(Cdkn1b), show cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-1 inhibition, retain their LFC nuclei, and are cataractous. Although a UPR was not detected in lenses expressing K6W-Ub, they also accumulated p27 and showed failed LFCD. Induction of a UPR in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) also induced accumulation of p27 associated with decreased levels of S-phase kinase-associated protein (Skp)-2, a ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis. These cells also showed decreased lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase arrest. The suppression of lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase transition induced by the UPR was rescued by knockdown of p27. Taken together, these data indicate that accumulation of p27, whether related to the UPR or not, prevents the phosphorylation of lamin A/C and LFCD in maturing LFCs in vivo, as well as in dividing HLECs. The former leads to cataract and the latter to metaphase arrest. These results suggest that accumulation of p27 is a common mechanism underlying retention of LFC nuclei. PMID:26590164

  17. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunit gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, Nikolay B.; Zhao, Hao; Basrur, Venkatesha; Modyanov, Nikolai N.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits are sharply different. {yields} BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. {yields} BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase {alpha}-subunit in skeletal muscle. {yields} Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. {yields} BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a {beta}-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was

  18. ATP1B3 Protein Modulates the Restriction of HIV-1 Production and Nuclear Factor κ Light Chain Enhancer of Activated B Cells (NF-κB) Activation by BST-2.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Abe, Makoto; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2016-02-26

    Here, we identify ATP1B3 and fibrillin-1 as novel BST-2-binding proteins. ATP1B3 depletion in HeLa cells (BST-2-positive cells), but not 293T cells (BST-2-negative cells), induced the restriction of HIV-1 production in a BST-2-dependent manner. In contrast, fibrillin-1 knockdown reduced HIV-1 production in 293T and HeLa cells in a BST-2-independent manner. Moreover, NF-κB activation was enhanced by siATP1B3 treatment in HIV-1- and HIV-1ΔVpu-infected HeLa cells. In addition, ATP1B3 silencing induced high level BST-2 expression on the surface of HeLa cells. These results indicate that ATP1B3 is a co-factor that accelerates BST-2 degradation and reduces BST-2-mediated restriction of HIV-1 production and NF-κB activation.

  19. Quorum-sensing Salmonella selectively trigger protein expression within tumors

    PubMed Central

    Swofford, Charles A.; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella that secrete anticancer proteins have the potential to eliminate tumors, but nonspecific expression causes damage to healthy tissue. We hypothesize that Salmonella, integrated with a density-dependent switch, would only express proteins in tightly packed colonies within tumors. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the lux quorum-sensing (QS) system and a GFP reporter into nonpathogenic Salmonella. Fluorescence and bacterial density were measured in culture and in a tumor-on-a-chip device to determine the critical density necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella were injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice to quantify GFP expression in vivo using immunofluorescence. At densities below 0.6 × 1010 cfu/g in tumors, less than 3% of QS Salmonella expressed GFP. Above densities of 4.2 × 1010 cfu/g, QS Salmonella had similar expression levels to constitutive controls. GFP expression by QS colonies was dependent upon the distance to neighboring bacteria. No colonies expressed GFP when the average distance to neighbors was greater than 155 µm. Calculations of autoinducer concentrations showed that expression was sigmoidally dependent on density and inversely dependent on average radial distance. Based on bacterial counts from excised tissue, the liver density (0.0079 × 1010 cfu/g) was less than the critical density (0.11 × 1010 cfu/g) necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella are a promising tool for cancer treatment that will target drugs to tumors while preventing damage to healthy tissue. PMID:25737556

  20. Tumor promotion by caspase-resistant retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Borges, Helena L; Bird, Jeff; Wasson, Katherine; Cardiff, Robert D; Varki, Nissi; Eckmann, Lars; Wang, Jean Y J

    2005-10-25

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein regulates cell proliferation and cell death. RB is cleaved by caspase during apoptosis. A mutation of the caspase-cleavage site in the RB C terminus has been made in the mouse Rb-1 locus; the resulting Rb-MI mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced apoptosis in the intestine. The Rb-MI mice do not exhibit increased tumor incidence, because the MI mutation does not disrupt the Rb tumor suppressor function. In this study, we show that Rb-MI can promote the formation of colonic adenomas in the p53-null genetic background. Consistent with this tumor phenotype, Rb-MI reduces colorectal epithelial apoptosis and ulceration caused by dextran sulfate sodium. By contrast, Rb-MI does not affect the lymphoma phenotype of p53-null mice, in keeping with its inability to protect thymocytes and splenocytes from apoptosis. The Rb-MI protein is expressed and phosphorylated in the tumors, thereby inactivating its growth suppression function. These results suggest that RB tumor suppressor function, i.e., inhibition of proliferation, is inactivated by phosphorylation, whereas RB tumor promoting function, i.e., inhibition of apoptosis, is inactivated by caspase cleavage. PMID:16227443

  1. Multimeric Disintegrin Protein Polymer Fusions That Target Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein therapeutics have increased in number and frequency since the introduction of human insulin, 25 years ago. Presently, proteins and peptides are commonly used in the clinic. However, the incorporation of peptides into clinically approved nanomedicines has been limited. Reasons for this include the challenges of decorating pharmaceutical-grade nanoparticles with proteins by a process that is robust, scalable, and cost-effective. As an alternative to covalent bioconjugation between a protein and nanoparticle, we report that biologically active proteins may themselves mediate the formation of small multimers through steric stabilization by large protein polymers. Unlike multistep purification and bioconjugation, this approach is completed during biosynthesis. As proof-of-principle, the disintegrin protein called vicrostatin (VCN) was fused to an elastin-like polypeptide (A192). A significant fraction of fusion proteins self-assembled into multimers with a hydrodynamic radius of 15.9 nm. The A192-VCN fusion proteins compete specifically for cell-surface integrins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435. Confocal microscopy revealed that, unlike linear RGD-containing protein polymers, the disintegrin fusion protein undergoes rapid cellular internalization. To explore their potential clinical applications, fusion proteins were characterized using small animal positron emission tomography (microPET). Passive tumor accumulation was observed for control protein polymers; however, the tumor accumulation of A192-VCN was saturable, which is consistent with integrin-mediated binding. The fusion of a protein polymer and disintegrin results in a higher intratumoral contrast compared to free VCN or A192 alone. Given the diversity of disintegrin proteins with specificity for various cell-surface integrins, disintegrin fusions are a new source of biomaterials with potential diagnostic and

  2. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma: Correlation with Tumor Grading and Treatment-Related Changes

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Bruno Jim; Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Calandra, Calogera; Crivelli, Filippo; De Falco, Giulia; Gazaneo, Sara; Tripodi, Sergio; Cevenini, Gabriele; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. The androgen deprivation therapy is the standard treatment for advanced stages. Unfortunately, virtually all tumors become resistant to androgen withdrawal. The progression to castration-resistance is not fully understood, although a recent paper has suggested translationally controlled tumor protein to be implicated in the process. The present study was designed to investigate the role of this protein in prostate cancer, focusing on the correlation between its expression level with tumor differentiation and response to treatment. We retrieved 292 prostatic cancer specimens; of these 153 had been treated only by radical prostatectomy and 139 had undergone radical prostatectomy after neoadjuvant treatment with combined androgen blockade therapy. Non-neoplastic controls were represented by 102 prostatic peripheral zone specimens. In untreated patients, the expression of the protein, evaluated by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry, was significantly higher in tumor specimens than in non-neoplastic control, increasing as Gleason pattern and score progressed. In treated prostates, the staining was correlated with the response to treatment. An association between protein expression and the main clinicopathological factors involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness was identified. These findings suggest that the protein may be a promising prognostic factor and a target for therapy. PMID:25667934

  3. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces through STAT3 expression of immunosuppressive protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1).

    PubMed

    Marzec, Michal; Zhang, Qian; Goradia, Ami; Raghunath, Puthiyaveettil N; Liu, Xiaobin; Paessler, Michele; Wang, Hong Yi; Wysocka, Maria; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2008-12-30

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation caused by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin (NPM)/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) remain only partially understood, with most of the previous studies focusing mainly on the impact of NPM/ALK on cell survival and proliferation. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells strongly express the immunosuppressive cell-surface protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1), as determined on the mRNA and protein level. The CD274 expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as demonstrated by inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+TCL cells by the small molecule ALK inhibitor CEP-14083 and by documenting CD274 expression in IL-3-depleted BaF3 cells transfected with the wild-type NPM/ALK, but not the kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant or empty vector alone. NPM/ALK induces CD274 expression by activating its key signal transmitter, transcription factor STAT3. STAT3 binds to the CD274 gene promoter in vitro and in vivo, as shown in the gel electromobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and is required for the PD-L1 gene expression, as demonstrated by siRNA-mediated STAT3 depletion. These findings identify an additional cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK and describe a direct link between an oncoprotein and an immunosuppressive cell-surface protein. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+TCL. Finally, they suggest that future immunotherapeutic protocols for this type of lymphoma may need to include the inhibition of NPM/ALK and STAT3 to achieve optimal clinical efficacy.

  4. Targeting prion-like protein doppel selectively suppresses tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Choi, Jeong Uk; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Controlled and site-specific regulation of growth factor signaling remains a major challenge for current antiangiogenic therapies, as these antiangiogenic agents target normal vasculature as well tumor vasculature. In this article, we identified the prion-like protein doppel as a potential therapeutic target for tumor angiogenesis. We investigated the interactions between doppel and VEGFR2 and evaluated whether blocking the doppel/VEGFR2 axis suppresses the process of angiogenesis. We discovered that tumor endothelial cells (TECs), but not normal ECs, express doppel; tumors from patients and mouse xenografts expressed doppel in their vasculatures. Induced doppel overexpression in ECs enhanced vascularization, whereas doppel constitutively colocalized and complexed with VEGFR2 in TECs. Doppel inhibition depleted VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, subsequently inducing the internalization and degradation of VEGFR2 and thereby attenuating VEGFR2 signaling. We also synthesized an orally active glycosaminoglycan (LHbisD4) that specifically binds with doppel. We determined that LHbisD4 concentrates over the tumor site and that genetic loss of doppel in TECs decreases LHbisD4 binding and targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, LHbisD4 eliminated VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, prevented VEGF binding in TECs, and suppressed tumor growth. Together, our results demonstrate that blocking doppel can control VEGF signaling in TECs and selectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26950422

  5. Targeting prion-like protein doppel selectively suppresses tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Chung, Seung Woo; Choi, Jeong Uk; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Kim, In-San; Byun, Youngro

    2016-04-01

    Controlled and site-specific regulation of growth factor signaling remains a major challenge for current antiangiogenic therapies, as these antiangiogenic agents target normal vasculature as well tumor vasculature. In this article, we identified the prion-like protein doppel as a potential therapeutic target for tumor angiogenesis. We investigated the interactions between doppel and VEGFR2 and evaluated whether blocking the doppel/VEGFR2 axis suppresses the process of angiogenesis. We discovered that tumor endothelial cells (TECs), but not normal ECs, express doppel; tumors from patients and mouse xenografts expressed doppel in their vasculatures. Induced doppel overexpression in ECs enhanced vascularization, whereas doppel constitutively colocalized and complexed with VEGFR2 in TECs. Doppel inhibition depleted VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, subsequently inducing the internalization and degradation of VEGFR2 and thereby attenuating VEGFR2 signaling. We also synthesized an orally active glycosaminoglycan (LHbisD4) that specifically binds with doppel. We determined that LHbisD4 concentrates over the tumor site and that genetic loss of doppel in TECs decreases LHbisD4 binding and targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, LHbisD4 eliminated VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, prevented VEGF binding in TECs, and suppressed tumor growth. Together, our results demonstrate that blocking doppel can control VEGF signaling in TECs and selectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26950422

  6. Structure and biosynthesis of fumosorinone, a new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitor firstly isolated from the entomogenous fungus Isaria fumosorosea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linxia; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuan; Teng, Jitao; Wang, Chengshu; Luo, Duqiang

    2015-08-01

    Fumosorinone, isolated from the entomogenous fungus Isaria fumosorosea, is a new 2-pyridone alkaloid which is elucidated by HRESIMS 1D and 2DNMR. Fumosorinone is structurally similar to tenellin and desmethylbassianin but it differs in chain length and degree of methylation. It is characterized by a classic noncompetitive inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (IC50 14.04μM) which was implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. For further study, we identified the biosynthetic gene cluster of fumosorinone from ongoing genome sequencing project, and it was verified by a direct knock-out strategy, reported for the first time in I. fumosorosea, using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in conjunction with linear deletion cassettes. The biosynthetic gene cluster includes a hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene, two cytochrome P450 enzyme genes, a trans-enoyl reductase gene, and other two transcription regulatory genes. Comparison of fumosorinone biosynthetic cluster with known gene clusters gives further insight into biosynthesis of pyridone alkaloids and provides the foundation for combinatorial biosynthesis for new fumosorinone derivatives. PMID:25857260

  7. Short-term regulation of murine colonic NBCe1-B (electrogenic Na+/HCO3(-) cotransporter) membrane expression and activity by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    May, Oliver; Yu, Haoyang; Riederer, Brigitte; Manns, Michael P; Seidler, Ursula; Bachmann, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The colonic mucosa actively secretes HCO3(-), and several lines of evidence point to an important role of Na+/HCO3(-) cotransport (NBC) as a basolateral HCO3(-) import pathway. We could recently demonstrate that the predominant NBC isoform in murine colonic crypts is electrogenic NBCe1-B, and that secretagogues cause NBCe1 exocytosis, which likely represents a component of NBC activation. Since protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in the regulation of ion transport by trafficking events, we asked whether it is also involved in the observed NBC activity increase. Crypts were isolated from murine proximal colon to assess PKC activation as well as NBC function and membrane abundance using fluorometric pHi measurements and cell surface biotinylation, respectively. PKC isoform translocation and phosphorylation occurred in response to PMA-, as well as secretagogue stimulation. The conventional and novel PKC inhibitors Gö6976 or Gö6850 did not alter NBC function or surface expression by themselves, but stimulation with forskolin (10(-5) M) or carbachol (10(-4) M) in their presence led to a significant decrease in NBC-mediated proton flux, and biotinylated NBCe1. Our data thus indicate that secretagogues lead to PKC translocation and phosphorylation in murine colonic crypts, and that PKC is necessary for the increase in NBC transport rate and membrane abundance caused by cholinergic and cAMP-dependent stimuli.

  8. The Usher 1B protein, MYO7A, is required for normal localization and function of the visual retinoid cycle enzyme, RPE65.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanda S; Gibbs, Daniel; Libby, Richard T; Aleman, Tomas S; Welch, Darcy L; Lillo, Concepción; Jacobson, Samuel G; Radu, Roxana A; Steel, Karen P; Williams, David S

    2011-07-01

    Mutations in the MYO7A gene cause a deaf-blindness disorder, known as Usher syndrome 1B.  In the retina, the majority of MYO7A is in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), where many of the reactions of the visual retinoid cycle take place.  We have observed that the retinas of Myo7a-mutant mice are resistant to acute light damage. In exploring the basis of this resistance, we found that Myo7a-mutant mice have lower levels of RPE65, the RPE isomerase that has a key role in the retinoid cycle.  We show for the first time that RPE65 normally undergoes a light-dependent translocation to become more concentrated in the central region of the RPE cells.  This translocation requires MYO7A, so that, in Myo7a-mutant mice, RPE65 is partly mislocalized in the light.  RPE65 is degraded more quickly in Myo7a-mutant mice, perhaps due to its mislocalization, providing a plausible explanation for its lower levels.  Following a 50-60% photobleach, Myo7a-mutant retinas exhibited increased all-trans-retinyl ester levels during the initial stages of dark recovery, consistent with a deficiency in RPE65 activity.  Lastly, MYO7A and RPE65 were co-immunoprecipitated from RPE cell lysate by antibodies against either of the proteins, and the two proteins were partly colocalized, suggesting a direct or indirect interaction.  Together, the results support a role for MYO7A in the translocation of RPE65, illustrating the involvement of a molecular motor in the spatiotemporal organization of the retinoid cycle in vision. PMID:21493626

  9. Potent and tumor specific: arming bacteria with therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Van Dessel, Nele; Swofford, Charles A; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are perfect vessels for targeted cancer therapy. Conventional chemotherapy is limited by passive diffusion, and systemic administration causes severe side effects. Bacteria can overcome these obstacles by delivering therapeutic proteins specifically to tumors. Bacteria have been modified to produce proteins that directly kill cells, induce apoptosis via signaling pathways, and stimulate the immune system. These three modes of bacterial treatment have all been shown to reduce tumor growth in animal models. Bacteria have also been designed to convert nontoxic prodrugs to active therapeutic compounds. The ease of genetic manipulation enables creation of arrays of bacteria that release many new protein drugs. This versatility will allow targeting of multiple cancer pathways and will establish a platform for individualized cancer medicine. PMID:25853312

  10. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review).

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Kaveh M; Lindström, Mikael S

    2016-04-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research.

  11. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GOUDARZI, KAVEH M.; LINDSTRÖM, MIKAEL S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  12. Quorum-sensing Salmonella selectively trigger protein expression within tumors.

    PubMed

    Swofford, Charles A; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-03-17

    Salmonella that secrete anticancer proteins have the potential to eliminate tumors, but nonspecific expression causes damage to healthy tissue. We hypothesize that Salmonella, integrated with a density-dependent switch, would only express proteins in tightly packed colonies within tumors. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the lux quorum-sensing (QS) system and a GFP reporter into nonpathogenic Salmonella. Fluorescence and bacterial density were measured in culture and in a tumor-on-a-chip device to determine the critical density necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella were injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice to quantify GFP expression in vivo using immunofluorescence. At densities below 0.6 × 10(10) cfu/g in tumors, less than 3% of QS Salmonella expressed GFP. Above densities of 4.2 × 10(10) cfu/g, QS Salmonella had similar expression levels to constitutive controls. GFP expression by QS colonies was dependent upon the distance to neighboring bacteria. No colonies expressed GFP when the average distance to neighbors was greater than 155 µm. Calculations of autoinducer concentrations showed that expression was sigmoidally dependent on density and inversely dependent on average radial distance. Based on bacterial counts from excised tissue, the liver density (0.0079 × 10(10) cfu/g) was less than the critical density (0.11 × 10(10) cfu/g) necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella are a promising tool for cancer treatment that will target drugs to tumors while preventing damage to healthy tissue.

  13. Heat Shock Proteins: Conditional Mediators of Inflammation in Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.; Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP)-based anticancer vaccines have undergone successful preclinical testing and are now entering clinical trial. Questions still remain, however regarding the immunological properties of HSPs. It is now accepted that many of the HSPs participate in tumor immunity, at least in part by chaperoning tumor antigenic peptides, introducing them into antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC) that display the antigens on MHC class I molecules on the cell surface and stimulate cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL). However, in order for activated CD8+ T cells to function as effective CTL and kill tumor cells, additional signals must be induced to obtain a sturdy CTL response. These include the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on the DC surface and inflammatory events that can induce immunogenic cytokine cascades. That such events occur is indicated by the ability of Hsp70 vaccines to induce antitumor immunity and overcome tolerance to tumor antigens such as mucin1. Secondary activation of CTL can be induced by inflammatory signaling through Toll-like receptors and/or by interaction of antigen-activated T helper cells with the APC. We will discuss the role of the inflammatory properties of HSPs in tumor immunity and the potential role of HSPs in activating T helper cells and DC licensing. PMID:22566956

  14. Syntaxin 7 complexes with mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b, syntaxin 6, vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, and VAMP7 in b16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, N; Bryant, N J; Connolly, L M; Simpson, R J; Luzio, J P; Piper, R C; James, D E

    2001-06-01

    Syntaxin 7 is a mammalian target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) involved in membrane transport between late endosomes and lysosomes. The aim of the present study was to use immunoaffinity techniques to identify proteins that interact with Syntaxin 7. We reasoned that this would be facilitated by the use of cells producing high levels of Syntaxin 7. Screening of a large number of tissues and cell lines revealed that Syntaxin 7 is expressed at very high levels in B16 melanoma cells. Moreover, the expression of Syntaxin 7 increased in these cells as they underwent melanogenesis. From a large scale Syntaxin 7 immunoprecipitation, we have identified six polypeptides using a combination of electrospray mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. These polypeptides corresponded to Syntaxin 7, Syntaxin 6, mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b (mVti1b), alpha-synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, VAMP7, and the protein phosphatase 1M regulatory subunit. We also observed partial colocalization between Syntaxin 6 and Syntaxin 7, between Syntaxin 6 and mVti1b, but not between Syntaxin 6 and the early endosomal t-SNARE Syntaxin 13. Based on these and data reported previously, we propose that Syntaxin 7/mVti1b/Syntaxin 6 may form discrete SNARE complexes with either VAMP7 or VAMP8 to regulate fusion events within the late endosomal pathway and that these events may play a critical role in melanogenesis.

  15. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  16. Triton 2 (1B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Michelle L.; Meiss, A. G.; Neher, Jason R.; Rudolph, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a detailed design analysis on a conceptually designed preliminary flight trainer. The Triton 2 (1B) must meet the current regulations in FAR Part 23. The detailed design process included the tasks of sizing load carrying members, pulleys, bolts, rivets, and fuselage skin for the safety cage, empennage, and control systems. In addition to the regulations in FAR Part 23, the detail design had to meet established minimums for environmental operating conditions and material corrosion resistance.

  17. Heterogeneity mapping of protein expression in tumors using quantitative immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Faratian, Dana; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Jones, Christine; Scott, Christopher; Um, InHwa; Harrison, David J

    2011-10-25

    Morphologic heterogeneity within an individual tumor is well-recognized by histopathologists in surgical practice. While this often takes the form of areas of distinct differentiation into recognized histological subtypes, or different pathological grade, often there are more subtle differences in phenotype which defy accurate classification (Figure 1). Ultimately, since morphology is dictated by the underlying molecular phenotype, areas with visible differences are likely to be accompanied by differences in the expression of proteins which orchestrate cellular function and behavior, and therefore, appearance. The significance of visible and invisible (molecular) heterogeneity for prognosis is unknown, but recent evidence suggests that, at least at the genetic level, heterogeneity exists in the primary tumor(1,2), and some of these sub-clones give rise to metastatic (and therefore lethal) disease. Moreover, some proteins are measured as biomarkers because they are the targets of therapy (for instance ER and HER2 for tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin), respectively). If these proteins show variable expression within a tumor then therapeutic responses may also be variable. The widely used histopathologic scoring schemes for immunohistochemistry either ignore, or numerically homogenize the quantification of protein expression. Similarly, in destructive techniques, where the tumor samples are homogenized (such as gene expression profiling), quantitative information can be elucidated, but spatial information is lost. Genetic heterogeneity mapping approaches in pancreatic cancer have relied either on generation of a single cell suspension(3), or on macrodissection(4). A recent study has used quantum dots in order to map morphologic and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer tissue(5), providing proof of principle that morphology and molecular mapping is feasible, but falling short of quantifying the heterogeneity. Since immunohistochemistry is, at best, only semi

  18. Detection of tumor markers with ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    The early diagnosis of cancer at a curable stage is crucial for the successful treatment of this disease. Most of the currently used tumor assays appear too late and rely on single biomarkers with high false-negative and/or false-positive rates. As an additional burden for the patient, the traditional assays often require biopsy material instead of less invasively taken samples like serum. With the hope for more reliable DNA- and RNA-based screening tools, the research activities of the past 20 years have focused on the genomic characteristics of cancer cells. But, up to now, the output from this strategy has been disappointingly low and the disillusionment is paired with a return to proteins as the real key players in all physiological and pathological processes. Meanwhile, comparative protein profiling is generally acknowledged as a promising way for the detection of specific and predictive protein patterns reflecting certain stages of cancer without dependency on single markers. To meet the new technological demands, the ProteinChip Biomarker System was developed for the Expression Difference Mapping analysis of several hundreds of samples per day on a single, uncomplicated platform; with software support for the construction of multi-marker predictive models. The Interaction Discovery Mapping platform is introduced as the next methodical step for investigations about protein binding partners of possible importance in diagnosis and therapy. This review summarizes the current state in cancer diagnosis, provides an introduction into the ProteinChip technology, and gives an update on publications and research collaborations in SELDI-based tumor marker discovery.

  19. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  20. Construction of HEK293 cells stably expressing wild-type organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1*1a) and variant OATP1B1*1b and OATP1B1*15.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Qu, B X; Chen, X L; Hu, H H; Jiang, H D; Yu, L S; Zhou, Q; Zeng, S

    2016-06-01

    A transgenic cell line stably expressing the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B1) was established. Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cell line stably expressing OATP1B1*1a sequence was amplified through PCR with the extracted total RNA as templates from human liver, then subcloned into the plasmid pMD19-T and verified by sequencing. OATP1B1*1b/OATP1B1*15 mutant sequences were obtained by site-directed mutation PCR with pMD19-T/ OATP1B1*1a as templates. The plasmids pcDNA3.1(+)/OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 were constructed and transfected into HEK293 cell line using Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. Several stable transfected clones were obtained after selection with G418. Using rosuvastatin as a probe substrate of OATP1B1, the intracellular rosuvastatin accumulation in HEK293 and HEK-OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 monoclone cells were validated by a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OATP1B1 mRNA and protein expression were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results from RT-PCR, rosuvastatin uptake and Western blot assay indicated that human OATP1B1 was highly expressed in transfected cells compared with controls. The HEK-293 cell lines stably expressing human OATP1B1-wild and variant (HEK-OATP1B1, *1b and *15) are potential models to study drug transport in vitro. PMID:27455553

  1. Construction of HEK293 cells stably expressing wild-type organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1*1a) and variant OATP1B1*1b and OATP1B1*15.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Qu, B X; Chen, X L; Hu, H H; Jiang, H D; Yu, L S; Zhou, Q; Zeng, S

    2016-06-01

    A transgenic cell line stably expressing the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B1) was established. Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cell line stably expressing OATP1B1*1a sequence was amplified through PCR with the extracted total RNA as templates from human liver, then subcloned into the plasmid pMD19-T and verified by sequencing. OATP1B1*1b/OATP1B1*15 mutant sequences were obtained by site-directed mutation PCR with pMD19-T/ OATP1B1*1a as templates. The plasmids pcDNA3.1(+)/OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 were constructed and transfected into HEK293 cell line using Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. Several stable transfected clones were obtained after selection with G418. Using rosuvastatin as a probe substrate of OATP1B1, the intracellular rosuvastatin accumulation in HEK293 and HEK-OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 monoclone cells were validated by a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OATP1B1 mRNA and protein expression were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results from RT-PCR, rosuvastatin uptake and Western blot assay indicated that human OATP1B1 was highly expressed in transfected cells compared with controls. The HEK-293 cell lines stably expressing human OATP1B1-wild and variant (HEK-OATP1B1, *1b and *15) are potential models to study drug transport in vitro.

  2. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  3. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  4. Proteasomal degradation of human CYP1B1: effect of the Asn453Ser polymorphism on the post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 expression.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Silvio; Weidlich, Simone; Harth, Volker; Broede, Peter; Ko, Yun; Friedberg, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Allelic variations in CYP1B1 are reported to modulate the incidence of several types of cancer. To provide a mechanistic basis for this association, we investigated the impact of nonsilent allelic changes on the intracellular levels and post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 protein. When transiently expressed in COS-1 cells, either in the presence or absence of recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, the cellular level of the CYP1B1.4 allelic variant (containing a Ser at the amino acid position 453; Ser453) was 2-fold lower compared with the other four allelic CYP1B1 proteins (containing Asn453), as analyzed by both immunoblotting and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity. This difference was caused by post-translational regulation; as in the presence of cycloheximide, the rate of degradation of immunodetectable and enzymatically active CYP1B1.4 was distinctly faster than that of CYP1B1.1. Pulse-chase analysis revealed that the half-life of CYP1B1.4 was a mere 1.6 h compared with 4.8 h for CYP1B1.1. The presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 [N-benzoyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Leu-Leuleucinal] increased the stability not only of immunodetectable CYP1B1, but also--unexpectedly given the size of the proteasome access channel--increased the stability of enzymatically active CYP1B1. The data presented herein also demonstrate that CYP1B1 is targeted for its polymorphism-dependent degradation by polyubiquitination but not phosphorylation. Our results importantly provide a mechanism to explain the recently reported lower incidence of endometrial cancer in individuals carrying the CYP1B1*4 compared with the CYP1B1*1 haplo-type. In addition, the mechanistic paradigms revealed herein may explain the strong overexpression of CYP1B1 in tumors compared with nondiseased tissues. PMID:15486049

  5. High Brain Ammonia Tolerance and Down-Regulation of Na+:K+:2Cl- Cotransporter 1b mRNA and Protein Expression in the Brain of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus, Exposed to Environmental Ammonia or Terrestrial Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Yuen K.; Hou, Zhisheng; Chen, Xiu L.; Ong, Jasmine L. Y.; Chng, You R.; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C.; Chew, Shit F.

    2013-01-01

    Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) has been implicated in mediating ischemia-, trauma- or ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling/brain edema in mammals. This study aimed to determine the effects of ammonia or terrestrial exposure on ammonia concentrations in the plasma and brain, and the mRNA expression and protein abundance of nkcc/Nkcc in the brain, of the swamp eel Monopterusalbus. Ammonia exposure led to a greater increase in the ammonia concentration in the brain of M. albus than terrestrial exposure. The brain ammonia concentration of M. albus reached 4.5 µmol g-1 and 2.7 µmol g-1 after 6 days of exposure to 50 mmol l-1 NH4Cl and terrestrial conditions, respectively. The full cDNA coding sequence of nkcc1b from M. albus brain comprised 3276 bp and coded for 1092 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 119.6 kDa. A molecular characterization indicated that it could be activated through phosphorylation and/or glycosylation by osmotic and/or oxidative stresses. Ammonia exposure for 1 day or 6 days led to significant decreases in the nkcc1b mRNA expression and Nkcc1b protein abundance in the brain of M. albus. In comparison, a significant decrease in nkcc1b mRNA expression was observed in the brain of M. albus only after 6 days of terrestrial exposure, but both 1 day and 6 days of terrestrial exposure resulted in significant decreases in the protein abundance of Nkcc1b. These results are novel because it has been established in mammals that ammonia up-regulates NKCC1 expression in astrocytes and NKCC1 plays an important role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling and brain edema. By contrast, our results indicate for the first time that M. albus is able to down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of nkcc1b/Nkcc1b in the brain when confronted with ammonia toxicity, which could be one of the contributing factors to its extraordinarily high brain ammonia tolerance. PMID:24069137

  6. Antagonists of IAP proteins: novel anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yichao; Liu, Tingting; Hou, Xuben; Dun, Yanyan; Guan, Peng; Fang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is an important reason for tumor cells to resist the anticancer drugs in cancer therapy. As a critical regulator, the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) can block the apoptosis by inhibiting the activities of caspases. Scientists find that IAPs are over-expressed in many cancer cells, such as leukemia and B-cell lymphoma, which elucidate that high levels of IAPs are closely related to tumorigenesis and cancer development. Thus, targeting IAPs may be an attractive strategy for anti-tumor treatment. As an endogenous antagonist of IAPs, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) can suppress their activities through directly binding to IAPs. Based on structural biology study, Smac interacts with IAPs through the Ala-Val-Pro-Ile (AVPI) tetra-peptide of Smac. Therefore, many agents have been studied to suppress the IAPs which result in the activation of caspases and subsequently induce the apoptosis of tumor cells based on mimicking AVPI peptide strategy. In this review, the functions of IAPs in apoptosis and the recent advance of IAPs antagonists will be discussed.

  7. Gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P E; Pettinato, G; Lillemoe, T J; Wick, M R

    1991-02-01

    Gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15) is a 15-kd glycoprotein that is expressed by normal apocrine epithelia and in a majority of breast carcinomas. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this substance is also present in tumors of the salivary glands, sweat glands, and prostate gland. To determine whether the expression of CGDFP-15 might aid in the differential diagnosis of salivary gland lesions, the anti-GCDFP-15 monoclonal antibody D6 was applied to paraffin sections of 133 such neoplasms. Benign tumors (76% reactive) were more often labeled than malignant lesions (28% reactive) by this antibody; overall, 53 (41%) of 133 cases were positive for GCDFP-15. Notably, the tubuloglandular components in 17 (81%) of 21 pleomorphic adenomas were reactive, but no example of either adenoid cystic carcinoma or polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma were labeled. In contrast, 24% of adenocarcinomas stained with this antibody. The apparent expression of GCDFP-15 by a spectrum of salivary gland tumors supports their biologic relationship to lesions of the cutaneous apocrine glands and breast. Furthermore, the demonstration of this determinant may be of use in suggesting the salivary gland nature of poorly differentiated carcinomas of the head and neck, and it may facilitate the separation of pleomorphic adenoma from histologically similar malignant neoplasms in the salivary glands themselves.

  8. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: from plant defense to tumor attack.

    PubMed

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-11-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  9. CYP1B1 Enhances Cell Proliferation and Metastasis through Induction of EMT and Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via Sp1 Upregulation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yeo-Jung; Baek, Hyoung-Seok; Ye, Dong-Jin; Shin, Sangyun; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is a major E2 hydroxylase involved in the metabolism of potential carcinogens. CYP1B1 expression has been reported to be higher in tumors compared to normal tissues, especially in hormone-related cancers including breast, ovary, and prostate tumors. To explore the role of CYP1B1 in cancer progression, we investigated the action of CYP1B1 in cells with increased CYP1B1 via the inducer 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA) or an overexpression vector, in addition to decreased CYP1B1 via the inhibitor tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) or siRNA knockdown. We observed that CYP1B1 promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. To understand its molecular mechanism, we measured key oncogenic proteins including β-catenin, c-Myc, ZEB2, and matrix metalloproteinases following CYP1B1 modulation. CYP1B1 induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling via upregulation of CTNNB1, ZEB2, SNAI1, and TWIST1. Sp1, a transcription factor involved in cell growth and metastasis, was positively regulated by CYP1B1, and suppression of Sp1 expression by siRNA or DNA binding activity using mithramycin A blocked oncogenic transformation by CYP1B1. Therefore, we suggest that Sp1 acts as a key mediator for CYP1B1 action. Treatment with 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), a major metabolite generated by CYP1B1, showed similar effects as CYP1B1 overexpression, indicating that CYP1B1 activity mediated various oncogenic events in cells. In conclusion, our data suggests that CYP1B1 promotes cell proliferation and metastasis by inducing EMT and Wnt/β-catenin signaling via Sp1 induction. PMID:26981862

  10. CYP1B1 Enhances Cell Proliferation and Metastasis through Induction of EMT and Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling via Sp1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yeo-Jung; Baek, Hyoung-Seok; Ye, Dong-Jin; Shin, Sangyun; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is a major E2 hydroxylase involved in the metabolism of potential carcinogens. CYP1B1 expression has been reported to be higher in tumors compared to normal tissues, especially in hormone-related cancers including breast, ovary, and prostate tumors. To explore the role of CYP1B1 in cancer progression, we investigated the action of CYP1B1 in cells with increased CYP1B1 via the inducer 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA) or an overexpression vector, in addition to decreased CYP1B1 via the inhibitor tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) or siRNA knockdown. We observed that CYP1B1 promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. To understand its molecular mechanism, we measured key oncogenic proteins including β-catenin, c-Myc, ZEB2, and matrix metalloproteinases following CYP1B1 modulation. CYP1B1 induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling via upregulation of CTNNB1, ZEB2, SNAI1, and TWIST1. Sp1, a transcription factor involved in cell growth and metastasis, was positively regulated by CYP1B1, and suppression of Sp1 expression by siRNA or DNA binding activity using mithramycin A blocked oncogenic transformation by CYP1B1. Therefore, we suggest that Sp1 acts as a key mediator for CYP1B1 action. Treatment with 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), a major metabolite generated by CYP1B1, showed similar effects as CYP1B1 overexpression, indicating that CYP1B1 activity mediated various oncogenic events in cells. In conclusion, our data suggests that CYP1B1 promotes cell proliferation and metastasis by inducing EMT and Wnt/β-catenin signaling via Sp1 induction. PMID:26981862

  11. Quantitative protein profiling of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis biomarkers in mouse and human models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumor and stromal cells secrete a variety of proteins acting as extracellular signals and creating a supportive microenvironment for tumor development, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We used the Luminex immunoassay platform (including MILLIPLEX® MAP cytokine/chemokine, bone metabolism, adipocyte, M...

  12. Activation of RNA polymerase III transcription of human Alu repetitive elements by adenovirus type 5: requirement for the E1b 58-kilodalton protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6.

    PubMed Central

    Panning, B; Smiley, J R

    1993-01-01

    We found that transcription of endogenous human Alu elements by RNA polymerase III was strongly stimulated following infection of HeLa cells with adenovirus type 5, leading to the accumulation of high levels of Alu transcripts initiated from Alu polymerase III promoters. In contrast to previously reported cases of adenovirus-induced activation of polymerase III transcription, induction required the E1b 58-kDa protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6 in addition to the 289-residue E1a protein. In addition, E1a function was not required at high multiplicities of infection, suggesting that E1a plays an indirect role in Alu activation. These results suggest previously unsuspected regulatory properties of the adenovirus E1b and E4 gene products and provide a novel approach to the study of the biology of the most abundant class of dispersed repetitive DNA in the human genome. Images PMID:7684492

  13. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  14. Oocytes in sheep homozygous for a mutation in bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B express lower mRNA levels of bone morphogenetic protein 15 but not growth differentiation factor 9.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Janet L; Heath, Derek A; Reader, Karen L; Quirke, Laurel D; Hudson, Norma L; Juengel, Jennifer L; McNatty, Kenneth P

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the high ovulation rate in ewes (BB) homozygous for a mutation in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B (BMPR1B) gene is linked to lower BMP15 and/or GDF9 mRNA in oocytes compared with those in wild-type (++) ewes. Cumulus cell-oocyte complexes (COC) and granulosa cells (GC) were recovered from ≥1 mm diameter follicles of BB and ++ ewes during a prostaglandin-induced follicular phase. Expression levels of GDF9 and BMP15 were measured by multiplex qPCR from individual COC. The gonadotropin-induced cAMP responses of the GC from each non-atretic follicle were measured following treatment with FSH or human chorionic gonadotropin. In a separate validation experiment, GDF9 and BMP15 expression was present only in oocytes and not in cumulus cells. There was no effect of follicular diameter on oocyte-derived GDF9 or BMP15 mRNA levels. The mean expression levels of BMP15, but not GDF9, were significantly lower in all non-atretic follicles, including the subsets containing either FSH- or LH-responsive GC in BB, compared with ++, ewes. No genotype effects were noted for FSH-induced cAMP production by GC either with respect to dose of, or number of follicles responding to, FSH. However, ovaries from BB ewes contained significantly more follicles responsive to LH, with respect to cAMP production in GC. We propose that these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the higher ovulation rate in BB sheep is due, at least in part, to lower oocyte-derived BMP15 mRNA levels together with the earlier onset of LH-responsiveness in GC.

  15. Targeting mutant p53 protein and the tumor vasculature: an effective combination therapy for advanced breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Benakanakere, Indira; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer progression depends upon the elaboration of a vasculature sufficient for the nourishment of the developing tumor. Breast tumor cells frequently contain a mutant form of p53 (mtp53), a protein which promotes their survival. The aim of this study was to determine whether combination therapy targeting mtp53 and anionic phospholipids (AP) on tumor blood vessels might be an effective therapeutic strategy for suppressing advanced breast cancer. We examined the therapeutic effects, singly, or in combination, of p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis (PRIMA-1), which reactivates mtp53 and induces tumor cell apoptosis, and 2aG4, a monoclonal antibody that disrupts tumor vasculature by targeting AP on the surface of tumor endothelial cells and causes antibody-dependent destruction of tumor blood vessels, leading to ischemia and tumor cell death. Xenografts from two tumor cell lines containing mtp53, BT-474 and HCC-1428, were grown in nude mice to provide models of advanced breast tumors. After treatment with PRIMA-1 and/or 2aG4, regressing tumors were analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, blood vessel loss, and apoptotic markers. Individual drug treatment led to partial suppression of breast cancer progression. In contrast, combined treatment with PRIMA-1 and 2aG4 was extremely effective in suppressing tumor growth in both models and completely eradicated approximately 30% of tumors in the BT-474 model. Importantly, no toxic effects were observed in any treatment group. Mechanistic studies determined that PRIMA-1 reactivated mtp53 and also exposed AP on the surface of tumor cells as determined by enhanced 2aG4 binding. Combination treatment led to significant induction of tumor cell apoptosis, loss of VEGF expression, as well as destruction of tumor blood vessels. Furthermore, combination treatment severely disrupted tumor blood vessel perfusion in both tumor models. The observed in vitro PRIMA-1-induced exposure of

  16. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zervos, Thomas M.; Hernandez, Jean N.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Branch, Oralee H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections. PMID:22339946

  17. Pathology of a mouse mutation in peripheral myelin protein P0 is characteristic of a severe and early onset form of human Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1B disorder.

    PubMed

    Rünker, Annette E; Kobsar, Igor; Fink, Torsten; Loers, Gabriele; Tilling, Thomas; Putthoff, Peggy; Wessig, Carsten; Martini, Rudolf; Schachner, Melitta

    2004-05-24

    Mutations in the gene of the peripheral myelin protein zero (P0) give rise to the peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1B disease (CMT1B), Déjérine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. To investigate the pathomechanisms of a specific point mutation in the P0 gene, we generated two independent transgenic mouse lines expressing the pathogenic CMT1B missense mutation Ile106Leu (P0sub) under the control of the P0 promoter on a wild-type background. Both P0sub-transgenic mouse lines showed shivering and ultrastructural abnormalities including retarded myelination, onion bulb formation, and dysmyelination seen as aberrantly folded myelin sheaths and tomacula in all nerve fibers. Functionally, the mutation leads to dispersed compound muscle action potentials and severely reduced conduction velocities. Our observations support the view that the Ile106Leu mutation acts by a dominant-negative gain of function and that the P0sub-transgenic mouse represents an animal model for a severe, tomaculous form of CMT1B. PMID:15148307

  18. AtRAB-H1b and AtRAB-H1c GTPases, homologues of the yeast Ypt6, target reporter proteins to the Golgi when expressed in Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jorunn Nergaard; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Moore, Ian; Hawes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Ypt/Rab GTPases act as key regulators of intracellular traffic through the conformational differences exhibited by their GTP or GDP-bound forms. In this paper, two Arabidopsis Ypt6 homologues, AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) were characterized and compared. Using a live cell imaging approach, it is shown that yellow fluorescent protein-fusions (YFP) of AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) locate to the Golgi and to the cytosol in both Nicotiana tabacum and in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) targets an as yet unknown compartment not labelled by YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) or Golgi markers. It is also shown that the subcellular location of YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) and YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) is affected by the state of GTP-binding and that expression of a GTP-deficient mutant results in increased apoplastic fluorescence of a secretory form of YFP.

  19. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions.

    PubMed

    Zervos, Thomas M; Hernandez, Jean N; Sutton, Patrick L; Branch, Oralee H

    2012-05-01

    The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections.

  20. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo; Hijikata, Makoto; Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi; Wakita, Takaji; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  1. Tumor Protein (TP)-p53 Members as Regulators of Autophagy in Tumor Cells upon Marine Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ratovitski, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting autophagic pathways might play a critical role in designing novel chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of human cancers, and the prevention of tumor-derived chemoresistance. Marine compounds were found to decrease tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Some of them were shown to induce autophagic flux in tumor cells. In this study, we observed that the selected marine life-derived compounds (Chromomycin A2, Psammaplin A, and Ilimaquinone) induce expression of several autophagic signaling intermediates in human squamous cell carcinoma, glioblastoma, and colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro through a transcriptional regulation by tumor protein (TP)-p53 family members. These conclusions were supported by specific qPCR expression analysis, luciferase reporter promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation of promoter sequences bound to the TP53 family proteins, and silencing of the TP53 members in tumor cells. PMID:27537898

  2. Increased hippocampal expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) mRNA variants 1B and +IRE and DMT1 protein after NMDA-receptor stimulation or spatial memory training.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Paola; Alvarez, Alvaro; Leal, Nancy; Adasme, Tatiana; Núñez, Marco Tulio; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2010-04-01

    Iron is essential for crucial neuronal functions but is also highly toxic in excess. Neurons acquire iron through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and via the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). The N-terminus (1A, 1B) and C-terminus (+IRE, -IRE) splice variants of DMT1 originate four protein isoforms, all of which supply iron to cells. Diverse physiological or pathological conditions induce differential DMT1 variant expression, which are cell-type dependent. Hence, it becomes relevant to ascertain if activation of neuronal plasticity processes that require functional N-methyl D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptors, including in vitro stimulation of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling and spatial memory training, selectively modify DMT1 variant expression. Here, we report for the first time that brief (5 min) exposure of primary hippocampal cultures to NMDA (50 muM) increased 24 h later the expression of DMT1-1B and DMT1+IRE, but not of DMT1-IRE mRNA. In contrast, endogenous DMT1 mRNA levels remained unaffected following 6 h incubation with brain-derived nerve factor. NMDA (25-50 muM) also enhanced DMT1 protein expression 24-48 h later; this enhancement was abolished by the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D and by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, implicating NMDA receptors in de novo DMT1 expression. Additionally, spatial memory training enhanced DMT1-1B and DMT1+IRE expression and increased DMT1 protein content in rat hippocampus, where the exon1A variant was not found. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity processes stimulate expression of the iron transporter DMT1-1B+IRE isoform, which presumably plays a significant role in hippocampal spatial memory formation. PMID:19655216

  3. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:22483848

  4. A nuclear-localized histone-gene binding protein from rice (OsHBP1b) functions in salinity and drought stress tolerance by maintaining chlorophyll content and improving the antioxidant machinery.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Nita; Nutan, Kamlesh K; Das, Priyanka; Anwar, Khalid; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2015-03-15

    Plants have evolved a number of molecular strategies and regulatory mechanisms to cope with abiotic stresses. Among the various key factors/regulators, transcription factors (TFs) play critical role(s) towards regulating the gene expression patterns in response to stress conditions. Altering the expression of the key TFs can greatly influence plant stress tolerance. OsHBP1b (accession no. KM096571) is one such TF belonging to bZIP family, localized within the Saltol QTL, whose expression is induced upon salinity treatment in the rice seedlings. qRT-PCR based expression studies for OsHBP1b in seedlings of contrasting genotypes of rice showed its differential regulation in response to salinity stress. A GFP based in vivo study showed that the OsHBP1b protein is nuclear localized and possesses the trans-activation activity. As compared to the WT tobacco plants, the transgenic plants ectopically expressing OsHBP1b showed better survival and favourable osmotic parameters (such as germination and survival rate, membrane stability, K(+)/Na(+) ratio, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage and proline contents) under salinity and drought stress. Under salinity conditions, the transgenic plants accumulated lower levels of reactive oxygen species as compared to the WT. It was also accompanied by higher activities of antioxidant enzymes (such as ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase), thereby demonstrating that transgenic plants are physiologically better adapted towards the oxidative damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that OsHBP1b contributes to abiotic stress tolerance through multiple physiological pathways and thus, may serve as a useful 'candidate gene' for improving multiple stress tolerance in crop plants.

  5. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) susceptible to rimantadine

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Lisa M.; Pacyniak, Erik; Miller, Jean-Marie; Hill, M. Sarah; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-05-10

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIV{sub M2}) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIV{sub VpuA19H} replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. This SHIV{sub VpuA19H} virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIV{sub M2}. Electron microscopic examination of SHIV{sub VpuA19H}-infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the

  6. The chimeric genes AML1/DS1 and AML1/EAP inhibit AML1B activation at the CSF1R promoter, but only AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoter properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zent, C.S.; Matheiu, C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-02-06

    The (3;21)(q26;q22) translocation associated with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome, treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, and blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia results in the expression of the chimeric genes AML1/EAP, AML1MDS1, and AML1/EVI1. AML1 (CBFA2), which codes for the {alpha} subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor CBF, is also involved in the t(8;21), and the gene coding for the {beta} subunit (CBFB) is involved in the inv(16). These are two of the most common recurring chromosomal rearrangements in acute myeloid leukemia. CBF corresponds to the murine Pebp2 factor, and CBF binding sites are found in a number of eukaryotic and viral enhancers and promoters. We studied the effects of AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 at the AML1 binding site of the CSF1R (macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor gene) promoter by using reporter gene assays, and we analyzed the consequences of the expression of both chimeric proteins in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line (Rat1A) in culture and after injection into athymic nude mice. Unlike AML1, which is an activator of the CSF1R promoter, the chimeric proteins did not transactivate the CSF1R promoter site but acted as inhibitors of AMLI (CBFA2). AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 expressed in adherent Rat1A cells decreased contact inhibition of growth, and expression of AML1/MDS1 was associated with acquisition of the ability to grow in suspension culture. Expression of AML1/MDS1 increased the tumorigenicity of Rat1A cells injected into athymic nude mice, whereas AML1/EAP expression provented tumor growth. These results suggest that expression of AML1/MDS1 can interfere with normal AML1 function, and that AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoting properties in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  8. Induction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages incubated with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, A; Shrivastava, A; Kumar, R

    1995-03-01

    The cellular and molecular interaction between monocyte/macrophage and tumor cells leading to macrophage activation is not clearly understood. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event, we checked whether the tumor cells alter tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in macrophages. We found that both L929 and Yac-1 tumor cells induced increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several polypeptides in peritoneal as well as P388D-1 and IC-21 macrophages. Macrophages co-cultured with tumor cells also showed increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These observations suggest that increased tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in tumor cell-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539664

  9. The Listeria monocytogenes Fur-regulated virulence protein FrvA is an Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hualiang; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes FrvA (Lmo0641) is critical for virulence in the mouse model and is an ortholog of the Bacillus subtilis Fur- and PerR-regulated Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase PfeT. Previously, FrvA was suggested to protect against heme toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that an frvA mutant is sensitive to iron intoxication, but not to other metals. Expression of frvA is induced by high iron and this induction requires Fur. FrvA functions in vitro as a divalent cation specific ATPase most strongly activated by ferrous iron. When expressed in B. subtilis, FrvA increases resistance to iron both in wild-type and in a pfeT null strain. FrvA is a high affinity Fe(II) exporter and its induction imposes severe iron limitation in B. subtilis resulting in derepression of both Fur- and PerR-regulated genes. FrvA also recognizes Co(II) and Zn(II) as substrates and can complement B. subtilis strains defective in the endogenous export systems for these cations. Building on these results, we conclude that FrvA functions in the efflux of Fe(II), and not heme during listerial infection.

  10. The Listeria monocytogenes Fur-regulated virulence protein FrvA is an Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hualiang; Patel, Sarju J; Argüello, José M; Helmann, John D

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes FrvA (Lmo0641) is critical for virulence in the mouse model and is an ortholog of the Bacillus subtilis Fur- and PerR-regulated Fe(II) efflux P1B4 -type ATPase PfeT. Previously, FrvA was suggested to protect against heme toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that an frvA mutant is sensitive to iron intoxication, but not to other metals. Expression of frvA is induced by high iron and this induction requires Fur. FrvA functions in vitro as a divalent cation specific ATPase most strongly activated by ferrous iron. When expressed in B. subtilis, FrvA increases resistance to iron both in wild-type and in a pfeT null strain. FrvA is a high affinity Fe(II) exporter and its induction imposes severe iron limitation in B. subtilis resulting in derepression of both Fur- and PerR-regulated genes. FrvA also recognizes Co(II) and Zn(II) as substrates and can complement B. subtilis strains defective in the endogenous export systems for these cations. Building on these results, we conclude that FrvA functions in the efflux of Fe(II), and not heme during listerial infection. PMID:26946370

  11. Simulation of the Protein-Shedding Kinetics of a Fully Vascularized Tumor.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Hermann B; Curtis, Louis T; Wu, Min; Kani, Kian; Mallick, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers are of significant interest for cancer detection and treatment personalization. However, the biophysical processes that determine how proteins are shed from cancer cells or their microenvironment, diffuse through tissue, enter blood vasculature, and persist in circulation remain poorly understood. Since approaches primarily focused on experimental evaluation are incapable of measuring the shedding and persistence for every possible marker candidate, we propose an interdisciplinary computational/experimental approach that includes computational modeling of tumor tissue heterogeneity. The model implements protein production, transport, and shedding based on tumor vascularization, cell proliferation, hypoxia, and necrosis, thus quantitatively relating the tumor and circulating proteomes. The results highlight the dynamics of shedding as a function of protein diffusivity and production. Linking the simulated tumor parameters to clinical tumor and vascularization measurements could potentially enable this approach to reveal the tumor-specific conditions based on the protein detected in circulation and thus help to more accurately manage cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26715830

  12. Inducible 70 kDa Heat Shock Proteins Protect Embryos from Teratogen-Induced Exencephaly: Analysis using Hspa1a/a1b Knockout Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: It is well known that a variety of teratogens induce neural tube defects in animals; however, less is known about proteins that play a role in protecting embryos from teratogen-induced neural tube defects. Previously, our lab has shown that embryos over-expressing th...

  13. Analysis of transcriptional activities of the Meq proteins present in highly virulent Marek's disease virus strains, RB1B and Md5.

    PubMed

    Murata, Shiro; Okada, Tsukasa; Kano, Rika; Hayashi, Yuko; Hashiguchi, Tomoyuki; Onuma, Misao; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus that causes malignant lymphomas in chickens. Recent field isolates of MDV have tended to exhibit increasing virulence, and MDV strains are currently classified into four categories based on their relative virulence. Meq, a putative MDV oncoprotein, resembles the Jun/Fos family of basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors and can regulate the expression of viral and cellular genes as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with a variety of bZIP family proteins. MDV isolates display distinct diversity and point mutations in Meq, which may contribute to changes in the transcriptional activities of Meq and subsequently, to observed increases in MDV oncogenicity. In this study, we introduced mutations into the meq gene and used dual luciferase reporter assays to analyze the transcriptional activities of the resulting Meq proteins to determine whether distinct mutations in Meq could be responsible for differences in transcriptional activity among MDV strains. A proline-to-alanine substitution at position 217, the second position of one of the proline direct repeats in the transactivation domain, enhanced the transactivation activity of Meq. In addition, we found that two substitutions at positions 283 and 320 affected transactivation activity. These results suggest that the distinct diversity of and point mutations in the Meq proteins are responsible for differences in transactivation activity among MDV strains.

  14. Roles of F-box proteins in human digestive system tumors (Review).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Lv, Liang; Huo, Jirong

    2014-12-01

    F-box proteins (FBPs), the substrate-recognition subunit of E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase, are the important components of Ub proteasome system (UPS). FBPs are involved in multiple cellular processes through ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of their target proteins. Many studies have described the roles of FBPs in human cancers. Digestive system tumors account for a large proportion of all the tumors, and their mortality is very high. This review summarizes for the first time the roles of FBPs in digestive system tumorige-nesis and tumor progression, aiming at finding new routes for the rational design of targeted anticancer therapies in digestive system tumors.

  15. Photodynamic therapy cures green fluorescent protein expressing RIF1 tumors in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Liu, Qingde; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern people, largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should destroy both the primary tumor and distant metastases with minimal toxicity to normal tissue. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that eventually cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, generation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins. Combination regimens are likely to emerge in the future to even further enhance immunity. Green fluorescent protein is used as an optical reporter to non-invasively image the progression of mouse tumors, and in addition, may act as a foreign (jellyfish) antigen. We asked whether the response of tumor bearing mice to PDT differed when a non-immunogenic tumor cell line was transfected with GFP? We injected RIF-1 or RIF1-EGFP cells in the leg of C3H/HeN mice and both the cells and tumors grew equally well. We used two PDT protocols (benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) with 15-minute interval or Photofrin with 24-hour interval). The results showed significant differences between the responses of RIF1 or RIF1-EGFP tumors after BPD or Photofrin PDT and complete cures and mouse survival when RIF-1 EGFP tumors were treated with BPD. This increased tumor response may be due to antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and the presence of an artificial tumor antigen (GFP) that can produce a CD8 T-cell response against the whole tumor. The presence of antibodies against EGFP in mouse serum correlates with the hypothesis.

  16. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  17. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  18. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  19. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  20. Multistage skin tumor promotion: involvement of a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mamrack, M.; Slaga, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current information suggests that chemical carcinogenesis is a multistep process with one of the best studied models in this regard being the two-stage carcinogenesis system using mouse skin. The effects of several carcinogens and tumor promoters in various sequences of application were studied to examine the nature of the process. The actions of several tumor inhibitors were compared. (ACR)

  1. Expression of the ERBB2 protein in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Stenman, G; Sandros, J; Nordkvist, A; Mark, J; Sahlin, P

    1991-03-01

    Fifty-two primary human salivary gland tumors were analyzed for expression of the p185ERBB2 protein using immunohistochemical and immunoblotting techniques. About 63% (33/52) of the tumors expressed the ERBB2 protein. The highest expression levels were detected among the carcinomas, where 32% of the tumors showed intense membrane staining in 25-100% of the tumor cells. In benign pleomorphic adenomas, the corresponding figure was only 12%. Clinical follow-up data available for 18 of the 19 patients with carcinomas suggested an association between high ERBB2 protein levels and poor prognosis as measured by recurrence of disease and/or the appearance of metastases. These results indicate that ERBB2 activation and overexpression could be an important genetic event with possible prognostic implications in a subset of malignant salivary gland tumors.

  2. Cyp1b1 exerts opposing effects on intestinal tumorigenesis via exogenous and endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Richard B.; Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Elmergreen, Tammy L.; Ko, Alex Y.; Irving, Amy A.; Clipson, Linda; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (Cyp1b1) metabolism contributes to physiological functions during embryogenesis, but also to carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). We generated Cyp1b1-deficient mice carrying the Min allele of the Adenomatous polyposis coli gene. These Cyp1b1-deficient Min mice developed twice as many tumors as Min controls, which, however, remained similar in size and histology. Tumors from older (130 day) Cyp1b1-deficient Min mice exhibited focal areas of nuclear atypia associated with less organized epithelia. The metabolism of endogenous substrates by Cyp1b1, therefore, suppresses tumor initiation, but also affects progression. Treatment of Min mice with 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) doubled both tumor multiplicity and size within 20 days, but not when mice lacked Cyp1b1. This was paralleled by an abnormal staining of crypts with β catenin, phospho-IKK, and ReIA, which may represent an early stage of tumorigenesis similar to aberrant crypt formation. Cyp1b1 deletion did not affect circulating DMBA and metabolites. Cyp1b1 expression was higher in the tumors compared to normal small intestines. Increased tumorigenesis may, therefore, arise from generation of DMBA metabolites by Cyp1b1 in the developing tumors. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), which is similarly activated by Cyp1b1 in vitro, did not affect tumorigenesis in Min mice. By contrast, BP and DMBA each suppressed tumor multiplicity in absence of Cyp1b1. Cyp1b1 metabolism of DMBA and endogenous oxygenation products may each impact a tumor promoting NF-κB. activation, whereas Ah receptor activation by PAH effects suppression. Tumorigenesis may, therefore, depend on activation of PAH by Cyp1b1, and on off-setting suppression by Cyp1b1 of endogenous tumor-enhancing substrates. PMID:18794127

  3. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB) promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  4. VAMP-Associated Protein B (VAPB) Promotes Breast Tumor Growth by Modulation of Akt Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer. PMID:23049696

  5. Phylogeography of E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Reguig, Ahmed; Harich, Nourdin; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup. The frequency ranged from 79.1% to 98.5% in all localities sampled. E1b1b1b2-M183 was the most dominant subclade in our samples, ranging from 65.1% to 83.1%. In contrast, the E1b1b1b1-M107 and E1b1b1b2a-M165 subclades were not found in our samples. Our results suggest a predominance of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup among Moroccan Berber-speaking males with a decreasing gradient from south to north. The most prevalent subclade in this haplogroup was E1b1b1b2-M183, for which diffferences among these three groups were statistically significant between central and southern groups. PMID:25397701

  6. Mitochondrial Dynamics Protein Drp1 Is Overexpressed in Oncocytic Thyroid Tumors and Regulates Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1 - a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line—and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells’ migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype. PMID:25822260

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics protein Drp1 is overexpressed in oncocytic thyroid tumors and regulates cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1--a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line--and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells' migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype.

  8. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  9. N-(3-oxo-acyl) homoserine lactone inhibits tumor growth independent of Bcl-2 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoping; Neely, Aaron M.; Schwarzer, Christian; Lu, Huayi; Whitt, Aaron G.; Stivers, Nicole S.; Burlison, Joseph A.; White, Carl; Machen, Terry E.; Li, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12) as a quorum-sensing molecule for bacterial communication. C12 has also been reported to induce apoptosis in various types of tumor cells. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of C12-triggerred tumor cell apoptosis is still unclear. In addition, it is completely unknown whether C12 possesses any potential therapeutic effects in vivo. Our data indicate that, unlike most apoptotic inducers, C12 evokes a novel form of apoptosis in tumor cells through inducing mitochondrial membrane permeabilization independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Importantly, C12 inhibits tumor growth in animals regardless of either pro- or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Furthermore, opposite to conventional chemotherapeutics, C12 requires paraoxonase 2 (PON2) to exert its cytotoxicity on tumor cells in vitro and its inhibitory effects on tumor growth in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate that C12 inhibits tumor growth independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and through inducing unique apoptotic signaling mediated by PON2 in tumor cells. PMID:26758417

  10. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49f(high)CD61(high) and CD24(+)Jagged1(-). First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in

  11. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  12. Absence of an essential regulatory influence of the adenovirus E1B 19-kilodalton protein on viral growth and early gene expression in human diploid WI38, HeLa, and A549 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Telling, G C; Perera, S; Szatkowski-Ozers, M; Williams, J

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the adenovirus (Ad) early region 1B 19-kDa protein (the 19K gene) result in multiple phenotypic effects upon infection of permissive human cells. It has been reported, for example, that Ad type 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 with mutations in the 19K gene (19K-defective mutants) have a marked growth advantage compared with wild-type virus in human diploid WI38 cells (E. White, B. Faha, and B. Stillman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:3763-3773, 1986), and it was proposed that this host range phenotype stems from the large increase in viral early gene expression reported to occur in the mutant-infected cells. These observations gave rise to the hypothesis that the 19-kDa protein (the 19K protein) normally functions as a negative regulator of Ad early gene expression and growth. We have tested this hypothesis and find that Ad5 and Ad12 wild-type viruses grow as efficiently as their respective 19K-defective mutants, in1 and dl337 and pm700 and in700, in WI38 and other human cell types. Neither the accumulation of E1A cytoplasmic mRNAs nor the synthesis of E1A and other viral early proteins in these cells is altered as a result of these mutations in the 19K gene, and we conclude that the 19K protein does not play an essential role in regulating viral early gene expression or viral growth in human cells. Images PMID:8254769

  13. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  14. Fibroblast activation protein α in tumor microenvironment: Recent progression and implications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZI, FUMING; HE, JINGSONG; HE, DONGHUA; LI, YI; YANG, LI; CAI, ZHEN

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of a given tumor is important in determining its drug resistance, tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. These microenvironments, like tumor cells, are vital targets for cancer therapy. The cross-talk between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, alternatively termed activated fibroblasts) is crucial in regulating the drug resistance, tumorigenesis, neoplastic progression, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis of a tumor. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a transmembrane serine protease and is highly expressed on CAFs present in >90% of human epithelial neoplasms. FAPα activity, alongside that of gelatinase and type I collagenase, has become increasingly important in cancer therapy due to its effectiveness in modulating tumor behavior. In this review, recent progression in the knowledge of the role of FAPα in tumor microenvironments is discussed. PMID:25593080

  15. The BRCA1-interacting protein, Abraxas, is required for genomic stability and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Andy; Paul, Atanu; Sun, Baohua; Huang, Ting Hsiang; Wang, Yucai; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Tyler, Jessica; Li, Lei; You, M James; Zou, Lee; Yao, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Germline mutations of BRCA1 confer hereditary susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, somatic mutation of BRCA1 is infrequent in sporadic breast cancers. The BRCA1 protein C-terminus BRCT domains interact with multiple proteins and are required for BRCA1's tumor suppressor function. In this study, we demonstrated that Abraxas, a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein, plays a role in tumor suppression. Abraxas exerts its function through binding to BRCA1 to regulate DNA repair and maintain genome stability. Both homozygous and heterozygous Abraxas knockout mice exhibited decreased survival and increased tumor incidence. The gene encoding Abraxas suffers from gene copy loss and somatic mutations in multiple human cancers including breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers, suggesting that mutation and loss of function of Abraxas may contribute to tumor development in human patients. PMID:25066119

  16. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  17. Comparative study of p53 gene and protein alterations in human astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Louis, D N; von Deimling, A; Chung, R Y; Rubio, M P; Whaley, J M; Eibl, R H; Ohgaki, H; Wiestler, O D; Thor, A D; Seizinger, B R

    1993-01-01

    The p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene involved in many common malignancies, including astrocytomas. Genetic analysis of the p53 gene and immunohistochemistry of the p53 protein have each been used to screen astrocytomas. To compare these methods, we performed immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801 and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) with sequence analysis on 34 astrocytic tumors (WHO grades II, III and IV). Seven cases had detectable p53 protein and gene mutations, while twelve cases had neither detectable protein nor gene mutations. Four tumors had frameshift mutations in the p53 gene that were not revealed by immunohistochemistry. One tumor had a genetic polymorphism and no detectable p53 protein. Ten tumors had p53 protein accumulation but no mutations by SSCP; these cases may represent p53 mutations outside of the conserved exons or elevated levels of wild-type p53 protein. Thus, some p53 mutations are missed with PAb 1801 immunohistochemistry alone. p53 immunohistochemistry, however, may reveal p53 accumulation independent of mutations in the conserved portions of the gene. Finally, we suggest that glioblastomas with p53 mutations in the conserved region of the gene may be a subset that are more common in women and in younger patients.

  18. Modulator of Apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) Is a Tumor Suppressor Protein Linked to the RASSF1A Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jennifer; Salla, Mohamed; Zare, Alaa; Wong, Yoke; Luong, Le; Volodko, Natalia; Svystun, Orysya; Flood, Kayla; Lim, Jonathan; Sung, Miranda; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Tan, Chong Teik; Su, Yu-Chin; Yu, Victor C.; Mackey, John; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a BH3-like protein that plays key roles in cell death or apoptosis. It is an integral partner to the tumor suppressor protein, Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), and functions to activate the Bcl-2 family pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Although RASSF1A is now considered a bona fide tumor suppressor protein, the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein has yet to be determined. In this study, we present several lines of evidence from cancer databases, immunoblotting of cancer cells, proliferation, and xenograft assays as well as DNA microarray analysis to demonstrate the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein. Frequent loss of MOAP-1 expression, in at least some cancers, appears to be attributed to mRNA down-regulation and the rapid proteasomal degradation of MOAP-1 that could be reversed utilizing the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of MOAP-1 in several cancer cell lines resulted in reduced tumorigenesis and up-regulation of genes involved in cancer regulatory pathways that include apoptosis (p53, Fas, and MST1), DNA damage control (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and ataxia telangiectasia mutated), those within the cell metabolism (IR-α, IR-β, and AMP-activated protein kinase), and a stabilizing effect on microtubules. The loss of RASSF1A (an upstream regulator of MOAP-1) is one of the earliest detectable epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor proteins in cancer, and we speculate that the additional loss of function of MOAP-1 may be a second hit to functionally compromise the RASSF1A/MOAP-1 death receptor-dependent pathway and drive tumorigenesis. PMID:26269600

  19. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. RESULTS NADH- and FADH2-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-dl-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20682693

  20. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    PubMed

    Rymen, Daisy; Peanne, Romain; Millón, María B; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  1. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  2. Cloning and characterization of human RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of RTVP-1 in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Cunli; Sarid, Ronit; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Lee, Hae-Kyung; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya

    2007-10-26

    Here, we report the cloning and characterization of RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of human RTVP-1, which was isolated from the U87 glioma cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that RTVP-1b contains an additional 71 base exon between exons 2 and 3 that is missing in RTVP-1, leading to a frame-shift and a different putative protein. The deduced protein was 237 amino acids in length, sharing the N-terminal 141 amino acids with RTVP-1. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that RTVP-1b was expressed in a wide range of tissues and that its expression was different from that of RTVP-1. In contrast, RTVP-1 and RTVP-1b showed similar patterns of expression in astrocytic tumors; highly expressed in glioblastomas as compared to normal brains, low-grade astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Overexpression of RTVP-1b increased glioma cell proliferation but did not affect cell migration. Our results suggest that RTVP-1b represents a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in gliomas.

  3. Solitary fibrous tumors: loss of chimeric protein expression and genomic instability mark dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Dagrada, Gian P; Spagnuolo, Rosalin D; Mauro, Valentina; Tamborini, Elena; Cesana, Luca; Gronchi, Alessandro; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Pierotti, Marco A; Negri, Tiziana; Pilotti, Silvana

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors, which are characterized by their broad morphological spectrum and unpredictable behavior, are rare mesenchymal neoplasias that are currently divided into three main variants that have the NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion as their unifying molecular lesion: usual, malignant and dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors. The aims of this study were to validate molecular and immunohistochemical/biochemical approaches to diagnose the range of solitary fibrous tumors by focusing on the dedifferentiated variant, and to reveal the genetic events associated with dedifferentiation by integrating the findings of array comparative genomic hybridization. We studied 29 usual, malignant and dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors from 24 patients (including paired samples from five patients whose tumors progressed to the dedifferentiated form) by means of STAT6 immunohistochemistry and (when frozen material was available) reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and biochemistry. In addition, the array comparative genomic hybridization findings were used to profile 12 tumors from nine patients. The NAB2/STAT6 fusion was detected in all of the tumors, but immunohistochemistry and western blotting indicated that chimeric protein expression was atypical or absent in 9 out of 11 dedifferentiated tumors. The comparative genomic hybridization results revealed that the usual and malignant solitary fibrous tumors had a simple profile, whereas the genome of the dedifferentiated tumors was complex and unstable, and suggested that 13q and 17p deletions and TP53 mutations may be present in malignant lesions before the full expression of a dedifferentiated phenotype. Solitary fibrous tumor dedifferentiation is associated with the loss of chimeric oncoprotein expression, genomic instability, and cell decommitment and reprogramming. The assessment of dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors is based on the presence of the fusion transcripts and, in principle, negative

  4. Interleukin 1B gene (IL1B) variation and internalizing symptoms in maltreated preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Ridout, Kathryn K; Parade, Stephanie H; Seifer, Ronald; Price, Lawrence H; Gelernter, Joel; Feliz, Paloma; Tyrka, Audrey R

    2014-11-01

    Evidence now implicates inflammatory proteins in the neurobiology of internalizing disorders. Genetic factors may influence individual responses to maltreatment; however, little work has examined inflammatory genetic variants in adults and none in children. The present study examined the role of an interleukin 1B gene (IL1B) variant in preschoolers exposed to maltreatment and other forms of adversity in internalizing symptom development. One hundred ninety-eight families were enrolled, with one child (age 3-5 years) from each family. Adversity measures included child protective service documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the last 6 months and interview-assessed contextual stressors. Internalizing symptoms were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist and the Diagnostic Infant and Preschool Assessment. Maltreated children had higher major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and marginally higher internalizing symptoms on the Child Behavior Checklist. Controlling for age, sex, and race, IL1B genotype was associated with MDD symptoms (p = .002). Contextual stressors were significantly associated with MDD and posttraumatic stress disorder and marginally with internalizing symptoms. The IL1B genotype interacted with contextual stress such that children homozygous for the minor allele had more MDD symptoms (p = .045). These results suggest that genetic variants of IL1B may modulate the development of internalizing symptoms in the face of childhood adversity. PMID:25422961

  5. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; de Geus, Susanna W.L.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Hawinkels, Lukas J.A.C.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications. PMID:27721658

  6. Interaction of human organic anion transporter polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 with antineoplastic compounds.

    PubMed

    Marada, Venkata V V R; Flörl, Saskia; Kühne, Annett; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Hagos, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Antineoplastic compounds are used in the treatment of a variety of cancers. The effectiveness of an antineoplastic compound to exert its activity is largely dependent on transport proteins involved in the entry of the compound into the cells, and those which drive it out of the cell. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3), belonging to the SLCO family of proteins, are specifically expressed in the sinusoidal membranes of the liver, and are known to interact with a variety of drugs. The present study deals with the interaction of these proteins with antineoplastic compounds routinely used in cancer chemotherapy. The proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were functionally characterized in stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells using [(3)H] labeled estrone 3-sulfate and [(3)H] labeled cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) as substrates, respectively. Substrate uptake experiments performed in the presence of antineoplastic compounds showed that vinblastine and paclitaxel strongly interacted with the OATP1B1 with Ki values of 10.2 μM and 0.84 μM, respectively. OATP1B3 showed highly significant interactions with a variety of antineoplastic compounds including chlorambucil, mitoxantrone, vinblastine, vincristine, paclitaxel and etoposide, with Ki values of 40.6 μM, 3.2 μM, 15.9 μM, 30.6 μM, 1.8 μM and 13.5 μM, respectively. We report several novel interactions of the transporter proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 highlighting the need to investigate their role in drug-drug interactions and cancer chemotherapy.

  7. [Solubilization Specificities Interferon beta-1b from Inclusion Bodies].

    PubMed

    Zhuravko, A S; Kononova, N V; Bobruskin, A I

    2015-01-01

    A new solubilization method of recombinant interferon beta-1b (IFNβ-1b) from the inclusion bodies was developed. This method allows to extract the target protein selectively in the solutions of different alcohols, such as ethanol, propanol and isopropanol. It was shown that the more effective IFNβ-1b solubilization was achieved in the 55% propanol solution. This method allowed to extract the target protein from inclusion bodies around 85-90%, and significantly reduced Escherichia coli content in the solubilizate, in comparison with standard methods.

  8. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  9. Characteristic Formation of Hyaluronan-Cartilage Link Protein-Proteoglycan Complex in Salivary Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Nishikado, Akira; Hayasaki, Hana; Isogai, Zenzo; Yoneda, Masahiko; Kawata, Ryo; Hirose, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its binding molecules, cartilage link protein (LP) and proteoglycan (PG), are structural components of the hydrated extracellular matrix. Because these molecules play important roles in the tumor microenvironment, we examined the distribution of HA, LP, versican, and aggrecan in salivary gland tumors using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, including double staining. LP was present in pleomorphic adenoma (PA) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) tissues, and aggrecan was absent in the malignant tumors that we investigated. LP colocalized with both HA and aggrecan in the chondromyxoid matrix of PA, suggesting the presence of a HA-LP-aggrecan complex. Furthermore, the HA-LP-versican complex could be observed in the pseudocystic space of the cribriform structures in ACC. The characteristic HA-LP-PG complex in PA and ACC might play a role in the behavior of tumors, and immunohistochemical analysis of these molecules could represent a diagnostic adjunct for salivary gland tumors.

  10. The nucleolar organizer regions associated protein (Ag-NORs) in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Sasaki, K; Tsuji, T; Shinozaki, F

    1989-04-01

    A silver colloid technique used to identify nucleolar organizer regions associated protein (Ag-NORs) has been applied to 20 salivary gland tumors. The method was readily applicable to the preparations of paraffin-embedded sections and the Ag-NORs were enumerated with ease. A significant difference was found between the numbers of Ag-NORs in the nuclei of malignant salivary gland tumors, such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid tumor and adenocarcinoma (with a mean of from 2.05 to 2.78 per nucleus) and those of benign salivary gland, such as pleomorphic adenoma, adenolymphoma (Wartin tumor) and clear cell adenoma (with a mean of from 1.47 to 1.72 per nucleus). It is proposed that the Ag-NORs technique, which is rapid, simple, and inexpensive, may be useful in the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign salivary gland tumors.

  11. Enhanced skin carcinogenesis and lack of thymus hyperplasia in transgenic mice expressing human cyclin D1b (CCND1b)

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Paola; Benavides, Fernando; Blando, Jorge; Perez, Carlos; Cardenas, Kim; Richie, Ellen; Knudsen, Erik S.; Johnson, David G.; Senderowicz, Adrian M.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; Conti, Claudio J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin D1b is an alternative transcript of the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) expressed in human tumors. Its abundance is regulated by a single base pair polymorphism at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary (nucleotide 870). Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between the presence of the G870A allele (that favors the splicing for cyclin D1b) with increased risk and less favorable outcome in several forms of cancer. More recently, it has been shown that, unlike cyclin D1a, the alternative transcript D1b by itself has the capacity to transform fibroblasts in vitro. In order to study the oncogenic potential of cyclin D1b, we developed transgenic mice expressing human cyclin D1b under the control of the bovine K5 promoter (K5D1b mice). Seven founders were obtained and none of them presented any significant phenotype or developed spontaneous tumors. Interestingly, K5D1b mice do not develop the fatal thymic hyperplasia, which is characteristic of the cyclin D1a transgenic mice (K5D1a). Susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis was tested in K5D1b mice using two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. In two independent experiments, K5D1b mice developed higher papilloma multiplicity as compared with wild-type littermates. However, when K5D1b mice were crossed with cyclin D1KO mice, the expression of cyclin D1b was unable to rescue the carcinogenesis-resistant phenotype of the cyclin D1 KO mice. To further explore the role of cyclin D1b in mouse models of carcinogenesis we carried out in silico analysis and in vitro experiments to evaluate the existence of a mouse homologous of the human cyclin D1b transcript. We were unable to find any evidence of an alternatively spliced transcript in mouse Ccnd1. These results show that human cyclin D1b has different biological functions than cyclin D1a and confirm its oncogenic properties. PMID:18942117

  12. AKR1B10 induces cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin by reducing C13 ketonic group

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Linlin; Shen Honglin; Huang Chenfei; Jing, Hongwu; Cao Deliang

    2011-08-15

    Daunorubicin, idarubicin, doxorubicin and epirubicin are anthracyclines widely used for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast, lung, and liver cancers, but tumor resistance limits their clinical success. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) is an NADPH-dependent enzyme overexpressed in liver and lung carcinomas. This study was aimed to determine the role of AKR1B10 in tumor resistance to anthracyclines. AKR1B10 activity toward anthracyclines was measured using recombinant protein. Cell resistance to anthracycline was determined by ectopic expression of AKR1B10 or inhibition by epalrestat. Results showed that AKR1B10 reduces C13-ketonic group on side chain of daunorubicin and idarubicin to hydroxyl forms. In vitro, AKR1B10 converted daunorubicin to daunorubicinol at V{sub max} of 837.42 {+-} 81.39 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} of 9.317 {+-} 2.25 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3.24. AKR1B10 showed better catalytic efficiency toward idarubicin with V{sub max} at 460.23 {+-} 28.12 nmol/mg/min, K{sub m} at 0.461 {+-} 0.09 mM and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} at 35.94. AKR1B10 was less active toward doxorubicin and epirubicin with a C14-hydroxyl group. In living cells, AKR1B10 efficiently catalyzed reduction of daunorubicin (50 nM) and idarubicin (30 nM) to corresponding alcohols. Within 24 h, approximately 20 {+-} 2.7% of daunorubicin (1 {mu}M) or 23 {+-} 2.3% of idarubicin (1 {mu}M) was converted to daunorubicinol or idarubicinol in AKR1B10 expression cells compared to 7 {+-} 0.9% and 5 {+-} 1.5% in vector control. AKR1B10 expression led to cell resistance to daunorubicin and idarubicin, but inhibitor epalrestat showed a synergistic role with these agents. Together our data suggest that AKR1B10 participates in cellular metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, resulting in drug resistance. These data are informative for the clinical use of idarubicin and daunorubicin. - Highlights: > This study defines enzyme activity of AKR1B10 protein towards daunorubicin, idarubicin

  13. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  14. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  15. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  16. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers. PMID:22876234

  17. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers.

  18. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  19. Protein disulfide isomerases are antibody targets during immune-mediated tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Catia; Soiffer, Robert; Ho, Vincent; Vanneman, Matthew; Jinushi, Masahisa; Ritz, Jerome; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The identification of cancer antigens that contribute to transformation and are linked with immune-mediated tumor destruction is an important goal for immunotherapy. Toward this end, we screened a murine renal cell carcinoma cDNA expression library with sera from mice vaccinated with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Multiple nonmutated, overexpressed proteins that function in tumor cell migration, protein/nucleic acid homeostasis, metabolism, and stress responses were detected. Among these, the most frequently recognized clone was protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). High titer antibodies to human PDI were similarly induced in an acute myeloid leukemia patient who achieved a complete response after vac-cination with irradiated, autologous GM-CSF–secreting tumor cells in the setting of nonmyeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, ERp5, a closely related disulfide isomerase involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein A (MICA) shedding, also evoked potent humoral reactions in diverse solid and hematologic malignancy patients who responded to GM-CSF–secreting tumor cell vaccines or antibody blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Together, these findings reveal the unexpected immunogenicity of PDIs and raise the possibility that these gene products might serve as targets for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19008459

  20. Suppression of Lipid Accumulation by Indole-3-Carbinol Is Associated with Increased Expression of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and CYP1B1 Proteins in Adipocytes and with Decreased Adipocyte-Stimulated Endothelial Tube Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Lin; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Hou, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of indole-3-carbinol (I3C) on adipogenesis- and angiogenesis-associated factors in mature adipocytes. The cross-talk between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells (ECs) was also explored by cultivating ECs in a conditioned medium (CM) by using I3C-treated adipocytes. The results revealed that I3C significantly inhibited triglyceride accumulation in mature adipocytes in association with significantly increased expression of AhR and CYP1B1 proteins as well as slightly decreased nuclear factor erythroid-derived factor 2-related factor 2, hormone-sensitive lipase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase expression by mature adipocytes. Furthermore, I3C inhibited CM-stimulated endothelial tube formation, which was accompanied by the modulated secretion of angiogenic factors in adipocytes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide. In conclusion, I3C reduced lipid droplet accumulation in adipocytes and suppressed adipocyte-stimulated angiogenesis in ECs, suggesting that I3C is a potential therapeutic agent for treating obesity and obesity-associated disorders. PMID:27527145

  1. Suppression of Lipid Accumulation by Indole-3-Carbinol Is Associated with Increased Expression of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and CYP1B1 Proteins in Adipocytes and with Decreased Adipocyte-Stimulated Endothelial Tube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei-Lin; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Hou, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of indole-3-carbinol (I3C) on adipogenesis- and angiogenesis-associated factors in mature adipocytes. The cross-talk between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells (ECs) was also explored by cultivating ECs in a conditioned medium (CM) by using I3C-treated adipocytes. The results revealed that I3C significantly inhibited triglyceride accumulation in mature adipocytes in association with significantly increased expression of AhR and CYP1B1 proteins as well as slightly decreased nuclear factor erythroid-derived factor 2–related factor 2, hormone-sensitive lipase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase expression by mature adipocytes. Furthermore, I3C inhibited CM-stimulated endothelial tube formation, which was accompanied by the modulated secretion of angiogenic factors in adipocytes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide. In conclusion, I3C reduced lipid droplet accumulation in adipocytes and suppressed adipocyte-stimulated angiogenesis in ECs, suggesting that I3C is a potential therapeutic agent for treating obesity and obesity-associated disorders. PMID:27527145

  2. Increased PTP1B expression and phosphatase activity in colorectal cancer results in a more invasive phenotype and worse patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Elmer; Das, Asha M.; Swets, Marloes; Cao, Wanlu; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Bruno, Marco J.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; ten Hagen, Timo L.M.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling is dependent on the balance between phosphorylation of proteins by kinases and dephosphorylation by phosphatases. This balance if often disrupted in colorectal cancer (CRC), leading to increased cell proliferation and invasion. For many years research has focused on the role of kinases as potential oncogenes in cancer, while phosphatases were commonly assumed to be tumor suppressive. However, this dogma is currently changing as phosphatases have also been shown to induce cancer growth. One of these phosphatases is protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Here we report that the expression of PTP1B is increased in colorectal cancer as compared to normal tissue, and that the intrinsic enzymatic activity of the protein is also enhanced. This suggests a role for PTP1B phosphatase activity in CRC formation and progression. Furthermore, we found that increased PTP1B expression is correlated to a worse patient survival and is an independent prognostic marker for overall survival and disease free survival. Knocking down PTP1B in CRC cell lines results in a less invasive phenotype with lower adhesion, migration and proliferation capabilities. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of PTP1B activity is a promising new target in the treatment of colorectal cancer and the prevention of metastasis. PMID:26942883

  3. C2-streptavidin mediates the delivery of biotin-conjugated tumor suppressor protein p53 into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Jörg; Schweitzer, Brigitte; Fiedler, Katja; Langer, Torben; Gierschik, Peter; Barth, Holger

    2013-04-17

    We have previously generated a recombinant C2-streptavidin fusion protein for the delivery of biotin-labeled molecules of low molecular weight into the cytosol of mammalian cells. A nontoxic moiety of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin mediates the cellular uptake, whereas the streptavidin unit serves as a binding platform for biotin-labeled cargo molecules. In the present study, we used the C2-streptavidin transporter to introduce biotin-conjugated p53 protein into various mammalian cell lines. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is inactivated in many human cancers by multiple mechanisms and therefore the restoration of its activity in tumor cells is of great therapeutic interest. Recombinant p53 was expressed in insect cells and biotin-labeled. Biotin-p53 retained its specific high-affinity DNA-binding as revealed by gel-shift analysis. Successful conjugation of biotin-p53 to the C2-streptavidin transporter was monitored by an overlay blot technique and confirmed by real-time surface plasmon resonance, providing a KD-value in the low nM range. C2-streptavidin significantly enhanced the uptake of biotin-p53 into African Green Monkey (Vero) epithelial cells as shown by flow cytometry. Using cell fractionation, the cytosolic translocation of biotin-p53 was detected in Vero cells as well as in HeLa cervix carcinoma cells. In line with this finding, confocal microscopy displayed cytoplasmic staining of biotin-p53 in HeLa and HL60 leukemia cells. Internalized biotin-p53 partially colocalized with early endosomes, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the successful conjugation of biotin-p53 to C2-streptavidin and its subsequent receptor-mediated endocytosis into different human tumor cell lines.

  4. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  5. Sequence and structure of the Drosophila melanogaster ovarian tumor gene and generation of an antibody specific for the ovarian tumor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauer, W R; Walsh, R C; Kalfayan, L J

    1989-01-01

    Sequencing cDNA and genomic DNA from the ovarian tumor gene revealed a gene with seven introns spanning 4.5 kilobases. The proline-rich, hydrophilic otu protein is novel. An antibody prepared to a beta-gal-otu fusion protein recognized a 110-kilodalton ovarian protein which was altered in the ovaries of otu gene mutants. Images PMID:2511440

  6. Ion channel TRPV1-dependent activation of PTP1B suppresses EGFR-associated intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Takahashi, Naoki; Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jihyung; Bertin, Samuel; Jeffries, James; Jung, Michael; Duong, Jen; Triano, Amy I.; Lee, Jongdae; Niv, Yaron; Herdman, David S.; Taniguchi, Koji; Kim, Chang-Whan; Dong, Hui; Eckmann, Lars; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio; Corr, Maripat; Raz, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of turnover, and dysregulation of pathways that regulate regeneration can lead to tumor development; however, the negative regulators of oncogenic events in the intestinal epithelium are not fully understood. Here we identified a feedback loop between the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of proliferation, and the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that TRPV1 was expressed by IECs and was intrinsically activated upon EGFR stimulation. Subsequently, TRPV1 activation inhibited EGFR-induced epithelial cell proliferation via activation of Ca2+/calpain and resulting activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). In a murine model of multiple intestinal neoplasia (ApcMin/+ mice), TRPV1 deficiency increased adenoma formation, and treatment of these animals with an EGFR kinase inhibitor reversed protumorigenic phenotypes, supporting a functional association between TRPV1 and EGFR signaling in IECs. Administration of a TRPV1 agonist suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, similar to — as well as in conjunction with — a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, which suggests that targeting both TRPV1 and COX-2 has potential as a therapeutic approach for tumor prevention. Our findings implicate TRPV1 as a regulator of growth factor signaling in the intestinal epithelium through activation of PTP1B and subsequent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25083990

  7. Preliminary clinical evaluation of a protein chip for tumor marker serodiagnosis of various cancers.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Kruavon; Laisupasin, Pikul; Dhepakson, Panadda; Warachit, Jiranan; Jantraraksri, Udom; Issaragrisil, Surapol; Yang, Xiao-Li; Hus, Geng-Xi

    2003-09-01

    This preliminary study aimed to investigate sensitivity and specificity of a protein chip system for multi-tumor marker serodiagnosis of ten types of cancers, and to understand the possible clinical applications of this protein chip for the Thai population. The specific cancers diagnosed by this protein chip are lung, breast, liver, cervix, colo-rectal, stomach, ovary, esophagus, prostate and pancreas cancers. We analyzed 215 serum samples of which 165 were obtained from clinically confirmed cancer patients and 50 from healthy people with no evidence of cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of the protein chip were 82.4% and 94.0%, respectively. The success rate of the protein chip for detecting all 10 types of cancers varied from 57% to 100%. The value of the simultaneous measurement of multiple tumor markers using the protein chip for cancer screening lied in the higher sensitivity compared to using single tumor markers for each type of cancer. In short, protein chips may be useful in mass screening for cancer during health checkups as well as for metastasis follow-up of cancer patients.

  8. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  9. The tumor protection effect of high-frequency administration of whole tumor cell vaccine and enhanced efficacy by the protein component from Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Whole tumor cell vaccines have been widely studied and elicits limited immune responses because of the poor immunogenicity. In the present study, we discovered that high-frequency administration of irradiated whole tumor cell vaccine triggered rejection of tumor cells (90% or 100% of the mice that were vaccinated with irradiated H22 cells or S180 respectively were protected), and provided cross-protection and long-term anti-tumor immunity in BALB/c mouse models. The antitumor activity required CD4+, CD8+ T cells and macrophage that was proved in the nude mice and cell depletion mouse models. The adoptive transfer experiment suggested that repeated whole tumor cell vaccination successfully stimulated the anti-tumor response by activation of the immune cells. A high immunization frequency within a short period of time and the presence of glycosylated molecules and nucleic acids on the surface of intact tumor cells were crucial for the successful prevention of tumor growth by whole tumor cell vaccines. Moreover, Yt, the protein component from fungus Agrocybe aegerita, increased whole tumor cell vaccine-mediated tumor rejection and cross-protection effect. These data indicated that the frequency of administration of whole tumor cell vaccines was of critical importance for the efficacy, which needed to be integrated into vaccine strategies for producing potential vaccines. PMID:26221228

  10. PRKAR1A gene analysis and protein kinase A activity in endometrial tumors.

    PubMed

    Tsigginou, A; Bimpaki, E; Nesterova, M; Horvath, A; Boikos, S; Lyssikatos, C; Papageorgiou, C; Dimitrakakis, C; Rodolakis, A; Stratakis, C A; Antsaklis, A

    2012-08-01

    PRKAR1A codes for the type 1a regulatory subunit (RIα) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), an enzyme with an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation. PKA dysregulation has been found in various tumors, and PRKAR1A-inactivating mutations have been reported in mostly endocrine neoplasias. In this study, we investigated PKA activity and the PRKAR1A gene in normal and tumor endometrium. Specimens were collected from 31 patients with endometrial cancer. We used as controls 41 samples of endometrium that were collected from surrounding normal tissues or from women undergoing gynecological operations for other reasons. In all samples, we sequenced the PRKAR1A-coding sequence and studied PKA subunit expression; we also determined PKA activity and cAMP binding. PRKAR1A mutations were not found. However, PKA regulatory subunit protein levels, both RIα and those of regulatory subunit type 2b (RIIβ), were lower in tumor samples; cAMP binding was also lower in tumors compared with normal endometrium (P<0.01). Free PKA activity was higher in tumor samples compared with that of control tissue (P<0.01). There are significant PKA enzymatic abnormalities in tumors of the endometrium compared with surrounding normal tissue; as these were not due to PRKAR1A mutations, other mechanisms affecting PKA function ought to be explored. PMID:22461635

  11. The potential of transferrin-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol liposomes encapsulating decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) as {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kasaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuo; Nigg, David; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate GB-10-encapsulating transferrin (TF)-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol (PEG) liposomes as tumor-targeting {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy. Methods and Materials: A free mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-{sup 1}B (BSH) or decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) solution, bare liposomes, PEG liposomes, or TF-PEG liposomes were injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumors and normal tissues were measured by {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Meanwhile, tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all intratumor proliferating cells, then injected with these {sup 1}B-carriers containing BSH or GB-10 in the same manner. Right after thermal neutron irradiation, the response of quiescent (Q) cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The frequency in the total tumor cells was determined from the BrdU nontreated tumors. Results: Transferrin-PEG liposomes showed a prolonged retention in blood circulation, low uptake by reticuloendothelial system, and the most enhanced accumulation of {sup 1}B in solid tumors. In general, the enhancing effects were significantly greater in total cells than Q cells. In both cells, the enhancing effects of GB-10-containing {sup 1}B-carriers were significantly greater than BSH-containing {sup 1}B-carriers, whether loaded in free solution or liposomes. In both cells, whether BSH or GB-10 was employed, the greatest enhancing effect was observed with TF-PEG liposomes followed in decreasing order by PEG liposomes, bare liposomes, and free BSH or GB-10 solution. In Q cells, the decrease was remarkable between PEG and bare liposomes. Conclusions: In terms of biodistribution characteristics and tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including Q cells, GB-10 TF-PEG liposomes were regarded as promising {sup 1}B-carriers.

  12. Expression of Antioxidant Molecules and Heat Shock Protein 27 in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Shucui; Vlantis, Alexander C; Liu, Shirley Y W; Ng, Enders K W; Chan, Amy B W; Wu, Juekun; Du, Jing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhimin; Ng, Siu Kwan; van Hasselt, C Andrew; Tong, Michael C F; Chen, George G

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage is a known causing factor for many types of tumors, but information on the role of oxidants and antioxidants in thyroid tumors is limited. The aim of this study was to determine antioxidant levels in thyroid tumors. In this study, tumor and its matched non-tumor thyroid tissue samples were obtained from 53 patients with thyroid tumors. The levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), thioredoxin reductase 2 (TXNRD2), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), catalase (CAT), and 27 kd heat-shock protein (hsp27) were determined in both thyroid tissue samples and cultured thyroid cells by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) was used to generate oxidant stress in the cell culture experiments. We found that the levels of MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, Gpx, and Hsp27 were increased in both malignant and benign tumors, while the level of CAT was decreased. To verify the results of the tissue study, we treated cultured thyroid cells with H2 O2 and found the same pattern of antioxidant changes. Hsp27 was also increased after H2 O2 treatment. The expression of hsp27 was upregulated by 8.24-, 6.96-, and 3.09-fold in thyroid cancer, follicular adenoma, multinodular goiter, respectively. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the levels of hsp27 together with MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, and Gpx were significantly upregulated by H2 O2 in thyroid tumors. The increase of these antioxidants is observed in both malignant and benign tumors, particularly in the former. The upregulation of antioxidants is likely a protective mechanism of tumor cells to maintain their survival and growth. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2473-2481, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970173

  13. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  14. Protein Expression for Novel Prognostic Markers (Cyclins D1, D2, D3, B1, B2, ITGβ7, FGFR3, PAX5) Correlate With Previously Reported Gene Expression Profile Patterns in Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Adnan; Akhter, Ariz; Pournazari, Payam; Mahe, Etienne; Shariff, Sami; Farooq, Fahad; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Shahbani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Rashid-Kolvear, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    Among plasma cell myeloma (PCM) patients, gene expression profiling (GEP)-based molecular classification has proven to be an independent predictor of survival, after autologous stem cell transplantation. However, GEP has limited routine clinical applicability given its complex methodology, high cost, and limited availability in clinical laboratories. In this study, we have evaluated biomarkers identified from GEP discoveries, utilizing immunohistochemistry (IHC) platform in a cohort of PCM patients. IHC staining for cyclins B1, B2, D1, D2, D3, FGFR3, PAX5, and integrin β7 (ITGβ7) was performed on the bone marrow biopsies of 93 newly diagnosed PCM patients. Expression of FGFR3 was noted in 10 (11%) samples correlating completely with t(4;14)(p16;q32) results (P<0.001); however, the association between FGFR3 and cyclin D2 expression was not significant (P=0.14). ITGβ7 expression was present in 9/93 (9%) patients and all these samples also demonstrated upregulated expression of cyclin D2 (P=0.014). Expression of cyclins D1, D2, and D3 was variable in this cohort. Positive protein expression of cyclin D1 was noted in 30/93 (32%), D2 in 17/93 (18%), and D3 in 5/93 (5%) samples. Coexpression of cyclins D1 and D2 was observed in 13/93 (14%) samples, whereas 28 (30%) samples were negative for all the 3 cyclin D proteins. Cyclin B1 was not expressed in any sample, despite adequate staining in positive controls. Cyclin B2 was expressed in 33/93 (35%) and PAX5 protein was noted in 7/93 (8%) samples. In summary, we have demonstrated that mRNA-based prognostic markers can be detected by routine IHC in decalcified bone marrow samples. This approach may provide a useful tool for the wider adoption of prognostic makers for risk stratification of PCM patients. We anticipate that such an approach might allow patients with high-risk immunoprofiles to be considered for other potential novel therapeutic agents, potentially sparing some patients the toxicity of stem cell transplant.

  15. In Vivo Visualization of Tumor Antigen-containing Microparticles Generated in Fluorescent-protein-elicited Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Liu, Shun; Liu, Xiuli; Liu, Lei; Luo, Meijie; Qi, Shuhong; Xu, Guoqiang; Qiao, Sha; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Xiangning; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    In vivo optical spatio-temporal imaging of the tumor microenvironment is useful to explain how tumor immunotherapies work. However, the lack of fluorescent antigens with strong immunogenicity makes it difficult to study the dynamics of how tumors are eliminated by any given immune response. Here, we develop an effective fluorescent model antigen based on the tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein KatushkaS158A (tfRFP), which elicits both humoral and cellular immunity. We use this fluorescent antigen to visualize the dynamic behavior of immunocytes as they attack and selectively eliminate tfRFP-expressing tumors in vivo; swarms of immunocytes rush toward tumors with high motility, clusters of immunocytes form quickly, and numerous antigen-antibody complexes in the form of tfRFP+ microparticles are generated in the tumor areas and ingested by macrophages in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, tfRFP, as both a model antigen and fluorescent reporter, is a useful tool to visualize specific immune responses in vivo. PMID:27375792

  16. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor stabilizes novel plant homeodomain protein Jade-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mina I; Wang, Hongmei; Ross, Jonathan J; Kuzmin, Igor; Xu, Chengen; Cohen, Herbert T

    2002-10-18

    The von Hippel-Lindau disease gene (VHL) is the causative gene for most adult renal cancers. However, the mechanism by which VHL protein functions as a renal tumor suppressor remains largely unknown. To identify low occupancy VHL protein partners with potential relevance to renal cancer, we screened a human kidney library against human VHL p30 using a yeast two-hybrid approach. Jade-1 (gene for Apoptosis and Differentiation in Epithelia) encodes a previously uncharacterized 64-kDa protein that interacts strongly with VHL protein and is most highly expressed in kidney. Jade-1 protein is short-lived and contains a candidate destabilizing (PEST) motif and plant homeodomains that are not required for the VHL interaction. Jade-1 is abundant in proximal tubule cells, which are clear-cell renal cancer precursors, and expression increases with differentiation. Jade-1 is expressed in cytoplasm and the nucleus diffusely and in speckles, where it partly colocalizes with VHL. VHL reintroduction into renal cancer cells increases endogenous Jade-1 protein abundance up to 10-fold. Furthermore, VHL increases Jade-1 protein half-life up to 3-fold. Thus, direct protein stabilization is identified as a new VHL function. Moreover, Jade-1 protein represents a novel candidate regulatory factor in VHL-mediated renal tumor suppression.

  17. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  18. [Suppressive effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on tumor cell function via phosphorylation of p53 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shinozuka, K; Kunitomo, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of a p53 protein. Exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7), increased the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein, whereas exposure to a tumor promoter phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased it in vivo after incubation with mouse epidermal JB6 cells for 3 h. Exposure to a cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) activator, forskolin, did not decrease the phosphorylation of p53 protein. In the transient transfection/luciferase reporter transactivation assay, H7 slightly increased the mouse double minute (MDM) 2 reporter transactivation activity of the p53 protein after treatment for 24 h, whereas TPA completely blocked it. Exposure to H7 and a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (bis), dose-dependently reduced the lung-colonizing potential of highly metastatic B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein is inversely related to PKC activation, and also suggest that the phosphorylation of the p53 protein is involved in the function of its transcription factor. The PKC inhibitor may exhibit a potent anti-metastatic effect through the phosphorylation of wild type p53 protein and the activation of its function. PMID:11193387

  19. PTP1B: a double agent in metabolism and oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Shu-Chin; Saha, Sayanti; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    PTP1B, a non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that has long been studied as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, has recently received renewed attention as an unexpected positive factor in tumorigenesis. In this review, we highlight how views of this enzyme have evolved from regarding it as a simple metabolic off-switch to a more complex view of PTP1B as an enzyme that can play both negative and positive roles diverse signaling pathways. These dual characteristics make PTP1B a particularly attractive therapeutic target for diabetes, obesity, and perhaps breast cancer. PMID:20381358

  20. Tumor liberated protein (TLP): its potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarro, G

    1999-01-01

    Our earlier studies led to the purification of a similar antigen from several types of human tumours which had the following properties: It provoked a delayed reaction in certain cancer patients which could be demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro (1). In contrast, healthy individuals did not react to this antigen. Subsequent studies led to a higher degree of purity of tumour antigen which enabled a partial sequence (2). The eight amino acid sequence obtained led to the synthesis of the corresponding peptide. This synthetic peptide was then used to raise specific antibodies in rabbits. The availability of such antibodies enabled to undertake a range of studies. Those investigations revealed that the antibodies were tumour specific because they reacted only with certain types of tumours but not with normal cells nor with other types of tumour tissues. We decided to name this tumour antigen as TLP for tumour liberated protein.

  1. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Mukaihara, Kenta; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kohsaka, Shinji; Akaike, Keisuke; Tanabe, Yu; Kubota, Daisuke; Ishii, Midori; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Okubo, Taketo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Yao, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the protein expression

  2. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  3. Mass spectrometric imaging of red fluorescent protein in breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Heeren, Ron M A; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters. PMID:23184411

  4. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Red Fluorescent Protein in Breast Tumor Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T.; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters.

  5. Organic anion transporter 3- and organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1- and 1B3-mediated transport of catalposide

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kwon, Mihwa; Lee, Yongnam; Yoo, Ji Seok; Shin, Dae Hee; Song, Im-Sook; Lee, Hye Suk

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro transport characteristics of catalposide in HEK293 cells overexpressing organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), OCT2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The transport mechanism of catalposide was investigated in HEK293 and LLC-PK1 cells overexpressing the relevant transporters. The uptake of catalposide was 319-, 13.6-, and 9.3-fold greater in HEK293 cells overexpressing OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters, respectively, than in HEK293 control cells. The increased uptake of catalposide via the OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters was decreased to basal levels in the presence of representative inhibitors such as probenecid, furosemide, and cimetidine (for OAT3) and cyclosporin A, gemfibrozil, and rifampin (for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3). The concentration-dependent OAT3-mediated uptake of catalposide revealed the following kinetic parameters: Michaelis constant (Km) =41.5 μM, maximum uptake rate (Vmax) =46.2 pmol/minute, and intrinsic clearance (CLint) =1.11 μL/minute. OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated catalposide uptake also showed concentration dependency, with low CLint values of 0.035 and 0.034 μL/minute, respectively. However, the OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, and BCRP transporters were apparently not involved in the uptake of catalposide into cells. In addition, catalposide inhibited the transport activities of OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of 83, 200, and 235 μM, respectively. However, catalposide did not significantly inhibit the transport activities of OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, or BCRP. In conclusion, OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 are major transporters that may regulate the pharmacokinetic properties and may cause herb–drug interactions of catalposide, although their clinical relevance awaits further evaluation. PMID:25653502

  6. Novel Ubiquitin-derived High Affinity Binding Proteins with Tumor Targeting Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Lorey, Susan; Fiedler, Erik; Kunert, Anja; Nerkamp, Jörg; Lange, Christian; Fiedler, Markus; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva; Meysing, Maren; Gloser, Manja; Rundfeldt, Chris; Rauchhaus, Una; Hänssgen, Ilka; Göttler, Thomas; Steuernagel, Arnd; Fiedler, Ulrike; Haupts, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Targeting effector molecules to tumor cells is a promising mode of action for cancer therapy and diagnostics. Binding proteins with high affinity and specificity for a tumor target that carry effector molecules such as toxins, cytokines, or radiolabels to their intended site of action are required for these applications. In order to yield high tumor accumulation while maintaining low levels in healthy tissues and blood, the half-life of such conjugates needs to be in an optimal range. Scaffold-based binding molecules are small proteins with high affinity and short systemic circulation. Due to their low molecular complexity, they are well suited for combination with effector molecules as well as half-life extension technologies yielding therapeutics with half-lives adapted to the specific therapy. We have identified ubiquitin as an ideal scaffold protein due to its outstanding biophysical and biochemical properties. Based on a dimeric ubiquitin library, high affinity and specific binding molecules, so-called Affilin® molecules, have been selected against the extradomain B of fibronectin, a target almost exclusively expressed in tumor tissues. Extradomain B-binding molecules feature high thermal and serum stability as well as strong in vitro target binding and in vivo tumor accumulation. Application of several half-life extension technologies results in molecules of largely unaffected affinity but significantly prolonged in vivo half-life and tumor retention. Our results demonstrate the utility of ubiquitin as a scaffold for the generation of high affinity binders in a modular fashion, which can be combined with effector molecules and half-life extension technologies. PMID:24474690

  7. Maspin protein expression correlates with tumor progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    KRAMER, MARIO W.; WAALKES, SANDRA; HENNENLOTTER, JÖRG; SERTH, JÜRGEN; STENZL, ARNULF; KUCZYK, MARKUS A.; MERSEBURGER, AXEL S.

    2010-01-01

    Maspin is a 42-kDa protein that belongs to the family of serine protease inhibitors. It is involved in various physiological processes. In cancer tissue, Maspin was found to influence angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis and the prognosis of tumor patients. This study was performed to analyze the involvement of Maspin in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder as well as its prognostic impact in a large patient cohort. Specimens from 162 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients (pTa, 91; pT1, 71) treated by transurethral resection with a minimum 3-year follow-up (median 58.5 months) were included in the present investigation. Tissue microarrays were constructed, and the specimens were immunohistochemically stained for Maspin protein expression. Each tissue specimen was assessed on a staining scale ranging from 0 (no staining) to 300 (strong staining) and correlated with various clinicopathological parameters. Maspin protein expression predicted progression with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 70% (p<0.001). In predicting recurrence, Maspin staining showed 52% sensitivity and 67% specificity (p<0.05). Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed, and a low Maspin protein expression was correlated with a higher incidence of tumor progression (p<0.0001). However, expression levels of Maspin protein did not distinguish between pTa and pT1 specimens. Multivariate analyses indicated Maspin expression as an independent factor for predicting progression (p<0.0001) and recurrence (p<0.05). The present results suggest that the Maspin protein expression is an independent prognostic indicator for predicting recurrence and progression to muscle invasive disease. This study further emphasizes a possible clinical role of this novel tumor suppressor gene in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. PMID:22966354

  8. Regulation of protein translation and c-Jun expression by prostate tumor overexpressed 1.

    PubMed

    Marqués, N; Sesé, M; Cánovas, V; Valente, F; Bermudo, R; de Torres, I; Fernández, Y; Abasolo, I; Fernández, P L; Contreras, H; Castellón, E; Celià-Terrassa, T; Méndez, R; Ramón Y Cajal, S; Thomson, T M; Paciucci, R

    2014-02-27

    Prostate tumor overexpressed-1 (PTOV1), a modulator of the Mediator transcriptional regulatory complex, is expressed at high levels in prostate cancer and other neoplasias in association with a more aggressive disease. Here we show that PTOV1 interacts directly with receptor of activated protein C kinase 1 (RACK1), a regulator of protein kinase C and Jun signaling and also a component of the 40S ribosome. Consistent with this interaction, PTOV1 was associated with ribosomes and its overexpression promoted global protein synthesis in prostate cancer cells and COS-7 fibroblasts in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Transfection of ectopic PTOV1 enhanced the expression of c-Jun protein without affecting the levels of c-Jun or RACK1 mRNA. Conversely, knockdown of PTOV1 caused significant declines in global protein synthesis and c-Jun protein levels. High levels of PTOV1 stimulated the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, which required c-Jun, whereas knockdown of PTOV1 strongly inhibited the tumorigenic and metastatic potentials of PC-3 prostate cancer cells. In human prostate cancer samples, the expression of high levels of PTOV1 in primary and metastatic tumors was significantly associated with increased nuclear localization of active c-Jun. These results unveil new functions of PTOV1 in the regulation of protein translation and in the progression of prostate cancer to an invasive and metastatic disease. PMID:23455324

  9. Protein Profiling of Human Breast Tumor Cells Identifies Novel Biomarkers Associated with Molecular Subtypes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Toiron, Yves; Esterni, Benjamin; Monville, Florence; Tarpin, Carole; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Chabannon, Christian; Extra, Jean-Marc; Viens, Patrice; Borg, Jean-Paul; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of breast cancer with relevant biological and clinical features have been defined recently, notably ERBB2-overexpressing, basal-like, and luminal-like subtypes. To investigate the ability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to analyze the molecular complexity of human breast cancer, we performed a SELDI-TOF MS-based protein profiling of human breast cell lines (BCLs). Triton-soluble proteins from 27 BCLs were incubated with ProteinChip arrays and subjected to SELDI analysis. Unsupervised global hierarchical clustering spontaneously discriminated two groups of BCLs corresponding to “luminal-like” cell lines and to “basal-like” cell lines, respectively. These groups of BCLs were also different in terms of estrogen receptor status as well as expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and other basal markers. Supervised analysis revealed various protein biomarkers with differential expression in basal-like versus luminal-like cell lines. We identified two of them as a carboxyl terminus-truncated form of ubiquitin and S100A9. In a small series of frozen human breast tumors, we confirmed that carboxyl terminus-truncated ubiquitin is observed in primary breast samples, and our results suggest its higher expression in luminal-like tumors. S100A9 up-regulation was found as part of the transcriptionally defined basal-like cluster in DNA microarrays analysis of human tumors. S100A9 association with basal subtypes as well as its poor prognosis value was demonstrated on a series of 547 tumor samples from early breast cancer deposited in a tissue microarray. Our study shows the potential of integrated genomics and proteomics profiling to improve molecular knowledge of complex tumor phenotypes and identify biomarkers with valuable diagnostic or prognostic values. PMID:18426791

  10. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  11. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  12. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  13. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  14. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  15. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  16. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  17. A novel radiofluorinated agouti-related protein for tumor angiogenesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han; Moore, Sarah J; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Hongguang; Miao, Zheng; Cochran, Frank V; Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Cochran, Jennifer R; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-02-01

    A novel protein scaffold based on the cystine knot domain of the agouti-related protein (AgRP) has been used to engineer mutants that can bind to the α(v)β(3) integrin receptor with high affinity and specificity. In the current study, an (18)F-labeled AgRP mutant (7C) was prepared and evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) probe for imaging tumor angiogenesis. AgRP-7C was synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis and site-specifically conjugated with 4-nitrophenyl 2-(18/19)F-fluoropropionate ((18/19)F-NFP) to produce the fluorinated peptide, (18/19)F-FP-AgRP-7C. Competition binding assays were used to measure the relative affinities of AgRP-7C and (19)F-FP-AgRP-7C to human glioblastoma U87MG cells that overexpress α(v)β(3) integrin. In addition, biodistribution, metabolic stability, and small animal PET imaging studies were conducted with (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C using U87MG tumor-bearing mice. Both AgRP-7C and (19)F-FP-AgRP-7C specifically competed with (125)I-echistatin for binding to U87MG cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 9.40 and 8.37 nM, respectively. Non-invasive small animal PET imaging revealed that (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C exhibited rapid and good tumor uptake (3.24 percentage injected dose per gram [% ID/g] at 0.5 h post injection [p.i.]). The probe was rapidly cleared from the blood and from most organs, resulting in excellent tumor-to-normal tissue contrasts. Tumor uptake and rapid clearance were further confirmed with biodistribution studies. Furthermore, co-injection of (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C with a large molar excess of blocking peptide c(RGDyK) significantly inhibited tumor uptake in U87MG xenograft models, demonstrating the integrin-targeting specificity of the probe. Metabolite assays showed that the probe had high stability, making it suitable for in vivo applications. (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C exhibits promising in vivo properties such as rapid tumor targeting, good tumor uptake, and excellent tumor-to-normal tissue ratios

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein modulator BMPER is highly expressed in malignant tumors and controls invasive cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Heinke, J; Kerber, M; Rahner, S; Mnich, L; Lassmann, S; Helbing, T; Werner, M; Patterson, C; Bode, C; Moser, M

    2012-06-14

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that exert important functions in cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Till date, multiple human tumors have been reported to display a dysregulation of several members of the BMP pathway that is associated with enhanced malignant tumor growth and metastasis. BMPER (BMP endothelial cell precursor-derived regulator) is a direct BMP modulator that is necessary for BMPs to exert their full-range signaling activity. Moreover, BMPER is expressed by endothelial cells and their progenitors, and has pro-angiogenic features in these cells. Here, we describe the expression of BMPER in human specimens of lung, colon and cervix carcinomas and cell lines derived from such carcinomas. In contrast to healthy tissues, BMPER is highly expressed upon malignant deterioration. Functionally, loss of BMPER in the lung tumor cell line A549 impairs proliferation, migration, invasion as well as tumor cell-induced endothelial cell sprout formation. In contrast, stimulation of A549 cells with exogenous BMPER had no further effect. We found that the BMPER effect may be transduced by regulation of the BMP target transcription factor inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Id1) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 9 and 2. These facilitators of cell migration are downregulated when BMPER is absent. To prove the relevance of our in vitro results in vivo, we generated Lewis lung carcinoma cells with impaired BMPER expression and implanted them into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. In this model, the absence of BMPER resulted in severely reduced tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, these data unequivocally demonstrate that the BMP modulator BMPER is highly expressed in malignant tumors and tumor growth is dependent on the presence of BMPER.

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein modulator BMPER is highly expressed in malignant tumors and controls invasive cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Heinke, J; Kerber, M; Rahner, S; Mnich, L; Lassmann, S; Helbing, T; Werner, M; Patterson, C; Bode, C; Moser, M

    2012-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that exert important functions in cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Till date, multiple human tumors have been reported to display a dysregulation of several members of the BMP pathway that is associated with enhanced malignant tumor growth and metastasis. BMPER (BMP endothelial cell precursor-derived regulator) is a direct BMP modulator that is necessary for BMPs to exert their full-range signaling activity. Moreover, BMPER is expressed by endothelial cells and their progenitors, and has pro-angiogenic features in these cells. Here, we describe the expression of BMPER in human specimens of lung, colon and cervix carcinomas and cell lines derived from such carcinomas. In contrast to healthy tissues, BMPER is highly expressed upon malignant deterioration. Functionally, loss of BMPER in the lung tumor cell line A549 impairs proliferation, migration, invasion as well as tumor cell-induced endothelial cell sprout formation. In contrast, stimulation of A549 cells with exogenous BMPER had no further effect. We found that the BMPER effect may be transduced by regulation of the BMP target transcription factor inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Id1) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 9 and 2. These facilitators of cell migration are down-regulated when BMPER is absent. To prove the relevance of our in vitro results in vivo, we generated Lewis lung carcinoma cells with impaired BMPER expression and implanted them into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. In this model, the absence of BMPER resulted in severely reduced tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, these data unequivocally demonstrate that the BMP modulator BMPER is highly expressed in malignant tumors and tumor growth is dependent on the presence of BMPER. PMID:22020334

  20. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver.

    PubMed

    Babich, Polina S; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and Apc(Min) mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver.

  1. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Polina S.; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V.; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V.; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and ApcMin mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver. PMID:23792645

  2. Synergy between an antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist and an antibody-cytokine fusion protein eradicates spontaneous tumor metastases.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Moehler, T; Xiang, R; Jonczyk, A; Gillies, S D; Cheresh, D A; Reisfeld, R A

    1999-02-16

    The suppression and eradication of primary tumors and distant metastases is a major goal of alternative treatment strategies for cancer, such as inhibition of angiogenesis and targeted immunotherapy. We report here a synergy between two novel monotherapies directed against vascular and tumor compartments, respectively, a tumor vasculature-specific antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins. Simultaneous and sequential combination of these monotherapies effectively eradicated spontaneous liver metastases in a poorly immunogenic syngeneic model of neuroblastoma. This was in contrast to controls subjected to monotherapies with either an antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist or antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins, which were only partially effective at the dose levels applied. Furthermore, simultaneous treatments with the integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins induced dramatic primary tumor regressions in three syngeneic murine tumor models, i.e., melanoma, colon carcinoma, and neuroblastoma. However, each agent used as monotherapy induced only a delay in tumor growth. A mechanism for this synergism was suggested because the antitumor response was accompanied by a simultaneous 50% reduction in tumor vessel density and a 5-fold increase in inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Subsequently, tumor necrosis was demonstrated only in animals receiving the combination therapy, but not when each agent was applied as monotherapy. The results suggest that these synergistic treatment modalities may provide a novel and effective tool for future therapies of metastatic cancer.

  3. Magnetically-Enabled and MR-Monitored Selective Brain Tumor Protein Delivery in Rats via Magnetic Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of bioactive proteins to tumors is associated with many difficulties that have impeded clinical translation of these promising therapeutics. Herein we present an approach, including (1) use of magnetically-responsive and MRI-visible nanoparticles as drug carriers, (2) topography-optimized intra-arterial magnetic targeting, (3) MRI-guided subject alignment within the magnetic field, and (4) surface modification of the protein drug with membrane-permeable polyethyleneimine (PEI), to prevail over the obstacles in protein delivery. Applying these methodologies, we demonstrated the delivery of a significant quantity of β-Galactosidase selectively into brain tumors of glioma-bearing rats, while limiting the exposure of normal brain regions. Clinical viability of the technologies utilized, and the ability to deliver proteins at high nanomolar-range tumor concentrations, sufficient to completely eradicate a tumor lesion with existing picomolar-potency protein toxins, renders the prospect of enabling protein-based cancer therapy extremely promising. PMID:21632104

  4. 7 CFR 1b.3 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Categorical exclusions. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.3 Categorical exclusions... individual or cumulative effect on the human environment and are excluded from the preparation...

  5. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of... environment for present and future generations. (b) Each USDA agency is responsible for compliance with...

  6. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of... environment for present and future generations. (b) Each USDA agency is responsible for compliance with...

  7. 7 CFR 1b.3 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Categorical exclusions. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.3 Categorical exclusions... individual or cumulative effect on the human environment and are excluded from the preparation...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  9. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  10. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a)...

  11. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  12. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  13. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  14. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  15. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  16. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  17. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  18. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  19. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a)...

  20. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  1. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  2. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a)...

  4. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  5. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  6. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a)...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  9. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  10. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  11. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  12. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  13. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  14. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  15. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  16. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  17. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  18. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  19. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  20. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  1. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  2. Study of protein modifications induced by phorbol ester tumor promoters in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced any specific changes in mouse epidermal proteins using the high resolution technique of two-dimensional electrophoresis. To accomplish this goal of determining the specificity and possibly the stage in promotion with which these protein changes were associated, epidermal proteins were analyzed (1) after treatment of adult mouse epidermis with several weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, (2) following treatment with TPA in combination with various inhibitors of tumor promotion, (3) in basal kerotinocytes isolated from adult epidermis following treatment with TPA or several weakly promoting agents, and (4) during an initiation-promotion experiment. Evidence was found which indicated that the potent tumor promoter TPA as well as the weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, mezerein, ethylphenylpropiolate (EPP), and mechanical abrasion, induced similar modifications of epidermal proteins, particularly among the keratins. These keratin modifications progressed with time following treatment resulting in a keratin pattern which resembled that of newborn epidermis.

  3. Cell cycle restriction is more important than apoptosis induction for RASSF1A protein tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Donninger, Howard; Clark, Jennifer A; Monaghan, Megan K; Schmidt, M Lee; Vos, Michele; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-11-01

    The Ras association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) is arguably one of the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressors in human cancer. RASSF1A modulates apoptosis via the Hippo and Bax pathways but also modulates the cell cycle. In part, cell cycle regulation appears to be dependent upon the ability of RASSF1A to complex with microtubules and regulate their dynamics. Which property of RASSF1A, apoptosis induction or microtubule regulation, is responsible for its tumor suppressor function is not known. We have identified a short conserved motif that is essential for the binding of RASSF family proteins with microtubule-associated proteins. By making a single point mutation in the motif, we were able to generate a RASSF1A variant that retains wild-type apoptotic properties but completely loses the ability to bind microtubule-associated proteins and complex with microtubules. Comparison of this mutant to wild-type RASSF1A showed that, despite retaining its proapoptotic properties, the mutant was completely unable to induce cell cycle arrest or suppress the tumorigenic phenotype. Therefore, it appears that the cell cycle/microtubule effects of RASSF1A are key to its tumor suppressor function rather than its apoptotic effects.

  4. Identification of Bidentate Salicylic Acid Inhibitors of PTP1B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PTP1B is a master regulator in the insulin and leptin metabolic pathways. Hyper-activated PTP1B results in insulin resistance and is viewed as a key factor in the onset of type II diabetes and obesity. Moreover, inhibition of PTP1B expression in cancer cells dramatically inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we report the computationally guided optimization of a salicylic acid-based PTP1B inhibitor 6, identifying new and more potent bidentate PTP1B inhibitors, such as 20h, which exhibited a > 4-fold improvement in activity. In CHO-IR cells, 20f, 20h, and 20j suppressed PTP1B activity and restored insulin receptor phosphorylation levels. Notably, 20f, which displayed a 5-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related PTPσ protein, showed no inhibition of PTP-LAR, PRL2 A/S, MKPX, or papain. Finally, 20i and 20j displayed nanomolar inhibition of PTPσ, representing interesting lead compounds for further investigation. PMID:26396684

  5. The role of stat1b in zebrafish hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Yan, Yi-lin; Titus, Tom; He, Xinjun; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    STAT1 mediates response to interferons and regulates immunity, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sensitivity of Fanconi Anemia cells to apoptosis after interferon signaling; the roles of STAT1 in embryos, however, are not understood. To explore embryonic functions of STAT1, we investigated stat1b, an unstudied zebrafish co-ortholog of human STAT1. Zebrafish stat1a encodes all five domains of the human STAT1-alpha splice form but, like the human STAT1-beta splice variant, stat1b lacks a complete transactivation domain; thus, two unlinked zebrafish paralogs encode protein forms translated from two splice variants of a single human gene, as expected by subfunctionalization after genome duplication. Phylogenetic and conserved synteny studies showed that stat1b and stat1a arose as duplicates in the teleost genome duplication (TGD) and clarified the evolutionary origin of STAT1, STAT2, STAT3, STAT4, STAT5A, STAT5B and STAT6 by tandem and genome duplication. RT-PCR revealed maternal expression of stat1a and stat1b. In situ hybridization detected stat1b but not stat1a expression in embryonic hematopoietic tissues. Morpholino knockdown of stat1b, but not stat1a, decreased expression of the myeloid and granulocyte markers spi and mpo and increased expression of the hematopoietic progenitor marker scl, the erythrocyte marker gata1, and hemoglobin. These results suggest that zebrafish Stat1b promotes myeloid development at the expense of erythroid development. PMID:21914475

  6. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors: Relationship with cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovani, G.; Lania, A.G.; Bondioni, S.; Peverelli, E.; Pedroni, C.; Ferrero, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Vicentini, L.; Arnaldi, G.; Bosari, S.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Spada, A.

    2008-01-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in growth control. Mutations of the R1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PKA regulatory subunits in non-PPNAD adrenocortical tumors causing ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and to test the impact of differential expression of these subunits on cell growth. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a defective expression of R2B in all cortisol-secreting adenomas (n = 16) compared with the normal counterpart, while both R1A and R2A were expressed at high levels in the same tissues. Conversely, carcinomas (n = 5) showed high levels of all subunits. Sequencing of R1A and R2B genes revealed a wild type sequence in all tissues. The effect of R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in mouse adrenocortical Y-1 cells. The R2-selective cAMP analogue 8-Cl-cAMP dose-dependently inhibited Y-1 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, while the R1-selective cAMP analogue 8-HA-cAMP stimulated cell proliferation. Finally, R2B gene silencing induced up-regulation of R1A protein, associated with an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose that a high R1/R2 ratio favors the proliferation of well differentiated and hormone producing adrenocortical cells, while unbalanced expression of these subunits is not required for malignant transformation.

  7. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma.

  8. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma. PMID:26073245

  9. CYP1B1 expression, a potential risk factor for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Erdmann, Christine A.; Russell, Marion

    2001-05-31

    CYP1B1 expression in non-tumor breast tissue from breast cancer patients and cancer-free individuals was determined to test the hypothesis that high CYP1B1 expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. Large interindividual variations in CYP1B1 expression were found with CYP1B1 levels notably higher in breast cancer patients than cancer-free individuals. The results indicate that CYP1B1 might play a role in breast cancer either through increased PAH activation or through metabolism of endogenous estrogen to a carcinogenic derivative.

  10. Bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7) as a potential tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Tang, Yan; Wang, Qi-Jing; Pan, Ke; Huang, Li-Xi; He, Jia; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Jiang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Zi-Qi; Weng, De-Sheng; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7) is a subunit of the PBAF complex, which functions as a transcriptional cofactor for the tumor suppressor protein p53. Down-regulation of BRD7 has been demonstrated in multiple types of cancer. This study aimed to investigate BRD7 expression and its tumor suppressive effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The expression of BRD7 was examined in clinical specimens of primary HCC and in HCC cell lines through real-time quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The prognostic value of BRD7 expression and its correlation with the clinicopathological features of HCC patients were statistically analyzed. The effect of BRD7 on the tumorigenicity of HCC was also examined using proliferation and colony-formation assays, cell-cycle assays, migration and cell-invasion assays, and xenograft nude mouse models. BRD7 was down-regulated in tumor tissues and HCC cell lines. BRD7 protein expression was strongly associated with clinical stage and tumor size. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed higher survival rates in patients with higher BRD7 expression levels compared to those with lower BRD7 levels. A multivariate analysis indicated that BRD7 expression was an independent prognostic marker. The re-introduction of BRD7 expression significantly inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion and led to cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, experiments in mice suggested that BRD7 overexpression suppresses HCC tumorigenicity in vivo. In conclusions, our data indicated that BRD7 may serve as a tumor suppressor in HCC and may be a novel molecular target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:26919247

  11. Serial Analysis of 38 Proteins during the Progression of Human Breast Tumor in Mice Using an Antibody Colocalization Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiyan; Bergeron, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Siegel, Peter M.; Juncker, David

    2015-01-01

    Proteins in serum or plasma hold great potential for use in disease diagnosis and monitoring. However, the correlation between tumor burden and protein biomarker concentration has not been established. Here, using an antibody colocalization microarray, the protein concentration in serum was measured and compared with the size of mammary xenograft tumors in 11 individual mice from the time of injection; seven blood samples were collected from each tumor-bearing mouse as well as control mice on a weekly basis. The profiles of 38 proteins detected in sera from these animals were analyzed by clustering, and we identified 10 proteins with the greatest relative increase in serum concentration that correlated with growth of the primary mammary tumor. To evaluate the diagnosis of cancer based on these proteins using either an absolute threshold (i.e. a concentration cutoff) or self-referenced differential threshold based on the increase in concentration before cell injection, receiver operating characteristic curves were produced for 10 proteins with increased concentration, and the area under curve was calculated for each time point based on a single protein or on a panel of proteins, in each case showing a rapid increase of the area under curve. Next, the sensitivity and specificity of individual and optimal protein panels were calculated, showing high accuracy as early as week 2. These results provide a foundation for studies of tumor growth through measuring serial changes of protein concentration in animal models. PMID:25680959

  12. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P < 0.05). In addition, tumors with high MTA3 expression were more likely to be of low WHO grade (P = 0.005) and reserve of body function (P = 0.014). Survival analysis showed that decreased MTA3 expression was independently associated with unfavorable overall survival of patients (P < 0.001). These results provide the first evidence that MTA3 expression was decreased in human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  13. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  14. Tumor repressor protein 53 and steroid hormones provide a new paradigm for ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Liu, Zhilin; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Deneke, Victoria; Ren, Yi Athena; Herron, Alan; Richards, JoAnne S

    2014-01-01

    The functional status of the tumor repressor protein (TP53 or TRP53) is a defining feature of ovarian cancer. Mutant or null alleles of TP53 are expressed in greater than 90% of all high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. Wild-type TP53 is elevated in low-grade serous adenocarcinomas in women and in our Pten;Kras;Amhr2-Cre mutant mouse model. Disruption of the Trp53 gene in this mouse model did not lead to high-grade ovarian cancer but did increase expression of estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and markedly enhanced the responsiveness of these cells to estrogen. Specifically, when Trp53-positive and Trp53 null mutant mice were treated with estradiol or vehicle, only the Trp53 null and Esr1-positive tumors respond vigorously to estradiol in vivo and exhibit features characteristic of high-grade type ovarian cancer: invasive growth into the ovarian stroma, rampant metastases to the peritoneal cavity, and nuclear atypia. Estrogen promoted and progesterone suppressed the growth of Trp53 null ovarian tumors and tumor cells injected ip, sc, or when grown in matrigel. Exposure of the Trp53 depleted cells to estrogen also has a profound impact on the tumor microenvironment and immune-related events. These results led to the new paradigm that TRP53 status is related to the susceptibility of transformed ovarian surface epithelial cells to estradiol-induced metastases and nuclear atypia via increased levels of estradiol receptor α.

  15. Deficiency of X-Linked Protein Kinase Nrk during Pregnancy Triggers Breast Tumor in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Takayo; Denda, Kimitoshi; Inatani, Takuya; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kumaki, Nobue; Inagaki, Yutaka; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    The onset and/or growth of breast tumor are controlled, at least in part, by estrogen. Therefore, to prevent the development of breast tumor, estrogen-dependent proliferation of mammary epithelial cells during pregnancy needs to be suppressed once the mammary gland is fully developed to enable lactation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Nrk is an X-linked protein serine/threonine kinase in the germinal center kinase family. Herein, we demonstrate a frequent occurrence of breast tumors in homozygous and heterozygous Nrk mutant mice that have experienced pregnancy/parturition. The tumors never developed in the mutant mice without a history of pregnancy/parturition. They exhibited histopathological features of noninvasive tubular adenocarcinoma, and expressed estrogen receptor α. At late gestation when estrogen receptor α expression was significantly reduced in the wild-type mammary gland, grossly normal mammary glands in the pregnant Nrk mutant mice occasionally contained hyperplastic foci continuously expressing the receptor. Consistently, Nrk expression was induced in the wild-type mammary gland at this period of pregnancy. On the other hand, the pregnant Nrk mutant mice also showed elevated blood estrogen levels at late gestation. We suggest that Nrk suppresses the excessive proliferation of mammary epithelial cells during pregnancy, and the impairment of this regulatory system leads to frequent occurrence of breast tumor in Nrk mutant mice. PMID:27634343

  16. Protein Delivery of Thymidylate Kinase Mediated by Tumor-Specific Antibody-Precoated Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Panahpour, Hamdollah; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Sagha, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy is an important, novel approach in the treatment of cancer because it interferes with certain molecules involved in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. Examples include monoclonal antibodies, microvesicles, and suicide genes. Several studies have focused on targeted therapies in prostate cancer, which is a serious cause of cancer death in men. We hypothesize that antibody-coated microvesicles can deliver thymidylate kinase, a suicide protein, to prostate cancer cells, potentiating them to death following azidothymidine (AZT) treatment. PMID:27278881

  17. Impacting tumor cell-fate by targeting the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ronan J; Lopez-Chavez, Ariel; Citrin, Deborah; Janik, John E; Morris, John C

    2011-04-06

    Survivin (BIRC5), a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family that inhibits caspases and blocks cell death is highly expressed in cancer and is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Functioning simultaneously during cell division and apoptosis inhibition, survivin plays a pivotal role in determining cell survival. Survivin has consistently been identified by molecular profiling analysis to be associated with higher tumor grade, more advanced disease, abbreviated survival, accelerated rates of recurrence, and chemotherapy and radiation resistance. Survivin's differential expression in cancer compared to normal tissue and its role as a nodal protein in a number of cellular pathways make it a highly flexible therapeutic target, suitable for small-molecule inhibitiors, molecular antagonists, and vaccination-based therapies. By targeting survivin it is hoped that multiple tumor signaling circuitries may be simultaneously disabled. This effect may be applicable to many tumor histologies irrespective of specific genetic makeup. To date, survivin inhibitors have shown modest activity as single agents, but it is anticipated that when given in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy or monoclonal antibodies they may exhibit enhanced efficacy. This review discusses the complex circuitry of survivin in human cancers and highlights clinical trials involving novel agents that target this important protein.

  18. The receptor for advanced glycation end products influences the expression of its S100 protein ligands in melanoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Meghnani, Varsha; Wagh, Anil; Indurthi, Venkata S K; Koladia, Mohit; Vetter, Stefan W; Law, Benedict; Leclerc, Estelle

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) participates in melanoma progression by promoting tumor growth. However, the mechanisms of RAGE activation in melanoma tumors are not clearly understood. To get deeper insights into these mechanisms, we transfected a melanoma cell line, which was established from a human melanoma primary tumor, with RAGE, and studied the effect of RAGE overexpression on cell proliferation and migration in vitro. We observed that overexpression of RAGE in these cells not only resulted in significantly increased migration rates compared to control cells, but also in decreased proliferation rates (Meghnani et al., 2014). In the present study, we compared the growth of xenograft tumors established from RAGE overexpressing WM115 cells, to that of control cells. We observed that when implanted in mice, RAGE overexpressing cells generated tumors faster than control cells. Analysis of protein tumor extracts showed increased levels of the RAGE ligands S100B, S100A2, S100A4, S100A6 and S100A10 in RAGE overexpressing tumors compared to control tumors. We show that the tumor growth was significantly reduced when the mice were treated with anti-RAGE antibodies, suggesting that RAGE, and probably several S100 proteins, were involved in tumor growth. We further demonstrate that the anti-RAGE antibody treatment significantly enhanced the efficacy of the alkylating drug dacarbazine in reducing the growth rate of RAGE overexpressing tumors. PMID:25310905

  19. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  20. Involvement of 14-3-3 Proteins in Regulating Tumor Progression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ju; Jan, Yee-Jee; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Liang, Shu-Man; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    There are seven mammalian isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein, which regulate multiple cellular functions via interactions with phosphorylated partners. Increased expression of 14-3-3 proteins contributes to tumor progression of various malignancies. Several isoforms of 14-3-3 are overexpressed and associate with higher metastatic risks and poorer survival rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ regulate HCC cell proliferation, tumor growth and chemosensitivity via modulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 signal pathways. Moreover, 14-3-3ε suppresses E-cadherin and induces focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression, thereby enhancing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and HCC cell migration. 14-3-3ζ forms complexes with αB-crystallin, which induces EMT and is the cause of sorafenib resistance in HCC. Finally, a recent study has indicated that 14-3-3σ induces heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression, which increases HCC cell migration. These results suggest that selective 14-3-3 isoforms contribute to cell proliferation, EMT and cell migration of HCC by regulating distinct targets and signal pathways. Targeting 14-3-3 proteins together with specific downstream effectors therefore has potential to be therapeutic and prognostic factors of HCC. In this article, we will overview 14-3-3's regulation of its downstream factors and contributions to HCC EMT, cell migration and proliferation. PMID:26083935

  1. Potential role for inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A tumor suppressor in salivary gland malignancies.

    PubMed

    Routila, Johannes; Mäkelä, Juho-Antti; Luukkaa, Heikki; Leivo, Ilmo; Irjala, Heikki; Westermarck, Jukka; Mäkitie, Antti; Ventelä, Sami

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of salivary gland malignancies remain unknown. To reveal novel molecular factors behind the development of salivary gland cancer, we performed gene expression analyses from Smgb-Tag mouse salivary gland samples. The overall purpose was to apply these results for clinical use to find new approaches for both possible therapeutic targets and more accurate diagnostic tools. Smgb-Tag mouse strain, in which salivary neoplasms arise through a dysplastic phase in submandibular glands, was investigated using genome-wide microarray expression analysis, ingenuity pathway analysis, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight human salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma samples were investigated using immunohistochemistry for validation purposes. Our genome-wide study showed that Ppp2r1b, a PP2A subunit encoding tumor suppressor gene, is underexpressed in submandibular gland tumors of Smgb-Tag mice. mTOR signaling pathway was significantly enriched and mTOR linked PP2A subunit gene B55 gamma was significantly underexpressed in the analyses. Furthermore, parallel immunohistochemical analysis of three PP2A inhibitors demonstrated that two PP2A inhibitors, CIP2A and SET, are highly expressed in both dysplastic and adenocarcinomatous tumors of the Smgb-Tag mice. In addition, all 38 investigated human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma samples stained positively for CIP2A and most for SET. Finally, p-S6 staining showed activation of mTOR pathway in human adenoid cystic carcinoma samples. Our results suggest that PP2A inhibition either via PP2A subunit underexpression or PP2A inhibitor overexpression play an important role in the formation of salivary gland malignancy, potentially due to mTOR signaling activation.

  2. Binding of the Fap2 protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum to human inhibitory receptor TIGIT protects tumors from immune cell attack.

    PubMed

    Gur, Chamutal; Ibrahim, Yara; Isaacson, Batya; Yamin, Rachel; Abed, Jawad; Gamliel, Moriya; Enk, Jonatan; Bar-On, Yotam; Stanietsky-Kaynan, Noah; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Shussman, Noam; Almogy, Gideon; Cuapio, Angelica; Hofer, Erhard; Mevorach, Dror; Tabib, Adi; Ortenberg, Rona; Markel, Gal; Miklić, Karmela; Jonjic, Stipan; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-02-17

    Bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, are present in the tumor microenvironment. However, the immunological consequences of intra-tumoral bacteria remain unclear. Here, we have shown that natural killer (NK) cell killing of various tumors is inhibited in the presence of various F. nucleatum strains. Our data support that this F. nucleatum-mediated inhibition is mediated by human, but not by mouse TIGIT, an inhibitory receptor present on all human NK cells and on various T cells. Using a library of F. nucleatum mutants, we found that the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum directly interacted with TIGIT, leading to the inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. We have further demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expressed TIGIT and that T cell activities were also inhibited by F. nucleatum via Fap2. Our results identify a bacterium-dependent, tumor-immune evasion mechanism in which tumors exploit the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum to inhibit immune cell activity via TIGIT.

  3. Protein modifications induced in mouse epidermis by potent and weak tumor-promoting hyperplasiogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.; Stephenson, K.B.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-10-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the changes in mouse epidermal proteins induced by the potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), by the moderate promoter mechanical abrasion, and by the weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents mezerein and ethylphenylpropiolate. Evidence is presented which indicates that TPA caused many changes in the epidermal protein profiles especially related to the keratins which are the major differentiation product of the epidermis. The criteria used for the identification of the keratins were extractability, isoelectric points, molecular weights, filament formation in vitro, immunological cross-reactivity, amino acid composition, and peptide mapping. Several other protein changes were evident in the more soluble epidermal proteins which were also prominent in the newborn epidermis. Mezerein and abrasion produced protein changes similar to those induced by TPA. Ethylphenylpropiolate-induced protein modifications not only occurred at later times compared with either mezerein or TPA but also were less in magnitude. However, although many of the protein modifications induced by TPA appear to be associated with the hyperplasiogenic properties of TPA, the major difference between a potent promoter like TPA and a weak promoter like ethylphenylpropiolate appeared to be related to the magnitude of the response and the time of appearance of the protein changes.

  4. Modulation of primary antibody response by protein A in tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, S I; Singh, K P; Raisuddin, S; Jafri, A; Saxena, A K; Choudhary, S; Ray, P K

    1995-11-01

    Protein A (PA) is a cell wall glycoprotein of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, which possess a number of immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. We have previously shown that PA suppresses the anti-sheep erythrocyte primary antibody response in normal mice. The present investigation evaluates the effect of protein A on the anti-sheep erythrocyte primary antibody response in tumor-bearing mice. The primary antibody response in tumor-bearing mice immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was suppressed by the intraperitoneal administration of PA in a dose-dependent fashion. The plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was used to assess this response. Maximum suppression of the PFC response was observed at 12 micrograms PA/animal (p < 0.001) and could be observed at doses as low as 1 microgram PA/animal (p < 0.01). The amount of suppression was proportional to the number of PA doses administered. In addition this effect was critically dependent on the timing of PA administration. PA showed no significant effect on PFC when injected after immunization, but it produced pronounced suppression when injected prior to the immunization with SRBC. Maximum suppression of the PFC response was observed when PA was administered one day before the antigen challenge. PA also reduced splenic localization of 51Cr labeled SRBC to 42% (p < 0.01). The altered localization of antigen in spleen may be responsible for reduced PFC response in tumor-bearing mice. Depletion of B-lymphocyte is reported to exhibit tumor inhibition. Therefore, we propose that the suppression of the primary antibody response by PA helps in tumor regression by reducing the soluble immunosuppressive immune complexes. PMID:8537611

  5. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  6. Identifying the role of Wilms tumor 1 associated protein in cancer prediction using integrative genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Sheng; Qian, Jia-Yi; Wang, Minghai; Yang, Haiwei

    2016-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor, WT1 was first identified due to its essential role in the normal development of the human genitourinary system. Wilms tumor 1 associated protein (WTAP) was subsequently revealed to interact with WT1 using yeast two-hybrid screening. The present study identified 44 complete WTAP genes in the genomes of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. The vertebrate WTAP proteins clustered into the primate, rodent and teleost lineages using phylogenetic tree analysis. From 1,347 available SNPs in the human WTAP gene, 19 were identified to cause missense mutations. WTAP was expressed in bladder, blood, brain, breast, colorectal, esophagus, eye, head and neck, lung, ovarian, prostate, skin and soft tissue cancers. A total of 17 out of 328 microarrays demonstrated an association between WTAP gene expression and cancer prognosis. However, the association between WTAP gene expression and prognosis varied in distinct types of cancer, and even in identical types of cancer from separate microarray databases. By searching the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database, 65 somatic mutations were identified in the human WTAP gene from the cancer tissue samples. These results suggest that the function of WTAP in tumor formation may be multidimensional. Furthermore, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, forkhead box protein O1, interferon regulatory factor 1, glucocorticoid receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ transcription factor binding sites were identified in the upstream (promoter) region of the human WTAP gene, suggesting that these transcription factors may be involved in WTAP functions in tumor formation. PMID:27430156

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of saliva proteins for the noninvasive differentiation of benign and malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangyuan; Huang, Shaohua; Lin, Duo; Chen, Guannan; Xu, Yuanji; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Zufang; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    The capability of saliva protein analysis, based on membrane protein purification and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), for detecting benign and malignant breast tumors is presented in this paper. A total of 97 SERS spectra from purified saliva proteins were acquired from samples obtained from three groups: 33 healthy subjects; 33 patients with benign breast tumors; and 31 patients with malignant breast tumors. Subtle but discernible changes in the mean SERS spectra of the three groups were observed. Tentative assignments of the saliva protein SERS spectra demonstrated that benign and malignant breast tumors led to several specific biomolecular changes of the saliva proteins. Multiclass partial least squares-discriminant analysis was utilized to analyze and classify the saliva protein SERS spectra from healthy subjects, benign breast tumor patients, and malignant breast tumor patients, yielding diagnostic sensitivities of 75.75%, 72.73%, and 74.19%, as well as specificities of 93.75%, 81.25%, and 86.36%, respectively. The results from this exploratory work demonstrate that saliva protein SERS analysis combined with partial least squares-discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithms has great potential for the noninvasive and label-free detection of breast cancer.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of saliva proteins for the noninvasive differentiation of benign and malignant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangyuan; Huang, Shaohua; Lin, Duo; Chen, Guannan; Xu, Yuanji; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Zufang; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    The capability of saliva protein analysis, based on membrane protein purification and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), for detecting benign and malignant breast tumors is presented in this paper. A total of 97 SERS spectra from purified saliva proteins were acquired from samples obtained from three groups: 33 healthy subjects; 33 patients with benign breast tumors; and 31 patients with malignant breast tumors. Subtle but discernible changes in the mean SERS spectra of the three groups were observed. Tentative assignments of the saliva protein SERS spectra demonstrated that benign and malignant breast tumors led to several specific biomolecular changes of the saliva proteins. Multiclass partial least squares–discriminant analysis was utilized to analyze and classify the saliva protein SERS spectra from healthy subjects, benign breast tumor patients, and malignant breast tumor patients, yielding diagnostic sensitivities of 75.75%, 72.73%, and 74.19%, as well as specificities of 93.75%, 81.25%, and 86.36%, respectively. The results from this exploratory work demonstrate that saliva protein SERS analysis combined with partial least squares–discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithms has great potential for the noninvasive and label-free detection of breast cancer. PMID:25609959

  9. PTP1B inhibitors from stems of Angelica keiskei (Ashitaba).

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Long; Gao, Li-Xin; Meng, Fan-Wang; Tang, Chun-Lan; Zhang, Ru-Jun; Li, Jing-Ya; Luo, Cheng; Li, Jia; Zhao, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    Three new chalcones, xanthoangelols K-M (1-3), together with 19 known compounds were isolated from the stems of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi, a well-known rejuvenated and anti-diabetic plant originated from Japan. The structures of compounds 1-3 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and Mosher's method. All compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Among them, six chalcones, xanthoangelol K (1), xanthoangelol (4), xanthoangelol F (5), 4-hydroxyderricin (6), xanthoangelol D (7), xanthoangelol E (8), and a coumarin, methoxsalen (17), showed strong PTP1B inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 0.82, 1.97, 1.67, 2.47, 3.97, 1.43, and 2.53μg/mL, respectively. A kinetic study revealed that compound 1 inhibited PTP1B with characteristics typical of a competitive inhibitor. Molecular docking simulations elucidated that ring B of 1 may anchor in a pocket of PTP1B and the molecule is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with Arg47, Asp48, and π-π interaction with Phe182 of PTP1B.

  10. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Egr-1 (early growth response-1 transcription factor) has been proposed to be involved in invasion and metastasis processes of human bladder cancer, but Egr-1 protein expression levels in human bladder cancer have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the expression levels of Egr-1 protein in early stages of human bladder cancer and correlated it to later progression. Methods Expression of Egr-1 protein in human bladder cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, on a tissue microarray constructed from tumors from 289 patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. Results The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling were found to localize at the tumor front in some of the tumor biopsies. Conclusion The results from this study support a potential involvement of Egr-1 in the progression from non-muscle invasive bladder cancers to muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:19878561

  11. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 suppresses invasion and anchorage-independent growth of astrocytic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockbill, Louisa M. R.; Murk, Kai; Love, Seth; Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors are the most common form of primary brain tumor. Astrocytic tumor cells infiltrate the surrounding CNS tissue, allowing them to evade removal upon surgical resection of the primary tumor. Dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton are crucial to cancer cell invasion, but the specific mechanisms that underlie the particularly invasive phenotype of astrocytic tumor cells are unclear. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) is a PDZ and BAR domain–containing protein that inhibits actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization and is involved in regulating the trafficking of a number of cell-surface receptors. Here we report that, in contrast to other cancers, PICK1 expression is down-regulated in grade IV astrocytic tumor cell lines and also in clinical cases of the disease in which grade IV tumors have progressed from lower-grade tumors. Exogenous expression of PICK1 in the grade IV astrocytic cell line U251 reduces their capacity for anchorage-independent growth, two-dimensional migration, and invasion through a three-dimensional matrix, strongly suggesting that low PICK1 expression plays an important role in astrocytic tumorigenesis. We propose that PICK1 negatively regulates neoplastic infiltration of astrocytic tumors and that manipulation of PICK1 is an attractive possibility for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26466675

  12. Polyproteins related to the major core protein of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Atterwill, M

    1978-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) contains several low-molecular-weight proteins which, together with the genomic RNA, constitute the core structure of the virion. The most abundant protein in the core is the 27,000-dalton protein (p27), and, by analogy to the type C viruses, this protein probably forms the core shell. In mouse mammary tumor cell lines (GR and Mm5MT) producing MuMTV the major p57 antigenic specificity resides in a large protein, which migrates in polyacrylamide gels as a doublet of 77,000 and 75,000 daltons (p 77/75). A series of lower-molecular-weight proteins, p61, p48, p38, and p34, is also present in small amounts and is probably derived by proteolytic cleavage of the p 77/75. These proteins have been identified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antiserum, and their sequence relatedness to p27 has been determined by an analysis of the peptides after trypsin digestion. After a 15-min pulse with [35S]-methionine, all of the p27-related proteins in these cell lines were labelled and, during a subsequent chase, progressively disappeared. The p27 was labeled poorly during the pulse, but the amount of label in this protein increased during the chase. A quantitation of these experiments suggested that the majority of the p27-related proteins were quite rapidly turned over in these cell lines. Hence, if p27 is derived by a progressive proteolytic cleavage mechanism, then the process is inefficient in the GR cells and only moderately efficient in the Mm5MT cells. When MuMTV was isolated from the culture medium of these cells harvested at 5-min intervals, the major p27-related protein was p34. The p27 accounted for only 29% of the anti-p27 serum immunoprecipitable proteins compared to 95% in virus isolated from an 18-h harvest. Incubation of the rapid-harvest virus at 37 degrees C for 2 h resulted in some conversion of p34 to p27. These results suggest that some of the p27 in MuMTV is formed in the virions by proteolytic cleavage of p34

  13. Validation of a P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) Humanized Mouse Model by Integrating Selective Absolute Quantification of Human MDR1, Mouse Mdr1a and Mdr1b Protein Expressions with In Vivo Functional Analysis for Blood-Brain Barrier Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Muhammad Waqas; Uchida, Yasuo; Hoshi, Yutaro; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to establish a useful validation method for newly generated humanized mouse models. The novel approach of combining our established species-specific protein quantification method combined with in vivo functional studies is evaluated to validate a humanized mouse model of P-gp/MDR1 efflux transporter. The P-gp substrates digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were administered to male FVB Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (FVB WT), FVB Mdr1a/1b(-/-) (Mdr1a/1b(-/-)), C57BL/6 Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (C57BL/6 WT) and humanized C57BL (hMDR1) mice. Brain-to-plasma total concentration ratios (Kp) were measured. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomic (QTAP) analysis was used to selectively quantify the protein expression levels of hMDR1, Mdr1a and Mdr1b in the isolated brain capillaries. The protein expressions of other transporters, receptors and claudin-5 were also quantified. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil, and docetaxel were 20, 30 and 4 times higher in the Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice than in the FVB WT controls, as expected. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were 2, 16 and 2-times higher in the hMDR1 compared to the C57BL/6 WT mice. The hMDR1 mice had 63- and 9.1-fold lower expressions of the hMDR1 and Mdr1a proteins than the corresponding expression of Mdr1a in C57BL/6 WT mice, respectively. The protein expression levels of other molecules were almost consistent between C57BL/6 WT and hMDR1 mice. The P-gp function at the BBB in the hMDR1 mice was smaller than that in WT mice due to lower protein expression levels of hMDR1 and Mdr1a. The combination of QTAP and in vivo functional analyses was successfully applied to validate the humanized animal model and evaluates its suitability for further studies. PMID:25932627

  14. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs. PMID:26997437

  15. LAPTM4B-35 protein is a weak tumor-associated antigen candidate

    PubMed Central

    SHI, GUILAN; ZHOU, CHUNXIA; WANG, DONGMEI; MA, WENBO; ZHANG, SHUREN

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4β (LAPTM4B) is a gene that has been indicated to be involved in cancer. It is located at chromosome 8q22 and is composed of seven exons and six introns. LAPTM4B encodes two protein isoforms: LAPTM4B-35 and LAPTM4B-24. LAPTM4B-35 is markedly upregulated and LAPTM4B-24 is downregulated in several types of cancer. LAPTM4B-35 is 91 amino acids (N91) longer than LAPTM4B-24 at the N-terminus. In the present study, western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis and the B16F10-N91 tumor bearing-mice experiments were used to evaluate whether the overexpression of N91 indicates its potential as a candidate tumor-associated antigen. The results revealed that N91 was expressed in a wide range of normal mouse tissues and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, with varying expression levels. The weak immunogenicity of N91 protein suggested it was a weak candidate antigen; however, the N91 protein was associated with cell proliferation. PMID:24396432

  16. Recombinant saphenous vein 5-HT1B receptors of the rabbit: comparative pharmacology with human 5-HT1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wurch, T; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1997-01-01

    1. The rabbit recombinant saphenous vein 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (r 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by measuring adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cycle AMP) formation upon exposure to various 5-HT receptor ligands. The effects of agonists and antagonists were compared with their effects determined previously at the human cloned 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions. 2. Intact C6-glial cells expressing rb HT1B receptors exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) binding sites with a Kd of 0.80 +/- 0.13 nM and a Bmax between 225 to 570 fmol mg-1 protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined in a membrane preparation with [3H]-5-CT or [3H]-N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(-4 -pyridyl) benzamide (GR 125,743) were similar. With the exception of ketanserin, ligand affinities were comparable to those determined at the clones h 5-HT1B receptor site. 3. rb 5-HT1B receptors were negatively coupled to cyclic AMP formation upon stimulation with 5-HT agonists. Of the several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-CT was the most potent, the potency rank order being: 5-CT > 5-HT > zolmitriptan > naratriptan > rizatriptan > sumatriptan > R (+)-8-(hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The maximal responses of these agonists were similar to those induced by 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2 = 0.87; P < 0.002) with their potency at the cloned h 5-HT1B receptor subtype. 4. 2'-Methyl-4-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-e-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]-amide (GR 127,935), methiothepin and ketanserin each behaved as silent, competitive antagonists at rb 5HT1B receptors; pKB values were 8.41, 8.32 and 7.05, respectively when naratriptan was used as an agonist. These estimates accorded with their binding affinities and the potencies found on 5-HT and/or sumatriptan

  17. Cloning/Characterization of the Canine Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1b4 (Oatp1b4) and Classification of the Canine OATP/SLCO Members

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chunshan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The human liver specific organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 are involved in the elimination of numerous xenobiotics and drugs. Although dogs are frequently used for toxicologic and pharmacokinetic characterization of novel drugs, nothing is known about their OATP1B1/1B3 ortholog. Therefore, we cloned and characterized the first canine organic anion transporting polypeptide from dog liver, termed Oatp1b4. The isolated Oatp1b4 cDNA comprises 3661 base pairs (bp) with an open reading frame of 2076 bp, encoding a 692-amino acid protein with a molecular mass of ~85 kDa. The Oatp1b4 gene is approximately 61 kb long and has a similar organization as the human OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 with 13 exons identical in length. Northern blot analysis shows that Oatp1b4 is predominantly expressed in the liver. Oatp1b4 mediates sodium-independent transport of typical organic anions including bromosulfophthalein (BSP), [D-penicillamine2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE), estradiol-17β-glucuronide (E17βG), estrone-3-sulfate and taurocholate. In addition, Oatp1b4 transports the OATP1B3-specific substrate cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8). Kinetic studies showed that Oatp1b4-mediated E17βG and estrone-3-sulfate transports were monophasic with Km values of 5 ± 1 μM and 33 ± 4 μM, respectively. In conclusion, the cloned canine Oatp1b4 will provide additional molecular basis to further characterize the species difference of the OATP1B family members. PMID:20079461

  18. Dropping in on the lipid droplet- tumor protein D52 (TPD52) as a new regulator and resident protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyan; Frost, Sarah; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets are essential for both the storage and retrieval of excess cellular nutrients, and their biology is regulated by a diverse range of cellular proteins, some of which function at the lipid droplet. Numerous studies have characterized lipid droplet proteomes in different organisms and cell types, and RNAi whole genome screening studies have examined the genetic regulation of lipid storage in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. While tumor protein D52 (TPD52) did not emerge from earlier studies as a strong candidate, exogenous expression of human TPD52 in cultured cells resulted in significantly increased numbers of lipid droplets, and oleic acid supplementation increased TPD52 detection at both lipid droplets and the Golgi apparatus. These results suggest that direct testing of proteins that are infrequently but recurrently identified in proteomic and RNAi screening studies may identify novel lipid droplet regulators. While the analysis of these possibly lower-abundance or itinerant lipid droplet proteins may be more technically challenging, such proteins could facilitate a more detailed interrogation of emerging aspects of lipid droplet biology. PMID:27617178

  19. Adherens junctional associated protein-1: a novel 1p36 tumor suppressor candidate in gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Fee, Brian E; Rivas, Miriam V; Lin, James; Adamson, David Cory

    2014-07-01

    In a broad range of human cancers 1p36 has been a mutational hotspot which strongly suggests that the loss of tumor suppressor activity maps to this genomic region during tumorigenesis. Adherens junctional associated protein-1 (AJAP1; also known as Shrew1) was initially discovered as a novel transmembrane protein of adherent junctions in epithelial cells. Gene profiling showed AJAP1 on 1p36 is frequently lost or epigenetically silenced. AJAP1 may affect cell motility, migration, invasion and proliferation by unclear mechanisms. AJAP1 may be translocated to the nucleus, via its interaction with β-catenin complexes, where it can regulate gene transcription, then possibly have a potent impact on cell cycling and apoptosis. Significantly, loss of AJAP1 expression predicts poor clinical outcome of patients with malignant gliomas such as GBM and it may serve as a promising tumor suppressor-related target. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge that may identify AJAP1 as a tumor suppressor in gliomas.

  20. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types. PMID:26568031

  1. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  2. Metastasis-associated Protein 1 Drives Tumor Cell Migration and Invasion through Transcriptional Repression of RING Finger Protein 144A*

    PubMed Central

    Marzook, Hezlin; Li, Da-Qiang; Nair, Vasudha S.; Mudvari, Prakriti; Reddy, Sirigiri Divijendra Natha; Pakala, Suresh B.; Santhoshkumar, T. R.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a component of the nucleosome-remodeling and histone deacetylase complex, is widely up-regulated in human cancers and significantly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis, but the mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Here, we report that MTA1 transcriptionally represses the expression of RING finger protein 144A (RNF144A), an uncharacterized gene whose protein product possesses potential E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, by recruiting the histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (c/EBPα) co-repressor complex onto human RNF144A promoter. Furthermore, an inverse correlation between the expression levels of MTA1 and RNF144A was demonstrated in publicly available breast cancer microarray datasets and the MCF10 breast cancer progression model system. To address functional aspects of MTA1 regulation of RNF144A, we demonstrate that RNF144A is a novel suppressor of cancer migration and invasion, two requisite steps of metastasis in vivo, and knockdown of endogenous RNF144A by small interfering RNAs accelerates the migration and invasion of MTA1-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that RNF144A is partially responsible for MTA1-mediated migration and invasion and that MTA1 overexpression in highly metastatic cancer cells drives cell migration and invasion by, at least in part, interfering with the suppressive function of RNF144A through transcriptional repression of RNF144A expression. Together, these findings provide novel mechanistic insights into regulation of tumor progression and metastasis by MTA1 and highlight a previously unrecognized role of RNF144A in MTA1-driven cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:22184113

  3. Regulation of human PTCH1b expression by different 5' untranslated region cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Ozretić, Petar; Bisio, Alessandra; Musani, Vesna; Trnski, Diana; Sabol, Maja; Levanat, Sonja; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    PTCH1 gene codes for a 12-pass transmembrane receptor with a negative regulatory role in the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PTCH1 germline mutations cause Gorlin syndrome, a disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and tumor susceptibility. The autosomal dominant inheritance, and the evidence for PTCH1 haploinsufficiency, suggests that fine-tuning systems of protein patched homolog 1 (PTC1) levels exist to properly regulate the pathway. Given the role of 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) in protein expression, our aim was to thoroughly explore cis-regulatory elements in the 5'UTR of PTCH1 transcript 1b. The (CGG)n polymorphism was the main potential regulatory element studied so far but with inconsistent results and no clear association between repeat number and disease risk. Using luciferase reporter constructs in human cell lines here we show that the number of CGG repeats has no strong impact on gene expression, both at mRNA and protein levels. We observed variability in the length of 5'UTR and changes in abundance of the associated transcripts after pathway activation. We show that upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) present only in longer 5'UTRs could negatively regulate the amount of PTC1 isoform L (PTC1-L). The existence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) observed using different approaches and mapped in the region comprising the CGG repeats, would counteract the effect of the uAUGs and enable synthesis of PTC1-L under stressful conditions, such as during hypoxia. Higher relative translation efficiency of PTCH1b mRNA in HEK 293T cultured hypoxia was observed by polysomal profiling and Western blot analyses. All our results point to an exceptionally complex and so far unexplored role of 5'UTR PTCH1b cis-element features in the regulation of the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PMID:25826662

  4. A nucleolar protein, H19 opposite tumor suppressor (HOTS), is a tumor growth inhibitor encoded by a human imprinted H19 antisense transcript

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Patrick; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    The H19 gene, which localizes within a chromosomal region on human chromosome 11p15 that is commonly lost in Wilms tumor (WT), encodes an imprinted untranslated RNA. However, the biological significance of the H19 noncoding transcript remains unresolved because replacement of the RNA transcript with a neocassette has no obvious phenotypic effect. Here we show that the human H19 locus also encodes a maternally expressed, translated gene, antisense to the known H19 transcript, which is conserved in primates. This gene, termed HOTS for H19 opposite tumor suppressor, encodes a protein that localizes to the nucleus and nucleolus and that interacts with the human enhancer of rudimentary homolog (ERH) protein. WTs that show loss of heterozygosity of 11p15 or loss of imprinting of IGF2 also silence HOTS (7/7 and 10/10, respectively). Overexpression of HOTS inhibits Wilms, rhabdoid, rhabdomyosarcoma, and choriocarcinoma tumor cell growth, and silencing HOTS by RNAi increases in vitro colony formation and in vivo tumor growth. These results demonstrate that the human H19 locus harbors an imprinted gene encoding a tumor suppressor protein within the long-sought WT2 locus. PMID:21940503

  5. Identification and evaluation of metastasis-related proteins, oxysterol binding protein-like 5 and calumenin, in lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Imai, Sunao; Zhao, Xiluli; Yamashita, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis is an important prognosis factor in lung cancer, therefore, it is imperative to identify target molecules and elucidate molecular mechanism of metastasis for developing new therapeutics and diagnosis methods. We searched for metastasis-related proteins by utilizing a novel antibody proteome technology developed in our laboratory that facilitated efficient screening of useful target proteins. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis identified sixteen proteins, which were highly expressed in metastatic lung cancer cells, as protein candidates. Monoclonal single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) binding to candidates were isolated from a scFv-displaying phage library by affinity selection. Tissue microarray analysis of scFvs binding to candidates revealed that oxysterol binding protein-like 5 (OSBPL5) and calumenin (CALU) were expressed at a significantly higher levels in the lung tissues of metastasis-positive cases than that in the metastasis-negative cases (OSBPL5; p=0.0156, CALU; p=0.0055). Furthermore, 80% of OSBPL5 and CALU double-positive cases were positive for lymph node metastasis. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of OSBPL5 and CALU promoted invasiveness of lung cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of these proteins using respective siRNAs reversed the invasiveness of the lung cancer cells. Moreover, these proteins were expressed in lung tumor tissues, but not in normal lung tissues. In conclusion, OSBPL5 and CALU are related to metastatic potential of lung cancer cells, and they could be useful targets for cancer diagnosis and also for development of drugs against metastasis.

  6. A recombinant vaccinia virus containing the papilloma E2 protein promotes tumor regression by stimulating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rosales, C; Graham, V V; Rosas, G A; Merchant, H; Rosales, R

    2000-09-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is associated with cervical cancer. The E6 and E7 papillomavirus proteins are normally required for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Expression of these proteins in infected cells is negatively regulated by the binding of the papilloma E2 protein to the long terminal control region of the papilloma virus genome. The E2 protein can also promote cell arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Therefore, it is clear that this protein has the potential of inhibiting the malignant phenotype. Because, anticancer vaccines based in vaccinia viruses have recently been shown to be an effective way to treat and to eradicate tumors, a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the E2 gene of bovine papilloma virus (Modified Vaccinia Ankara, MVA E2) was created, to explore further the antitumor potential of the E2 protein. A series of rabbits, containing the VX2 transplantable papilloma carcinoma, were treated with MVA E2. An impressive tumor regression, up to a complete disappearance of tumor, was observed in most animals (80%). In contrast, very little or no regression was detected if the normal vaccinia virus was used. Lymphocytes isolated from MVA E2-treated rabbits did not show cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. However, in these animals a humoral immune response against tumor cells was observed. These antitumor antibodies were capable of activating macrophages to destroy tumor cells efficiently. These data indicate that injecting the MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus directly into the tumor results in a robust and long-lasting tumor regression. Data also suggest that antitumor antibodies are responsible, at least in part, for eliminating tumors by activating macrophage antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

  7. Inhibition of Snail1-DNA-PKcs protein-protein interface sensitizes cancer cells and inhibits tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ga-Young; Pyun, Bo-Jeong; Seo, Haeng Ran; Jin, Yeung Bae; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study suggested that the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) interacts with Snail1, which affects genomic instability, sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, and migration of tumor cells by reciprocal regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1. Here, we further investigate that a peptide containing 7-amino acid sequences (amino acids 15-21) of Snail1 (KPNYSEL, SP) inhibits the endogenous interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 through primary interaction with DNA-PKcs. SP restored the inhibited DNA-PKcs repair activity and downstream pathways. On the other hand, DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation of Snail1 was inhibited by SP, which resulted in decreased Snail1 stability and Snail1 functions. However, these phenomena were only shown in p53 wild-type cells, not in p53-defective cells. From these results, it is suggested that interfering with the protein interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 might be an effective strategy for sensitizing cancer cells and inhibiting tumor migration, especially in both Snail1-overexpressing and DNA-PKcs-overexpressing cancer cells with functional p53.

  8. Cellular and Tumor Radiosensitivity is Correlated to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Expression Level in Tumors Without EGFR Amplification;Epidermal growth factor receptor; Radiotherapy; Squamous cell carcinoma; Biomarker; Local tumor control

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Saker, Jarob; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Yaromina, Ala; Meyer-Staeckling, Soenke; Scherkl, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Brandt, Burkhard; Grenman, Reidar; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: There is conflicting evidence for whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in human tumors can be used as a marker of radioresponse. Therefore, this association was studied in a systematic manner using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines grown as cell cultures and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The study was performed with 24 tumor cell lines of different tumor types, including 10 SCC lines, which were also investigated as xenografts on nude mice. Egfr gene dose and the length of CA-repeats in intron 1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction, protein expression in vitro by Western blot and in vivo by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radiosensitivity in vitro by colony formation. Data were correlated with previously published tumor control dose 50% data after fractionated irradiation of xenografts of the 10 SCC. Results: EGFR protein expression varies considerably, with most tumor cell lines showing moderate and only few showing pronounced upregulation. EGFR upregulation could only be attributed to massive gene amplification in the latter. In the case of little or no amplification, in vitro EGFR expression correlated with both cellular and tumor radioresponse. In vivo EGFR expression did not show this correlation. Conclusions: Local tumor control after the fractionated irradiation of tumors with little or no gene amplification seems to be dependent on in vitro EGFR via its effect on cellular radiosensitivity.

  9. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a) The... by calling (202) 502-8390 or 1-888-889-8030 (toll free), by e-mail at hotline@ferc.gov, or writing...

  10. Rescued expression of WIF-1 in gallbladder cancer inhibits tumor growth and induces tumor cell apoptosis with altered expression of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Du, Qiang; Wu, Weibao; She, Feifei; Chen, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved metabolic pathway, the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and several other processes. In normal cells, this pathway is suppressed, and abnormal activation is often associated with tumor occurrence and development. In certain types of tumor, Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), an inhibitor of the Wnt pathway, inhibits tumor growth. However, the effect of the expression of WIF-1 on gallbladder cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were conducted. The present study demonstrated that, in gallbladder cancer, WIF-1 generally exhibited low levels of expression as a result of gene promoter methylation. Treatment with the drug, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, increased the expression of WIF-1 in the GBC-SD gallbladder cell line. In addition, a WIF-1-expression plasmid was transfected into GBC-SD cells, and it was found that cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis declined significantly, whereas the apoptotic rate increased. A nude mouse tumor transplantation experiment showed that the oncogenicity of the GBC-SD cells expressing WIF-1 was substantially lower, compared with that of the untransfected GBC-SD cells and of GBD-SD cells expressing the control plasmid. A fluorescent protein chip experiment showed that the restored expression of WIF-1 affected the expression of several cellular proteins. These alterations may explain the different biological behavior of the tumor cells expressing WIF-1. As an effective inhibitory factor of the Wnt signaling pathway, WIF-1 modulated the expression of proteins controlling the proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis of gallbladder tumor cells, thus suppressing the tumor. Therefore, WIF-1 may be an effective treatment target for gallbladder cancer. PMID:27430608

  11. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) is a novel tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and many patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC), and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) fail to respond to conventional therapies, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Additional therapeutic targets and treatment options are needed for these patients. We recently reported that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is highly expressed in ATC and confers an aggressive phenotype when overexpressed in DTC cells. Methods Microarray analysis was used to identify downstream targets of PPARγ in ATC cells. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to assess thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) expression in thyroid cancer cell lines and primary tumor specimens. Retroviral transduction was used to generate ATC cell lines that overexpress TXNIP, and assays that assess glucose uptake, viable cell proliferation, and invasion were used to characterize the in vitro properties of these cells. An orthotopic thyroid cancer mouse model was used to assess the effect of TXNIP overexpression in ATC cell lines in vivo. Results Using microarray analysis, we show that TXNIP is highly upregulated when PPARγ is depleted from ATC cells. Using Western blot analysis and IHC, we show that DTC and ATC cells exhibit differential TXNIP expression patterns. DTC cell lines and patient tumors have high TXNIP expression in contrast to low or absent expression in ATC cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of TXNIP decreases the growth of HTh74 cells compared to vector controls and inhibits glucose uptake in the ATC cell lines HTh74 and T238. Importantly, TXNIP overexpression in T238 cells results in attenuated tumor growth and decreased metastasis in an orthotopic thyroid cancer mouse model. Conclusions Our findings indicate that TXNIP functions as a tumor suppressor in thyroid cells, and its downregulation is likely important in

  12. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  13. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a Dual Functional Protein Involved in the Immune Response of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-01-01

    Insect gut immunity is the first line of defense against oral infection. Although a few immune-related molecules in insect intestine has been identified by genomics or proteomics approach with comparison to well-studied tissues, such as hemolymph or fat body, our knowledge about the molecular mechanism underlying the gut immunity which would involve a variety of unidentified molecules is still limited. To uncover additional molecules that might take part in pathogen recognition, signal transduction or immune regulation in insect intestine, a T7 phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut is constructed. By use of different ligands for biopanning, Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been selected. BmTCTP is produced in intestinal epithelial cells and released into the gut lumen. The protein level of BmTCTP increases at the early time points during oral microbial infection and declines afterwards. In vitro binding assay confirms its activity as a multi-ligand binding molecule and it can further function as an opsonin that promotes the phagocytosis of microorganisms. Moreover, it can induce the production of anti-microbial peptide via a signaling pathway in which ERK is required and a dynamic tyrosine phosphorylation of certain cytoplasmic membrane protein. Taken together, our results characterize BmTCTP as a dual-functional protein involved in both the cellular and the humoral immune response of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. PMID:23894441

  14. Development of an ELISA detecting Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 in serum of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Houda; Seillier, Marion; Sandi, Maria José; Peuget, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Dusetti, Nelson J; Iovanna, Juan L; Rocchi, Palma; Amri, Mohamed; Carrier, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) plays an important role during cell stress response in synergy with the potent "genome-keeper" p53. In human, the gene encoding TP53INP1 is expressed at very high level in some pathological situations, such as inflammation and prostate cancer (PC). TP53INP1 overexpression in PC seems to be a worse prognostic factor, particularly predictive of biological cancer relapse, making TP53INP1 a relevant specific target for molecular therapy of Castration Resistant (CR) PC. In that context, detection of TP53INP1 in patient biological fluids is a promising diagnostic avenue. We report here successful development of a new Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) detecting TP53INP1, taking advantage of molecular tools (monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and recombinant proteins) generated in the laboratory during the course of basic functional investigations devoted to TP53INP1. The ELISA principle is based on a sandwich immunoenzymatic system, TP53INP1 protein being trapped by a first specific mAb coated on microplate then recognized by a second specific mAb. This new assay allows specific detection of TP53INP1 in serum of several PC patients. This breakthrough paves the way towards investigation of a large cohort of patients and assessment of clinical applications of TP53INP1 dosage. PMID:24600558

  15. A diverse family of proteins containing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domains.

    PubMed

    Zapata, J M; Pawlowski, K; Haas, E; Ware, C F; Godzik, A; Reed, J C

    2001-06-29

    We have identified three new tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain-containing proteins in humans using bioinformatics approaches, including: MUL, the product of the causative gene in Mulibrey Nanism syndrome; USP7 (HAUSP), an ubiquitin protease; and SPOP, a POZ domain-containing protein. Unlike classical TRAF family proteins involved in TNF family receptor (TNFR) signaling, the TRAF domains (TDs) of MUL, USP7, and SPOP are located near the NH(2) termini or central region of these proteins, rather than carboxyl end. MUL and USP7 are capable of binding in vitro via their TDs to all of the previously identified TRAF family proteins (TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF4, TRAF5, and TRAF6), whereas the TD of SPOP interacts weakly with TRAF1 and TRAF6 only. The TD of MUL also interacted with itself, whereas the TDs of USP7 and SPOP did not self-associate. Analysis of various MUL and USP7 mutants by transient transfection assays indicated that the TDs of these proteins are necessary and sufficient for suppressing NF-kappaB induction by TRAF2 and TRAF6 as well as certain TRAF-binding TNF family receptors. In contrast, the TD of SPOP did not inhibit NF-kappaB induction. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy indicated that MUL localizes to cytosolic bodies, with targeting to these structures mediated by a RBCC tripartite domain within the MUL protein. USP7 localized predominantly to the nucleus, in a TD-dependent manner. Data base searches revealed multiple proteins containing TDs homologous to those found in MUL, USP7, and SPOP throughout eukaryotes, including yeast, protists, plants, invertebrates, and mammals, suggesting that this branch of the TD family arose from an ancient gene. We propose the moniker TEFs (TD-encompassing factors) for this large family of proteins.

  16. Efficient killing of CD22{sup +} tumor cells by a humanized diabody-RNase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Juergen . E-ma