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Sample records for protein 3 regulatory

  1. Moonlighting chaperone-like activity of the universal regulatory 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2017-05-01

    The ubiquitous eukaryotic 14-3-3 proteins coordinate multiple cellular processes due to their well-known regulatory function, which is based on specific recognition of phosphorylated motifs in their partners. In this context, 14-3-3 proteins have been called 'chaperones'. Although in the classical meaning this is not fully correct, recent studies have revealed that they can indeed be an integral part of the protein quality control system, as they (a) display ATP-independent anti-aggregation ('holdase') activity, similar to that of the unrelated small heat shock proteins, (b) assist in clearing misfolded proteins by directing them to proteasomes or aggresomes, (c) cooperate with classical chaperones for substrate refolding, and also (d) are associated with neurodegenerative disorders by affecting aggregation of tau, prion protein, α-synuclein, huntingtin, etc. Importantly, these activities are usually independent of substrate phosphorylation and therefore should be considered as distinct, 'moonlighting' functions of 14-3-3 proteins that mimic and complement the functions of dedicated molecular chaperones. Although the precise mechanism of this activity is still unknown, it has been shown that it is not dependent on the unstructured C-terminal region or the amphipathic phosphopeptide-binding groove. However, since disassembly of 14-3-3 dimers significantly increases their chaperone-like activity, the dimer interface, located in the N terminus, possessing a high disorder propensity and pronounced hydrophobicity, is likely to be involved. Various factors affecting the oligomeric status of 14-3-3 proteins can thus regulate the balance between regulatory phosphomotif binding and genuine chaperone-like activity. Understanding the latter mode of 14-3-3 functioning is fundamental to defining the underlying molecular mechanisms for a range of human disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  3. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl−/HCO3− exchanger 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl− uptake and HCO3− secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl−/HCO3− exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1–480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3− secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl−/HCO3− exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2. PMID:26716707

  4. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Leonn Mendes Soares; Gomes, Samara Tatielle Monteiro; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg) development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance. PMID:28603524

  5. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  6. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  7. Lung Angiogenesis Requires CD4+Forkhead Homeobox Protein-3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Zhong, Qiong; Jenkins, John; Moldobaeva, Aigul

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis in ischemic organs is modulated by immune cells. Systemic neovascularization of the ischemic lung requires macrophages, with chemokines playing a central role in new vessel growth. Because regulatory T (Treg) cells modulate tumor-induced neovascularization, we questioned whether this CD4+ lymphocyte subset impacts blood vessel growth during ischemia. In a model of left lung ischemia, an increase in CD4+ CD25+ forkhead homeobox protein-3 (Foxp3)+ cells was observed 3–5 days after the onset of ischemia in wild-type C57Bl/6 mice. Using transgenic mice where Foxp3+ Treg cells can be depleted with diphtheria toxin (DT; Foxp3DTR), we unexpectedly found that Foxp3+ Treg depletion led to markedly reduced lung angiogenesis (90% reduction from Foxp3gfp controls). Adoptive transfer studies using CD4+ CD25+ splenocytes from congenic CD45.1 mice into Foxp3+ Treg–depleted mice showed an almost complete recovery of the angiogenic phenotype (80% of Foxp3gfp controls). A survey of lung gene expression of angiogenic (lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine [LIX], IL-6, IL-17) and angiostatic (IFN-γ, transforming growth factor-β, IL-10) cytokines showed Treg-dependent differences only in LIX (CXCL5) and IL-6. Protein confirmation demonstrated a significant reduction in LIX in Treg-deficient mice compared with controls 5 days after the onset of ischemia. Phenotyping other inflammatory cells in the lung by multicolor flow cytometry demonstrated a significantly reduced number of macrophages (major histocombatibility complex class II [MHCII]int, CD11C+) in Treg-deficient lungs compared with Treg-sufficient lungs. Treg cells are essential for maximal systemic angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia. One likely mechanism responsible for the decrease in angiogenesis in Treg-depleted mice was the decline in the essential CXC chemokine, LIX. PMID:25275926

  8. Computational identification of new structured cis-regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated region of human protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei Sylvia; Brown, Chris M

    2012-10-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acids (RNAs) contain a large number of cis-regulatory RNA elements that function in many types of post-transcriptional regulation. These cis-regulatory elements are often characterized by conserved structures and/or sequences. Although some classes are well known, given the wide range of RNA-interacting proteins in eukaryotes, it is likely that many new classes of cis-regulatory elements are yet to be discovered. An approach to this is to use computational methods that have the advantage of analysing genomic data, particularly comparative data on a large scale. In this study, a set of structural discovery algorithms was applied followed by support vector machine (SVM) classification. We trained a new classification model (CisRNA-SVM) on a set of known structured cis-regulatory elements from 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and successfully distinguished these and groups of cis-regulatory elements not been strained on from control genomic and shuffled sequences. The new method outperformed previous methods in classification of cis-regulatory RNA elements. This model was then used to predict new elements from cross-species conserved regions of human 3'-UTRs. Clustering of these elements identified new classes of potential cis-regulatory elements. The model, training and testing sets and novel human predictions are available at: http://mRNA.otago.ac.nz/CisRNA-SVM.

  9. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC.

  10. Hormone-induced 14-3-3γ Adaptor Protein Regulates Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Activity and Steroid Biosynthesis in MA-10 Leydig Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Rone, Malena B.; Blonder, Josip; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hales, D. Buck; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is the sole precursor of steroid hormones in the body. The import of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, relies on the formation of a protein complex that assembles at the outer mitochondrial membrane called the transduceosome. The transduceosome contains several mitochondrial and cytosolic components, including the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR). Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induces de novo synthesis of STAR, a process shown to parallel maximal steroid production. In the hCG-dependent steroidogenic MA-10 mouse Leydig cell line, the 14-3-3γ protein was identified in native mitochondrial complexes by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting, and its levels increased in response to hCG treatment. The 14-3-3 proteins bind and regulate the activity of many proteins, acting via target protein activation, modification and localization. In MA-10 cells, cAMP induces 14-3-3γ expression parallel to STAR expression. Silencing of 14-3-3γ expression potentiates hormone-induced steroidogenesis. Binding motifs of 14-3-3γ were identified in components of the transduceosome, including STAR. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate a hormone-dependent interaction between 14-3-3γ and STAR that coincides with reduced 14-3-3γ homodimerization. The binding site of 14-3-3γ on STAR was identified to be Ser-194 in the STAR-related sterol binding lipid transfer (START) domain, the site phosphorylated in response to hCG. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 14-3-3γ negatively regulates steroidogenesis by binding to Ser-194 of STAR, thus keeping STAR in an unfolded state, unable to induce maximal steroidogenesis. Over time 14-3-3γ homodimerizes and dissociates from STAR, allowing this protein to induce maximal mitochondrial steroid formation. PMID:22427666

  11. Human Herpesvirus 8 Interferon Regulatory Factor-Mediated BH3-Only Protein Inhibition via Bid BH3-B Mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Sandford, Gordon; Nicholas, John

    2012-01-01

    Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of host cells. For HHV-8, viral interferon regulatory factor-1 (vIRF-1) contributes to this process in part via inhibitory interactions with BH3-only protein (BOP) Bim, recently identified as an interaction partner of vIRF-1. Here we recognize that the Bim-binding domain (BBD) of vIRF-1 resembles a region (BH3-B) of Bid, another BOP, which interacts intramolecularly with the functional BH3 domain of Bid to inhibit it pro-apoptotic activity. Indeed, vIRF-1 was found to target Bid in addition to Bim and to interact, via its BBD region, with the BH3 domain of each. In functional assays, BBD could substitute for BH3-B in the context of Bid, to suppress Bid-induced apoptosis in a BH3-binding-dependent manner, and vIRF-1 was able to protect transfected cells from apoptosis induced by Bid. While vIRF-1 can mediate nuclear sequestration of Bim, this was not the case for Bid, and inhibition of Bid and Bim by vIRF-1 could occur independently of nuclear localization of the viral protein. Consistent with this finding, direct BBD-dependent inactivation by vIRF-1 of Bid-induced mitochondrial permeabilization was demonstrable in vitro and isolated BBD sequences were also active in this assay. In addition to Bim and Bid BH3 domains, BH3s of BOPs Bik, Bmf, Hrk, and Noxa also were found to bind BBD, while those of both pro- and anti-apoptotic multi-BH domain Bcl-2 proteins were not. Finally, the significance of Bid to virus replication was demonstrated via Bid-depletion in HHV-8 infected cells, which enhanced virus production. Together, our data demonstrate and characterize BH3 targeting and associated inhibition of BOP pro-apoptotic activity by vIRF-1 via Bid BH3-B mimicry, identifying a novel mechanism of viral evasion from host cell defenses. PMID:22685405

  12. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  13. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses.

  14. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  15. Cell-penetrable mouse forkhead box protein 3 alleviates experimental arthritis in mice by up-regulating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Baoju; Sun, Mengyi; Wu, Weijiang; Huang, Lili; Sun, Aihua; Zong, Yangyong; Xia, Sheng; Shi, Liyun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) have potential applications in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. However, their numbers are limited. Forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) is a key transcription factor that controls T(reg) development and function. Here, we generated a cell-permeable fusion protein, protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated mouse FoxP3 protein (PTD-mFoxP3), and evaluated whether PTD-mFoxp3 can alleviate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. As expected, PTD-mFoxP3 was transduced into cells effectively, and inhibited T cell activation and attenuated the cell proliferation. It decreased interleukin (IL) 2 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and increased IL-10 expression in activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. PTD-mFoxP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells attenuated proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, PTD-mFoxP3 blocked the Th17 differentiation programme in vitro and down-regulated IL-17 production from T cells by modulating induction and levels of retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt). Intra-articular delivery of PTD-mFoxP3 delayed disease incidence remarkably and alleviated autoimmune symptoms of CIA mice. Moreover, protective effects of PTD-mFoxP3 were associated with regulating the balance of T helper type 17 (Th17) and T(regs). These results suggest that PTD-mFoxP3 may be a candidate for RA therapy.

  16. Human glutaredoxin 3 can bind and effectively transfer [4Fe-4S] cluster to apo-iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyan; Li, Binghua; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Tong; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-09-25

    Glutaredoxin 3 (GLRX3) is a member of monothiol glutaredoxins with a CGFS active site that has been demonstrated to function in cellular iron sensing and trafficking via its bound iron-sulfur cluster. Human GLRX3 has been shown to form a dimer that binds two bridging [2Fe-2S] clusters with glutathione (GSH) as a ligand, assembling a compound 2GLRX3-2[2Fe-2S]-4GSH. Each iron of the iron-sulfur clusters is bound to the thiols of the cysteines, one of which is from the active site of GLRX3, the other from the noncovalently bound GSH. Here, we show that the recombinant human GLRX3 isolated anaerobically from Escherichia coli can incorporate [4Fe-4S] cluster in the absence of GSH, revealed by spectral and enzymatic analysis. [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing GLRX3 is competent for converting iron regulatory protein 1 (apo-IRP1) into aconitase within 30 min, via intact iron-sulfur cluster transfer. These in vitro studies suggest that human GLRX3 is important for cytosolic Fe-S protein maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Genetic Variant Interacts with Omega-3 PUFA to Influence Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Mc Monagle, Jolene; Gulseth, Hanne L.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Shaw, Danielle I.; Karlström, Brita; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Blaak, Ellen E.; Helal, Olfa; Malczewska-Malec, Małgorzata; Defoort, Catherine; Risérus, Ulf; Saris, Wim H. M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Drevon, Christian A.; Roche, Helen M.; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Objective To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects. Design Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort. Results Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019), C-peptide (P = 0.004), HOMA-IR (P = 0.008) and CRP (P = 0.032) as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446). In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele. Conclusions We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195 PMID:21674002

  18. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in general—should be revisited. I therefore direct the Director of OMB, in consultation with... delay; clarify the role of the behavioral sciences in formulating regulatory policy; and identify...

  19. T-bet regulates differentiation of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells in programmed cell death-1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, M; Kondo, Y; Yokosawa, M; Tsuboi, H; Takahashi, S; Shibayama, S; Matsumoto, I; Sumida, T

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important role in peripheral T cell tolerance, but whether or not it affects the differentiation of helper T cell subsets remains elusive. Here we describe the importance of PD-1 in the control of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell activation and development of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). PD-1-deficient T cell-specific T-bet transgenic (P/T) mice showed growth retardation, and the majority died within 10 weeks. P/T mice showed T-bet over-expression, increased interferon (IFN)-γ production by CD4+ T cells and significantly low FoxP3+ Treg cell percentage. P/T mice developed systemic inflammation, which was probably induced by augmented Th1 response and low FoxP3+ Treg count. The study identified a unique, previously undescribed role for PD-1 in Th1 and Treg differentiation, with potential implication in the development of Th1 cell-targeted therapy. PMID:25219397

  20. Iron regulatory proteins in pathobiology.

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, G; Pietrangelo, A

    2000-01-01

    The capacity of readily exchanging electrons makes iron not only essential for fundamental cell functions, but also a potential catalyst for chemical reactions involving free-radical formation and subsequent oxidative stress and cell damage. Cellular iron levels are therefore carefully regulated in order to maintain an adequate substrate while also minimizing the pool of potentially toxic 'free iron'. Iron homoeostasis is controlled through several genes, an increasing number of which have been found to contain non-coding sequences [i.e. the iron-responsive elements (IREs)] which are recognized at the mRNA level by two cytoplasmic iron-regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2). The IRPs belong to the aconitase superfamily. By means of an Fe-S-cluster-dependent switch, IRP-1 can function as an mRNA-binding protein or as an enzyme that converts citrate into isocitrate. Although structurally and functionally similar to IRP-1, IRP-2 does not seem to assemble a cluster nor to possess aconitase activity; moreover, it has a distinct pattern of tissue expression and is modulated by means of proteasome-mediated degradation. In response to fluctuations in the level of the 'labile iron pool', IRPs act as key regulators of cellular iron homoeostasis as a result of the translational control of the expression of a number of iron metabolism-related genes. Conversely, various agents and conditions may affect IRP activity, thereby modulating iron and oxygen radical levels in different pathobiological settings. As the number of mRNAs regulated through IRE-IRP interactions keeps growing, the definition of IRPs as iron-regulatory proteins may in the near future become limiting as their role expands to other essential metabolic pathways. PMID:11085915

  1. Rho family GTP binding proteins are involved in the regulatory volume decrease process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Stine F; Beisner, Kristine H; Hougaard, Charlotte; Willumsen, Berthe M; Lambert, Ian H; Hoffmann, Else K

    2002-06-15

    The role of Rho GTPases in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) process following osmotic cell swelling is controversial and has so far only been investigated for the swelling-activated Cl- efflux. We investigated the involvement of RhoA in the RVD process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts, using wild-type cells and three clones expressing constitutively active RhoA (RhoAV14). RhoAV14 expression resulted in an up to fourfold increase in the rate of RVD, measured by large-angle light scattering. The increase in RVD rate correlated with RhoAV14 expression. RVD in wild-type cells was unaffected by the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. The maximal rates of swelling-activated K+ (86 Rb+ as tracer) and taurine ([3H]taurine as tracer) efflux after a 30 % reduction in extracellular osmolarity were increased about twofold in cells with maximal RhoAV14 expression compared to wild-type cells, but were unaffected by Y-27632. The volume set points for activation of release of both osmolytes appeared to be reduced by RhoAV14 expression. The maximal taurine efflux rate constant was potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na(3)VO(4), and inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. The magnitude of the swelling-activated Cl- current (I(Cl,swell) ) was higher in RhoAV14 than in wild-type cells after a 7.5 % reduction in extracellular osmolarity, but, in contrast to 86Rb+ and [3H]taurine efflux, similar in both strains after a 30 % reduction in extracellular osmolarity. I(Cl,swell) was inhibited by Y-27632 and strongly potentiated by the myosin light chain kinase inhibitors ML-7 and AV25. It is suggested that RhoA, although not the volume sensor per se, is an important upstream modulator shared by multiple swelling-activated channels on which RhoA exerts its effects via divergent signalling pathways.

  2. Inhibition of EGFR-mediated phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3-K) signaling and glioblastoma phenotype by signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs).

    PubMed

    Wu, C J; Chen, Z; Ullrich, A; Greene, M I; O'Rourke, D M

    2000-08-17

    Several growth factors and cytokines, including EGF, are known to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Signal Regulatory Proteins (SIRPs). Consistent with the idea that increased phosphorylation activates SIRP function, we overexpressed human SIRPalpha1 in U87MG glioblastoma cells in order to examine how SIRPalpha1 modulates EGFR signaling pathways. Endogenous EGFR proteins are overexpressed in U87MG cells and these cells exhibit survival and motility phenotypes that are influenced by EGFR kinase activity. Overexpression of the SIRPalpha1 cDNA diminished EGF-induced phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3-K) activation in U87MG cells. Reduced EGF-stimulated activation of PI3-K was mediated by interactions between carboxyl terminus of SIRPalpha1 and the Src homology-2 (SH2)-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase, SHP2. SIRPalpha1 overexpression also reduced the EGF-induced association between SHP2 and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-K. Inhibition of transformation and enhanced apoptosis following gamma-irradiation were observed in SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG cells, and enhanced apoptosis was associated with reduced levels of bcl-xL protein. Furthermore, SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG cells displayed reduced cell migration and cell spreading that was mediated by association between SIRPalpha1 and SHP2. However, SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG clonal derivatives exhibited no differences in cell growth or levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. These data reveal a pathway that negatively regulates EGFR-induced PI3-K activation in glioblastoma cells and involves interactions between SHP2 and tyrosine phosphorylated SIRPalpha1. These results also suggest that negative regulation of PI3-K pathway activation by the SIRP family of transmembrane receptors may diminish EGFR-mediated motility and survival phenotypes that contribute to transformation of glioblastoma cells. Oncogene (2000) 19, 3999 - 4010.

  3. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 controls forkhead box protein 3 T regulatory cell induction but is dispensable for T helper type 1 cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Fousteri, G; Jofra, T; Debernardis, I; Stanford, S M; Laurenzi, A; Bottini, N; Battaglia, M

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) regulate T cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thus have a role in T cell differentiation. Here we tested whether the autoimmune predisposing gene PTPN22 encoding for a PTP that inhibits TCR signalling affects the generation of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and T helper type 1 (Th1) cells. Murine CD4+ T cells isolated from Ptpn22 knock-out (Ptpn22KO) mice cultured in Treg cell polarizing conditions showed increased sensitivity to TCR activation compared to wild-type (WT) cells, and subsequently reduced FoxP3 expression at optimal-to-high levels of activation. However, at lower levels of TCR activation, Ptpn22KO CD4+ T cells showed enhanced expression of FoxP3. Similar experiments in humans revealed that at optimal levels of TCR activation PTPN22 knock-down by specific oligonucleotides compromises the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into Treg cells. Notably, in vivo Treg cell conversion experiments in mice showed delayed kinetic but overall increased frequency and number of Treg cells in the absence of Ptpn22. In contrast, the in vitro and in vivo generation of Th1 cells was comparable between WT and Ptpn22KO mice, thus suggesting PTPN22 as a FoxP3-specific regulating factor. Together, these results propose PTPN22 as a key factor in setting the proper threshold for FoxP3+ Treg cell differentiation. PMID:24905474

  4. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3(+) (LAG3(+)) forkhead box protein 3(-) (FOXP3(-)) regulatory T cells induced by B cells alleviates joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Chen, Yi-Lien; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which dysregulated immune cells primarily target synovial joints. Despite recent advances in the treatment of RA, including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal. Previous studies have demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) was effective in treating a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The objective of this study was to develop optimal potential iTreg-based therapy for CIA by adoptively transferring LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells. B-cell-induced Treg-of-B cells expressed LAG3 but not Foxp3 (designated LAG3(+) Treg-of-B), and secreted IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. Furthermore, LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) responder T cells through both LAG3 and IL-10 production. In the murine CIA model, adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells alleviated the joint severity as well as local and systemic inflammation. Treatment with LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells also promoted IL-10 production in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and draining lymph nodes. Moreover, mice receiving LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cell treatment showed significantly less pronounced osteolysis in the hind footpads, which correlated with the downregulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. In conclusion, we identified a novel subset of Tregs for CIA treatment. This insight may facilitate exploring novel regulatory T-cell-based therapies for human autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Light-Regulated Hypocotyl Elongation Involves Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of the Microtubule Regulatory Protein WDL3 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Qin, Tao; Ma, Qianqian; Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Ziqiang; Yuan, Ming; Mao, Tonglin

    2013-01-01

    Light significantly inhibits hypocotyl cell elongation, and dark-grown seedlings exhibit elongated, etiolated hypocotyls. Microtubule regulatory proteins function as positive or negative regulators that mediate hypocotyl cell elongation by altering microtubule organization. However, it remains unclear how plants coordinate these regulators to promote hypocotyl growth in darkness and inhibit growth in the light. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE-DAMPENED 2–LIKE3 (WDL3), a microtubule regulatory protein of the WVD2/WDL family from Arabidopsis thaliana, functions in hypocotyl cell elongation and is regulated by a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent pathway in response to light. WDL3 RNA interference Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light had much longer hypocotyls than controls. Moreover, WDL3 overexpression resulted in overall shortening of hypocotyl cells and stabilization of cortical microtubules in the light. Cortical microtubule reorganization occurred slowly in cells from WDL3 RNA interference transgenic lines but was accelerated in cells from WDL3-overexpressing seedlings subjected to light treatment. More importantly, WDL3 protein was abundant in the light but was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway in the dark. Overexpression of WDL3 inhibited etiolated hypocotyl growth in regulatory particle non-ATPase subunit-1a mutant (rpn1a-4) plants but not in wild-type seedlings. Therefore, a ubiquitin-26S proteasome–dependent mechanism regulates the levels of WDL3 in response to light to modulate hypocotyl cell elongation. PMID:23653471

  6. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Signaling Activates Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-2 in Hepatocyte Cells via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase and Caspase-3*

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Dan Duc; Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.; Eriksson, Ove; Mogollón, Isabel; Korhonen, Laura T.; Arumäe, Urmas; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) influences the survival and differentiation of a specific population of neurons during development, but its role in non-neuronal cells has been less studied. We observed here that NGF and its pro-form, pro-NGF, are elevated in fatty livers from leptin-deficient mice compared with controls, concomitant with an increase in low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs). Stimulation of mouse primary hepatocytes with NGF or pro-NGF increased LDLR expression through the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Studies using Huh7 human hepatocyte cells showed that the neurotrophins activate the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2) that regulates genes involved in lipid metabolism. The mechanisms for this were related to stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and activation of caspase-3 and SREBP2 cleavage following NGF and pro-NGF stimulations. Cell fractionation experiments showed that caspase-3 activity was increased particularly in the membrane fraction that harbors SREBP2 and caspase-2. Experiments showed further that caspase-2 interacts with pro-caspase-3 and that p38 MAPK reduced this interaction and caused caspase-3 activation. Because of the increased caspase-3 activity, the cells did not undergo cell death following p75NTR stimulation, possibly due to concomitant activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway by the neurotrophins. These results identify a novel signaling pathway triggered by ligand-activated p75NTR that via p38 MAPK and caspase-3 mediate the activation of SREBP2. This pathway may regulate LDLRs and lipid uptake particularly after injury or during tissue inflammation accompanied by an increased production of growth factors, including NGF and pro-NGF. PMID:26984409

  7. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Abd Eldaim, Mabrouk A; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP-la, expression of FAS genes and lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells in the presence of RA and/or H2O2. RA (1 microM) treatment suppressed expression of SREBP-1a and FAS genes and lipid accumulation. H2O2 (2 microM) treatment induced increased cleavage of SREBP-1a, without affecting amounts of SREBP-1a mRNA and precursor protein, and enhanced expression of FAS gene and lipid accumulation. Increased cleavage of SREBP-1a by H2O2 was also observed even in the presence of RA. These results suggest that H2O2, enhances a cleavage of SREBP-1a precursor protein, which independently occurs with the RA suppression of SREBP-1a gene expression, and that RA itself has no role in the SREBP-1a activation in adipocytes.

  8. Emergence of new regulatory mechanisms in the Benson-Calvin pathway via protein-protein interactions: a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/CP12/phosphoribulokinase complex.

    PubMed

    Graciet, Emmanuelle; Lebreton, Sandrine; Gontero, Brigitte

    2004-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions are involved in many metabolic pathways. This review will focus on the role of such associations in CO2 assimilation (Benson-Calvin cycle) and especially on the involvement of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex which has been identified in many photosynthetic organisms and may have an important role in the regulation of CO2 assimilation. The emergence of new kinetic and regulatory properties as a consequence of protein-protein interactions will be addressed as well as some of the questions raised by the existence of these supramolecular complexes such as composition, function, and assembly pathways. The presence and role of small intrinsically unstructured proteins like the 8.5 kDa protein CP12, involved in the regulation and/or assembly of these complexes will be discussed. Copyright 2004 Society for Experimental Biology

  9. α -Actinin TvACTN3 of Trichomonas vaginalis is an RNA-binding protein that could participate in its posttranscriptional iron regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Calla-Choque, Jaeson Santos; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Ávila-González, Leticia; Arroyo, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted flagellated protist parasite responsible for trichomoniasis. This parasite is dependent on high levels of iron, favoring its growth and multiplication. Iron also differentially regulates some trichomonad virulence properties by unknown mechanisms. However, there is evidence to support the existence of gene regulatory mechanisms at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels that are mediated by iron concentration in T. vaginalis. Thus, the goal of this study was to identify an RNA-binding protein in T. vaginalis that interacts with the tvcp4 RNA stem-loop structure, which may participate in a posttranscriptional iron regulatory mechanism mediated by RNA-protein interactions. We performed RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay (REMSA) and supershift, UV cross-linking, Northwestern blot, and western blot (WB) assays using cytoplasmic protein extracts from T. vaginalis with the tvcp4 RNA hairpin structure as a probe. We identified a 135-kDa protein isolated by the UV cross-linking assays as α-actinin 3 (TvACTN3) by MALDI-TOF-MS that was confirmed by LS-MS/MS and de novo sequencing. TvACTN3 is a cytoplasmic protein that specifically binds to hairpin RNA structures from trichomonads and humans when the parasites are grown under iron-depleted conditions. Thus, TvACTN3 could participate in the regulation of gene expression by iron in T. vaginalis through a parallel posttranscriptional mechanism similar to that of the IRE/IRP system.

  10. Trypanosome MKT1 and the RNA-binding protein ZC3H11: interactions and potential roles in post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditi; Minia, Igor; Droll, Dorothea; Fadda, Abeer; Clayton, Christine; Erben, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    The trypanosome zinc finger protein ZC3H11 binds to AU-rich elements in mRNAs. It is essential for survival of the mammalian-infective bloodstream form, where it stabilizes several mRNAs including some encoding chaperones, and is also required for stabilization of chaperone mRNAs during the heat-shock response in the vector-infective procyclic form. When ZC3H11 was artificially ‘tethered’ to a reporter mRNA in bloodstream forms it increased reporter expression. We here show that ZC3H11 interacts with trypanosome MKT1 and PBP1, and that domains required for both interactions are necessary for function in the bloodstream-form tethering assay. PBP1 interacts with MKT1, LSM12 and poly(A) binding protein, and localizes to granules during parasite starvation. All of these proteins are essential for bloodstream-form trypanosome survival and increase gene expression in the tethering assay. MKT1 is cytosolic and polysome associated. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and tandem affinity purification we found that trypanosome MKT1 interacts with multiple RNA-binding proteins and other potential RNA regulators, placing it at the centre of a post-transcriptional regulatory network. A consensus interaction sequence, H(E/D/N/Q)PY, was identified. Recruitment of MKT1-containing regulatory complexes to mRNAs via sequence-specific mRNA-binding proteins could thus control several different post-transcriptional regulons. PMID:24470144

  11. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation in vivo and incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine in vitro after follicle regulatory protein administration

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, K.E.; Montz, F.J.; Scott, L.; Condon, S.; Fujimori, K.; diZerega, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Follicle regulatory protein immunoreactivity and biologic activity were measured in ascites from a patient with juvenile granulosa cell tumor. Microscopic examination of immunohistochemical staining of a juvenile granulosa cell tumor with anti-follicle regulatory protein antisera showed homogeneous cytosolic expression of follicle regulatory protein throughout the tumor. Tumor cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Partially purified follicle regulatory protein (50 micrograms/day) was then injected daily for 10 days, or for 25 days once the tumor became palpable. Treatment with follicle regulatory protein significantly slowed the rate of tumor growth with both treatments. To test the tissue specificity of the effect, a metastatic, well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma was also grown in nude mice. Follicle regulatory protein treatment did not alter the rate of tumor growth. An in vitro clonigenic assay confirmed these in vivo results. Partially purified follicle regulatory protein had a biphasic effect on the proliferation of juvenile granulosa tumor cell but did not affect the proliferation of endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. Clonigenic assays were performed on five ovarian adenocarcinomas passaged in vitro, and these tumor cells exhibited a biphasic response to follicle regulatory protein. Immunoneutralization studies showed that this biphasic response was due to impurities in the follicle regulatory protein preparations. The longer the exposure of the tumor cells to follicle regulatory protein, the greater the degree of inhibition of proliferation. In summary, administration of follicle regulatory protein slowed tumor growth through a direct effect on the tumor cell rather than an indirect effect on the hormonal or immune status of the host.

  12. Prediction and integration of regulatory and protein-protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wichadakul, Duangdao; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram

    2009-04-20

    Knowledge of transcriptional regulatory interactions (TRIs) is essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology in any organism. While several results from genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks are available, they are limited to model organisms such as yeast [1] and worm [2]. Beyond these networks, experiments on TRIs study only individual genes and proteins of specific interest. In this chapter, we present a method for the integration of various data sets to predict TRIs for 54 organisms in the Bioverse [3]. We describe how to compile and handle various formats and identifiers of data sets from different sources, and how to predict the TRIs using a homology-based approach, utilizing the compiled data sets. Integrated data sets include experimentally verified TRIs, binding sites of transcription factors, promoter sequences, protein sub-cellular localization, and protein families. Predicted TRIs expand the networks of gene regulation for a large number of organisms. The integration of experimentally verified and predicted TRIs with other known protein-protein interactions (PPIs) gives insight into specific pathways, network motifs, and the topological dynamics of an integrated network with gene expression under different conditions, essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology.

  13. Yeast sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage requires Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing subunit of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Emerson V; Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Burg, John S; Nwosu, Christine C; Lintner, Robert E; Daza, Riza; Russ, Carsten; Ponchner, Karen; Nusbaum, Chad; Espenshade, Peter J

    2012-01-02

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sre1 is a membrane-bound transcription factor that controls adaptation to hypoxia. Like its mammalian homolog, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), Sre1 activation requires release from the membrane. However, in fission yeast, this release occurs through a strikingly different mechanism that requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasome. The mechanistic details of Sre1 cleavage, including the link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and proteasome, are not well understood. Here, we present results of a genetic selection designed to identify additional components required for Sre1 cleavage. From the selection, we identified two new components of the fission yeast SREBP pathway: Dsc5 and Cdc48. The AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein, interact with known Dsc complex components and are required for SREBP cleavage. These findings provide a mechanistic link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and the proteasome in SREBP cleavage and add to a growing list of similarities between the Dsc E3 ligase and membrane E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

  14. Species and tissue distribution of the regulatory protein of glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Vandercammen, A; Van Schaftingen, E

    1993-09-01

    Rat liver is known to contain a regulatory protein that inhibits glucokinase (hexokinase IV or D) competitively versus glucose. This inhibition is greatly reinforced by the presence of fructose 6-phosphate and antagonized by fructose 1-phosphate and by KCl. This protein was now measured in various rat tissues and in the livers of various species by the inhibition it exerts on rat liver glucokinase. Rat, mouse, rabbit, guinea-pig and pig liver, all of which contain glucokinase, also contained between 60 and 200 units/g of tissue of a regulatory protein displaying the properties mentioned above. By contrast, this protein could not be detected in cat, goat, chicken or trout liver, or in rat brain, heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and spleen, all tissues from which glucokinase is missing. Fructose 1-phosphate stimulated glucokinase in extracts of human liver, indicating the presence of regulatory protein. In addition, antibodies raised against rat regulatory protein allowed the detection of an approximately 60 kDa polypeptide in rat, guinea pig, rabbit and human liver. The livers of the toad Bufo marinus, of Xenopus laevis and of the turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans contained a regulatory protein similar to that of the rat, with, however, the major difference that it was not sensitive to fructose 6-phosphate or fructose 1-phosphate. In rat liver, the regulatory protein was detectable 4 days before birth. Its concentration increased afterwards to reach the adult level at day 30 of extrauterine life, whereas glucokinase only appeared after day 15. In the liver of the adult rat, starvation and streptozotocin-diabetes caused a 50-60% decrease in the concentration of regulatory protein after 7 days, whereas glucokinase activity fell to about 20% of its initial level. When 4-day-starved rats were refed, or when diabetic rats were treated with insulin, the concentration of regulatory protein slowly increased to reach about 85% of the control level after 3 days, whereas the

  15. Disparate Regulatory Mechanisms Control Fat3 and P75NTR Protein Transport through a Conserved Kif5-Interaction Domain

    PubMed Central

    Birkness, Jacqueline E.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Directed transport delivers proteins to specific cellular locations and is one mechanism by which cells establish and maintain polarized cellular architectures. The atypical cadherin Fat3 directs the polarized extension of dendrites in retinal amacrine cells by influencing the distribution of cytoskeletal regulators during retinal development, however the mechanisms regulating the distribution of Fat3 remain unclear. We report a novel Kinesin/Kif5 Interaction domain (Kif5-ID) in Fat3 that facilitates Kif5B binding, and determines the distribution of Fat3 cytosolic domain constructs in neurons and MDCK cells. The Kif5-ID sequence is conserved in the neurotrophin receptor P75NTR, which also binds Kif5B, and Kif5-ID mutations similarly result in P75NTR mislocalization. Despite these similarities, Kif5B-mediated protein transport is differentially regulated by these two cargos. For Fat3, the Kif5-ID is regulated by alternative splicing, and the timecourse of splicing suggests that the distribution of Fat3 may switch between early and later stages of retinal development. In contrast, P75NTR binding to Kif5B is enhanced by tyrosine phosphorylation and thus has the potential to be dynamically regulated on a more rapid time scale. PMID:27788242

  16. Human monocyte-derived suppressor cells control graft-versus-host disease by inducing regulatory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Janikashvili, Nona; Trad, Malika; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Samson, Maxime; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Bonnefoy, Francis; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Ciudad, Marion; Rekhviashvili, Khatuna; Seaphanh, Famky; Gaugler, Béatrice; Perruche, Sylvain; Bateman, Andrew; Martin, Laurent; Audia, Sylvain; Saas, Philippe; Larmonier, Nicolas; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive transfer of immunosuppressive cells has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, only a limited number of such cells can be isolated from in vivo specimens. Therefore efficient ex vivo differentiation and expansion procedures are critically needed to produce a clinically relevant amount of these suppressive cells. We sought to develop a novel, clinically relevant, and feasible approach to generate ex vivo a subpopulation of human suppressor cells of monocytic origin, referred to as human monocyte-derived suppressive cells (HuMoSCs), which can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to treat inflammatory disorders. HuMoSCs were generated from human monocytes cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-6. The immune-regulatory properties of HuMoSCs were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy of HuMoSCs was evaluated by using a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) model of humanized mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) [NSG] mice). CD33+ HuMoSCs are highly potent at inhibiting the proliferation and activation of autologous and allogeneic effector T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. The suppressive activity of these cells depends on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Of therapeutic relevance, HuMoSCs induce long-lasting memory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T lymphocytes and significantly reduce GvHD induced with human PBMCs in NSG mice. Ex vivo-generated HuMoSCs inhibit effector T lymphocytes, promote the expansion of immunosuppressive forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T cells, and can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to prevent GvHD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Characterization of Rpn3 Uncovers a Distinct 19S Proteasomal Subunit Requirement for Ubiquitin-Dependent Proteolysis of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Eric; Reed, Steven I.

    1999-01-01

    By selectively eliminating ubiquitin-conjugated proteins, the 26S proteasome plays a pivotal role in a large variety of cellular regulatory processes, particularly in the control of cell cycle transitions. Access of ubiquitinated substrates to the inner catalytic chamber within the 20S core particle is mediated by the 19S regulatory particle (RP), whose subunit composition in budding yeast has been recently elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the cell cycle defects resulting from conditional inactivation of one of these RP components, the essential non-ATPase Rpn3/Sun2 subunit. Using temperature-sensitive mutant alleles, we show that rpn3 mutations do not prevent the G1/S transition but cause a metaphase arrest, indicating that the essential Rpn3 function is limiting for mitosis. rpn3 mutants appear severely compromised in the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several physiologically important proteasome substrates. Thus, RPN3 function is required for the degradation of the G1-phase cyclin Cln2 targeted by SCF; the S-phase cyclin Clb5, whose ubiquitination is likely to involve a combination of E3 (ubiquitin protein ligase) enzymes; and anaphase-promoting complex targets, such as the B-type cyclin Clb2 and the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Our results indicate that the Pds1 degradation defect of the rpn3 mutants most likely accounts for the metaphase arrest phenotype observed. Surprisingly, but consistent with the lack of a G1 arrest phenotype in thermosensitive rpn3 strains, the Cdk inhibitor Sic1 exhibits a short half-life regardless of the RPN3 genotype. In striking contrast, Sic1 turnover is severely impaired by a temperature-sensitive mutation in RPN12/NIN1, encoding another essential RP subunit. While other interpretations are possible, these data strongly argue for the requirement of distinct RP subunits for efficient proteolysis of specific cell cycle regulators. The potential implications of these data are discussed in the context of possible Rpn3

  18. Maturation and Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 Is Inhibited by Acyl-CoA Binding Domain Containing 3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis. PMID:23166793

  19. Maturation and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 is inhibited by acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis.

  20. PGE2 Induces Macrophage IL-10 Production and a Regulatory-like Phenotype via a Protein Kinase A–SIK–CRTC3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Kirsty F.; Clark, Kristopher; Naqvi, Shaista; McGuire, Victoria A.; Nöehren, Gesa; Kristariyanto, Yosua; van den Bosch, Mirjam; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; McCarthy, Pierre C.; Pattison, Michael J.; Pedrioli, Patrick G. A.; Barton, Geoff J.; Toth, Rachel; Prescott, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The polarization of macrophages into a regulatory-like phenotype and the production of IL-10 plays an important role in the resolution of inflammation. We show in this study that PGE2, in combination with LPS, is able to promote an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages characterized by high expression of IL-10 and the regulatory markers SPHK1 and LIGHT via a protein kinase A–dependent pathway. Both TLR agonists and PGE2 promote the phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB on Ser133. However, although CREB regulates IL-10 transcription, the mutation of Ser133 to Ala in the endogenous CREB gene did not prevent the ability of PGE2 to promote IL-10 transcription. Instead, we demonstrate that protein kinase A regulates the phosphorylation of salt-inducible kinase 2 on Ser343, inhibiting its ability to phosphorylate CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 3 in cells. This in turn allows CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 3 to translocate to the nucleus where it serves as a coactivator with the transcription factor CREB to induce IL-10 transcription. In line with this, we find that either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of salt-inducible kinases mimics the effect of PGE2 on IL-10 production. PMID:23241891

  1. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T G

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupted. Expression of the GDH1, PUT1, PUT2, and PUT4 genes also responded to DAL80 disruption, but much more modestly. Expression of GLN1 and GDH2 exhibited parallel responses to the provision of asparagine and glutamine as nitrogen sources but did not follow the regulatory responses noted above for the nitrogen catabolic genes such as DAL5. Steady-state mRNA levels of both genes did not significantly decrease when glutamine was provided as nitrogen source but were lowered by the provision of asparagine. They also did not respond to disruption of DAL80.

  2. Regional Differences in Gallbladder Cancer Pathogenesis: Insights from a Comparison of Cell Cycle-Regulatory, PI3K, and Pro-Angiogenic Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Jean M.; Torres, Javiera; Veras, Emanuela F.; Matsuo, Kenichi; Gönen, Mithat; D’Angelica, Michael I.; Waugh, Enrique; Meneses, Manuel; Inayama, Yoshiyaki; Fong, Yuman; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; De La Fuente, Hernan; Endo, Itaru; Klimstra, David S.; Jarnagin, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The variable incidence of gallbladder cancer (GBCA) suggests regional pathogenetic differences. This study compares cell cycle-regulatory, angiogenesis-related, and PI3K pathway protein expression in GBCAs from three continents. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of several proteins was assessed, correlated with clinicopathologic variables, and compared among centers from Chile (Fundación Arturo López Pérez [FALP]), Japan (Yokohama City University [YCU]), and the United States (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center [MSKCC]). Hierarchical clustering was used to partition the data based on protein-expression and treatment center. Results Tissue from 117 patients (MSKCC = 76; FALP = 22; YCU = 19) was analyzed. Mdm2 overexpression was seen only at MSKCC (p < 0.0001). Absence of p21 (p = 0.03) and VEGFR2 (p = 0.018) were more common and p27 expression was less frequent (p = 0.047) in tumors from YCU. Ki-67 labeling index in YCU tumors (median = 10) was two-thirds lower than at other centers. On hierarchical clustering analysis, all YCU patients (p = 0.017) and those with early tumors (p = 0.017) clustered separately from MSKCC. Median disease-specific survival after curative intent (R0) resection was 27 months and was similar among centers (p = 0.9). Median disease-specific survival of patients with early tumors was 28.4 months and was higher at YCU (not reached, p = 0.06). Conclusions Cell cycle-regulatory protein expression patterns of YCU tumors differed from those treated at FALP and MSKCC. The differential clustering of protein expression and survival in patients with early tumors suggest regional differences in pathogenesis and disease biology. PMID:23212762

  3. Swiss Cheese, a protein involved in progressive neurodegeneration acts as a non-canonical regulatory subunit for PKA-C3

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Alexandre Bettencourt; Wentzell, Jill; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Swiss Cheese (SWS) protein and its vertebrate orthologue Neuropathy Target Esterase (NTE) are required for neuronal survival and glial integrity. In humans, NTE is the target of organophosphorous compounds which cause a paralyzing axonal degeneration and recently mutations in NTE have been shown to cause a Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia called NTE-related Motor-Neuron Disorder. SWS and NTE are concentrated in the endoplasmic reticulum and both have been shown to have an esterase function against an artificial substrate. However, the functional mechanisms and the pathways in which SWS/NTE are involved in are still widely unknown. Here we show that SWS interacts specifically with the C3 catalytic subunit of cAMP activated protein kinase (PKA-C3) which together with orthologues in mouse (Pkare) and human (PrKX) forms a novel class of catalytic subunits of unknown function. This interaction requires a domain of SWS which shows homology to regulatory subunits of PKA and, like conventional regulatory subunits, the binding of SWS to the PKA-C3 inhibits is function. Consistent with this result, expression of additional PKA-C3 induces degeneration and enhances the neurodegenerative phenotype in sws mutants. We also show that the complex formation with the membrane-bound SWS tethers PKA-C3 to membranes. We therefore propose a model in which SWS acts as a non-canonical subunit for PKA-C3, whereby the complex formation regulates the localization and kinase activity of PKA-C3, and that disruption of this regulation can induce neurodegeneration. PMID:18945896

  4. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  5. Sterols regulate 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) via dual sterol regulatory elements: cooperative induction of key enzymes in lipid synthesis by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzes a final step in cholesterol synthesis, and has been ascribed diverse functions, such as being anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. How this enzyme is regulated transcriptionally by sterols is currently unclear. Some studies have suggested that its expression is regulated by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs) while another suggests it is through the Liver X Receptor (LXR). However, these transcription factors have opposing effects on cellular sterol levels, so it is likely that one predominates. Here we establish that sterol regulation of DHCR24 occurs predominantly through SREBP-2, and identify the particular region of the DHCR24 promoter to which SREBP-2 binds. We demonstrate that sterol regulation is mediated by two sterol regulatory elements (SREs) in the promoter of the gene, assisted by two nearby NF-Y binding sites. Moreover, we present evidence that the dual SREs work cooperatively to regulate DHCR24 expression by comparison to two known SREBP target genes, the LDL receptor with one SRE, and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1, with two SREs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative anatomy of a regulatory ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Michael; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2002-08-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 is a crucial folding mediator and an important architectural component of the large ribosomal subunit. Furthermore, Escherichia coli L4 produced in excess of its rRNA binding sites downregulates the transcription and translation of its own S10 operon, encoding 11 ribosomal proteins. Genetic experiments and the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima L4 had implicated separable regions on L4 in ribosome association and expression control while RNA competition experiments and the regulatory capacity of heterologous L4 had suggested an overlap of the protein sequences involved in the two functions. We report herein that contrary to other foreign bacterial L4 proteins, L4 from T. maritima only weakly controlled expression of the S10 operon in E. coli. Also, wildtype T. maritima L4 was more weakly associated with E. coli ribosomes than with the E. coli analog. Rational mutageneses were performed to try to increase the regulatory competence of T. maritima L4. The ribosome incorporation of the mutant proteins was also investigated. Two different deletions removing T. maritima-specific sequences had little effects on regulation although one did improve ribosome association. Interestingly, a set of multiple mutations, which rendered the region around helices alpha4 and alpha5 in T. maritima L4 more E. coli-like, had no influence on the incorporation of the protein into the large ribosomal subunit but considerably improved its regulatory potential. Therefore, the area around helices alpha4 and alpha5, which is critical for the initial folding steps of the large subunit, is also a central element of autogenous control, presumably by contacting the S10 mRNA leader. Ribosome association is compounded at later stages of assembly by additional rRNA contacts through L4 areas which do not participate in regulation. Similarly, sequences outside the alpha4/alpha5 region aid expression control.

  7. Characterisation of the regulatory function of the H-NS protein in the benthic bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 under cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Xu, Guanpeng; Wang, Fengping; Xiao, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    The histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein is conserved in Gram-negative bacteria and plays important roles as a multifunctional bacterial modulator. However, its roles in deep-sea microorganisms warrant investigation. In this study, the relationship between temperature and the regulatory function of H-NS was characterised in the benthic bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3. Comparative microarray analysis of the hns knockout mutant and wild-type strain identified a total of 264 differentially expressed genes at 4°C, which is significantly less than that at 20°C. Notably, H-NS was proved to be involved in the cold-mediated induction of lateral flagellar gene transcription. We further showed that the binding affinity of H-NS is higher at 4°C than 20°C, thus explaining the significant difference in the expression pattern at different temperatures.

  8. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  9. Characterization and functional studies of forkhead box protein 3− lymphocyte activation gene 3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells induced by mucosal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K-H; Chiang, B-L

    2015-01-01

    The induction of mucosal tolerance has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Our previous study demonstrated that Peyer's patch B cells could convert naive T cells into regulatory T cells (so-called Treg-of-B(P) cells); however, it is important to characterize this particular subset of Treg-of-B cells for future applications. This study aimed to investigate the role of lymphocyte activating gene 3 (LAG3) in mediating the regulatory function of Treg-of-B(P) cells induced by mucosal follicular B (FOB) cells. Microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess the gene expression pattern of Treg-of-B(P) cells. To evaluate the role of LAG3, the in-vitro suppressive function and the alleviation of airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma was assessed. Our data indicated that FOB cells isolated from Peyer's patches had the ability to generate more suppressive Treg-of-B cells with LAG3 expression, compared with CD23loCD21lo B cells. LAG3 is not only a marker for Treg-of-B(P) cells, but also participate in the suppressive ability. Moreover, CCR4 and CCR6 could be detected on the LAG3+, not LAG3−, Treg-of-B(P) cells and would help cells homing to allergic lung. In the murine model of asthma, the adoptive transfer of LAG3+ Treg-of-B(P) cells was able to sufficiently suppress T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration and alleviate asthmatic symptoms. LAG3 was expressed in Treg-of-B(P) cells and was also involved in the function of Treg-of-B(P) cells. In the future, this particular subset of Treg-of-B cells might be used to alleviate allergic symptoms. PMID:25581421

  10. A feedback regulatory loop between G3P and lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1 mediates azelaic-acid-induced systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Keshun; Soares, Juliana Moreira; Mandal, Mihir Kumar; Wang, Caixia; Chanda, Bidisha; Gifford, Andrew N; Fowler, Joanna S; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2013-04-25

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced by the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AA) requires the phosphorylated sugar derivative glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Pathogen inoculation induced the release of free unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) and thereby triggered AA accumulation, because these FAs serve as precursors for AA. AA accumulation in turn increased the levels of G3P, which is required for AA-conferred SAR. The lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1, both of which are required for G3P- and AA-induced SAR, were essential for G3P accumulation. Conversely, reduced G3P resulted in decreased AZI1 and DIR1 transcription. Our results demonstrate that an intricate feedback regulatory loop among G3P, DIR1, and AZI1 regulates SAR and that AA functions upstream of G3P in this pathway. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  12. Synovial Regulatory T Cells Occupy a Discrete TCR Niche in Human Arthritis and Require Local Signals To Stabilize FOXP3 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulou, Eirini; Lom, Hannah; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is great interest in harnessing the immunosuppressive potential of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for treating autoimmunity, a sizeable knowledge gap exists regarding Treg fate in human disease. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, we have previously reported that atypical CD25+FOXP3− Treg-like cells uniquely populate the inflamed site. Intriguingly, their proportions relative to CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs associate with arthritis course, suggesting a role in disease. The ontogeny of these FOXP3− Treg-like cells is, however, unknown. In this study, we interrogated clonal relationships between CD4+ T cell subsets in JIA, using high-throughput TCR repertoire analysis. We reveal that FOXP3+ Tregs possess highly exclusive TCRβ usage from conventional T cells, in blood, and also at the inflamed site, where they are clonally expanded. Intriguingly, the repertoires of FOXP3+ Tregs in synovial fluid are highly overlapping with CD25+FOXP3− Treg-like cells, indicating fluctuations in FOXP3 expression in the inflamed joint. Furthermore, cultured synovial Tregs rapidly downregulated FOXP3 protein (but not mRNA), and this process was prevented by addition of synovial fluid from JIA patients, through an IL-6–independent mechanism. Our findings suggest that most Tregs arise from a separate lineage from conventional T cells, and that this repertoire divergence is largely maintained under chronic inflammatory conditions. We propose that subsequent Treg expansions at the inflamed site creates an environment that leads to competition for limited resources within the synovium, resulting in the destabilization of FOXP3 expression in some Tregs. PMID:26561546

  13. The regulation of apoptosis by the downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator/potassium channel interacting protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) through interactions with hexokinase I.

    PubMed

    Craig, Theodore A; Ramachandran, Pradeep L; Bergen, H Robert; Podratz, Jewel L; Windebank, Anthony J; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-04-19

    The EF-hand protein, DREAM/KChIP3 (henceforth referred to as DREAM), regulates apoptosis by incompletely understood mechanisms. We demonstrate that in the presence of Ca2+, DREAM interacts with hexokinase I, a protein known to bind mitochondria and regulate apoptosis. A mutant DREAM protein construct incapable of binding Ca2+ does not associate with hexokinase I. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM is required for binding to hexokinase I, as a DREAM construct lacking the first 94 amino terminal residues fails to bind hexokinase I. Expression of DREAM in neuroblastoma cells enhances cisplatin mediated caspase-3 activity. Simultaneous expression of hexokinase I in such cells reduces DREAM-stimulated apoptosis. DREAM overexpression in neuroblastoma cells reduces hexokinase I localization on isolated mitochondria. The interaction of DREAM with hexokinase I may be important in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Regulation of Apoptosis by the Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonistic Modulator/Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) Through Interactions with Hexokinase I

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Theodore A.; Ramachandran, Pradeep L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Podratz, Jewel L; Windebank, Anthony J.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The EF-hand protein, DREAM/KChIP3 (henceforth referred to as DREAM), regulates apoptosis by incompletely understood mechanisms. We demonstrate that in the presence of Ca2+, DREAM interacts with hexokinase I, a protein known to bind mitochondria and regulate apoptosis. A mutant DREAM protein construct incapable of binding Ca2+ does not associate with hexokinase I. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM is required for binding to hexokinase I, as a DREAM construct lacking the first 94 amino terminal residues fails to bind hexokinase I. Expression of DREAM in neuroblastoma cells enhances cisplatin mediated caspase-3 activity. Simultaneous expression of hexokinase I in such cells reduces DREAM-stimulated apoptosis. DREAM overexpression in neuroblastoma cells reduces hexokinase I localization on isolated mitochondria. The interaction of DREAM with hexokinase I may be important in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. PMID:23524266

  15. Ubiquitylation activates a peptidase that promotes cleavage and destabilization of its activating E3 ligases and diverse growth regulatory proteins to limit cell proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Dumenil, Jack; Lu, Fu-Hao; Na, Li; Vanhaeren, Hannes; Naumann, Christin; Klecker, Maria; Prior, Rachel; Smith, Caroline; McKenzie, Neil; Saalbach, Gerhard; Chen, Liangliang; Xia, Tian; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Seguela, Mathilde; Inzé, Dirk; Dissmeyer, Nico; Li, Yunhai; Bevan, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic shapes and sizes of organs are established by cell proliferation patterns and final cell sizes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms coordinating these are poorly understood. Here we characterize a ubiquitin-activated peptidase called DA1 that limits the duration of cell proliferation during organ growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. The peptidase is activated by two RING E3 ligases, Big Brother (BB) and DA2, which are subsequently cleaved by the activated peptidase and destabilized. In the case of BB, cleavage leads to destabilization by the RING E3 ligase PROTEOLYSIS 1 (PRT1) of the N-end rule pathway. DA1 peptidase activity also cleaves the deubiquitylase UBP15, which promotes cell proliferation, and the transcription factors TEOSINTE BRANCED 1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF 15 (TCP15) and TCP22, which promote cell proliferation and repress endoreduplication. We propose that DA1 peptidase activity regulates the duration of cell proliferation and the transition to endoreduplication and differentiation during organ formation in plants by coordinating the destabilization of regulatory proteins. PMID:28167503

  16. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome

  17. [The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins of the densovirus of German cockroach, Blattella germanica].

    PubMed

    Martynova, E U; Kapelinskaia, T V; Schal, C; Mukha, D V

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins encoded by the genome of the densovirus of German cockroach was analyzed using western-blotting of nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts of the densovirus-infected passaging cells tissue culture BGE-2. Two of the three regulatory proteins, NS1 and NS3, were shown to possess mainly nuclear localization, while NS2 protein was distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Data obtained provide new information necessary for prediction of the functions of densovirus regulatory proteins. Intracellular localization of NS3 protein was described for the densoviruses for the first time.

  18. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-mediated effect of fluvastatin on cytosolic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase transcription.

    PubMed

    Mascaró, C; Ortiz, J A; Ramos, M M; Haro, D; Hegardt, F G

    2000-02-15

    The effects of acute treatment with fluvastatin, a hypocholesteremic drug, on the mRNA levels of several regulatory enzymes of cholesterogenesis and of the LDL receptor were determined in rat liver. Fluvastatin increased the hepatic mRNA levels for HMG-CoA reductase up to 12-fold in 5 weeks of treatment at a daily dose of 6. 3 mg/kg. The effect was less marked in cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase, farnesyl-PP synthase, squalene synthetase, and LDL receptor. SREBP-2 mRNA levels were also increased, but SREBP-1 were not. De novo synthesis of cholesterol in several cultured cells was reduced by increasing concentrations of fluvastatin, and the IC(50) values of fluvastatin in HepG2, CV-1, and CHO cells were respectively 0.01, 0. 05, and 0.1 microM. When CHO cells stably transfected with a chimeric gene composed of the promoter of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase and the CAT gene as a reporter were incubated with fluvastatin, the CAT gene was overexpressed, an effect which was similar to the cotransfection with the processed form of SREBP-1a. Both ALLN and fluvastatin increased the transcriptional activity of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. Mutation in either SRE or NF-Y boxes abolished the increase in transcriptional rate caused by fluvastatin in the promoter of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. These results indicate that the increase in transcriptional activity in the HMG-CoA synthase gene attributable to fluvastatin is a consequence of the activation of the proteolytic cleavage of SREBPs by reduced levels of intracellular cholesterol.

  19. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients.

  20. A Novel Function of F-Box Protein FBXO17 in Negative Regulation of Type I IFN Signaling by Recruiting PP2A for IFN Regulatory Factor 3 Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Di; Wang, Zining; Huang, Anfei; Zhao, Yong; Qin, F Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-15

    The F-box proteins were originally identified as the key component of SKP1-Cullin1-F-box E3 ligase complexes that control the stability of their specific downstream substrates essential for cell growth and survival. However, the involvement of these proteins in type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling during innate immunity has not been investigated. In this study we report that the F-box protein FBXO17 negatively regulates IFN-I signaling triggered by double-strand DNA, RNA, or viral infection. We found that FBXO17 specifically interacts with IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and decreases its dimerization and nuclear translocation. The decrease of IRF3 dimerization and nuclear translocation is due to the recruitment of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) mediated by FBXO17, resulting in IRF3 dephosphorylation. Interestingly, PP2A recruitment does not require the F-box domain but instead the F-box associated region of the protein; thus, the recruitment is independent of the canonical function of the SKP1-Cullin1-F-box family of E3 ligase. Together, our studies identify a previously unreported role of FBXO17 in regulating IFN-I signaling and further demonstrate a novel mechanism for IRF3 deactivation by F-box protein-mediated recruitment of PP2A.

  1. A Novel Function of F-Box Protein FBXO17 in Negative Regulation of Type I IFN Signaling by Recruiting PP2A for IFN Regulatory Factor 3 Deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Di; Wang, Zining; Huang, Anfei

    2017-01-01

    The F-box proteins were originally identified as the key component of SKP1-Cullin1-F-box E3 ligase complexes that control the stability of their specific downstream substrates essential for cell growth and survival. However, the involvement of these proteins in type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling during innate immunity has not been investigated. In this study we report that the F-box protein FBXO17 negatively regulates IFN-I signaling triggered by double-strand DNA, RNA, or viral infection. We found that FBXO17 specifically interacts with IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and decreases its dimerization and nuclear translocation. The decrease of IRF3 dimerization and nuclear translocation is due to the recruitment of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) mediated by FBXO17, resulting in IRF3 dephosphorylation. Interestingly, PP2A recruitment does not require the F-box domain but instead the F-box associated region of the protein; thus, the recruitment is independent of the canonical function of the SKP1-Cullin1-F-box family of E3 ligase. Together, our studies identify a previously unreported role of FBXO17 in regulating IFN-I signaling and further demonstrate a novel mechanism for IRF3 deactivation by F-box protein-mediated recruitment of PP2A. PMID:27956528

  2. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  3. Sequence and expression of GLN3, a positive nitrogen regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoding a protein with a putative zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Minehart, P L; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    The GLN3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the activation of transcription of a number of genes in response to the replacement of glutamine by glutamate as source of nitrogen. We cloned the GLN3 gene and constructed null alleles by gene disruption. GLN3 is not essential for growth, but increased copies of GLN3 lead to a drastic decrease in growth rate. The complete nucleotide sequence of the GLN3 gene was determined, revealing one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 730 amino acids, with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000. The GLN3 protein contains a single putative Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger which has homology to the Neurospora crassa NIT2 protein, the Aspergillus nidulans AREA protein, and the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the GLN3 protein binds the nitrogen upstream activation sequence of GLN1, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase. Neither control of transcription nor control of initiation of translation of GLN3 is important for regulation in response to glutamine availability. Images PMID:1682800

  4. Promoters, transcripts, and regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic geminivirus.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-07-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing.

  5. Promoters, Transcripts, and Regulatory Proteins of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Geminivirus†

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing. PMID:15956560

  6. Regulatory elements of the Staphylococcus aureus protein A (Spa) promoter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinxin; Stewart, George C

    2004-06-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (Spa) is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus. Transcription of the spa determinant occurs during the exponential growth phase and is repressed when the cells enter the postexponential growth phase. Regulation of spa expression has been found to be complicated, with regulation involving multiple factors, including Agr, SarA, SarS, SarT, Rot, and MgrA. Our understanding of how these factors work on the spa promoter to regulate spa expression is incomplete. To identify regulatory sites within the spa promoter, analysis of deletion derivatives of the promoter in host strains deficient in one or more of the regulatory factors was undertaken, and several critical features of spa regulation were revealed. The transcriptional start sites of spa were determined by primer extension. The spa promoter sequences were subcloned in front of a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. Various lengths of spa truncations with the same 3' end were constructed, and the resultant plasmids were transduced into strains with different regulatory genetic backgrounds. Our results identified upstream promoter sequences necessary for Agr system regulation of spa expression. The cis elements for SarS activity, an activator of spa expression, and for SarA activity, a repressor of spa expression, were identified. The well-characterized SarA consensus sequence on the spa promoter was found to be insufficient for SarA repression of the spa promoter. Full repression required the presence of a second consensus site adjacent to the SarS binding site. Sequences directly upstream of the core promoter sequence were found to stimulate transcription.

  7. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  8. Multiple DNA elements for sterol regulatory element-binding protein and NF-Y are responsible for sterol-regulated transcription of the genes for human 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase and squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Inoue, J; Sato, R; Maeda, M

    1998-06-01

    The expression of the human SREBP-2 gene is transcriptionally regulated in a cooperative manner by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and the general transcription factor NF-Y [Sato, R., Inoue, J., Kawabe, Y., Kodama, T., Takano, T., and Maeda, M. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 26461-26464]. To understand the sterol-dependent transcriptional regulation by these factors in detail, we have examined the regulation of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) synthase and squalene synthase genes, whose promoters have multiple potential sterol regulatory elements (SRE, SREBP binding site) and NF-Y binding sites. The promoter of the human HMG CoA synthase gene was cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized by means of reporter gene assays. The results indicate that an inverted CCAAT box, two SRE motifs and two Sp1 sites localized in a 90-bp region coordinately regulate the transcription. In the case of the human squalene synthase promoter, two SRE motifs and an inverted CCAAT box between the motifs localized in a 51-bp region are responsible for the sterol-regulated transcription of the gene. Gel mobility shift assay reveals that these two inverted CCAAT boxes are recognized by NF-Y. The involvement of multiple responsive elements in the transcription of HMG CoA synthase and squalene synthase seems to induce a higher level of sterol-dependent regulation (3.5 to 5. 8-fold) compared with that of the SREBP-2 promoter, which contains a single pair of SRE motif and CCAAT box (1.8 to 2.6-fold). Reporter gene assays using constructs containing various nucleotide spacing lengths between the SRE motif and the CCAAT box demonstrate that the 16 to 20-bp spacing range is required for maximal transcriptional regulation. These results agree with the findings that the distances between the two motifs in the known sterol responsive elements in several genes, including the human HMG CoA synthase and squalene synthase genes, are in this range.

  9. Regulatory role of PI3K-protein kinase B on the release of interleukin-1β in peritoneal macrophages from the ascites of cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Abellán, A; Ruiz-Alcaraz, A J; Antón, G; Miras-López, M; Francés, R; Such, J; Martínez-Esparza, M; García-Peñarrubia, P

    2014-01-01

    Great effort has been paid to identify novel targets for pharmaceutical intervention to control inflammation associated with different diseases. We have studied the effect of signalling inhibitors in the secretion of the proinflammatory and profibrogenic cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) obtained from the ascites of cirrhotic patients and compared with those obtained from the blood of healthy donors. Peritoneal M-DM were isolated from non-infected ascites of cirrhotic patients and stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and heat-killed Candida albicans in the presence or absence of inhibitors for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). The IL1B and CASP1 gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR). The expression of IL-1β and caspase-1 were determined by Western blot. IL-1β was also assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in cell culture supernatants. Results revealed that MEK1 and JNK inhibition significantly reduced the basal and stimulated IL-1β secretion, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor had no effect on IL-1β levels. On the contrary, inhibition of PI3K increased the secretion of IL-1β from stimulated M-DM. The activating effect of PI3K inhibitor on IL-1β release was mediated mainly by the enhancement of the intracellular IL-1β and caspase-1 content release to the extracellular medium and not by increasing the corresponding mRNA and protein expression levels. These data point towards the role of MEK1 and JNK inhibitors, in contrast to the PI3K-protein kinase B inhibitors, as potential therapeutic tools for pharmaceutical intervention to diminish hepatic damage by reducing the inflammatory response mediated by IL-1β associated with liver failure. PMID:25080058

  10. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast. PMID:19715344

  11. Sumoylation: a regulatory protein modification in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins is now established as one of the key regulatory protein modifications in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of proteins involved in processes such as chromatin organization, transcription, DNA repair, macromolecular assembly, protein homeostasis, trafficking, and signal transduction are subject to reversible sumoylation. Hence, it is not surprising that disease links are beginning to emerge and that interference with sumoylation is being considered for intervention. Here, we summarize basic mechanisms and highlight recent developments in the physiology of sumoylation.

  12. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  13. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Hovingh, Elise S.; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed. PMID:28066340

  14. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  15. Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-Glucopyranoside-Mediated Hypoglycaemia and Its Influence on Apoptosis-Regulatory Protein Expression in the Injured Kidneys of Streptozotocin-Induced Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qingwei; Liang, Tao; Qin, Feizhang; Wei, Jinbin; He, Qiaoling; Luo, Xiu; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Ni; Huang, Renbin

    2013-01-01

    Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) root (ACLR) has a long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine for treating diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (DN). (±)-Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (LGP1, LGP2) were two chiral lignan glucosides that were isolated from the ACLR. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of LGP1 and LGP2-mediated hypoglycaemia on renal injury in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. STZ-induced diabetic mice were administrated LGP1 and LGP2 orally (20, 40, 80 mg/kg body weight/d) for 14 days. Hyperglycaemia and the expression of related proteins such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), caspase-3, -8, -9, and Bcl-associated X protein (Bax) were markedly decreased by LGP1 treatment. However, LGP2 treatment had no hypoglycaemic activity. Diabetes-dependent alterations in the kidney such as glomerular hypertrophy, excessive extracellular matrix amassing, and glomerular and tubular basement membrane thickening were improved after 14 days of LGP1 treatment. B cell lymphoma Leukaemia-2 (Bcl-2) expression was reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic mouse kidneys but was enhanced by LGP1 treatment. These findings suggest that LGP1 treatment may inhibit diabetic nephropathy progression and may regulate several pharmacological targets for treating or preventing diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24312585

  16. Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-mediated hypoglycaemia and its influence on apoptosis-regulatory protein expression in the injured kidneys of streptozotocin-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qingwei; Liang, Tao; Qin, Feizhang; Wei, Jinbin; He, Qiaoling; Luo, Xiu; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Ni; Huang, Renbin

    2013-01-01

    Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) root (ACLR) has a long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine for treating diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (DN). (±)-Lyoniresinol 3α-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (LGP1, LGP2) were two chiral lignan glucosides that were isolated from the ACLR. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of LGP1 and LGP2-mediated hypoglycaemia on renal injury in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. STZ-induced diabetic mice were administrated LGP1 and LGP2 orally (20, 40, 80 mg/kg body weight/d) for 14 days. Hyperglycaemia and the expression of related proteins such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), caspase-3, -8, -9, and Bcl-associated X protein (Bax) were markedly decreased by LGP1 treatment. However, LGP2 treatment had no hypoglycaemic activity. Diabetes-dependent alterations in the kidney such as glomerular hypertrophy, excessive extracellular matrix amassing, and glomerular and tubular basement membrane thickening were improved after 14 days of LGP1 treatment. B cell lymphoma Leukaemia-2 (Bcl-2) expression was reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic mouse kidneys but was enhanced by LGP1 treatment. These findings suggest that LGP1 treatment may inhibit diabetic nephropathy progression and may regulate several pharmacological targets for treating or preventing diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Influence of endurance training on skeletal muscle mitophagy regulatory proteins in type 2 diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Christian; Przyklenk, Axel; Metten, Alexander; Schiffer, Thorsten; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brixius, Klara; Gehlert, Sebastian

    2017-05-24

    Mitophagy is a form of autophagy for the elimination of mitochondria. Mitochondrial content and function are reduced in the skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Physical training has been shown to restore mitochondrial capacity in T2DM patients, but the role of mitophagy has not been examined in this context. This study analyzes the impact of a 3-month endurance training on important skeletal muscle mitophagy regulatory proteins and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in T2DM patients. Muscle biopsies were obtained from eight overweight/obese T2DM men (61±10 years) at T1 (6 weeks pre-training), T2 (1 week pre-training), and T3 (3 to 4 days post-training). Protein contents were determined by Western blotting. The training increased mitochondrial complex II significantly (T2-T3: +29%, p = 0.037). The protein contents of mitophagy regulatory proteins (phosphorylated form of forkhead box O3A (pFOXO3A), mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase-1 (MUL1), Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kD interacting protein-3 (BNIP3), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3B (the ratio LC3B-II/LC3B-I was determined)) did not differ significantly between T1, T2, and T3. The results imply that training-induced changes in OXPHOS subunits (significant increase in complex II) are not accompanied by changes in mitophagy regulatory proteins in T2DM men. Future studies should elucidate whether acute exercise might affect mitophagic processes in T2DM patients (and whether a transient regulation of mitophagy regulatory proteins is evident) to fully clarify the role of physical activity and mitophagy for mitochondrial health in this particular patient group.

  18. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  19. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larson, Ryan P; Shafiani, Shahin; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must be tightly regulated to mount a sufficient response to limit bacterial growth and dissemination while avoiding excessive inflammation that could damage host tissues. A wide variety of cell types, cell surface molecules, and cytokines are likely to contribute to this regulation, but recent studies have revealed that a subset of CD4 T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3, called regulatory T (reg) cells, play a critical role [1-3]. Although the first reports of T reg cells in tuberculosis (TB) occurred only recently (i.e., 2006) [4, 5], we have already gained many insights into their activity during TB. While it is likely that T reg cells do play some beneficial roles by preventing inflammation-mediated damage to host tissues during TB, this aspect of their function has not been well studied to date. What is clear, however, is that during the initial T cell response to Mtb infection, Mtb induces the expansions of T reg cells that delay the onset of adaptive immunity, suggesting that Mtb has hijacked T reg cell-mediated immune suppression to allow it to replicate unabated in the lung until T cells finally arrive [6]. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of the delayed T cell response to Mtb and a brief introduction to regulatory T cells. We will then review what is known about T reg cells from observations in human populations, discuss mechanistic insights revealed in the mouse model, and speculate about the relevance of this understanding for future efforts to prevent and treat TB.

  20. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  1. A tomato alternative oxidase protein with altered regulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Holtzapffel, Ruth C; Castelli, Joanne; Finnegan, Patrick M; Millar, A Harvey; Whelan, Jim; Day, David A

    2003-09-30

    We have investigated the expression and regulatory properties of the two alternative oxidase (Aox) proteins that are expressed in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. Mill cv. Sweetie) after storage of green fruit at 4 degrees C. Four Aox genes were identified in the tomato genome, of which two (LeAox1a and LeAox1b) were demonstrated to be expressed in cold-treated fruit. The activity and regulatory properties of LeAox1a and LeAox1b were assayed after expression of each protein in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), proving that each is an active Aox protein. The LeAox1b protein was shown to have altered regulatory properties due to the substitution of a Ser for the highly conserved Cys(I) residue. LeAox1b could not form inactive disulfide-linked dimers and was activated by succinate instead of pyruvate. This is the first example of a dicot species expressing a natural Cys(I)/Ser isoform. The implications of the existence and expression of such Aox isoforms is discussed in the light of the hypothesised role for Aox in plant metabolism.

  2. Keratinocyte-specific ablation of the NF-κB regulatory protein A20 (TNFAIP3) reveals a role in the control of epidermal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lippens, S; Lefebvre, S; Gilbert, B; Sze, M; Devos, M; Verhelst, K; Vereecke, L; Mc Guire, C; Guérin, C; Vandenabeele, P; Pasparakis, M; Mikkola, M L; Beyaert, R; Declercq, W; van Loo, G

    2011-12-01

    The ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 3) serves as a critical brake on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. In humans, polymorphisms in or near the A20 gene are associated with several inflammatory disorders, including psoriasis. We show here that epidermis-specific A20-knockout mice (A20(EKO)) develop keratinocyte hyperproliferation, but no signs of skin inflammation, such as immune cell infiltration. However, A20(EKO) mice clearly developed ectodermal organ abnormalities, including disheveled hair, longer nails and sebocyte hyperplasia. This phenotype resembles that of mice overexpressing ectodysplasin-A1 (EDA-A1) or the ectodysplasin receptor (EDAR), suggesting that A20 negatively controls EDAR signaling. We found that A20 inhibited EDAR-induced NF-κB signaling independent from its de-ubiquitinating activity. In addition, A20 expression was induced by EDA-A1 in embryonic skin explants, in which its expression was confined to the hair placodes, known to be the site of EDAR expression. In summary, our data indicate that EDAR-induced NF-κB levels are controlled by A20, which functions as a negative feedback regulator, to assure proper skin homeostasis and epidermal appendage development.

  3. [Modulators of the regulatory protein activity acting at microdoses].

    PubMed

    Iamskova, V P; Krasnov, M S; Skripnikova, V S; Moliavka, A A; Il'ina, A P; Margasiuk, D V; Borisenko, A V; Berezin, B B; Iamskov, I A

    2009-01-01

    New, previously not studied bioregulators active in the ultra low doses corresponding of 10(-8) - 10(-17) mg/ml have been isolated from vitreoretinal tissue of eye. It has been shown that these bioregulators comprise some regulatory peptides-modulators represented by proteins with molecular weights 15-70 KDa one of which is bovine serum albumin. Correlation between the nanosize of bioregulators and their ability to show activity in ultra low doses is established.

  4. The expression of cytoskeleton regulatory protein Mena in colorectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, I; Prantner, I; Ember, I; Pávai, Z; Mezei, T

    2008-01-01

    The actin regulatory proteins Ena/VASP (Enabled/Vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein) family is involved in the control of cell motility and adhesion. They are important in the actin-dependent processes where dynamic actin reorganization it is necessary. The deregulation of actin cycle could have an important role in the cells' malignant transformation, tumor invasion or metastasis. Recently studies revealed that the human orthologue of murine Mena is modulated during the breast carcinogenesis. In our study, we tried to observe the immunohistochemical expression of mammalian Ena (Mena) in the colorectal polyps and carcinomas. We analyzed 10 adenomatous polyps (five with dysplasia) and 36 adenocarcinomas. We used the indirect immunoperoxidase staining. BD Biosciences have provided the Mena antibody. We observed that Mena was not expressed in the normal colorectal mucosa neither in polyps without dysplasia, but its expression was very high in polyps with high dysplasia. In colorectal carcinomas, Mena marked the tumoral cells in 80% of cases. In 25% of positive cases, the intensity was 3+, in 60% 2+ and in the other 15% 1+. The Mena intensity was higher in the microsatellite stable tumors (MSS) and was correlated with vascular invasion, with intensity of angiogenesis marked with CD31 and CD105 and with c-erbB-2 and p53 expression. This is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in colorectal lesions.

  5. Herpes simplex virus 1-encoded tegument protein VP16 abrogates the production of beta interferon (IFN) by inhibiting NF-κB activation and blocking IFN regulatory factor 3 to recruit its coactivator CBP.

    PubMed

    Xing, Junji; Ni, Liwen; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Kezhen; Lin, Rongtuan; Zheng, Chunfu

    2013-09-01

    Host cells activate innate immune signaling pathways to defend against invading pathogens. To survive within an infected host, viruses have evolved intricate strategies to counteract host immune responses. Herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), have large genomes and therefore have the capacity to encode numerous proteins that modulate host innate immune responses. Here we define the contribution of HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 in the inhibition of beta interferon (IFN-β) production. VP16 was demonstrated to significantly inhibit Sendai virus (SeV)-induced IFN-β production, and its transcriptional activation domain was not responsible for this inhibition activity. Additionally, VP16 blocked the activation of the NF-κB promoter induced by SeV or tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment and expression of NF-κB-dependent genes through interaction with p65. Coexpression analysis revealed that VP16 selectively blocked IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3)-mediated but not IRF-7-mediated transactivation. VP16 was able to bind to IRF-3 but not IRF-7 in vivo, based on coimmunoprecipitation analysis, but it did not affect IRF-3 dimerization, nuclear translocation, or DNA binding activity. Rather, VP16 interacted with the CREB binding protein (CBP) coactivator and efficiently inhibited the formation of the transcriptional complexes IRF-3-CBP in the context of HSV-1 infection. These results illustrate that VP16 is able to block the production of IFN-β by inhibiting NF-κB activation and interfering with IRF-3 to recruit its coactivator CBP, which may be important to the early events leading to HSV-1 infection.

  6. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  7. The Evolution of the Secreted Regulatory Protein Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Palfree, Roger G. E.; Bennett, Hugh P. J.; Bateman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Progranulin is a secreted growth factor that is active in tumorigenesis, wound repair, and inflammation. Haploinsufficiency of the human progranulin gene, GRN, causes frontotemporal dementia. Progranulins are composed of chains of cysteine-rich granulin modules. Modules may be released from progranulin by proteolysis as 6kDa granulin polypeptides. Both intact progranulin and some of the granulin polypeptides are biologically active. The granulin module occurs in certain plant proteases and progranulins are present in early diverging metazoan clades such as the sponges, indicating their ancient evolutionary origin. There is only one Grn gene in mammalian genomes. More gene-rich Grn families occur in teleost fish with between 3 and 6 members per species including short-form Grns that have no tetrapod counterparts. Our goals are to elucidate progranulin and granulin module evolution by investigating (i): the origins of metazoan progranulins (ii): the evolutionary relationships between the single Grn of tetrapods and the multiple Grn genes of fish (iii): the evolution of granulin module architectures of vertebrate progranulins (iv): the conservation of mammalian granulin polypeptide sequences and how the conserved granulin amino acid sequences map to the known three dimensional structures of granulin modules. We report that progranulin-like proteins are present in unicellular eukaryotes that are closely related to metazoa suggesting that progranulin is among the earliest extracellular regulatory proteins still employed by multicellular animals. From the genomes of the elephant shark and coelacanth we identified contemporary representatives of a precursor for short-from Grn genes of ray-finned fish that is lost in tetrapods. In vertebrate Grns pathways of exon duplication resulted in a conserved module architecture at the amino-terminus that is frequently accompanied by an unusual pattern of tandem nearly identical module repeats near the carboxyl-terminus. Polypeptide

  8. The RGK family: a regulatory tail of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathleen

    2005-12-01

    RGK proteins are small Ras-related GTP-binding proteins that function as potent inhibitors of voltage-dependent calcium channels, and two members of the family, Gem and Rad, modulate Rho-dependent remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Within the Ras superfamily, RGK proteins have distinct structural and regulatory characteristics. It is an open question as to whether RGK proteins catalyze GTP hydrolysis in vivo. Binding of calmodulin and the 14-3-3 protein to RGK proteins controls downstream pathways. Here, we discuss the structural and functional properties of RGK proteins and highlight recent work by Beguin and colleagues addressing the mechanism of Gem regulation by calmodulin and 14-3-3.

  9. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  10. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  11. Dsc E3 ligase localization to the Golgi requires the ATPase Cdc48 and cofactor Ufd1 for activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Burr, Risa; Ribbens, Diedre; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Stewart, Emerson V; Ho, Jason; Espenshade, Peter J

    2017-09-29

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe regulate lipid homeostasis and the hypoxic response under conditions of low sterol or oxygen availability. SREBPs are cleaved in the Golgi through the combined action of the Dsc E3 ligase complex, the rhomboid protease Rbd2, and the essential ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA(+)) ATPase Cdc48. The soluble SREBP N-terminal transcription factor domain is then released into the cytosol to enter the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Previously, we reported that Cdc48 binding to Rbd2 is required for Rbd2-mediated SREBP cleavage. Here, using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry experiments, we identified Cdc48-binding proteins in S. pombe, generating a list of many previously unknown potential Cdc48-binding partners. We show that the established Cdc48 cofactor Ufd1 is required for SREBP cleavage but does not interact with the Cdc48-Rbd2 complex. Cdc48-Ufd1 is instead required at a step prior to Rbd2 function, during Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex. Together, these findings demonstrate that two distinct Cdc48 complexes, Cdc48-Ufd1 and Cdc48-Rbd2, are required for SREBP activation and low-oxygen adaptation in S. pombe. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Protein Kinase CK2: Intricate Relationships within Regulatory Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Nuñez de Villavicencio-Diaz, Teresa; Rabalski, Adam J; Litchfield, David W

    2017-03-05

    Protein kinase CK2 is a small family of protein kinases that has been implicated in an expanding array of biological processes. While it is widely accepted that CK2 is a regulatory participant in a multitude of fundamental cellular processes, CK2 is often considered to be a constitutively active enzyme which raises questions about how it can be a regulatory participant in intricately controlled cellular processes. To resolve this apparent paradox, we have performed a systematic analysis of the published literature using text mining as well as mining of proteomic databases together with computational assembly of networks that involve CK2. These analyses reinforce the notion that CK2 is involved in a broad variety of biological processes and also reveal an extensive interplay between CK2 phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. The interplay between CK2 and other post-translational modifications suggests that CK2 does have intricate roles in orchestrating cellular events. In this respect, phosphorylation of specific substrates by CK2 could be regulated by other post-translational modifications and CK2 could also have roles in modulating other post-translational modifications. Collectively, these observations suggest that the actions of CK2 are precisely coordinated with other constituents of regulatory cellular networks.

  13. Protein Kinase CK2: Intricate Relationships within Regulatory Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez de Villavicencio-Diaz, Teresa; Rabalski, Adam J.; Litchfield, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a small family of protein kinases that has been implicated in an expanding array of biological processes. While it is widely accepted that CK2 is a regulatory participant in a multitude of fundamental cellular processes, CK2 is often considered to be a constitutively active enzyme which raises questions about how it can be a regulatory participant in intricately controlled cellular processes. To resolve this apparent paradox, we have performed a systematic analysis of the published literature using text mining as well as mining of proteomic databases together with computational assembly of networks that involve CK2. These analyses reinforce the notion that CK2 is involved in a broad variety of biological processes and also reveal an extensive interplay between CK2 phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. The interplay between CK2 and other post-translational modifications suggests that CK2 does have intricate roles in orchestrating cellular events. In this respect, phosphorylation of specific substrates by CK2 could be regulated by other post-translational modifications and CK2 could also have roles in modulating other post-translational modifications. Collectively, these observations suggest that the actions of CK2 are precisely coordinated with other constituents of regulatory cellular networks. PMID:28273877

  14. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  15. Structural Instability Tuning as a Regulatory Mechanism in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Balabanidou, Vassilia; Remeta, David P.; Minetti, Conceição A.S.A.; Portaliou, Athina G.; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein-protein interactions mediate a vast number of cellular processes. Here we present a regulatory mechanism in protein-protein interactions mediated by finely-tuned structural instability coupled with molecular mimicry. We show that a set of type III secretion (TTS) autoinhibited homodimeric chaperones adopt a molten-globule-like state that transiently exposes the substrate binding site as a means to become rapidly poised for binding to their cognate protein substrates. Packing defects at the homodimeric interface stimulate binding whereas correction of these defects results in less labile chaperones that give rise to non-functional biological systems. The protein substrates use structural mimicry to offset the “weak spots” in the chaperones and to counteract their autoinhibitory conformation. This regulatory mechanism of protein activity is evolutionary conserved among several TSS systems and presents a lucid example of functional advantage conferred upon a biological system by finely-tuned structural instability. PMID:22152477

  16. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Molodtsova, Daria; Harpur, Brock A.; Kent, Clement F.; Seevananthan, Kajendra; Zayed, Amro

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behavior are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behavior is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behavior arise if behavior is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behavior, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behavior of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behavior can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network. PMID:25566318

  17. Caerulomycin A Enhances Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad3 Protein Signaling by Suppressing Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) Protein Signaling to Expand Regulatory T Cells (Tregs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Rama Krishna; Kujur, Weshely; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play a very important role in the regulation of immune homeostasis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) responsible for the generation of peripheral tolerance are under the tight regulation of the cytokine milieu. In this study, we report a novel role of a bipyridyl compound, Caerulomycin A (CaeA), in inducing the generation of Tregs. It was observed that CaeA substantially up-regulated the pool of Tregs, as evidenced by an increased frequency of CD4+ Foxp3+ cells. In addition, CaeA significantly suppressed the number of Th1 and Th17 cells, as supported by a decreased percentage of CD4+/IFN-γ+ and CD4+/IL-17+ cells, respectively. Furthermore, we established the mechanism and observed that CaeA interfered with IFN-γ-induced STAT1 signaling by augmenting SOCS1 expression. An increase in the TGF-β-mediated Smad3 activity was also noted. Furthermore, CaeA rescued Tregs from IFN-γ-induced inhibition. These results were corroborated by blocking Smad3 activity, which abolished the CaeA-facilitated generation of Tregs. In essence, our results indicate a novel role of CaeA in inducing the generation of Tregs. This finding suggests that CaeA has enough potential to be considered as a potent future drug for the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:24811173

  18. Integration of Regulatory Guidelines into Protein Drug Product Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The drug product development process for proteins went through its infancy in the early eighties of last century and is in its maturity today. This has been driven largely by the rapid growth of the biotechnology industry, which led to the development and issuance of many regulatory guidelines/directories, especially those through the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH). These guidelines have certainly guided different aspects of a drug product development process. On the other hand, they were issued separately on different topics and in different time periods. An integration of all relevant guidelines into the corresponding areas in drug product development would greatly facilitate the development process. The purpose of this short review is to integrate the relevant (mainly ICH) regulatory guidelines into protein drug product development and to discuss remaining issues, which may lead to further revision of existing guidelines or development of new ones. Drug product development scientists need to collect adequate and relevant development data for a successful product registration. The key is the ability to justify the final drug product in terms of choice of the drug product formulation, container closure system, and manufacturing process. The drug product development process for proteins has matured today, largely due to the rapid growth of the biotechnology industry. In this process, many regulatory guidelines/directories were developed and issued, especially through the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH). However, they were issued separately on different topics and in different time periods. An integration of all relevant guidelines into the corresponding areas in drug product development would greatly facilitate the development process. The purpose of this short review is to integrate the relevant (mainly ICH) regulatory guidelines into protein drug product development and to discuss remaining issues, which may lead to further

  19. Treatment with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone preserves calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gualtiero; Sordi, Andrea; Lonati, Caterina; Carlin, Andrea; Turcatti, Flavia; Leonardi, Patrizia; Gatti, Stefano; Catania, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Prevention of graft dysfunction is a major objective in transplantation medicine. Previous research on experimental heart transplantation indicated that treatment with the immunomodulatory peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) improves histopathology, prolongs allograft survival, and reduces expression of the main tissue injury mediators. Because calcium-handling is critical in heart graft function, we determined the effects of transplantation injury and influences of alpha-MSH treatment on representative calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts. Hearts from Brown Norway rats were transplanted heterotopically into MHC incompatible Lewis rats. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C epsilon (PKC epsilon), sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2 (SERCA2a), arrestin-beta1 (Arrb1), cholinergic receptor M2 (Chrm2), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (InsP(3)R1) were examined in: (1) non-transplanted donor hearts; (2) allografts from saline-treated rats; and (3) allografts from rats treated with the synthetic alpha-MSH analog Nle4-DPhe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) (100 microg i.p. every 12h). Transplantation injury was associated with severe reduction in calcium regulatory protein transcription and expression level. NDP-alpha-MSH administration partly reversed inhibition of protein transcription and almost completely prevented protein loss. Finally, because certain effects of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling on calcium handling in cardiac myocytes depend on activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), we determined Epac1 mRNA and protein expression in heart allografts. Transplantation injury markedly reduced Epac1. NDP-alpha-MSH treatment significantly preserved both Epac1 protein and mRNA in the allografts. Administration of alpha-MSH or related melanocortins could reduce transplantation-induced dysfunction through protection of heart calcium

  20. The Interaction of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Regulatory Protein ICP22 with the cdc25C Phosphatase Is Enabled In Vitro by Viral Protein Kinases US3 and UL13▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Donald, Benjamin A.; Roizman, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that ICP22 and the UL13 protein kinase but not the US3 kinase are required for optimal expression of a subset of late (γ2) genes exemplified by UL38, UL41, and US11. In primate cells, ICP22 mediates the disappearance of inactive isoforms of cdc2 and degradation of cyclins A and B1. Active cdc2 acquires a new partner, the viral DNA synthesis processivity factor UL42. The cdc2-UL42 complex recruits and phosphorylates topoisomerase IIα for efficient expression of the γ2 genes listed above. In uninfected cells, the cdc25C phosphatase activates cdc2 by removing two inhibitory phosphates. The accompanying report shows that in the absence of cdc25C, the rate of degradation of cyclin B1 is similar to that occurring in infected wild-type mouse embryo fibroblast cells but the levels of cdc2 increase, and the accumulation of a subset of late proteins and virus yields are reduced. This report links ICP22 with cdc25C. We show that in infected cells, ICP22 and US3 protein kinase mediate the phosphorylation of cdc25C at its C-terminal domain. In in vitro assays with purified components, both UL13 and US3 viral kinases phosphorylate cdc25C and ICP22. cdc25C also interacts with cdc2. However, in infected cells, the ability of cdc25C to activate cdc2 by dephosphorylation of the inactive cdc2 protein is reduced. Coupled with the phosphorylation of cdc25C by the US3 kinase, the results raise the possibility that herpes simplex virus 1 diverts cdc25C to perform functions other than those performed in uninfected cells. PMID:18272572

  1. Dysregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c in livers of morbidly obese women is associated with altered suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Elam, Marshall B; Yellaturu, Chandrahasa; Howell, George E; Deng, Xiong; Cowan, George S; Kumar, Poonam; Park, Edwards A; Hiler, M Lloyd; Wilcox, Henry G; Hughes, Thomas A; Cook, George A; Raghow, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    We compared hepatic expression of genes that regulate lipid biosynthesis and metabolic signaling in liver biopsy specimens from women who were undergoing gastric bypass surgery (GBP) for morbid obesity with that in women undergoing ventral hernia repair who had experienced massive weight loss (MWL) after prior GBP. Comprehensive metabolic profiles of morbidly obese (MO) (22 subjects) and MWL (9 subjects) were also compared. Analyses of gene expression in liver biopsies from MO and MWL were accomplished by Affymetrix microarray, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting techniques. After GBP, MWL subjects had lost on average 102 lb as compared with MO subjects. This was accompanied by effective reversal of the dyslipidemia and insulin resistance that were present in MO. As compared with MWL, livers of MO subjects exhibited increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c and its downstream lipogenic targets, fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase-1. Livers of MO subjects also exhibited enhanced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 protein and attenuated Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. Consistent with these findings, we found that the human SREBP-1c promoter was positively regulated by insulin and negatively regulated by STAT3. These data support the hypothesis that suppressor of cytokine signaling-3-mediated attenuation of the STAT signaling pathway and resulting enhanced expression of SREBP-1c, a key regulator of de novo lipid biosynthesis, are mechanistically related to the development of hepatic insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in MO women.

  2. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  3. Sequence diversity of the Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein family.

    PubMed

    Beucher, M; Norris, K A

    2008-02-01

    As a central component of innate immunity, complement activation is a critical mechanism of containment and clearance of microbial pathogens in advance of the development of acquired immunity. Several pathogens restrict complement activation through the acquisition of host proteins that regulate complement activation or through the production of their own complement regulatory molecules (M. K. Liszewski, M. K. Leung, R. Hauhart, R. M. Buller, P. Bertram, X. Wang, A. M. Rosengard, G. J. Kotwal, and J. P. Atkinson, J. Immunol. 176:3725-3734, 2006; J. Lubinski, L. Wang, D. Mastellos, A. Sahu, J. D. Lambris, and H. M. Friedman, J. Exp. Med. 190:1637-1646, 1999). The infectious stage of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi produces a surface-anchored complement regulatory protein (CRP) that functions to inhibit alternative and classical pathway complement activation (K. A. Norris, B. Bradt, N. R. Cooper, and M. So, J. Immunol. 147:2240-2247, 1991). This study addresses the genomic complexity of the T. cruzi CRP and its relationship to the T. cruzi supergene family comprising active trans-sialidase (TS) and TS-like proteins. The TS superfamily consists of several functionally distinct subfamilies that share a characteristic sialidase domain at their amino termini. These TS families include active TS, adhesions, CRPs, and proteins of unknown functions (G. A. Cross and G. B. Takle, Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 47:385-411, 1993). A sequence comparison search of GenBank using BLASTP revealed several full-length paralogs of CRP. These proteins share significant homology at their amino termini and a strong spatial conservation of cysteine residues. Alternative pathway complement regulation was confirmed for CRP paralogs with 58% (low) and 83% (high) identity to AAB49414. CRPs are functionally similar to the microbial and mammalian proteins that regulate complement activation. Sequence alignment of mammalian complement control proteins to CRP showed that these sequences are

  4. Effect of adiponectin on the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression, progesterone and androstenedione production by the porcine uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, N; Dobrzyn, K; Kiezun, M; Szeszko, K; Maleszka, A; Kaminski, T

    2016-06-01

    Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the human and porcine uterus and this endocrine system has important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B1) were observed in the human and porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy. The de novo synthesis of steroids in the uterus might be a crucial factor for effective implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that adiponectin modulates the expression of key enzymes in the synthesis of the steroids: StAR, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) and HSD3B1, as well as progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) secretion by the porcine uterus. Endometrial and myometrial explants harvested from gilts (n = 5) on days 10 to 11, 12 to 13, 15 to 16 and 27 to 28 of pregnancy and on days 10 to 11 of the oestrous cycle were cultured in vitro in the presence of adiponectin (1, 10 μg/ml), adiponectin with insulin (10 ng/ml) and insulin alone (10 ng/ml). Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and the secretion of the steroids was determined by radioimmunoassay. The content of StAR, CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 mRNAs and the secretion of P4 and A4 was modulated by adiponectin in endometrial and myometrial tissue explants during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle. In this action adiponectin interacted with insulin. Insulin itself also regulated the steroidogenic activity of the porcine uterus. ere we reported, for the first time, the expression of CYP11A1 genes in the porcine endometrium and myometrium. Our novel findings indicate that adiponectin affects basal and insulin-stimulated expression of key steroidogenic genes and production of steroid hormones by the porcine uterus during maternal recognition of pregnancy and implantation.

  5. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p < 0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  6. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  7. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  8. A conserved regulatory mechanism in bifunctional biotin protein ligases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingheng; Beckett, Dorothy

    2017-08-01

    Class II bifunctional biotin protein ligases (BirA), which catalyze post-translational biotinylation and repress transcription initiation, are broadly distributed in eubacteria and archaea. However, it is unclear if these proteins all share the same molecular mechanism of transcription regulation. In Escherichia coli the corepressor biotinoyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP), which is also the intermediate in biotin transfer, promotes operator binding and resulting transcription repression by enhancing BirA dimerization. Like E. coli BirA (EcBirA), Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis BirA (Sa and BsBirA) repress transcription in vivo in a biotin-dependent manner. In this work, sedimentation equilibrium measurements were performed to investigate the molecular basis of this biotin-responsive transcription regulation. The results reveal that, as observed for EcBirA, Sa, and BsBirA dimerization reactions are significantly enhanced by bio-5'-AMP binding. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the Biotin Regulatory System is conserved in the biotin repressors from these three organisms. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  9. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling.

  10. 14-3-3 proteins are promising LRRK2 interactors.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Iakov N; Cookson, Mark R

    2010-09-15

    Mutations in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) are the most common cause of familial PD (Parkinson's disease). Mutations that cause PD are found in either the GTPase or kinase domains of LRRK2 or an intervening sequence called the COR [C-terminus of ROC (Ras of complex proteins)] domain. As well as the two catalytic domains, LRRK2 possesses several protein-protein interaction domains, but their function and the proteins with which they interact are poorly understood. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Nichols et al. study the interaction of the N-terminal region of LRRK2 with 14-3-3 proteins, regulatory proteins that often bind to phosphorylated regions of components of cell signalling pathways. Using a combination of techniques, Nichols et al. have identified two residues (Ser910 and Ser935) that are critically responsible for 14-3-3 binding. The interaction of LRRK2 with 14-3-3 proteins can prevent dephosphorylation of Ser910/Ser935 and stabilize LRRK2 structure, perhaps by influencing the dimerization of LRRK2. The ability to interact with 14-3-3 correlates with the pattern of intracellular LRRK2 distribution. Collectively, these new results identify a potentially important regulatory mechanism of this complex protein and might provide ways to think about therapeutic opportunities for PD.

  11. Thiazolidinediones modulate the expression of beta-catenin and other cell-cycle regulatory proteins by targeting the F-box proteins of Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase independently of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuo; Lin, Li-Fang; Yang, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Geen-Dong; Chen, Hungwen; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2007-09-01

    Considering the role of aberrant beta-catenin signaling in tumorigenesis, we investigated the mechanism by which the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist troglitazone facilitated beta-catenin down-regulation. We demonstrate that troglitazone and its more potent PPARgamma-inactive analogs Delta2TG and STG28 mediated the proteasomal degradation of beta-catenin in prostate cancer cells by up-regulating the expression of beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), an F-box component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Evidence indicates that although small interfering RNA-mediated beta-TrCP knockdown protected cells against STG28-facilitated beta-catenin ablation, ectopic beta-TrCP expression enhanced the degradation. The involvement of beta-TrCP in beta-catenin degradation was also corroborated by the pull-down analysis and the concurrent down-regulation of known beta-TrCP substrates examined, including Wee1, Ikappabetaalpha, cdc25A, and nuclear factor-kappaB/p105. Furthermore, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta represented a key regulator in the effect of these thiazolidinedione derivatives on beta-catenin proteolysis even though these agents increased its phosphorylation level. It is noteworthy that this drug-induced beta-TrCP up-regulation was accompanied by the concomitant down-regulation of Skp2 and Fbw7, thereby affecting many of the target proteins of these two F-box proteins (such as p27 and cyclin E). As a consequence, the ability of troglitazone to target these F-box proteins provides a molecular basis to account for its reported effect on modulating the expression of aforementioned cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Despite this complicated mode of pharmacological actions, normal prostate epithelial cells, relative to LNCaP cells, were less susceptible to the effects of STG28 on modulating the expression of beta-catenin and beta-TrCP, suggesting the translation potential of using STG28 as a scaffold to

  12. Cold shock Y-box protein-1 participates in signaling circuits with auto-regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sabine; Raffetseder, Ute; Djudjaj, Sonja; Schreiter, Anja; Kadereit, Bert; Michele, Melanie; Pabst, Melanie; Zhu, Cheng; Mertens, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock protein Y-box (YB) binding-1 is an example of a highly regulated protein with pleiotropic functions. Besides activities as a transcription factor in the nucleus or regulator of translation in the cytoplasm, recent findings indicate extracellular effects and secretion via a non-classical secretion pathway. This review summarizes regulatory pathways in which YB-1 participates, all iterating auto-regulatory loops. Schematics are developed that elucidate the cold shock protein activities in (i) fine-tuning its own expression level following platelet-derived growth factor-B-, thrombin- or interferon-γ-dependent signaling, (ii) as a component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex for interleukin-2 synthesis in T-cell commitment/activation, (iii) pro-fibrogenic cell phenotypic changes mediated by transforming growth factor-β, and (iv) receptor Notch-3 cleavage and signal transduction. Emphasis is put forward on subcellular protein translocation mechanisms and underlying signaling pathways. These have mostly been analysed in cell culture systems and rarely in experimental models. In sum, YB-1 seems to fulfill a pacemaker role in diverse diseases, both inflammatory/pro-fibrogenic as well as tumorigenic. A clue towards potential intervention strategies may reside in the understanding of the outlined auto-regulatory loops and means to interfere with cycling pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron regulatory proteins and their role in controlling iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2015-02-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is regulated by post-transcriptional feedback mechanisms, which control the expression of proteins involved in iron uptake, release and storage. Two cytoplasmic proteins with mRNA-binding properties, iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) play a central role in this regulation. Foremost, IRPs regulate ferritin H and ferritin L translation and thus iron storage, as well as transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) mRNA stability, thereby adjusting receptor expression and iron uptake via receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-loaded transferrin. In addition splice variants of iron transporters for import and export at the plasma-membrane, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin are regulated by IRPs. These mechanisms have probably evolved to maintain the cytoplasmic labile iron pool (LIP) at an appropriate level. In certain tissues, the regulation exerted by IRPs influences iron homeostasis and utilization of the entire organism. In intestine, the control of ferritin expression limits intestinal iron absorption and, thus, whole body iron levels. In bone marrow, erythroid heme biosynthesis is coordinated with iron availability through IRP-mediated translational control of erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase mRNA. Moreover, the translational control of HIF2α mRNA in kidney by IRP1 coordinates erythropoietin synthesis with iron and oxygen supply. Besides IRPs, body iron absorption is negatively regulated by hepcidin. This peptide hormone, synthesized and secreted by the liver in response to high serum iron, downregulates ferroportin at the protein level and thereby limits iron absorption from the diet. Hepcidin will not be discussed in further detail here.

  14. Luteal expression of cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase genes in late pregnant rats: effect of luteinizing hormone and RU486.

    PubMed

    Stocco, C O; Chedrese, J; Deis, R P

    2001-10-01

    A decrease in serum progesterone at the end of pregnancy is essential for the induction of parturition in rats. We have previously demonstrated that LH participates in this process through: 1) inhibiting 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) activity and 2) stimulating progesterone catabolism by inducing 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD) activity. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of LH and progesterone on the luteal expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450(scc)), 3beta-HSD, and 20alpha-HSD genes. Gene expression was analyzed by Northern blot analysis 24 and 48 h after administration of LH or vehicle on Day 19 of pregnancy. StAR and 3beta-HSD mRNA levels were lower in LH-treated rats than in rats administered with vehicle at both time points studied. P450(scc) mRNA levels were unaffected by LH. The 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels were not different between LH and control rats 24 h after treatment; however, greater expression of 20alpha-HSD, with respect to controls, was observed in LH-treated rats 48 h after treatment. Luteal progesterone content dropped in LH-treated rats at both time points studied, whereas serum progesterone decreased after 48 h only. In a second set of experiments, the anti-progesterone RU486 was injected intrabursally on Day 20 of pregnancy. RU486 had no effect on 3beta-HSD or P450(scc) expression but increased 20alpha-HSD mRNA levels after 8 h treatment. In conclusion, the luteolytic effect of LH is mediated by a drop in StAR and 3beta-HSD expression without effect on P450(scc) expression. We also provide the first in vivo evidence indicating that a decrease in luteal progesterone content may be an essential step toward the induction of 20alpha-HSD expression at the end of pregnancy in rats.

  15. Shear stress-mediated changes in the expression of complement regulatory protein CD59 on human endothelial progenitor cells by ECM-integrinαVβ3-F-actin pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Bu, Hongnan; Liu, Na; Li, Hong; Guan, Xiumei; Yan, Hong; Wang, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hua; Ding, Yuzhen; Cheng, Min

    2017-09-21

    Membrane regulatory proteins, such as CD46, CD55, and CD59, prevent excess complement activation and to protect cells from damage. Previous investigations confirmed that shear stress in the physiological range was more favorable for endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to repair injured vascular endothelial cells and operates mainly in atheroprotective actions. However, detailed events that contribute to shear stress-induced protection in EPCs, particularly the mechanisms of signal transduction, remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed shear stress-mediated changes in the expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55, and CD59 on human EPCs and focused on the mechanical transmission mechanism in transformed cells in response to the ECM-F-actin pathway in vitro. Shear stress was observed to promote the expression of complement regulatory protein CD59, but not CD46 or CD55, on EPCs. In addition, the shear stress-induced CD59 expression was confirmed to be associated with the ECM components and was alleviated in EPCs pretreated with GRGDSP, which inhibits ECM components-integrin interaction. Furthermore, shear stress also promotes the rearrangement and polymerization of F-actin. However, shear stress-induced CD59 expression was reduced when the F-actin stress fiber formation process was delayed by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP) or destroyed by cytochalasin D (Cyto D), while Jasplakinolide (JAS) reversed the expression of CD59 through promotion of F-actin polymerization and its stabilizing capacities. Our results indicates that shear stress is an important mediator in EPC expression of CD59 regulated by the ECM-F-actin pathway, which is a key factor in preventing membrane attack complex (MAC) -mediated cell autolysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Structural Similarity of YbeD Protein from Escherichia coli to Allosteric Regulatory Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Elias, Demetra; Semesi, Anthony; Yee, Adelinda; Cygler, Miroslaw; Gehring, Kalle

    2004-01-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group in several metabolic pathways. The biosynthetic pathway of protein lipoylation in Escherichia coli involves gene products of the lip operon. YbeD is a conserved bacterial protein located in the dacA-lipB intergenic region. Here, we report the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of YbeD from E. coli. The structure includes a βαββαβ fold with two α-helices on one side of a four-strand antiparallel β-sheet. The β2-β3 loop shows the highest sequence conservation and is likely functionally important. The β-sheet surface contains a patch of conserved hydrophobic residues, suggesting a role in protein-protein interactions. YbeD shows striking structural homology to the regulatory domain from d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, hinting at a role in the allosteric regulation of lipoic acid biosynthesis or the glycine cleavage system. PMID:15547281

  17. Protein modularity, cooperative binding, and hybrid regulatory states underlie transcriptional network diversification

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher R.; Booth, Lauren N.; Sorrells, Trevor R.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We examine how different transcriptional network structures can evolve from an ancestral network. By characterizing how the ancestral mode of gene regulation for genes specific to a-type cells in yeast species evolved from an activating paradigm to a repressing one, we show that regulatory protein modularity, conversion of one cis-regulatory sequence to another, distribution of binding energy among protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and exploitation of ancestral network features all contribute to the evolution of a novel regulatory mode. The formation of this derived mode of regulation did not disrupt the ancestral mode and thereby created a hybrid regulatory state where both means of transcription regulation (ancestral and derived) contribute to the conserved expression pattern of the network. Finally, we show how this hybrid regulatory state has resolved in different ways in different lineages to generate the diversity of regulatory network structures observed in modern species. PMID:23021217

  18. Protein modularity, cooperative binding, and hybrid regulatory states underlie transcriptional network diversification.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher R; Booth, Lauren N; Sorrells, Trevor R; Johnson, Alexander D

    2012-09-28

    We examine how different transcriptional network structures can evolve from an ancestral network. By characterizing how the ancestral mode of gene regulation for genes specific to a-type cells in yeast species evolved from an activating paradigm to a repressing one, we show that regulatory protein modularity, conversion of one cis-regulatory sequence to another, distribution of binding energy among protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and exploitation of ancestral network features all contribute to the evolution of a novel regulatory mode. The formation of this derived mode of regulation did not disrupt the ancestral mode and thereby created a hybrid regulatory state where both means of transcription regulation (ancestral and derived) contribute to the conserved expression pattern of the network. Finally, we show how this hybrid regulatory state has resolved in different ways in different lineages to generate the diversity of regulatory network structures observed in modern species.

  19. Excess capacity of the iron regulatory protein system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2007-08-24

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) are master regulators of cellular iron metabolism. IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) present in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding proteins of iron storage, uptake, transport, and export. Because simultaneous knockout of IRP1 and IRP2 is embryonically lethal, it has not been possible to use dual knockouts to explore the consequences of loss of both IRP1 and IRP2 in mammalian cells. In this report, we describe the use of small interfering RNA to assess the relative contributions of IRP1 and IRP2 in epithelial cells. Stable cell lines were created in which either IRP1, IRP2, or both were knocked down. Knockdown of IRP1 decreased IRE binding activity but did not affect ferritin H and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) expression, whereas knockdown of IRP2 marginally affected IRE binding activity but caused an increase in ferritin H and a decrease in TfR1. Knockdown of both IRPs resulted in a greater reduction of IRE binding activity and more severe perturbation of ferritin H and TfR1 expression compared with single IRP knockdown. Even though the knockdown of IRP-1, IRP-2, or both was efficient, resulting in nondetectable protein and under 5% of wild type levels of mRNA, all stable knockdowns retained an ability to modulate ferritin H and TfR1 appropriately in response to iron challenge. However, further knockdown of IRPs accomplished by transient transfection of small interfering RNA in stable knockdown cells completely abolished the response of ferritin H and TfR1 to iron challenge, demonstrating an extensive excess capacity of the IRP system.

  20. Iron regulatory protein-1 protects against mitoferrin-1-deficient porphyria.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jacky; Anderson, Sheila A; Gwynn, Babette; Deck, Kathryn M; Chen, Michael J; Langer, Nathaniel B; Shaw, George C; Huston, Nicholas C; Boyer, Leah F; Datta, Sumon; Paradkar, Prasad N; Li, Liangtao; Wei, Zong; Lambert, Amy J; Sahr, Kenneth; Wittig, Johannes G; Chen, Wen; Lu, Wange; Galy, Bruno; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Hentze, Matthias W; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry; Eisenstein, Richard S; Peters, Luanne L; Paw, Barry H

    2014-03-14

    Mitochondrial iron is essential for the biosynthesis of heme and iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters in mammalian cells. In developing erythrocytes, iron is imported into the mitochondria by MFRN1 (mitoferrin-1, SLC25A37). Although loss of MFRN1 in zebrafish and mice leads to profound anemia, mutant animals showed no overt signs of porphyria, suggesting that mitochondrial iron deficiency does not result in an accumulation of protoporphyrins. Here, we developed a gene trap model to provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) inhibits protoporphyrin accumulation. Mfrn1(+/gt);Irp1(-/-) erythroid cells exhibit a significant increase in protoporphyrin levels. IRP1 attenuates protoporphyrin biosynthesis by binding to the 5'-iron response element (IRE) of alas2 mRNA, inhibiting its translation. Ectopic expression of alas2 harboring a mutant IRE, preventing IRP1 binding, in Mfrn1(gt/gt) cells mimics Irp1 deficiency. Together, our data support a model whereby impaired mitochondrial [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis in Mfrn1(gt/gt) cells results in elevated IRP1 RNA-binding that attenuates ALAS2 mRNA translation and protoporphyrin accumulation.

  1. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  2. Pin1: Intimate involvement with the regulatory protein kinase networks in the global phosphorylation landscape.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H; Brandl, Christopher J; Gyenis, Laszlo

    2015-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a universal regulatory mechanism that involves an extensive network of protein kinases. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 added an additional layer of complexity to these regulatory networks. We have evaluated interactions between Pin1 and the regulatory kinome and proline-dependent phosphoproteome taking into consideration findings from targeted studies as well as data that has emerged from systematic phosphoproteomic workflows and from curated protein interaction databases. The relationship between Pin1 and the regulatory protein kinase networks is not restricted simply to the recognition of proteins that are substrates for proline-directed kinases. In this respect, Pin1 itself is phosphorylated in cells by protein kinases that modulate its functional properties. Furthermore, the phosphorylation-dependent targets of Pin1 include a number of protein kinases as well as other enzymes such as phosphatases and regulatory subunits of kinases that modulate the actions of protein kinases. As a result of its interactions with numerous protein kinases and their substrates, as well as itself being a target for phosphorylation, Pin1 has an intricate relationship with the regulatory protein kinase and phosphoproteomic networks that orchestrate complex cellular processes and respond to environmental cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulatory Activities of Four ArsR Proteins in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Brame, Keenan; Jetter, Jonathan; Bothner, Brian B.; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ArsR is a well-studied transcriptional repressor that regulates microbe-arsenic interactions. Most microorganisms have an arsR gene, but in cases where multiple copies exist, the respective roles or potential functional overlap have not been explored. We examined the repressors encoded by arsR1 and arsR2 (ars1 operon) and by arsR3 and arsR4 (ars2 operon) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. ArsR1 and ArsR4 are very similar in their primary sequences and diverge phylogenetically from ArsR2 and ArsR3, which are also quite similar to one another. Reporter constructs (lacZ) for arsR1, arsR2, and arsR4 were all inducible by As(III), but expression of arsR3 (monitored by reverse transcriptase PCR) was not influenced by As(III) and appeared to be linked transcriptionally to an upstream lysR-type gene. Experiments using a combination of deletion mutations and additional reporter assays illustrated that the encoded repressors (i) are not all autoregulatory as is typically known for ArsR proteins, (ii) exhibit variable control of each other's encoding genes, and (iii) exert variable control of other genes previously shown to be under the control of ArsR1. Furthermore, ArsR2, ArsR3, and ArsR4 appear to have an activator-like function for some genes otherwise repressed by ArsR1, which deviates from the well-studied repressor role of ArsR proteins. The differential regulatory activities suggest a complex regulatory network not previously observed in ArsR studies. The results indicate that fine-scale ArsR sequence deviations of the reiterated regulatory proteins apparently translate to different regulatory roles. IMPORTANCE Given the significance of the ArsR repressor in regulating various aspects of microbe-arsenic interactions, it is important to assess potential regulatory overlap and/or interference when a microorganism carries multiple copies of arsR. This study explores this issue and shows that the four arsR genes in A. tumefaciens 5A, associated with two separate

  4. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  5. 3 CFR - Regulatory Flexibility, Small Business, and Job Creation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulatory Flexibility, Small Business, and Job... Flexibility, Small Business, and Job Creation Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies... 60 percent of all new jobs in the Nation. Although small businesses and new companies provide...

  6. Improving enzyme regulatory protein classification by means of SVM-RFE feature selection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Fernández-Blanco, Enrique; Dave, Kirtan; Pedreira, Nieves; Gestal, Marcos; Dorado, Julián; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2014-05-01

    Enzyme regulation proteins are very important due to their involvement in many biological processes that sustain life. The complexity of these proteins, the impossibility of identifying direct quantification molecular properties associated with the regulation of enzymatic activities, and their structural diversity creates the necessity for new theoretical methods that can predict the enzyme regulatory function of new proteins. The current work presents the first classification model that predicts protein enzyme regulators using the Markov mean properties. These protein descriptors encode the topological information of the amino acid into contact networks based on amino acid distances and physicochemical properties. MInD-Prot software calculated these molecular descriptors for 2415 protein chains (350 enzyme regulators) using five atom physicochemical properties (Mulliken electronegativity, Kang-Jhon polarizability, vdW area, atom contribution to P) and the protein 3D regions. The best classification models to predict enzyme regulators have been obtained with machine learning algorithms from Weka using 18 features. K* has been demonstrated to be the most accurate algorithm for this protein function classification. Wrapper Subset Evaluator and SVM-RFE approaches were used to perform a feature subset selection with the best results obtained from SVM-RFE. Classification performance employing all the available features can be reached using only the 8 most relevant features selected by SVM-RFE. Thus, the current work has demonstrated the possibility of predicting new molecular targets involved in enzyme regulation using fast theoretical algorithms.

  7. 14-3-3 proteins: regulators of numerous eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, G Paul H

    2005-09-01

    14-3-3 proteins form a family of highly conserved proteins capable of binding to more than 200 different mostly phosphorylated proteins. They are present in all eukaryotic organisms investigated, often in multiple isoforms, up to 13 in some plants. 14-3-3 binding partners are involved in almost every cellular process and 14-3-3 proteins play a key role in these processes. 14-3-3 proteins interact with products encoded by oncogenes, with filament forming proteins involved in Alzheimer'ss disease and many other proteins related to human diseases. Disturbance of the interactions with 14-3-3 proteins may lead to diseases like cancer and the neurological Miller-Dieker disease. The molecular consequences of 14-3-3 binding are diverse and only partly understood. Binding of a protein to a 14-3-3 protein may result in stabilization of the active or inactive phosphorylated form of the protein, to a conformational alteration leading to activation or inhibition, to a different subcellular localization or to the interaction with other proteins. Currently genome- and proteome-wide studies are contributing to a wider knowledge of this important family of proteins.

  8. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from those of all other species

  9. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-05

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins.

  10. 75 FR 45172 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guides 3.44 and 3.49

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ...: Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 3.44, ``Standard Format and Content for the Safety Analysis Report for an... withdrawing Regulatory Guide (RG) 3.44, ``Standard Format and Content for the Safety Analysis Report for an... Guide 3.44 provides guidance to applicants on the format and content of the safety analysis report that...

  11. Control of alternative splicing by signal-dependent degradation of splicing-regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Marengo, Matthew S; Wassarman, David A

    2009-04-17

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation of the ATR (ATM-RAD3-related) signaling pathway by the chemotherapeutic drug camptothecin (CPT). The screen identified 15 proteins that, when knocked down, caused the same change in TAF1 alternative splicing as CPT treatment. However, combined RNA interference and CPT treatment experiments indicated that only a subset of the identified proteins are targets of the CPT-induced signal, suggesting that multiple independent pathways regulate TAF1 alternative splicing. To understand how signals modulate the function of splicing factors, we characterized one of the CPT targets, Tra2 (Transformer-2). CPT was found to down-regulate Tra2 protein levels. CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation was ATR-dependent and temporally paralleled the change in TAF1 alternative splicing, supporting the conclusion that Tra2 directly regulates TAF1 alternative splicing. Additionally, CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation occurred independently of new protein synthesis, suggesting a post-translational mechanism. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 reduced CPT-induced Tra2 degradation and TAF1 alternative splicing, and mutation of evolutionarily conserved Tra2 lysine 81, a potential ubiquitin conjugation site, to arginine inhibited CPT-induced Tra2 degradation, supporting a proteasome-dependent alternative splicing mechanism. We conclude that CPT-induced TAF1 alternative splicing occurs through ATR-signaled degradation of a subset of splicing-regulatory proteins.

  12. Altered turnover of calcium regulatory proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferrington, D A; Krainev, A G; Bigelow, D J

    1998-03-06

    We have measured the in vivo protein turnover for the major calcium regulatory proteins of the sarcoplasmic reticulum from the skeletal muscle of young adult (7 months) and aged (28 months) Fischer 344 rats. From the time course of the incorporation and decay of protein-associated radioactivity after a pulse injection of [14C]leucine and correcting for leucine reutilization, in young rats, the apparent half-lives for calsequestrin, the 53-kDa glycoprotein, and ryanodine receptor are 5.4 +/- 0.4, 6.3 +/- 1.3, and 8.3 +/- 1.3 days, respectively. A half-life of 14.5 +/- 2.5 days was estimated for the Ca-ATPase isolated from young muscle. Differences in protein turnover associated with aging were determined using sequential injection of two different isotopic labels ([14C]leucine and [3H]leucine) to provide an estimate of protein synthesis and degradation within the same animal. The Ca-ATPase and ryanodine receptor isolated from aged muscle exhibits 27 +/- 5% and 25 +/- 3% slower protein turnover, respectively, relative to that from young muscle. In contrast, the 53-kDa glycoprotein exhibits a 25 +/- 5% more rapid turnover in aged SR, while calsequestrin exhibits no age-dependent alteration in turnover. Statistical analysis comparing the sensitivity of various methods for discriminating different rates of protein turnover validates the approach used in this study and demonstrates that the use of two isotopic labels provides at least a 6-fold more sensitive means to detect age-related differences in protein turnover relative to other methods.

  13. Yeast 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, G Paul H; Steensma, H Yde

    2006-02-01

    14-3-3 proteins form a family of highly conserved proteins which are present in all eukaryotic organisms investigated, often in multiple isoforms, up to 13 in some plants. They interact with more than 200 different, mostly phosphorylated proteins. The molecular consequences of 14-3-3 binding are diverse: this binding may result in stabilization of the active or inactive phosphorylated form of the protein, to a conformational alteration leading to activation or inhibition, to a different subcellular localization, to the interaction with other proteins or to shielding of binding sites. The binding partners, and hence the 14-3-3 proteins, are involved in almost every cellular process and 14-3-3 proteins have been linked to several diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, the neurological Miller-Dieker and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 diseases and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe both have two genes encoding 14-3-3 proteins, BMH1 and BMH2 and rad24 and rad25, respectively. In these yeasts, 14-3-3 proteins are essential in most laboratory strains. As in higher eukaryotes, yeast 14-3-3 proteins bind to numerous proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Recent genome-wide studies on yeast strains with impaired 14-3-3 function support the participation of 14-3-3 proteins in numerous yeast cellular processes. Given the high evolutionary conservation of the 14-3-3 proteins, the experimental accessibility and relative simplicity of yeasts make them excellent model organisms for elucidating the function of the 14-3-3 protein family.

  14. Regulatory Elements in Vectors for Efficient Generation of Cell Lines Producing Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maksimenko, O.; Gasanov, N. B.; Georgiev, P.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been an increasing number of drugs produced in mammalian cell cultures. In order to enhance the expression level and stability of target recombinant proteins in cell cultures, various regulatory elements with poorly studied mechanisms of action are used. In this review, we summarize and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of such regulatory elements. PMID:26483956

  15. Interaction between transcriptional activator protein LAC9 and negative regulatory protein GAL80.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Langdon, S D; Johnston, S A

    1989-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcriptional activation mediated by the GAL4 regulatory protein is repressed in the absence of galactose by the binding of the GAL80 protein, an interaction that requires the carboxy-terminal 28 amino acids of GAL4. The homolog of GAL4 from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC9, activates transcription in S. cerevisiae and is highly similar to GAL4 in its carboxyl terminus but is not repressed by wild-type levels of GAL80 protein. Here we show that GAL80 does repress LAC9-activated transcription in S. cerevisiae if overproduced. We sought to determine the molecular basis for the difference in the responses of the LAC9 and GAL4 proteins to GAL80. Our results indicate that this difference is due primarily to the fact that under wild-type conditions, the level of LAC9 protein in S. cerevisiae is much higher than that of GAL4, which suggests that LAC9 escapes GAL80-mediated repression by titration of GAL80 protein in vivo. The difference in response to GAL80 is not due to amino acid sequence differences between the LAC9 and GAL4 carboxyl termini. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanism of galactose metabolism regulation in S. cerevisiae and K. lactis. Images PMID:2550790

  16. Modular architecture of protein structures and allosteric communications: potential implications for signaling proteins and regulatory linkages

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Amoros, Dolors; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Background Allosteric communications are vital for cellular signaling. Here we explore a relationship between protein architectural organization and shortcuts in signaling pathways. Results We show that protein domains consist of modules interconnected by residues that mediate signaling through the shortest pathways. These mediating residues tend to be located at the inter-modular boundaries, which are more rigid and display a larger number of long-range interactions than intra-modular regions. The inter-modular boundaries contain most of the residues centrally conserved in the protein fold, which may be crucial for information transfer between amino acids. Our approach to modular decomposition relies on a representation of protein structures as residue-interacting networks, and removal of the most central residue contacts, which are assumed to be crucial for allosteric communications. The modular decomposition of 100 multi-domain protein structures indicates that modules constitute the building blocks of domains. The analysis of 13 allosteric proteins revealed that modules characterize experimentally identified functional regions. Based on the study of an additional functionally annotated dataset of 115 proteins, we propose that high-modularity modules include functional sites and are the basic functional units. We provide examples (the Gαs subunit and P450 cytochromes) to illustrate that the modular architecture of active sites is linked to their functional specialization. Conclusion Our method decomposes protein structures into modules, allowing the study of signal transmission between functional sites. A modular configuration might be advantageous: it allows signaling proteins to expand their regulatory linkages and may elicit a broader range of control mechanisms either via modular combinations or through modulation of inter-modular linkages. PMID:17531094

  17. Solubilization and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, K.; Dickey, B.F.; Pyun, H.Y.; Navarro, J.

    1988-07-12

    The authors describe the solubilization, resolution, and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMet-Leu-Phe) receptor and guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins (G-proteins). The receptor was solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. Guanine nucleotides decreased the number of high-affinity binding sites and accelerated the rate of dissociation of the receptor-ligand complex, suggesting that the solubilized receptor remained coupled to endogenous G-proteins. The solubilized receptor was resolved from endogenous G-proteins by fractionation on a wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose 4B column. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)fMet-Leu-Phe binding to the WGA-purified receptor was diminished and exhibited reduced guanine nucleotide sensitivity. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)fMET-Leu-Phe binding and guanine nucleotide sensitivity were reconstituted upon the addition of purified brain G-proteins. Similar results were obtained when the receptor was reconstituted with brain G-proteins into phospholipid vesicles by gel filtration chromatography. In addition, they also demonstrated fMET-Leu-Phe-dependent GTP hydrolysis in the reconstituted vesicles. The results of this work indicate that coupling of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor to G-proteins converts the receptor to a high-affinity binding state and that agonist produces activation of G-proteins. The resolution and functional reconstitution of this receptor should provide an important step toward the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of the fMet-Leu-Phe transduction system in neutrophils.

  18. Functional Characterization of a Novel Pro-Apoptotic Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    of establishing stable cell lines in ovarian cancer as stated above, this project awaits the establishment of tetracycline -inducible ovarian cancer ...W81XWH-04-1-0085 TITLE: Functional Characterization of a Novel Pro-Apoptotic Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer ...Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0085 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  19. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self.

  20. Exceptionally high heterologous protein levels in transgenic dicotyledonous seeds using Phaseolus vulgaris regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    De Jaeger, Geert; Angenon, Geert; Depicker, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Seeds are concentrated sources of protein and thus may be ideal 'bioreactors' for the production of heterologous proteins. For this application, strong seed-specific expression signals are required. A set of expression cassettes were designed using 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of the seed storage protein gene arcelin 5-I (arc5-I) from Phaseolus vulgaris, and evaluated for the production of heterologous proteins in dicotyledonous plant species. A murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was chosen as model protein because of the current industrial interest to produce antibodies and derived fragments in crops. Because the highest scFv accumulation in seed had previously been achieved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the scFv-encoding sequence was provided with signal sequences for accumulation in the ER. Transgenic Arabidopsis seed stocks, expressing the scFv under control of the 35S promoter, contained scFv accumulation levels in the range of 1% of total soluble protein (TSP). However, the seed storage promoter constructs boosted the scFv to exceptionally high levels. Maximum scFv levels were obtained in homozygous seed stocks, being 12.5% of TSP under control of the arc5-I regulatory sequences and even up to 36.5% of TSP upon replacing the arc5-I promoter by the beta-phaseolin promoter of Phaseolus vulgaris. Even at such very high levels, the scFv proteins retain their full antigen-binding activity. Moreover, the presence of very high scFv levels has only minory effects on seed germination and no effect on seed production. These results demonstrate that the expression levels of arcelin 5-I and beta-phaseolin seed storage protein genes can be transferred to heterologous proteins, giving exceptionally high levels of heterologous proteins, which can be of great value for the molecular farming industry by raising production yield and lowering bio-mass production and purification costs. Finally, the feasibility of heterologous protein production using the

  1. Foxp3-transduced polyclonal regulatory T cells protect against chronic renal injury from adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Watson, Debbie; Hori, Shohei; Alexander, Ian E; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2006-03-01

    Chronic proteinuric renal injury is a major cause of ESRD. Adriamycin nephropathy is a murine model of chronic proteinuric renal disease whereby chemical injury is followed by immune and structural changes that mimic human disease. Foxp3 is a gene that induces a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype. It was hypothesized that Foxp3-transduced Treg could protect against renal injury in Adriamycin nephropathy. CD4+ T cells were transduced with either a Foxp3-containing retrovirus or a control retrovirus. Foxp3-transduced T cells had a regulatory phenotype by functional and phenotypic assays. Adoptive transfer of Foxp3-transduced T cells protected against renal injury. Urinary protein excretion and serum creatinine were reduced (P<0.05), and there was significantly less glomerulosclerosis, tubular damage, and interstitial infiltrates (P<0.01). It is concluded that Foxp3-transduced Treg cells may have a therapeutic role in protecting against immune injury and disease progression in chronic proteinuric renal disease.

  2. HIV-1 Vpu Does Not Degrade Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that HIV-1 Vpu mediates the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) to avoid innate immune sensing. Here, we show that Vpu does not deplete IRF-3 from transfected cell lines or HIV-1-infected primary cells. Furthermore, the Vpu-dependent suppression of beta interferon expression described in previous studies could be ascribed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Thus, Vpu suppresses innate immune activation through inhibition of NF-κB rather than degradation of IRF-3. PMID:23552418

  3. Development of coagulation regulatory proteins in the fetal and neonatal lamb.

    PubMed

    Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Jacobson, Linda J; Hacker, Michele R; Townsend, Susan F; Murphy, James; Hay, William

    2002-10-01

    To investigate the development of coagulation regulatory proteins-protein C (PC), protein S (PS), and antithrombin (AT)-in relationship to the procoagulant protein factor X (FX), a chronically catheterized fetal ovine model was used. Infusion and sampling catheters were placed into pregnant ewes and their fetuses and maintained from mid-gestation. From a total of 110 fetuses, 17 lambs, and 63 ewes that were studied on one to 15 occasions, 212 fetal, 88 neonatal, and 157 maternal samples were obtained. Liver tissue was obtained from 31 fetuses and 15 ewes. Plasma levels of all proteins studied were higher in the ewe than in the fetus (p < 0.0001). Plasma levels of FX, PC, and PS achieved neonatal levels by mid-gestation with mild but significant decreases during mid- and late gestation. Fetal and early neonatal plasma concentrations of these vitamin K-dependent proteins fit a model with both quadratic (p < 0.01) and linear (p < 0.01) components. The discrepant levels in mRNA relative to plasma concentration were consistent with regulatory control beyond the level of transcription. In contrast, a simple linear increase in plasma protein levels was determined for the vitamin K-independent coagulation regulatory protein, AT (p for quadratic component > 0.05). This study suggests that fetal regulation of coagulation proteins follows characteristic patterns relative to the vitamin K dependence of the protein rather than its role as a procoagulant versus regulatory protein.

  4. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin.

  5. Sequential actions of the AAA-ATPase valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 and the proteasome 19 S regulatory particle in sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lindsey L; Hartman, Isamu Z; Jun, Dong-Jae; Seemann, Joachim; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2014-07-04

    Accelerated endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) of the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase results from its sterol-induced binding to ER membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2. This binding allows for subsequent ubiquitination of reductase by Insig-associated ubiquitin ligases. Once ubiquitinated, reductase becomes dislocated from ER membranes into the cytosol for degradation by 26 S proteasomes through poorly defined reactions mediated by the AAA-ATPase valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 and augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol. Here, we report that the oxysterol 25-hydroxycholesterol and geranylgeraniol combine to trigger extraction of reductase across ER membranes prior to its cytosolic release. This conclusion was drawn from studies utilizing a novel assay that measures membrane extraction of reductase by determining susceptibility of a lumenal epitope in the enzyme to in vitro protease digestion. Susceptibility of the lumenal epitope to protease digestion and thus membrane extraction of reductase were tightly regulated by 25-hydroxycholesterol and geranylgeraniol. The reaction was inhibited by RNA interference-mediated knockdown of either Insigs or VCP/p97. In contrast, reductase continued to become membrane-extracted, but not cytosolically dislocated, in cells deficient for AAA-ATPases of the proteasome 19 S regulatory particle. These findings establish sequential roles for VCP/p97 and the 19 S regulatory particle in the sterol-accelerated ERAD of reductase that may be applicable to the ERAD of other substrates. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Proliferation of transformed somatotroph cells related to low or absent expression of protein kinase a regulatory subunit 1A protein.

    PubMed

    Lania, Andrea G; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano; Pellegrini, Caterina; Bondioni, Sara; Peverelli, Erika; Braidotti, Paola; Locatelli, Marco; Zavanone, Mario L; Ferrante, Emanuela; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2004-12-15

    The two regulatory subunits (R1 and R2) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in cancer cell lines and exert diverse roles in growth control. Recently, mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit 1A gene (PRKAR1A) have been identified in patients with Carney complex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the PKA regulatory subunits R1A, R2A, and R2B in a series of 30 pituitary adenomas and the effects of subunit activation on cell proliferation. In these tumors, neither mutation of PRKAR1A nor loss of heterozygosity was identified. By real-time PCR, mRNA of the three subunits was detected in all of the tumors, R1A being the most represented in the majority of samples. By contrast, immunohistochemistry documented low or absent R1A levels in all tumors, whereas R2A and R2B were highly expressed, thus resulting in an unbalanced R1/R2 ratio. The low levels of R1A were, at least in part, due to proteasome-mediated degradation. The effect of the R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in GH3 cells, which showed a similar unbalanced pattern of R subunits expression, and in growth hormone-secreting adenomas. The R2-selective cAMP analog 8-Cl cAMP and R1A RNA silencing, stimulated cell proliferation and increased Cyclin D1 expression, respectively, in human and rat adenomatous somatotrophs. These data show that a low R1/R2 ratio promoted proliferation of transformed somatotrophs and are consistent with the Carney complex model in which R1A inactivating mutations further unbalance this ratio in favor of R2 subunits. These results suggest that low expression of R1A protein may favor cAMP-dependent proliferation of transformed somatotrophs.

  7. [The contractile, regulatory and structural proteins of myocardium].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Michaela; Pelouch, Václav

    2003-01-01

    The myocardium consists of three basic categories of proteins. The myofibrillar proteins trasform the chemical energy of ATP to the mechanical work of the heart. The metabolic proteins located both in the cytosol and in the mitochondrial compartments provide energy for the cardiac contraction. The interstitial space between myocytes is occupied by the extracellular proteins (collagens, glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans, elastins). By far the greater percentage of myofibrillar proteins (about 80%) is that concerned with contraction (actin and myosin), with about 10% concerned with its regulation (troponin, tropomyosin and tropomodulin) and another 10% concerned with maintenance of the structure of myofibril (C, M-, H-proteins, myomesin, nebulette, alpha-actinin, titin, CapZ protein). Most collagenous and non-collagenous proteins exist in many isoforms that originate from the same genom but are the product of alternative splicing of a primary RNA transcript.

  8. The 3' untranslated region of human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulatory subunit 1 contains regulatory elements affecting transcript stability

    PubMed Central

    Moncini, Silvia; Bevilacqua, Annamaria; Venturin, Marco; Fallini, Claudia; Ratti, Antonia; Nicolin, Angelo; Riva, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background CDK5R1 plays a central role in neuronal migration and differentiation during central nervous system development. CDK5R1 has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders and proposed as a candidate gene for mental retardation. The remarkable size of CDK5R1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of CDK5R1 expression. Results The bioinformatic study shows a high conservation degree in mammals and predicts several AU-Rich Elements (AREs). The insertion of CDK5R1 3'-UTR into luciferase 3'-UTR causes a decreased luciferase activity in four transfected cell lines. We identified 3'-UTR subregions which tend to reduce the reporter gene expression, sometimes in a cell line-dependent manner. In most cases the quantitative analysis of luciferase mRNA suggests that CDK5R1 3'-UTR affects mRNA stability. A region, leading to a very strong mRNA destabilization, showed a significantly low half-life, indicating an accelerated mRNA degradation. The 3' end of the transcript, containing a class I ARE, specifically displays a stabilizing effect in neuroblastoma cell lines. We also observed the interaction of the stabilizing neuronal RNA-binding proteins ELAV with the CDK5R1 transcript in SH-SY5Y cells and identified three 3'-UTR sub-regions showing affinity for ELAV proteins. Conclusion Our findings evince the presence of both destabilizing and stabilizing regulatory elements in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and support the hypothesis that CDK5R1 gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled in neurons by ELAV-mediated mechanisms. This is the first evidence of the involvement of 3'-UTR in the modulation of CDK5R1 expression. The fine tuning of CDK5R1 expression by 3'-UTR may have a role in central nervous system development and functioning, with potential implications in neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. PMID:18053171

  9. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-09-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself.

  10. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-01-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself. PMID:9726945

  11. Function of fusion regulatory proteins (FRPs) in immune cells and virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Tsurudome, M; Ito, Y

    2000-01-01

    Two molecules that regulate cell fusion have been identified and designated fusion regulatory protein-1 (FRP-1) and FRP-2. FRP-1 is a complex composed of a glycosylated heavy chain and a nonglycosylated light chain that are disulfide linked. FRP-1 heavy chain is identical to 4F2/CD98 heavy chain, whereas FRP-2 is identical to integrin alpha3 subunit. The FRP-1 heavy chain is a multifunctional molecule: that is, fusion regulator, amino acid transporter, integrin regulator, comitogenic factor, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, oncogenic protein, and so on. Several aspects of the structure and function of the FRP-1 system are reviewed: fusion regulatory molecular mechanisms, cross-talk between the FRP-1 and integrin, the FRP-1 system as amino acid transporter, and FRP-1-mediated T-cell activation. The FRP-1 system is involved in virus-mediated cell fusion and multinucleated giant cell formation of blood monocytes. Monoclonal antibodies against human FRP-1 heavy chain induce polykaryocytes that have properties as osteoclasts. Multiple steps participate in molecular mechanisms regulating cell fusion. The FRP-1 heavy chain supports amino acid transport activity and the FRP-1 light chains have recently been cloned as amino acid transporters that require association with the heavy chain to exhibit their activity. Novel pathways for monocyte-dependent regulation of T-cell activation have recently been found that are mediated by the FRP-1 system. In conclusion, the FRP-1 molecules are essential factors for basic cellular functions.

  12. Regulatory function of Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) in ethylene response and signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honglin; Sun, Yue; Chang, Jianhong; Zheng, Fangfang; Pei, Haixia; Yi, Yanjun; Chang, Caren; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2016-07-01

    Ethylene as a gaseous plant hormone is directly involved in various processes during plant growth and development. Much is known regarding the ethylene receptors and regulatory factors in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis thaliana, REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1) can interact with and positively regulates the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1). In this study we report the identification and characterization of an RTE1-interacting protein, a putative Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) of unknown function. Through bimolecular fluorescence complementation, a direct molecular interaction between LTP1 and RTE1 was verified in planta. Analysis of an LTP1-GFP fusion in transgenic plants and plasmolysis experiments revealed that LTP1 is localized to the cytoplasm. Analysis of ethylene responses showed that the ltp1 knockout is hypersensitive to 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC), while LTP1 overexpression confers insensitivity. Analysis of double mutants etr1-2 ltp1 and rte1-3 ltp1 demonstrates a regulatory function of LTP1 in ethylene receptor signaling through the molecular association with RTE1. This study uncovers a novel function of Arabidopsis LTP1 in the regulation of ethylene response and signaling.

  13. A feedback regulatory loop between methyltransferase PRMT1 and orphan receptor TR3

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Na-zi; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Chen, Hang-zi; Wang, Yuan; Zhan, Yan-yan; Zheng, Zhong-hui; Shen, Yue-mao; Wu, Qiao

    2009-01-01

    PRMT1, an arginine methyltransferase, plays an important role in numerous cellular processes. In this study, we demonstrate a feedback regulatory loop between PRMT1 and the orphan receptor TR3. Unlike another orphan receptor HNF4, TR3 is not methylated by PRMT1 although they physically interact with each other. By delaying the TR3 protein degradation, PRMT1 binding leads to the elevation of TR3 cellular protein level, thereby enhances the DNA binding and transactivation activity of TR3 in a non-methyltransferase manner. Another coactivator SRC-2 acts synergistically with PRMT1 to regulate TR3 functions. In turn, TR3 binding to the catalytic domain of PRMT1 causes an inhibition of the PRMT1 methyltransferase activity. This repression results in the functional changes in some of PRMT1 substrates, including STAT3 and Sam68. The negative regulation of PRMT1 by TR3 was further confirmed in both TR3-knockdown cells and TR3-knockout mice with the use of an agonist for TR3. Taken together, our study not only identifies a regulatory role of PRMT1, independent on methyltransferase activity, in TR3 transactivation, but also characterizes a novel function of TR3 in the repression of PRMT1 methyltransferase activity. PMID:19095693

  14. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  15. DNA binding and transcription activation by chicken interferon regulatory factor-3 (chIRF-3)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Caroline E.; May, Donna L.; Deeley, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the cellular response to interferons and viral infection. Previously we isolated an IRF from a chicken embryonic liver cDNA library. Using a PCR-based binding site selection assay, we have characterised the binding specificity of chIRF-3. The optimal binding site (OBS) fits within the consensus interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) but the specificity of chIRF-3 binding allows less variation in nucleotides outside the core IRF-binding sequence. A comparison of IRF-1 and chIRF-3 binding to ISREs in electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the binding specificity of chIRF-3 was clearly distinguishable from IRF-1. The selection assay also showed that chIRF-3 is capable of binding an inverted repeat of two half OBSs separated by 10–13 nt. ChIRF-3 appears to bind both the OBS and inverted repeat sites as a dimer with the protein–protein interaction requiring a domain between amino acids 117 and 311. In transfection experiments expression of chIRF-3 strongly activated a promoter containing the OBS. The activation domain was mapped to between amino acids 138 and 221 and a domain inhibitory to activation was also mapped to the C-terminal portion of chIRF-3. PMID:11095692

  16. Genetic control of telomere integrity in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: rad3(+) and tel1(+) are parts of two regulatory networks independent of the downstream protein kinases chk1(+) and cds1(+).

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, A; Naito, T; Ishikawa, F

    1999-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe checkpoint gene named rad3(+) encodes an ATM-homologous protein kinase that shares a highly conserved motif with proteins involved in DNA metabolism. Previous studies have shown that Rad3 fulfills its function via the regulation of the Chk1 and Cds1 protein kinases. Here we describe a novel role for Rad3 in the control of telomere integrity. Mutations in the rad3(+) gene alleviated telomeric silencing and produced shortened lengths in the telomere repeat tracts. Genetic analysis revealed that the other checkpoint rad mutations rad1, rad17, and rad26 belong to the same phenotypic class with rad3 with regard to control of the telomere length. Of these mutations, rad3 and rad26 have a drastic effect on telomere shortening. tel1(+), another ATM homologue in S. pombe, carries out its telomere maintenance function in parallel with the checkpoint rad genes. Furthermore, either a single or double disruption of cds1(+) and chk1(+) caused no obvious changes in the telomeric DNA structure. Our results demonstrate a novel role of the S. pombe ATM homologues that is independent of chk1(+) and cds1(+). PMID:10430579

  17. An Appetite for Modernizing the Regulatory Framework for Protein Content Claims in Canada.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Foisy, Samara; Shoveller, Anna K; Porter, Cara; Musa-Veloso, Kathy; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2017-08-23

    The need for protein-rich plant-based foods continues as dietary guidelines emphasize their contribution to healthy dietary patterns that prevent chronic disease and promote environmental sustainability. However, the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations provide a regulatory framework that can prevent Canadian consumers from identifying protein-rich plant-based foods. In Canada, protein nutrient content claims are based on the protein efficiency ratio (PER) and protein rating method, which is based on a rat growth bioassay. PERs are not additive, and the protein rating of a food is underpinned by its Reasonable Daily Intake. The restrictive nature of Canada's requirements for supporting protein claims therefore presents challenges for Canadian consumers to adapt to a rapidly changing food environment. This commentary will present two options for modernizing the regulatory framework for protein content claims in Canada. The first and preferred option advocates that protein quality not be considered in the determination of the eligibility of a food for protein content claims. The second and less preferred option, an interim solution, is a framework for adopting the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score as the official method for supporting protein content and quality claims and harmonizes Canada's regulatory framework with that of the USA.

  18. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2011-11-02

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  19. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. ); Pandey, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  20. Protein disulfide isomerase secretion following vascular injury initiates a regulatory pathway for thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Bowley, Sheryl R.; Fang, Chao; Merrill-Skoloff, Glenn; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), secreted by platelets and endothelial cells on vascular injury, is required for thrombus formation. Using PDI variants that form mixed disulfide complexes with their substrates, we identify by kinetic trapping multiple substrate proteins, including vitronectin. Plasma vitronectin does not bind to αvβ3 or αIIbβ3 integrins on endothelial cells and platelets. The released PDI reduces disulfide bonds on plasma vitronectin, enabling vitronectin to bind to αVβ3 and αIIbβ3. In vivo studies of thrombus generation in mice demonstrate that vitronectin rapidly accumulates on the endothelium and the platelet thrombus following injury. This process requires PDI activity and promotes platelet accumulation and fibrin generation. We hypothesize that under physiologic conditions in the absence of secreted PDI, thrombus formation is suppressed and maintains a quiescent, patent vasculature. The release of PDI during vascular injury may serve as a regulatory switch that allows activation of proteins, among them vitronectin, critical for thrombus formation. PMID:28218242

  1. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Rita; Schwarz, Christoph; Furtwängler, Katarina; Tarasov, Valery; Wende, Andy; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-05-28

    Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  2. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp)-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F) and lrpA1 (OE2621R), were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3. PMID:20509863

  3. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  4. DTDP-rhamnosyl transferase RfbF, is a newfound receptor-related regulatory protein for phage phiYe-F10 specific for Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junrong; Li, Xu; Zha, Tao; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Liu, Chang; Duan, Ran; Xiao, Yuchun; Su, Mingming; Wang, Xin; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-03-11

    Bacteriophages and their hosts are continuously engaged in evolutionary competition. Here we isolated a lytic phage phiYe-F10 specific for Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3. We firstly described the phage receptor was regulated by DTDP-rhamnosyl transferase RfbF, encoded within the rfb cluster that was responsible for the biosynthesis of the O antigens. The deletion of DTDP-rhamnosyl transferase RfbF of wild type O:3 strain caused failure in phiYe-F10 adsorption; however, the mutation strain retained agglutination with O:3 antiserum; and complementation of its mutant converted its sensitivity to phiYe-F10. Therefore, DTDP-rhamnosyl transferase RfbF was responsible for the phage infection but did not affect recognition of Y. enterocolitica O:3 antiserum. Further, the deletions in the putative O-antigen biosynthesis protein precursor and outer membrane protein had no effect on sensitivity to phiYe-F10 infection. However, adsorption of phages onto mutant HNF10-ΔO-antigen took longer time than onto the WT, suggesting that deletion of the putative O-antigen biosynthesis protein precursor reduced the infection efficiency.

  5. Catecholamine Stress Hormones Regulate Cellular Iron Homeostasis by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism Mediated by Iron Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tapryal, Nisha; Vivek G, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate availability of iron is important for cellular energy metabolism. Catecholamines such as epinephrine and norepinephrine promote energy expenditure to adapt to conditions that arose due to stress. To restore the energy balance, epinephrine/norepinephrine-exposed cells may face higher iron demand. So far, no direct role of epinephrine/norepinephrine in cellular iron homeostasis has been reported. Here we show that epinephrine/norepinephrine regulates iron homeostasis components such as transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H in hepatic and skeletal muscle cells by promoting the binding of iron regulatory proteins to iron-responsive elements present in the UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H transcripts. Increased transferrin receptor-1, decreased ferritin-H, and increased iron-responsive element-iron regulatory protein interaction are also observed in liver and muscle tissues of epinephrine/norepinephrine-injected mice. We demonstrate the role of epinephrine/norepinephrine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in converting cytosolic aconitase (ACO1) into iron regulatory protein-1 to bind iron-responsive elements present in UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H. Our study further reveals that mitochondrial iron content and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) activity are elevated by epinephrine/norepinephrine that are blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and iron regulatory protein-1 siRNA, suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species and iron regulatory protein-1 in this mechanism. This study reveals epinephrine and norepinephrine as novel regulators of cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25572399

  6. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  7. Cleavage of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 by Enterovirus 71 3C Suppresses Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Xue, Qinghua; Jin, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a positive-stranded RNA virus which is capable of inhibiting innate immunity. Among virus-encoded proteins, the 3C protein compromises the type I interferon (IFN-I) response mediated by retinoid acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) or Toll-like receptor 3 that activates interferon regulatory 3 (IRF3) and IRF7. In the present study, we report that enterovirus 71 downregulates IRF7 through the 3C protein, which inhibits the function of IRF7. When expressed in mammalian cells, the 3C protein mediates cleavage of IRF7 rather than that of IRF3. This process is insensitive to inhibitors of caspase, proteasome, lysosome, and autophagy. H40D substitution in the 3C active site abolishes its activity, whereas R84Q or V154S substitution in the RNA binding motif has no effect. Furthermore, 3C-mediated cleavage occurs at the Q189-S190 junction within the constitutive activation domain of IRF7, resulting in two cleaved IRF7 fragments that are incapable of activating IFN expression. Ectopic expression of wild-type IRF7 limits EV71 replication. On the other hand, expression of the amino-terminal domain of IRF7 enhances EV71 infection, which correlates with its ability to interact with and inhibit IRF3. These results suggest that control of IRF7 by the 3C protein may represent a viral mechanism to escape cellular responses. PMID:23175366

  8. Structure-based prediction of DNA target sites by regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Kono, H; Sarai, A

    1999-04-01

    Regulatory proteins play a critical role in controlling complex spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression in higher organism, by recognizing multiple DNA sequences and regulating multiple target genes. Increasing amounts of structural data on the protein-DNA complex provides clues for the mechanism of target recognition by regulatory proteins. The analyses of the propensities of base-amino acid interactions observed in those structural data show that there is no one-to-one correspondence in the interaction, but clear preferences exist. On the other hand, the analysis of spatial distribution of amino acids around bases shows that even those amino acids with strong base preference such as Arg with G are distributed in a wide space around bases. Thus, amino acids with many different geometries can form a similar type of interaction with bases. The redundancy and structural flexibility in the interaction suggest that there are no simple rules in the sequence recognition, and its prediction is not straightforward. However, the spatial distributions of amino acids around bases indicate a possibility that the structural data can be used to derive empirical interaction potentials between amino acids and bases. Such information extracted from structural databases has been successfully used to predict amino acid sequences that fold into particular protein structures. We surmised that the structures of protein-DNA complexes could be used to predict DNA target sites for regulatory proteins, because determining DNA sequences that bind to a particular protein structure should be similar to finding amino acid sequences that fold into a particular structure. Here we demonstrate that the structural data can be used to predict DNA target sequences for regulatory proteins. Pairwise potentials that determine the interaction between bases and amino acids were empirically derived from the structural data. These potentials were then used to examine the compatibility between DNA

  9. A mathematical model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 cholesterol biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bonhi S; Sweby, Peter K; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Jackson, Kim G; Tindall, Marcus J

    2014-05-21

    Cholesterol is one of the key constituents for maintaining the cellular membrane and thus the integrity of the cell itself. In contrast high levels of cholesterol in the blood are known to be a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. We formulate a deterministic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) cholesterol genetic regulatory pathway in a hepatocyte. The mathematical model includes a description of genetic transcription by SREBP-2 which is subsequently translated to mRNA leading to the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), a main regulator of cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol synthesis subsequently leads to the regulation of SREBP-2 via a negative feedback formulation. Parameterised with data from the literature, the model is used to understand how SREBP-2 transcription and regulation affects cellular cholesterol concentration. Model stability analysis shows that the only positive steady-state of the system exhibits purely oscillatory, damped oscillatory or monotic behaviour under certain parameter conditions. In light of our findings we postulate how cholesterol homeostasis is maintained within the cell and the advantages of our model formulation are discussed with respect to other models of genetic regulation within the literature.

  10. A mathematical model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 cholesterol biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bonhi S.; Sweby, Peter K.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Jackson, Kim G.; Tindall, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the key constituents for maintaining the cellular membrane and thus the integrity of the cell itself. In contrast high levels of cholesterol in the blood are known to be a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. We formulate a deterministic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model of the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) cholesterol genetic regulatory pathway in a hepatocyte. The mathematical model includes a description of genetic transcription by SREBP-2 which is subsequently translated to mRNA leading to the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), a main regulator of cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol synthesis subsequently leads to the regulation of SREBP-2 via a negative feedback formulation. Parameterised with data from the literature, the model is used to understand how SREBP-2 transcription and regulation affects cellular cholesterol concentration. Model stability analysis shows that the only positive steady-state of the system exhibits purely oscillatory, damped oscillatory or monotic behaviour under certain parameter conditions. In light of our findings we postulate how cholesterol homeostasis is maintained within the cell and the advantages of our model formulation are discussed with respect to other models of genetic regulation within the literature. PMID:24444765

  11. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-11-09

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s{sup -1}. We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase.

  12. Human diabetes associated with defects in nuclear regulatory proteins for the insulin receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, A; Brunetti, L; Foti, D; Accili, D; Goldfine, I D

    1996-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is mediated by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (trans-acting factors) that bind to upstream regulatory elements (cis elements). We have previously identified two DNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with two unique AT-rich sequences of the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene which have in vivo promoter activity. Herein we have investigated the expression of these DNA-binding proteins in cells from two unrelated patients with insulin resistance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In these patients, the insulin receptor gene was normal. In EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from both patients, insulin receptor mRNA levels and insulin receptor expression were decreased. The expression of nuclear-binding proteins for the 5' regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene was markedly reduced, and this defect paralleled the decrease in insulin receptor protein expression. These studies indicate that DNA-binding proteins to the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene are important for expression of the insulin receptor. Further, they suggest that in affected individuals, defects in the expression of these proteins may cause decreased insulin receptor expression and insulin resistance. PMID:8550844

  13. Glucokinase regulatory proten genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3...

  14. Calyculin A Reveals Serine/Threonine Phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 1 as a Regulatory Nodal Point in Canonical Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Signaling of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, Carlos; Zouein, Fouad A.; Chidiac, Rony; Kurdi, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is initiated by stimuli acting on endothelial cells. A clinical feature of vascular inflammation is increased circulating interleukin 6 (IL-6) type cytokines such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), but their role in vascular inflammation is not fully defined. IL-6 type cytokines activate transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which has a key role in inflammation and the innate immune response. Canonical STAT3 gene induction is due to phosphorylation of (1) Y705, leading to STAT3 dimerization and DNA binding and (2) S727, enhancing homodimerization and DNA binding by recruiting p300/CBP. We asked whether enhancing S727 STAT3 phosphorylation using the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor, calyculin A, would enhance LIF-induced gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Cotreatment with calyculin A and LIF markedly increased STAT3 S727 phosphorylation, without affecting the increase in the nuclear fraction of STAT3 phosphorylated on Y705. PP2A inhibitors, okadaic acid and fostriecin, did not enhance STAT3 S727 phosphorylation. Surprisingly, calyculin A eliminated LIF-induced gene expression: (1) calyculin A reduced binding of nuclear extracts to a STAT3 consensus site, thereby reducing the overall level of binding observed with LIF; and (2) calyculin A caused p300/CBP phosphorylation, thus resulting in reduced acetylation activity and degradation. Together, these findings reveal a pivotal role of a protein serine/threonine phosphatases that is likely PP1 in HMEC in controlling STAT3 transcriptional activity. PMID:22142222

  15. 14-3-3 Proteins: insights from genome-wide studies in yeast.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, G Paul H

    2009-11-01

    14-3-3 proteins form a family of highly conserved, acidic, dimeric proteins. These proteins have been identified in all eukaryotic species investigated, often in multiple isoforms, up to 13 in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Hundreds of proteins, from diverse eukaryotic organisms, implicated in numerous cellular processes, have been identified as binding partners of 14-3-3 proteins. Therefore, the major activity of 14-3-3 proteins seems to be its ability to bind other intracellular proteins. Binding to 14-3-3 proteins may result in a conformational change of the protein required for its full activity or for inhibition of its activity, in interaction between two binding partners or in a different subcellular localization. Most of these interactions take place after phosphorylation of the binding partners. These observations suggest a major role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulatory networks. Here, the information on 14-3-3 proteins gathered from several genome- and proteome-wide studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. In particular, the protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of 14-3-3 binding partners, phosphorylation of 14-3-3 proteins themselves, the transcriptional regulation of the 14-3-3 genes, and the role of 14-3-3 proteins in transcription are addressed. These large scale studies may help understand the function of 14-3-3 proteins at a cellular level rather than at the level of a single process.

  16. Assembly of cell regulatory systems through protein interaction domains.

    PubMed

    Pawson, Tony; Nash, Piers

    2003-04-18

    The sequencing of complete genomes provides a list that includes the proteins responsible for cellular regulation. However, this does not immediately reveal what these proteins do, nor how they are assembled into the molecular machines and functional networks that control cellular behavior. The regulation of many different cellular processes requires the use of protein interaction domains to direct the association of polypeptides with one another and with phospholipids, small molecules, or nucleic acids. The modular nature of these domains, and the flexibility of their binding properties, have likely facilitated the evolution of cellular pathways. Conversely, aberrant interactions can induce abnormal cellular behavior and disease. The fundamental properties of protein interaction domains are discussed in this review and in detailed reviews on individual domains at Science's STKE at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/300/5618/445/DC1.

  17. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  18. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  19. Modelling gene and protein regulatory networks with answer set programming.

    PubMed

    Fayruzov, Timur; Janssen, Jeroen; Vermeir, Dirk; Cornelis, Chris; De Cock, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many approaches to model regulatory networks have been proposed in the systems biology domain. However, the task is far from being solved. In this paper, we propose an Answer Set Programming (ASP)-based approach to model interaction networks. We build a general ASP framework that describes the network semantics and allows modelling specific networks with little effort. ASP provides a rich and flexible toolbox that allows expanding the framework with desired features. In this paper, we tune our framework to mimic Boolean network behaviour and apply it to model the Budding Yeast and Fission Yeast cell cycle networks. The obtained steady states of these networks correspond to those of the Boolean networks.

  20. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  2. A high-throughput method to examine protein-nucleotide interactions identifies targets of the bacterial transcriptional regulatory protein fur.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Lopez, Carlos A; Hu, Han; Xia, Yu; Freedman, David S; Reddington, Alexander P; Daaboul, George G; Unlü, M Selim; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2014-01-01

    The Ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that functions to control gene transcription in response to iron in a number of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we applied a label-free, quantitative and high-throughput analysis method, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), to rapidly characterize Fur-DNA interactions in vitro with predicted Fur binding sequences in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. IRIS can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide complexes simultaneously and demonstrated here that seventy percent of the predicted Fur boxes in promoter regions of iron-induced genes bound to Fur in vitro with a range of affinities as observed using this microarray screening technology. Combining binding data with mRNA expression levels in a gonococcal fur mutant strain allowed us to identify five new gonococcal genes under Fur-mediated direct regulation.

  3. Characterization of a manganese-dependent regulatory protein, TroR, from Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Posey, James E.; Hardham, John M.; Norris, Steven J.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    1999-01-01

    Genome sequence analysis of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, suggests that this bacterium has a limited iron requirement with few, if any, proteins that require iron. Instead, T. pallidum may use manganese-dependent enzymes for metabolic pathways. This strategy apparently alleviates the necessity of T. pallidum to acquire iron from the host, thus overcoming iron limitation, which is a primary host defense. Interestingly, a putative metal-dependent regulatory protein, TroR, which has homology with the diphtheria toxin regulatory protein, DtxR, from Corynebacterium diphtheriae was identified from T. pallidum. We describe here the characterization of TroR, a regulatory protein. Mobility-shift DNA binding and DNase I footprint assays indicated that purified TroR bound to a 22-nt region of dyad symmetry that overlaps the −10 region of the promoter of the tro operon, which contains the genes for a putative metal transport system, the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase, and TroR. Unlike other metal-dependent regulatory proteins like diphtheria toxin regulatory protein and the ferric ion uptake regulator, Fur, which can be activated by divalent metals such as Fe2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+, TroR is activated only by Mn2+. The TroR-Mn2+ complex binds its target sequence and blocks transcription of the troPO/lacZ fusion, suggesting that TroR acts as a metal-dependent repressor in vivo. In addition, TroR exists as a dimer in both its inactive (metal free) and active states as indicated by chemical crosslinking experiments. Based on these data, we propose that TroR represents a unique regulatory system for controlling gene expression in T. pallidum in response to Mn2+. PMID:10485921

  4. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I.; Vivian, Julian P.; Cortes, Adrian; Barber, Thomas; Kuttikkatte, Subita Balaram; Jensen, Lise Torp; Attfield, Kathrine E.; Dendrou, Calliope A.; Carrington, Mary; McVean, Gil; Purcell, Anthony W.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Fugger, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Expression of HLA-C varies widely across individuals in an allele-specific manner. This variation in expression can influence efficacy of the immune response, as shown for infectious and autoimmune diseases. MicroRNA binding partially influences differential HLA-C expression, but the additional contributing factors have remained undetermined. Here we use functional and structural analyses to demonstrate that HLA-C expression is modulated not just at the RNA level, but also at the protein level. Specifically, we show that variation in exons 2 and 3, which encode the α1/α2 domains, drives differential expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors that modulate HLA-C expression. PMID:28649982

  5. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  6. Phage φ29 Regulatory Protein p4 Stabilizes the Binding of the RNA Polymerase to the Late Promoter in a Process Involving Direct Protein-Protein Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuez, Beatriz; Rojo, Fernando; Salas, Margarita

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage φ29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  7. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  8. Import of Soluble Proteins into Chloroplasts and Potential Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sjuts, Inga; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from an endosymbiotic event in which a free-living cyanobacterium was engulfed by an ancestral eukaryotic host. During evolution the majority of the chloroplast genetic information was transferred to the host cell nucleus. As a consequence, proteins formerly encoded by the chloroplast genome are now translated in the cytosol and must be subsequently imported into the chloroplast. This process involves three steps: (i) cytosolic sorting procedures, (ii) binding to the designated receptor-equipped target organelle and (iii) the consecutive translocation process. During import, proteins have to overcome the two barriers of the chloroplast envelope, namely the outer envelope membrane (OEM) and the inner envelope membrane (IEM). In the majority of cases, this is facilitated by two distinct multiprotein complexes, located in the OEM and IEM, respectively, designated TOC and TIC. Plants are constantly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions such as temperature and light and must therefore regulate protein composition within the chloroplast to ensure optimal functioning of elementary processes such as photosynthesis. In this review we will discuss the recent models of each individual import stage with regard to short-term strategies that plants might use to potentially acclimate to changes in their environmental conditions and preserve the chloroplast protein homeostasis. PMID:28228773

  9. 14-3-3 theta binding to cell cycle regulatory factors is enhanced by HIV-1 Vpr

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L; Barnitz, Robert A; Sakai, Keiko; Lenardo, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite continuing advances in our understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell depletion in HIV-1-infected individuals remains unclear. The HIV-1 Vpr accessory protein causes cell death, likely through a mechanism related to its ability to arrest cells in the G2,M phase. Recent evidence implicated the scaffold protein, 14-3-3, in Vpr cell cycle blockade. Results We found that in human T cells, 14-3-3 plays an active role in mediating Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and reveal a dramatic increase in the amount of Cdk1, Cdc25C, and CyclinB1 bound to 14-3-3 θ during Vprv-induced G2,M arrest. By contrast, a cell-cycle-arrest-dead Vpr mutant failed to augment 14-3-3 θ association with Cdk1 and CyclinB1. Moreover, G2,M arrest caused by HIV-1 infection strongly correlated with a disruption in 14-3-3 θ binding to centrosomal proteins, Plk1 and centrin. Finally, Vpr caused elevated levels of CyclinB1, Plk1, and Cdk1 in a complex with the nuclear transport and spindle assembly protein, importin β. Conclusion Thus, our data reveal a new facet of Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest involving previously unrecognized abnormal rearrangements of multiprotein assemblies containing key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by David Kaplan, Nathaniel R. Landau and Yan Zhou. PMID:18445273

  10. Pestivirus Npro Directly Interacts with Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Monomer and Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F.; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a transcription factor involved in the activation of type I alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in response to viral infection. Upon viral infection, the IRF3 monomer is activated into a phosphorylated dimer, which induces the transcription of interferon genes in the nucleus. Viruses have evolved several ways to target IRF3 in order to subvert the innate immune response. Pestiviruses, such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV), target IRF3 for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This is mediated by the viral protein Npro that interacts with IRF3, but the molecular details for this interaction are largely unknown. We used recombinant Npro and IRF3 proteins and show that Npro interacts with IRF3 directly without additional proteins and forms a soluble 1:1 complex. The full-length IRF3 but not merely either of the individual domains is required for this interaction. The interaction between Npro and IRF3 is not dependent on the activation state of IRF3, since Npro binds to a constitutively active form of IRF3 in the presence of its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP). The results indicate that the Npro-binding site on IRF3 encompasses a region that is unperturbed by the phosphorylation and subsequent activation of IRF3 and thus excludes the dimer interface and CBP-binding site. IMPORTANCE The pestivirus N-terminal protease, Npro, is essential for evading the host's immune system by facilitating the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). However, the nature of the Npro interaction with IRF3, including the IRF3 species (inactive monomer versus activated dimer) that Npro targets for degradation, is largely unknown. We show that classical swine fever virus Npro and porcine IRF3 directly interact in solution and that full-length IRF3 is required for interaction with Npro. Additionally, Npro interacts with a constitutively active form of IRF3 bound to its transcriptional

  11. In Vitro Treatment of Human Monocytes/Macrophages with Myristoylated Recombinant Nef of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Leads to the Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, IκB Kinases, and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 and to the Release of Beta Interferon▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Giorgio; Percario, Zulema A.; Fiorucci, Gianna; Vaccari, Gabriele; Manrique, Santiago; Romeo, Giovanna; Federico, Maurizio; Geyer, Matthias; Affabris, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    The viral protein Nef is a virulence factor that plays multiple roles during the early and late phases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication. Nef regulates the cell surface expression of critical proteins (including down-regulation of CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I), T-cell receptor signaling, and apoptosis, inducing proapoptotic effects in uninfected bystander cells and antiapoptotic effects in infected cells. It has been proposed that Nef intersects the CD40 ligand signaling pathway in macrophages, leading to modification in the pattern of secreted factors that appear able to recruit and activate T lymphocytes, rendering them susceptible to HIV infection. There is also increasing evidence that in vitro cell treatment with Nef induces signaling effects. Exogenous Nef treatment is able to induce apoptosis in uninfected T cells, maturation in dendritic cells, and suppression of CD40-dependent immunoglobulin class switching in B cells. Previously, we reported that Nef treatment of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) induces a cycloheximide-independent activation of NF-κB and the synthesis and secretion of a set of chemokines/cytokines that activate STAT1 and STAT3. Here, we show that Nef treatment is capable of hijacking cellular signaling pathways, inducing a very rapid regulatory response in MDMs that is characterized by the rapid and transient phosphorylation of the α and β subunits of the IκB kinase complex and of JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase family members. In addition, we have observed the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3, leading to the synthesis of beta interferon mRNA and protein, which in turn induces STAT2 phosphorylation. All of these effects require Nef myristoylation. PMID:17182689

  12. H3K27 modifications define segmental regulatory domains in the Drosophila bithorax complex.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Sarah K; Deaton, Aimee M; Domingues, Heber; Wang, Peggy I; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Kingston, Robert E; Bender, Welcome

    2014-07-31

    The bithorax complex (BX-C) in Drosophila melanogaster is a cluster of homeotic genes that determine body segment identity. Expression of these genes is governed by cis-regulatory domains, one for each parasegment. Stable repression of these domains depends on Polycomb Group (PcG) functions, which include trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). To search for parasegment-specific signatures that reflect PcG function, chromatin from single parasegments was isolated and profiled. The H3K27me3 profiles across the BX-C in successive parasegments showed a 'stairstep' pattern that revealed sharp boundaries of the BX-C regulatory domains. Acetylated H3K27 was broadly enriched across active domains, in a pattern complementary to H3K27me3. The CCCTC-binding protein (CTCF) bound the borders between H3K27 modification domains; it was retained even in parasegments where adjacent domains lack H3K27me3. These findings provide a molecular definition of the homeotic domains, and implicate precisely positioned H3K27 modifications as a central determinant of segment identity.

  13. Modulators of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Sijbesma, Eline; Botta, Maurizio; MacKintosh, Carol; Obsil, Tomas; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cau, Ylenia; Wilson, Andrew J; Karawajczyk, Anna; Eickhoff, Jan; Davis, Jeremy; Hann, Michael M; O'Mahony, Gavin; Doveston, Richard G; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-10-02

    Direct interactions between proteins are essential for the regulation of their functions in biological pathways. Targeting the complex network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has now been widely recognized as an attractive means to therapeutically intervene in disease states. Even though this is a challenging endeavor and PPIs have long been regarded as 'undruggable' targets, the last two decades have seen an increasing number of successful examples of PPI modulators resulting in a growing interest in this field. PPI modulation requires novel approaches and the integrated efforts of multiple disciplines to be a fruitful strategy. This Perspective focuses on the hub protein 14-3-3, which has several hundred identified protein interaction partners and is therefore involved in a wide range of cellular processes and diseases. Here, we aim to provide an integrated overview of the approaches explored for the modulation of 14-3-3 PPIs and review the examples resulting from these efforts in both inhibiting and stabilizing specific 14-3-3 protein complexes by small molecules, peptide-mimetics and natural products.

  14. Selective translational control of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein transcript by iron regulatory protein-1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Hee; Cahill, Catherine M; Vanderburg, Charles R; Scherzer, Clemens R; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2010-10-08

    Iron influx increases the translation of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) via an iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in its 5'-untranslated region. Equal modulated interaction of the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) with canonical IREs controls iron-dependent translation of the ferritin subunits. However, our immunoprecipitation RT-PCR and RNA binding experiments demonstrated that IRP1, but not IRP2, selectively bound the APP IRE in human neural cells. This selective IRP1 interaction pattern was evident in human brain and blood tissue from normal and Alzheimer disease patients. We computer-predicted an optimal novel RNA stem loop structure for the human, rhesus monkey, and mouse APP IREs with reference to the canonical ferritin IREs but also the IREs encoded by erythroid heme biosynthetic aminolevulinate synthase and Hif-2α mRNAs, which preferentially bind IRP1. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension analysis was consistent with a 13-base single-stranded terminal loop and a conserved GC-rich stem. Biotinylated RNA probes deleted of the conserved CAGA motif in the terminal loop did not bind to IRP1 relative to wild type probes and could no longer base pair to form a predicted AGA triloop. An AGU pseudo-triloop is key for IRP1 binding to the canonical ferritin IREs. RNA probes encoding the APP IRE stem loop exhibited the same high affinity binding to rhIRP1 as occurs for the H-ferritin IRE (35 pm). Intracellular iron chelation increased binding of IRP1 to the APP IRE, decreasing intracellular APP expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Functionally, shRNA knockdown of IRP1 caused increased expression of neural APP consistent with IRP1-APP IRE-driven translation.

  15. Evolutionary adaptation of an AraC-like regulatory protein in Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimee; Petty, Nicola K; Hocking, Dianna; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Wakefield, Matthew; Praszkier, Judyta; Tauschek, Marija; Yang, Ji; Robins-Browne, Roy

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of pathogenic bacteria is a multifaceted and complex process, which is strongly influenced by the horizontal acquisition of genetic elements and their subsequent expression in their new hosts. A well-studied example is the RegA regulon of the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The RegA regulatory protein is a member of the AraC/XylS superfamily, which coordinates the expression of a gene repertoire that is necessary for full pathogenicity of this murine pathogen. Upon stimulation by an exogenous, gut-associated signal, namely, bicarbonate ions, RegA activates the expression of a series of genes, including virulence factors, such as autotransporters, fimbriae, a dispersin-like protein, and the grlRA operon on the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island. Interestingly, the genes encoding RegA homologues are distributed across the genus Escherichia, encompassing pathogenic and nonpathogenic subtypes. In this study, we carried out a series of bioinformatic, transcriptional, and functional analyses of the RegA regulons of these bacteria. Our results demonstrated that regA has been horizontally transferred to Escherichia spp. and C. rodentium. Comparative studies of two RegA homologues, namely, those from C. rodentium and E. coli SMS-3-5, a multiresistant environmental strain of E. coli, showed that the two regulators acted similarly in vitro but differed in terms of their abilities to activate the virulence of C. rodentium in vivo, which evidently was due to their differential activation of grlRA. Our data indicate that RegA from C. rodentium has strain-specific adaptations that facilitate infection of its murine host. These findings shed new light on the development of virulence by C. rodentium and on the evolution of virulence-regulatory genes of bacterial pathogens in general.

  16. Evolutionary Adaptation of an AraC-Like Regulatory Protein in Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia Species

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aimee; Petty, Nicola K.; Hocking, Dianna; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Wakefield, Matthew; Praszkier, Judyta; Tauschek, Marija; Yang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of pathogenic bacteria is a multifaceted and complex process, which is strongly influenced by the horizontal acquisition of genetic elements and their subsequent expression in their new hosts. A well-studied example is the RegA regulon of the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The RegA regulatory protein is a member of the AraC/XylS superfamily, which coordinates the expression of a gene repertoire that is necessary for full pathogenicity of this murine pathogen. Upon stimulation by an exogenous, gut-associated signal, namely, bicarbonate ions, RegA activates the expression of a series of genes, including virulence factors, such as autotransporters, fimbriae, a dispersin-like protein, and the grlRA operon on the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island. Interestingly, the genes encoding RegA homologues are distributed across the genus Escherichia, encompassing pathogenic and nonpathogenic subtypes. In this study, we carried out a series of bioinformatic, transcriptional, and functional analyses of the RegA regulons of these bacteria. Our results demonstrated that regA has been horizontally transferred to Escherichia spp. and C. rodentium. Comparative studies of two RegA homologues, namely, those from C. rodentium and E. coli SMS-3-5, a multiresistant environmental strain of E. coli, showed that the two regulators acted similarly in vitro but differed in terms of their abilities to activate the virulence of C. rodentium in vivo, which evidently was due to their differential activation of grlRA. Our data indicate that RegA from C. rodentium has strain-specific adaptations that facilitate infection of its murine host. These findings shed new light on the development of virulence by C. rodentium and on the evolution of virulence-regulatory genes of bacterial pathogens in general. PMID:25624355

  17. The potential function of steroid sulphatase activity in steroid production and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Teruo; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2004-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone. StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory) protein plays a crucial role in the intra-mitochondrial movement of cholesterol. STS (steroid sulphatase), which is present ubiquitously in mammalian tissues, including the placenta, adrenal gland, testis and ovary, desulphates a number of 3beta-hydroxysteroid sulphates, including cholesterol sulphate. The present study was designed to examine the effect of STS on StAR protein synthesis and steroidogenesis in cells. Steroidogenic activities of COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with a vector for the cholesterol P450scc (cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage enzyme) system, named F2, a StAR expression vector (pStAR), and an STS expression vector (pSTS) were assayed. Whole-cell extracts were subjected to SDS/PAGE and then to Western blot analysis. pSTS co-expressed in COS-1 cells with F2 and pStAR increased pregnenolone synthesis 2-fold compared with that of co-expression with F2 and pStAR. Western blot analysis using COS-1 cells that had been co-transfected with pSTS, F2 and pStAR revealed that StAR protein levels increased, whereas STS and P450scc protein levels did not change. The amount of StAR protein translation products increased when pSTS was added to an in vitro transcription-translation reaction mixture. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the 37 kDa StAR pre-protein disappeared significantly ( P <0.01) more slowly in COS-1 cells that had been transfected with pSTS than in COS-1 cells that had not been transfected with pSTS. The increase in StAR protein level is not a result of an increase in StAR gene expression, but is a result of both an increase in translation and a longer half-life of the 37 kDa pre-StAR protein. In conclusion, STS increases StAR protein expression level and stimulates steroid production. PMID:14969586

  18. Heterogeneity and Stability in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Booki

    2017-09-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in controlling tolerance and immunity against self- and foreign antigens. The failure of Tregs to properly function is the direct cause of systemic and chronic inflammation as well as immune suppression. It is now evident that Tregs are highly heterogeneous populations depending on the surface phenotypes, cytokine profiles, and anatomical locations. Yet, our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying such heterogeneity is very limited. Furthermore, some Tregs lose the phenotype (and suppressive functions) and instead acquire pathogenicity. Since utilizing Tregs as a tool for immunotherapy is being implemented in many clinical settings, it is of utmost importance to understand the precise mechanisms by which the loss of Treg phenotype (and function) is prevented. In this review, both cellular and molecular factors involved in Treg heterogeneity and stability are discussed.

  19. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  20. Iron regulatory protein-2 knockout increases perihematomal ferritin expression and cell viability after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F

    2010-06-14

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls 3 days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at 3 days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries.

  1. Unperturbed Posttranscriptional Regulatory Rev Protein Function and HIV-1 Replication in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes protect neurons, but also evoke proinflammatory responses to injury and viral infections, including HIV. There is a prevailing notion that HIV-1 Rev protein function in astrocytes is perturbed, leading to restricted viral replication. In earlier studies, our finding of restricted viral entry into astrocytes led us to investigate whether there are any intracellular restrictions, including crippled Rev function, in astrocytes. Despite barely detectable levels of DDX3 (Rev-supporting RNA helicase) and TRBP (anti-PKR) in primary astrocytes compared to astrocytic cells, Rev function was unperturbed in wild-type, but not DDX3-ablated astrocytes. As in permissive cells, after HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes, viral-encoded Tat and Rev proteins had robust regulatory activities, leading to efficient viral replication. Productive HIV-1 infection in astrocytes persisted for several weeks. Our findings on HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes demonstrated that the intracellular environment is conducive to viral replication and that Tat and Rev functions are unperturbed. PMID:25188302

  2. A microtubule-facilitated nuclear import pathway for cancer regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roth, Daniela Martino; Moseley, Gregory W; Glover, Dominic; Pouton, Colin W; Jans, David A

    2007-06-01

    Nuclear protein import is dependent on specific targeting signals within cargo proteins recognized by importins (IMPs) that mediate translocation through the nuclear pore. Recent evidence, however, implicates a role for the microtubule (MT) network in facilitating nuclear import of the cancer regulatory proteins parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and p53 tumor suppressor. Here we assess the extent to which MT and actin integrity may be generally required for nuclear protein import for the first time. We examine 10 nuclear-localizing proteins with diverse IMP-dependent nuclear import pathways, our results indicating that the cytoskeleton does not have a general mechanistic role in nuclear localization sequence-dependent nuclear protein import. Of the proteins examined, only the p110(Rb) tumor suppressor protein Rb, together with p53 and PTHrP, was found to require MT integrity for optimal nuclear import. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments indicated that the MT-dependent nuclear transport pathway increases both the rate and extent of Rb nuclear import but does not affect Rb nuclear export. Dynamitin overexpression experiments implicate the MT motor dynein in the import process. The results indicate that, additional to IMP/diffusion-dependent processes, certain cancer regulatory proteins utilize an MT-enhanced pathway for accelerated nuclear import that is presumably required for their nuclear functions.

  3. The regulatory subunits of PI3Kγ control distinct neutrophil responses.

    PubMed

    Deladeriere, Arnaud; Gambardella, Laure; Pan, Dingxin; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Phillip T; Stephens, Len R

    2015-01-20

    Neutrophils, which migrate toward inflamed sites and kill pathogens by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), are important in the defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens, but their inappropriate regulation causes various chronic inflammatory diseases. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) functions downstream of proinflammatory G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in neutrophils and is a therapeutic target. In neutrophils, PI3Kγ consists of a p110γ catalytic subunit, which is activated by the guanosine triphosphatase Ras, and either a p84 or p101 regulatory subunit. Loss or inhibition of p110γ or expression of a Ras-insensitive variant p110γ (p110γ(DASAA/DASAA)) impairs PIP3 production, Akt phosphorylation, migration, and ROS formation in response to GPCR activation. The p101 subunit binds to, and mediates PI3Kγ activation by, G protein βγ subunits, and p101(-/-) neutrophils have a similar phenotype to that of p110γ(-/-) neutrophils, except that ROS responses are normal. We found that p84(-/-) neutrophils displayed reduced GPCR-stimulated PIP3 and Akt signaling, which was indistinguishable from that of p101(-/-) neutrophils. However, p84(-/-) neutrophils produced less ROS and exhibited normal migration in response to GPCR stimulation. These data suggest that p84-containing PI3Kγ controls GPCR-dependent ROS production. Thus, the PI3regulatory subunits enable PI3Kγ to mediate distinct neutrophil responses, which may occur by targeting PIP3 signaling into spatially distinct domains. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. The B56γ3 regulatory subunit-containing protein phosphatase 2A outcompetes Akt to regulate p27KIP1 subcellular localization by selectively dephosphorylating phospho-Thr157 of p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tai-Yu; Yang, Yu-San; Hong, Wei-Fu; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The B56γ-containing protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B56γ) has been postulated to have tumor suppressive functions. Here, we report regulation of p27KIP1 subcellular localization by PP2A-B56γ3. B56γ3 overexpression enhanced nuclear localization of p27KIP1, whereas knockdown of B56γ3 decreased p27KIP1 nuclear localization. B56γ3 overexpression decreased phosphorylation at Thr157 (phospho-Thr157), whose phosphorylation promotes cytoplasmic localization of p27KIP1, whereas B56γ3 knockdown significantly increased the level of phospho-Thr157. In vitro, PP2A-B56γ3 catalyzed dephosphorylation of phospho-Thr157 in a dose-dependent and okadaic acid-sensitive manner. B56γ3 did not increase p27KIP1 nuclear localization by down-regulating the upstream kinase Akt activity and outcompeted a myristoylated constitutively active Akt (Aktca) in regulating Thr157 phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27KIP1. In addition, results of interaction domain mapping revealed that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of p27 and a domain at the C-terminus of B56γ3 are required for interaction between p27 and B56γ3. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p27KIP1 levels are positively correlated with B56γ levels in both non-tumor and tumor parts of a set of human colon tissue specimens. However, positive correlation between nuclear p27KIP1 levels and B56γ levels was found only in the non-tumor parts, but not in tumor parts of these tissues, implicating a dysregulation in PP2A-B56γ3-regulated p27KIP1 nuclear localization in these tumor tissues. Altogether, this study provides a new mechanism by which the PP2A-B56γ3 holoenzyme plays its tumor suppressor role. PMID:26684356

  5. Functional characterisation of the regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A homologue of Giardia lamblia: Differential expression of the regulatory and catalytic subunits during encystation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Candace; Schanen, Brian; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2006-06-01

    To understand the functional roles of protein kinase A (PKA) during vegetative and differentiating states of Giardia parasites, we studied the structural and functional characteristics of the regulatory subunit of PKA (gPKAr) and its involvement in the giardial encystment process. Molecular cloning and characterisation showed that gPKAr contains two tandem 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monphosphate (cyclic AMP) binding domains at the C-terminal end and the interaction domain for the catalytic subunit. A number of consensus residues including in vivo phosphorylation site for PKAc and dimerisation/docking domain are present in gPKAr. The regulatory subunit physically interacts with the catalytic subunit and inhibits its kinase activity in the absence of cyclic AMP, which could be partially restored upon addition of cyclic AMP. Western blot analysis showed a marked reduction in the endogenous gPKAr concentration during differentiation of Giardia into cysts. An increased activity of gPKAc was also detected during encystation without any significant change in the protein concentration. Distinct localisations of gPKAc to the anterior flagella, basal bodies and caudal flagella as noted in trophozoites were absent in encysting cells at later stages. Instead, PKAc staining was punctate and located mostly to the cell periphery. Our study indicates possible enrichment of the active gPKAc during late stages of encystation, which may have implications in completion of the encystment process or priming of cysts for efficient excystation.

  6. Differential effects of thin and thick filament disruption on zebrafish smooth muscle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, G.; Seiler, C.; Abrams, J.; Soriano, A. J.; Pack, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The smooth muscle actin binding proteins Caldesmon and Tropomyosin (Tm) promote thin filament assembly by stabilizing actin polymerization, however, whether filament assembly affects either the stability or activation of these and other smooth muscle regulatory proteins is not known. Methods Measurement of smooth muscle regulatory protein levels in wild type zebrafish larvae following antisense knockdown of smooth muscle actin (Acta2) and myosin heavy chain (Myh11) proteins, and in colourless mutants that lack enteric nerves. Comparison of intestinal peristalsis in wild type and colourless larvae. Key Results Knockdown of Acta2 led to reduced levels of phospho-Caldesmon and Tm. Total Caldesmon and phospho-myosin light chain (p-Mlc) levels were unaffected. Knockdown of Myh11 had no effect on the levels of either of these proteins. Phospho-Caldesmon and p-Mlc levels were markedly reduced in colourless mutants that have intestinal motility comparable with wild type larvae. Conclusions & Inferences These in vivo findings provide new information regarding the activation and stability of smooth muscle regulatory proteins in zebrafish larvae and their role in intestinal peristalsis in this model organism. PMID:20591105

  7. Roundup inhibits steroidogenesis by disrupting steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L P; McCormick, C; Martin, C; Stocco, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that many currently used pesticides have the capacity to disrupt reproductive function in animals. Although this reproductive dysfunction is typically characterized by alterations in serum steroid hormone levels, disruptions in spermatogenesis, and loss of fertility, the mechanisms involved in pesticide-induced infertility remain unclear. Because testicular Leydig cells play a crucial role in male reproductive function by producing testosterone, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig tumor cell line to study the molecular events involved in pesticide-induced alterations in steroid hormone biosynthesis. We previously showed that the organochlorine insecticide lindane and the organophosphate insecticide Dimethoate directly inhibit steroidogenesis in Leydig cells by disrupting expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. StAR protein mediates the rate-limiting and acutely regulated step in steroidogenesis, the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme initiates the synthesis of all steroid hormones. In the present study, we screened eight currently used pesticide formulations for their ability to inhibit steroidogenesis, concentrating on their effects on StAR expression in MA-10 cells. In addition, we determined the effects of these compounds on the levels and activities of the P450scc enzyme (which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone) and the 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) enzyme (which converts pregnenolone to progesterone). Of the pesticides screened, only the pesticide Roundup inhibited dibutyryl [(Bu)(2)]cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in MA-10 cells without causing cellular toxicity. Roundup inhibited steroidogenesis by disrupting StAR protein expression, further demonstrating the susceptibility of StAR to environmental pollutants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

  8. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    PubMed

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) dysregulation in anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Jana B.; Tucholski, Janusz; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission occurs in this illness, and a major contribution may involve dysregulation of the AMPA subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR). Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) form direct associations with AMPARs to modulate the trafficking and biophysical functions of these receptors, and their dysregulation may alter the localization and activity of AMPARs, thus having a potential role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We performed comparative quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to measure transcript (schizophrenia, N = 25; comparison subjects, N = 25) and protein (schizophrenia, N = 36; comparison subjects, N = 33) expression of TARPs (γ subunits 1-8) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in schizophrenia and a comparison group. TARP expression was also measured in frontal cortex of rats chronically treated with haloperidol decanoate (28.5 mg/kg every three weeks for nine months) to determine the effect of antipsychotic treatment on the expression of these molecules. We found decreased transcript expression of TARP γ-8 in schizophrenia. At the protein level, γ-3 and γ-5 were increased, while γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 were decreased in schizophrenia. No changes in any of the molecules were noted in the frontal cortex of haloperidol-treated rats. TARPs are abnormally expressed at transcript and protein levels in ACC in schizophrenia, and these changes are likely due to the illness and not antipsychotic treatment. Alterations in the expression of TARPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and represent a potential mechanism of glutamatergic dysregulation in this illness. PMID:23566497

  10. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) dysregulation in anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Jana B; Tucholski, Janusz; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2013-06-01

    The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission occurs in this illness, and a major contribution may involve dysregulation of the AMPA subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR). Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) form direct associations with AMPARs to modulate the trafficking and biophysical functions of these receptors, and their dysregulation may alter the localization and activity of AMPARs, thus having a potential role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We performed comparative quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to measure transcript (schizophrenia, N=25; comparison subjects, N=25) and protein (schizophrenia, N=36; comparison subjects, N=33) expression of TARPs (γ subunits 1-8) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in schizophrenia and a comparison group. TARP expression was also measured in frontal cortex of rats chronically treated with haloperidol decanoate (28.5mg/kg every three weeks for nine months) to determine the effect of antipsychotic treatment on the expression of these molecules. We found decreased transcript expression of TARP γ-8 in schizophrenia. At the protein level, γ-3 and γ-5 were increased, while γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 were decreased in schizophrenia. No changes in any of the molecules were noted in the frontal cortex of haloperidol-treated rats. TARPs are abnormally expressed at transcript and protein levels in ACC in schizophrenia, and these changes are likely due to the illness and not to the antipsychotic treatment. Alterations in the expression of TARPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and represent a potential mechanism of glutamatergic dysregulation in this illness.

  11. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  12. The MID1 E3 ligase catalyzes the polyubiquitination of Alpha4 (α4), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A): novel insights into MID1-mediated regulation of PP2A.

    PubMed

    Du, Haijuan; Huang, Yongzhao; Zaghlula, Manar; Walters, Erica; Cox, Timothy C; Massiah, Michael A

    2013-07-19

    Alpha4 (α4) is a key regulator of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and mTOR in steps essential for cell-cycle progression. α4 forms a complex with PP2A and MID1, a microtubule-associated ubiquitin E3 ligase that facilitates MID1-dependent regulation of PP2A and the dephosphorylation of MID1 by PP2A. Ectopic overexpression of α4 is associated with hepatocellular carcinomas, breast cancer, and invasive adenocarcinomas. Here, we provide data suggesting that α4 is regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation mediated by MID1. In cells stably expressing a dominant-negative form of MID1, significantly elevated levels of α4 were observed. Treatment of cells with the specific proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, resulted in a 3-fold increase in α4 in control cells and a similar level in mutant cells. Using in vitro assays, individual MID1 E3 domains facilitated monoubiquitination of α4, whereas full-length MID1 as well as RING-Bbox1 and RING-Bbox1-Bbox2 constructs catalyzed its polyubiquitination. In a novel non-biased functional screen, we identified a leucine to glutamine substitution at position 146 within Bbox1 that abolished MID1-α4 interaction and the subsequent polyubiquitination of α4, indicating that direct binding to Bbox1 was necessary for the polyubiquitination of α4. The mutant had little impact on the RING E3 ligase functionality of MID1. Mass spectrometry data confirmed Western blot analysis that ubiquitination of α4 occurs only within the last 105 amino acids. These novel findings identify a new role for MID1 and a mechanism of regulation of α4 that is likely to impact the stability and activity level of PP2Ac.

  13. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  14. Hookworm recombinant protein promotes regulatory T cell responses that suppress experimental asthma.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Severine; Pickering, Darren A; Ferreira, Ivana B; Jones, Linda; Ryan, Stephanie; Troy, Sally; Leech, Andrew; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Laha, Thewarach; Prentice, Roger; Sparwasser, Tim; Croese, John; Engwerda, Christian R; Upham, John W; Julia, Valerie; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex

    2016-10-26

    In the developed world, declining prevalence of some parasitic infections correlates with increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune disorders. Moreover, experimental human infection with some parasitic worms confers protection against inflammatory diseases in phase 2 clinical trials. Parasitic worms manipulate the immune system by secreting immunoregulatory molecules that offer promise as a novel therapeutic modality for inflammatory diseases. We identify a protein secreted by hookworms, anti-inflammatory protein-2 (AIP-2), that suppressed airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma, reduced expression of costimulatory markers on human dendritic cells (DCs), and suppressed proliferation ex vivo of T cells from human subjects with house dust mite allergy. In mice, AIP-2 was primarily captured by mesenteric CD103(+) DCs and suppression of airway inflammation was dependent on both DCs and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) that originated in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and accumulated in distant mucosal sites. Transplantation of MLNs from AIP-2-treated mice into naïve hosts revealed a lymphoid tissue conditioning that promoted Treg induction and long-term maintenance. Our findings indicate that recombinant AIP-2 could serve as a novel curative therapeutic for allergic asthma and potentially other inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  16. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  17. Cellular responses to excess fatty acids: focus on ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein 8.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonwoo; Ye, Jin

    2014-04-01

    Although fatty acids are crucial for cell survival, their overaccumulation triggers lipotoxicity that leads to metabolic syndrome. Thus, cells maintain their homeostasis by multiple feedback regulatory systems. This review focuses on how cells regulate the level of fatty acids by these systems. Ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein 8 has been identified as a specific sensor for unsaturated fatty acids that regulates lipogenic activity. Together with the previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and liver X receptor, these proteins sense the presence of unsaturated fatty acids and initiate reactions preventing their overaccumulation. Understanding the mechanism of the signal transduction pathways mediated by these proteins may offer new strategies to treat metabolic syndrome.

  18. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  19. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  20. Structural and biological features of FOXP3 dimerization relevant to regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaomin; Li, Bin; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Chunxia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yujie; Berezov, Alan; Xu, Chen; Gao, Yayi; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Zhang, Hongtao; Karger, Barry L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Wells, Andrew D.; Zhou, Zhaocai; Greene, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    FOXP3 is a key transcription factor for regulatory T cell function. We report the crystal structure of the FOXP3 coiled coil domain, through which a loose or transient dimeric association is formed and modulated, accounting for the activity variations introduced by disease-causing mutations or posttranslational modifications. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed that FOXP3 coiled coil mediated homo-dimerization is essential for Treg function in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we identified human FOXP3 K250 and K252 as key residues for the conformational change and stability of the FOXP3 dimer, which can be regulated by protein posttranslational modifications such as reversible lysine acetylation. These studies provide structural and mechanistic explanations for certain disease-causing mutations in the coiled coil domain of FOXP3 that are commonly found in IPEX syndrome. Overall the regulatory machinery involving homo-oligomerization, acetylation, and hetero-association has been dissected, defining atomic insights into the biological and pathological characteristics of the FOXP3 complex. PMID:22813742

  1. UbiNet: an online resource for exploring the functional associations and regulatory networks of protein ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Nui; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Lai, K. Robert; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation catalyzed by E3 ubiquitin ligases are crucial in the regulation of many cellular processes. Owing to the high throughput of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, a number of methods have been developed for the experimental determination of ubiquitylation sites, leading to a large collection of ubiquitylation data. However, there exist no resources for the exploration of E3-ligase-associated regulatory networks of for ubiquitylated proteins in humans. Therefore, the UbiNet database was developed to provide a full investigation of protein ubiquitylation networks by incorporating experimentally verified E3 ligases, ubiquitylated substrates and protein–protein interactions (PPIs). To date, UbiNet has accumulated 43 948 experimentally verified ubiquitylation sites from 14 692 ubiquitylated proteins of humans. Additionally, we have manually curated 499 E3 ligases as well as two E1 activating and 46 E2 conjugating enzymes. To delineate the regulatory networks among E3 ligases and ubiquitylated proteins, a total of 430 530 PPIs were integrated into UbiNet for the exploration of ubiquitylation networks with an interactive network viewer. A case study demonstrated that UbiNet was able to decipher a scheme for the ubiquitylation of tumor proteins p63 and p73 that is consistent with their functions. Although the essential role of Mdm2 in p53 regulation is well studied, UbiNet revealed that Mdm2 and additional E3 ligases might be implicated in the regulation of other tumor proteins by protein ubiquitylation. Moreover, UbiNet could identify potential substrates for a specific E3 ligase based on PPIs and substrate motifs. With limited knowledge about the mechanisms through which ubiquitylated proteins are regulated by E3 ligases, UbiNet offers users an effective means for conducting preliminary analyses of protein ubiquitylation. The UbiNet database is now freely accessible via http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/UbiNet/. The content is regularly updated with the

  2. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  3. ErbB3 (HER3) interaction with the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hellyer, N J; Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1998-01-01

    ErbB3 (HER3), a unique member of the ErbB receptor family, lacks intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity and contains six Tyr-Xaa-Xaa-Met (YXXM) consensus binding sites for the SH2 domains of the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. ErbB3 also has a proline-rich sequence that forms a consensus binding site for the SH3 domain of p85. Here we have investigated the interacting domains of ErbB3 and p85 by a unique application of the yeast two-hybrid system. A chimaeric ErbB3 molecule containing the epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase domain was developed so that the C-terminal domain of ErbB3 could become phosphorylated in the yeast system. We also generated several ErbB3 deletion and Tyr-->Phe site-specific mutants, and observed that a single ErbB3 YXXM motif was necessary and sufficient for the association of ErbB3 with p85. The incorporation of multiple YXXM motifs into the ErbB3 C-terminus enabled a stronger ErbB3/p85 interaction. The proline-rich region of ErbB3 was not necessary for interaction with p85. However, either deletion or mutation of the p85 SH3 domain decreased the observed ErbB3/p85 association. Additionally an ErbB3/p85 SH3 domain interaction was detected by an assay in vitro. These results were consistent with a model in which pairs of phosphorylated ErbB3 YXXM motifs co-operate in binding to the tandem SH2 domains of p85. Although a contributing role for the p85 SH3 domain was suggested, the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains seemed to be primarily responsible for the high-affinity association of p85 and ErbB3. PMID:9677338

  4. ErbB3 (HER3) interaction with the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, N J; Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1998-08-01

    ErbB3 (HER3), a unique member of the ErbB receptor family, lacks intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity and contains six Tyr-Xaa-Xaa-Met (YXXM) consensus binding sites for the SH2 domains of the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. ErbB3 also has a proline-rich sequence that forms a consensus binding site for the SH3 domain of p85. Here we have investigated the interacting domains of ErbB3 and p85 by a unique application of the yeast two-hybrid system. A chimaeric ErbB3 molecule containing the epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase domain was developed so that the C-terminal domain of ErbB3 could become phosphorylated in the yeast system. We also generated several ErbB3 deletion and Tyr-->Phe site-specific mutants, and observed that a single ErbB3 YXXM motif was necessary and sufficient for the association of ErbB3 with p85. The incorporation of multiple YXXM motifs into the ErbB3 C-terminus enabled a stronger ErbB3/p85 interaction. The proline-rich region of ErbB3 was not necessary for interaction with p85. However, either deletion or mutation of the p85 SH3 domain decreased the observed ErbB3/p85 association. Additionally an ErbB3/p85 SH3 domain interaction was detected by an assay in vitro. These results were consistent with a model in which pairs of phosphorylated ErbB3 YXXM motifs co-operate in binding to the tandem SH2 domains of p85. Although a contributing role for the p85 SH3 domain was suggested, the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains seemed to be primarily responsible for the high-affinity association of p85 and ErbB3.

  5. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  6. Human CHAC1 Protein Degrades Glutathione, and mRNA Induction Is Regulated by the Transcription Factors ATF4 and ATF3 and a Bipartite ATF/CRE Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Rebecca R; Prescott, Eugenia T; Sylvester, Charity F; Higdon, Ashlee N; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S; Mungrue, Imran N

    2015-06-19

    Using an unbiased systems genetics approach, we previously predicted a role for CHAC1 in the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, linked functionally to activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) following treatment with oxidized phospholipids, a model for atherosclerosis. Mouse and yeast CHAC1 homologs have been shown to degrade glutathione in yeast and a cell-free system. In this report, we further defined the ATF4-CHAC1 interaction by cloning the human CHAC1 promoter upstream of a luciferase reporter system for in vitro assays in HEK293 and U2OS cells. Mutation and deletion analyses defined two major cis DNA elements necessary and sufficient for CHAC1 promoter-driven luciferase transcription under conditions of ER stress or ATF4 coexpression: the -267 ATF/cAMP response element (CRE) site and a novel -248 ATF/CRE modifier (ACM) element. We also examined the ability of the CHAC1 ATF/CRE and ACM sequences to bind ATF4 and ATF3 using immunoblot-EMSA and confirmed ATF4, ATF3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β binding at the human CHAC1 promoter in the proximity of the ATF/CRE and ACM using ChIP. To further validate the function of CHAC1 in a human cell model, we measured glutathione levels in HEK293 cells with enhanced CHAC1 expression. Overexpression of CHAC1 led to a robust depletion of glutathione, which was alleviated in a CHAC1 catalytic mutant. These results suggest an important role for CHAC1 in oxidative stress and apoptosis with implications for human health and disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Human CHAC1 Protein Degrades Glutathione, and mRNA Induction Is Regulated by the Transcription Factors ATF4 and ATF3 and a Bipartite ATF/CRE Regulatory Element*

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Rebecca R.; Prescott, Eugenia T.; Sylvester, Charity F.; Higdon, Ashlee N.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Mungrue, Imran N.

    2015-01-01

    Using an unbiased systems genetics approach, we previously predicted a role for CHAC1 in the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, linked functionally to activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) following treatment with oxidized phospholipids, a model for atherosclerosis. Mouse and yeast CHAC1 homologs have been shown to degrade glutathione in yeast and a cell-free system. In this report, we further defined the ATF4-CHAC1 interaction by cloning the human CHAC1 promoter upstream of a luciferase reporter system for in vitro assays in HEK293 and U2OS cells. Mutation and deletion analyses defined two major cis DNA elements necessary and sufficient for CHAC1 promoter-driven luciferase transcription under conditions of ER stress or ATF4 coexpression: the −267 ATF/cAMP response element (CRE) site and a novel −248 ATF/CRE modifier (ACM) element. We also examined the ability of the CHAC1 ATF/CRE and ACM sequences to bind ATF4 and ATF3 using immunoblot-EMSA and confirmed ATF4, ATF3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β binding at the human CHAC1 promoter in the proximity of the ATF/CRE and ACM using ChIP. To further validate the function of CHAC1 in a human cell model, we measured glutathione levels in HEK293 cells with enhanced CHAC1 expression. Overexpression of CHAC1 led to a robust depletion of glutathione, which was alleviated in a CHAC1 catalytic mutant. These results suggest an important role for CHAC1 in oxidative stress and apoptosis with implications for human health and disease. PMID:25931127

  8. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  9. Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Are Required for Recovery from Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Schmoeckel, Katrin; Cziupka, Katharina; Nguyen, Huu Hung; Hildebrandt, Petra; Hünig, Thomas; Sparwasser, Tim; Huehn, Jochen; Pötschke, Christian; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2013-01-01

    The role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in bacterial sepsis remains controversial because antibody-mediated depletion experiments gave conflicting results. We employed DEREG mice (DEpletion of REGulatory T cells) and a caecal ligation and puncture model to elucidate the role of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs in sepsis. In DEREG mice natural Tregs can be visualized easily and selectively depleted by diphtheria toxin because the animals express the diphtheria toxin receptor and enhanced green fluorescent protein as a fusion protein under the control of the foxp3 locus. We confirmed rapid Treg-activation and an increased ratio of Tregs to Teffs in sepsis. Nevertheless, 24 h after sepsis induction, Treg-depleted and control mice showed equally strong inflammation, immune cell immigration into the peritoneum and bacterial dissemination. During the first 36 h of disease survival was not influenced by Treg-depletion. Later, however, only Treg-competent animals recovered from the insult. We conclude that the suppressive capacity of Tregs is not sufficient to control overwhelming inflammation and early mortality, but is a prerequisite for the recovery from severe sepsis. PMID:23724126

  10. The transcription factor regulatory factor X1 increases the expression of neuronal glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-07-28

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) play an important role in maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. However, very few studies have investigated the regulation of EAAT expression. A binding sequence for the regulatory factor X1 (RFX1) exists in the promoter region of the gene encoding for EAAT3, a neuronal EAAT, but not in the promoter regions of the genes encoding for EAAT1 and EAAT2, two glial EAATs. RFX proteins are transcription factors binding to X-boxes of DNA sequences. Although RFX proteins are necessary for the normal function of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, their roles in the mammalian brain are not known. We showed that RFX1 increased EAAT3 expression and activity in C6 glioma cells. RFX1 binding complexes were found in the nuclear extracts of C6 cells. The activity of EAAT3 promoter as measured by luciferase reporter activity was increased by RFX1 in C6 cells and the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. However, RFX1 did not change the expression of EAAT2 proteins in the NRK52E cells. RFX1 proteins were expressed in the neurons of rat brain. A high expression level of RFX1 proteins was found in the neurons of cerebral cortex and Purkinje cells. Knockdown of the RFX1 expression by RFX1 antisense oligonucleotides decreased EAAT3 expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. These results suggest that RFX1 enhances the activity of EAAT3 promoter to increase the expression of EAAT3 proteins. This study provides initial evidence for the regulation of gene expression in the nervous cells by RFX1.

  11. The switch from early to late transcription in phage GA-1: characterization of the regulatory protein p4G.

    PubMed

    Horcajadas, J A; Monsalve, M; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1999-07-30

    The transcription program of the Bacillus phage GA-1, a distant relative of phage Phi29, has been studied. Transcription of the GA-1 genome occurred in two stages, early and late. Early genes were expressed from two promoters equivalent to the Phi29 A2b and A2c promoters, whereas late transcription started at a site equivalent to the Phi29 late A3 promoter. The activity of the GA-1 early A2b and A2c promoters diminished 10 minutes after infection, a time at which expression of the late promoter increased significantly. The switch from early to late transcription required protein synthesis, suggesting the need for viral protein(s). An open reading frame was found in the GA-1 genome coding for a protein showing a 53 % similarity to Phi29 regulatory protein p4, and was named p4G. In Phi29, protein p4 represses the early A2b and A2c promoters and activates the late A3 promoter by recruiting RNA polymerase to it. A binding site for protein p4Gwas localized upstream from the GA-1 late A3 promoter, overlapping with the early A2b promoter. In vitro, protein p4Gprevented the binding of RNA polymerase to the GA-1 early A2b promoter but, unlike in Phi29, had no effect on the expression of the late A3 promoter: RNA polymerase could efficiently bind and initiate transcription from the A3 promoter in the absence of protein p4G. Therefore, activation of late transcription occurs differently in GA-1 and Phi29. We propose that protein p4Gis an anti-repressor which inhibits the binding to the late promoter of an unknown repressor factor present in the host strain. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Regulatory landscape and clinical implication of MBD3 in human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ling; Wirbisky, Sara E.; Freeman, Jennifer L.; Liu, Jingping; Liu, Qing; Yuan, Xianrui; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In this article we inspect the roles and functions of the methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3 (MBD3) in human malignant glioma, to assess its potential as an epigenetic biomarker for prognosis. The regulatory effects of MBD3 on glioma transcriptome were first profiled by high-throughput microarray. Our results indicate that MBD3 is involved in both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, MBD3 fine-controls a spectrum of proteins critical for cellular metabolism and proliferation, thereby contributing to an exquisite anti-glioma network. Specifically, the expression of MHC class II molecules was found to positively correlate with MBD3, which provides new insight into the immune escape of gliomagenesis. In addition, MBD3 participates in constraining a number of oncogenic non-coding RNAs whose over-activation could drive cells into excessive growth and higher malignancy. Having followed up a pilot cohort, we noted that the survival of malignant glioma patients was proportional to the content of MBD3 and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in their tumor cells. The progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were relatively poor for patients with lower amount of MBD3 and 5hmC in the tissue biopsies. Taken together, this work enriches our understanding of the mechanistic involvement of MBD3 in malignant glioma. PMID:27835581

  13. Multi-disciplinary methods to define RNA-protein interactions and regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Ascano, Manuel; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Tuschl, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The advent of high-throughput technologies including deep-sequencing and protein mass spectrometry is facilitating the acquisition of large and precise data sets toward the definition of post-transcriptional regulatory networks. While early studies that investigated specific RNA-protein interactions in isolation laid the foundation for our understanding of the existence of molecular machines to assemble and process RNAs, there is a more recent appreciation of the importance of individual RNA-protein interactions that contribute to post-transcriptional gene regulation. The multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and their many RNA targets has only been captured experimentally in recent times. In this review, we will examine current multidisciplinary approaches toward elucidating RNA-protein networks and their regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Binding of Regulatory Subunits of Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase to Cyclic CMP Agarose

    PubMed Central

    Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α1β1 synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  15. Promoting Adoption of the 3Rs through Regulatory Qualification.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elizabeth Gribble; Baker, Amanda F; Sauer, John-Michael

    2016-12-01

    One mechanism to advance the application of novel safety assessment methodologies in drug development, including in silico or in vitro approaches that reduce the use of animals in toxicology studies, is regulatory qualification. Regulatory qualification, a formal process defined at the the U. S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, hinges on a central concept of stating an appropriate "context of use" for a novel drug development tool (DDT) that precisely defines how that DDT can be used to support decision making in a regulated drug development setting. When accumulating the data to support a particular "context-of-use," the concept of "fit-for-purpose" often guides assay validation, as well as the type and amount of data or evidence required to evaluate the tool. This paper will review pathways for regulatory acceptance of novel DDTs and discuss examples of safety projects considered for regulatory qualification. Key concepts to be considered when defining the evidence required to formally adopt and potentially replace animal-intensive traditional safety assessment methods using qualified DDTs are proposed. Presently, the use of qualified translational kidney safety biomarkers can refine and reduce the total numbers of animals used in drug development. We propose that the same conceptual regulatory framework will be appropriate to assess readiness of new technologies that may eventually replace whole animal models.

  16. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  17. Infarct-Induced Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein: A Survival Role in Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Anuka, Eli; Yivgi-Ohana, Natalie; Eimerl, Sarah; Garfinkel, Benjamin; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Chepurkol, Elena; Aravot, Dan; Zinman, Tova; Shainberg, Asher; Hochhauser, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is indispensable for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonadal tissues. This study reveals that StAR is also expressed at high levels in nonsteroidogenic cardiac fibroblasts confined to the left ventricle of mouse heart examined 3 days after permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Unlike StAR, CYP11A1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase proteins were not observed in the postinfarction heart, suggesting an apparent lack of de novo cardiac steroidogenesis. Work with primary cultures of rat heart cells revealed that StAR is induced in fibroblasts responding to proapoptotic treatments with hydrogen peroxide or the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (STS). Such induction of StAR in culture was noted before spontaneous differentiation of the fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. STS induction of StAR in the cardiac fibroblasts conferred a marked resistance to apoptotic cell death. Consistent with that finding, down-regulation of StAR by RNA interference proportionally increased the number of STS-treated apoptotic cells. StAR down-regulation also resulted in a marked increase of BAX activation in the mitochondria, an event known to associate with the onset of apoptosis. Last, STS treatment of HeLa cells showed that apoptotic demise characterized by mitochondrial fission, cytochrome c release, and nuclear fragmentation is arrested in individual HeLa cells overexpressing StAR. Collectively, our in vivo and ex vivo evidence suggests that postinfarction expression of nonsteroidogenic StAR in cardiac fibroblasts has novel antiapoptotic activity, allowing myofibroblast precursor cells to survive the traumatized event, probably to differentiate and function in tissue repair at the infarction site. PMID:23831818

  18. Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein is involved in suppression of the adiponectin gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X Z; Imachi, H; Lyu, J Y; Fukunaga, K; Sato, S; Ibata, T; Kobayashi, T; Yoshimoto, T; Kikuchi, F; Dong, T; Murao, K

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein (PREB), a member of the WD-repeat protein family, has been recognized as a transcriptional factor that regulates prolactin promoter activity in the anterior pituitary of rats. PREB is expressed not only in the pituitary but also in various other tissues, including the adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that PREB acts as a transcriptional regulator and suppresses the expression of the adiponectin gene in cultured 3T3L1 preadipocytes. The aim of this study was to further examine the potential role of PREB in adipose tissue in vivo. Transgenic mice that overexpressing PREB (PREB transgenic mice) were generated. Insulin resistance was evaluated in PREB transgenic mice using glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Adiponectin expression in the adipose tissue was examined by western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd) and adiponectin receptor 2(ADIPOR2) were quantified by qPCR. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed insulin resistance in PREB transgenic mice. Serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations were decreased. Adiponectin gene expression was decreased in the adipose tissue, which was confirmed by the downregulation of the adiponectin-dependent hepatic Scd gene and upregulation of the ADIPOR2 gene in the liver of PREB transgenic mice. We also found that pioglitazone, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-r, improved the insulin resistance in the PREB transgenic mice after a 10-day feeding period. These results demonstrated that PREB might contribute to the regulation of adiponectin gene expression in vivo.

  19. Infarct-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein: a survival role in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Anuka, Eli; Yivgi-Ohana, Natalie; Eimerl, Sarah; Garfinkel, Benjamin; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Chepurkol, Elena; Aravot, Dan; Zinman, Tova; Shainberg, Asher; Hochhauser, Edith; Orly, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is indispensable for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonadal tissues. This study reveals that StAR is also expressed at high levels in nonsteroidogenic cardiac fibroblasts confined to the left ventricle of mouse heart examined 3 days after permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Unlike StAR, CYP11A1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase proteins were not observed in the postinfarction heart, suggesting an apparent lack of de novo cardiac steroidogenesis. Work with primary cultures of rat heart cells revealed that StAR is induced in fibroblasts responding to proapoptotic treatments with hydrogen peroxide or the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (STS). Such induction of StAR in culture was noted before spontaneous differentiation of the fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. STS induction of StAR in the cardiac fibroblasts conferred a marked resistance to apoptotic cell death. Consistent with that finding, down-regulation of StAR by RNA interference proportionally increased the number of STS-treated apoptotic cells. StAR down-regulation also resulted in a marked increase of BAX activation in the mitochondria, an event known to associate with the onset of apoptosis. Last, STS treatment of HeLa cells showed that apoptotic demise characterized by mitochondrial fission, cytochrome c release, and nuclear fragmentation is arrested in individual HeLa cells overexpressing StAR. Collectively, our in vivo and ex vivo evidence suggests that postinfarction expression of nonsteroidogenic StAR in cardiac fibroblasts has novel antiapoptotic activity, allowing myofibroblast precursor cells to survive the traumatized event, probably to differentiate and function in tissue repair at the infarction site.

  20. Regulation of iron metabolism in the sanguivore lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis--molecular cloning of two ferritin subunits and two iron-regulatory proteins (IRP) reveals evolutionary conservation of the iron-regulatory element (IRE)/IRP regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O; Pantopoulos, K; Kao, H T; Muckenthaler, M; Youson, J H; Pieribone, V

    1998-06-01

    Two ferritin cDNAs were cloned from the liver and spinal cord of the sanguivore lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, an extant representative of the ancient agnathan (jawless) stage in vertebrate evolution. The deduced proteins of 20.2 kDa (H-subunit) and 20.1 kDa (M-subunit) display 73% sequence identity, and both contain the ferroxidase center characteristic of animal H-ferritin. A highly conserved iron-responsive element (IRE) was identified in the 5' untranslated region of lamprey H-ferritin. Lamprey ferritin IRE forms a specific complex with crude lamprey and rat liver extracts, and with recombinant human iron-regulatory protein (IRP-1) in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Furthermore, lamprey ferritin IRE competes with labeled human ferritin IRE for binding to IRP in lamprey and mammalian extracts. Two liver cDNA sequences encoding 323 residues and 101 residues of two genetically distinct lamprey IRP were amplified by PCR. Lamprey IRP-1 and IRP-2, which are 72% identical, display about 74% sequence identity to their presumed homologues in mammals. Northern blot analysis shows that two IRP transcripts of 3.6 kb and 5.8 kb are expressed in lamprey liver. Given the ancient lineage of lampreys, the results indicate that the IRE/IRP regulatory system has remained highly conserved during the evolution of vertebrates.

  1. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells.

  2. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Brian Finley

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  3. Cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of a transcriptional regulatory protein (Rv3291c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Tripti; Kumar, Sandeep; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2004-10-01

    Rv3291c, the translational product of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3291c gene, is an 18 kDa protein. It is a putative transcriptional regulatory protein belonging to the leucine-responsive regulatory protein/asparagine synthase C (Lrp/AsnC) family, which are proteins that have been identified in archaea and bacteria. Rv3291c probably plays a significant role during the persistent/latent phase of M. tuberculosis, as supported by its up-regulation several-fold during this stage. Orthorhombic crystals of recombinant Rv3291c have been grown from trisodium citrate dihydrate-buffered solutions containing monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate. Diffraction data extending to 2.7 A have been collected from a single crystal with unit-cell parameters a = 99.6, b = 100.7, c = 100.6 A. Assuming an octamer in the asymmetric unit results in a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 1.75 A3 Da(-1), corresponding to a solvent content of about 30%.

  4. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on the cell cycle and its regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan-Yong; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Taehong; Yun, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Nam; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether single or combined radio frequency (RF) radiation exposure has effects on the cell cycle and its regulatory proteins. Exposure of MCF7 cells to either single (837 MHz) or combined (837 and 1950 MHz) RF radiation was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 4 W/kg for 1 h. During the exposure period, the chamber was made isothermal by circulating water through the cavity. After RF radiation exposure, DNA synthesis rate and cell cycle distribution were assessed. The levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins, p53, p21, cyclins, and cyclin-dependent kinases were also examined. The positive control group was exposed to 0.5 and 4 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR) and showed changes in DNA synthesis and cell cycle distribution. The levels of p53, p21, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1 were also affected by IR exposure. In contrast to the IR-exposed group, neither the single RF radiation- nor the combined RF radiation-exposed group elicited alterations in DNA synthesis, cell cycle distribution, and levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These results indicate that neither single nor combined RF radiation affect cell cycle progression.

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, September 1995. Volume 42, Number 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This book contains an issuance of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board and a Director`s Decision, both of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The issuance concerns the dismissal of a case by adopting a settlement reached by the Staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Radiation Safety Officer of a hospital in which the safety officer pled guilty to deliberate misconduct. The Director`s Decision was to deny a petition to impose a fine on Tennessee Valley Authority concerning alleged harassment of the petitioner and to appoint an independent arbitration board to review all past complaints filed against TVA concerning the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant.

  6. Generation of novel bacterial regulatory proteins that detect priority pollutant phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, A.A.; Kuske, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic systems of bacteria that have the ability to use organic pollutants as carbon and energy sources can be adapted to create bacterial biosensors for the detection of industrial pollution. The creation of bacterial biosensors is hampered by a lack of information about the genetic systems that control production of bacterial enzymes that metabolize pollutants. The authors have attempted to overcome this problem through modification of DmpR, a regulatory protein for the phenol degradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. The phenol detection capacity of DmpR was altered by using mutagenic PCR targeted to the DmpR sensor domain. DmpR mutants were identified that both increased sensitivity to the phenolic effectors of wild-type DmpR and increased the range of molecules detected. The phenol detection characteristics of seven DmpR mutants were demonstrated through their ability to activate transcription of a lacZ reporter gene. Effectors of the DmpR derivatives included phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 4-nitrophenol.

  7. Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene polymorphism affects postprandial lipemic response in a dietary intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haiqing; Pollin, Toni I.; Damcott, Coleen M.; McLenithan, John C.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Postprandial triglyceridemia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, most of the genes that influence postprandial triglyceridemia are not known. We evaluated whether a common nonsynonymous SNP rs1260326/P446L in the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene influenced variation in the postprandial lipid response after a high-fat challenge in seven hundred and seventy participants in the Amish HAPI Heart Study who underwent an oral high-fat challenge and had blood samples taken in the fasting state and during the postprandial phase at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours. We found that the minor T allele at rs1260326 was associated with significantly higher fasting TG levels after adjusting for age, sex, and family structure (Pa = 0.06 for additive model, and Pr=0.0003 for recessive model). During the fat challenge, the T allele was associated with significantly higher maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), incremental maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.02) and incremental TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.03). Our data indicate that the rs1260326 T allele of GCKR is associated with both higher fasting levels of TG as well as the postprandial TG response, which may result in higher atherogenic risk. PMID:19526250

  8. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 gene in Murrah bulls.

    PubMed

    Jain, Varsha; Patel, Brijesh; Umar, Farhat Paul; Ajithakumar, H M; Gurjar, Suraj K; Gupta, I D; Verma, Archana

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted with the objective to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 (PPP1R11) gene in Murrah bulls. Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol-chloroform extraction method from the frozen semen samples of 65 Murrah bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The quality and concentration of DNA was checked by spectrophotometer reading and agarose gel electrophoresis. The target region of PPP1R11 gene was amplified using four sets of primer designed based on Bos taurus reference sequence. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using Clustal Omega for identification of SNPs. Animals were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using EcoNI restriction enzyme. The sequences in the NCBI accession number NW_005785016.1 for Bubalus bubalis were compared and aligned with the edited sequences of Murrah bulls with Clustal Omega software. A total of 10 SNPs were found, out of which 1 at 5'UTR, 3 at intron 1, and 6 at intron 2 region. PCR-RFLP using restriction enzyme EcoNI revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study. A total of 10 SNPs were found. PCR-RFLP revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study, due to which association analysis with conception rate was not feasible.

  9. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-05

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state.

  10. Enhanced suppressor function of TIM-3+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gautron, Anne-Sophie; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; de Marcken, Marine; Hafler, David A

    2014-09-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) is an Ig-superfamily member expressed on IFN-γ-secreting Th1 and Tc1 cells and was identified as a negative regulator of immune tolerance. TIM-3 is expressed by a subset of activated CD4(+) T cells, and anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation increases both the level of expression and the number of TIM-3(+) T cells. In mice, TIM-3 is constitutively expressed on natural regulatory T (Treg) cells and has been identified as a regulatory molecule of alloimmunity through its ability to modulate CD4(+) T-cell differentiation. Here, we examined TIM-3 expression on human Treg cells to determine its role in T-cell suppression. In contrast to mice, TIM-3 is not expressed on Treg cells ex vivo but is upregulated after activation. While TIM-3(+) Treg cells with increased gene expression of LAG3, CTLA4, and FOXP3 are highly efficient suppressors of effector T (Teff) cells, TIM-3(-) Treg cells poorly suppressed Th17 cells as compared with their suppression of Th1 cells; this decreased suppression ability was associated with decreased STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation and reduced gene expression of IL10, EBI3, GZMB, PRF1, IL1Rα, and CCR6. Thus, our results suggest that TIM-3 expression on Treg cells identifies a population highly effective in inhibiting pathogenic Th1- and Th17-cell responses.

  11. Systematic identification of transcriptional regulatory modules from protein–protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Diego; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) combine with co-factors to form transcriptional regulatory modules (TRMs) that regulate gene expression programs with spatiotemporal specificity. Here we present a novel and generic method (rTRM) for the reconstruction of TRMs that integrates genomic information from TF binding, cell type-specific gene expression and protein–protein interactions. rTRM was applied to reconstruct the TRMs specific for embryonic stem cells (ESC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), neural progenitor cells, trophoblast stem cells and distinct types of terminally differentiated CD4+ T cells. The ESC and HSC TRM predictions were highly precise, yielding 77 and 96 proteins, of which ∼75% have been independently shown to be involved in the regulation of these cell types. Furthermore, rTRM successfully identified a large number of bridging proteins with known roles in ESCs and HSCs, which could not have been identified using genomic approaches alone, as they lack the ability to bind specific DNA sequences. This highlights the advantage of rTRM over other methods that ignore PPI information, as proteins need to interact with other proteins to form complexes and perform specific functions. The prediction and experimental validation of the co-factors that endow master regulatory TFs with the capacity to select specific genomic sites, modulate the local epigenetic profile and integrate multiple signals will provide important mechanistic insights not only into how such TFs operate, but also into abnormal transcriptional states leading to disease. PMID:24137002

  12. Differential expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Dhore, C R; Cleutjens, J P; Lutgens, E; Cleutjens, K B; Geusens, P P; Kitslaar, P J; Tordoir, J H; Spronk, H M; Vermeer, C; Daemen, M J

    2001-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of regulators of bone formation and osteoclastogenesis in human atherosclerosis because accumulating evidence suggests that atherosclerotic calcification shares features with bone calcification. The most striking finding of this study was the constitutive immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein in nondiseased aortas and the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin in nondiseased aortas and early atherosclerotic lesions. When atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated calcification or bone formation, BMP-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin were upregulated. Interestingly, this upregulation was associated with a sustained immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein. The 2 modulators of osteoclastogenesis (osteoprotegerin [OPG] and its ligand, OPGL) were present in the nondiseased vessel wall and in early atherosclerotic lesions. In advanced calcified lesions, OPG was present in bone structures, whereas OPGL was only present in the extracellular matrix surrounding calcium deposits. The observed expression patterns suggest a tight regulation of the expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins during human atherogenesis. The expression pattern of both OPG and OPGL during atherogenesis might suggest a regulatory role of these proteins not only in osteoclastogenesis but also in atherosclerotic calcification.

  13. [Effect of pingxian granules on protein expression of apoptosis regulatory genes in hippocampus of pentylenetetrazol-induced epileptic model rats].

    PubMed

    Tian, Rong; She, Yali; Jia, Yuxin; Wang, Yu; Cheng, Xiaoli; Mu, Baolong

    2012-05-01

    To observe the effect of Pingxian granules on the protein expression of apoptosis regulatory genes Bcl-2 and Bax in the hippocampus of epileptic model rats and study the molecular biological mechanism of the anti-epileptic effect of Pingxian granules. Totally 60 45-days-old Wistar rats were selected and then randomly assigned into 5 groups: the normal control group, the model group, the positive control group, the Pingxian high dose group and the Pingxian low dose group, with 12 in each group. Except the normal control group, all the groups were intraperitoneally injected with 35 mg x kg(-1) pentylenetetrazol to establish the models of epilepsy. The Pingxian high dose (1.66 g x mL(-1)) and low dose (0.42 g x mL(-1)) groups were intragastrically infused with Pingxian granules 2 mL x d(-1). The positive control group received 3.6 g x L(-1) phenobarbital suspension by gastric perfusion. The normal group and the model group were drenched with distilled water, 2 mL x d(-1), for 5 weeks. Bcl-2 and Bax protein positive cells were labeled with immunohistochemical SABC at 3, 5 w. (1) Rats in the model group appeared the epileptic behavior at the 1st week, and became serious with the kindle frequency; grade VIepileptic behavior appeared at the 4th week. The attack frequency and grade of the Pingxian group were less and lower, the highest grade were only IV, and there were no significant differences in the attack grade and frequency. (2) With the increase in kindle frequency, the model group showed a notable decrease in the Bcl-2 expression compared with the normal control group at the 3rd and 5th weekend (P < 0.01), but a significant increase in Bax protein expression (P <0. 01). The number of the Bcl-2 protein expression in Pingxian groups and the positive control group were obviously more than the model group (P < 0.01); and the number of the Bax protein expression in Pingxian groups and the positive control group were obviously less than the model group (P < 0

  14. Identification of a regulatory loop for the synthesis of neurosteroids: a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-dependent mechanism involving hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meethal, Sivan Vadakkadath; Liu, Tianbing; Chan, Hsien W.; Ginsburg, Erika; Wilson, Andrea C.; Gray, Danielle N.; Bowen, Richard L.; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Atwood, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain sex steroids are derived from both peripheral (primarily gonadal) and local (neurosteroids) sources and are crucial for neurogenesis, neural differentiation and neural function. The mechanism(s) regulating the production of neurosteroids is not understood. To determine whether hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis components previously detected in the extra-hypothalamic brain comprise a feedback loop to regulate neuro-sex steroid (NSS) production, we assessed dynamic changes in expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a key regulator of steroidogenesis, and key hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine receptors, by modulating peripheral sex hormone levels in female mice. Ovariectomy (OVX; high serum gonadotropins, low serum sex steroids) had a differential effect on StAR protein levels in the extrahypothalamic brain; increasing the 30- and 32-kDa variants but decreasing the 37-kDa variant and is indicative of cholesterol transport into mitochondria for steroidogenesis. Treatment of OVX animals with E2,P4,or E2 + P4 for 3 days, which decreases OVX-induced increases in GnRH/gonadotropin production, reversed this pattern. Suppression of gonadotropin levels in OVX mice using the GnRH agonist leuprolide acetate inhibited the processing of the 37-kDa StAR protein into the 30-kDa StAR protein, confirming that the differential processing of brain StAR protein is regulated by gonadotropins. OVX dramatically suppressed extra-hypothalamic brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 receptor expression, and was further suppressed in E2- or P4-treated OVX mice. Together, these data indicate the existence of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine feedback loops that regulate NSS synthesis. Further delineation of these feedback loops that regulate NSS production will aid in developing therapies to maintain brain sex steroid levels and cognition. PMID:19493163

  15. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meng-Ru; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Browning, Joseph A; Wilkins, Robert J; Ellory, J Clive

    2001-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl− channel. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl− channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  16. Physical and functional domains of the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1988-01-01

    A characteristic common to DNA animal viruses is the expression early in infection of viral proteins that act in trans to regulate subsequent RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of the remainder of the viral genome. The predominant transcriptional regulatory protein specified by herpes simplex virus type 1 is the immediate-early protein ICP4. ICP4 is a complex multifunctional protein required for the activation of many herpes simplex virus type 1 transcriptional units and for repression of its own transcription. In the present study we have introduced nonsense and deletion mutations into both genome copies of the ICP4 gene such that the resulting mutants express only defined subsets of the primary ICP4 amino acid sequence. The partial peptides retain activities and physical properties of the intact ICP4 molecule, permitting one to attribute individual activities and properties to defined amino acid sequences. Images PMID:2828668

  17. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  18. Phosphorylation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a by protein kinase A (PKA) regulates transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingming; Giorgianni, Francesco; Deng, Xiong; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Bridges, Dave; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Elam, Marshall B

    2014-07-11

    The counter-regulatory hormone glucagon inhibits lipogenesis via downregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1). The effect of glucagon is mediated via protein kinase A (PKA). To determine if SREBP-1 is a direct phosphorylation target of PKA, we conducted mass spectrometry analysis of recombinant n-terminal SREBP-1a following PKA treatment in vitro. This analysis identified serines 331/332 as bona-fide phosphorylation targets of PKA. To determine the functional consequences of phosphorylation at these sites, we constructed mammalian expression vector for both nSREBP-1a and 1c isoforms in which the candidate PKA phosphorylation sites were mutated to active phosphomimetic or non-phosphorylatable amino acids. The transcriptional activity of SREBP was reduced by the phosphomimetic mutation of S332 of nSREBP-1a and the corresponding serine (S308) of nSREBP-1c. This site is a strong candidate for mediating the negative regulatory effect of glucagon on SREBP-1 and lipogenesis.

  19. [Micro RNA-451 promoting osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells by targeting regulatory calcium binding protein 39].

    PubMed

    Kang, Xia; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Guo, Hongfeng; Quan, Yi; Dong, Shiwu

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the role of micro RNA-451 (miRNA-451) in promoting the osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by targeting regulatory calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39). pMIR-report and pRL-TK vectors were selected to identify the relationship between miRNA-451 and CAB39 by using dual-luciferase reporter assay. pre-miRNA-451 (group A), anti-miRNA-451 (group C), pre-miRNA negative control (group B), and anti-miRNA negative control (group D) were transfected into the C3H10T1/2 cells, respectively. Then, the cells were collected after osteogenic induction for 7 and 14 days. At 7 and 14 days, the real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and Western blot assays were performed to detect the related osteogenetic biomarkers [Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA] and expressions of CAB39 protein. At 14 days, the extracellular calcium deposition during the osteogenesis of MSCs was tested by Alizarin red staining method. CAB39 was the target gene of miRNA-451. At 7 and 14 days after osteogenic induction, the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and ALP in group A were significantly higher than those in group B (P < 0.05), and the expressions in group C was significantly lower than those in group D (P < 0.05). Furthermore, at 14 days after osteogenic induction, the protein expression of CAB39 in group A (0.55 +/- 0.05) was significantly lower than that in group B (1.00 +/- 0.07), and the protein expression in group C (1.21 +/- 0.05) was significantly higher than that in group D (1.00 +/- 0.04), all showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Finally, at 14 days after osteogenic induction, the extracellular calcium deposition in group A was obviously more than that in group B, and group C was downregulated when compared with group D. miRNA-451 can promote the osteogenesis process of MSCs by downregulating the CAB39.

  20. 14-3-3 Proteins Participate in Light Signaling through Association with PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eri; Diaz, Celine; Hong, Jong-Pil; Shin, Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are regulatory proteins found in all eukaryotes and are known to selectively interact with phosphorylated proteins to regulate physiological processes. Through an affinity purification screening, many light-related proteins were recovered as 14-3-3 candidate binding partners. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the 14-3-3 kappa isoform (14-3-3κ) could bind to PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3) and CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Further analysis by in vitro pull-down assay confirmed the interaction between 14-3-3κ and PIF3. Interruption of putative phosphorylation sites on the 14-3-3 binding motifs of PIF3 was not sufficient to inhibit 14-3-3κ from binding or to disturb nuclear localization of PIF3. It was also indicated that 14-3-3κ could bind to other members of the PIF family, such as PIF1 and PIF6, but not to LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1). 14-3-3 mutants, as well as the PIF3 overexpressor, displayed longer hypocotyls, and a pif3 mutant displayed shorter hypocotyls than the wild-type in red light, suggesting that 14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of photomorphogenesis and function antagonistically with PIF3. Consequently, our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins bind to PIFs and initiate photomorphogenesis in response to a light signal. PMID:25501334

  1. Behavioral and regulatory abnormalities in mice deficient in the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Erbel-Sieler, Claudia; Dudley, Carol; Zhou, Yudong; Wu, Xinle; Estill, Sandi Jo; Han, Tina; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; McKnight, Steven L

    2004-09-14

    Laboratory mice bearing inactivating mutations in the genes encoding the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities. Behavioral abnormalities included diminished startle response, as measured by prepulse inhibition, and impaired social recognition. NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice also exhibited stereotypic darting behavior at weaning and increased locomotor activity. Immunohistochemical staining assays showed that the NPAS1 and NPAS3 proteins are expressed in inhibitory interneurons and that the viability and anatomical distribution of these neurons are unaffected by the absence of either transcription factor. Adult brain tissues from NPAS3- and NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice exhibited a distinct reduction in reelin, a large, secreted protein whose expression has been reported to be attenuated in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia. These observations raise the possibility that a regulatory program controlled in inhibitory interneurons by the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors may be either substantively or tangentially relevant to psychosis.

  2. Behavioral and regulatory abnormalities in mice deficient in the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Erbel-Sieler, Claudia; Dudley, Carol; Zhou, Yudong; Wu, Xinle; Estill, Sandi Jo; Han, Tina; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, S. Steven; McKnight, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory mice bearing inactivating mutations in the genes encoding the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities. Behavioral abnormalities included diminished startle response, as measured by prepulse inhibition, and impaired social recognition. NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice also exhibited stereotypic darting behavior at weaning and increased locomotor activity. Immunohistochemical staining assays showed that the NPAS1 and NPAS3 proteins are expressed in inhibitory interneurons and that the viability and anatomical distribution of these neurons are unaffected by the absence of either transcription factor. Adult brain tissues from NPAS3- and NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice exhibited a distinct reduction in reelin, a large, secreted protein whose expression has been reported to be attenuated in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia. These observations raise the possibility that a regulatory program controlled in inhibitory interneurons by the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors may be either substantively or tangentially relevant to psychosis. PMID:15347806

  3. Protective role of interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated signaling against prion infection.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C)) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrP(Sc) was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrP(Sc) formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  4. Protective Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Mediated Signaling against Prion Infection

    PubMed Central

    Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrPSc was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrPSc formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:22379081

  5. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  6. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  7. Cytoplasmic dynein and its regulatory proteins in Golgi pathology in nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Dick; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a dynamic organelle involved in processing and sorting of lipids and proteins. In neurons, the Golgi apparatus is important for the development of axons and dendrites and maintenance of their highly complex polarized morphology. The motor protein complex cytoplasmic dynein has an important role in Golgi apparatus positioning and function. Together, with dynactin and other regulatory factors it drives microtubule minus-end directed motility of Golgi membranes. Inhibition of dynein results in fragmentation and dispersion of the Golgi ribbon in the neuronal cell body, resembling the Golgi abnormalities observed in some neurodegenerative disorders, in particular motor neuron diseases. Mutations in dynein and its regulatory factors, including the dynactin subunit p150Glued, BICD2 and Lis-1, are associated with several human nervous system disorders, including cortical malformation and motor neuropathy. Here we review the role of dynein and its regulatory factors in Golgi function and positioning, and the potential role of dynein malfunction in causing Golgi apparatus abnormalities in nervous system disorders. PMID:26578860

  8. NRF2-ome: an integrated web resource to discover protein interaction and regulatory networks of NRF2.

    PubMed

    Türei, Dénes; Papp, Diána; Fazekas, Dávid; Földvári-Nagy, László; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    NRF2 is the master transcriptional regulator of oxidative and xenobiotic stress responses. NRF2 has important roles in carcinogenesis, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. We developed an online resource, NRF2-ome, to provide an integrated and systems-level database for NRF2. The database contains manually curated and predicted interactions of NRF2 as well as data from external interaction databases. We integrated NRF2 interactome with NRF2 target genes, NRF2 regulating TFs, and miRNAs. We connected NRF2-ome to signaling pathways to allow mapping upstream NRF2 regulatory components that could directly or indirectly influence NRF2 activity totaling 35,967 protein-protein and signaling interactions. The user-friendly website allows researchers without computational background to search, browse, and download the database. The database can be downloaded in SQL, CSV, BioPAX, SBML, PSI-MI, and in a Cytoscape CYS file formats. We illustrated the applicability of the website by suggesting a posttranscriptional negative feedback of NRF2 by MAFG protein and raised the possibility of a connection between NRF2 and the JAK/STAT pathway through STAT1 and STAT3. NRF2-ome can also be used as an evaluation tool to help researchers and drug developers to understand the hidden regulatory mechanisms in the complex network of NRF2.

  9. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    DOE PAGES

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extendedmore » interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks.« less

  10. Proteome analysis of the rice etioplast: metabolic and regulatory networks and novel protein functions.

    PubMed

    von Zychlinski, Anne; Kleffmann, Torsten; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjölander, Kimmen; Baginsky, Sacha; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2005-08-01

    We report an extensive proteome analysis of rice etioplasts, which were highly purified from dark-grown leaves by a novel protocol using Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. Comparative protein profiling of different cell compartments from leaf tissue demonstrated the purity of the etioplast preparation by the absence of diagnostic marker proteins of other cell compartments. Systematic analysis of the etioplast proteome identified 240 unique proteins that provide new insights into heterotrophic plant metabolism and control of gene expression. They include several new proteins that were not previously known to localize to plastids. The etioplast proteins were compared with proteomes from Arabidopsis chloroplasts and plastid from tobacco Bright Yellow 2 cells. Together with computational structure analyses of proteins without functional annotations, this comparative proteome analysis revealed novel etioplast-specific proteins. These include components of the plastid gene expression machinery such as two RNA helicases, an RNase II-like hydrolytic exonuclease, and a site 2 protease-like metalloprotease all of which were not known previously to localize to the plastid and are indicative for so far unknown regulatory mechanisms of plastid gene expression. All etioplast protein identifications and related data were integrated into a data base that is freely available upon request.

  11. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extended interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks. PMID:26364903

  12. RNA regulatory networks diversified through curvature of the PUF protein scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Wilinski, Daniel; Qiu, Chen; Lapointe, Christopher P.; Nevil, Markus; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-09-14

    Proteins bind and control mRNAs, directing their localization, translation and stability. Members of the PUF family of RNA-binding proteins control multiple mRNAs in a single cell, and play key roles in development, stem cell maintenance and memory formation. Here we identified the mRNA targets of a S. cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf5p, by ultraviolet-crosslinking-affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP). The binding sites recognized by Puf5p are diverse, with variable spacer lengths between two specific sequences. Each length of site correlates with a distinct biological function. Crystal structures of Puf5p–RNA complexes reveal that the protein scaffold presents an exceptionally flat and extended interaction surface relative to other PUF proteins. In complexes with RNAs of different lengths, the protein is unchanged. A single PUF protein repeat is sufficient to induce broadening of specificity. Changes in protein architecture, such as alterations in curvature, may lead to evolution of mRNA regulatory networks.

  13. Renal mass reduction results in accumulation of lipids and dysregulation of lipid regulatory proteins in the remnant kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Moradi, Hamid; Yuan, Jun; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2009-06-01

    A significant reduction of renal mass results in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial injury, culminating in end-stage chronic renal failure (CRF). The accumulation of lipids in the kidney can cause renal disease. Uptake of oxidized lipoproteins via scavenger receptors, reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids via the megalin-cubilin complex, and increased glucose load per nephron can promote lipid accumulation in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells in CRF. Cellular lipid homeostasis is regulated by lipid influx, synthesis, catabolism, and efflux. We examined lipid-regulatory factors in the remnant kidney of rats 11 wk after nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation. CRF resulted in azotemia, proteinuria, lipid accumulation in the kidney, upregulation of megalin, cubilin, mediators of lipid influx (scavenger receptor class A and lectin-like oxidized receptor-1), lipid efflux (liver X receptor alpha/beta and ATP-binding cassette transporter), and fatty acid biosynthesis (carbohydrate-response element binding protein, fatty acid synthase, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase). However, factors involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (sterol regulatory element binding protein, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, SCAP, Insig-1, and Insig-2) and fatty acid oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, acyl-CoA oxidase, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein) were reduced in the remnant kidney. Thus CRF results in heavy lipid accumulation in the remnant kidney, which is mediated by upregulation of pathways involved in tubular reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids, influx of oxidized lipoproteins and synthesis of fatty acids, and downregulation of pathways involved in fatty acid catabolism.

  14. Construction of hormonally responsive intact cell hybrids by cell fusion: transfer of. beta. -adrenergic receptor and nucleotide regulatory protein(s) in normal and desensitized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schulster, D.; Salmon, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion of normal, untreated human erythrocytes with desensitized turkey erythrocytes increases isoproterenol stimulation of cyclic (/sup 3/H)AMP accumulation over basal rates. Moreover, pretreatment of the human erythrocytes with cholera toxin before they are fused with desensitized turkey erthythrocytes leads to a large stimulation with isoproterenol. This is even greater and far more rapid than the response obtained if turkey erythrocytes are treated directly with cholera toxin. It is concluded that the stimulation in the fused system is due to the transfer of an ADP-ribosylated subunit of nucleotide regulatory protein.

  15. APG: an Active Protein-Gene network model to quantify regulatory signals in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiguang; Sun, Yidan; Zheng, Si; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Zhou, Huarong; Chen, Luonan

    2013-01-01

    Synergistic interactions among transcription factors (TFs) and their cofactors collectively determine gene expression in complex biological systems. In this work, we develop a novel graphical model, called Active Protein-Gene (APG) network model, to quantify regulatory signals of transcription in complex biomolecular networks through integrating both TF upstream-regulation and downstream-regulation high-throughput data. Firstly, we theoretically and computationally demonstrate the effectiveness of APG by comparing with the traditional strategy based only on TF downstream-regulation information. We then apply this model to study spontaneous type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and Wistar control rats. Our biological experiments validate the theoretical results. In particular, SP1 is found to be a hidden TF with changed regulatory activity, and the loss of SP1 activity contributes to the increased glucose production during diabetes development. APG model provides theoretical basis to quantitatively elucidate transcriptional regulation by modelling TF combinatorial interactions and exploiting multilevel high-throughput information.

  16. Regulatory landscape fusion in rhabdomyosarcoma through interactions between the PAX3 promoter and FOXO1 regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Vicente-García, Cristina; Villarejo-Balcells, Barbara; Irastorza-Azcárate, Ibai; Naranjo, Silvia; Acemel, Rafael D; Tena, Juan J; Rigby, Peter W J; Devos, Damien P; Gómez-Skarmeta, Jose L; Carvajal, Jaime J

    2017-06-14

    The organisation of vertebrate genomes into topologically associating domains (TADs) is believed to facilitate the regulation of the genes located within them. A remaining question is whether TAD organisation is achieved through the interactions of the regulatory elements within them or if these interactions are favoured by the pre-existence of TADs. If the latter is true, the fusion of two independent TADs should result in the rewiring of the transcriptional landscape and the generation of ectopic contacts. We show that interactions within the PAX3 and FOXO1 domains are restricted to their respective TADs in normal conditions, while in a patient-derived alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, harbouring the diagnostic t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation that brings together the PAX3 and FOXO1 genes, the PAX3 promoter interacts ectopically with FOXO1 sequences. Using a combination of 4C-seq datasets, we have modelled the three-dimensional organisation of the fused landscape in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The chromosomal translocation that leads to alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma development generates a novel TAD that is likely to favour ectopic PAX3:FOXO1 oncogene activation in non-PAX3 territories. Rhabdomyosarcomas may therefore arise from cells which do not normally express PAX3. The borders of this novel TAD correspond to the original 5'- and 3'- borders of the PAX3 and FOXO1 TADs, respectively, suggesting that TAD organisation precedes the formation of regulatory long-range interactions. Our results demonstrate that, upon translocation, novel regulatory landscapes are formed allowing new intra-TAD interactions between the original loci involved.

  17. Bacterial co-expression of human Tau protein with protein kinase A and 14-3-3 for studies of 14-3-3/phospho-Tau interaction.

    PubMed

    Tugaeva, Kristina V; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Sluchanko, Nikolai N

    2017-01-01

    Abundant regulatory 14-3-3 proteins have an extremely wide interactome and coordinate multiple cellular events via interaction with specifically phosphorylated partner proteins. Notwithstanding the key role of 14-3-3/phosphotarget interactions in many physiological and pathological processes, they are dramatically underexplored. Here, we focused on the 14-3-3 interaction with human Tau protein associated with the development of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Among many known phosphorylation sites within Tau, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates several key residues of Tau and induces its tight interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. However, the stoichiometry and mechanism of 14-3-3 interaction with phosphorylated Tau (pTau) are not clearly elucidated. In this work, we describe a simple bacterial co-expression system aimed to facilitate biochemical and structural studies on the 14-3-3/pTau interaction. We show that dual co-expression of human fetal Tau with PKA in Escherichia coli results in multisite Tau phosphorylation including also naturally occurring sites which were not previously considered in the context of 14-3-3 binding. Tau protein co-expressed with PKA displays tight functional interaction with 14-3-3 isoforms of a different type. Upon triple co-expression with 14-3-3 and PKA, Tau protein could be co-purified with 14-3-3 and demonstrates complex which is similar to that formed in vitro between individual 14-3-3 and pTau obtained from dual co-expression. Although used in this study for the specific case of the previously known 14-3-3/pTau interaction, our co-expression system may be useful to study of other selected 14-3-3/phosphotarget interactions and for validations of 14-3-3 complexes identified by other methods.

  18. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha; Levi, Edi; Rishi, Arun K.; Datta, Nabanita S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  19. Binding of cellular proteins to the regulatory region of BK virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, R B; Dynan, W S

    1988-01-01

    The human papovavirus BK has a noncoding regulatory region located between the divergently transcribed early and late coding regions. Many strains of BK virus (BKV) have direct DNA sequence repeats in the regulatory region, although the number and extent of these repeats varies widely between independent isolates. Until recently, little was known about the individual functional elements within the BKV regulatory region, and the biological significance of the variable repeat structure has been unclear. To characterize the interaction between sequences in the BKV regulatory region and host cell transcription factors, we have carried out DNase I footprinting and competitive binding experiments on three strains of BKV, including one strain that does not contain direct sequence repeats. We have used relatively crude fractions from HeLa cell nuclear extracts, as well as DNA affinity-purified preparations of proteins. Our results demonstrate that BK(Dunlop), BK(WW), and BK(MM) each contain multiple binding sites for a factor, NF-BK, that is a member of the nuclear factor 1 family of transcription factors. We predict the presence of three to eight binding sites for NF-BK in the other strains of BKV for which a DNA sequence is available. This suggests that the binding of this protein is likely to be required for biological activity of the virus. In addition to NF-BK sites, BK(WW) and BK(MM) each contain a single binding site for transcription factor Sp1, and BK(Dunlop) contains two binding sites for transcription factor AP-1. The AP-1 sites in BK(Dunlop) span the junction of adjacent direct repeats, suggesting that repeat formation may be an important mechanism for de novo formation of binding sites not present in a parental strain. Images PMID:2841492

  20. Distribution of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) isoforms in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M; Agalave, N; Watanabe, M; Svensson, C I

    2013-09-17

    The transmembrane α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of auxiliary AMPA receptor subunits that differentially modulate trafficking and many functional properties of the receptor. To investigate which TARP isoforms may be involved in AMPA receptor-mediated spinal synaptic transmission, we have mapped the localization of five of the known TARP isoforms, namely γ-2 (also known as stargazin), γ-3, γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8, in the rat spinal cord. Immunoblotting showed expression of all isoforms in the spinal cord to varying degrees. At the light microscopic level, immunoperoxidase labeling of γ-4, γ-7 and γ-8 was found throughout spinal gray matter. In white matter, γ-4 and γ-7 immunolabeling was observed in astrocytic processes and in mature oligodendrocytes. In pepsin-treated spinal cord, γ-7 often colocalized with GluA2 immunopositive puncta in the deep dorsal horn as well as in the ventral horn, but not in the superficial dorsal horn. Postembedding immunogold labeling was further used to assess the synaptic localization of γ-2, γ-7 and γ-8 in the dorsal horn. Synaptic immunogold labeling of γ-2 was sparse throughout the dorsal horn, with some primary afferent synapses weakly labeled, whereas relatively strong γ-7 immunogold labeling was found at deep dorsal horn synapses, including at synapses formed by low-threshold mechanosensitive primary afferent terminals. Prominent immunogold labeling of γ-8 was frequently detected at synapses established by primary afferent fibers. The spinal localization patterns of TARP isoforms reported here suggest that AMPA receptors at spinal synaptic populations and in glial cells may exhibit different functional characteristics owing to differences in auxiliary subunit composition.

  1. 3 CFR 13579 - Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies 13579 Order 13579 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011 EO 13579 Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies By...

  2. 3 CFR 13563 - Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011. Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011. Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review 13563 Order 13563 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order... improve regulation and regulatory review, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. General...

  3. A novel regulatory relationship between RIPK4 and ELF3 in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Glen M; Sulaiman, Nur S; Al Baiiaty, Sahar; Kwa, Mei Qi; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-12-01

    Keratinocytes are central to the barrier functions of surface epithelia, such as the gingiva and epidermis. RIPK4 is a key regulator of keratinocyte differentiation; however, the signalling pathways in which it functions remain poorly defined. In this study, we identified a regulatory relationship between RIPK4 and ELF3, an ETS family transcription factor. RIPK4 was shown to be important for the upregulation of ELF3 gene expression by the PKC agonist PMA in both oral and epidermal keratinocytes. RIPK4 promotes keratinocyte differentiation in part by phosphorylating and thereby activating the IRF6 transcription factor. Significantly, silencing of IRF6 inhibited the PMA-inducible expression of ELF3. A role for the GRHL3 transcription factor, a downstream target gene of IRF6, in the regulation of ELF3 expression was similarly demonstrated. ELF3 has previously been shown to regulate the expression of SPPR1A and SPRR1B, small proline-rich proteins that contribute to the cornification of keratinocytes. Consistently, RIPK4 and IRF6 were important for the PMA-inducible expression of SPRR1A and SPRR1B. They were also important for the upregulation of TGM1, a transglutaminase that catalyses the cross-linking of proteins, including small proline-rich proteins, during keratinocyte cornification. RIPK4 was also shown to upregulate the expression of TGM2 independently of IRF6. Collectively, our findings position RIPK4 upstream of a hierarchal IRF6-GRHL3-ELF3 transcription factor pathway in keratinocytes, as well as provide insight into a potential role for RIPK4 in the regulation of keratinocyte cornification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  5. Structure of dual function iron regulatory protein 1 complexed with ferritin IRE-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, William E.; Selezneva, Anna I.; Dupuy, Jérôme; Volbeda, Anne; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Volz1, Karl

    2011-07-27

    Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) binds iron-responsive elements (IREs) in messenger RNAs (mRNAs), to repress translation or degradation, or binds an iron-sulfur cluster, to become a cytosolic aconitase enzyme. The 2.8 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the IRP1:ferritin H IRE complex shows an open protein conformation compared with that of cytosolic aconitase. The extended, L-shaped IRP1 molecule embraces the IRE stem-loop through interactions at two sites separated by {approx}30 angstroms, each involving about a dozen protein:RNA bonds. Extensive conformational changes related to binding the IRE or an iron-sulfur cluster explain the alternate functions of IRP1 as an mRNA regulator or enzyme.

  6. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zi Li; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway.

  7. Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is essential for early porcine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Zi Li; CUI, Xiang-Shun; NAMGOONG, Suk; KIM, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) is a regulator of both transcription and actin filament assembly. JMY is a critical nucleation-promoting factor (NPF); however, its role in the development of mammalian embryos is poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the functional roles of the NPF JMY in porcine embryos. Porcine embryos expressed JMY mRNA and protein, and JMY protein moved from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at later embryonic developmental stages. Knockdown of JMY by RNA interference markedly decreased the rate of blastocyst development, validating its role in the development of porcine embryos. Furthermore, injection of JMY dsRNA also impaired actin and Arp2 expression, and co-injection of actin and Arp2 mRNA partially rescued blastocyst development. Taken together, our results show that the NPF JMY is involved in the development of porcine embryos by regulating the NPF-Arp2-actin pathway. PMID:26052154

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  9. A maize protein associated with the G-box binding complex has homology to brain regulatory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    de Vetten, N C; Lu, G; Feri, R J

    1992-01-01

    The G-box element is a moderately conserved component of the promoter of many inducible genes, including the alcohol dehydrogenase genes of Arabidopsis and maize. We used monoclonal antibodies generated against partially purified G-box binding factor (GBF) activity to characterize maize proteins that are part of the DNA binding complex. Antibodies interacted with partially purified maize GBF complexes to produce a slower migrating complex in the gel retardation assay. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that the protein recognized by the antibody is not a DNA binding protein in and of itself, but rather is associated with the DNA binding complex. These monoclonal antibodies were used to isolate cDNA clones encoding a protein that we have designated GF14. Maize GF14 contains a region resembling a leucine zipper and acidic carboxy and amino termini, of which the latter can form an amphipathic alpha-helix similar to known transcriptional activators such as VP16 and GAL4. Protein gel blot analysis of cell culture extract showed that a single, major protein of approximately 30 kD is recognized by anti-GF14; the protein is also present predominantly in the kernel and root. The deduced amino acid sequence of maize GF14 is more than 80% identical to Arabidopsis GF14 and Oenothera PHP-O, and is more than 60% identical to a class of mammalian brain proteins described as both protein kinase C inhibitors and activators of tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylases. GF14 is found in a variety of monocotyledons and dicotyledons, gymnosperms, and yeast. This suggests a deep evolutionary conservation of a potential regulatory protein associated with a core sequence found in the promoter region of many genes. PMID:1446170

  10. Cytosolic Na+ controls and epithelial Na+ channel via the Go guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Komwatana, P; Dinudom, A; Young, J A; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the fate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-beta-S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the alpha-subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8755611

  11. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  13. Development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Ghali, Joanna; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wang, Ya; Sawyer, Andrew; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Hapudeniya, Dhanushka A; Wang, Yiping; Cao, Qi; Zheng, Guoping; Harris, David C; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as having a major role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing and limiting autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Tregs derive from the thymus and also develop peripherally. In this review, we discuss recent progress in our understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in Treg development and function in protecting against autoimmunity in the periphery, including thymic selection, peripheral induction and the many mechanisms of Treg suppression. Specifically in kidney disease, Tregs have been shown to play a role in limiting injury and may potentially have a therapeutic role.

  14. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  15. Myelin basic protein gene transcription. Identification of proximal and distal cis-acting regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Devine-Beach, K; Lashgari, M S; Khalili, K

    1990-08-15

    Myelin basic proteins (MBPs) represent a major component of the myelin membrane which are exclusively expressed by glial cells in the nervous system. The cell type-specific expression of MBP is controlled preferentially at the level of RNA synthesis. To investigate the mechanisms by which the MBP gene is regulated, we analyzed transcriptional regulation of this gene in glial and non-glial cells. We have demonstrated that the 320 base pairs upstream of the MBP transcriptional start site contain regulatory elements that preferentially stimulate transcription of MBPs in glial cells. Using a test vector containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter placed upstream of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, we localized three major promoter elements within the 5'-upstream sequence. These elements, designated MB1, MB4, and MB7, spanning proximal (-14 to -50) and distal (-130 to -169 and -249 to -288) positions with respect to the RNA initiation site, activated SV40 promoter transcription more than 40-fold in glial cells. The promoter distal elements, MB4 and MB7, enhanced SV40 promoter activity 2- and 8-fold, respectively, in L cells. Using the gel mobility shift assay, we have demonstrated that the MBP activators (MB1, MB4, and MB7) interact with multiple proteins derived from glial and L cell extract and result in the formation of several complexes. Comparison of band intensity of these complexes implies that these cells contain both unique and ubiquitous DNA binding proteins that recognize the DNA sequences within these activators. These studies suggest that the MBP promoter consists of several regulatory sequences in which the proximal element, MB1, and one of the distal elements, MB4, are selectively more active in glial cells than in L cells. Thus, these novel regulatory elements, in concert with other sequences, appear to stimulate MBP promoter transcription in glial cells.

  16. Tim-3 pathway controls regulatory and effector T cell balance during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Jonathan P; Wang, Jia M; Zhang, Ying; Ji, Xiao J; Ma, Cheng J; Wu, Xiao Y; Jia, Zhan S; Wang, Ke S; Yao, Zhi Q

    2012-07-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is remarkable at disrupting human immunity to establish chronic infection. Upregulation of inhibitory signaling pathways (such as T cell Ig and mucin domain protein-3 [Tim-3]) and accumulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) play pivotal roles in suppressing antiviral effector T cell (Teff) responses that are essential for viral clearance. Although the Tim-3 pathway has been shown to negatively regulate Teffs, its role in regulating Foxp3(+) Tregs is poorly explored. In this study, we investigated whether and how the Tim-3 pathway alters Foxp3(+) Treg development and function in patients with chronic HCV infection. We found that Tim-3 was upregulated, not only on IL-2-producing CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) Teffs, but also on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs, which accumulate in the peripheral blood of chronically HCV-infected individuals when compared with healthy subjects. Tim-3 expression on Foxp3(+) Tregs positively correlated with expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 on Tregs, but it was inversely associated with proliferation of IL-2-producing Teffs. Moreover, Foxp3(+) Tregs were found to be more resistant to, and Foxp3(-) Teffs more sensitive to, TCR activation-induced cell apoptosis, which was reversible by blocking Tim-3 signaling. Consistent with its role in T cell proliferation and apoptosis, blockade of Tim-3 on CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells promoted expansion of Teffs more substantially than Tregs through improving STAT-5 signaling, thus correcting the imbalance of Foxp3(+) Tregs/Foxp3(-) Teffs that was induced by HCV infection. Taken together, the Tim-3 pathway appears to control Treg and Teff balance through altering cell proliferation and apoptosis during HCV infection.

  17. Individual Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 Thiol Residues Are Not Critical for Its Activation Following Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo. PMID:22817838

  18. Individual interferon regulatory factor-3 thiol residues are not critical for its activation following virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo.

  19. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  20. A large family of anti-activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Yan, Michael B; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H; Kendall, Melissa M; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P

    2016-07-01

    AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down-regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR-activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC-like member AggR. ANR-AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR-DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α-helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners.

  1. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 gene in Murrah bulls

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Varsha; Patel, Brijesh; Umar, Farhat Paul; Ajithakumar, H. M.; Gurjar, Suraj K.; Gupta, I. D.; Verma, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted with the objective to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 (PPP1R11) gene in Murrah bulls. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction method from the frozen semen samples of 65 Murrah bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The quality and concentration of DNA was checked by spectrophotometer reading and agarose gel electrophoresis. The target region of PPP1R11 gene was amplified using four sets of primer designed based on Bos taurus reference sequence. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using Clustal Omega for identification of SNPs. Animals were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using EcoNI restriction enzyme. Results: The sequences in the NCBI accession number NW_005785016.1 for Bubalus bubalis were compared and aligned with the edited sequences of Murrah bulls with Clustal Omega software. A total of 10 SNPs were found, out of which 1 at 5’UTR, 3 at intron 1, and 6 at intron 2 region. PCR-RFLP using restriction enzyme EcoNI revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study. Conclusion: A total of 10 SNPs were found. PCR-RFLP revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study, due to which association analysis with conception rate was not feasible. PMID:28344410

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 regulatory protein ICP22 and a cellular protein which shares antigenic determinants with ICP22.

    PubMed Central

    Blaho, J A; Zong, C S; Mortimer, K A

    1997-01-01

    At least eight herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and five HSV-2 proteins were tyrosine phosphorylated in infected cells. The first viral tyrosine phosphoprotein identified was the HSV-1 regulatory protein ICP22. Also, two novel phosphotyrosine proteins were bound by anti-ICP22 antibodies. H(R22) is a cellular protein, while the F(R10) protein is observed only in HSV-1-infected cells. PMID:9371655

  3. Exacerbated experimental arthritis in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficiency: modulatory role of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Gerben; Carter, Natalie A; Recher, Mike; Malinova, Dessislava; Adriani, Marsilio; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Burns, Siobhan O; Mauri, Claudia; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    Patients deficient in the cytoskeletal regulator Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) are predisposed to varied autoimmunity, suggesting it has an important controlling role in participating cells. IL-10-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells are emerging as important mediators of immunosuppressive activity. In experimental, antigen-induced arthritis WASp-deficient (WASp knockout [WAS KO]) mice developed exacerbated disease associated with decreased Breg cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells, but increased Th17 cells in knee-draining LNs. Arthritic WAS KO mice showed increased serum levels of B-cell-activating factor, while their B cells were unresponsive in terms of B-cell-activating factor induced survival and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of WT Breg cells ameliorated arthritis in WAS KO recipients and restored a normal balance of Treg and Th17 cells. Mice with B-cell-restricted WASp deficiency, however, did not develop exacerbated arthritis, despite exhibiting reduced Breg- and Treg-cell numbers during active disease, and Th17 cells were not increased over equivalent WT levels. These findings support a contributory role for defective Breg cells in the development of WAS-related autoimmunity, but demonstrate that functional competence in other regulatory populations can be compensatory. A properly regulated cytoskeleton is therefore important for normal Breg-cell activity and complementation of defects in this lineage is likely to have important therapeutic benefits. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events.

  5. Regulatory-auxiliary subunits of CLC chloride channel-transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Gradogna, Antonella; Zanardi, Ilaria; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-09-15

    The CLC family of chloride channels and transporters is composed by nine members, but only three of them, ClC-Ka/b, ClC-7 and ClC-2, have been found so far associated with auxiliary subunits. These CLC regulatory subunits are small proteins that present few common characteristics among them, both structurally and functionally, and their effects on the corresponding CLC protein are different. Barttin, a protein with two transmembrane domains, is essential for the membrane localization of ClC-K proteins and their activity in the kidney and inner ear. Ostm1 is a protein with a single transmembrane domain and a highly glycosylated N-terminus. Unlike the other two CLC auxiliary subunits, Ostm1 shows a reciprocal relationship with ClC-7 for their stability. The subcellular localization of Ostm1 depends on ClC-7 and not the other way around. ClC-2 is active on its own, but GlialCAM, a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule with two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, regulates its subcellular localization and activity in glial cells. The common theme for these three proteins is their requirement for a proper homeostasis, since their malfunction leads to distinct diseases. We will review here their properties and their role in normal chloride physiology and the pathological consequences of their improper function.

  6. Influence of gamma subunit prenylation on association of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins with membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Muntz, K H; Sternweis, P C; Gilman, A G; Mumby, S M

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches were taken to address the possible role of gamma-subunit prenylation in dictating the cellular distribution of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. Prenylation of gamma subunits was prevented by site-directed mutagenesis or by inhibiting the synthesis of mevalonate, the precursor of cellular isoprenoids. When beta or gamma subunits were transiently expressed in COS-M6 simian kidney cells (COS) cells, the proteins were found in the membrane fraction by immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence experiments indicated that the proteins were distributed to intracellular structures in addition to plasma membranes. Replacement of Cys68 of gamma with Ser prevented prenylation of the mutant protein and association of the protein with the membrane fraction of COS cells. Immunoblotting results demonstrated that some of the beta subunits were found in the cytoplasm when coexpressed with the nonprenylated mutant gamma subunit. When Neuro 2A cells were treated with compactin to inhibit protein prenylation, a fraction of endogenous beta and gamma was distributed in the cytoplasm. It is concluded that prenylation facilitates association of gamma subunits with membranes, that the cellular location of gamma influences the distribution of beta, and that prenylation is not an absolute requirement for interaction of beta and gamma. Images PMID:1550955

  7. A 3D bioprinting exemplar of the consequences of the regulatory requirements on customized processes.

    PubMed

    Hourd, Paul; Medcalf, Nicholas; Segal, Joel; Williams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Computer-aided 3D printing approaches to the industrial production of customized 3D functional living constructs for restoration of tissue and organ function face significant regulatory challenges. Using the manufacture of a customized, 3D-bioprinted nasal implant as a well-informed but hypothetical exemplar, we examine how these products might be regulated. Existing EU and USA regulatory frameworks do not account for the differences between 3D printing and conventional manufacturing methods or the ability to create individual customized products using mechanized rather than craft approaches. Already subject to extensive regulatory control, issues related to control of the computer-aided design to manufacture process and the associated software system chain present additional scientific and regulatory challenges for manufacturers of these complex 3D-bioprinted advanced combination products.

  8. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Betty L; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M

    2015-12-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition.

  9. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  10. The role of complement regulatory proteins (CD55 and CD59) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemocytopenias.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Llorente, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells are provided with surface-bound complement regulatory proteins that protect them from uncontrolled complement-mediated lysis. Two of these regulators in humans, CD55 and CD59, are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored, type I cell surface proteins, which inhibit formation of the C3 convertases and prevent the terminal polymerization of the membrane attack complex, respectively. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a genetic disorder due to the impaired conformation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor, that results in the deficient expression of CD55 and CD50 which leads to excessive destruction of red cells and leukocytes. We have studied the expression of these two molecules in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus showing lymphopenia, and found that all three types of cytopenias are associated to deficient expression of CD55 and CD59 on the involved hematopoietic lineage. These are the first descriptions of acquired deficiencies of complement regulatory molecules in human disease, and it seems, from our results, that such deficiencies might play a pathogenic role in the mechanism of cell destruction. Although autoantibodies appeal as the best candidates to cause underexpression of CD55 and CD59, the search for an association to the presence and titers of most frequent self-reactive antibodies has proved non-existent.

  11. Geminivirus C3 Protein: Replication Enhancement and Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Settlage, Sharon B.; See, Renee G.; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Most dicot-infecting geminiviruses encode a replication enhancer protein (C3, AL3, or REn) that is required for optimal replication of their small, single-stranded DNA genomes. C3 interacts with C1, the essential viral replication protein that initiates rolling circle replication. C3 also homo-oligomerizes and interacts with at least two host-encoded proteins, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the retinoblastoma-related protein (pRBR). It has been proposed that protein interactions contribute to C3 function. Using the C3 protein of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, we examined the impact of mutations to amino acids that are conserved across the C3 protein family on replication enhancement and protein interactions. Surprisingly, many of the mutations did not affect replication enhancement activity of C3 in tobacco protoplasts. Other mutations either enhanced or were detrimental to C3 replication activity. Analysis of mutated proteins in yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that mutations that inactivate C3 replication enhancement activity also reduce or inactivate C3 oligomerization and interaction with C1 and PCNA. In contrast, mutated C3 proteins impaired for pRBR binding are fully functional in replication assays. Hydrophobic residues in the middle of the C3 protein were implicated in C3 interaction with itself, C1, and PCNA, while polar resides at both the N and C termini of the protein are important for C3-pRBR interaction. These experiments established the importance of C3-C3, C3-C1, and C3-PCNA interactions in geminivirus replication. While C3-pRBR interaction is not required for viral replication in cycling cells, it may play a role during infection of differentiated cells in intact plants. PMID:16014949

  12. Cross regulation between Candida albicans catalytic and regulatory subunits of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Romina; Kronberg, Florencia; Biondi, Ricardo M; Hernández, Alejandra I; Passeron, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In the pathogen Candida albicans protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit is encoded by two genes TPK1 and TPK2 and the regulatory subunit by one gene, BCY1. PKA mediates several cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the yeast to hyphae transition, a key factor for C. albicans virulence. The catalytic isoforms Tpk1p and Tpk2p share redundant functions in vegetative growth and hyphal development, though they differentially regulate glycogen metabolism, the stress response pathway and pseudohyphal formation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae it was earlier reported that BCY1 overexpression not only increased the amount of TPK3 mRNA but also its catalytic activity. In C. albicans a significant decrease in Bcy1p expression levels was already observed in tpk2Δ null strains. In this work we showed that the upregulation in Bcy1p expression was observed in a set of strains having a TPK1 or TPK2 allele reintegrated in its own locus, as well as in strains expressing the TPKs under the control of the constitutive ACT1 promoter. To confirm the cross regulation event between Bcy1p and Tpkp expression we generated a mutant strain with the lowest PKA activity carrying one TPK1 and a unique BCY1 allele with the aim to obtain two derived strains in which BCY1 or TPK1 were placed under their own promoters inserted in the RPS10 neutral locus. We found that placing one copy of BCY1 upregulated the levels of Tpk1p and its catalytic activity; while TPK1 insertion led to an increase in BCY1 mRNA, Bcy1p and in a high cAMP binding activity. Our results suggest that C. albicans cells were able to compensate for the increased levels of either Tpk1p or Tpk2p subunits with a corresponding elevation of Bcy1 protein levels and vice versa, implying a tightly regulated mechanism to balance holoenzyme formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus BGLF4 Kinase Suppresses the Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Signaling Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiin-Tarng; Doong, Shin-Lian; Teng, Shu-Chun; Lee, Chung-Pei; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2009-01-01

    The BGLF4 protein kinase of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the conserved family of herpesvirus protein kinases which, to some extent, have a function similar to that of the cellular cyclin-dependent kinase in regulating multiple cellular and viral substrates. In a yeast two-hybrid screening assay, a splicing variant of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) was found to interact with the BGLF4 protein. This interaction was defined further by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected cells and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down in vitro. Using reporter assays, we show that BGLF4 effectively suppresses the activities of the poly(I:C)-stimulated IFN-β promoter and IRF3-responsive element. Moreover, BGLF4 represses the poly(I:C)-stimulated expression of endogenous IFN-β mRNA and the phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr701. In searching for a possible mechanism, BGLF4 was shown not to affect the dimerization, nuclear translocation, or CBP recruitment of IRF3 upon poly(I:C) treatment. Notably, BGLF4 reduces the amount of active IRF3 recruited to the IRF3-responsive element containing the IFN-β promoter region in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. BGLF4 phosphorylates GST-IRF3 in vitro, but Ser339-Pro340 phosphorylation-dependent, Pin1-mediated downregulation is not responsible for the repression. Most importantly, we found that three proline-dependent phosphorylation sites at Ser123, Ser173, and Thr180, which cluster in a region between the DNA binding and IRF association domains of IRF3, contribute additively to the BGLF4-mediated repression of IRF3(5D) transactivation activity. IRF3 signaling is activated in reactivated EBV-positive NA cells, and the knockdown of BGLF4 further stimulates IRF3-responsive reporter activity. The data presented here thus suggest a novel mechanism by which herpesviral protein kinases suppress host innate immune responses and facilitate virus replication. PMID:19052084

  14. Downregulation of key regulatory proteins in androgen dependent prostate tumor cells by oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Saraf, Pooja; Meseke, Tyler; Miller, Cathy L

    2015-11-01

    As prostate tumor cell growth depends on hormones, androgen ablation is an effective therapy for prostate cancer (PCa). However, progression of PCa cells to androgen independent growth (castrate resistant prostate cancer, CRPC) results in relapse and mortality. Hypoxia, a microenvironment of low oxygen that modifies the activity of PCa regulatory proteins including the androgen receptor (AR), plays a critical role in progression to CRPC. Therapies targeting hypoxia and the AR may lengthen the time to CRPC progression thereby increasing survival time of PCa patients. Mammalian Orthoreovirus (MRV) has shown promise for the treatment of prostate tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that MRV infection induces downregulation of proteins implicated in CRPC progression, interferes with hypoxia-induced AR activity, and induces apoptosis in androgen dependent cells. This suggests MRV possesses traits that could be exploited to create novel therapies for the inhibition of progression to CRPC.

  15. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  16. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; ...

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions thatmore » mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.« less

  17. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; Brooks, Aaron N.; Beer, Karlyn D.; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Reiss, David J.; Facciotti, Marc T.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions that mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.

  18. Regulatory mechanisms of exoribonuclease PNPase and regulatory small RNA on T3SS of dickeya dadantii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is an essential virulence factor for many bacterial pathogens. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is one of the major exoribonucleases in bacteria and plays important roles in mRNA degradation, tRNA processing, and small RNA (sRNA) turnover. In this study, we ...

  19. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  20. Mitochondrial fusion and ERK activity regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein localization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR.

  1. Identification of a Novel Protein Interaction Motif in the Regulatory Subunit of Casein Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jennifer Yinuo; Shire, Kathy; Landry, Cameron; Gish, Gerald D.; Pawson, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) regulates multiple cellular processes and can promote oncogenesis. Interactions with the CK2β regulatory subunit of the enzyme target its catalytic subunit (CK2α or CK2α′) to specific substrates; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which these interactions occur. We previously showed that by binding CK2β, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 protein recruits CK2 to promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, where increased CK2-mediated phosphorylation of PML proteins triggers their degradation. Here we have identified a KSSR motif near the dimerization interface of CK2β as forming part of a protein interaction pocket that mediates interaction with EBNA1. We show that the EBNA1-CK2β interaction is primed by phosphorylation of EBNA1 on S393 (within a polyserine region). This phosphoserine is critical for EBNA1-induced PML degradation but does not affect EBNA1 functions in EBV replication or segregation. Using comparative proteomics of wild-type (WT) and KSSR mutant CK2β, we identified an uncharacterized cellular protein, C18orf25/ARKL1, that also binds CK2β through the KSSR motif and show that this involves a polyserine sequence resembling the CK2β binding sequence in EBNA1. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of CK2 interaction used by viral and cellular proteins. PMID:24216761

  2. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guiqin; Shi, Fengying; Liu, Aiqiao; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57) would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator), member 5 (SLC25A5) and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO) would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF). In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation. PMID:28006025

  3. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangqi; Sun, Congjiao; Wu, Guiqin; Shi, Fengying; Liu, Aiqiao; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57) would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator), member 5 (SLC25A5) and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO) would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF). In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  4. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlin; Zhao, Guifang; Gao, Xiaocai

    2013-02-20

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. The positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Li, Rongtian; Liu, Xin; Sun, Mingzhe; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress.

  6. The Positive Regulatory Roles of the TIFY10 Proteins in Plant Responses to Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Li, Rongtian; Liu, Xin; Sun, Mingzhe; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. PMID:25375909

  7. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23425632

  8. FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells in chronic kidney disease: molecular pathways and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    CD4+/FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and Tregs deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmunity in both mice and humans. The forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression is required for both survival of Tregs precursors as well as their function. This suggests that Tregs may use multiple mechanisms to limit autoimmunity and may reflect functional heterogeneity among Tregs subsets that localize to distinct tissue environments. Both cell contact- and cytokine-based immunosuppressive mechanisms would require that Tregs be in close proximity to their targets. The fundamental regulatory activity that can be consistently demonstrated by Tregs in vivo and in vitro has stimulated great interest in developing novel strategies for treating ongoing inflammatory conditions. Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) are known to display a cellular immune dysfunction. Uremic solutes that accumulate during ESKD may be involved in these processes. In these patients, oxidative stress induced by oxLDL may increase Tregs sensitivity to Fas-mediated apoptosis in part as a consequence of 26S proteasome activation. The 26S proteasome, an ATP-dependent multisubunit protease complex found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of all eukaryotic cells, constitutes the central proteolytic machinery of the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Considering the effect of uremia and oxLDL, Tregs from patients with ESKD exhibit early cell-cycle arrest and become apoptotic. These phenomena are the consequence of the oxLDL inhibited proteasome proteolytic activity of p27(Kipl) and Bax proteins in Tregs. This may be one mechanistic explanation of the cellular immune dysfunction in patients with ESKD and may have important implications in clinics, since this response could contribute to the micro-inflammation and atherogenesis encountered in this population.

  9. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  10. t-Darpp stimulates protein kinase A activity by forming a complex with its RI regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Theile, Dirk; Geng, Shuhui; Denny, Erin C; Momand, Jamil; Kane, Susan E

    2017-09-01

    t-Darpp is the truncated form of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (Darpp-32) and has been demonstrated to confer resistance to trastuzumab, a Her2-targeted anticancer agent, via sustained signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). The mechanism of t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation is poorly understood. In the PKA holoenzyme, when the catalytic subunits are bound to regulatory subunits RI or RII, kinase activity is inhibited. We investigated PKA activity and holoenzyme composition in cell lines overexpressing t-Darpp (SK.tDp) or a T39A phosphorylation mutant (SK.tDp(T39A)), as well as an empty vector control cell line (SK.empty). We also evaluated protein-protein interactions between t-Darpp and PKA catalytic (PKAc) or regulatory subunits RI and RII in those cell lines. SK.tDp cells had elevated PKA activity and showed diminished association of RI with PKAc, whereas SK.tDp(T39A) cells did not have these properties. Moreover, wild type t-Darpp associates with RI. Concurrent expression of Darpp-32 reversed t-Darrp's effects on PKA holoenzyme state, consistent with earlier observations that Darpp-32 reverses t-Darpp's activation of PKA. Together, t-Darpp phosphorylation at T39 seems to be crucial for t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation and this activation appears to occur through an association with RI and sequestering of RI away from PKAc. The t-Darpp-RI interaction could be a druggable target to reduce PKA activity in drug-resistant cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  12. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  13. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  14. Regulation of starch accumulation by granule-associated plant 14-3-3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sehnke, Paul C.; Chung, Hwa-Jee; Wu, Ke; Ferl, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    In higher plants the production of starch is orchestrated by chloroplast-localized biosynthetic enzymes, namely starch synthases, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and starch branching and debranching enzymes. Diurnal regulation of these enzymes, as well as starch-degrading enzymes, influences both the levels and composition of starch, and is dependent in some instances upon phosphorylation-linked regulation. The phosphoserine/threonine-binding 14-3-3 proteins participate in environmentally responsive phosphorylation-related regulatory functions in plants, and as such are potentially involved in starch regulation. We report here that reduction of the ɛ subgroup of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins by antisense technology resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase in leaf starch accumulation. Dark-governed starch breakdown was unaffected in these “antisense plants,” indicating an unaltered starch-degradation pathway and suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in regulation of starch synthesis. Absorption spectra and gelatinization properties indicate that the starch from the antisense plants has an altered branched glucan composition. Biochemical characterization of protease-treated starch granules from both Arabidopsis leaves and maize endosperm showed that 14-3-3 proteins are internal intrinsic granule proteins. These data suggest a direct role for 14-3-3 proteins in starch accumulation. The starch synthase III family is a possible target for 14-3-3 protein regulation because, uniquely among plastid-localized starch metabolic enzymes, all members of the family contain the conserved 14-3-3 protein phosphoserine/threonine-binding consensus motif. This possibility is strengthened by immunocapture using antibodies to DU1, a maize starch synthase III family member, and direct interaction with biotinylated 14-3-3 protein, both of which demonstrated an association between 14-3-3 proteins and DU1 or DU1-like proteins. PMID:11149942

  15. Chromatin reader L(3)mbt requires the Myb-MuvB/DREAM transcriptional regulatory complex for chromosomal recruitment.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Daniel P; Georlette, Daphne; Antoszewski, Lisa; Botchan, Michael R

    2014-10-07

    Lethal malignant brain tumors (lmbt) result from the loss of the conserved transcriptional repressor l(3)mbt, in Drosophila melanogaster. Similar mutations in the human homolog L3MBTL1 correlate with some cancers. The protein's C-terminal MBT repeats bind mono and dimethylated histones in vitro, which could influence recruitment of L3MBTL1 to its target sites. The L(3)mbt chromatin targeting mechanism, however, is controversial and several studies suggest insufficiency or a minor role for histone methylation in determining the site specificity for recruitment. We report that L(3)mbt colocalizes with core members of the Myb-MuvB/DREAM (MMB/DREAM) transcriptional regulatory complex genome-wide, and that L(3)mbt-mediated repression requires this complex in salivary glands and larval brains. Loss of l(3)mbt or of MMB components through mutation cause similar spurious expression of genes, including the transposon regulatory gene piwi, in terminally differentiated cells. The DNA-binding MMB core component Mip120 (Lin54) is required for L(3)mbt recruitment to chromosomes, whereas Mip130 (Lin9) (an MMB core protein) and E2f2 (an MMB transcriptional repressor) are not, but are essential for repression. Cytolocalization experiments suggest the presence of site-specific differential composition of MMB in polytene chromosomes where some loci were bound by a Myb-containing or alternatively, an E2f2 and L(3)mbt form of the complex.

  16. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  17. Quercetin and vitamin E attenuate Bonny Light crude oil-induced alterations in testicular apoptosis, stress proteins and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ebokaiwe, Azubuike P; Mathur, Premendu P; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown the reproductive effects of Bonny Light crude oil (BLCO) via the mechanism of oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. We investigated the protective role of quercetin and vitamin E on BLCO-induced testicular apoptosis. Experimental rats were divided into four groups of four each. Animals were orally administered 2 ml/kg corn oil (control: group 1), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 10 mg/kg quercetin (group 2), BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight + 50 mg/kg vitamin E (group 3) and BLCO-800 mg/kg body weight only (group 4) for 7 d. Protein levels of caspase 3, FasL, NF-kB, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and stress response proteins were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunofluorescence staining was used to quantify the expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB. Apoptosis was quantified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Administration of BLCO resulted in a significant increase in the levels of stress response proteins and apoptosis-related proteins by 50% and above after 7 d following BLCO exposure and a concomitant increase in expression of caspase 3, FasL and NF-kB expression by immunofluorescence staining. Apoptosis showed a significant increase in TUNEL positive cells. Co-administration with quercetin or vitamin E reversed BLCO-induced apoptosis and levels of stress protein, relative to control. These findings suggest that quercetin and vitamin E may confer protection against BLCO-induced testicular oxidative stress-related apoptosis.

  18. Protein turnover in 3T3 cells transformed with the oncogene c-H-ras1.

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, J M; James, G

    1992-01-01

    We have examined protein turnover, growth, DNA synthesis and proliferation in three independent clones of 3T3-NR6 cells transformed with the oncogene c-H-ras1. We find that, firstly, the half-maximum concentration of serum and insulin regulating protein turnover in ras-transformed cells is significantly reduced from 0.5 to 0.3% for serum and from 4 nM to 0.5 nM for insulin, and, secondly, ras-transformed cells consistently have lower rates of protein degradation. The catabolic effect of conditioned medium or serum withdrawal is attenuated in transformed lines by maintaining lower basal rates of protein breakdown and higher basal rates of DNA and protein synthesis. Serum stimulation of growth in transformed cells is achieved in the short term by lower rates of protein breakdown rather than higher rates of protein synthesis: rates of protein synthesis become significantly higher 24 h after serum stimulation. Therefore transformed cells have higher rates of proliferation and grow to higher densities, but display characteristics common to normal cells because rates of protein synthesis decrease and protein degradation increase as a function of cell density. We conclude that higher basal rates of protein synthesis and growth with retention of the normal proliferative response to serum result from the pleiotropic nature of ras transformation, whereas lower rates of protein degradation and increased sensitivity to serum and insulin imply a direct regulatory role for ras. PMID:1575687

  19. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  20. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  1. Optimal regulatory strategies for metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli depending on protein costs

    PubMed Central

    Wessely, Frank; Bartl, Martin; Guthke, Reinhard; Li, Pu; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    While previous studies have shed light on the link between the structure of metabolism and its transcriptional regulation, the extent to which transcriptional regulation controls metabolism has not yet been fully explored. In this work, we address this problem by integrating a large number of experimental data sets with a model of the metabolism of Escherichia coli. Using a combination of computational tools including the concept of elementary flux patterns, methods from network inference and dynamic optimization, we find that transcriptional regulation of pathways reflects the protein investment into these pathways. While pathways that are associated to a high protein cost are controlled by fine-tuned transcriptional programs, pathways that only require a small protein cost are transcriptionally controlled in a few key reactions. As a reason for the occurrence of these different regulatory strategies, we identify an evolutionary trade-off between the conflicting requirements to reduce protein investment and the requirement to be able to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. PMID:21772263

  2. KH-type splicing regulatory protein is a new component of Chromatoid body.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Guishuan; Liu, Lin; Liang, Xiaolin; Lin, Yu; Lin, Yi-Yu; Chou, Chu-Fang; Liu, Mo-Fang; Huang, Hefeng; Sun, Fei

    2017-09-04

    The chromatoid body (CB) is a specific cloud-like structure in the cytoplasm of haploid spermatids. Recent findings indicate that CB is identified as a male germ cell specific RNA storage and processing center, but its function has remained elusive for decades. In somatic cells, KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) is involved in regulating gene expression and maturation of select microRNAs (miRNAs). However, the function of KSRP in spermatogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we showed that KSRP partly localizes in CB, as a component of CB. KSRP interacts with proteins (mouse VASA homolog (MVH), polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (PABP1), and polyadenylate-binding protein 2 (PABP2)), mRNAs (Tnp2 and Odf1) and microRNAs (microRNA-182) in mouse CB. Moreover, KSRP may regulate the integrity of CB via DDX5-miRNA-182 pathway. In addition, we found abnormal expressions of CB component in testes of Ksrp knockout mice and of patients with hypospermatogenesis. Thus, our results provide mechanistic insight into the role of KSRP in spermatogenesis.

  3. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  4. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-06-03

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity.

  5. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  6. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Tang, Elizabeth I; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; John, Constance M; Turek, Paul J; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB)? Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5-20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4-200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by mislocalization of actin filament barbed end capping and bundling protein Eps8, and branched actin polymerization protein Arp3. Besides impeding actin dynamics

  7. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  8. Regulatory Advances in 11 Sub-Saharan Countries in Year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC).

    PubMed

    Dynes, Michelle; Tison, Laura; Johnson, Carla; Verani, Andre; Zuber, Alexandra; Riley, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa carries the greatest burden of the HIV pandemic. Enhancing the supply and use of human resources through policy and regulatory reform is a key action needed to improve the quality of HIV services in this region. In year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC), a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief initiative, 11 country teams of nursing and midwifery leaders ("Quads") received small grants to carry out regulatory improvement projects. Four countries advanced a full stage on the Regulatory Function Framework (RFF), a staged capability maturity model used to evaluate progress in key regulatory functions. While the remaining countries did not advance a full stage on the RFF, important gains were noted. The year-3 evaluation highlighted limitations of the ARC evaluation strategy to capture nuanced progress and provided insight into how the RFF might be adapted for future use.

  9. Regulatory Advances in 11 Sub-Saharan Countries in Year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    Dynes, Michelle; Tison, Laura; Johnson, Carla; Verani, Andre; Zuber, Alexandra; Riley, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa carries the greatest burden of the HIV pandemic. Enhancing the supply and use of human resources through policy and regulatory reform is a key action needed to improve the quality of HIV services in this region. In year 3 of the African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives (ARC), a President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief initiative, 11 country teams of nursing and midwifery leaders (“Quads”) received small grants to carry out regulatory improvement projects. Four countries advanced a full stage on the Regulatory Function Framework (RFF), a staged capability maturity model used to evaluate progress in key regulatory functions. While the remaining countries did not advance a full stage on the RFF, important gains were noted. The year-3 evaluation highlighted limitations of the ARC evaluation strategy to capture nuanced progress and provided insight into how the RFF might be adapted for future use. PMID:27086189

  10. Molecular mechanism underlying the regulatory specificity of a Drosophila homeodomain protein that specifies myoblast identity

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Shokri, Leila; Jaeger, Savina A.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Singhania, Aditi; Berger, Michael F.; Zhou, Bo; Bulyk, Martha L.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    A subfamily of Drosophila homeodomain (HD) transcription factors (TFs) controls the identities of individual muscle founder cells (FCs). However, the molecular mechanisms by which these TFs generate unique FC genetic programs remain unknown. To investigate this problem, we first applied genome-wide mRNA expression profiling to identify genes that are activated or repressed by the muscle HD TFs Slouch (Slou) and Muscle segment homeobox (Msh). Next, we used protein-binding microarrays to define the sequences that are bound by Slou, Msh and other HD TFs that have mesodermal expression. These studies revealed that a large class of HDs, including Slou and Msh, predominantly recognize TAAT core sequences but that each HD also binds to unique sites that deviate from this canonical motif. To understand better the regulatory specificity of an individual FC identity HD, we evaluated the functions of atypical binding sites that are preferentially bound by Slou relative to other HDs within muscle enhancers that are either activated or repressed by this TF. These studies showed that Slou regulates the activities of particular myoblast enhancers through Slou-preferred sequences, whereas swapping these sequences for sites that are capable of binding to multiple HD family members does not support the normal regulatory functions of Slou. Moreover, atypical Slou-binding sites are overrepresented in putative enhancers associated with additional Slou-responsive FC genes. Collectively, these studies provide new insights into the roles of individual HD TFs in determining cellular identity, and suggest that the diversity of HD binding preferences can confer regulatory specificity. PMID:22296846

  11. New polymorphisms for the BoLA-DRB3 upstream regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Ripoli, M V; Villegas-Castagnasso, E E; Peral-Garcia, P; Giovambattista, G

    2005-08-01

    Two new alleles, named BoLA-DRB3-P*06 and BoLA-DRB3-P*07, have been identified for the upstream regulatory region of the BoLA-DRB3 gene. The 228-bp nucleotide sequences of the promoter comprising the W, X, Y, CAAT and TATA regulatory boxes were analysed. The BoLA-DRB3-P*06 exhibits one insertion between the W and X boxes, and one transition between the X and Y boxes. On the other hand, the BoLA-DRB3-P*07 showed one insertion in the X box.

  12. Copper and the ACE1 Regulatory Protein Reversibly Induce Yeast Metallothionein Gene Transcription in a Mouse Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski Culotta, Valeria; Hsu, Tsao; Hu, Stella; Furst, Peter; Hamer, Dean

    1989-11-01

    We describe a cell-free system in which the transcription of the yeast metallothionein gene is inducible by the addition of metal ions plus a specific regulatory protein. Efficient transcription requires the complete yeast ACE1 metalloregulatory protein, including both its DNA-binding and transactivation domains; a mouse nuclear extract providing RNA polymerase and general transcription factors; a template containing the ACE1 binding site; and Cu(I). Because the binding of ACE1 to DNA is dependent on Cu, it is possible to inhibit transcription by the use of Cu-complexing agents such as CN-. We have used this specific inhibition to show that the ACE1 regulatory protein is required for the maintenance as well as the formation of a functional preinitiation complex. The ability to reversibly induce yeast metallothionein gene transcription in vitro provides a powerful system for determining the molecular mechanism of a simple eukaryotic regulatory circuit.

  13. Distribution of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A and A kinase anchor proteins (AKAP 95, 150) in rat pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Koch, M; Korf, H-W

    2002-12-01

    The rat pineal organ is an established model to study signal transduction cascades that are activated by norepinephrine (NE) and cause increases in cAMP levels and stimulation of protein kinase A (PKA). PKA type II catalyzes the phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) which is essential for the transcriptional induction of the arylalkylamine- N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the rate limiting enzyme of melatonin biosynthesis. Moreover, PKA may control protein levels and enzyme activity via two PKA-dependent phosphorylation sites in the AANAT molecule. Despite the functional importance of PKA very little is known about the distribution of its isoenzymes and of A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) that target the PKA to specific membrane areas and organelles by binding to the regulatory (R) subunits of PKA. We have addressed this problem by demonstrating the R subunits alpha and beta of PKA type I and II and two AKAPs (150 and 95) in NE-stimulated and untreated rat pinealocytes by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. The immunoreactions (IR) of all four R subunits were confined to granules evenly distributed in the pinealocyte cytoplasm. Immunoreactions of RIIalpha and RIIbeta were stronger than those of RIalpha and RIbeta. AKAP 150-IR was concentrated at the cell periphery; AKAP 95-IR was restricted to the nucleus. Amount and subcellular distribution of the immunoreactions of all proteins investigated did not change upon NE stimulation. A substantial colocalization was observed between RII-subunits and AKAP 150-IR, suggesting that, in rat pinealocytes, AKAP 150 primarily anchors the R subunits of PKA II.

  14. E6-Associated Protein Dependent Estrogen Receptor Regulation of Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit R2A Expression in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Jean-Pierre; Zeidan, Youssef H; Zafar, Nawal; El Hokayem, Jimmy

    2017-02-18

    E6ap is a known transcriptional coregulator for estrogen receptor alpha (Er, Erα) in the presence of estrogen. Protein kinase A (PKA) contains two regulatory subunits derived from four genes. Recent evidence demonstrates that PKA regulates E6ap activity. Data generated in our lab indicated estrogen dependent regulation of Pkar2a levels. Our project sets to investigate a possible feedback mechanism constituting of Erα and E6ap transcriptional regulation of Pkar2a expression. Western blot evaluated protein regulation correlations with E2 in mouse neuroblastoma lines. Bioinformatics detected estrogen response element (ERE) sequences. quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the western blot results. ERE oligonucleotides were synthesized. Reporter gene transcriptional activity was evaluated via Luciferase assay output. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) assessed direct binding between Erα relevant sequences. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Re-ChIP were conducted in quantifying protein complex recruitment levels. Pkar2a protein expression directly correlated with E2, and four putative ERE sequences were identified. Pkar2a mRNA expression reverted to baseline with either E2 or E6ap absent. In the presence of E2, ERE-1 and ERE-4 possessed Luciferase reporter gene transcriptional capabilities. ERE-1 portrayed band shifts, representing direct binding to Erα with E2 supplementation. With E2, ERE-1 significantly enhanced Erα and E6ap recruitment levels to the Pkar2a promoter. Pkar2a is directly regulated by Erα and E6ap in the presence of estrogen stimulus. This work indicates a feedback mechanism in the interplay between PKA and E6ap, which may prove crucial for the role of both proteins in cancers and neurogenetic diseases like Angelman syndrome.

  15. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  16. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is a Principal Regulator of Anaerobic Gene Expression in Fission Yeast†

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Bridget L.; Stewart, Emerson V.; Burg, John S.; Hughes, Adam L.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Fission yeast sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), called Sre1p, functions in an oxygen-sensing pathway to allow adaptation to fluctuating oxygen concentrations. The Sre1p-Scp1p complex responds to oxygen-dependent sterol synthesis as an indirect measure of oxygen availability. To examine the role of Sre1p in anaerobic gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we performed transcriptional profiling experiments after a shift to anaerobic conditions for 1.5 h. Of the 4,940 genes analyzed, expression levels of 521 (10.5%) and 686 (13.9%) genes were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, under anaerobic conditions. Sre1p controlled 68% of genes induced ≥2-fold. Oxygen-requiring biosynthetic pathways for ergosterol, heme, sphingolipid, and ubiquinone were primary targets of Sre1p. Induction of glycolytic genes and repression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation genes largely did not require Sre1p. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated that Sre1p acts directly at target gene promoters and stimulates its own transcription under anaerobic conditions. sre1+ promoter analysis identified two DNA elements that are both necessary and sufficient for oxygen-dependent, Sre1p-dependent transcription. Interestingly, these elements are homologous to sterol regulatory elements bound by mammalian SREBP, highlighting the evolutionary conservation between Sre1p and SREBP. We conclude that Sre1p is a principal activator of anaerobic gene expression, upregulating genes required for nonrespiratory oxygen consumption. PMID:16537923

  17. The PI3K p110δ Regulates Expression of CD38 on Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Daniel T.; Wilson, Marcus D.; Rowan, Wendy C.; Soond, Dalya R.; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K pathway has emerged as a key regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) development and homeostasis and is required for full Treg-mediated suppression. To identify new genes involved in PI3K-dependent suppression, we compared the transcriptome of WT and p110δD910A Tregs. Among the genes that were differentially expressed was the gene for the transmembrane cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase CD38. Here we show that CD38 is expressed mainly by a subset of Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ T cells originating in the thymus and on Tregs in the spleen. CD38high WT Tregs showed superior suppressive activity to CD38low Tregs, which failed to upregulate CD73, a surface protein which is important for suppression. However, Tregs from heterozygous CD38+/− mice were unimpaired despite lower levels of CD38 expression. Therefore, CD38 can be used as a marker for Tregs with high suppressive activity and the impaired Treg function in p110δD910A mice can in part be explained by the failure of CD38high cells to develop. PMID:21390257

  18. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rashaun S.; Swatek, Kirby N.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants. PMID:27242818

  19. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry.

  20. An account of fungal 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravinder

    2017-02-24

    14-3-3s are a group of relatively low molecular weight, acidic, dimeric, protein(s) conserved from single-celled yeast to multicellular vertebrates including humans. Despite lacking catalytic activity, these proteins have been shown to be involved in multiple cellular processes. Apart from their role in normal cellular physiology, recently these proteins have been implicated in various medical consequences. In this present review, fungal 14-3-3 protein localization, interactions, transcription, regulation, their role in the diverse cellular process including DNA duplication, cell cycle, protein trafficking or secretion, apoptosis, autophagy, cell viability under stress, gene expression, spindle positioning, role in carbon metabolism have been discussed. In the end, I also highlighted various roles of yeasts 14-3-3 proteins in tabular form. Thus this review with primary emphasis on yeast will help in appreciating the significance of 14-3-3 proteins in cell physiology.

  1. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  2. Protein Kinase C-η Controls CTLA-4-Mediated Regulatory T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kok-Fai; Fu, Guo; Zhang, Yaoyang; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Casas, Javier; Canonigo-Balancio, Ann J.; Becart, Stephane; Kim, Gisen; Yates, John R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Saito, Takashi; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Altman, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which maintain immune homeostasis and self-tolerance, form an immunological synapse (IS) with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, signaling events at the Treg IS remain unknown. Here we show that protein kinase C-η (PKC-η) associated with CTLA-4 and was recruited to the Treg IS. PKC-η-deficient Treg cells displayed defective suppressive activity, including suppression of tumor immunity but not autoimmune colitis. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed an association between CTLA-4-PKC-η and the GIT-PIX-PAK complex, an IS-localized focal adhesion complex. Defective activation of this complex in PKC-η-deficient Treg cells was associated with reduced CD86 depletion from APCs by Treg cells. These results reveal a novel CTLA-4-PKC-η signaling axis required for contact-dependent suppression, implicating this pathway as a potential cancer immunotherapy target. PMID:24705298

  3. Interaction of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) with smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2003-06-01

    The interaction of a protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) isolated from Basidiomycetes with smooth muscle myosin components was evaluated by limited digestion, urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis, affinity chromatography and overlay assay using a peptide array. PSK was bound to the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin, but not to the essential light chain. The binding to PSK was definitely observed for unphosphorylated RLC, compared to phosphorylated one. From the amino acid sequence of the RLC, 490 peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane. Overlay assays showed that the PSK-binding on the molecule of RLC were localized in the N- and C-terminal basic regions and these sites were conserved in RLC from the human smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells.

  4. Stochastic modeling and numerical simulation of gene regulatory networks with protein bursting.

    PubMed

    Pájaro, Manuel; Alonso, Antonio A; Otero-Muras, Irene; Vázquez, Carlos

    2017-05-21

    Gene expression is inherently stochastic. Advanced single-cell microscopy techniques together with mathematical models for single gene expression led to important insights in elucidating the sources of intrinsic noise in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In addition to the finite size effects due to low copy numbers, translational bursting is a dominant source of stochasticity in cell scenarios involving few short lived mRNA transcripts with high translational efficiency (as is typically the case for prokaryotes), causing protein synthesis to occur in random bursts. In the context of gene regulation cascades, the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing gene expression has in general no closed form solution, and the accurate stochastic simulation of the dynamics of complex gene regulatory networks is a major computational challenge. The CME associated to a single gene self regulatory motif has been previously approximated by a one dimensional time dependent partial integral differential equation (PIDE). However, to the best of our knowledge, multidimensional versions for such PIDE have not been developed yet. Here we propose a multidimensional PIDE model for regulatory networks involving multiple genes with self and cross regulations (in which genes can be regulated by different transcription factors) derived as the continuous counterpart of a CME with jump process. The model offers a reliable description of systems with translational bursting. In order to provide an efficient numerical solution, we develop a semilagrangian method to discretize the differential part of the PIDE, combined with a composed trapezoidal quadrature formula to approximate the integral term. We apply the model and numerical method to study sustained stochastic oscillations and the development of competence, a particular case of transient differentiation attained by certain bacterial cells under stress conditions. We found that the resulting probability distributions are distinguishable

  5. cAMP-dependent posttranscriptional regulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein by the zinc finger protein ZFP36L1/TIS11b.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haichuan; Cherradi, Nadia; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Jefcoate, Colin

    2009-04-01

    Star is expressed in steroidogenic cells as 3.5- and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR). In mouse MA10 testis and Y-1 adrenal lines, Br-cAMP preferentially stimulates 3.5-kb mRNA. ACTH is similarly selective in primary bovine adrenocortical cells. The 3.5-kb form harbors AU-rich elements (AURE) in the extended 3'-UTR, which enhance turnover. After peak stimulation of 3.5-kb mRNA, degradation is seen. Star mRNA turnover is enhanced by the zinc finger protein ZFP36L1/TIS11b, which binds to UAUUUAUU repeats in the extended 3'-UTR. TIS11b is rapidly stimulated in each cell type in parallel with Star mRNA. Cotransfection of TIS11b selectively decreases cytomegalovirus-promoted Star mRNA and luciferase-Star 3'-UTR reporters harboring the extended 3'-UTR. Direct complex formation was demonstrated between TIS11b and the extended 3'-UTR of the 3.5-kb Star. AURE mutations revealed that TIS11b-mediated destabilization required the first two UAUUUAUU motifs. HuR, which also binds AURE, did not affect Star expression. Targeted small interfering RNA knockdown of TIS11b specifically enhanced stimulation of 3.5-kb Star mRNA in bovine adrenocortical cells, MA-10, and Y-1 cells but did not affect the reversals seen after peak stimulation. Direct transfection of Star mRNA demonstrated that Br-cAMP stimulated a selective turnover of 3.5-kb mRNA independent of AURE, which may correspond to these reversal processes. Steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein induction was halved by TIS11b knockdown, concomitant with decreased cholesterol metabolism. TIS11b suppression of 3.5-kb mRNA is therefore surprisingly coupled to enhanced Star translation leading to increased cholesterol metabolism.

  6. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  7. Nigericin inhibits accumulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein but not steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    King, S R; Walsh, L P; Stocco, D M

    2000-08-30

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein mediates the delivery of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side chain cleavage complex converts it to pregnenolone. While the mechanism by which this mitochondrial protein acts is poorly understood, one component of the mitochondrial electrochemical gradient, the electrochemical potential (DeltaPsi), appears to be essential. In this study, the importance of the other component, the proton gradient (DeltapH), was examined. Disruption of DeltapH with the electroneutral K(+)/H(+) exchanger, nigericin, had no effect on steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells at concentrations which significantly reduced StAR protein levels. These data indicate for the first time in true steroidogenic cells, that StAR can act prior to being fully imported into the mitochondria and are consistent with observations made in COS-1 cells using mutant forms of StAR. These results support the hypothesis that a DeltaPsi-dependent factor is required for StAR activity and demonstrate that nigericin is the first compound described, capable of inhibiting StAR accumulation without affecting steroidogenesis.

  8. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the homeostasis of regulatory T cells (Tregs)

    PubMed Central

    Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the family of conservative polypeptides with a high homology of the primary structure. The uniqueness of this family lies in their ability to interact with a large number of different proteins and provide protection from cellular and environmental stress factors as molecular chaperones to keep protein homeostasis. While intracellular HSPs play a mainly protective role, extracellular or membrane-bound HSPs mediate immunological functions and immunomodulatory activity. In immune system are subsets of cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) with suppressive functions. HSPs are implicated in the function of innate and adaptive immune systems, stimulate T lymphocyte proliferation and immunomodulatory functions, increase the effectiveness of cross-presentation of antigens, and induce the secretion of cytokines. HSPs are also important in the induction, proliferation, suppressive function, and cytokine production of Tregs, which are a subset of CD4+ T cells maintaining peripheral tolerance. Together HSPs and Tregs are potential tools for future clinical interventions in autoimmune disease. PMID:27833451

  9. Differential expression of smooth muscle regulatory proteins in the uterosacral ligaments of women with uterine prolapse.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Peter; Gualtieri, Marc; Nassiri, Mehdi; Candiotti, Keith; Fornoni, Alessia; Medina, Carlos A

    2010-06-01

    To compare smooth muscle regulatory protein expression in the uterosacral ligament (USL) of women with and without uterine prolapse. USLs ligament were sampled in women with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) uterine prolapse. Caldesmon, smooth muscle actin (SMA), myosin heavy chain, and zinc finger protein messenger RNA expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry and digital image analysis were used to determine protein expression. Caldesmon messenger RNA expression and the ratio of caldesmon-SMA messenger RNA expression was significantly increased in the USL from women with uterine prolapse compared with women without prolapse (caldesmon mean +/- standard deviation messenger RNA, 0.81 +/- 0.46 vs 0.39 +/- 0.16; P = .01 and caldesmon-SMA messenger RNA ratio, mean +/- standard deviation, 0.11 +/- 0.04 vs 0.07 +/- 0.02; P = .01). In addition, the ratio of caldesmon-SMA staining was significantly increased in women with uterine prolapse compared with women without prolapse (mean +/- standard deviation, 0.44 +/- 0.28 vs 0.28 +/- 0.16; P = .03). Uterine prolapse is associated with an increased ratio of caldesmon-SMA actin expression. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of the endogenous VEGF-A gene by exogenous designed regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Schröder, Oliver; Frey, Gerhard; Briggs, Steven P.; Sera, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We describe a facile method to activate or repress transcription of endogenous genes in a quantitative and specific manner by treatment with designed regulatory proteins (DRPs), in which artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are fused to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Penetration of DRPs into cells is mediated by an N-terminal CPP fused to a nuclear localization signal; a DNA-binding domain and a transactivation domain follow. The DNA-binding domain was targeted to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene. An agonist DRP was rapidly taken up by cells and transported to the nucleus; soon after, the cells began transcribing the gene and secreting VEGF-A protein in a dose-dependent manner. Multiple copies of a short oligopeptide derived from a minimal transactivation domain of human β-catenin was stronger than VP-16. The SRDX domain from the plant transcription factor, SUPERMAN, changed the DRP to a hypoxia-induced antagonist of VEGF-A. DRPs combine many of the potential benefits of transgenes with those of recombinant proteins. PMID:15475575

  11. Ethanol utilization regulatory protein: profile alignments give no evidence of origin through aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase gene fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, H. B.; Persson, B.; Jörnvall, H.; Hempel, J.

    1995-01-01

    The suggestion that the ethanol regulatory protein from Aspergillus has its evolutionary origin in a gene fusion between aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase genes (Hawkins AR, Lamb HK, Radford A, Moore JD, 1994, Gene 146:145-158) has been tested by profile analysis with aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase family profiles. We show that the degree and kind of similarity observed between these profiles and the ethanol regulatory protein sequence is that expected from random sequences of the same composition. This level of similarity fails to support the suggested gene fusion. PMID:8580855

  12. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein Functions as an A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hundsrucker, Christian; Skroblin, Philipp; Christian, Frank; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Popara, Viola; Joshi, Mangesh; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Reif, Bernd; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2010-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) include a family of scaffolding proteins that target protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to cellular compartments and thereby confine the activities of the associated proteins to distinct regions within cells. AKAPs bind PKA directly. The interaction is mediated by the dimerization and docking domain of regulatory subunits of PKA and the PKA-binding domain of AKAPs. Analysis of the interactions between the dimerization and docking domain and various PKA-binding domains yielded a generalized motif allowing the identification of AKAPs. Our bioinformatics and peptide array screening approaches based on this signature motif identified GSKIP (glycogen synthase kinase 3β interaction protein) as an AKAP. GSKIP directly interacts with PKA and GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β). It is widely expressed and facilitates phosphorylation and thus inactivation of GSK3β by PKA. GSKIP contains the evolutionarily conserved domain of unknown function 727. We show here that this domain of GSKIP and its vertebrate orthologues binds both PKA and GSK3β and thereby provides a mechanism for the integration of PKA and GSK3β signaling pathways. PMID:20007971

  13. Role of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.; Stetson, Cloyce L.; Slominski, Andrzej T.; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are an important class of regulatory molecules that are synthesized in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal, ovary, testis, placenta, brain and skin, and influence a spectrum of developmental and physiological processes. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) predominantly mediates the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, i.e., the transport of the substrate of all steroid hormones, cholesterol, from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane. At the inner membrane, cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme cleaves the cholesterol side-chain to form the first steroid, pregnenolone, which is converted by a series of enzymes to various steroid hormones in specific tissues. Both basic and clinical evidence have demonstrated the crucial involvement of the STAR protein in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. Multiple levels of regulation impinge on STAR action. Recent findings demonstrate that hormone-sensitive lipase, through its action on the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters, plays an important role in regulating StAR expression and steroidogenesis which involve the liver X receptor pathway. Activation of the latter influences macrophage cholesterol efflux that is a key process in the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Appropriate regulation of steroid hormones is vital for proper functioning of many important biological activities, which are also paramount for geriatric populations to live longer and healthier. This review summarizes the current level of understanding on tissue-specific and hormone-induced regulation of STAR expression and steroidogenesis, and provides insights into a number of cholesterol and/or steroid coupled physiological and pathophysiological consequences. PMID:26271515

  14. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-08-15

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  15. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  16. Construction of a Comprehensive Protein-Protein Interaction Map for Vitiligo Disease to Identify Key Regulatory Elements: A Systemic Approach.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Anvita Gupta; Jha, Mohit; Singh, Sudha; Pandey, Khushhali M

    2017-03-13

    Vitiligo is an idiopathic disorder characterized by depigmented patches on the skin due to progressive loss of melanocytes. Several genetic, immunological, and pathophysiological investigations have established vitiligo as a polygenetic disorder with multifactorial etiology. However, no definite model explaining the interplay between these causative factors has been established hitherto. Therefore, we studied the disorder at the system level to identify the key proteins involved by exploring their molecular connectivity in terms of topological parameters. The existing research data helped us in collating 215 proteins involved in vitiligo onset or progression. Interaction study of these proteins leads to a comprehensive vitiligo map with 4845 protein nodes linked with 107,416 edges. Based on centrality measures, a backbone network with 500 nodes has been derived. This has presented a clear overview of the proteins and processes involved and the crosstalk between them. Clustering backbone proteins revealed densely connected regions inferring major molecular interaction modules essential for vitiligo. Finally, a list of top order proteins that play a key role in the disease pathomechanism has been formulated. This includes SUMO2, ESR1, COPS5, MYC, SMAD3, and Cullin proteins. While this list is in fair agreement with the available literature, it also introduces new candidate proteins that can be further explored. A subnetwork of 64 vitiligo core proteins was built by analyzing the backbone and seed protein networks. Our finding suggests that the topology, along with functional clustering, provides a deep insight into the behavior of proteins. This in turn aids in the illustration of disease condition and discovery of significant proteins involved in vitiligo.

  17. Motile hepatocellular carcinoma cells preferentially secret sugar metabolism regulatory proteins via exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lu, Shaohua; Zhou, Ye; Meng, Kun; Chen, Zhipeng; Cui, Yizhi; Shi, Yunfeng; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are deliverers of critically functional proteins, capable of transforming target cells in numerous cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We hypothesize that the motility of HCC cells can be featured by comparative proteome of exosomes. Hence, we performed the super-SILAC-based MS analysis on the exosomes secreted by three human HCC cell lines, including the non-motile Hep3B cell, and the motile 97H and LM3 cells. More than 1400 exosomal proteins were confidently quantified in each MS analysis with highly biological reproducibility. We justified that 469 and 443 exosomal proteins represented differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the 97H/Hep3B and LM3/Hep3B comparisons, respectively. These DEPs focused on sugar metabolism-centric canonical pathways per ingenuity pathway analysis, which was consistent with the gene ontology analysis on biological process enrichment. These pathways included glycolysis I, gluconeogenesis I and pentose phosphate pathways; and the DEPs enriched in these pathways could form a tightly connected network. By analyzing the relative abundance of proteins and translating mRNAs, we found significantly positive correlation between exosomes and cells. The involved exosomal proteins were again focusing on sugar metabolism. In conclusion, motile HCC cells tend to preferentially export more sugar metabolism-associated proteins via exosomes that differentiate them from non-motile HCC cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Transmembrane protein 88: a Wnt regulatory protein that specifies cardiomyocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Pabon, Lil; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S.; Hadland, Brandon K.; Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L.; Paige, Sharon L.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Moon, Randall T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic regulation of the cell fate transition from lateral plate mesoderm to the specification of cardiomyocytes requires suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but the mechanism for this is not well understood. By analyzing gene expression and chromatin dynamics during directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we identified a suppressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, transmembrane protein 88 (TMEM88), as a potential regulator of cardiovascular progenitor cell (CVP) specification. During the transition from mesoderm to the CVP, TMEM88 has a chromatin signature of genes that mediate cell fate decisions, and its expression is highly upregulated in advance of key cardiac transcription factors in vitro and in vivo. In early zebrafish embryos, tmem88a is expressed broadly in the lateral plate mesoderm, including the bilateral heart fields. Short hairpin RNA targeting of TMEM88 during hESC cardiac differentiation increases Wnt/β-catenin signaling, confirming its role as a suppressor of this pathway. TMEM88 knockdown has no effect on NKX2.5 or GATA4 expression, but 80% of genes most highly induced during CVP development have reduced expression, suggesting adoption of a new cell fate. In support of this, analysis of later stage cell differentiation showed that TMEM88 knockdown inhibits cardiomyocyte differentiation and promotes endothelial differentiation. Taken together, TMEM88 is crucial for heart development and acts downstream of GATA factors in the pre-cardiac mesoderm to specify lineage commitment of cardiomyocyte development through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:23924634

  19. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  20. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: Implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops

    PubMed Central

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed. PMID:25523175

  1. Regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models: a multilevel perspective.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Marie-Jeanne W A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Hendriksen, Coenraad F M; Bakker, Wieger E

    2012-01-01

    The importance placed on risk avoidance in our society has resulted in a broad range of regulations intended to guarantee safety of products such as pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Many of these regulations rely on animal tests. As a result, about 25% of the animal experiments in Europe are done for regulatory purposes. There are many initiatives that aim to replace, reduce, or refine laboratory animal use, but the regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models lags behind. The central question of this study is: "Which variables influence the regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models and in what way?" Regulatory acceptance is seen as one of the biggest hurdles 3R models face, but the rationale behind this is still underexplored. This study is an approach to filling that gap by combining opinions from experts in the field with literature on technology acceptance and risk regulation, resulting in a model of the variables that determine the process of the regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models.

  2. Highly accessible AU-rich regions in 3’ untranslated regions are hotspots for binding of regulatory factors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is regarded as one of the major processes involved in the regulation of gene expression. It is mainly performed by RNA binding proteins and microRNAs, which target RNAs and typically affect their stability. Recent efforts from the scientific community have aimed at understanding post-transcriptional regulation at a global scale by using high-throughput sequencing techniques such as cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP), which facilitates identification of binding sites of these regulatory factors. However, the diversity in the experimental procedures and bioinformatics analyses has hindered the integration of multiple datasets and thus limited the development of an integrated view of post-transcriptional regulation. In this work, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets from 49 different RBPs in HEK293 cells to shed light on the complex interactions that govern post-transcriptional regulation. By developing a more stringent CLIP analysis pipeline we have discovered the existence of conserved regulatory AU-rich regions in the 3’UTRs where miRNAs and RBPs that regulate several processes such as polyadenylation or mRNA stability bind. Analogous to promoters, many factors have binding sites overlapping or in close proximity in these hotspots and hence the regulation of the mRNA may depend on their relative concentrations. This hypothesis is supported by RBP knockdown experiments that alter the relative concentration of RBPs in the cell. Upon AGO2 knockdown (KD), transcripts containing “free” target sites show increased expression levels compared to those containing target sites in hotspots, which suggests that target sites within hotspots are less available for miRNAs to bind. Interestingly, these hotspots appear enriched in genes with regulatory functions such as DNA binding and RNA binding. Taken together, our results suggest that hotspots are functional regulatory elements that define an extra layer

  3. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wild-type cells enriched for DNA-binding proteins by heparin affinity chromatography. These extracts could be used directly for DNase I and exonuclease III protection experiments. A lac9 deletion strain, which fails to induce the beta-galactosidase gene, did not contain the binding factor. The homology of LAC9 protein with GAL4 (J.M. Salmeron and S. A. Johnston, Nucleic Acids Res. 14:7767-7781, 1986) strongly suggests that LAC9 protein binds directly to UASL and plays a role similar to that of GAL4 in regulating transcription. Images PMID:2830492

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Structural Analysis of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cau, Ylenia; Fiorillo, Annarita; Mori, Mattia; Ilari, Andrea; Botta, Maurizo; Lalle, Marco

    2015-12-28

    Giardiasis is a gastrointestinal diarrheal illness caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis, which affects annually over 200 million people worldwide. The limited antigiardial drug arsenal and the emergence of clinical cases refractory to standard treatments dictate the need for new chemotherapeutics. The 14-3-3 family of regulatory proteins, extensively involved in protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with pSer/pThr clients, represents a highly promising target. Despite homology with human counterparts, the single 14-3-3 of G. duodenalis (g14-3-3) is characterized by a constitutive phosphorylation in a region critical for target binding, thus affecting the function and the conformation of g14-3-3/clients interaction. However, to approach the design of specific small molecule modulators of g14-3-3 PPIs, structural elucidations are required. Here, we present a detailed computational and crystallographic study exploring the implications of g14-3-3 phosphorylation on protein structure and target binding. Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics and classical molecular dynamics simulations show that phosphorylation affects locally and globally g14-3-3 conformation, inducing a structural rearrangement more suitable for target binding. Profitable features for g14-3-3/clients interaction were highlighted using a hydrophobicity-based descriptor to characterize g14-3-3 client peptides. Finally, the X-ray structure of g14-3-3 in complex with a mode-1 prototype phosphopeptide was solved and combined with structure-based simulations to identify molecular features relevant for clients binding to g14-3-3. The data presented herein provide a further and structural understanding of g14-3-3 features and set the basis for drug design studies.

  5. Nucleotide-specific recognition of iron-responsive elements by iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Selezneva, Anna I; Walden, William E; Volz, Karl W

    2013-09-23

    IRP1 [iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1] is a bifunctional protein with mutually exclusive end-states. In one mode of operation, IRP1 binds iron-responsive element (IRE) stem-loops in messenger RNAs encoding proteins of iron metabolism to control their rate of translation. In its other mode, IRP1 serves as cytoplasmic aconitase to correlate iron availability with the energy and oxidative stress status of the cell. IRP1/IRE binding occurs through two separate interfaces, which together contribute about two-dozen hydrogen bonds. Five amino acids make base-specific contacts and are expected to contribute significantly to binding affinity and specificity of this protein:RNA interaction. In this mutagenesis study, each of the five base-specific amino acids was changed to alter binding at each site. Analysis of IRE binding affinity and translational repression activity of the resulting IRP1 mutants showed that four of the five contact points contribute uniquely to the overall binding affinity of the IRP1:IRE interaction, while one site was found to be unimportant. The stronger-than-expected effect on binding affinity of mutations at Lys379 and Ser681, residues that make contact with the conserved nucleotides G16 and C8, respectively, identified them as particularly critical for providing specificity and stability to IRP1:IRE complex formation. We also show that even though the base-specific RNA-binding residues are not part of the aconitase active site, their substitutions can affect the aconitase activity of holo-IRP1, positively or negatively.

  6. The Multifaceted Activity of the VirF Regulatory Protein in the Shigella Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Falconi, Maurizio; Micheli, Gioacchino; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV). The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome. The primary regulator of the virulence phenotype is VirF, a DNA-binding protein belonging to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators. The virF gene, located on the pINV, is expressed only within the host, mainly in response to the temperature transition occurring when the bacterium transits from the outer environment to the intestinal milieu. VirF then acts as anti-H-NS protein and directly activates the icsA and virB genes, triggering the full expression of the invasion program of Shigella. In this review we will focus on the structure of VirF, on its sophisticated regulation, and on its role as major player in the path leading from the non-invasive to the invasive phenotype of Shigella. We will address also the involvement of VirF in mechanisms aimed at withstanding adverse conditions inside the host, indicating that this protein is emerging as a global regulator whose action is not limited to virulence systems. Finally, we will discuss recent observations conferring VirF the potential of a novel antibacterial target for shigellosis.

  7. The Multifaceted Activity of the VirF Regulatory Protein in the Shigella Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Falconi, Maurizio; Micheli, Gioacchino; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV). The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome. The primary regulator of the virulence phenotype is VirF, a DNA-binding protein belonging to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators. The virF gene, located on the pINV, is expressed only within the host, mainly in response to the temperature transition occurring when the bacterium transits from the outer environment to the intestinal milieu. VirF then acts as anti-H-NS protein and directly activates the icsA and virB genes, triggering the full expression of the invasion program of Shigella. In this review we will focus on the structure of VirF, on its sophisticated regulation, and on its role as major player in the path leading from the non-invasive to the invasive phenotype of Shigella. We will address also the involvement of VirF in mechanisms aimed at withstanding adverse conditions inside the host, indicating that this protein is emerging as a global regulator whose action is not limited to virulence systems. Finally, we will discuss recent observations conferring VirF the potential of a novel antibacterial target for shigellosis. PMID:27747215

  8. High-yield soluble expression, purification and characterization of human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) fused to a cleavable Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP).

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Tugaeva, Kristina V; Faletrov, Yaroslav V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2016-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the rapid delivery of cholesterol to mitochondria where the lipid serves as a source for steroid hormones biosynthesis in adrenals and gonads. Despite many successful investigations, current understanding of the mechanism of StAR action is far from being completely clear. StAR was mostly obtained using denaturation/renaturation or in minor quantities in a soluble form at decreased temperatures that, presumably, limited the possibilities for its consequent detailed exploration. In our hands, existing StAR expression constructs could be bacterially expressed almost exclusively as insoluble forms, even upon decreased expression temperatures and in specific strains of Escherichia coli, and isolated protein tended to aggregate and was difficult to handle. To maximize the yield of soluble protein, optimized StAR sequence encompassing functional domain STARD1 (residues 66-285) was fused to the C-terminus of His-tagged Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) with the possibility to cleave off the whole tag by 3C protease. The developed protocol of expression and purification comprising of a combination of subtractive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size-exclusion chromatography allowed us to obtain up to 25 mg/1 L culture of completely soluble StAR protein, which was (i) homogenous according to SDS-PAGE, (ii) gave a single symmetrical peak on a gel-filtration, (iii) showed the characteristic CD spectrum and (iv) pH-dependent ability to bind a fluorescently-labeled cholesterol analogue. We conclude that our strategy provides fully soluble and native StAR protein which in future could be efficiently used for biotechnology and drug discovery aimed at modulation of steroids production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Opposing Roles for Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3) and Type I Interferon Signaling during Plague

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami A.; Lee-Lewis, Hanni; Anderson, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs) following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production. PMID:22911267

  10. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analyses of Iron Response Element (IRE)-mRNA Binding to Iron Regulatory Protein, IRP1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Walden, William E; Theil, Elizabeth C; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-08-17

    Comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic properties of IRP1 (iron regulatory protein1) binding to FRT (ferritin) and ACO2 (aconitase2) IRE-RNAs, with or without Mn(2+), revealed differences specific to each IRE-RNA. Conserved among animal mRNAs, IRE-RNA structures are noncoding and bind Fe(2+) to regulate biosynthesis rates of the encoded, iron homeostatic proteins. IRP1 protein binds IRE-RNA, inhibiting mRNA activity; Fe(2+) decreases IRE-mRNA/IRP1 binding, increasing encoded protein synthesis. Here, we observed heat, 5 °C to 30 °C, increased IRP1 binding to IRE-RNA 4-fold (FRT IRE-RNA) or 3-fold (ACO2 IRE-RNA), which was enthalpy driven and entropy favorable. Mn(2+) (50 µM, 25 °C) increased IRE-RNA/IRP1 binding (K d) 12-fold (FRT IRE-RNA) or 6-fold (ACO2 IRE-RNA); enthalpic contributions decreased ~61% (FRT) or ~32% (ACO2), and entropic contributions increased ~39% (FRT) or ~68% (ACO2). IRE-RNA/IRP1 binding changed activation energies: FRT IRE-RNA 47.0 ± 2.5 kJ/mol, ACO2 IRE-RNA 35.0 ± 2.0 kJ/mol. Mn(2+) (50 µM) decreased the activation energy of RNA-IRP1 binding for both IRE-RNAs. The observations suggest decreased RNA hydrogen bonding and changed RNA conformation upon IRP1 binding and illustrate how small, conserved, sequence differences among IRE-mRNAs selectively influence thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity of the protein/RNA interactions.

  11. Duck Hepatitis B Virus Expresses a Regulatory HBx-Like Protein from a Hidden Open Reading Frame

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shau-Feng; Netter, Hans Jürgen; Hildt, Eberhard; Schuster, Ralph; Schaefer, Stephan; Hsu, Yin-Chen; Rang, Andreas; Will, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Duck hepatitis B viruses (DHBV), unlike mammalian hepadnaviruses, are thought to lack X genes, which encode transcription-regulatory proteins believed to contribute to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. A lack of association of chronic DHBV infection with hepatocellular carcinoma development supports this belief. Here, we demonstrate that DHBV genomes have a hidden open reading frame from which a transcription-regulatory protein, designated DHBx, is expressed both in vitro and in vivo. We show that DHBx enhances neither viral protein expression, intracellular DNA synthesis, nor virion production when assayed in the full-length genome context in LMH cells. However, similar to mammalian hepadnavirus X proteins, DHBx activates cellular and viral promoters via the Raf–mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and localizes primarily in the cytoplasm. The functional similarities as well as the weak sequence homologies of DHBx and the X proteins of mammalian hepadnaviruses strongly suggest a common ancestry of ortho- and avihepadnavirus X genes. In addition, our data disclose similar intracellular localization and transcription regulatory functions of the corresponding proteins, raise new questions as to their presumed role in hepatocarcinogenesis, and imply unique opportunities for deciphering of their still-enigmatic in vivo functions. PMID:11119585

  12. DANGER, a novel regulatory protein of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-receptor activity.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Damian B; Patterson, Randen L; Cheung, King-Ho; Barrow, Roxanne K; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Gessell, Gregory S; Burkholder, Scott G; Watkins, D Neil; Foskett, J Kevin; Snyder, Solomon H

    2006-12-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of DANGER, a novel protein which physiologically binds to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)R). DANGER is a membrane-associated protein predicted to contain a partial MAB-21 domain. It is expressed in a wide variety of neuronal cell lineages where it localizes to membranes in the cell periphery together with IP(3)R. DANGER interacts with IP(3)R in vitro and co-immunoprecipitates with IP(3)R from cellular preparations. DANGER robustly enhances Ca(2+)-mediated inhibition of IP(3) RCa(2+) release without affecting IP(3) binding in microsomal assays and inhibits gating in single-channel recordings of IP(3)R. DANGER appears to allosterically modulate the sensitivity of IP(3) RtoCa(2+) inhibition, which likely alters IP(3)R-mediated Ca(2+) dynamics in cells where DANGER and IP(3)R are co-expressed.

  13. Chromatin reader L(3)mbt requires the Myb–MuvB/DREAM transcriptional regulatory complex for chromosomal recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Daniel P.; Georlette, Daphne; Antoszewski, Lisa; Botchan, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal malignant brain tumors (lmbt) result from the loss of the conserved transcriptional repressor l(3)mbt, in Drosophila melanogaster. Similar mutations in the human homolog L3MBTL1 correlate with some cancers. The protein’s C-terminal MBT repeats bind mono and dimethylated histones in vitro, which could influence recruitment of L3MBTL1 to its target sites. The L(3)mbt chromatin targeting mechanism, however, is controversial and several studies suggest insufficiency or a minor role for histone methylation in determining the site specificity for recruitment. We report that L(3)mbt colocalizes with core members of the Myb–MuvB/DREAM (MMB/DREAM) transcriptional regulatory complex genome-wide, and that L(3)mbt-mediated repression requires this complex in salivary glands and larval brains. Loss of l(3)mbt or of MMB components through mutation cause similar spurious expression of genes, including the transposon regulatory gene piwi, in terminally differentiated cells. The DNA-binding MMB core component Mip120 (Lin54) is required for L(3)mbt recruitment to chromosomes, whereas Mip130 (Lin9) (an MMB core protein) and E2f2 (an MMB transcriptional repressor) are not, but are essential for repression. Cytolocalization experiments suggest the presence of site-specific differential composition of MMB in polytene chromosomes where some loci were bound by a Myb-containing or alternatively, an E2f2 and L(3)mbt form of the complex. PMID:25249635

  14. Dynamic localization of glucokinase and its regulatory protein in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Magdiel; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefanía; Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de Los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose.

  15. Iron Regulatory Protein-2 Knockout Increases Perihematomal Ferritin Expression and Cell Viability after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O.; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls three days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at three days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries. PMID:20399759

  16. Distinct forms of the. beta. subunit of GTP-binding regulatory proteins identified by molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Amatruda, T.T. III; Birren, B.W.; Simon, M.I.

    1987-06-01

    Two distinct ..beta.. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins have been identified by cDNA cloning and are referred to as ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 1/ subunits. The bovine transducin ..beta.. subunit (..beta../sub 1/) has been cloned previously. The author now isolated and analyzed cDNA clones that encode the ..beta../sub 2/ subunit from bovine adrenal, bovine brain, and a human myeloid leukemia cell line, HL-60. The 340-residue M/sub r/ 37,329 BETA/sub 2/ protein is 90% identical with ..beta../sub 1/ in predicted amino acid sequence, and it is also organized as a series of repetitive homologous segments. The major mRNA that encodes the bovine ..beta../sub 2/ subunit is 1.7 kilobases in length. It is expressed at lower levels than ..beta../sub 1/ subunit mRNA in all tissues examined. The ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ messages are expressed in cloned human cell lines. Hybridization of cDNA probes to bovine DNA showed that ..beta../sub 1/ and ..beta../sub 2/ are encoded by separate genes. The amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 2/ subunit are identical, as are the amino acid sequences for the bovine and human ..beta../sub 1/ subunit. This evolutionary conservation suggests that the two ..beta.. subunits have different roles in the signal transduction process.

  17. MicroRNA-33 regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Takahiro; Nishino, Tomohiro; Baba, Osamu; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Nakao, Tetsushi; Nishiga, Masataka; Usami, Shunsuke; Izuhara, Masayasu; Sowa, Naoya; Yahagi, Naoya; Shimano, Hitoshi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Kume, Noriaki; Yokode, Masayuki; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Ono, Koh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that bind to specific mRNAs and inhibit translation or promote mRNA degradation. Recent reports have indicated that miR-33, which is located within the intron of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 2, controls cholesterol homoeostasis and may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Here we show that deletion of miR-33 results in marked worsening of high-fat diet-induced obesity and liver steatosis. Using miR-33−/−Srebf1+/− mice, we demonstrate that SREBP-1 is a target of miR-33 and that the mechanisms leading to obesity and liver steatosis in miR-33−/− mice involve enhanced expression of SREBP-1. These results elucidate a novel interaction between SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 mediated by miR-33 in vivo. PMID:24300912

  18. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  19. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine.

  20. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein-dependent and -independent inhibitors of GTP cyclohydrolase I.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Wilson, L M; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates the feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) through protein complex formation. Since guanine and BH4 have a common pyrimidine ring structure, we examined the inhibitory effect of guanine and its analogs on the enzyme activity. Guanine, 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-methylguanine, and 8-bromoguanine inhibited the enzyme activity in a GFRP-dependent and pH-dependent manner and induced complex formation between GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP. The type of inhibition by this group is a mixed type. All these properties were shared with BH4. In striking contrast, inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was GFRP-independent and pH-independent. The type of inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was a competitive type. The two compounds did not induce complex formation between the enzyme and GFRP. These results demonstrate that guanine compounds of the first group bind to the BH4-binding site of the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex, whereas 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine bind to the active site of the enzyme. Finally, the possible implications in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Parkinson diseases of the inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by guanine and 8-hydroxyguanine are discussed.

  1. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression reduces inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Cao, Shengxuan; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Wang, Songmei; Yin, Lianhua; Zhi, Xiuling

    2017-04-12

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a mitochondrial cholesterol delivery protein, plays a beneficial role in hyperlipidemia, NAFLD and endothelial inflammation. Elevated circulating fatty acids and low grade inflammation are known as key risk factors of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the present study, C57BL/6J mice were fed with a HFD and infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing StAR by tail-vein injection. Intraperitoneal glucose/insulin tolerance test was performed to assess the insulin sensitivity. Morphological analysis and intramuscular lipid determination were used to illustrate the adipose hypertrophy and ectopic fat accumulation in skeletal muscle. The levels of inflammatory factor and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. The fatty acids composition was analysis using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The expression of genes associated with inflammation and insulin resistance were determined by Western blotting and qPCR to elucidate the underlying mechanism.We demonstrated that StAR overexpression ameliorated insulin resistance and systemic inflammatory response with the reduction of adipose hypertrophy and intramuscular lipid in HFD fed mice. In addition, StAR overexpression increased serum unsaturated fatty acids and PPARγ expression in muscle and adipose tissue of obese mice. In conclusion, StAR may activate PPARγ by increasing unsaturated fatty acids, which leads to a protective role in systemic inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic Localization of Glucokinase and Its Regulatory Protein in Hypothalamic Tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose. PMID:24739934

  3. CDK5 Regulatory Subunit-Associated Protein 1-like 1 Negatively Regulates Adipocyte Differentiation through Activation of Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Take, Kazumi; Waki, Hironori; Sun, Wei; Wada, Takahito; Yu, Jing; Nakamura, Masahiro; Aoyama, Tomohisa; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2017-08-04

    CDK5 Regulatory Subunit-Associated Protein 1-like 1 (CDKAL1) was identified as a susceptibility gene for type 2 diabetes and body mass index in genome-wide association studies. Although it was reported that CDKAL1 is a methylthiotransferase essential for tRNA(Lys)(UUU) and faithful translation of proinsulin generated in pancreatic β cells, the role of CDKAL1 in adipocytes has not been understood well. In this study, we found that CDKAL1 is expressed in adipose tissue and its expression is increased during differentiation. Stable overexpression of CDKAL1, however, inhibited adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, whereas knockdown of CDKAL1 promoted differentiation. CDKAL1 increased protein levels of β-catenin and its active unphosphorylated form in the nucleus, thereby promoting Wnt target gene expression, suggesting that CDKAL1 activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway-a well-characterized inhibitory regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Mutant experiments show that conserved cysteine residues of Fe-S clusters of CDKAL1 are essential for its anti-adipogenic action. Our results identify CDKAL1 as novel negative regulator of adipocyte differentiation and provide insights into the link between CDKAL1 and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  4. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  5. Unidirectional allostery in the regulatory subunit RIα facilitates efficient deactivation of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The holoenzyme complex of protein kinase A is in an inactive state; activation involves ordered cAMP binding to two tandem domains of the regulatory subunit and release of the catalytic subunit. Deactivation has been less studied, during which the two cAMPs unbind from the regulatory subunit to allow association of the catalytic subunit to reform the holoenzyme complex. Unbinding of the cAMPs appears ordered as indicated by a large difference in unbinding rates from the two sites, but the cause has remained elusive given the structural similarity of the two tandem domains. Even more intriguingly, NMR data show that allosteric communication between the two domains is unidirectional. Here, we present a mechanism for the unidirectionality, developed from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the tandem domains in different cAMP-bound forms. Disparate responses to cAMP releases from the two sites (A and B) in conformational flexibility and chemical shift perturbation confirmed unidirectional allosteric communication. Community analysis revealed that the A-site cAMP, by forming across-domain interactions, bridges an essential pathway for interdomain communication. The pathway is impaired when this cAMP is removed but remains intact when only the B-site cAMP is removed. Specifically, removal of the A-site cAMP leads to the separation of the two domains, creating room for binding the catalytic subunit. Moreover, the A-site cAMP, by maintaining interdomain coupling, retards the unbinding of the B-site cAMP and stalls an unproductive pathway of cAMP release. Our work expands the perspective on allostery and implicates functional importance for the directionality of allostery. PMID:27791125

  6. Overproduction of lactimidomycin by cross-overexpression of genes encoding Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yijun; Pan, Guohui; Xiang, Wensheng; Shen, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The glutarimide-containing polyketides represent a fascinating class of natural products that exhibit a multitude of biological activities. We have recently cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene clusters for three members of the glutarimide-containing polyketides-iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993, lactimidomycin (LTM) from Streptomyces amphibiosporus ATCC 53964, and cycloheximide (CHX) from Streptomyces sp. YIM56141. Comparative analysis of the three clusters identified mgsA and chxA, from the mgs and chx gene clusters, respectively, that were predicted to encode the PimR-like Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) but failed to reveal any regulatory gene from the ltm gene cluster. Overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. platensis NRRL 18993, Streptomyces sp. YIM56141 or SB11024, and a recombinant strain of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 carrying the intact mgs gene cluster has no significant effect on iso-MGS or CHX production, suggesting that MgsA or ChxA regulation may not be rate-limiting for iso-MGS and CHX production in these producers. In contrast, overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. amphibiosporus ATCC 53964 resulted in a significant increase in LTM production, with LTM titer reaching 106 mg/L, which is five-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results support MgsA and ChxA as members of the SARP family of positive regulators for the iso-MGS and CHX biosynthetic machinery and demonstrate the feasibility to improve glutarimide-containing polyketide production in Streptomyces strains by exploiting common regulators.

  7. Identification of Novel Regulatory Cholesterol Metabolite, 5-Cholesten, 3β,25-Diol, Disulfate

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shunlin; Kim, Jin Koung; Kakiyama, Genta; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Pandak, William M.; Min, Hae-Ki; Ning, Yanxia

    2014-01-01

    Oxysterol sulfation plays an important role in regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we report the discovery of a novel regulatory sulfated oxysterol in nuclei of primary rat hepatocytes after overexpression of the gene encoding mitochondrial cholesterol delivery protein (StarD1). Forty-eight hours after infection of the hepatocytes with recombinant StarD1 adenovirus, a water-soluble oxysterol product was isolated and purified by chemical extraction and reverse-phase HPLC. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified the oxysterol as 5-cholesten-3β, 25-diol, disulfate (25HCDS), and confirmed the structure by comparing with a chemically synthesized compound. Administration of 25HCDS to human THP-1-derived macrophages or HepG2 cells significantly inhibited cholesterol synthesis and markedly decreased lipid levels in vivo in NAFLD mouse models. RT-PCR showed that 25HCDS significantly decreased SREBP-1/2 activities by suppressing expression of their responding genes, including ACC, FAS, and HMG-CoA reductase. Analysis of lipid profiles in the liver tissues showed that administration of 25HCDS significantly decreased cholesterol, free fatty acids, and triglycerides by 30, 25, and 20%, respectively. The results suggest that 25HCDS inhibits lipid biosynthesis via blocking SREBP signaling. We conclude that 25HCDS is a potent regulator of lipid metabolism and propose its biosynthetic pathway. PMID:25072708

  8. Identification of novel regulatory cholesterol metabolite, 5-cholesten, 3β,25-diol, disulfate.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shunlin; Kim, Jin Koung; Kakiyama, Genta; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Pandak, William M; Min, Hae-Ki; Ning, Yanxia

    2014-01-01

    Oxysterol sulfation plays an important role in regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we report the discovery of a novel regulatory sulfated oxysterol in nuclei of primary rat hepatocytes after overexpression of the gene encoding mitochondrial cholesterol delivery protein (StarD1). Forty-eight hours after infection of the hepatocytes with recombinant StarD1 adenovirus, a water-soluble oxysterol product was isolated and purified by chemical extraction and reverse-phase HPLC. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified the oxysterol as 5-cholesten-3β, 25-diol, disulfate (25HCDS), and confirmed the structure by comparing with a chemically synthesized compound. Administration of 25HCDS to human THP-1-derived macrophages or HepG2 cells significantly inhibited cholesterol synthesis and markedly decreased lipid levels in vivo in NAFLD mouse models. RT-PCR showed that 25HCDS significantly decreased SREBP-1/2 activities by suppressing expression of their responding genes, including ACC, FAS, and HMG-CoA reductase. Analysis of lipid profiles in the liver tissues showed that administration of 25HCDS significantly decreased cholesterol, free fatty acids, and triglycerides by 30, 25, and 20%, respectively. The results suggest that 25HCDS inhibits lipid biosynthesis via blocking SREBP signaling. We conclude that 25HCDS is a potent regulator of lipid metabolism and propose its biosynthetic pathway.

  9. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is expressed in serotonin neurons and regulates tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kapatos, G; Hirayama, K; Shimoji, M; Milstien, S

    1999-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the coenzyme required for hydroxylation of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, regulates its own synthesis through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) mediated by a regulatory subunit, the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). In the liver, L-phenylalanine specifically stimulates tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis by displacing tetrahydrobiopterin from the GTPCH-GFRP complex. To explore the role of this regulatory system in rat brain, we examined the localization of GFRP mRNA using double-label in situ hybridization. GFRP mRNA expression was abundant in serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus but was undetectable in dopamine neurons of the midbrain or norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus. Simultaneous nuclease protection assays for GFRP and GTPCH mRNAs showed that GFRP mRNA is most abundant within the brainstem and that the ratio of GFRP to GTPCH mRNA is much higher than in the ventral midbrain. Two species of GFRP mRNA differing by approximately 20 nucleotides in length were detected in brainstem but not in other tissues, with the longer, more abundant form being common to other brain regions. It is interesting that the pineal and adrenal glands did not contain detectable levels of GFRP mRNA, although GTPCH mRNA was abundant in both. Primary neuronal cultures were used to examine the role of GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCH on tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis within brainstem serotonin neurons and midbrain dopamine neurons. L-Phenylalanine increased tetrahydrobiopterin levels in serotonin neurons to a maximum of twofold in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas D-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan were without effect. In contrast, tetrahydrobiopterin levels within cultured dopamine neurons were not altered by L-phenylalanine. The time course of this effect was very rapid, with a maximal response observed within 60 min. Inhibitors of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis prevented the L

  10. Tissue expression analysis, cloning and characterization of the 5'-regulatory region of the bovine FABP3 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Anning; Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Xin, Yaping; Zan, Linsen

    2016-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) is a member of the FABP family which bind fatty acids and have an important role in fatty acid metabolism. A large number of studies have shown that the genetic polymorphisms of FABP3 are positively correlated with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in domestic animals, however, the function and transcriptional characteristics of FABP3 in cattle remain unclear. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that bovine FABP3 was highly expressed in cardiac tissue. The 5'-regulatory region of bovine FABP3 was cloned and its transcription initiation sites were identified. Sequence analysis showed that many transcriptional factor binding sites including TATA-box and CCAAT-box were present on the 5'-flanking region of bovine FABP3, and four CpG islands were found on nucleotides from -891 to +118. Seven serial deletion constructs of the 5'-regulatory region evaluated in dual-luciferase reporter assay indicated that its core promoter was 384 base pairs upstream from the transcription initiation site. The transcriptional factor binding sites RXRα, KLF15, CREB and Sp1 were conserved in the core promoter of cattle, sheep, pigs and dogs. These results provide further understanding of the function and regulation mechanism of bovine FABP3.

  11. Human Regulatory Protein Ki-1/57 Is a Target of SUMOylation and Affects PML Nuclear Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ângela; Souza, Edmarcia E; Costa, Fernanda C; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Santos, Marcos T; Bressan, Gustavo C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Kobarg, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Ki-1/57 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic regulatory protein first identified in malignant cells from Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is involved in gene expression regulation on both transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. Ki-1/57 belongs to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins and undergoes phosphorylation by PKC and methylation by PRMT1. Previous characterization of its protein interaction profile by yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Ki-1/57 interacts with proteins of the SUMOylation machinery, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBC9 and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS3, which suggested that Ki-1/57 could be involved with this process. Here we identified seven potential SUMO target sites (lysine residues) on Ki-1/57 sequence and observed that Ki-1/57 is modified by SUMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 occurred on lysines 213, 276, and 336. In transfected cells expressing FLAG-Ki-1/57 wild-type, its paralog FLAG-CGI-55 wild-type, or their non-SUMOylated triple mutants, the number of PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is reduced compared with the control cells not expressing the constructs. More interestingly, after treating cells with arsenic trioxide (As2O3), the number of PML-NBs is no longer reduced when the non-SUMOylated triple mutant Ki-1/57 is expressed, suggesting that the SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 has a role in the control of As2O3-induced PML-NB formation. A proteome-wide analysis of Ki-1/57 partners in the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2 suggests that the involvement of Ki-1/57 with the regulation of gene expression is independent of the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2; however, the presence of SUMO-1 strongly influences the interaction of Ki-1/57 with proteins associated with cellular metabolism, maintenance, and cell cycle.

  12. High affinity binding proteins for the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase: Cloning, characterization and expression of P150 and P75

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase II-B appears to be adapted for function in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) via the properties of its regulatory subunit (RII-B). RII-B is selectively expressed in brain, tightly associated with cerebral cortex membranes and avidly complexed by the bovine brain calmodulin-binding protein designated P75. Complexes of RII-B and P75 polypeptides can be purified to near-homogeneity from either membrane or cytosolic fractions of brain homogenates, suggested that the binding protein plays a role in determining the subcellular localization and/or other CNS-specific properties of protein kinase II-B. In general, a single high-affinity RII-B binding protein is expressed in the brains of mammals, but the size of the protein varies (e.g., cow: 75 kDa; rat: 150 kDa). To investigate these non-abundant and CNS-enriched RII-B binding proteins, cDNAs for bovine brain P75 and rat brain P150, the homologue of P75, have been cloned and characterized. The cDNAs were retrieved from bovine and rat lambda gt11 expression libraries using {sup 32}P-RII-B as a functional probe. cDNA inserts subcloned into pIN-IA2 or pET-3b expression plasmids directed the production of partial P75 and P150 polypeptides in E. coli that exhibited RII-B binding activity. P150 cDNAs hybridize with 3 rat mRNAs (7.3, 5.0, 4.2 kb) that are present in brain and lung, but not other tissues. These mRNAs are not detected in fetal brain, but are expressed during the period of post-natal synaptogenesis and in adult rats. The P75 cDNA hybridizes to a 6 kb bovine brain mRNA. Finally, 3'-deletion analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal 15-25 amino acids of P150 or P75 are essential for binding with RII-B.

  13. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo.

  14. Association of Vaccinia Virus Fusion Regulatory Proteins with the Multicomponent Entry/Fusion Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Timothy R.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the A56R and K2L genes of vaccinia virus form a heterodimer (A56/K2) and have a fusion regulatory role as deletion or mutation of either causes infected cells to form large syncytia spontaneously. Here, we showed that syncytia formation is dependent on proteins of the recently described entry fusion complex (EFC), which are also required for virus-cell fusion and low-pH-triggered cell-cell fusion. This finding led us to consider that A56/K2 might prevent fusion by direct or indirect interaction with the EFC. To test this hypothesis, we made a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses that have a tandem affinity purification tag attached to A56, K2, or the A28 EFC protein. Interaction between A56/K2 and the EFC was demonstrated by their copurification from detergent-treated lysates of infected cells and identification by mass spectrometry or Western blotting. In addition, a purified soluble transmembrane-deleted form of A56/K2 was shown to interact with the EFC. Tagged A56 did not interact with the EFC in the absence of K2, nor did tagged K2 interact with the EFC in the absence of A56. The finding that both A56 and K2 are required for efficient binding to the EFC fits well with prior experiments showing that mutation of either A56 or K2 results in spontaneous fusion of infected cells. Because A56 and K2 are located on the surface of infected cells, they are in position to interact with the EFC of released progeny virions and prevent back-fusion and syncytia formation. PMID:17409143

  15. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR): Evidence of Gonadotropin-Induced Steroidogenesis in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Kate M; Stocco, Douglas M; Casadesus, Gemma; Bowen, Richard L; Atwood, Craig S; Previll, Laura A; Harris, Peggy LR; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, impairments in behavior, language and visual-spatial skills and ultimately, death. Epidemiological data reporting the predisposition of women to AD has led to a number of lines of evidence suggesting that age-related changes in hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis following reproductive senescence, may contribute to the etiology of AD. Recent studies from our group and others have reported not only increases in circulating gonadotropins, namely luteinizing hormone (LH) in individuals with AD compared with control individuals, but also significant elevations of LH in vulnerable neuronal populations in individuals with AD compared to control cases as well as the highest density of gonadotropin receptors in the brain are found within the hippocampus, a region devastated in AD. However, while LH is higher in AD patients, the downstream consequences of this are incompletely understood. To begin to examine this issue, here, we examined the expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, which regulates the first key event in steroidogenesis, namely, the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, and is regulated by LH through the cyclic AMP second messenger pathway, in AD and control brain tissue. Results Our data revealed that StAR protein was markedly increased in both the cytoplasm of hippocampal pyramidal neurons as well as in the cytoplasm of other non-neuronal cell types from AD brains when compared with age-matched controls. Importantly, and suggestive of a direct mechanistic link, StAR protein expression in AD brains colocalized with LH receptor expression. Conclusion Therefore, our findings suggest that LH is not only able to bind to its receptor and induce potentially pathogenic signaling in AD, but also that steroidogenic pathways regulated by LH may play a role in AD. PMID:17018137

  16. Association of vaccinia virus fusion regulatory proteins with the multicomponent entry/fusion complex.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Timothy R; Moss, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    The proteins encoded by the A56R and K2L genes of vaccinia virus form a heterodimer (A56/K2) and have a fusion regulatory role as deletion or mutation of either causes infected cells to form large syncytia spontaneously. Here, we showed that syncytia formation is dependent on proteins of the recently described entry fusion complex (EFC), which are also required for virus-cell fusion and low-pH-triggered cell-cell fusion. This finding led us to consider that A56/K2 might prevent fusion by direct or indirect interaction with the EFC. To test this hypothesis, we made a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses that have a tandem affinity purification tag attached to A56, K2, or the A28 EFC protein. Interaction between A56/K2 and the EFC was demonstrated by their copurification from detergent-treated lysates of infected cells and identification by mass spectrometry or Western blotting. In addition, a purified soluble transmembrane-deleted form of A56/K2 was shown to interact with the EFC. Tagged A56 did not interact with the EFC in the absence of K2, nor did tagged K2 interact with the EFC in the absence of A56. The finding that both A56 and K2 are required for efficient binding to the EFC fits well with prior experiments showing that mutation of either A56 or K2 results in spontaneous fusion of infected cells. Because A56 and K2 are located on the surface of infected cells, they are in position to interact with the EFC of released progeny virions and prevent back-fusion and syncytia formation.

  17. Evidence for regulatory genes on mouse chromosome 7 that affect the quantitative expression of proteins in the fetal and newborn liver.

    PubMed Central

    Giometti, C S; Gemmell, M A; Taylor, J; Tollaksen, S L; Angeletti, R; Gluecksohn-Waelsch, S

    1992-01-01

    A series of deletions around the albino locus on mouse chromosome 7 is believed to include one or more regulatory genes that control the activities of a cluster of liver enzymes. To further characterize the functions of this region of the mouse genome, we have used quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis to analyze the effects of two of these deletions, c3H and c14CoS, on the expression of liver proteins. More than 400 distinct protein gene products were quantitated in livers from fetal and newborn wild-type homozygous (cch/cch), heterozygous (cch/c3H or cch/c14CoS), and deletion homozygous (c3H/c3H or c14CoS/c14CoS) mice. Livers of fetal and newborn c3H heterozygotes and homozygous wild-type littermates produced qualitatively identical protein patterns after two-dimensional electrophoresis. In livers of c3H homozygous fetuses, however, abnormal amounts (either increased or decreased relative to homozygous wild-type and heterozygous littermates) of 29 proteins were found. Twenty-eight of these 29 protein anomalies were also found in livers of newborn c3H homozygotes. Livers of fetal and newborn mice homozygous for the c14CoS deletion, which overlaps the c3H deletion and produces a similar phenotype, expressed normal amounts of these proteins. One of the 29 proteins (MSN807) has an amino-terminal sequence similar to a 23-kDa translationally controlled protein abundant in mouse erythroleukemia and sarcoma-180 cells. These results suggest that normal chromosome 7 contains genes, located within the region of the c3H but not the c14CoS deletion, that regulate the abundance of specific proteins in the liver. These proteins cannot be related to the phenotypic alterations shared by the c3H and c14CoS deletions. Images PMID:1549608

  18. A novel microRNA-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR regulatory pathway in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dibash K.; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cause of cancer-specific deaths in the U.S. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms for its development and progression remain unclear. Studies have established that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in PCa. The intron-derived microRNA-1207-3p (miR-1207-3p) is encoded at the non-protein coding gene locus PVT1 on the 8q24 human chromosomal region, an established PCa susceptibility locus. However, miR-1207-3p in PCa had not previously been investigated. Therefore, we explored if miR-1207-3p plays any regulatory role in PCa. We discovered that miR-1207-3p is significantly underexpressed in PCa cell lines in comparison to normal prostate epithelial cells, and that increased expression of microRNA-1207-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibits proliferation, migration, and induces apoptosis via direct molecular targeting of fibronectin type III domain containing 1 (FNDC1). Our studies also revealed significant overexpression of FNDC1, fibronectin (FN1) and the androgen receptor (AR) in human PCa cell lines as well as tissues, and FNDC1, FN1, and AR positively correlate with aggressive PCa. These findings, recently published in Experimental Cell Research, are the first to describe a novel miR-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR novel regulatory pathway in PCa. PMID:28251177

  19. Identification of a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 which mediates blue light signaling for stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Shota; Yano, Takayuki; Ariyoshi, Chie; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprised of a catalytic subunit (PP1c) and a regulatory subunit that modulates catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate specificity. PP1c positively regulates stomatal opening through blue light signaling between phototropins and the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in guard cells. However, the regulatory subunit functioning in this process is unknown. We identified Arabidopsis PRSL1 (PP1 regulatory subunit2-like protein1) as a regulatory subunit of PP1c. Tautomycin, a selective inhibitor of PP1c, inhibited blue light responses of stomata in the single mutants phot1 and phot2, supporting the idea that signals from phot1 and phot2 converge on PP1c. We obtained PRSL1 based on the sequence similarity to Vicia faba PRS2, a PP1c-binding protein isolated by a yeast two-hybrid screen. PRSL1 bound to Arabidopsis PP1c through its RVxF motif, a consensus PP1c-binding sequence. Arabidopsis prsl1 mutants were impaired in blue light-dependent stomatal opening, H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the H(+)-ATPase, but showed normal phototropin activities. PRSL1 complemented the prsl1 phenotype, but not if the protein carried a mutation in the RVxF motif, suggesting that PRSL1 functions through binding PP1c via the RVxF motif. PRSL1 did not affect the catalytic activity of Arabidopsis PP1c but it stimulated the localization of PP1c in the cytoplasm. We conclude that PRSL1 functions as a regulatory subunit of PP1 and regulates blue light signaling in stomata.

  20. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.

    PubMed

    Cates, Justin M M; Memoli, Vincent A; Gonzalez, Raul S

    2015-08-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.