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Sample records for protein binding microarrays

  1. Universal protein binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA binding specificities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology provides a rapid, high-throughput means of characterizing the in vitro DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs). Using high-density, custom-designed microarrays containing all 10-mer sequence variants, one can obtain comprehensive binding site measurements for any TF, regardless of its structural class or species of origin. Here, we present a protocol for the examination and analysis of TF binding specificities at high resolution using such ‘all 10-mer’ universal PBMs. This procedure involves double-stranding a commercially synthesized DNA oligonucleotide array, binding a TF directly to the double-stranded DNA microarray, and labeling the protein-bound microarray with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody. We describe how to computationally extract the relative binding preferences of the examined TF for all possible contiguous and gapped 8-mers over the full range of affinities, from highest affinity sites to nonspecific sites. Multiple proteins can be tested in parallel in separate chambers on a single microarray, enabling the processing of a dozen or more TFs in a single day. PMID:19265799

  2. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  3. Leptospiral Outer Membrane Protein Microarray, a Novel Approach to Identification of Host Ligand-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with worldwide distribution caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The leptospiral life cycle involves transmission via freshwater and colonization of the renal tubules of their reservoir hosts. Infection requires adherence to cell surfaces and extracellular matrix components of host tissues. These host-pathogen interactions involve outer membrane proteins (OMPs) expressed on the bacterial surface. In this study, we developed an Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 OMP microarray containing all predicted lipoproteins and transmembrane OMPs. A total of 401 leptospiral genes or their fragments were transcribed and translated in vitro and printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides. We investigated the potential of this protein microarray to screen for interactions between leptospiral OMPs and fibronectin (Fn). This approach resulted in the identification of the recently described fibronectin-binding protein, LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and 14 novel Fn-binding proteins, denoted Microarray Fn-binding proteins (MFns). We confirmed Fn binding of purified recombinant LIC11612 (MFn1), LIC10714 (MFn2), LIC11051 (MFn6), LIC11436 (MFn7), LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and LIC10537 (MFn9) by far-Western blot assays. Moreover, we obtained specific antibodies to MFn1, MFn7, MFn8 (Lsa66), and MFn9 and demonstrated that MFn1, MFn7, and MFn9 are expressed and surface exposed under in vitro growth conditions. Further, we demonstrated that MFn1, MFn4 (LIC12631, Sph2), and MFn7 enable leptospires to bind fibronectin when expressed in the saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa. Protein microarrays are valuable tools for high-throughput identification of novel host ligand-binding proteins that have the potential to play key roles in the virulence mechanisms of pathogens. PMID:22961849

  4. Quadruple 9-mer-based protein binding microarray with DsRed fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Tae-Ho; Pahk, Yoon-Mok; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Choi, Yang Do; Nahm, Baek Hie; Kim, Yeon-Ki

    2009-01-01

    Background The interaction between a transcription factor and DNA motif (cis-acting element) is an important regulatory step in gene regulation. Comprehensive genome-wide methods have been developed to characterize protein-DNA interactions. Recently, the universal protein binding microarray (PBM) was introduced to determine if a DNA motif interacts with proteins in a genome-wide manner. Results We facilitated the PBM technology using a DsRed fluorescent protein and a concatenated sequence of oligonucleotides. The PBM was designed in such a way that target probes were synthesized as quadruples of all possible 9-mer combinations, permitting unequivocal interpretation of the cis-acting elements. The complimentary DNA strands of the features were synthesized with a primer and DNA polymerase on microarray slides. Proteins were labeled via N-terminal fusion with DsRed fluorescent protein, which circumvents the need for a multi-step incubation. The PBM presented herein confirmed the well-known DNA binding sequences of Cbf1 and CBF1/DREB1B, and it was also applied to elucidate the unidentified cis-acting element of the OsNAC6 rice transcription factor. Conclusion Our method demonstrated PBM can be conveniently performed by adopting: (1) quadruple 9-mers may increase protein-DNA binding interactions in the microarray, and (2) a one-step incubation shortens the wash and hybridization steps. This technology will facilitate greater understanding of genome-wide interactions between proteins and DNA. PMID:19761621

  5. Identification of proteins binding coding and non-coding human RNAs using protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation and function of mammalian RNAs has been increasingly appreciated to operate via RNA-protein interactions. With the recent discovery of thousands of novel human RNA molecules by high-throughput RNA sequencing, efficient methods to uncover RNA-protein interactions are urgently required. Existing methods to study proteins associated with a given RNA are laborious and require substantial amounts of cell-derived starting material. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a rapid and large-scale approach to characterize binding of in vitro transcribed labeled RNA to ~9,400 human recombinant proteins spotted on protein microarrays. Results We have optimized methodology to probe human protein microarrays with full-length RNA molecules and have identified 137 RNA-protein interactions specific for 10 coding and non-coding RNAs. Those proteins showed strong enrichment for common human RNA binding domains such as RRM, RBD, as well as K homology and CCCH type zinc finger motifs. Previously unknown RNA-protein interactions were discovered using this technique, and these interactions were biochemically verified between TP53 mRNA and Staufen1 protein as well as between HRAS mRNA and CNBP protein. Functional characterization of the interaction between Staufen 1 protein and TP53 mRNA revealed a novel role for Staufen 1 in preserving TP53 RNA stability. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates a scalable methodology, allowing rapid and efficient identification of novel human RNA-protein interactions using RNA hybridization to human protein microarrays. Biochemical validation of newly identified interactions between TP53-Stau1 and HRAS-CNBP using reciprocal pull-down experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrates the utility of this approach to study uncharacterized RNA-protein interactions. PMID:23157412

  6. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  7. Using protein-binding microarrays to study transcription factor specificity: homologs, isoforms and complexes

    PubMed Central

    Andrilenas, Kellen K.; Penvose, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Protein–DNA binding is central to specificity in gene regulation, and methods for characterizing transcription factor (TF)–DNA binding remain crucial to studies of regulatory specificity. High-throughput (HT) technologies have revolutionized our ability to characterize protein–DNA binding by significantly increasing the number of binding measurements that can be performed. Protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) are a robust and powerful HT platform for studying DNA-binding specificity of TFs. Analysis of PBM-determined DNA-binding profiles has provided new insight into the scope and mechanisms of TF binding diversity. In this review, we focus specifically on the PBM technique and discuss its application to the study of TF specificity, in particular, the binding diversity of TF homologs and multi-protein complexes. PMID:25431149

  8. Lipochitin oligosaccharides immobilized through oximes in glycan microarrays bind LysM proteins.

    PubMed

    Maolanon, Nicolai N; Blaise, Mickael; Sørensen, Kasper K; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Cló, Emiliano; Sullivan, John T; Ronson, Clive W; Stougaard, Jens; Blixt, Ola; Jensen, Knud J

    2014-02-10

    Glycan microarrays have emerged as novel tools to study carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe the preparation of a covalent microarray with lipochitin oligosaccharides and its use in studying proteins containing LysM domains. The glycan microarray was assembled from glycoconjugates that were synthesized by using recently developed bifunctional chemoselective aminooxy reagents without the need for transient carbohydrate protecting groups. We describe for the first time the preparation of a covalent microarray with lipochitin oligosaccharides and its use for studying proteins containing LysM domains. Lipochitin oligosaccharides (also referred to as Nod factors) were isolated from bacterial strains or chemoenzymatically synthesized. The glycan microarray also included peptidoglycan-related compounds, as well as chitin oligosaccharides of different lengths. In total, 30 ligands were treated with the aminooxy linker molecule. The identity of the glycoconjugates was verified by mass spectrometry, and they were then immobilized on the array. The presence of the glycoconjugates on the array surface was confirmed by use of lectins and human sera (IgG binding). The functionality of our array was tested with a bacterial LysM domain-containing protein, autolysin p60, which is known to act on the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. P60 showed specific binding to Nod factors and to chitin oligosaccharides. Increasing affinity was observed with increasing chitin oligomer length. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  10. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  11. Protein microarray analysis reveals BAFF-binding autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Price, Jordan V; Haddon, David J; Kemmer, Dodge; Delepine, Guillaume; Mandelbaum, Gil; Jarrell, Justin A; Gupta, Rohit; Balboni, Imelda; Chakravarty, Eliza F; Sokolove, Jeremy; Shum, Anthony K; Anderson, Mark S; Cheng, Mickie H; Robinson, William H; Browne, Sarah K; Holland, Steven M; Baechler, Emily C; Utz, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    Autoantibodies against cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors inhibit normal immunity and are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune disease and diseases of immune deficiency. In an effort to evaluate serum from autoimmune and immunodeficient patients for Abs against cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in a high-throughput and unbiased manner, we constructed a multiplex protein microarray for detection of serum factor-binding Abs and used the microarray to detect autoantibody targets in SLE. We designed a nitrocellulose-surface microarray containing human cytokines, chemokines, and other circulating proteins and demonstrated that the array permitted specific detection of serum factor-binding probes. We used the arrays to detect previously described autoantibodies against cytokines in samples from individuals with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and chronic mycobacterial infection. Serum profiling from individuals with SLE revealed that among several targets, elevated IgG autoantibody reactivity to B cell-activating factor (BAFF) was associated with SLE compared with control samples. BAFF reactivity correlated with the severity of disease-associated features, including IFN-α-driven SLE pathology. Our results showed that serum factor protein microarrays facilitate detection of autoantibody reactivity to serum factors in human samples and that BAFF-reactive autoantibodies may be associated with an elevated inflammatory disease state within the spectrum of SLE.

  12. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Wong, Hau-San

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k = 8∼10). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build TFBS (also known as DNA motif) models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement if choosing di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  13. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  15. Microarray Meta-Analysis of RNA-Binding Protein Functions in Alternative Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Yuting; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate diverse mRNA transcripts with different 3′UTRs from the same gene. In this study, we systematically searched for the APA events with differential expression in public mouse microarray data. Hundreds of genes with over-represented differential APA events and the corresponding experiments were identified. We further revealed that global APA differential expression occurred prevalently in tissues such as brain comparing to peripheral tissues, and biological processes such as development, differentiation and immune responses. Interestingly, we also observed widespread differential APA events in RNA-binding protein (RBP) genes such as Rbm3, Eif4e2 and Elavl1. Given the fact that RBPs are considered as the main regulators of differential APA expression, we constructed a co-expression network between APAs and RBPs using the microarray data. Further incorporation of CLIP-seq data of selected RBPs showed that Nova2 represses and Mbnl1 promotes the polyadenylation of closest poly(A) sites respectively. Altogether, our study is the first microarray meta-analysis in a mammal on the regulation of APA by RBPs that integrated massive mRNA expression data under a wide-range of biological conditions. Finally, we present our results as a comprehensive resource in an online website for the research community. PMID:24622240

  16. Identification of Immunodominant B-cell Epitope Regions of Reticulocyte Binding Proteins in Plasmodium vivax by Protein Microarray Based Immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hee; Li, Jian; Wang, Bo; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Na, Sunghun; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum can invade all stages of red blood cells, while Plasmodium vivax can invade only reticulocytes. Although many P. vivax proteins have been discovered, their functions are largely unknown. Among them, P. vivax reticulocyte binding proteins (PvRBP1 and PvRBP2) recognize and bind to reticulocytes. Both proteins possess a C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane domain, which drives adhesion to reticulocytes. PvRBP1 and PvRBP2 are large (> 326 kDa), which hinders identification of the functional domains. In this study, the complete genome information of the P. vivax RBP family was thoroughly analyzed using a prediction server with bioinformatics data to predict B-cell epitope domains. Eleven pvrbp family genes that included 2 pseudogenes and 9 full or partial length genes were selected and used to express recombinant proteins in a wheat germ cell-free system. The expressed proteins were used to evaluate the humoral immune response with vivax malaria patients and healthy individual serum samples by protein microarray. The recombinant fragments of 9 PvRBP proteins were successfully expressed; the soluble proteins ranged in molecular weight from 16 to 34 kDa. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to each recombinant PvRBP protein indicated a high antigenicity, with 38-88% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Of them, N-terminal parts of PvRBP2c (PVX_090325-1) and PvRBP2 like partial A (PVX_090330-1) elicited high antigenicity. In addition, the PvRBP2-like homologue B (PVX_116930) fragment was newly identified as high antigenicity and may be exploited as a potential antigenic candidate among the PvRBP family. The functional activity of the PvRBP family on merozoite invasion remains unknown.

  17. Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David A.; Ptacek, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Protein chips have emerged as a promising approach for a wide variety of applications including the identification of protein-protein interactions, protein-phospholipid interactions, small molecule targets, and substrates of proteins kinases. They can also be used for clinical diagnostics and monitoring disease states. This article reviews current methods in the generation and applications of protein microarrays. PMID:17126887

  18. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes as Peptide/Protein Microarray Substrate for Improving Protein Binding and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Gao, Jiaxue; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-04-27

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) polymer-brush substrate for protein and peptide microarray fabrication, and this substrate was facilely prepared by copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomers via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on a glass slide. The performance of obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (P(GMA-HEMA)) brush substrate was assessed by binding of human IgG with rabbit antihuman IgG antibodies on a protein microarray and by the determination of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities on a peptide microarray. The P(GMA-HEMA) brush substrate exhibited higher immobilization capacities for proteins and peptides than those of a two-dimensional (2D) planar epoxy slide. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based microarray on rabbit antihuman IgG antibody detection was much higher than that of its 2D counterpart. The enzyme activities of MMPs were determined specifically with a low detection limit of 6.0 pg mL(-1) for MMP-2 and 5.7 pg mL(-1) for MMP-9. By taking advantage of the biocompatibility of PHEMA, the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based peptide microarray was also employed to evaluate the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by cells cultured off the chip or directly on the chip, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  19. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Calvert, Valerie; Hodge, Alex; VanMeter, Amy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2017-01-01

    While genes and RNA encode information about cellular status, proteins are considered the engine of the cellular machine, as they are the effective elements that drive all cellular functions including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. Consequently, investigations of the cellular protein network are considered a fundamental tool for understanding cellular functions.Alteration of the cellular homeostasis driven by elaborate intra- and extracellular interactions has become one of the most studied fields in the era of personalized medicine and targeted therapy. Increasing interest has been focused on developing and improving proteomic technologies that are suitable for analysis of clinical samples. In this context, reverse-phase protein microarrays (RPPA) is a sensitive, quantitative, high-throughput immunoassay for protein analyses of tissue samples, cells, and body fluids.RPPA is well suited for broad proteomic profiling and is capable of capturing protein activation as well as biochemical reactions such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, protein cleavage, and conformational alterations across hundreds of samples using a limited amount of biological material. For these reasons, RPPA represents a valid tool for protein analyses and generates data that help elucidate the functional signaling architecture through protein-protein interaction and protein activation mapping for the identification of critical nodes for individualized or combinatorial targeted therapy.

  20. UniPROBE, update 2015: new tools and content for the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Hume, Maxwell A; Barrera, Luis A; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) serves as a convenient source of information on published data generated using universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology, which provides in vitro data about the relative DNA-binding preferences of transcription factors for all possible sequence variants of a length k ('k-mers'). The database displays important information about the proteins and displays their DNA-binding specificity data in terms of k-mers, position weight matrices and graphical sequence logos. This update to the database documents the growth of UniPROBE since the last update 4 years ago, and introduces a variety of new features and tools, including a new streamlined pipeline that facilitates data deposition by universal PBM data generators in the research community, a tool that generates putative nonbinding (i.e. negative control) DNA sequences for one or more proteins and novel motifs obtained by analyzing the PBM data using the BEEML-PBM algorithm for motif inference. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org.

  1. UniPROBE, update 2015: new tools and content for the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein–DNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Maxwell A.; Barrera, Luis A.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) serves as a convenient source of information on published data generated using universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology, which provides in vitro data about the relative DNA-binding preferences of transcription factors for all possible sequence variants of a length k (‘k-mers’). The database displays important information about the proteins and displays their DNA-binding specificity data in terms of k-mers, position weight matrices and graphical sequence logos. This update to the database documents the growth of UniPROBE since the last update 4 years ago, and introduces a variety of new features and tools, including a new streamlined pipeline that facilitates data deposition by universal PBM data generators in the research community, a tool that generates putative nonbinding (i.e. negative control) DNA sequences for one or more proteins and novel motifs obtained by analyzing the PBM data using the BEEML-PBM algorithm for motif inference. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org. PMID:25378322

  2. Quantitative proteomics analysis integrated with microarray data reveals that extracellular matrix proteins, catenins, and p53 binding protein 1 are important for chemotherapy response in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Cheng, Lihua; White, James T; Lu, Wei; Utleg, Angelita G; Yan, Xiaowei; Urban, Nicole D; Drescher, Charles W; Hood, Leroy; Lin, Biaoyang

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel is the standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients. Although most patients initially respond to this treatment, few are cured. Resistance to chemotherapy is the major cause of treatment failure. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on ICAT/MS/MS technology to analyze tissues harvested at primary debulking surgery before the initiation of combination chemotherapy in order to identify potential naive or intrinsic chemotherapy response proteins in ovarian cancers. We identified 44 proteins that are overexpressed, and 34 proteins that are underexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue compared to the chemoresistant tissue. The overexpressed proteins identified in the chemoresistant tissue include 10 proteins (25.6%) belonging to the extracellular matrix (ECM), including decorin, versican, basigin (CD147), fibulin-1, extracellular matrix protein 1, biglycan, fibronectin 1, dermatopontin, alpha-cardiac actin (smooth muscle actin), and an EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1. Interesting proteins identified as overexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue include gamma-catenin (junction plakoglobin) and delta-catenin, tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), annexin A11, and 53 kDa selenium binding protein 1. Integrative analysis with expression profiling data of eight chemoresistant tissues and 13 chemosensitive tissues revealed that 16 proteins showed consistent changes at both the protein and the RNA levels. These include P53 binding protein 1, catenin delta 1 and plakoglobin, EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1. Our results suggest that chemotherapy response may be determined by multiple and complex system properties involving extracellular-matrix, cell adhesion and junction proteins.

  3. Diagnostic challenges for multiplexed protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Master, Stephen R; Bierl, Charlene; Kricka, Larry J

    2006-11-01

    Multiplexed protein analysis using planar microarrays or microbeads is growing in popularity for simultaneous assays of antibodies, cytokines, allergens, drugs and hormones. However, this new assay format presents several new operational issues for the clinical laboratory, such as the quality control of protein-microarray-based assays, the release of unrequested test data and the use of diagnostic algorithms to transform microarray data into diagnostic results.

  4. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  5. Label-free optical detection of small-molecule compound microarrays immobilized on solid support using macromolecular scaffolds and subsequent protein binding reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S.; Landry, J. P.; Fei, Y. Y.; Zhu, X. D.; Luo, J. T.; Wang, X. B.; Lam, K. S.

    2009-02-01

    Small-molecule microarrays composed of tens of thousands of distinct synthetic molecules, natural products, and their combinations/modifications provide a high-throughput platform for studying protein-ligand interactions. Immobilization of small molecule compounds on solid supports remains a challenge as widely varied small molecules generally lack unique chemical groups that readily react with singly or even multiply functionalized solid support. We explored two strategies for immobilizing small molecule compounds on epoxy-functionalized glass surface using primary-aminecontaining macromolecular scaffolds: bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amine-modified poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA). Small molecules with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) groups were conjugated to BSA or amine-modified PVA. Small-molecule-BSA conjugates and small-molecule-PVA conjugates were subsequently immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides through amine-epoxy reactions. Using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) scanning microscope as a label-free detector, we performed a comparative study of the effectiveness of BSA and PVA as macromolecular scaffolds for anchoring small molecule compounds in terms of conjugation efficiency, surface immobilization efficiency, effect of the scaffold on end-point and kinetics of subsequent binding reactions with protein probes.

  6. A critical comparison of protein microarray fabrication technologies.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Davidoff, S Nikki; Miles, Adam R; Grainger, David W; Gale, Bruce K; Brooks, Benjamin D

    2014-03-21

    Of the diverse analytical tools used in proteomics, protein microarrays possess the greatest potential for providing fundamental information on protein, ligand, analyte, receptor, and antibody affinity-based interactions, binding partners and high-throughput analysis. Microarrays have been used to develop tools for drug screening, disease diagnosis, biochemical pathway mapping, protein-protein interaction analysis, vaccine development, enzyme-substrate profiling, and immuno-profiling. While the promise of the technology is intriguing, it is yet to be realized. Many challenges remain to be addressed to allow these methods to meet technical and research expectations, provide reliable assay answers, and to reliably diversify their capabilities. Critical issues include: (1) inconsistent printed microspot morphologies and uniformities, (2) low signal-to-noise ratios due to factors such as complex surface capture protocols, contamination, and static or no-flow mass transport conditions, (3) inconsistent quantification of captured signal due to spot uniformity issues, (4) non-optimal protocol conditions such as pH, temperature, drying that promote variability in assay kinetics, and lastly (5) poor protein (e.g., antibody) printing, storage, or shelf-life compatibility with common microarray assay fabrication methods, directly related to microarray protocols. Conventional printing approaches, including contact (e.g., quill and solid pin), non-contact (e.g., piezo and inkjet), microfluidics-based, microstamping, lithography, and cell-free protein expression microarrays, have all been used with varying degrees of success with figures of merit often defined arbitrarily without comparisons to standards, or analytical or fiduciary controls. Many microarray performance reports use bench top analyte preparations lacking real-world relevance, akin to "fishing in a barrel", for proof of concept and determinations of figures of merit. This review critiques current protein

  7. A Protein Microarray ELISA for Screening Biological Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    Protein microarrays permit the simultaneous measurement of many proteins in a small sample volume and therefore provide an attractive approach for the quantitative measurement of proteins in biological fluids, including serum. This chapter describes a microarray ELISA assay. Capture antibodies are immobilized onto a glass surface, the covalently attached antibodies bind a specific antigen from a sample overlaying the array. A second, biotinylated antibody that recognizes the same antigen as the first antibody but at a different epitope is then used for detection. Detection is based upon an enzymatic signal enhancement method known as tyramide signal amplification (TSA). By coupling a microarray-ELISA format with the signal amplification of tyramide deposition, the assay sensitivity is as low as sub-pg/ml.

  8. Picoliter-scale protein microarrays by laser direct write.

    PubMed

    Ringeisen, B R; Wu, P K; Kim, H; Piqué, A; Auyeung, R Y C; Young, H D; Chrisey, D B; Krizman, D B

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the accurate picoliter-scale dispensing of active proteins using a novel laser transfer technique. Droplets of protein solution are dispensed onto functionalized glass slides and into plastic microwells, activating as small as 50-microm diameter areas on these surfaces. Protein microarrays fabricated by laser transfer were assayed using standard fluorescent labeling techniques to demonstrate successful protein and antigen binding. These results indicate that laser transfer does not damage the active site of the dispensed protein and that this technique can be used to successfully fabricate a functioning protein microarray. Also, as a result of the efficient nature of the process, material usage is reduced by two to four orders of magnitude compared to conventional pin dispensing methods for protein spotting.

  9. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  10. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  11. Quantifying protein–protein interactions in high throughput using protein domain microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Allen, John E; Gordus, Andrew; Stiffler, Michael A; Karp, Ethan S; Chang, Bryan H; MacBeath, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient way to identify and quantify protein–protein interactions in high throughput. One drawback of this technique is that proteins show a broad range of physicochemical properties and are often difficult to produce recombinantly. To circumvent these problems, we have focused on families of protein interaction domains. Here we provide protocols for constructing microarrays of protein interaction domains in individual wells of 96-well microtiter plates, and for quantifying domain–peptide interactions in high throughput using fluorescently labeled synthetic peptides. As specific examples, we will describe the construction of microarrays of virtually every human Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, as well as microarrays of mouse PDZ domains, all produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli. For domains that mediate high-affinity interactions, such as SH2 and PTB domains, equilibrium dissociation constants (KDs) for their peptide ligands can be measured directly on arrays by obtaining saturation binding curves. For weaker binding domains, such as PDZ domains, arrays are best used to identify candidate interactions, which are then retested and quantified by fluorescence polarization. Overall, protein domain microarrays provide the ability to rapidly identify and quantify protein–ligand interactions with minimal sample consumption. Because entire domain families can be interrogated simultaneously, they provide a powerful way to assess binding selectivity on a proteome-wide scale and provide an unbiased perspective on the connectivity of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:20360771

  12. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-29

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems.

  13. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems. PMID:28146048

  14. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  15. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  16. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  17. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Keehwan; Grose, Carissa; Pieper, Rembert; Pandya, Gagan A; Fleischmann, Robert D; Peterson, Scott N

    2009-01-01

    Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST) composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents protein solubility and

  18. Zeptosens' protein microarrays: a novel high performance microarray platform for low abundance protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Michael; Schick, Eginhard; Bopp, Martin A; Schneider, Michael J; Oroszlan, Peter; Ehrat, Markus

    2002-04-01

    Protein microarrays are considered an enabling technology, which will significantly expand the scope of current protein expression and protein interaction analysis. Current technologies, such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry, allowing the identification of biologically relevant proteins, have a high resolving power, but also considerable limitations. As was demonstrated by Gygi et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2000,97, 9390-9395), most spots in 2-DE, observed from whole cell extracts, are from high abundance proteins, whereas low abundance proteins, such as signaling molecules or kinases, are only poorly represented. Protein microarrays are expected to significantly expedite the discovery of new markers and targets of pharmaceutical interest, and to have the potential for high-throughput applications. Key factors to reach this goal are: high read-out sensitivity for quantification also of low abundance proteins, functional analysis of proteins, short assay analysis times, ease of handling and the ability to integrate a variety of different targets and new assays. Zeptosens has developed a revolutionary new bioanalytical system based on the proprietary planar waveguide technology which allows us to perform multiplexed, quantitative biomolecular interaction analysis with highest sensitivity in a microarray format upon utilizing the specific advantages of the evanescent field fluorescence detection. The analytical system, comprising an ultrasensitive fluorescence reader and microarray chips with integrated microfluidics, enables the user to generate a multitude of high fidelity data in applications such as protein expression profiling or investigating protein-protein interactions. In this paper, the important factors for developing high performance protein microarray systems, especially for targeting low abundant messengers of relevant biological information, will be discussed and the performance of the system will

  19. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Huang, Xiaohua; Choo, Yen; Church, George M.

    2001-01-01

    A key step in the regulation of networks that control gene expression is the sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to their DNA recognition sites. A more complete understanding of these DNA–protein interactions will permit a more comprehensive and quantitative mapping of the regulatory pathways within cells, as well as a deeper understanding of the potential functions of individual genes regulated by newly identified DNA-binding sites. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based method to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage display library, prepared by randomizing critical amino acid residues in the second of three fingers of the mouse Zif268 domain, provided a rich source of zinc-finger proteins with variant DNA-binding specificities. Microarrays containing all possible 3-bp binding sites for the variable zinc fingers permitted the quantitation of the binding site preferences of the entire library, pools of zinc fingers corresponding to different rounds of selection from this library, as well as individual Zif268 variants that were isolated from the library by using specific DNA sequences. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays for genome-wide identification of putative transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:11404456

  20. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  1. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  2. Circumventing the problems caused by protein diversity in microarrays: implications for protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gordus, Andrew; MacBeath, Gavin

    2006-10-25

    Protein microarrays provide a well-controlled, high-throughput way to uncover protein-protein interactions. One problem with this and other standardized assays, however, is that proteins vary considerably with respect to their physical properties. If a simple threshold-based approach is used to define protein-protein interactions, the resulting binary networks can be strongly biased. Here, we investigate the extent to which even closely related protein interaction domains vary when printed as microarrays. We find that, when a collection of well behaved, monomeric Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are printed at the same concentration, they vary by up to 50-fold with respect to the resulting surface density of active protein. When a threshold-based binding assay is performed on these domains using fluorescently labeled phosphopeptides, a misleading picture of the underlying biophysical interactions emerges. This problem can be circumvented, however, by obtaining saturation binding curves for each protein-peptide interaction. Importantly, the equilibrium dissociation constants obtained from these curves are independent of the surface density of active protein. We submit that an increased emphasis should be placed on obtaining quantitative information from protein microarrays and that this should serve as a more general goal in all efforts to define large-scale protein interaction networks.

  3. Discovery of RNA Binding Small Molecules Using Small Molecule Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Colleen M; Abulwerdi, Fardokht A; Schneekloth, John S

    2017-01-01

    New methods to identify RNA-binding small molecules open yet unexplored opportunities for the pharmacological modulation of RNA-driven biology and disease states. One such approach is the use of small molecule microarrays (SMMs). Typically, SMMs are generated by spatially arraying and covalently linking a library of small molecules to a glass surface. Next, incubation of the arrays with a fluorescently labeled RNA reveals binding interactions that are detected upon slide imaging. The relative ease with which SMMs are manufactured enables the screening of multiple oligonucleotides in parallel against tens of thousands of small molecules, providing information about both binding and selectivity of identified RNA-small molecule interactions. This approach is useful for screening a broad variety of structurally and functionally diverse RNAs. Here, we present a general method for the preparation and use of SMMs to rapidly identify small molecules that selectively bind to an RNA of interest.

  4. Fabrication and application of G protein-coupled receptor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye; Webb, Brian; Hong, Yulong; Ferrie, Ann; Lai, Fang; Frutos, Anthony G; Lahiri, Joydeep

    2004-01-01

    The increased number of drug targets and compounds demands novel high-throughput screening technologies that could be used for parallel analysis of many genes and proteins. Protein microarrays are evolving promising technologies for the parallel analysis of many proteins with respect to their abundance, location, modifications, and interactions with other biological and chemical molecules. This chapter specifically describes the fabrication of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) microarrays, a unique subset of protein microarrays, using contact-pin printing technology. The bioassays and potential applications of GPCR microarrays for the determination of compound affinities and potencies are also included.

  5. Protein microarray applications: Autoantibody detection and posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Atak, Apurva; Mukherjee, Shuvolina; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shabarni; Singh, Vedita Anand; Gahoi, Nikita; K P, Manubhai; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of DNA microarrays was a major milestone in genomics; however, it could not adequately predict the structure or dynamics of underlying protein entities, which are the ultimate effector molecules in a cell. Protein microarrays allow simultaneous study of thousands of proteins/peptides, and various advancements in array technologies have made this platform suitable for several diagnostic and functional studies. Antibody arrays enable researchers to quantify the abundance of target proteins in biological fluids and assess PTMs by using the antibodies. Protein microarrays have been used to assess protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions, and autoantibody profiling in various disease conditions. Here, we summarize different microarray platforms with focus on its biological and clinical applications in autoantibody profiling and PTM studies. We also enumerate the potential of tissue microarrays to validate findings from protein arrays as well as other approaches, highlighting their significance in proteomics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Emerging technology of in situ cell free expression protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nand, Amita; Gautam, Anju; Pérez, Javier Batista; Merino, Alejandro; Zhu, Jinsong

    2012-02-01

    Recently, in situ protein microarrays have been developed for large scale analysis and high throughput studies of proteins. In situ protein microarrays produce proteins directly on the solid surface from pre-arrayed DNA or RNA. The advances in in situ protein microarrays are exemplified by the ease of cDNA cloning and cell free protein expression. These technologies can evaluate, validate and monitor protein in a cost effective manner and address the issue of a high quality protein supply to use in the array. Here we review the importance of recently employed methods: PISA (protein in situ array), DAPA (DNA array to protein array), NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array) and TUSTER microarrays and the role of these methods in proteomics.

  7. Applications of optical resonance to biological imaging and label-free protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Unlü, M Selim; Ozkumur, I E; Needham, J; Bergstein, D A; Goldberg, B B; Yalcin, A; Spuhler, P; Irani, R; DeLisi, C

    2008-01-01

    We present biological imaging and sensing methods based on optical resonance and interference. In fluorescence microscopy, our nanoscale imaging capability sheds light onto conformational changes of DNA, DNA-protein complexes and polymer coatings on a solid surface. Interference measurements on a layered substrate yield a label-free sensing platform for protein binding in a high-throughput micro-array format.

  8. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  9. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  10. Protein microarray-mediated detection of antienterovirus antibodies in serum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiying; Xiu, Bingshui; Zhang, Heqiu; Li, Ning

    2016-04-01

    To utilize prokaryotic gene expression and protein microarray to develop and evaluate a sensitive, accurate protein microarray assay for detecting antienterovirus antibodies in serum samples from patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), two common causative agents for HFMD, were used for assay development. Serum was collected from patients with HFMD and healthy controls. EV71 and CA16 VP1 and VP3 genes were expressed in transfected Escherichia coli; the resultant VP1 and 3 proteins were used in a microarray assay for human serum EV71 and CA16 immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG. To validate the microarray assay, serum samples were tested for EV71 IgM using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of 50 patients with HFMD, EV71 IgM and CA16 IgM was detected in 80% and 44% of serum samples, respectively, using protein microarray, and EV71 IgM was detected in 78% of samples using ELISA. Protein microarray and ELISA showed 100% specificity for EV71-IgM detection. The protein microarray assay developed in the present study shows potential as a sensitive technique for detecting EV71 IgM in serum samples from patients with HFMD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels.

  12. Protein Microarray-Based IgE Immunoassay for Allergy Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jambari, Nuzul N; Wang, XiaoWei; Alcocer, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarray is a miniaturized multi-analyte, solid-phased immunoassay where thousands of immobilized individual protein spots on a microscopic slide bind are bound to specific antibodies (immunoglobulins) from serum samples, which are then detected by fluorescent labeling. The image processing and pattern recognition are then quantitatively analyzed using advanced algorithms. Here, we describe the use of an in-house-produced complex protein microarray containing extracts and pure proteins that has been probed with antibodies present in the horse sera and detection by fluorophore-conjugated antibody and data analysis. The flexibility of the number and types of proteins that can be printed on the microarray allows different set of specific IgE immunoassay analysis to be carried out.

  13. Functional protein microarrays by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Kazuyo; He, Ying; Sutanto, Erick; Kang, Somi; Le, An-Phong; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Alleyne, Andrew G; Ferreira, Placid M; Lu, Yi; Rogers, John A

    2012-11-20

    This paper reports the use of advanced forms of electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing for creating micro- and nanoscale patterns of proteins on various surfaces ranging from flat silica substrates to structured plasmonic crystals, suitable for micro/nanoarray analysis and other applications in both fluorescent and plasmonic detection modes. The approaches function well with diverse classes of proteins, including streptavidin, IgG, fibrinogen, and γ-globulin. Detailed study reveals that the printing process does not adversely alter the protein structure or function, as demonstrated in the specific case of streptavidin through measurements of its binding specificity to biotin-modified DNA. Multinozzle printing systems enable several types of proteins (up to four currently) to be patterned on a single substrate, in rapid fashion and with excellent control over spatial dimensions and registration. High-speed, pulsed operational modes allow large-area printing, with narrow statistical distributions of drop size and spacing in patterns that include millions of droplets. The process is also compatible with the structured surfaces of plasmonic crystal substrates to enable detection without fluorescence. These collective characteristics suggest potential utility of e-jet techniques in wide-ranging areas of biotechnology, where its compatibility with various biomaterials and substrates with different topographies and surface chemistries, and ability to form deposits that range from thick films to submonolayer coatings, derive from the remote, noncontacting physical material transfer mode of operation.

  14. The application of protein microarray assays in psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Ayling, K; Bowden, T; Tighe, P; Todd, I; Dilnot, E M; Negm, O H; Fairclough, L; Vedhara, K

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays are miniaturized multiplex assays that exhibit many advantages over the commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This article aims to introduce protein microarrays to readers of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity and demonstrate its utility and validity for use in psychoneuroimmunological research. As part of an ongoing investigation of psychological and behavioral influences on influenza vaccination responses, we optimized a novel protein microarray to quantify influenza-specific antibody levels in human sera. Reproducibility was assessed by calculating intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variance on serially diluted human IgG concentrations. A random selection of samples was analyzed by microarray and ELISA to establish validity of the assay. For IgG concentrations, intra-assay and inter-assay precision profiles demonstrated a mean coefficient of variance of 6.7% and 11.5% respectively. Significant correlations were observed between microarray and ELISA for all antigens, demonstrating the microarray is a valid alternative to ELISA. Protein microarrays are a highly robust, novel assay method that could be of significant benefit for researchers working in psychoneuroimmunology. They offer high throughput, fewer resources per analyte and can examine concurrent neuro-immune-endocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Microintaglio Printing of In situ Synthesized Proteins Enables Rapid Printing of High-Density Protein Microarrays Directly from DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyani, Manish; Moriyasu, Junpei; Tanaka, Yoko; Sato, Shusuke; Ueno, Shingo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-08-01

    A simple and versatile approach to the simultaneous on-chip synthesis and printing of proteins has been studied for high-density protein microarray applications. The method used is based on the principle of intaglio printing using microengraved plates. Unlike conventional approaches that require multistep reactions for synthesizing proteins off the chip followed by printing using a robotic spotter, our approach demonstrates the following: (i) parallel and spotter-free printing of high-density protein microarrays directly from a type of DNA microarray and (ii) microcompartmentalization of cell-free coupled transcription/translation reaction and direct transferring of picoliter protein solution per spot to pattern microarrays of 25-100 µm features.

  16. Enhanced Detection of Autoantibodies on Protein Microarrays Using a Modified Protein Digestion Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patwa, Tasneem H.; Wang, Yanfei; Simeone, Diane M.; Lubman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput studies to determine differential immune (humoral) response to diseases are becoming of increasing interest because the information they provide can help in early diagnosis as well as monitoring of therapeutics. Protein microarrays are a high-throughput and convenient technology that can be applied to the study of the humoral response. Proteins can be arrayed on slides and then probed with serum from different classes of patients to observe differences that may exist among autoantibodies that reflect differences in disease states. However, such studies may be difficult to interpret due to the weak overall signal response of such protein microarrays. We propose that this weak signal response is due to the physical positioning of the disease proteins that renders them sterically hindered from binding partners in the serum. In this study, we hypothesize that reducing the complexity and size of the disease proteins by chemical digestion using cyanogen bromide (CNBr) may enhance the overall signal from the humoral response and facilitate visualization of disease-specific responses in various classes of serum. A modified protein microarray methodology using CNBr digestion is presented here. The new workflow was applied to a set of 10 serum samples from healthy subjects, 10 from patients with chronic pancreatitis and 10 from patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and the results were compared to results obtained in the absence of CNBr digestion. CNBr digestion allowed the identification of 10 additional autoantibodies that responded to serum, 5 of which were unique to pancreatitis and cancer sera. This new methodology may increase the sensitivity of microarray studies measuring autoantibodies in serum. PMID:18452326

  17. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  18. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  19. Design of a combinatorial DNA microarray for protein-DNA interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Mintseris, Julian; Eisen, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Background Discovery of precise specificity of transcription factors is an important step on the way to understanding the complex mechanisms of gene regulation in eukaryotes. Recently, double-stranded protein-binding microarrays were developed as a potentially scalable approach to tackle transcription factor binding site identification. Results Here we present an algorithmic approach to experimental design of a microarray that allows for testing full specificity of a transcription factor binding to all possible DNA binding sites of a given length, with optimally efficient use of the array. This design is universal, works for any factor that binds a sequence motif and is not species-specific. Furthermore, simulation results show that data produced with the designed arrays is easier to analyze and would result in more precise identification of binding sites. Conclusion In this study, we present a design of a double stranded DNA microarray for protein-DNA interaction studies and show that our algorithm allows optimally efficient use of the arrays for this purpose. We believe such a design will prove useful for transcription factor binding site identification and other biological problems. PMID:17018151

  20. Elucidating glycosaminoglycan-protein-protein interactions using carbohydrate microarray and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Claude J; Clark, Peter M; Tully, Sarah E; Abrol, Ravinder; Garcia, K Christopher; Goddard, William A; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2011-06-14

    Glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides play critical roles in many cellular processes, ranging from viral invasion and angiogenesis to spinal cord injury. Their diverse biological activities are derived from an ability to regulate a remarkable number of proteins. However, few methods exist for the rapid identification of glycosaminoglycan-protein interactions and for studying the potential of glycosaminoglycans to assemble multimeric protein complexes. Here, we report a multidisciplinary approach that combines new carbohydrate microarray and computational modeling methodologies to elucidate glycosaminoglycan-protein interactions. The approach was validated through the study of known protein partners for heparan and chondroitin sulfate, including fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and its receptor FGFR1, the malarial protein VAR2CSA, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We also applied the approach to identify previously undescribed interactions between a specific sulfated epitope on chondroitin sulfate, CS-E, and the neurotrophins, a critical family of growth factors involved in the development, maintenance, and survival of the vertebrate nervous system. Our studies show for the first time that CS is capable of assembling multimeric signaling complexes and modulating neurotrophin signaling pathways. In addition, we identify a contiguous CS-E-binding site by computational modeling that suggests a potential mechanism to explain how CS may promote neurotrophin-tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk) complex formation and neurotrophin signaling. Together, our combined microarray and computational modeling methodologies provide a general, facile means to identify new glycosaminoglycan-protein-protein interactions, as well as a molecular-level understanding of those complexes.

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  4. Inkjet printing for the production of protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Iain; Chong Kwan, Marisa; Hall, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    A significant proportion of protein microarray researchers would like the arrays they develop to become widely used research, screening, validation or diagnostic devices. For this to be achievable the arrays must be compatible with high-throughput techniques that allow manufacturing scale production. In order to simplify the transition from laboratory bench to market, Arrayjet have developed a range of inkjet microarray printers, which, at one end of the scale, are suitable for R&D and, at the other end, are capable of true high-throughput array output. To maintain scalability, all Arrayjet microarray printers utilise identical core technology comprising a JetSpyder™ liquid handling adaptor, which enables automated loading of an industry standard inkjet printhead compatible with non-contact on-the-fly printing. This chapter contains a detailed explanation of Arrayjet technology followed by a historical look at the development of inkjet technologies for protein microarray production. The method described subsequently is a simple example of an antibody array printed onto nitrocellulose-coated slides with specific detection with fluorescently labelled IgG. The method is linked to a notes section with advice on best practice and sources of useful information for protein microarray production using inkjet technology.

  5. Design of a combinatorial dna microarray for protein-dnainteraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mintseris, Julian; Eisen, Michael B.

    2006-07-07

    Background: Discovery of precise specificity oftranscription factors is an important step on the way to understandingthe complex mechanisms of gene regulation in eukaryotes. Recently,doublestranded protein-binding microarrays were developed as apotentially scalable approach to tackle transcription factor binding siteidentification. Results: Here we present an algorithmic approach toexperimental design of a microarray that allows for testing fullspecificity of a transcription factor binding to all possible DNA bindingsites of a given length, with optimally efficient use of the array. Thisdesign is universal, works for any factor that binds a sequence motif andis not species-specific. Furthermore, simulation results show that dataproduced with the designed arrays is easier to analyze and would resultin more precise identification of binding sites. Conclusion: In thisstudy, we present a design of a double stranded DNA microarray forprotein-DNA interaction studies and show that our algorithm allowsoptimally efficient use of the arrays for this purpose. We believe such adesign will prove useful for transcription factor binding siteidentification and other biological problems.

  6. Nanotechnology in the Fabrication of Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Manuel; Díez, Paula; Casado-Vela, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Protein biochips are the heart of many medical and bioanalytical applications. Increasing interest of protein biochip fabrication has been focused on surface activation and subsequent functionalization strategies for the immobilization of these molecules.

  7. Peptidoglycan microarray as a novel tool to explore protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Hirata, Akiyoshi; Nokihara, Kiyoshi; Fukase, Koichi; Fujimoto, Yukari

    2016-11-04

    Peptidoglycan is a giant bag-shaped molecule essential for bacterial cell shape and resistance to osmotic stresses. The activity of a large number of bacterial surface proteins involved in cell growth and division requires binding to this macromolecule. Recognition of peptidoglycan by immune effectors is also crucial for the establishment of the immune response against pathogens. The availability of pure and chemically defined peptidoglycan fragments is a major technical bottleneck that has precluded systematic studies of the mechanisms underpinning protein-mediated peptidoglycan recognition. Here, we report a microarray strategy suitable to carry out comprehensive studies to characterize proteins-peptidoglycan interactions. We describe a method to introduce a functional group on peptidoglycan fragments allowing their stable immobilization on amorphous carbon chip plates to minimize nonspecific binding. Such peptidoglycan microarrays were used with a model peptidoglycan binding protein-the human peptidoglycan recognition protein-S (hPGRP-S). We propose that this strategy could be implemented to carry out high-throughput analyses to study peptidoglycan binding proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 422-429, 2016.

  8. Development of multiplexed microarray binding assays for high-throughput drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yulong; Liu, Li; Pai, Sadashiva; Graf, James N; Rao, Hongwei; Lynn, Jeffrey G; van Staden, Carlo; Lee, Paul H; Lai, Fang; Salon, John A

    2009-06-01

    The ability to combine primary hit identification assays with target profiling would significantly streamline the current drug discovery process. Working towards this end, we report here the development of a microarray-based ligand binding assay that supports multiplexed analysis of G protein-coupled receptor systems in a 96-well microplate format that is compatible with the equipment and infrastructure typical of high-throughput screening laboratories. A prototype microarray was generated by pin-printing seven different receptors within the wells of a specially coated glass-bottom microplate and assaying with a cocktail of fluorescent ligands. Development of the multiplexed system included optimization of methods for depositing receptor membrane proteins and establishing a generic set of assay conditions that simultaneously satisfied the pharmacology requirements of all of the receptor systems included on the array. The multiplexed system is shown to produce valid pharmacological results as evidenced by its ability to report K(i) values for receptor-specific fluorescent ligands and rank ordered potencies for diagnostic displacing compounds comparable to values generated by conventional simplexed assays. Moreover, the results of a 40-compound mini-screen confirmed that the assay accurately identifies valid hits. The results suggest the assay may be immediately suitable for routine profiling tasks and demonstrate the potential of the format for high-throughput multiplexed drug discovery.

  9. Validation of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The specificity and utility of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray, or Pigoligoarray (www.pigoligoarray.org), has been evaluated by profiling the expression of transcripts from four porcine tissues. Tools for comparative analyses of expression on the Pigoligoarray were developed i...

  10. An arabidopsis promoter microarray and its initial usage in the identification of HY5 binding targets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Li, Jinming; Strickland, Elizabeth; Hua, Sujun; Zhao, Hongyu; Chen, Zhangliang; Qu, Lijia; Deng, Xing Wang

    2004-03-01

    To analyze transcription factor-promoter interactions in Arabidopsis, a general strategy for generating a promoter microarray has been established. This includes an integrated platform for promoter sequence extraction and the design of primers for the PCR amplification of the promoter regions of annotated genes in the Arabidopsis genome. A web-interfaced primer-retrieval program was used to obtain up to 10 primer pairs with a suitability ranking given to each gene. We selected primer pairs for the promoters of about 3800 genes, and greater than 95% of the promoter fragments from the total genomic DNA were successfully amplified by PCR. These PCR products were purified and used to print an Arabidopsis promoter microarray. This initial promoter microarray was used to study the in vitro binding of the transcription factor HY5 to its promoter targets. A set of promoter fragments exhibited consistent and strong interaction with the HY5 protein in vitro, and computational analysis revealed that they were enriched with the HY5 consensus binding G-box motif. Thus, a promoter microarray can be a useful tool for identifying transcription factor binding sites at the genomic scale in higher plants.

  11. Nano rolling-circle amplification for enhanced SERS hot spots in protein microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Juan; Su, Shao; He, Shijiang; He, Yao; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dongfang; Zhang, Honglu; Huang, Qing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2012-11-06

    Although "hot spots" have been proved to contribute to surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), less attention was paid to increase the number of the "hot spot" to directly enhance the Raman signals in bioanalytical systems. Here we report a new strategy based on nano rolling-circle amplification (nanoRCA) and nano hyperbranched rolling-circle amplification (nanoHRCA) to increase "hot spot" groups for protein microarrays. First, protein and ssDNA are coassembled on gold nanoparticles, making the assembled probe have both binding ability and hybridization ability. Second, the ssDNAs act as primers to initiate in situ RCA reaction to produced long ssDNAs. Third, a large number of SERS probes are loaded on the long ssDNA templetes, allowing thousands of SERS probes involved in each biomolecular recognition event. The strategy offered high-efficiency Raman enhancement and could detect less than 10 zeptomolar protein molecules in protein microarray analysis.

  12. Method for printing functional protein microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric dispensing of proteins from borosilicate glass capillaries is a popular method of protein biochip fabrication that offers the advantages of sample recovery and noncontact with the printing substrate. However, little regard has been given to the quantitative aspects of dispensing minute volumes (1 nL or less) at the low protein concentrations (20 micrograms/mL or less) typically used in microprinting. Specifically, loss of protein sample due to nonspecific adsorption to the glass surface of the dispensing capillaries can limit the amount of protein delivered to the substrate. We demonstrate the benefits of a low ionic strength buffer containing the carrier protein BSA that effectively minimizes the ionic strength-dependent phenomenon of nonspecific protein adsorption to borosilicate glass. Over the concentration range of 20-2.5 micrograms/mL, the dispensing of a reference IgG in 10 mM PBS including 0.1% BSA resulted in the deposition of 3.6- to 44-fold more IgG compared to the deposition of IgG in standard 150 mM PBS in the absence of BSA. Furthermore, when the IgG was dispensed with carrier protein, the resulting spots exhibited a more uniform morphology. In a direct immunoassay for cholera toxin, capture antibody spots dispensed in 10 mM PBS containing 0.1% BSA produced fluorescent signals that were 2.8- to 4.3-fold more intense than antibody spots that were dispensed in 150 mM PBS without BSA. Interestingly, no differences were observed in the specific activities of the capture antibodies as a result of printing in the different buffers. The implications of these results on the future development of protein biochips are discussed.

  13. Method for printing functional protein microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric dispensing of proteins from borosilicate glass capillaries is a popular method of protein biochip fabrication that offers the advantages of sample recovery and noncontact with the printing substrate. However, little regard has been given to the quantitative aspects of dispensing minute volumes (1 nL or less) at the low protein concentrations (20 micrograms/mL or less) typically used in microprinting. Specifically, loss of protein sample due to nonspecific adsorption to the glass surface of the dispensing capillaries can limit the amount of protein delivered to the substrate. We demonstrate the benefits of a low ionic strength buffer containing the carrier protein BSA that effectively minimizes the ionic strength-dependent phenomenon of nonspecific protein adsorption to borosilicate glass. Over the concentration range of 20-2.5 micrograms/mL, the dispensing of a reference IgG in 10 mM PBS including 0.1% BSA resulted in the deposition of 3.6- to 44-fold more IgG compared to the deposition of IgG in standard 150 mM PBS in the absence of BSA. Furthermore, when the IgG was dispensed with carrier protein, the resulting spots exhibited a more uniform morphology. In a direct immunoassay for cholera toxin, capture antibody spots dispensed in 10 mM PBS containing 0.1% BSA produced fluorescent signals that were 2.8- to 4.3-fold more intense than antibody spots that were dispensed in 150 mM PBS without BSA. Interestingly, no differences were observed in the specific activities of the capture antibodies as a result of printing in the different buffers. The implications of these results on the future development of protein biochips are discussed.

  14. NAPPA as a Real New Method for Protein Microarray Generation.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; González-González, María; Lourido, Lucía; Dégano, Rosa M; Ibarrola, Nieves; Casado-Vela, Juan; LaBaer, Joshua; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-04-24

    Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays (NAPPA) have emerged as a powerful and innovative technology for the screening of biomarkers and the study of protein-protein interactions, among others possible applications. The principal advantages are the high specificity and sensitivity that this platform offers. Moreover, compared to conventional protein microarrays, NAPPA technology avoids the necessity of protein purification, which is expensive and time-consuming, by substituting expression in situ with an in vitro transcription/translation kit. In summary, NAPPA arrays have been broadly employed in different studies improving knowledge about diseases and responses to treatments. Here, we review the principal advances and applications performed using this platform during the last years.

  15. A microarray immunoassay for simultaneous detection of proteins and bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development and characterization of an antibody microarray biosensor for the rapid detection of both protein and bacterial analytes under flow conditions. Using a noncontact microarray printer, biotinylated capture antibodies were immobilized at discrete locations on the surface of an avidin-coated glass microscope slide. Preservation of capture antibody function during the deposition process was accomplished with the use of a low-salt buffer containing sucrose and bovine serum albumin. The slide was fitted with a six-channel flow module that conducted analyte-containing solutions over the array of capture antibody microspots. Detection of bound analyte was subsequently achieved using fluorescent tracer antibodies. The pattern of fluorescent complexes was interrogated using a scanning confocal microscope equipped with a 635-nm laser. This microarray system was employed to detect protein and bacterial analytes both individually and in samples containing mixtures of analytes. Assays were completed in 15 min, and detection of cholera toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, and Bacillus globigii was demonstrated at levels as low as 8 ng/mL, 4 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, and 6.2 x 10(4) cfu/mL, respectively. The assays presented here are very fast, as compared to previously published methods for measuring antibody-antigen interactions using microarrays (minutes versus hours).

  16. Native antigen fractionation protein microarrays for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert J; O'Rourke, Dennis J; Barder, Timothy J; Nelson, Bryce P; Liu, Brian C-S

    2011-01-01

    In this protocol, we used the T24 human bladder cancer cell line as a source of native antigens to construct fractionated lysate microarrays. Subsequently, these microarrays were used to compare the autoantibody responses of individuals with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) to those of normal female controls. To accomplish this, T24 cells were lysed under nondenaturing conditions to obtain native antigens. These native antigens were then fractionated in 2D using a PF-2D liquid chromatography; the first dimension separated the proteins by their isoelectric points, and the second separated them according to hydrophobicity. The resulting protein fractions were printed onto nitrocellulose-coated glass slides (PATH slides) to create a set of fractionated lysate microarrays. To compare the autoantibody responses of IC/PBS patients with normal controls, the fractionated lysate arrays were competitively hybridized with fluorescently labeled IgG samples purified from both IC/PBS and control sera. This protocol presents a detailed description of the creation and use of native antigen fractionated lysate microarrays for autoantibody profiling.

  17. A microarray immunoassay for simultaneous detection of proteins and bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development and characterization of an antibody microarray biosensor for the rapid detection of both protein and bacterial analytes under flow conditions. Using a noncontact microarray printer, biotinylated capture antibodies were immobilized at discrete locations on the surface of an avidin-coated glass microscope slide. Preservation of capture antibody function during the deposition process was accomplished with the use of a low-salt buffer containing sucrose and bovine serum albumin. The slide was fitted with a six-channel flow module that conducted analyte-containing solutions over the array of capture antibody microspots. Detection of bound analyte was subsequently achieved using fluorescent tracer antibodies. The pattern of fluorescent complexes was interrogated using a scanning confocal microscope equipped with a 635-nm laser. This microarray system was employed to detect protein and bacterial analytes both individually and in samples containing mixtures of analytes. Assays were completed in 15 min, and detection of cholera toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, and Bacillus globigii was demonstrated at levels as low as 8 ng/mL, 4 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, and 6.2 x 10(4) cfu/mL, respectively. The assays presented here are very fast, as compared to previously published methods for measuring antibody-antigen interactions using microarrays (minutes versus hours).

  18. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray-based analysis of protein location

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Johnstone, Sarah E; Young, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide location analysis, also known as ChIP-Chip, combines chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis to identify protein-DNA interactions that occur in living cells. Protein-DNA interactions are captured in vivo by chemical crosslinking. Cell lysis, DNA fragmentation and immunoaffinity purification of the desired protein will co-purify DNA fragments that are associated with that protein. The enriched DNA population is then labeled, combined with a differentially labeled reference sample and applied to DNA microarrays to detect enriched signals. Various computational and bioinformatic approaches are then applied to normalize the enriched and reference channels, to connect signals to the portions of the genome that are represented on the DNA microarrays, to provide confidence metrics and to generate maps of protein-genome occupancy. Here, we describe the experimental protocols that we use from crosslinking of cells to hybridization of labeled material, together with insights into the aspects of these protocols that influence the results. These protocols require approximately 1 week to complete once sufficient numbers of cells have been obtained, and have been used to produce robust, high-quality ChIP-chip results in many different cell and tissue types. PMID:17406303

  19. A versatile protein microarray platform enabling antibody profiling against denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Barker, Kristi; Steel, Jason; Park, Jin; Saul, Justin; Festa, Fernanda; Wallstrom, Garrick; Yu, Xiaobo; Bian, Xiaofang; Anderson, Karen S; Figueroa, Jonine D; LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, Ji

    2013-06-01

    We aim to develop a protein microarray platform capable of presenting both natural and denatured forms of proteins for antibody biomarker discovery. We will further optimize plasma screening protocols to improve detection. We developed a new covalent capture protein microarray chemistry using HaloTag fusion proteins and ligand. To enhance protein yield, we used HeLa cell lysate as an in vitro transcription translation (IVTT) system. Escherichia coli lysates were added to the plasma blocking buffer to reduce nonspecific background. These protein microarrays were probed with plasma samples and autoantibody responses were quantified and compared with or without denaturing buffer treatment. We demonstrated that protein microarrays using the covalent attachment chemistry endured denaturing conditions. Blocking with E. coli lysates greatly reduced the background signals and expression with IVTT based on HeLa cell lysates significantly improved the antibody signals on protein microarrays probed with plasma samples. Plasma samples probed on denatured protein arrays produced autoantibody profiles distinct from those probed on natively displayed proteins. This versatile protein microarray platform allows the display of both natural and denatured proteins, offers a new dimension to search for disease-specific antibodies, broadens the repertoire of potential biomarkers, and will potentially yield clinical diagnostics with greater performance. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Microarray Method for the Rapid Detection of Glycosaminoglycan–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Claude J.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) perform numerous vital functions within the body. As major components of the extracellular matrix, these polysaccharides participate in a diverse array of cell-signaling events. We have developed a simple microarray assay for the evaluation of protein binding to various GAG subclasses. In a single experiment, the binding to all members of the GAG family can be rapidly determined, giving insight into the relative specificity of the interactions and the importance of specific sulfation motifs. The arrays are facile to prepare from commercially available materials. PMID:22057535

  1. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Analysis of Protein Glycosylation and Phosphorylation Using Liquid Phase Separation, Protein Microarray Technology, and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Patwa, Tasneem H.; Pal, Manoj; Qiu, Weilian; Lubman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein glycosylation and phosphorylation are very common posttranslational modifications. The alteration of these modifications in cancer cells is closely related to the onset and progression of cancer and other disease states. In this protocol, strategies for monitoring the changes in protein glycosylation and phosphorylation in serum or tissue cells on a global scale and specifically characterizing these alterations are included. The technique is based on lectin affinity enrichment for glycoproteins, all liquid-phase two-dimensional fractionation, protein microarray, and mass spectrometry technology. Proteins are separated based on pI in the first dimension using chromatofocusing (CF) or liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by the second-dimension separation using nonporous silica RP-HPLC. Five lectins with different binding specificities to glycan structures are used for screening glycosylation patterns in human serum through a biotin–streptavidin system. Fluorescent phosphodyes and phosphospecific antibodies are employed to detect specific phosphorylated proteins in cell lines or human tissues. The purified proteins of interest are identified by peptide sequencing. Their modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation could be further characterized by mass-spectrometry-based approaches. These strategies can be used in biological samples for large-scale glycoproteome/phosphoproteome screening as well as for individual protein modification analysis. PMID:19241043

  3. Analysis of protein glycosylation and phosphorylation using liquid phase separation, protein microarray technology, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Patwa, Tasneem H; Pal, Manoj; Qiu, Weilian; Lubman, David M

    2009-01-01

    Protein glycosylation and phosphorylation are very common posttranslational modifications. The alteration of these modifications in cancer cells is closely related to the onset and progression of cancer and other disease states. In this protocol, strategies for monitoring the changes in protein glycosylation and phosphorylation in serum or tissue cells on a global scale and specifically characterizing these alterations are included. The technique is based on lectin affinity enrichment for glycoproteins, all liquid-phase two-dimensional fractionation, protein microarray, and mass spectrometry technology. Proteins are separated based on pI in the first dimension using chromatofocusing (CF) or liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by the second-dimension separation using nonporous silica RP-HPLC. Five lectins with different binding specificities to glycan structures are used for screening glycosylation patterns in human serum through a biotin streptavidin system. Fluorescent phosphodyes and phosphospecific antibodies are employed to detect specific phosphorylated proteins in cell lines or human tissues. The purified proteins of interest are identified by peptide sequencing. Their modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation could be further characterized by mass-spectrometry-based approaches. These strategies can be used in biological samples for large-scale glycoproteome/phosphoproteome screening as well as for individual protein modification analysis.

  4. Protein microarrays using liquid phase fractionation of cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Sreekumar, Arun; Laxman, Bharathi; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Lubman, David M; Barder, Timothy J

    2003-07-01

    We describe an approach in which protein microarrays are produced using a two-dimensional (2-D) liquid phase fractionation of cell lysates. The method involves a pI-based fractionation using chromatofocusing in the first dimension followed by nonporous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of each pI fraction in the second dimension. This allows fractionation of cellular proteins in the liquid phase that could then be arrayed on nitrocellulose slides and used to study humoral response in cancer. Protein microarrays have been used to identify potential serum biomarkers for prostate cancer. It is shown that specific fractions are immunoreactive against prostate cancer serum but not against serum from healthy individuals. These proteins could serve as sero-diagnostic markers for prostate cancer. Importantly, this method allows for use of post-translationally modified proteins as baits for detection of humoral response. Proteins eliciting an immune response are identified using the molecular mass and peptide sequence data obtained using mass spectrometric analysis of the liquid fractions. The fractionation of proteins in the liquid phase make this method amenable to automation.

  5. Ubiquitination screen using protein microarrays for comprehensive identification of Rsp5 substrates in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ronish; Kus, Bart; Fladd, Christopher; Wasmuth, James; Tonikian, Raffi; Sidhu, Sachdev; Krogan, Nevan J; Parkinson, John; Rotin, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s) are responsible for target recognition and regulate stability, localization or function of their substrates. However, the substrates of most E3 enzymes remain unknown. Here, we describe the development of a novel proteomic in vitro ubiquitination screen using a protein microarray platform that can be utilized for the discovery of substrates for E3 ligases on a global scale. Using the yeast E3 Rsp5 as a test system to identify its substrates on a yeast protein microarray that covers most of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) proteome, we identified numerous known and novel ubiquitinated substrates of this E3 ligase. Our enzymatic approach was complemented by a parallel protein microarray protein interaction study. Examination of the substrates identified in the analysis combined with phage display screening allowed exploration of binding mechanisms and substrate specificity of Rsp5. The development of a platform for global discovery of E3 substrates is invaluable for understanding the cellular pathways in which they participate, and could be utilized for the identification of drug targets. PMID:17551511

  6. Protein microarrays and quantum dot probes for early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Aleksandra; Song, Dansheng; Qian, Wei; Zhukov, Tatyana

    2007-08-01

    We describe here a novel approach for detection of cancer markers using quantum dot protein microarrays. Both relatively new technologies; quantum dots and protein microarrays, offer very unique features that together allow detection of cancer markers in biological specimens (serum, plasma, body fluids) at pg/ml concentration. Quantum dots offer remarkable photostability and brightness. They do not exhibit photobleaching common to organic fluorophores. Moreover, the high emission amplitude for QDs results in a marked improvement in the signal to noise ratio of the final image. Protein microarrays allow highly parallel quantitation of specific proteins in a rapid, low-cost and low sample volume format. Furthermore the multiplexed assay enables detection of many proteins at once in one sample, making it a powerful tool for biomarker analysis and early cancer diagnostics. In a series of multiplexing experiments we investigated ability of the platform to detect six different cytokines in protein solution. We were able to detect TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-6, MIP-1beta, IL-13 and IL-1beta down to picomolar concentration, demonstrating high sensitivity of the investigated detection system. We have also constructed and investigated two different models of quantum dot probes. One by conjugation of nanocrystals to antibody specific to the selected marker--IL-10, and the second by use of streptavidin coated quantum dots and biotinylated detector antibody. Comparison of those two models showed better performance of streptavidin QD-biotinylated detector antibody model. Data quantitated using custom designed computer program (CDAS) show that proposed methodology allows monitoring of changes in biomarker concentration in physiological range.

  7. Quantum Dots-based Reverse Phase Protein Microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Shingyoji, Masato; Gerion, Daniele; Pinkel, Dan; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

    2005-07-15

    CdSe nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (Qdots) are a novel class of fluorophores, which have a diameter of a few nanometers and possess high quantum yield, tunable emission wavelength and photostability. They are an attractive alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes. Quantum dots can be silanized to be soluble in aqueous solution under biological conditions, and thus be used in bio-detection. In this study, we established a novel Qdot-based technology platform that can perform accurate and reproducible quantification of protein concentration in a crude cell lysate background. Protein lysates have been spiked with a target protein, and a dilution series of the cell lysate with a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude has been used for this proof-of-concept study. The dilution series has been spotted in microarray format, and protein detection has been achieved with a sensitivity that is at least comparable to standard commercial assays, which are based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed diaminobenzidine (DAB) chromogenesis. The data obtained through the Qdot method has shown a close linear correlation between relative fluorescence unit and relative protein concentration. The Qdot results are in almost complete agreement with data we obtained with the well-established HRP-DAB colorimetric array (R{sup 2} = 0.986). This suggests that Qdots can be used for protein quantification in microarray format, using the platform presented here.

  8. NAPPA as a Real New Method for Protein Microarray Generation

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; González-González, María; Lourido, Lucía; Dégano, Rosa M.; Ibarrola, Nieves; Casado-Vela, Juan; LaBaer, Joshua; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays (NAPPA) have emerged as a powerful and innovative technology for the screening of biomarkers and the study of protein-protein interactions, among others possible applications. The principal advantages are the high specificity and sensitivity that this platform offers. Moreover, compared to conventional protein microarrays, NAPPA technology avoids the necessity of protein purification, which is expensive and time-consuming, by substituting expression in situ with an in vitro transcription/translation kit. In summary, NAPPA arrays have been broadly employed in different studies improving knowledge about diseases and responses to treatments. Here, we review the principal advances and applications performed using this platform during the last years. PMID:27600221

  9. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T; Vinson, Charles

    2015-07-16

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS ((C)/GCGGAA GT: ) and CRE ( GT: GACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif ((C)/GCGGAA GT: GACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form (C)/GCGGA--CG-, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding. Copyright © 2015 He et al.

  10. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Vinson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS (C/GCGGAAGT) and CRE (GTGACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif (C/GCGGAAGTGACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form C/GCGGA—–CG—, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding. PMID:26185160

  11. Gel-based oligonucleotide microarray approach to analyze protein–ssDNA binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zasedateleva, Olga A.; Mikheikin, Andrey L.; Turygin, Alexander Y.; Prokopenko, Dmitry V.; Chudinov, Alexander V.; Belobritskaya, Elena E.; Chechetkin, Vladimir R.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    Gel-based oligonucleotide microarray approach was developed for quantitative profiling of binding affinity of a protein to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To demonstrate additional capabilities of this method, we analyzed the binding specificity of ribonuclease (RNase) binase from Bacillus intermedius (EC 3.1.27.3) to ssDNA using generic hexamer oligodeoxyribonucleotide microchip. Single-stranded octamer oligonucleotides were immobilized within 3D hemispherical gel pads. The octanucleotides in individual pads 5′-{N}N1N2N3N4N5N6{N}-3′ consisted of a fixed hexamer motif N1N2N3N4N5N6 in the middle and variable parts {N} at the ends, where {N} represent A, C, G and T in equal proportions. The chip has 4096 pads with a complete set of hexamer sequences. The affinity was determined by measuring dissociation of the RNase–ssDNA complexes with the temperature increasing from 0°C to 50°C in quasi-equilibrium conditions. RNase binase showed the highest sequence-specificity of binding to motifs 5′-NNG(A/T/C)GNN-3′ with the order of preference: GAG > GTG > GCG. High specificity towards G(A/T/C)G triplets was also confirmed by measuring fluorescent anisotropy of complexes of binase with selected oligodeoxyribonucleotides in solution. The affinity of RNase binase to other 3-nt sequences was also ranked. These results demonstrate the applicability of the method and provide the ground for further investigations of nonenzymatic functions of RNases. PMID:18474529

  12. Antibody Colocalization Microarray: A Scalable Technology for Multiplex Protein Analysis in Complex Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Pla-Roca, M.; Leulmi, R. F.; Tourekhanova, S.; Bergeron, S.; Laforte, V.; Moreau, E.; Gosline, S. J. C.; Bertos, N.; Hallett, M.; Park, M.; Juncker, D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA microarrays were rapidly scaled up from 256 to 6.5 million targets, and although antibody microarrays were proposed earlier, sensitive multiplex sandwich assays have only been scaled up to a few tens of targets. Cross-reactivity, arising because detection antibodies are mixed, is a known weakness of multiplex sandwich assays that is mitigated by lengthy optimization. Here, we introduce (1) vulnerability as a metric for assays. The vulnerability of multiplex sandwich assays to cross-reactivity increases quadratically with the number of targets, and together with experimental results, substantiates that scaling up of multiplex sandwich assays is unfeasible. We propose (2) a novel concept for multiplexing without mixing named antibody colocalization microarray (ACM). In ACMs, both capture and detection antibodies are physically colocalized by spotting to the same two-dimensional coordinate. Following spotting of the capture antibodies, the chip is removed from the arrayer, incubated with the sample, placed back onto the arrayer and then spotted with the detection antibodies. ACMs with up to 50 targets were produced, along with a binding curve for each protein. The ACM was validated by comparing it to ELISA and to a small-scale, conventional multiplex sandwich assay (MSA). Using ACMs, proteins in the serum of breast cancer patients and healthy controls were quantified, and six candidate biomarkers identified. Our results indicate that ACMs are sensitive, robust, and scalable. PMID:22171321

  13. Protein Microarray Characterization of the S-Nitrosoproteome*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Il; Giovinazzo, Daniel; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Yunjong; Jeong, Jun Seop; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Xie, Zhi; Hu, Jianfei; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Blackshaw, Seth; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates a substantial part of its physiologic functions via S-nitrosylation, however the cellular substrates for NO-mediated S-nitrosylation are largely unknown. Here we describe the S-nitrosoproteome using a high-density protein microarray chip containing 16,368 unique human proteins. We identified 834 potentially S-nitrosylated human proteins. Using a unique and highly specific labeling and affinity capture of S-nitrosylated proteins, 138 cysteine residues on 131 peptides in 95 proteins were determined, defining critical sites of NO's actions. Of these cysteine residues 113 are novel sites of S-nitrosylation. A consensus sequence motif from these 834 proteins for S-nitrosylation was identified, suggesting that the residues flanking the S-nitrosylated cysteine are likely to be the critical determinant of whether the cysteine is S-nitrosylated. We identify eight ubiquitin E3 ligases, RNF10, RNF11, RNF41, RNF141, RNF181, RNF208, WWP2, and UBE3A, whose activities are modulated by S-nitrosylation, providing a unique regulatory mechanism of the ubiquitin proteasome system. These results define a new and extensive set of proteins that are susceptible to NO regulation via S-nitrosylation. Similar approaches could be used to identify other post-translational modification proteomes. PMID:24105792

  14. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction.

  15. A protein microarray-based analysis of S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Forrester, Michael T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous cellular influence of nitric oxide (NO) is exerted substantially through protein S-nitrosylation. Whereas NO is highly promiscuous, physiological S-nitrosylation is typically restricted to one or very few Cys residue(s) in target proteins. The molecular basis for this specificity may derive from properties of the target protein, the S-nitrosylating species, or both. Here, we describe a protein microarray-based approach to investigate determinants of S-nitrosylation by biologically relevant low-mass S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We identify large sets of yeast and human target proteins, among which those with active-site Cys thiols residing at N termini of α-helices or within catalytic loops were particularly prominent. However, S-nitrosylation varied substantially even within these families of proteins (e.g., papain-related Cys-dependent hydrolases and rhodanese/Cdc25 phosphatases), suggesting that neither secondary structure nor intrinsic nucleophilicity of Cys thiols was sufficient to explain specificity. Further analyses revealed a substantial influence of NO-donor stereochemistry and structure on efficiency of S-nitrosylation as well as an unanticipated and important role for allosteric effectors. Thus, high-throughput screening and unbiased proteome coverage reveal multifactorial determinants of S-nitrosylation (which may be overlooked in alternative proteomic analyses), and support the idea that target specificity can be achieved through rational design of S-nitrosothiols. PMID:19864628

  16. A protein microarray-based analysis of S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew W; Forrester, Michael T; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2009-11-10

    The ubiquitous cellular influence of nitric oxide (NO) is exerted substantially through protein S-nitrosylation. Whereas NO is highly promiscuous, physiological S-nitrosylation is typically restricted to one or very few Cys residue(s) in target proteins. The molecular basis for this specificity may derive from properties of the target protein, the S-nitrosylating species, or both. Here, we describe a protein microarray-based approach to investigate determinants of S-nitrosylation by biologically relevant low-mass S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We identify large sets of yeast and human target proteins, among which those with active-site Cys thiols residing at N termini of alpha-helices or within catalytic loops were particularly prominent. However, S-nitrosylation varied substantially even within these families of proteins (e.g., papain-related Cys-dependent hydrolases and rhodanese/Cdc25 phosphatases), suggesting that neither secondary structure nor intrinsic nucleophilicity of Cys thiols was sufficient to explain specificity. Further analyses revealed a substantial influence of NO-donor stereochemistry and structure on efficiency of S-nitrosylation as well as an unanticipated and important role for allosteric effectors. Thus, high-throughput screening and unbiased proteome coverage reveal multifactorial determinants of S-nitrosylation (which may be overlooked in alternative proteomic analyses), and support the idea that target specificity can be achieved through rational design of S-nitrosothiols.

  17. Sensitive single-molecule protein quantification and protein complex detection in a microarray format

    PubMed Central

    Tessler, Lee A.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule protein analysis provides sensitive protein quantitation with a digital read-out and is promising for studying biological systems and detecting biomarkers clinically. However, current single-molecule platforms rely on the quantification of one protein at a time. Conventional antibody microarrays are scalable to detect many proteins simultaneously, but they rely on less-sensitive and less quantitative quantification by the ensemble averaging of fluorescent molecules. Here we demonstrate a single-molecule protein assay in a microarray format enabled by an ultra-low background surface and single-molecule imaging. The digital read-out provides a highly sensitive, low femtomolar limit of detection and 4 orders of magnitude of dynamic range through the use of hybrid digital-analog quantification. From crude cell lysate, we measured levels of p53 and MDM2 in parallel, proving the concept of a digital antibody microarray for use in proteomic profiling. We also applied the single-molecule microarray to detect the p53-MDM2 protein complex in cell lysate. Our study is promising for development and application of single-molecule protein methods because it represents a technological bridge between single-plex and highly multiplex studies. PMID:22038904

  18. Determining the binding affinities of prostate-specific antigen to lectins: SPR and microarray approaches.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Zámorová, Martina; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common newly diagnosed cancers among men and we focused on its traditional biomarker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), using targeted glycomics-based strategies. The aberrant glycosylation pattern of PSA may serve as a valuable tool for improving PCa diagnosis including its early-stage. In this study, we evaluated the usability of two techniques, surface plasmon resonance and protein microarray assay, for the study and characterization of interactions of PSA (both free and complexed) with six lectins (SNA, ConA, RCA, AAL, WGA and MAA II). The information on the character of such interactions is important for the application of lectins as prospective bioreceptors for biomarker glycoprofiling in a follow-up biosensing assays. SPR as well as established bioanalytical techniques allowed determination of KD values of PSA-lectin interactions in a more reliable way than protein microarray. The protein microarray method did not allow accurate quantification of KD values. However, the features of a microarray approach, such as speed and costs, enabled the screening and estimation of the nature of lectin-glycan biomarker interaction in an effective and time-saving way. All of the tested lectins interacted with commercial PSA standard isolated from healthy persons, except MAA II which reacted only very weakly. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  20. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL‐10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins’ capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  1. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Stieber, Bettina; Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins. Methods In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays. Results 110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate. Conclusions The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers. PMID:26624622

  2. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of BRCA1 Discovered Using Small Molecule Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Na, Zhenkun; Pan, Sijun; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Yao, Shao Q

    2017-01-01

    Microarray screening technology has transformed the life sciences arena over the last decade. The platform is widely used in the area of mapping interaction networks, to molecular fingerprinting and small molecular inhibitor discovery. The technique has significantly impacted both basic and applied research. The microarray platform can likewise enable high-throughput screening and discovery of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors. Herein we demonstrate the application of microarray-guided PPI inhibitor discovery, using human BRCA1 as an example. Mutations in BRCA1 have been implicated in ~50 % of hereditary breast cancers. By targeting the (BRCT)2 domain, we showed compound 15a and its prodrug 15b inhibited BRCA1 activities in tumor cells. Unlike previously reported peptide-based PPI inhibitors of BRCA1, the compounds identified could be directly administered to tumor cells, thus making them useful in targeting BRCA1/PARP-related pathways involved in DNA damage and repair response, for cancer therapy.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Protein microarrays identify disease-specific anti-cytokine autoantibody profiles in the landscape of immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jacob M.; Price, Jordan V.; Barcenas-Morales, Gabriela; Ceron-Gutierrez, Lourdes; Davies, Sophie; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Döffinger, Rainer; Utz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-cytokine autoantibodies (ACAAs) are pathogenic in a handful of rare immunodeficiencies. However, the prevalence and significance of other ACAAs across immunodeficiencies have not yet been described. Objective We sought to profile ACAAs in a diverse cohort of serum samples from patients with immunodeficiency and assess the sensitivity and specificity of protein microarrays for ACAA identification and discovery. Methods Highly multiplexed protein microarrays were designed and fabricated. Blinded serum samples from a cohort of 58 patients with immunodeficiency and healthy control subjects were used to probe microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to identify clusters of reactivity, and after unblinding, significance analysis of microarrays was used to identify disease-specific autoantibodies. A bead-based assay was used to validate protein microarray results. Blocking activity of serum containing ACAAs was measured in vitro. Results Protein microarrays were highly sensitive and specific for the detection of ACAAs in patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, detecting ACAA levels consistent with those in the published literature. Protein microarray results were validated by using an independent bead-based assay. To confirm the functional significance of these ACAAs, we tested and confirmed the blocking activity of select ACAAs in vitro. Conclusion Protein microarrays are a powerful tool for ACAA detection and discovery, and they hold promise as a diagnostic for the evaluation and monitoring of clinical immunodeficiency. PMID:26365387

  6. Direct labeling of serum proteins by fluorescent dye for antibody microarray.

    PubMed

    Klimushina, M V; Gumanova, N G; Metelskaya, V A

    2017-05-06

    Analysis of serum proteome by antibody microarray is used to identify novel biomarkers and to study signaling pathways including protein phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions. Labeling of serum proteins is important for optimal performance of the antibody microarray. Proper choice of fluorescent label and optimal concentration of protein loaded on the microarray ensure good quality of imaging that can be reliably scanned and processed by the software. We have optimized direct serum protein labeling using fluorescent dye Arrayit Green 540 (Arrayit Corporation, USA) for antibody microarray. Optimized procedure produces high quality images that can be readily scanned and used for statistical analysis of protein composition of the serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monnet, V

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins, which form part of the oligopeptide transport system belonging to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters. Depending on the bacterial species, these binding proteins (OppA) capture peptides ranging in size from 2 to 18 amino acids from the environment and pass them on to the other components of the oligopeptide transport system for internalisation. Bacteria have developed several strategies to produce these binding proteins, which are periplasmic in Gram- bacteria and membrane-anchored in Gram+, with a higher stoichiometry (probably necessary for efficient transport) than the other components in the transport system. The expression of OppA-encoding genes is clearly modulated by external factors, especially nitrogen compounds, but the mechanisms of regulation are not always clear. The best-understood roles played by OppAs are internalisation of peptides for nutrition and recycling of muropeptides. It has, however, recently become clear that OppAs are also involved in sensing the external medium via specific or non-specific peptides.

  8. Protein microarray with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence for quantification of serum α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanshun; Zhang, Yonghong; Lin, Dongdong; Li, Kang; Yin, Chengzeng; Liu, Xiuhong; Jin, Boxun; Sun, Libo; Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Aiying; Li, Ning

    2015-10-01

    To develop and evaluate a protein microarray assay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) chemiluminescence for quantification of α-fetoprotein (AFP) in serum from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A protein microarray assay for AFP was developed. Serum was collected from patients with HCC and healthy control subjects. AFP was quantified using protein microarray and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum AFP concentrations determined via protein microarray were positively correlated (r = 0.973) with those determined via ELISA in patients with HCC (n = 60) and healthy control subjects (n = 30). Protein microarray showed 80% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis. ELISA had 83.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Protein microarray effectively distinguished between patients with HCC and healthy control subjects (area under ROC curve 0.974; 95% CI 0.000, 1.000). Protein microarray is a rapid, simple and low-cost alternative to ELISA for detecting AFP in human serum. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. PASE: a web-based platform for peptide/protein microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Pamelard, Fabien; Even, Gael; Apostol, Costin; Preda, Cristian; Dhaenens, Clarisse; Fafeur, Vronique; Desmet, Rémi; Melnyk, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Peptide microarray technology requires bioinformatics and statistical tools to manage, store, and analyze the large amount of data produced. To address these needs, we developed a system called protein array software environment (PASE) that provides an integrated framework to manage and analyze microarray information from polypeptide chip technologies.

  10. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Chandra K; Aguirre, Gerson R

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  11. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  12. Dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels/protein microarray for detection of protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Huo, Qisheng; Varnum, Susan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-11-01

    We report a dye-encapsulated silica nanoparticle as a label, with the advantages of high fluorescence intensity, photostability, and biocompatibility, in conjunction with microarray technology for sensitive immunoassay of a biomarker, interleukin-6 (IL-6), on a microarray format. The tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(ii) chloride hexahydrate (Rubpy) dye was incorporated into silica nanoparticles using a simple one-step microemulsion synthesis. In this synthesis process, Igepal CA520 was used as the surfactant, therefore, no requirement of cosolvent during the synthesis and the particle size was reduced comparing to the commonly used Triton surfactant system. The nanoparticles are uniform in size with a diameter of 50 nm. The microarray fluorescent immunoassay approach based on dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels has high sensitivity for practical applications with a limit of detection for IL-6 down to 0.1 ng mL(-1). The calibration curve is linear over the range from 0.1 ng mL(-1) to 10 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, results illustrated that the assay is highly specific for IL-6 in the presence of range of cytokines or proteins. The RuDS dye-labeled nanoparticles in connection with protein microarrays show the promise for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers.

  13. Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticle Labels/Protein Microarray for Detection of Protein Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Huo, Qisheng; Varnum, Susan M.; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-10-20

    Biomarkers serve as indicators of biological and pathological processes, or physiological and pharmacological responses to a drug treatment. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a biomarker with its important biological and pathological functions, has been studied for decades. Conventional fluorescence immunoassay has been widely used for analysis of biomakers like IL-6. However, single fluorophore labeling shows its limitations of low intensity and poor stability. We report a dye-encapsulated silica nanoparticle as a label, with the advantages of high fluorescence intensity, photostability, and biocompatibility, in conjunction with microarray technology for sensitive immunoassay of IL-6 on a microarray format. The tris (2,2’-bipyridyl)ruthenium (II)chloride hexahydrate (Rubpy) dye incorporated into silica nanoparticles using a simple one-step microemulsion synthesis step. The nanoparticles are uniform in size with a diameter of 50 nm. The microarray fluorescent immunoassay approach based on dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels has high sensitivity for practical applications with a limit of detection for IL-6 down to 0.1 ng mL-1. The calibration curve is linear over the range from 0.1 ng mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1. Furthermore, results illustrated that the assay is highly specific for IL-6 in the presence of range of cytokines or proteins. The RuDS dye-labeled nanoparticles in connection with protein microarrays show the promise for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers.

  14. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  15. Mapping the affinity landscape of Thrombin-binding aptamers on 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric G-Quadruplex microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lietard, Jory; Abou Assi, Hala; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; González, Carlos; Somoza, Mark M; Damha, Masad J

    2017-01-18

    In situ fabricated nucleic acids microarrays are versatile and very high-throughput platforms for aptamer optimization and discovery, but the chemical space that can be probed against a given target has largely been confined to DNA, while RNA and non-natural nucleic acid microarrays are still an essentially uncharted territory. 2'-Fluoroarabinonucleic acid (2'F-ANA) is a prime candidate for such use in microarrays. Indeed, 2'F-ANA chemistry is readily amenable to photolithographic microarray synthesis and its potential in high affinity aptamers has been recently discovered. We thus synthesized the first microarrays containing 2'F-ANA and 2'F-ANA/DNA chimeric sequences to fully map the binding affinity landscape of the TBA1 thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer containing all 32 768 possible DNA-to-2'F-ANA mutations. The resulting microarray was screened against thrombin to identify a series of promising 2'F-ANA-modified aptamer candidates with Kds significantly lower than that of the unmodified control and which were found to adopt highly stable, antiparallel-folded G-quadruplex structures. The solution structure of the TBA1 aptamer modified with 2'F-ANA at position T3 shows that fluorine substitution preorganizes the dinucleotide loop into the proper conformation for interaction with thrombin. Overall, our work strengthens the potential of 2'F-ANA in aptamer research and further expands non-genomic applications of nucleic acids microarrays.

  16. A Platform for Combined DNA and Protein Microarrays Based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel microarray technology based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) in combination with DNA and protein bioassays immobilized at the TIRF surface. Unlike conventional microarrays that exhibit reduced signal-to-background ratio, require several stages of incubation, rinsing and stringency control, and measure only end-point results, our TIRF microarray technology provides several orders of magnitude better signal-to-background ratio, performs analysis rapidly in one step, and measures the entire course of association and dissociation kinetics between target DNA and protein molecules and the bioassays. In many practical cases detection of only DNA or protein markers alone does not provide the necessary accuracy for diagnosing a disease or detecting a pathogen. Here we describe TIRF microarrays that detect DNA and protein markers simultaneously, which reduces the probabilities of false responses. Supersensitive and multiplexed TIRF DNA and protein microarray technology may provide a platform for accurate diagnosis or enhanced research studies. Our TIRF microarray system can be mounted on upright or inverted microscopes or interfaced directly with CCD cameras equipped with a single objective, facilitating the development of portable devices. As proof-of-concept we applied TIRF microarrays for detecting molecular markers from Bacillus anthracis, the pathogen responsible for anthrax. PMID:22438738

  17. A Protein Microarray ELISA for the Detection of Botulinum neurotoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.

    2007-06-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), using high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of the heavy chain of BoNT/A. The ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers a screening test with detection limits comparable to the mouse bioassay, with results available in hours instead of days.

  18. Protein microarrays for highly parallel detection and quantitation of specific proteins and antibodies in complex solutions

    PubMed Central

    Haab, Brian B; Dunham, Maitreya J; Brown, Patrick O

    2001-01-01

    Background: We have developed and tested a method for printing protein microarrays and using these microarrays in a comparative fluorescence assay to measure the abundance of many specific proteins in complex solutions. A robotic device was used to print hundreds of specific antibody or antigen solutions in an array on the surface of derivatized microscope slides. Two complex protein samples, one serving as a standard for comparative quantitation, the other representing an experimental sample in which the protein quantities were to be measured, were labeled by covalent attachment of spectrally resolvable fluorescent dyes. Results: Specific antibody-antigen interactions localized specific components of the complex mixtures to defined cognate spots in the array, where the relative intensity of the fluorescent signal representing the experimental sample and the reference standard provided a measure of each protein's abundance in the experimental sample. To test the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of this assay, we analyzed the performance of 115 antibody/antigen pairs. 50% of the arrayed antigens and 20% of the arrayed antibodies provided specific and accurate measurements of their cognate ligands at or below concentrations of 0.34 μg/ml and 1.6 μg/ml, respectively. Some of the antibody/antigen pairs allowed detection of the cognate ligands at absolute concentrations below 1 ng/ml, and partial concentrations of 1 part in 106, sensitivities sufficient for measurement of many clinically important proteins in patient blood samples. Conclusions: These results suggest that protein microarrays can provide a practical means to characterize patterns of variation in hundreds of thousands of different proteins in clinical or research applications. PMID:11182887

  19. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  20. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  1. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Felsenstein, Kenneth M; Saunders, Lindsey B; Simmons, John K; Leon, Elena; Calabrese, David R; Zhang, Shuling; Michalowski, Aleksandra; Gareiss, Peter; Mock, Beverly A; Schneekloth, John S

    2016-01-15

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  2. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  3. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h.

  4. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Aguirre, Gerson R.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation. PMID:27600343

  5. An application of protein microarray in the screening of monoclonal antibodies against the oyster mushroom spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Min-Gon; Jung, Hyo-Am; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2008-03-15

    The oyster mushroom spherical virus (OMSV) is a causative agent of dieback disease in the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus. Outbreaks of this virus occasionally result in serious disease that is associated with hefty economic losses. Thus, the detection and removal of OMSV-infected spawn is considered to be a crucial step for the stable production of P. ostreatus. For the detection of OMSV, we attempted to generate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against an RNA polymerase domain (RPD) of an OMSV protein. In an effort to simplify the laborious multistep mAb screening process, we developed a protein microarray on a slide glass that is chemically modified with the RPD protein. The culture supernatants of 87 hybridoma cells, which were prepared from the fusion of RPD-immunized mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells, were spotted onto the RPD-coated microarray. The binding of mAb to RPD was detected via Alexa 488 dye-labeled anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a secondary antibody. Of 87 samples, 13 evidenced a significant level of fluorescence signal intensity. Subsequent immunoblot analysis revealed that the specificity of each mAb against RPD coincided with the corresponding fluorescence signal intensity, thereby indicating the effectiveness of the protein microarray in mAb screening.

  6. Oxygen-binding haem proteins.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael T; Reeder, Brandon J

    2008-01-01

    Myoglobin and haemoglobin, the respiratory pigments of mammals and some molluscs, annelids and arthropods, belong to an ancient superfamily of haem-associated globin proteins. Members of this family share common structural and spectral features. They also share some general functional characteristics, such as the ability to bind ligands, e.g. O2, CO and NO, at the iron atom and to undergo redox changes. These properties are used in vivo to perform a wide range of biochemical and physiological roles. While it is acknowledged that the major role of haemoglobin is to bind oxygen reversibly and deliver it to the tissues, this is not its only function, while the often-stated role of myoglobin as an oxygen storage protein is possibly a misconception. Furthermore, haemoglobin and myoglobin express enzymic activities that are important to their function, e.g. NO dioxygenase activity or peroxidatic activity that may be partly responsible for pathophysiology following haemorrhage. Evidence for these functions is described, and the discussion extended to include proteins that have recently been discovered and that are expressed at low levels within the cell. These proteins are hexaco-ordinate, unlike haemoglobin and myoglobin, and are widely distributed throughout the animal kingdom (e.g. neuroglobins and cytoglobins). They may have specialist roles in oxygen delivery to particular sites within the cell but may also perform roles associated with O2 sensing and signalling and in responses to stress, e.g. protection from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Haemoglobins are also widespread in plants and bacteria and may serve similar protective functions.

  7. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  8. Protein microarrays on hybrid polymeric thin films prepared by self-assembly of polyelectrolytes for multiple-protein immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xichun; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-03-01

    We report here the development and characterization of protein microarrays fabricated on nanoengineered 3-D polyelectrolyte thin films (PET) deposited on glass slide by consecutive adsorption of polyelectrolytes via self-assembly technique. Antibodies or antigens were immobilized in the PET-coated glass slides by electrostatic adsorption and entrapment of porous structure of the 3-D polymer film and thus establishing a platform for parallel analysis. Both antigen and antibody microarrays were fabricated on the PET-coated slides, and direct and indirect immunoassays on protein microarrays for multiple-analyte detection were demonstrated. Microarrays produced on these PET-coated slides have consistent spot morphology and provide performance features needed for proteomic analysis. The protein microarrays on the PET films provide LOD as low as 6 pg/mL and dynamic ranges up to three orders of magnitude, which are wider than the protein microarrays fabricated on aldehyde and poly-L-lysine functionalized slides. The PET films constructed by self-assembly technique in aqueous solution is green chemistry based, cost-effective method to generate 3-D thin film coatings on glass surface, and the coated slide is well suited for immobilizing many types of biological molecules so that a wide variety of microarray formats can be developed on this type of slide.

  9. Development and Validation of Protein Microarray Technology for Simultaneous Inflammatory Mediator Detection in Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Tubby, Carolyn; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J.; Harrison, Tim; Fairclough, Lucy C.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers, including cytokines, can help in the diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment response across a wide range of disease settings. Consequently, the recent emergence of protein microarray technology, which is able to quantify a range of inflammatory mediators in a large number of samples simultaneously, has become highly desirable. However, the cost of commercial systems remains somewhat prohibitive. Here we show the development, validation, and implementation of an in-house microarray platform which enables the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple protein biomarkers. The accuracy and precision of the in-house microarray system were investigated according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines for pharmacokinetic assay validation. The assay fell within these limits for all but the very low-abundant cytokines, such as interleukin- (IL-) 10. Additionally, there were no significant differences between cytokine detection using our microarray system and the “gold standard” ELISA format. Crucially, future biomarker detection need not be limited to the 16 cytokines shown here but could be expanded as required. In conclusion, we detail a bespoke protein microarray system, utilizing well-validated ELISA reagents, that allows accurate, precise, and reproducible multiplexed biomarker quantification, comparable with commercial ELISA, and allowing customization beyond that of similar commercial microarrays. PMID:25382942

  10. Development and validation of protein microarray technology for simultaneous inflammatory mediator detection in human sera.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Senthooran; Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Tubby, Carolyn; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J; Harrison, Tim; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers, including cytokines, can help in the diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment response across a wide range of disease settings. Consequently, the recent emergence of protein microarray technology, which is able to quantify a range of inflammatory mediators in a large number of samples simultaneously, has become highly desirable. However, the cost of commercial systems remains somewhat prohibitive. Here we show the development, validation, and implementation of an in-house microarray platform which enables the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple protein biomarkers. The accuracy and precision of the in-house microarray system were investigated according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines for pharmacokinetic assay validation. The assay fell within these limits for all but the very low-abundant cytokines, such as interleukin- (IL-) 10. Additionally, there were no significant differences between cytokine detection using our microarray system and the "gold standard" ELISA format. Crucially, future biomarker detection need not be limited to the 16 cytokines shown here but could be expanded as required. In conclusion, we detail a bespoke protein microarray system, utilizing well-validated ELISA reagents, that allows accurate, precise, and reproducible multiplexed biomarker quantification, comparable with commercial ELISA, and allowing customization beyond that of similar commercial microarrays.

  11. A Guided Materials Screening Approach for Developing Quantitative Sol-gel Derived Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Helka, Blake-Joseph; Brennan, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have found use in the development of high-throughput assays for new materials and discovery of small-molecule drug leads. Herein we describe a guided material screening approach to identify sol-gel based materials that are suitable for producing three-dimensional protein microarrays. The approach first identifies materials that can be printed as microarrays, narrows down the number of materials by identifying those that are compatible with a given enzyme assay, and then hones in on optimal materials based on retention of maximum enzyme activity. This approach is applied to develop microarrays suitable for two different enzyme assays, one using acetylcholinesterase and the other using a set of four key kinases involved in cancer. In each case, it was possible to produce microarrays that could be used for quantitative small-molecule screening assays and production of dose-dependent inhibitor response curves. Importantly, the ability to screen many materials produced information on the types of materials that best suited both microarray production and retention of enzyme activity. The materials data provide insight into basic material requirements necessary for tailoring optimal, high-density sol-gel derived microarrays. PMID:24022739

  12. Detailed insights from microarray and crystallographic studies into carbohydrate recognition by microneme protein 1 (MIC1) of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, James A; Liu, Yan; Leon, Ester; Allman, Sarah A; Friedrich, Nikolas; Saouros, Savvas; Curry, Stephen; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Davis, Benjamin G; Feizi, Ten; Matthews, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is among the most widespread parasites. The broad host cell range of the parasite can be explained by carbohydrate microarray screening analyses that have demonstrated the ability of the T. gondii adhesive protein, TgMIC1, to bind to a wide spectrum of sialyl oligosaccharide ligands. Here, we investigate by further microarray analyses in a dose-response format the differential binding of TgMIC1 to 2-3- and 2-6-linked sialyl carbohydrates. Interestingly, two novel synthetic fluorinated analogs of 3′SiaLacNAc1–4 and 3′SiaLacNAc1–3 were identified as highly potent ligands. To understand the structural basis of the carbohydrate binding specificity of TgMIC1, we have determined the crystal structures of TgMIC1 micronemal adhesive repeat (MAR)-region (TgMIC1-MARR) in complex with five sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine analogs. These crystal structures have revealed a specific, water-mediated hydrogen bond network that accounts for the preferential binding of TgMIC1-MARR to arrayed 2-3-linked sialyl oligosaccharides and the high potency of the fluorinated analogs. Furthermore, we provide strong evidence for the first observation of a C—F···H—O hydrogen bond within a lectin-carbohydrate complex. Finally, detailed comparison with other oligosaccharide-protein complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) reveals a new family of sialic-acid binding sites from lectins in parasites, bacteria, and viruses. PMID:19593815

  13. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  14. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  15. Site-specific and covalent attachment of his-tagged proteins by chelation assisted photoimmobilization: a strategy for microarraying of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Enander, Karin; Bui, Lan; Lundström, Ingemar; Konradsson, Peter; Liedberg, Bo

    2013-09-17

    A novel strategy for site-specific and covalent attachment of proteins has been developed, intended for robust and controllable immobilization of histidine (His)-tagged ligands in protein microarrays. The method is termed chelation assisted photoimmobilization (CAP) and was demonstrated using human IgG-Fc modified with C-terminal hexahistidines (His-IgGFc) as the ligand and protein A as the analyte. Alkanethiols terminated with either nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), benzophenone (BP), or oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold and thoroughly characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. In the process of CAP, NTA chelates Ni(2+) and the complex coordinates the His-tagged ligand in an oriented assembly. The ligand is then photoimmobilized via BP, which forms covalent bonds upon UV light activation. In the development of affinity biosensors and protein microarrays, site-specific attachment of ligands in a fashion where analyte binding sites are available is often preferred to random coupling. Analyte binding performance of ligands immobilized either by CAP or by standard amine coupling was characterized by surface plasmon resonance in combination with IRAS. The relative analyte response with randomly coupled ligand was 2.5 times higher than when site-specific attachment was used. This is a reminder that also when immobilizing ligands via residues far from the binding site, there are many other factors influencing availability and activity. Still, CAP provides a valuable expansion of protein immobilization techniques since it offers attractive microarraying possibilities amenable to applications within proteomics.

  16. Twist on protein microarrays: layering wax-patterned nitrocellulose to create customizable and separable arrays of multiplexed affinity columns.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Victoria; Vörös, János

    2014-05-06

    We developed the simple and inexpensive FoRe microarray to simultaneously test several 1 μL samples for multiple proteins. By combining forward and reverse phase microarrays into an innovative three-dimensional format, the FoRe array exploits the advantages and eliminates several drawbacks of the traditional approaches (i.e., large sample volumes, protein loss, and cross-reactivity between detection antibodies). Samples are pipetted into an array of separable, multiplexed affinity columns. Several nitrocellulose membranes, each functionalized with a different capture antibody, are stacked to create a customizable affinity column. The nitrocellulose is patterned with wax to form 25 isolated microspots on each layer, allowing us to analyze multiple samples in parallel. After running the immunoassay, the stacks are quickly disassembled, revealing 2D microarrays of different fractions from multiple samples. By combining the stack-and-separate technique with wax patterning, we keep the arrays low cost and easily tailored to a variety of applications. We successfully performed 3D multiplexing using a model system with mouse and rabbit IgG. Binding proved to be independent of the position in the stack, and the limit of detection for a mouse IgG sandwich assay was 7.3 pM in BSA and 15 pM in human plasma. The FoRe microarray makes it possible to identify protein expression patterns across several minute volume samples; for example, it could be used to analyze cell lysate in drug response studies or pricks of blood from small animal studies.

  17. An extremely simple method for fabricating 3D protein microarrays with an anti-fouling background and high protein capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifeng; Ma, Yuhong; Zhao, Changwen; Chen, Ruichao; Zhu, Xing; Zhang, Lihua; Yan, Xu; Yang, Wantai

    2014-07-21

    Protein microarrays have become vital tools for various applications in biomedicine and bio-analysis during the past decade. The intense requirements for a lower detection limit and industrialization in this area have resulted in a persistent pursuit to fabricate protein microarrays with a low background and high signal intensity via simple methods. Here, we report on an extremely simple strategy to create three-dimensional (3D) protein microarrays with an anti-fouling background and a high protein capacity by photo-induced surface sequential controlled/living graft polymerization developed in our lab. According to this strategy, "dormant" groups of isopropyl thioxanthone semipinacol (ITXSP) were first introduced to a polymeric substrate through ultraviolet (UV)-induced surface abstraction of hydrogen, followed by a coupling reaction. Under visible light irradiation, the ITXSP groups were photolyzed to initiate surface living graft polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate (PEGMMA), thus introducing PEG brushes to the substrate to generate a full anti-fouling background. Due to the living nature of this graft polymerization, there were still ITXSP groups on the chain ends of the PEG brushes. Therefore, by in situ secondary living graft cross-linking copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), we could finally plant height-controllable cylinder microarrays of a 3D PEG network containing reactive epoxy groups onto the PEG brushes. Through a commonly used reaction of amine and epoxy groups, the proteins could readily be covalently immobilized onto the microarrays. This delicate design aims to overcome two universal limitations in protein microarrays: a full anti-fouling background can effectively eliminate noise caused by non-specific absorption and a 3D reactive network provides a larger protein-loading capacity to improve signal intensity. The results of non-specific protein absorption tests

  18. Crossword: A Fully Automated Algorithm for the Segmentation and Quality Control of Protein Microarray Images

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biological assays formatted as microarrays have become a critical tool for the generation of the comprehensive data sets required for systems-level understanding of biological processes. Manual annotation of data extracted from images of microarrays, however, remains a significant bottleneck, particularly for protein microarrays due to the sensitivity of this technology to weak artifact signal. In order to automate the extraction and curation of data from protein microarrays, we describe an algorithm called Crossword that logically combines information from multiple approaches to fully automate microarray segmentation. Automated artifact removal is also accomplished by segregating structured pixels from the background noise using iterative clustering and pixel connectivity. Correlation of the location of structured pixels across image channels is used to identify and remove artifact pixels from the image prior to data extraction. This component improves the accuracy of data sets while reducing the requirement for time-consuming visual inspection of the data. Crossword enables a fully automated protocol that is robust to significant spatial and intensity aberrations. Overall, the average amount of user intervention is reduced by an order of magnitude and the data quality is increased through artifact removal and reduced user variability. The increase in throughput should aid the further implementation of microarray technologies in clinical studies. PMID:24417579

  19. Kinetic identification of protein ligands in a 51,200 small-molecule library using microarrays and a label-free ellipsometric scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, James P.; Proudian, Andrew P.; Malovichko, Galina; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2013-02-01

    Drug discovery begins by identifying protein-small molecule binding pairs. Afterwards, binding kinetics and biofunctional assays are performed, to reduce candidates for further development. High-throughput screening, typically employing fluorescence, is widely used to find protein ligands in small-molecule libraries, but is rarely used for binding kinetics measurement because: (1) attaching fluorophores to proteins can alter kinetics and (2) most label-free technologies for kinetics measurement are inherently low-throughput and consume expensive sensing surfaces. We addressed this need with polarization-modulated ellipsometric scanning microscopes, called oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD). Label-free ligand screening and kinetics measurement are performed simultaneously on small-molecule microarrays printed on relatively inexpensive isocyanate-functionalized glass slides. As a microarray is reacted, an OI-RD microscope tracks the change in surface-bound macromolecule density in real-time at every spot. We report progress applying OI-RD to screen purified proteins and virus particles against a 51,200-compound library from the National Cancer Institute. Four microarrays, each containing 12,800 library compounds, are installed in four flow cells in an automated OI-RD microscope. The slides are reacted serially, each giving 12,800 binding curves with ~30 sec time resolution. The entire library is kinetically screened against a single probe in ~14 hours and multiple probes can be reacted sequentially under automation. Real-time binding detection identifies both high-affinity and low-affinity (transient binding) interactions; fluorescence endpoint images miss the latter. OI-RD and microarrays together is a powerful high-throughput tool for early stage drug discovery and development. The platform also has great potential for downstream steps such as in vitro inhibition assays.

  20. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; ...

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  1. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  2. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Neubauer, George H; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. PMID:25445329

  4. Continuous scaling 3d micro flow printing for improved spot morphology in protein microarrays - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Gale, Bruce; Eckman, Josh; Miles, Adam; Brooks, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray platform while innovative still poses a number of challenges which can only be met through creative and sophisticated system design. Pin printing while allowing for flexibility as to the type of medium printed does not offer the kind of spot reproducibility that a very sensitive application may require. The Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM) was designed to not only allow for flexibility and reproducibility but to also achieve solution stability through flow scaling. This study uses the emerging CFM for printing protein and antibodies three dimensionally for general protein microarray applications. Consistent spot morphology, a continual and persistent problem in traditional pin printed microarrays, was compared under variable printed flow rates. The final assessment was performed using a rudimentary shear model. Force effects discussion and statistical data was used to demonstrate the versatility of the system.

  5. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chipinda, Itai; Hettick, Justin M.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Low molecular weight chemical (LMW) allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed. PMID:21785613

  6. Photocleavage Based Affinity Purification and Printing of Cell-free Expressed Proteins: Application to Proteome Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Proteome microarrays hold great promise for various biotechnological and biomedical applications including mapping protein-protein interactions, drug discovery and biomarker discovery. However, the need to express, purify and print thousands of functional proteins at high density on a microarray substrate presents challenges which limit their wide-spread availability and use. We report the development of new methods, based on photocleavage, for the purification and printing of nascent proteins. Photocleavable biotin (PC-biotin) is incorporated into nascent proteins by misaminoacylated tRNAs used in a coupled transcription/translation rabbit reticulocyte cell-free expression system. Proteins were affinity isolated onto (strept)avidin coated beads and then photo-released (PC-SNAG). Compared to polyhistidine tag based affinity purification, PC-SNAG provided a higher purity yet comparable yield using a GST test protein. Antibody mediated PC-SNAG is also demonstrated. PC-SNAG proteins were found to exhibit native enzymatic activity and were suitable for the printing of ordered protein microarrays used in protein-protein interaction assays. Alternatively, when beads carrying photocleavably tethered proteins were placed in close proximity to an activated planar surface and then illuminated, proteins were transferred directly to the surface (PC-PRINT) to form discrete spots whose dimensions match that of the beads. PC-PRINT can provide an inexpensive method to fabricate very large scale, high density proteome microarrays. Moreover, transferring the proteins off the beads significantly reduces background auto-fluorescence observed with common bead types. In order to decode nascent proteins which are deposited by PC-PRINT from individual beads, the feasibility of using photocleavable quantum dot codes is demonstrated. PMID:18762158

  7. Monobodies and other synthetic binding proteins for expanding protein science.

    PubMed

    Sha, Fern; Salzman, Gabriel; Gupta, Ankit; Koide, Shohei

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic binding proteins are constructed using nonantibody molecular scaffolds. Over the last two decades, in-depth structural and functional analyses of synthetic binding proteins have improved combinatorial library designs and selection strategies, which have resulted in potent platforms that consistently generate binding proteins to diverse targets with affinity and specificity that rival those of antibodies. Favorable attributes of synthetic binding proteins, such as small size, freedom from disulfide bond formation and ease of making fusion proteins, have enabled their unique applications in protein science, cell biology and beyond. Here, we review recent studies that illustrate how synthetic binding proteins are powerful probes that can directly link structure and function, often leading to new mechanistic insights. We propose that synthetic proteins will become powerful standard tools in diverse areas of protein science, biotechnology and medicine.

  8. Binding specificity and stability of duplexes formed by modified oligonucleotides with a 4096-hexanucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Edward; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    The binding of oligodeoxynucleotides modified with adenine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside, cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyriboside or 5-bromodeoxyuridine was studied with a microarray containing all possible (4096) polyacrylamide-bound hexadeoxynucleotides (a generic microchip). The generic microchip was manufactured by using reductive immobilization of aminooligonucleotides in the activated copolymer of acrylamide, bis-acrylamide and N-(2,2-dimethoxyethyl) acrylamide. The binding of the fluorescently labeled modified octanucleotides to the array was analyzed with the use of both melting profiles and the fluorescence distribution at selected temperatures. Up to three substitutions of adenosines in the octamer sequence by adenine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Am), 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Dm) or 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyribosides (D) resulted in increased mismatch discrimination measured at the melting temperature of the corresponding perfect duplex. The stability of complexes formed by 2′-O-methyl-adenosine-modified oligodeoxynucleotides was slightly decreased with every additional substitution, yielding ∼4°C of total loss in melting temperature for three modifications, as followed from microchip thermal denaturation experiments. 2,6-Diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside modifications led to considerable duplex stabilization. The cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside and 5-bromodeoxyuridine modifications generally did not change either duplex stability or mismatch resolution. Denaturation experiments conducted with selected perfect duplexes on microchips and in solution showed similar results on thermal stabilities. Some hybridization artifacts were observed that might indicate the formation of parallel DNA. PMID:11410672

  9. On-chip synthesis of RNA aptamer microarrays for multiplexed protein biosensing with SPR imaging measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulin; Nakamoto, Kohei; Niwa, Osamu; Corn, Robert M

    2012-06-05

    Microarrays of RNA aptamers are fabricated in a one-step, multiplexed enzymatic synthesis on gold thin films in a microfluidic format and then employed in the detection of protein biomarkers with surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) measurements. Single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) oligonucleotides are transcribed on-chip from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates attached to microarray elements (denoted as generator elements) by the surface transcription reaction of T7 RNA polymerase. As they are synthesized, the ssRNA oligonucleotides diffuse in the microfluidic channel and are quickly captured by hybridization adsorption onto adjacent single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) microarray elements (denoted as detector elements) that contain a sequence complementary to 5'-end of the ssRNA. The RNA aptamers attached to these detector elements are subsequently used in SPRI measurements for the bioaffinity detection of protein biomarkers. The microfluidic generator-detector element format permits the simultaneous fabrication of multiple ssRNA oligonucleotides with different capture sequences that can hybridize simultaneously to distinct detector elements and thus create a multiplexed aptamer microarray. In an initial set of demonstration experiments, SPRI measurements are used to monitor the bioaffinity adsorption of human thrombin (hTh) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins onto RNA aptamer microarrays fabricated in situ with this on-chip RNA polymerase synthesis methodology. Additional SPRI measurements of the hydrolysis and desorption of the surface-bound ssRNA aptamers with a surface RNase H are used to verify the capture of ssRNA with RNA-DNA surface hybridization onto the detector elements. The on-chip RNA synthesis described here is an elegant, one-step multiplexed methodology for the rapid and contamination-free fabrication of RNA aptamer microarrays for protein biosensing with SPRI.

  10. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  11. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  12. Development and application of a fluorescence protein microarray for detecting serum alpha-fetoprotein in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiying; Yin, Chengzeng; Wang, Zhenshun; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Yuanshun; Li, Ang; Sun, Huanqin; Lin, Dongdong; Li, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Objective To develop a simple, effective, time-saving and low-cost fluorescence protein microarray method for detecting serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Method Non-contact piezoelectric print techniques were applied to fluorescence protein microarray to reduce the cost of prey antibody. Serum samples from patients with HCC and healthy control subjects were collected and evaluated for the presence of AFP using a novel fluorescence protein microarray. To validate the fluorescence protein microarray, serum samples were tested for AFP using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results A total of 110 serum samples from patients with HCC ( n = 65) and healthy control subjects ( n = 45) were analysed. When the AFP cut-off value was set at 20 ng/ml, the fluorescence protein microarray had a sensitivity of 91.67% and a specificity of 93.24% for detecting serum AFP. Serum AFP quantified via fluorescence protein microarray had a similar diagnostic performance compared with ELISA in distinguishing patients with HCC from healthy control subjects (area under receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.906 for fluorescence protein microarray; 0.880 for ELISA). Conclusion A fluorescence protein microarray method was developed for detecting serum AFP in patients with HCC.

  13. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shone, Clifford C; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E; Edwards, Laura J; Tighe, Patrick J; Wilcox, Mark H; Monaghan, Tanya M

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shone, Clifford C.; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E.; Edwards, Laura J.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. PMID:26178385

  15. Functions of Intracellular Retinoid Binding-Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Multiple binding and transport proteins facilitate many aspects of retinoid biology through effects on retinoid transport, cellular uptake, metabolism, and nuclear delivery. These include the serum retinol binding protein sRBP (aka Rbp4), the plasma membrane sRBP receptor Stra6, and the intracellular retinoid binding-proteins such as cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP). sRBP transports the highly lipophilic retinol through an aqueous medium. The major intracellular retinol-binding protein, CRBP1, likely enhances efficient retinoid use by providing a sink to facilitate retinol uptake from sRBP through the plasma membrane or via Stra6, delivering retinol or retinal to select enzymes that generate retinyl esters or retinoic acid, and protecting retinol/retinal from excess catabolism or opportunistic metabolism. Intracellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP1 and 2, and FABP5) seem to have more diverse functions distinctive to each, such as directing retinoic acid to catabolism, delivering retinoic acid to specific nuclear receptors, and generating non-canonical actions. Gene ablation of intracellular retinoid binding-proteins does not cause embryonic lethality or gross morphological defects. Metabolic and functional defects manifested in knockouts of CRBP1, CRBP2 and CRBP3, however, illustrate their essentiality to health, and in the case of CRBP2, to survival during limited dietary vitamin A. Future studies should continue to address the specific molecular interactions that occur between retinoid binding-proteins and their targets and their precise physiologic contributions to retinoid homeostasis and function. PMID:27830500

  16. Target gene analysis by microarrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation identifies HEY proteins as highly redundant bHLH repressors.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Julia; Weber, David; Englberger, Eva; Winkler, Anja; Kneitz, Susanne; Sung, Wing-Kin; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Wei, Chia-Lin; Gessler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    HEY bHLH transcription factors have been shown to regulate multiple key steps in cardiovascular development. They can be induced by activated NOTCH receptors, but other upstream stimuli mediated by TGFß and BMP receptors may elicit a similar response. While the basic and helix-loop-helix domains exhibit strong similarity, large parts of the proteins are still unique and may serve divergent functions. The striking overlap of cardiac defects in HEY2 and combined HEY1/HEYL knockout mice suggested that all three HEY genes fulfill overlapping function in target cells. We therefore sought to identify target genes for HEY proteins by microarray expression and ChIPseq analyses in HEK293 cells, cardiomyocytes, and murine hearts. HEY proteins were found to modulate expression of their target gene to a rather limited extent, but with striking functional interchangeability between HEY factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a much greater number of potential binding sites that again largely overlap between HEY factors. Binding sites are clustered in the proximal promoter region especially of transcriptional regulators or developmental control genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that HEY proteins primarily act as direct transcriptional repressors, while gene activation seems to be due to secondary or indirect effects. Mutagenesis of putative DNA binding residues supports the notion of direct DNA binding. While class B E-box sequences (CACGYG) clearly represent preferred target sequences, there must be additional and more loosely defined modes of DNA binding since many of the target promoters that are efficiently bound by HEY proteins do not contain an E-box motif. These data clearly establish the three HEY bHLH factors as highly redundant transcriptional repressors in vitro and in vivo, which explains the combinatorial action observed in different tissues with overlapping expression.

  17. Protein-protein interactions: scoring schemes and binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K; Jemimah, Sherlyn

    2017-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediate several cellular functions, which can be understood from the information obtained using the three-dimensional structures of protein-protein complexes and binding affinity data. This review focuses on computational aspects of predicting the best native-like complex structure and binding affinities. The first part covers the prediction of protein-protein complex structures and the advantages of conformational searching and scoring functions in protein-protein docking. The second part is devoted to various aspects of protein-protein interaction thermodynamics, such as databases for binding affinities and other thermodynamic parameters, computational methods to predict the binding affinity using either the three-dimensional structures of complexes or amino acid sequences, and change in binding affinities of the complexes upon mutations. We provide the latest developments on protein-protein docking and binding affinity studies along with a list of available computational resources for understanding protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  19. SVOP Is a Nucleotide Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) and SV2-related protein (SVOP) are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF) family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1). In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[γ] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9–12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. Conclusions/Significance SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately. PMID:19390693

  20. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  1. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G; Spuhler, Philipp S; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M Selim

    2016-03-14

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.

  2. THE BINDING OF MYOGLOBIN BY PLASMA PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Lathem, Willoughby

    1960-01-01

    When added to dog plasma in vitro and in vivo, myoglobin was bound to plasma protein in a concentration which, maximally, averaged 21 ± 6 mg. per cent. Electrophoretically, bound myoglobin was separated from free myoglobin and migrated between alpha-2 and beta globulin. The electrophoretic characteristics of protein-bound myoglobin were similar to, although not identical with, those of protein-bound hemoglobin. The maximal binding capacity of plasma for myoglobin was less than for hemoglobin, which averaged 123 mg. per cent. At concentrations below the maximal binding capacity, from 15 to 50 per cent of the myoglobin was in the free, unbound state, differing from hemoglobin which was completely bound at all concentrations below the binding capacity. When myoglobin and hemoglobin were added together to plasma, hemoglobin appeared to interfere with the binding of myoglobin or to replace it at the binding sites. Myoglobin, however, did not appear to interfere with the binding of hemoglobin. These observations suggested that myoglobin and hemoglobin were bound at least in part by the same protein. When myoglobin was given intravenously, free myoglobin was excreted in the urine, whereas protein-bound myoglobin was not excreted. This suggests that protein-binding contributes to or determines the apparent renal threshold to myoglobin. PMID:14414439

  3. Clinical role of protein binding of quinolones.

    PubMed

    Bergogne-Bérézin, Eugénie

    2002-01-01

    Protein binding of antibacterials in plasma and tissues has long been considered a component of their pharmacokinetic parameters, playing a potential role in distribution, excretion and therapeutic effectiveness. Since the beginning of the 'antibacterial era', this factor has been extensively analysed for all antibacterial classes, showing that wide variations of the degree of protein binding occur even in the same antibacterial class, as with beta-lactams. As the understanding of protein binding grew, the complexity of the binding system was increasingly perceived and its dynamic character described. Studies of protein binding of the fluoroquinolones have shown that the great majority of these drugs exhibit low protein binding, ranging from approximately 20 to 40% in plasma, and that they are bound predominantly to albumin. The potential role in pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics of binding of fluoroquinolones to plasma, tissue and intracellular proteins has been analysed, but it has not been established that protein binding has any significant direct or indirect impact on therapeutic effectiveness. Regarding the factors influencing the tissue distribution of antibacterials, physicochemical characteristics and the small molecular size of fluoroquinolones permit a rapid penetration into extravascular sites and intracellularly, with a rapid equilibrium being established between intravascular and extravascular compartments. The high concentrations of these drugs achieved in tissues, body fluids and intracellularly, in addition to their wide antibacterial spectrum, mean that fluoroquinolones have therapeutic effectiveness in a large variety of infections. The tolerability of quinolones has generally been reported as good, based upon long experience in using pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in clinical practice. Among more recently developed molecules, good tolerability has been reported for levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, but certain other new

  4. “On silico” peptide microarrays for high-resolution mapping of antibody epitopes and diverse protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Xu, Guangyu; Levy, Dan; Baechler, Emily C.; Gozani, Or; Varma, Madoo; Liu, Chih Long

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel, silicon-based peptide array for broad biological applications, including potential for development as a real-time point-of-care platform. We employed photolithography on silicon wafers to synthesize microarrays (Intel arrays), containing every possible overlapping peptide within a linear protein sequence covering the N-terminal tail of human histone H2B. Arrays also included peptides with acetylated and methylated lysine residues reflecting post-translational modifications of H2B. We defined minimum binding epitopes for commercial antibodies recognizing modified and unmodified H2B peptides. We further demonstrated that this platform is suitable for highly sensitive methyltransferase and kinase substrate characterization. Intel arrays also revealed specific H2B epitopes recognized by autoantibodies in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that have increased disease severity. By combining emerging nonfluorescence-based detection methods with an underlying integrated circuit, we are now poised to create a truly transformative proteomics platform with applications in bioscience, drug development, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:22902875

  5. Identification of the feline humoral immune response to Bartonella henselae infection by protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Adam; Ortega, Rocio; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Tan, Xiaolin; Chomel, Bruno B; Kasten, Rickie W; Koehler, Jane E; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-07-06

    Bartonella henselae is the zoonotic agent of cat scratch disease and causes potentially fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. Understanding the complex interactions between the host's immune system and bacterial pathogens is central to the field of infectious diseases and to the development of effective diagnostics and vaccines. We report the development of a microarray comprised of proteins expressed from 96% (1433/1493) of the predicted ORFs encoded by the genome of the zoonotic pathogen Bartonella henselae. The array was probed with a collection of 62 uninfected, 62 infected, and 8 "specific-pathogen free" naïve cat sera, to profile the antibody repertoire elicited during natural Bartonella henselae infection. We found that 7.3% of the B. henselae proteins on the microarray were seroreactive and that seroreactivity was not evenly distributed between predicted protein function or subcellular localization. Membrane proteins were significantly most likely to be seroreactive, although only 23% of the membrane proteins were reactive. Conversely, we found that proteins involved in amino acid transport and metabolism were significantly underrepresented and did not contain any seroreactive antigens. Of all seroreactive antigens, 52 were differentially reactive with sera from infected cats, and 53 were equally reactive with sera from infected and uninfected cats. Thirteen of the seroreactive antigens were found to be differentially seroreactive between B. henselae type I and type II. Based on these results, we developed a classifier algorithm that was capable of accurately discerning 93% of the infected animals using the microarray platform. The seroreactivity and diagnostic potential of these antigens was then validated on an immunostrip platform, which correctly identified 98% of the infected cats. Our protein microarray platform provides a high-throughput, comprehensive analysis of the feline humoral immune response to natural infection with the alpha

  6. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  7. Personalised proteome analysis by means of protein microarrays made from individual patient samples

    PubMed Central

    Syafrizayanti; Lueong, Smiths S.; Di, Cuixia; Schaefer, Jonas V.; Plückthun, Andreas; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing has advanced to a state that permits studying the genomes of individual patients as nearly a matter of routine. Towards analysing a tissue’s protein content in a similar manner, we established a method for the production of microarrays that represent full-length proteins as they are encoded in individual specimens, exhibiting the particular variations, such as mutations or splice variations, present in these samples. From total RNA isolates, each transcript is copied to a specific location on the array by an on-chip polymerase elongation reaction, followed by in situ cell-free transcription and translation. These microarrays permit parallel analyses of variations in protein structure and interaction that are specific to particular samples. PMID:28045055

  8. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  9. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  10. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment. PMID:22988444

  11. Characterization of Receptor Binding Profiles of Influenza A Viruses Using An Ellipsometry-Based Label-Free Glycan Microarray Assay Platform

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yiyan; Sun, Yung-Shin; Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Lau, Kam; Landry, James P.; Luo, Zeng; Baumgarth, Nicole; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    A key step leading to influenza viral infection is the highly specific binding of a viral spike protein, hemagglutinin (HA), with an extracellular glycan receptor of a host cell. Detailed and timely characterization of virus-receptor binding profiles may be used to evaluate and track the pandemic potential of an influenza virus strain. We demonstrate a label-free glycan microarray assay platform for acquiring influenza virus binding profiles against a wide variety of glycan receptors. By immobilizing biotinylated receptors on a streptavidin-functionalized solid surface, we measured binding curves of five influenza A virus strains with 24 glycans of diverse structures and used the apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (avidity constants, 10–100 pM) as characterizing parameters of viral receptor profiles. Furthermore by measuring binding kinetic constants of solution-phase glycans to immobilized viruses, we confirmed that the glycan-HA affinity constant is in the range of 10 mM and the reaction is enthalpy-driven. PMID:26193329

  12. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  13. Novel Protein Microarray Technology to Examine Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    LyC) from chicken egg white , ADH from bakers yeast, and BSA were all obtained from Sigma (St. Louis, MO, USA). PSA was purified from human seminal...three model proteins: lysozyme , alcohol dehydrogenase, and serum albumin at levels of 100 and 20 fmol. In an effort to assess the rapid digestion platform...Abbreviations: ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase; Æ-CHCA, a-cyano-4- hydroxycinnamic acid; hK2, human kallikrein 2; LyC, lysozyme C; PSA, prostate-specific antigen; PS

  14. Calling Biomarkers in Milk Using a Protein Microarray on Your Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Susann K J; Tokarski, Christian; Lang, Stefan N; van Ginkel, Leendert A; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nielen, Michel W F

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the concept of a protein microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay for multiple biomarker detection in milk extracts by an ordinary smartphone. A multiplex immunoassay was designed on a microarray chip, having built-in positive and negative quality controls. After the immunoassay procedure, the 48 microspots were labelled with Quantum Dots (QD) depending on the protein biomarker levels in the sample. QD-fluorescence was subsequently detected by the smartphone camera under UV light excitation from LEDs embedded in a simple 3D-printed opto-mechanical smartphone attachment. The somewhat aberrant images obtained under such conditions, were corrected by newly developed Android-based software on the same smartphone, and protein biomarker profiles were calculated. The indirect detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in milk extracts based on altered biomarker profile of anti-rbST antibodies was selected as a real-life challenge. RbST-treated and untreated cows clearly showed reproducible treatment-dependent biomarker profiles in milk, in excellent agreement with results from a flow cytometer reference method. In a pilot experiment, anti-rbST antibody detection was multiplexed with the detection of another rbST-dependent biomarker, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Milk extract IGF-1 levels were found to be increased after rbST treatment and correlated with the results obtained from the reference method. These data clearly demonstrate the potential of the portable protein microarray concept towards simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We envisage broad application of this 'protein microarray on a smartphone'-concept for on-site testing, e.g., in food safety, environment and health monitoring.

  15. Calling Biomarkers in Milk Using a Protein Microarray on Your Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Susann K. J.; Tokarski, Christian; Lang, Stefan N.; van Ginkel, Leendert A.; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nielen, Michel W. F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the concept of a protein microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay for multiple biomarker detection in milk extracts by an ordinary smartphone. A multiplex immunoassay was designed on a microarray chip, having built-in positive and negative quality controls. After the immunoassay procedure, the 48 microspots were labelled with Quantum Dots (QD) depending on the protein biomarker levels in the sample. QD-fluorescence was subsequently detected by the smartphone camera under UV light excitation from LEDs embedded in a simple 3D-printed opto-mechanical smartphone attachment. The somewhat aberrant images obtained under such conditions, were corrected by newly developed Android-based software on the same smartphone, and protein biomarker profiles were calculated. The indirect detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in milk extracts based on altered biomarker profile of anti-rbST antibodies was selected as a real-life challenge. RbST-treated and untreated cows clearly showed reproducible treatment-dependent biomarker profiles in milk, in excellent agreement with results from a flow cytometer reference method. In a pilot experiment, anti-rbST antibody detection was multiplexed with the detection of another rbST-dependent biomarker, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Milk extract IGF-1 levels were found to be increased after rbST treatment and correlated with the results obtained from the reference method. These data clearly demonstrate the potential of the portable protein microarray concept towards simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We envisage broad application of this ‘protein microarray on a smartphone’-concept for on-site testing, e.g., in food safety, environment and health monitoring. PMID:26308444

  16. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  17. Microelectrospotting as a new method for electrosynthesis of surface-imprinted polymer microarrays for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Bosserdt, Maria; Erdőssy, Júlia; Lautner, Gergely; Witt, Julia; Köhler, Katja; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Yarman, Aysu; Wittstock, Gunther; Scheller, Frieder W; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2015-11-15

    Here we introduce microelectrospotting as a new approach for preparation of protein-selective molecularly imprinted polymer microarrays on bare gold SPR imaging chips. During electrospotting both the gold chip and the spotting tip are electrically connected to a potentiostat as working and counter electrodes, respectively. The spotting pin encloses the monomer-template protein cocktail that upon contacting the gold surface is in-situ electropolymerized resulting in surface confined polymer spots of ca. 500 µm diameter. By repeating this procedure at preprogrammed locations for various composition monomer-template mixtures microarrays of nanometer-thin surface-imprinted films are generated in a controlled manner. We show that the removal and rebinding kinetics of the template and various potential interferents to such microarrays can be monitored in real-time and multiplexed manner by SPR imaging. The proof of principle for microelectrospotting of electrically insulating surface-imprinted films is made by using scopoletin as monomer and ferritin as protein template. It is shown that microelectrospotting in combination with SPR imaging can offer a versatile platform for label-free and enhanced throughput optimization of the molecularly imprinted polymers for protein recognition and for their analytical application.

  18. Functional GPCR microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yulong; Webb, Brian L; Su, Hui; Mozdy, Eric J; Fang, Ye; Wu, Qi; Liu, Li; Beck, Jonathan; Ferrie, Ann M; Raghavan, Srikanth; Mauro, John; Carre, Alain; Müeller, Dirk; Lai, Fang; Rasnow, Brian; Johnson, Michael; Min, Hosung; Salon, John; Lahiri, Joydeep

    2005-11-09

    This paper describes G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) microarrays on porous glass substrates and functional assays based on the binding of a europium-labeled GTP analogue. The porous glass slides were made by casting a glass frit on impermeable glass slides and then coating with gamma-aminopropyl silane (GAPS). The emitted fluorescence was captured on an imager with a time-gated intensified CCD detector. Microarrays of the neurotensin receptor 1, the cholinergic receptor muscarinic 2, the opioid receptor mu, and the cannabinoid receptor 1 were fabricated by pin printing. The selective agonism of each of the receptors was observed. The screening of potential antagonists was demonstrated using a cocktail of agonists. The amount of activation observed was sufficient to permit determinations of EC50 and IC50. Such microarrays could potentially streamline drug discovery by helping integrate primary screening with selectivity and safety screening without compromising the essential functional information obtainable from cellular assays.

  19. Facilitated diffusion of DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Klenin, Konstantin V; Merlitz, Holger; Langowski, Jörg; Wu, Chen-Xu

    2006-01-13

    The diffusion-controlled limit of reaction times for site-specific DNA-binding proteins is derived from first principles. We follow the generally accepted concept that a protein propagates via two competitive modes, a three-dimensional diffusion in space and a one-dimensional sliding along the DNA. However, our theoretical treatment of the problem is new. The accuracy of our analytical model is verified by numerical simulations. The results confirm that the unspecific binding of protein to DNA, combined with sliding, is capable to reduce the reaction times significantly.

  20. Membrane-based microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Elliott P.; Hudson, James; Steward, John; Donnell, Philip A.; Chan, Wing W.; Taylor, Richard F.

    1999-11-01

    Microarrays represent a new approach to the rapid detection and identification of analytes. Studies to date have shown that the immobilization of receptor molecules (such as DNA, oligonucleotides, antibodies, enzymes and binding proteins) onto silicon and polymeric substrates can result in arrays able to detect hundreds of analytes in a single step. The formation of the receptor/analyte complex can, itself, lead to detection, or the complex can be interrogated through the use of fluorescent, chemiluminescent or radioactive probes and ligands.

  1. Drug protein binding and the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gugler, R; Azarnoff, D L

    1976-01-01

    A reduction in plasma albumin concentration, as seen in patients with the nephrotic syndrome, is usually associated with a decrease in plasma protein binding of highly bound drugs. Therefore, the fraction of the unbound drug increases, but the absolute free concentration remains essentially unchanged due to a compensatory reduction in the steady state total plasma concentration. With phenytoin, protein binding and plasma albumin concentration are closely related, so that the degree of binding can be estimated without specific binding techniques. To be able to correctly interprete plasma levels the degree of protein binding should be known, since a reduced total concentration may be fully effective, if the free drug fraction is increased in hypoalbuminaemic patients. Although the mean steady state plasma concentration of highly bound drugs is not affected in the nephrotic syndrome, a greater fluctuation of the unbound level is observed between doses, offering a possible explanation for the increased incidence of toxicity in hypoalbuminaemic patients. As a consequence, shorter dosing intervals of these drugs seems to be advisable, rather than a reduction in the total daily dose. Reduced protein binding is accompanied by an increase in the total plasma clearance which is a function of the elimination rate constant and the volume of distribution.

  2. Phosphoprotein Stability in Clinical Tissue and Its Relevance for Reverse Phase Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Virginia; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated proteins reflect the activity of specific cell signaling nodes in biological kinase protein networks. Cell signaling pathways can be either activated or deactivated depending on the phosphorylation state of the constituent proteins. The state of these kinase pathways reflects the in vivo activity of the cells and tissue at any given point in time. As such, cell signaling pathway information can be extrapolated to infer which phosphorylated proteins/pathways are driving an individual tumor’s growth. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays (RPMA) are a sensitive and precise platform that can be applied to the quantitative measurement of hundreds of phosphorylated signal proteins from a small sample of tissue. Pre-analytical variability originating from tissue procurement and preservation may cause significant variability and bias in downstream molecular analysis. Depending on the ex vivo delay time in tissue processing, and the manner of tissue handling, protein biomarkers such as signal pathway phosphoproteins will be elevated or suppressed in a manner that does not represent the biomarker levels at the time of excision. Consequently, assessment of the state of these kinase networks requires stabilization, or preservation, of the phosphoproteins immediately post tissue procurement. We have employed reverse phase protein microarray analysis of phosphoproteins to study the factors influencing stability of phosphoproteins in tissue following procurement. Based on this analysis we have established tissue procurement guidelines for clinical research with an emphasis on quantifying phosphoproteins by RPMA. PMID:21901591

  3. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  4. Phosphate binding sites identification in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Parca, Luca; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ausiello, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Nearly half of known protein structures interact with phosphate-containing ligands, such as nucleotides and other cofactors. Many methods have been developed for the identification of metal ions-binding sites and some for bigger ligands such as carbohydrates, but none is yet available for the prediction of phosphate-binding sites. Here we describe Pfinder, a method that predicts binding sites for phosphate groups, both in the form of ions or as parts of other non-peptide ligands, in proteins of known structure. Pfinder uses the Query3D local structural comparison algorithm to scan a protein structure for the presence of a number of structural motifs identified for their ability to bind the phosphate chemical group. Pfinder has been tested on a data set of 52 proteins for which both the apo and holo forms were available. We obtained at least one correct prediction in 63% of the holo structures and in 62% of the apo. The ability of Pfinder to recognize a phosphate-binding site in unbound protein structures makes it an ideal tool for functional annotation and for complementing docking and drug design methods. The Pfinder program is available at http://pdbfun.uniroma2.it/pfinder. PMID:20974634

  5. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  6. Label-free detection of nucleic acid and protein microarrays by scanning Kelvin nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Cheran, Larisa-Emilia; Zhang, Mingquan; Chacko, Melissa; Huo, Hong; Sadeghi, Saman

    2005-02-15

    A high-resolution scanning Kelvin nanoprobe is introduced as an alternative technique to the conventional fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection methods currently employed in nucleic acid and protein microarray technology. The new instrument is capable of the highly sensitive discernment of surface biochemical events taking place at molecular level such as nucleic acid hybridization and antibody-antigen interaction. The method involves measurement of changes in work function and surface potential instigated by such interactions. Being a label-free and non-contact technique, the structure, spatial configuration, local properties or function of the molecular system under study are not affected, nor perturbed by intercalating dyes, a strong electric field or ionizing beam. Subsequent to scanning, the microarray can be examined by other alternative approaches. Nucleic acids and proteins have been printed in microarray format on slides with a gold film in place using gold-sulphur interactive chemistry. Hybridization of nucleic acids for complementary and mismatched configurations shows consistent and reproducible values of work function. Differentiation of single internal mismatches is demonstrated. Protein concentration and formation of antibody-antigen pairs can be visualized and examined with high sensitivity and good inter-spot reproducibility.

  7. Differential phosphoprotein mapping in cancer cells using protein microarrays produced from 2-D liquid fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Manoj; Moffa, Allison; Sreekumar, Arun; Ethier, Stephen P; Barder, Timothy J; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lubman, David M

    2006-02-01

    A combination of protein microarrays and two-dimensional liquid-phase separation of proteins has been used for global profiling of the phosphoproteome in human breast cancer cells. This method has been applied to study changes in phosphorylation profile resulting from treatment of the cancer cells with PD173074, a known receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The proteins separated by 2-D liquid-phase separation were arrayed on epoxy-coated glass slides and first screened for phosphorylation using fluorescent Pro-Q Diamond stain. The candidate proteins were then identified using MALDI/ESI MS/MS analysis. Further, validation was achieved by immunoblot analysis using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. A dynamic range of approximately 100 was achieved on the microarray when beta-casein was used as a standard protein for obtaining quantitative data. Importantly, the power of this method lies in its ability to identify a large group of proteins in a single experiment that are coregulated in their posttranslational modifications, upon treatment with the inhibitor. Since proteins are known to form interacting circuits that eventually lead to various signaling events, detection of such global phosphorylation profiles might enable delineation of functional pathways that play an important role during cancer initiation and progression.

  8. Predicting Ca(2+)-binding sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Nayal, M; Di Cera, E

    1994-01-18

    The coordination shell of Ca2+ ions in proteins contains almost exclusively oxygen atoms supported by an outer shell of carbon atoms. The bond-strength contribution of each ligating oxygen in the inner shell can be evaluated by using an empirical expression successfully applied in the analysis of crystals of metal oxides. The sum of such contributions closely approximates the valence of the bound cation. When a protein is embedded in a very fine grid of points and an algorithm is used to calculate the valence of each point representing a potential Ca(2+)-binding site, a typical distribution of valence values peaked around 0.4 is obtained. In 32 documented Ca(2+)-binding proteins, containing a total of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites, a very small fraction of points in the distribution has a valence close to that of Ca2+. Only 0.06% of the points have a valence > or = 1.4. These points share the remarkable tendency to cluster around documented Ca2+ ions. A high enough value of the valence is both necessary (58 out of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites have a valence > or = 1.4) and sufficient (87% of the grid points with a valence > or = 1.4 are within 1.0 A from a documented Ca2+ ion) to predict the location of bound Ca2+ ions. The algorithm can also be used for the analysis of other cations and predicts the location of Mg(2+)- and Na(+)-binding sites in a number of proteins. The valence is, therefore, a tool of pinpoint accuracy for locating cation-binding sites, which can also be exploited in engineering high-affinity binding sites and characterizing the linkage between structural components and functional energetics for molecular recognition of metal ions by proteins.

  9. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  10. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  11. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    PubMed

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-02

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities.

  12. Profiling the Humoral Immune Response of Acute and Chronic Q Fever by Protein Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Chen, Chen; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Pablo, Jozelyn; Hendrix, Laura R.; Samuel, James E.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen profiling using comprehensive protein microarrays is a powerful tool for characterizing the humoral immune response to infectious pathogens. Coxiella burnetii is a CDC category B bioterrorist infectious agent with worldwide distribution. In order to assess the antibody repertoire of acute and chronic Q fever patients we have constructed a protein microarray containing 93% of the proteome of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Here we report the profile of the IgG and IgM seroreactivity in 25 acute Q fever patients in longitudinal samples. We found that both early and late time points of infection have a very consistent repertoire of IgM and IgG response, with a limited number of proteins undergoing increasing or decreasing seroreactivity. We also probed a large collection of acute and chronic Q fever patient samples and identified serological markers that can differentiate between the two disease states. In this comparative analysis we confirmed the identity of numerous IgG biomarkers of acute infection, identified novel IgG biomarkers for acute and chronic infections, and profiled for the first time the IgM antibody repertoire for both acute and chronic Q fever. Using these results we were able to devise a test that can distinguish acute from chronic Q fever. These results also provide a unique perspective on isotype switch and demonstrate the utility of protein microarrays for simultaneously examining the dynamic humoral immune response against thousands of proteins from a large number of patients. The results presented here identify novel seroreactive antigens for the development of recombinant protein-based diagnostics and subunit vaccines, and provide insight into the development of the antibody response. PMID:21817167

  13. An overview of innovations and industrial solutions in Protein Microarray Technology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shabarni; Manubhai, K P; Kulkarni, Vishwesh; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-04-01

    The complexity involving protein array technology reflects in the fact that instrumentation and data analysis are subject to change depending on the biological question, technical compatibility of instruments and software used in each experiment. Industry has played a pivotal role in establishing standards for future deliberations in sustenance of these technologies in the form of protein array chips, arrayers, scanning devices, and data analysis software. This has enhanced the outreach of protein microarray technology to researchers across the globe. These have encouraged a surge in the adaptation of "nonclassical" approaches such as DNA-based protein arrays, micro-contact printing, label-free protein detection, and algorithms for data analysis. This review provides a unique overview of these industrial solutions available for protein microarray based studies. It aims at assessing the developments in various commercial platforms, thus providing a holistic overview of various modalities, options, and compatibility; summarizing the journey of this powerful high-throughput technology. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    in vitro TF-DNA preferences obtained from the universal protein binding microarrays (PBM) for ~90 eukaryotic TFs belonging to 22 different DNA-binding domain types. As a result of this new analysis, we conclude that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding is a widespread phenomenon that significantly affects protein-DNA binding preferences and need not require the presence of consensus (specific) TFBSs in order to achieve genome-wide TF-DNA binding specificity. PMID:26285121

  15. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes.

    PubMed

    Afek, Ariel; Cohen, Hila; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B

    2015-08-01

    in vitro TF-DNA preferences obtained from the universal protein binding microarrays (PBM) for ~90 eukaryotic TFs belonging to 22 different DNA-binding domain types. As a result of this new analysis, we conclude that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding is a widespread phenomenon that significantly affects protein-DNA binding preferences and need not require the presence of consensus (specific) TFBSs in order to achieve genome-wide TF-DNA binding specificity.

  16. The Development and Application of a Quantitative Peptide Microarray Based Approach to Protein Interaction Domain Specificity Space*

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Brett W.; Kim, Yohan; Wang, Miaoyan; Peters, Bjoern; Rock, Ronald S.; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein interaction domain (PID) linear peptide motif interactions direct diverse cellular processes in a specific and coordinated fashion. PID specificity, or the interaction selectivity derived from affinity preferences between possible PID-peptide pairs is the basis of this ability. Here, we develop an integrated experimental and computational cellulose peptide conjugate microarray (CPCMA) based approach for the high throughput analysis of PID specificity that provides unprecedented quantitative resolution and reproducibility. As a test system, we quantify the specificity preferences of four Src Homology 2 domains and 124 physiological phosphopeptides to produce a novel quantitative interactome. The quantitative data set covers a broad affinity range, is highly precise, and agrees well with orthogonal biophysical validation, in vivo interactions, and peptide library trained algorithm predictions. In contrast to preceding approaches, the CPCMAs proved capable of confidently assigning interactions into affinity categories, resolving the subtle affinity contributions of residue correlations, and yielded predictive peptide motif affinity matrices. Unique CPCMA enabled modes of systems level analysis reveal a physiological interactome with expected node degree value decreasing as a function of affinity, resulting in minimal high affinity binding overlap between domains; uncover that Src Homology 2 domains bind ligands with a similar average affinity yet strikingly different levels of promiscuity and binding dynamic range; and parse with unprecedented quantitative resolution contextual factors directing specificity. The CPCMA platform promises broad application within the fields of PID specificity, synthetic biology, specificity focused drug design, and network biology. PMID:25135669

  17. Development and application of an antibody-based protein microarray to assess physiological stress in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Ruth I; Cattet, Marc R L; Sarauer, Bryan L; Nielsen, Scott E; Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Janz, David M

    2016-01-01

    A novel antibody-based protein microarray was developed that simultaneously determines expression of 31 stress-associated proteins in skin samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The microarray determines proteins belonging to four broad functional categories associated with stress physiology: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis proteins, apoptosis/cell cycle proteins, cellular stress/proteotoxicity proteins and oxidative stress/inflammation proteins. Small skin samples (50-100 mg) were collected from captured bears using biopsy punches. Proteins were isolated and labelled with fluorescent dyes, with labelled protein homogenates loaded onto microarrays to hybridize with antibodies. Relative protein expression was determined by comparison with a pooled standard skin sample. The assay was sensitive, requiring 80 µg of protein per sample to be run in triplicate on the microarray. Intra-array and inter-array coefficients of variation for individual proteins were generally <10 and <15%, respectively. With one exception, there were no significant differences in protein expression among skin samples collected from the neck, forelimb, hindlimb and ear in a subsample of n = 4 bears. This suggests that remotely delivered biopsy darts could be used in future sampling. Using generalized linear mixed models, certain proteins within each functional category demonstrated altered expression with respect to differences in year, season, geographical sampling location within Alberta and bear biological parameters, suggesting that these general variables may influence expression of specific proteins in the microarray. Our goal is to apply the protein microarray as a conservation physiology tool that can detect, evaluate and monitor physiological stress in grizzly bears and other species at risk over time in response to environmental change.

  18. Development and application of an antibody-based protein microarray to assess physiological stress in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Ruth I.; Cattet, Marc R. L.; Sarauer, Bryan L.; Nielsen, Scott E.; Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B.; Janz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel antibody-based protein microarray was developed that simultaneously determines expression of 31 stress-associated proteins in skin samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The microarray determines proteins belonging to four broad functional categories associated with stress physiology: hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis proteins, apoptosis/cell cycle proteins, cellular stress/proteotoxicity proteins and oxidative stress/inflammation proteins. Small skin samples (50–100 mg) were collected from captured bears using biopsy punches. Proteins were isolated and labelled with fluorescent dyes, with labelled protein homogenates loaded onto microarrays to hybridize with antibodies. Relative protein expression was determined by comparison with a pooled standard skin sample. The assay was sensitive, requiring 80 µg of protein per sample to be run in triplicate on the microarray. Intra-array and inter-array coefficients of variation for individual proteins were generally <10 and <15%, respectively. With one exception, there were no significant differences in protein expression among skin samples collected from the neck, forelimb, hindlimb and ear in a subsample of n = 4 bears. This suggests that remotely delivered biopsy darts could be used in future sampling. Using generalized linear mixed models, certain proteins within each functional category demonstrated altered expression with respect to differences in year, season, geographical sampling location within Alberta and bear biological parameters, suggesting that these general variables may influence expression of specific proteins in the microarray. Our goal is to apply the protein microarray as a conservation physiology tool that can detect, evaluate and monitor physiological stress in grizzly bears and other species at risk over time in response to environmental change. PMID:27293753

  19. Predicting protein concentrations with ELISA microarray assays, monotonic splines and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Don S.; Anderson, Kevin K.; White, Amanda M.; Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2008-07-14

    Background: A microarray of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, or ELISA microarray, predicts simultaneously the concentrations of numerous proteins in a small sample. These predictions, however, are uncertain due to processing error and biological variability. Making sound biological inferences as well as improving the ELISA microarray process require require both concentration predictions and creditable estimates of their errors. Methods: We present a statistical method based on monotonic spline statistical models, penalized constrained least squares fitting (PCLS) and Monte Carlo simulation (MC) to predict concentrations and estimate prediction errors in ELISA microarray. PCLS restrains the flexible spline to a fit of assay intensity that is a monotone function of protein concentration. With MC, both modeling and measurement errors are combined to estimate prediction error. The spline/PCLS/MC method is compared to a common method using simulated and real ELISA microarray data sets. Results: In contrast to the rigid logistic model, the flexible spline model gave credible fits in almost all test cases including troublesome cases with left and/or right censoring, or other asymmetries. For the real data sets, 61% of the spline predictions were more accurate than their comparable logistic predictions; especially the spline predictions at the extremes of the prediction curve. The relative errors of 50% of comparable spline and logistic predictions differed by less than 20%. Monte Carlo simulation rendered acceptable asymmetric prediction intervals for both spline and logistic models while propagation of error produced symmetric intervals that diverged unrealistically as the standard curves approached horizontal asymptotes. Conclusions: The spline/PCLS/MC method is a flexible, robust alternative to a logistic/NLS/propagation-of-error method to reliably predict protein concentrations and estimate their errors. The spline method simplifies model selection and fitting

  20. Computational analysis of maltose binding protein translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinappi, Mauro; Cecconi, Fabio; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    We propose a computational model for the study of maltose binding protein translocation across α-hemolysin nanopores. The phenomenological approach simplifies both the pore and the polypeptide chain; however it retains the basic structural protein-like properties of the maltose binding protein by promoting the correct formation of its native key interactions. By considering different observables characterising the channel blockade and molecule transport, we verified that MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the behaviour observed in a recent experiment. Simulations reveal that blockade events consist of a capture stage, to some extent related to the unfolding kinetics, and a single file translocation process in the channel. A threshold mechanics underlies the process activation with a critical force depending on the protein denaturation state. Finally, our results support the simple interpretation of translocation via first-passage statistics of a driven diffusion process of a single reaction coordinate.

  1. Structure binding relationship of galactosylated Glycoclusters toward Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecA using a DNA-based carbohydrate microarray.

    PubMed

    Gerland, Béatrice; Goudot, Alice; Ligeour, Caroline; Pourceau, Gwladys; Meyer, Albert; Vidal, Sébastien; Gehin, Thomas; Vidal, Olivier; Souteyrand, Eliane; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Chevolot, Yann; Morvan, François

    2014-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a major public health issue due to its impact on nosocomial infections as well as its impact on cystic fibrosis patient mortality. One of the main concerns is its ability to develop antibiotic resistance. Therefore, inhibition of PA virulence has been proposed as an alternative strategy to tackle PA based infections. LecA (or PA-IL), a galactose binding lectin from PA, is involved in its virulence. Herein, we aimed at designing high affinity synthetic ligands toward LecA for its inhibition and at understanding the key parameters governing the binding of multivalent galactosylated clusters. Twenty-five glycoclusters were synthesized and their bindings were studied on a carbohydrate microarray. Monosaccharide centered clusters and linear comb-like clusters were synthesized with different linkers separating the core and the galactosyl residues. Their length, flexibility, and aromaticity were varied. Our results showed that the binding profile of LecA to galactosylated clusters was dependent on both the core and the linker and also that the optimal linker was different for each core. Nevertheless, an aryl group in the linker structure drastically improved the binding to LecA. Our results also suggest that optimal distances are preferred between the core and the aromatic group and the core and the galactose.

  2. Potential serodiagnostic markers for Q fever identified in Coxiella burnetii by immunoproteomic and protein microarray approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is the etiological agent of Q fever. The clinical diagnosis of Q fever is mainly based on several serological tests. These tests all need Coxiella organisms which are difficult and hazardous to culture and purify. Results An immunoproteomic study of C. burnetii Xinqiao strain isolated in China was conducted with the sera from experimentally infected BALB/c mice and Q fever patients. Twenty of whole proteins of Xinqiao recognized by the infection sera were identified by mass spectrometry. Nineteen of the 20 proteins were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and used to fabricate a microarray which was probed with Q fever patient sera. As a result, GroEL, YbgF, RplL, Mip, OmpH, Com1, and Dnak were recognized as major seroreactive antigens. The major seroreactive proteins were fabricated in a small microarray and further analyzed with the sera of patients with rickettsial spotted fever, Legionella pneumonia or streptococcal pneumonia. In this analysis, these proteins showed fewer cross-reactions with the tested sera. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that these 7 Coxiella proteins gave a modest sensitivity and specificity for recognizing of Q fever patient sera, suggesting that they are potential serodiagnostic markers for Q fever. PMID:22420424

  3. Exploring the binding dynamics of BAR proteins.

    PubMed

    Kabaso, Doron; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kreft, Marko; Van Rienen, Ursula; Zorec, Robert; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-09-01

    We used a continuum model based on the Helfrich free energy to investigate the binding dynamics of a lipid bilayer to a BAR domain surface of a crescent-like shape of positive (e.g. I-BAR shape) or negative (e.g. F-BAR shape) intrinsic curvature. According to structural data, it has been suggested that negatively charged membrane lipids are bound to positively charged amino acids at the binding interface of BAR proteins, contributing a negative binding energy to the system free energy. In addition, the cone-like shape of negatively charged lipids on the inner side of a cell membrane might contribute a positive intrinsic curvature, facilitating the initial bending towards the crescent-like shape of the BAR domain. In the present study, we hypothesize that in the limit of a rigid BAR domain shape, the negative binding energy and the coupling between the intrinsic curvature of negatively charged lipids and the membrane curvature drive the bending of the membrane. To estimate the binding energy, the electric potential at the charged surface of a BAR domain was calculated using the Langevin-Bikerman equation. Results of numerical simulations reveal that the binding energy is important for the initial instability (i.e. bending of a membrane), while the coupling between the intrinsic shapes of lipids and membrane curvature could be crucial for the curvature-dependent aggregation of negatively charged lipids near the surface of the BAR domain. In the discussion, we suggest novel experiments using patch clamp techniques to analyze the binding dynamics of BAR proteins, as well as the possible role of BAR proteins in the fusion pore stability of exovesicles.

  4. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  5. Calling cards for DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoyi; Johnston, Mark; Mitra, Robi David

    2007-01-01

    Identifying genomic targets of transcription factors is fundamental for understanding transcriptional regulatory networks. Current technology enables identification of all targets of a single transcription factor, but there is no realistic way to achieve the converse: identification of all proteins that bind to a promoter of interest. We have developed a method that promises to fill this void. It employs the yeast retrotransposon Ty5, whose integrase interacts with the Sir4 protein. A DNA-binding protein fused to Sir4 directs insertion of Ty5 into the genome near where it binds; the Ty5 becomes a “calling card” the DNA-binding protein leaves behind in the genome. We constructed customized calling cards for seven transcription factors of yeast by including in each Ty5 a unique DNA sequence that serves as a “molecular bar code.” Ty5 transposition was induced in a population of yeast cells, each expressing a different transcription factor–Sir4 fusion and its matched, bar-coded Ty5, and the calling cards deposited into selected regions of the genome were identified, revealing the transcription factors that visited that region of the genome. In each region we analyzed, we found calling cards for only the proteins known to bind there: In the GAL1–10 promoter we found only calling cards for Gal4; in the HIS4 promoter we found only Gcn4 calling cards; in the PHO5 promoter we found only Pho4 and Pho2 calling cards. We discuss how Ty5 calling cards might be implemented for mapping all targets of all transcription factors in a single experiment. PMID:17623806

  6. MAPPI-DAT: data management and analysis for protein-protein interaction data from the high-throughput MAPPIT cell microarray platform.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya; De Puysseleyr, Veronic; Van der Heyden, José; Maddelein, Davy; Lemmens, Irma; Lievens, Sam; Degroeve, Sven; Tavernier, Jan; Martens, Lennart

    2017-01-18

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) studies have dramatically expanded our knowledge about cellular behaviour and development in different conditions. A multitude of high-throughput PPI techniques have been developed to achieve proteome-scale coverage for PPI studies, including the microarray based Mammalian Protein-Protein Interaction Trap (MAPPIT) system. Because such high-throughput techniques typically report thousands of interactions, managing and analysing the large amounts of acquired data is a challenge. We have therefore built the MAPPIT cell microArray Protein Protein Interaction- Data management & Analysis Tool (MAPPI-DAT) as an automated data management and analysis tool for MAPPIT cell microarray experiments. MAPPI-DAT stores the experimental data and metadata in a systematic and structured way, automates data analysis and interpretation, and enables the meta-analysis of MAPPIT cell microarray data across all stored experiments.

  7. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  8. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy for label-free multiplexed protein microarray assay.

    PubMed

    Joo, Chulmin; Ozkumur, Emre; Unlü, M Selim; Boer, Johannes F de

    2009-10-15

    Quantitative measurement of affinities and kinetics of various biomolecular interactions such as protein-protein, protein-DNA and receptor-ligand is central to our understanding of basic molecular and cellular functions and is useful for therapeutic evaluation. Here, we describe a laser-scanning quantitative imaging method, referred to as spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy, as an optical platform for label-free detection of biomolecular interactions. The instrument is based on a confocal interferometric microscope that enables depth-resolved quantitative phase measurements on sensor surface with high spatial resolution and phase stability. We demonstrate picogram per square millimeter surface mass sensitivity, and show its sensing capability by presenting static and dynamic detection of multiplexed protein microarray as immobilized antigens capture their corresponding antibodies.

  9. Lectin Microarray Reveals Binding Profiles of Lactobacillus casei Strains in a Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Cell Wall Polysaccharides▿†

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  10. Phylointeractomics reconstructs functional evolution of protein binding

    PubMed Central

    Kappei, Dennis; Scheibe, Marion; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Bluhm, Alina; Gossmann, Toni Ingolf; Dietz, Sabrina; Dejung, Mario; Herlyn, Holger; Buchholz, Frank; Mann, Matthias; Butter, Falk

    2017-01-01

    Molecular phylogenomics investigates evolutionary relationships based on genomic data. However, despite genomic sequence conservation, changes in protein interactions can occur relatively rapidly and may cause strong functional diversification. To investigate such functional evolution, we here combine phylogenomics with interaction proteomics. We develop this concept by investigating the molecular evolution of the shelterin complex, which protects telomeres, across 16 vertebrate species from zebrafish to humans covering 450 million years of evolution. Our phylointeractomics screen discovers previously unknown telomere-associated proteins and reveals how homologous proteins undergo functional evolution. For instance, we show that TERF1 evolved as a telomere-binding protein in the common stem lineage of marsupial and placental mammals. Phylointeractomics is a versatile and scalable approach to investigate evolutionary changes in protein function and thus can provide experimental evidence for phylogenomic relationships. PMID:28176777

  11. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to P. falciparum Infection with Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Doolan, Denise L.; Mu, Yunxiang; Unal, Berkay; Sundaresh, Suman; Hirst, Siddiqua; Valdez, Conrad; Randall, Arlo; Molina, Douglas; Liang, Xiaowu; Freilich, Daniel A.; Oloo, J. Aggrey; Blair, Peter L.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Baldi, Pierre; Davies, D. Huw; Felgner, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    A complete description of the serological response following exposure of humans to complex pathogens is lacking and approaches suitable for accomplishing this are limited. Here we report, using malaria as a model, a method which elucidates the profile of antibodies that develop after natural or experimental infection or after vaccination with attenuated organisms, and which identifies immunoreactive antigens of interest for vaccine development or other applications. Expression vectors encoding 250 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) proteins were generated by PCR/recombination cloning; the proteins were individually expressed with >90% efficiency in E. coli cell-free in vitro transcription and translation reactions, and printed directly without purification onto microarray slides. The protein microarrays were probed with human sera from one of four groups which differed in immune status: sterile immunity or no immunity against experimental challenge following vaccination with radiation-attenuated Pf sporozoites, partial immunity acquired by natural exposure, and no previous exposure to Pf. Overall, 72 highly reactive Pf antigens were identified. Proteomic features associated with immunoreactivity were identified. Importantly, antibody profiles were distinct for each donor group. Information obtained from such analyses will facilitate identifying antigens for vaccine development, dissecting the molecular basis of immunity, monitoring the outcome of whole-organism vaccine trials, and identifying immune correlates of protection. PMID:18937256

  12. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. PMID:27364157

  14. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests. PMID:27600218

  15. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  16. Inferring epitopes of a polymorphic antigen amidst broadly cross-reactive antibodies using protein microarrays: a study of OspC proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Baum, Elisabeth; Randall, Arlo Z; Zeller, Michael; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    Epitope mapping studies aim to identify the binding sites of antibody-antigen interactions to enhance the development of vaccines, diagnostics and immunotherapeutic compounds. However, mapping is a laborious process employing time- and resource-consuming 'wet bench' techniques or epitope prediction software that are still in their infancy. For polymorphic antigens, another challenge is characterizing cross-reactivity between epitopes, teasing out distinctions between broadly cross-reactive responses, limited cross-reactions among variants and the truly type-specific responses. A refined understanding of cross-reactive antibody binding could guide the selection of the most informative subsets of variants for diagnostics and multivalent subunit vaccines. We explored the antibody binding reactivity of sera from human patients and Peromyscus leucopus rodents infected with Borrelia burgdorferi to the polymorphic outer surface protein C (OspC), an attractive candidate antigen for vaccine and improved diagnostics for Lyme disease. We constructed a protein microarray displaying 23 natural variants of OspC and quantified the degree of cross-reactive antibody binding between all pairs of variants, using Pearson correlation calculated on the reactivity values using three independent transforms of the raw data: (1) logarithmic, (2) rank, and (3) binary indicators. We observed that the global amino acid sequence identity between OspC pairs was a poor predictor of cross-reactive antibody binding. Then we asked if specific regions of the protein would better explain the observed cross-reactive binding and performed in silico screening of the linear sequence and 3-dimensional structure of OspC. This analysis pointed to residues 179 through 188 the fifth C-terminal helix of the structure as a major determinant of type-specific cross-reactive antibody binding. We developed bioinformatics methods to systematically analyze the relationship between local sequence/structure variation

  17. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  18. Selective protein covalent binding and target organ toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S D; Pumford, N R; Khairallah, E A; Boekelheide, K; Pohl, L R; Amouzadeh, H R; Hinson, J A

    1997-03-01

    Protein covalent binding by xenobiotic metabolites has long been associated with target organ toxicity but mechanistic involvement of such binding has not been widely demonstrated. Modern biochemical, molecular, and immunochemical approaches have facilitated identification of specific protein targets of xenobiotic covalent binding. Such studies have revealed that protein covalent binding is not random, but rather selective with respect to the proteins targeted. Selective binding to specific cellular target proteins may better correlate with toxicity than total protein covalent binding. Current research is directed at characterizing and identifying the targeted proteins and clarifying the effect of such binding on their structure, function, and potential roles in target organ toxicity. The approaches employed to detect and identify the tartgeted proteins are described. Metabolites of acetaminophen, halothane, and 2,5-hexanedione form covalently bound adducts to recently identified protein targets. The selective binding may influence homeostatic or other cellular responses which in turn contribute to drug toxicity, hypersensitivity, or autoimmunity.

  19. Visualization of high-throughput and label-free antibody-polypeptide binding for drug screening based on microarrays and surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shengyi; Deng, Tao; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Jia; Li, Xin; Li, Qiang; Huang, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a visualization method for the high-throughput monitoring of antibody-polypeptide binding by integrating a microarray chip with surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). A prism-coupled SPRi system with smart images processing software and a 5×5 polypeptide microarray was developed. The modeling analysis was performed to optimize the system and the materials of prism and chip, looking for the optimal incident wavelength and angle of incidence for dynamic SPRi detection in solution. The system can dynamically monitor 25 tunnels of biomolecule interactions in solution without secondary tag reactants. In addition, this system can determine the specific profile of antibody-polypeptide binding in each tunnel and yield a visual three-dimensional histogram of dynamic combinations in all microarray tunnels. Furthermore, the detection limit of the label-free antibody-polypeptide binding reached 1 pg/μL in a one-step binding test, and an ultrasensitive detection of 10 fg/μL was obtained using three-step cascade binding. Using the peptide microarray, the amount of sample and reagents used was reduced to 80 nL per tunnel, and 20×20 tunnels of biomolecule interactions could be analyzed in parallel in a 7 mm×7 mm microreaction cells. This device and method offer a potential platform for high-throughput and label-free dynamic monitoring multiple biomolecule interactions for drug discovery and basic biomedical research.

  20. Exploring host-pathogen interactions through genome wide protein microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Scietti, Luigi; Sampieri, Katia; Pinzuti, Irene; Bartolini, Erika; Benucci, Barbara; Liguori, Alessia; Haag, Andreas F.; Lo Surdo, Paola; Pansegrau, Werner; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Santini, Laura; Arora, Seguinde; Leber, Xavier; Rindi, Simonetta; Savino, Silvana; Costantino, Paolo; Maione, Domenico; Merola, Marcello; Speziale, Pietro; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Bagnoli, Fabio; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Scharenberg, Meike; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Nissum, Mikkel; Liberatori, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    During bacterial pathogenesis extensive contacts between the human and the bacterial extracellular proteomes take place. The identification of novel host-pathogen interactions by standard methods using a case-by-case approach is laborious and time consuming. To overcome this limitation, we took advantage of large libraries of human and bacterial recombinant proteins. We applied a large-scale protein microarray-based screening on two important human pathogens using two different approaches: (I) 75 human extracellular proteins were tested on 159 spotted Staphylococcus aureus recombinant proteins and (II) Neisseria meningitidis adhesin (NadA), an important vaccine component against serogroup B meningococcus, was screened against ≈2300 spotted human recombinant proteins. The approach presented here allowed the identification of the interaction between the S. aureus immune evasion protein FLIPr (formyl-peptide receptor like-1 inhibitory protein) and the human complement component C1q, key players of the offense-defense fighting; and of the interaction between meningococcal NadA and human LOX-1 (low-density oxidized lipoprotein receptor), an endothelial receptor. The novel interactions between bacterial and human extracellular proteins here presented might provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying S. aureus and N. meningitidis pathogenesis. PMID:27302108

  1. Exploring host-pathogen interactions through genome wide protein microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Scietti, Luigi; Sampieri, Katia; Pinzuti, Irene; Bartolini, Erika; Benucci, Barbara; Liguori, Alessia; Haag, Andreas F; Lo Surdo, Paola; Pansegrau, Werner; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Santini, Laura; Arora, Seguinde; Leber, Xavier; Rindi, Simonetta; Savino, Silvana; Costantino, Paolo; Maione, Domenico; Merola, Marcello; Speziale, Pietro; Bottomley, Matthew J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Scharenberg, Meike; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Nissum, Mikkel; Liberatori, Sabrina

    2016-06-15

    During bacterial pathogenesis extensive contacts between the human and the bacterial extracellular proteomes take place. The identification of novel host-pathogen interactions by standard methods using a case-by-case approach is laborious and time consuming. To overcome this limitation, we took advantage of large libraries of human and bacterial recombinant proteins. We applied a large-scale protein microarray-based screening on two important human pathogens using two different approaches: (I) 75 human extracellular proteins were tested on 159 spotted Staphylococcus aureus recombinant proteins and (II) Neisseria meningitidis adhesin (NadA), an important vaccine component against serogroup B meningococcus, was screened against ≈2300 spotted human recombinant proteins. The approach presented here allowed the identification of the interaction between the S. aureus immune evasion protein FLIPr (formyl-peptide receptor like-1 inhibitory protein) and the human complement component C1q, key players of the offense-defense fighting; and of the interaction between meningococcal NadA and human LOX-1 (low-density oxidized lipoprotein receptor), an endothelial receptor. The novel interactions between bacterial and human extracellular proteins here presented might provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying S. aureus and N. meningitidis pathogenesis.

  2. Sensitivity of protein array deposition using continuous flow printing for fluorescent microarray applications - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Miles, Adam; Gale, Bruce; Eckman, Josh; Brooks, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The promise of antibody and protein microarrays to revolutionize disease diagnostics has failed to live up to the hype primarily due to the problems associated with the printing of the antibodies and/or proteins onto the detection surface. The current standard in printing proteins is pin printing. An alternative to the pin printer is the continuous-flow microspotter (CFM), a protein printer that uses microfluidic flow to print down the proteins. The advantages of the CFM include consistent spot morphology, spot-to-spot uniformity and enhanced surface concentration. Further, the CFM is effective at capturing proteins and antibodies from either dilute or complex (e.g. blood or tissue) samples. In this study, the sensitivity of CFM printing Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescently labeled proteins was determined. Values were obtained at low concentrations tens of ng/mL with low coefficients of variation. Thus, the CFM can effectively print and quantify proteins and antibodies from low concentration and complex buffered samples.

  3. Sterol Carrier Protein-2: Binding Protein for Endocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Liedhegner, Elizabeth Sabens; Vogt, Caleb D.; Sem, Daniel S.; Cunningham, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of eCB ligands and the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), subserves retrograde, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the brain. eCB signaling occurs “on-demand,” thus the processes regulating synthesis, mobilization and degradation of eCBs are also primary mechanisms for the regulation of CB1R activity. The eCBs, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are poorly soluble in water. We hypothesize that their aqueous solubility, and, therefore, their intracellular and transcellular distribution, are facilitated by protein binding. Using in silico docking studies, we have identified the nonspecific lipid binding protein, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP-2), as a potential AEA binding protein. The docking studies predict that AEA and AM404 associate with SCP-2 at a putative cholesterol binding pocket with ΔG values of −3.6 and −4.6 kcal/mol, respectively. These values are considerably higher than cholesterol (−6.62 kcal/mol) but consistent with a favorable binding interaction. In support of the docking studies, SCP-2-mediated transfer of cholesterol in vitro is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AEA; and heterologous expression of SCP-2 in HEK 293 cells increases time-related accumulation of AEA in a temperature-dependent fashion. These results suggest that SCP-2 facilitates cellular uptake of AEA. However, there is no effect of SCP-2 transfection on the cellular accumulation of AEA determined at equilibrium or the IC50 values for AEA, AM404 or 2-AG to inhibit steady state accumulation of radiolabelled AEA. We conclude that SCP-2 is a low affinity binding protein for AEA that can facilitate its cellular uptake but does not contribute significantly to intracellular sequestration of AEA. PMID:24510313

  4. Novel retinoid-binding proteins from filarial parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, B P; Vaid, A; Comley, J C; Montgomery, J A

    1985-01-01

    The present study deals with the discovery and partial characterization of specific binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid from filarial parasites (worms of the superfamily Filarioidea), including those from two species of Onchocerca. These binding proteins, which are distinct in their physicochemical properties and in the mode of ligand interactions from the host-tissue retinoid-binding proteins, may be involved in the mediation of the putative biological roles of retinoids in the control of parasitic growth, differentiation and reproduction. Parasite retinol-binding protein and retinoic acid-binding protein exhibited specificity for binding retinol and retinoic acid respectively. Both the binding proteins showed an s20,w value of 2.0 S. On gel filtration, both proteins were retarded to a position corresponding to the same molecular size (19.0 kDa). On preparative columns, the parasite binding proteins exhibited isoelectric points at pH 5.7 and 5.75. Unlike the retinoid-binding proteins of mammalian and avian origin, the parasite retinoid-binding proteins showed a lack of mercurial sensitivity in ligand binding. The comparative amounts of retinoic acid-binding protein in five parasites, Onchocerca volvulus, Onchocerca gibsoni, Dipetalonema viteae, Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis, were between 2.7 and 3.1 pmol of retinoic acid bound/mg of extractable protein. However, the levels of parasite retinol-binding protein were between 4.8 and 5.8 pmol/mg, which is considerably higher than the corresponding levels of cellular retinol-binding protein of mammalian and avian origin. Both retinol- and retinoic acid-binding-protein levels in O. volvulus-infected human nodules and O. gibsoni-infected bovine nodules were similar to their levels in mammalian tissues. Also, these nodular binding proteins, like the host-binding proteins, exhibited mercurial sensitivity to ligand interactions. PMID:3004410

  5. Monoclonal antibody selection for interleukin-4 quantification using suspension arrays and forward-phase protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Cole, K D; Peterson, A; He, Hua-Jun; Gaigalas, A K; Zong, Y

    2007-12-01

    A recombinant mouse interleukin-4 (IL-4) and three different purified rat antimouse IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with different clonalities were employed as a model system. This system was used to examine monoclonal antibody effectiveness using both conventional and high-throughput measurement techniques to select antibodies for attaining the most sensitive detection of the recombinant IL-4 through the "sandwich-type" immunoassays. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements and two high-throughput methods, suspension arrays (also called multiplexed bead arrays) and forward-phase protein microarrays, predicted the same capture (BVD4-1D11) and detection (BVD6-24G2) antibody pair for the most sensitive detection of the recombinant cytokine. By using this antibody pair, we were able to detect as low as 2 pg/mL of IL-4 in buffer solution and 13.5 pg/mL of IL-4 spiked in 100% normal mouse serum with the multiplexed bead arrays. Due to the large amount of material required for SPR measurements, the study suggests that the multiplexed bead arrays and protein microarrays are both suited for the selection of numerous antibodies against the same analyte of interest to meet the need in the areas of systems biology and reproducible clinical diagnostics for better patient care.

  6. Defining the humoral immune response to infectious agents using high-density protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Davies, D Huw; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-01-01

    A major component of the adaptive immune response to infection is the generation of protective and long-lasting humoral immunity. Traditional approaches to understanding the host’s humoral immune response are unable to provide an integrated understanding of the antibody repertoire generated in response to infection. By studying multiple antigenic responses in parallel, we can learn more about the breadth and dynamics of the antibody response to infection. Measurement of antibody production following vaccination is also a gauge for efficacy, as generation of antibodies can protect from future infections and limit disease. Protein microarrays are well suited to identify, quantify and compare individual antigenic responses following exposure to infectious agents. This technology can be applied to the development of improved serodiagnostic tests, discovery of subunit vaccine antigen candidates, epidemiologic research and vaccine development, as well as providing novel insights into infectious disease and the immune system. In this review, we will discuss the use of protein microarrays as a powerful tool to define the humoral immune response to bacteria and viruses. PMID:20143947

  7. Multiple roles for polypyrimidine tract binding (PTB) proteins in trypanosome RNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Michael Zeev; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Haham, Tomer; Barda, Omer; Levi, Sarit; Wachtel, Chaim; Nilsen, Timothy W.; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosomatid genomes encode for numerous proteins containing an RNA recognition motif (RRM), but the function of most of these proteins in mRNA metabolism is currently unknown. Here, we report the function of two such proteins that we have named PTB1 and PTB2, which resemble the mammalian polypyrimidine tract binding proteins (PTB). RNAi silencing of these factors indicates that both are essential for life. PTB1 and PTB2 reside mostly in the nucleus, but are found in the cytoplasm, as well. Microarray analysis performed on PTB1 and PTB2 RNAi silenced cells indicates that each of these factors differentially affects the transcriptome, thus regulating a different subset of mRNAs. PTB1 and PTB2 substrates were categorized bioinformatically, based on the presence of PTB binding sites in their 5′ and 3′ flanking sequences. Both proteins were shown to regulate mRNA stability. Interestingly, PTB proteins are essential for trans-splicing of genes containing C-rich polypyrimidine tracts. PTB1, but not PTB2, also affects cis-splicing. The specificity of binding of PTB1 was established in vivo and in vitro using a model substrate. This study demonstrates for the first time that trans-splicing of only certain substrates requires specific factors such as PTB proteins for their splicing. The trypanosome PTB proteins, like their mammalian homologs, represent multivalent RNA binding proteins that regulate mRNAs from their synthesis to degradation. PMID:19218552

  8. Binding of transition metals to S100 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a unique class of EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins distributed in a cell-specific, tissue-specific, and cell cycle-specific manner in humans and other vertebrates. These proteins are distinguished by their distinctive homodimeric structure, both intracellular and extracellular functions, and the ability to bind transition metals at the dimer interface. Here we summarize current knowledge of S100 protein binding of Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, focusing on binding affinities, conformational changes that arise from metal binding, and the roles of transition metal binding in S100 protein function. PMID:27430886

  9. The dataset for protein-RNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiufeng; Li, Haotian; Huang, Yangyu; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a non-redundant protein-RNA binding benchmark dataset derived from the available protein-RNA structures in the Protein Database Bank. It consists of 73 complexes with measured binding affinity. The experimental conditions (pH and temperature) for binding affinity measurements are also listed in our dataset. This binding affinity dataset can be used to compare and develop protein-RNA scoring functions. The predicted binding free energy of the 73 complexes from three available scoring functions for protein-RNA docking has a low correlation with the binding Gibbs free energy calculated from Kd.

  10. Specific protein-protein binding in many-component mixtures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2004-06-01

    Proteins must bind to specific other proteins in vivo in order to function. The proteins are required to bind to only one or a few other proteins of the few thousand proteins typically present in vivo. To quantify this requirement we introduce a property of proteins called the capability. The capability is the maximum number of specific-binding interactions possible in a mixture, or in other words the size of largest sustainable interactome. This calculation of the maximum number possible is closely analogous to the work of Shannon and others on the maximum rate of communication through noisy channels. Using a simple model of proteins, we find specific binding to be a demanding function in the sense that it demands that the binding sites of the proteins be encoded by long sequences of elements, and the requirement for specific binding then strongly constrains these sequences.

  11. Production of Tissue Microarrays, Immunohistochemistry Staining and Digitalization Within the Human Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, IngMarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts 1 2. Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) 3 4. The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  12. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-05-31

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  13. Phosphorylation of native porcine olfactory binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Nagnan-Le Meillour, Patricia; Le Danvic, Chrystelle; Brimau, Fanny; Chemineau, Philippe; Michalski, Jean-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The identification of various isoforms of olfactory binding proteins is of major importance to elucidate their involvement in detection of pheromones and other odors. Here, we report the characterization of the phosphorylation of OBP (odorant binding protein) and Von Ebner's gland protein (VEG) from the pig, Sus scrofa. After labeling with specific antibodies raised against the three types of phosphorylation (Ser, Thr, Tyr), the phosphate-modified residues were mapped by using the beta-elimination followed by Michael addition of dithiothreitol (BEMAD) method. Eleven phosphorylation sites were localized in the pOBP sequence and nine sites in the VEG sequence. OBPs are secreted by Bowman's gland cells in the extracellular mucus lining the nasal cavity. After tracking the secretion pathway in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of these cells, we hypothesize that these proteins may be phosphorylated by ectokinases that remain to be characterized. The existence of such a regulatory mechanism theoretically increases the number of OBP variants, and it suggests a more specific role for OBPs in odorant coding than the one of odorant solubilizer and transporter.

  14. ChIP-seq for genome-scale analysis of bacterial DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are central to many basic biological processes, including transcription regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is used to determine the position and strength of protein-DNA interactions in vivo. Coupling ChIP with microarrays (ChIP-chip), and more recently with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq), has allowed genome-wide profiling of DNA binding events in vivo. In this chapter we outline the steps to generate ChIP-seq libraries from bacterial samples and briefly discuss basic analysis of the data.

  15. PAA: an R/bioconductor package for biomarker discovery with protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Turewicz, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Eisenacher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The R/Bioconductor package Protein Array Analyzer (PAA) facilitates a flexible analysis of protein microarrays for biomarker discovery (esp., ProtoArrays). It provides a complete data analysis workflow including preprocessing and quality control, uni- and multivariate feature selection as well as several different plots and results tables to outline and evaluate the analysis results. As a main feature, PAA’s multivariate feature selection methods are based on recursive feature elimination (e.g. SVM-recursive feature elimination, SVM-RFE) with stability ensuring strategies such as ensemble feature selection. This enables PAA to detect stable and reliable biomarker candidate panels. Availability and implementation: PAA is freely available (BSD 3-clause license) from http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/PAA/. Contact: michael.turewicz@rub.de or martin.eisenacher@rub.de PMID:26803161

  16. Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Kinase Specificity Using Positional Scanning Peptide Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yang; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases phosphorylate their substrates within the context of specific consensus sequences surrounding the site of modification. We describe a peptide microarray approach to rapidly determine tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site motifs. This method uses a peptide library that systematically substitutes each of the amino acid residues at multiple positions surrounding a central tyrosine residue. Peptide substrates are synthesized as biotin conjugates for immobilization on avidin-coated slides. Following incubation of the slide with protein kinase and radiolabeled ATP, the relative extent of phosphorylation of each of the peptides is quantified by phosphor imaging. This method allows small quantities of kinase to be analyzed rapidly in parallel, facilitating analysis of large numbers of kinases.

  17. Copper-binding protein in Mimulus guttatus

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.J.; Thurman, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A Cu-binding protein has been purified from the roots of Mimulus guttatus using gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-75 and anion exchange chromatography on DEAE Biogel A. The protein has similar properties to putative metallothioneins (MTS) purified from other angiosperms. Putative MT was estimated by measuring the relative percentage incorporation of (/sup 35/S) into fractions containing the protein after HPLC on SW 3000-gel. In the roots of both Cu-tolerant and non tolerant plants synthesis of putative MT is induced by increased Cu concentration in the nutrient solution. The relative percentage incorporation of (/sup 35/S) into putative MT is significantly higher in extracts from the roots of Cu-tolerant than non tolerant M. guttatus after growth in 1 ..mu..M Cu suggesting involvement in the mechanism of tolerance. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of “matching water affinities.” This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K+ < Na+ < Li+ of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules. PMID:19666545

  19. A Crayfish Insulin-like-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a “pulldown” methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23–38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  20. Genome-Scale Protein Microarray Comparison of Human Antibody Responses in Plasmodium vivax Relapse and Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Chuquiyauri, Raul; Molina, Douglas M.; Moss, Eli L.; Wang, Ruobing; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Torres, Sonia; Gilman, Robert H.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Felgner, Philip; Liang, Xiaowu; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale antibody responses in Plasmodium vivax malaria remains unexplored in the endemic setting. Protein microarray analysis of asexual-stage P. vivax was used to identify antigens recognized in sera from residents of hypoendemic Peruvian Amazon. Over 24 months, of 106 participants, 91 had two symptomatic P. vivax malaria episodes, 11 had three episodes, 3 had four episodes, and 1 had five episodes. Plasmodium vivax relapse was distinguished from reinfection by a merozoite surface protein-3α restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (MSP3α PCR-RFLP) assay. Notably, P. vivax reinfection subjects did not have higher reactivity to the entire set of recognized P. vivax blood-stage antigens than relapse subjects, regardless of the number of malaria episodes. The most highly recognized P. vivax proteins were MSP 4, 7, 8, and 10 (PVX_003775, PVX_082650, PVX_097625, and PVX_114145); sexual-stage antigen s16 (PVX_000930); early transcribed membrane protein (PVX_090230); tryptophan-rich antigen (Pv-fam-a) (PVX_092995); apical merozoite antigen 1 (PVX_092275); and proteins of unknown function (PVX_081830, PVX_117680, PVX_118705, PVX_121935, PVX_097730, PVX_110935, PVX_115450, and PVX_082475). Genes encoding reactive proteins exhibited a significant enrichment of non-synonymous nucleotide variation, an observation suggesting immune selection. These data identify candidates for seroepidemiological tools to support malaria elimination efforts in P. vivax-endemic regions. PMID:26149860

  1. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    PubMed Central

    Vadnagara, Komal; Moe, Orson W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, and nuclear export signals. These structural features are essential for the function of the three members of the CHP subfamily. Indeed, CHP1–CHP3 have multiple and diverse essential functions, ranging from the regulation of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger protein function, to carrier vesicle trafficking and gene transcription. The diverse functions attributed to the CHP subfamily rendered an understanding of its action highly complex and often controversial. This review provides a comprehensive and organized examination of the properties and physiological roles of the CHP subfamily with a view to revealing a link between CHP diverse functions. PMID:22189947

  2. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  3. Chromatin Architecture and Transcription Factor Binding Regulate Expression of Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Laurie A.; Maksimova, Yelena; Schulz, Vincent; Wong, Clara; Raha, Debasish; Mahajan, Milind C.; Weissman, Sherman M.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2009-01-01

    Erythrocyte membrane protein genes serve as excellent models of complex gene locus structure and function, but their study has been complicated by both their large size and their complexity. To begin to understand the intricate interplay of transcription, dynamic chromatin architecture, transcription factor binding, and genomic organization in regulation of erythrocyte membrane protein genes, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with microarray analysis and ChIP coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing in both erythroid and nonerythroid cells. Unexpectedly, most regions of GATA-1 and NF-E2 binding were remote from gene promoters and transcriptional start sites, located primarily in introns. Cooccupancy with FOG-1, SCL, and MTA-2 was found at all regions of GATA-1 binding, with cooccupancy of SCL and MTA-2 also found at regions of NF-E2 binding. Cooccupancy of GATA-1 and NF-E2 was found frequently. A common signature of histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4, GATA-1, NF-E2, FOG-1, SCL, and MTA-2 binding and consensus GATA-1-E-box binding motifs located 34 to 90 bp away from NF-E2 binding motifs was found frequently in erythroid cell-expressed genes. These results provide insights into our understanding of membrane protein gene regulation in erythropoiesis and the regulation of complex genetic loci in erythroid and nonerythroid cells and identify numerous candidate regions for mutations associated with membrane-linked hemolytic anemia. PMID:19687298

  4. Development and Validation of a Method for Profiling Post-Translational Modification Activities Using Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Widschwendter, Martin; Sun, Dahui; Sieburg, Hans B.; Spruck, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs) impact on the stability, cellular location, and function of a protein thereby achieving a greater functional diversity of the proteome. To fully appreciate how PTMs modulate signaling networks, proteome-wide studies are necessary. However, the evaluation of PTMs on a proteome-wide scale has proven to be technically difficult. To facilitate these analyses we have developed a protein microarray-based assay that is capable of profiling PTM activities in complex biological mixtures such as whole-cell extracts and pathological specimens. Methodology/Principal Findings In our assay, protein microarrays serve as a substrate platform for in vitro enzymatic reactions in which a recombinant ligase, or extracts prepared from whole cells or a pathological specimen is overlaid. The reactions include labeled modifiers (e.g., ubiquitin, SUMO1, or NEDD8), ATP regenerating system, and other required components (depending on the assay) that support the conjugation of the modifier. In this report, we apply this methodology to profile three molecularly complex PTMs (ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and NEDDylation) using purified ligase enzymes and extracts prepared from cultured cell lines and pathological specimens. We further validate this approach by confirming the in vivo modification of several novel PTM substrates identified by our assay. Conclusions/Significance This methodology offers several advantages over currently used PTM detection methods including ease of use, rapidity, scale, and sample source diversity. Furthermore, by allowing for the intrinsic enzymatic activities of cell populations or pathological states to be directly compared, this methodology could have widespread applications for the study of PTMs in human diseases and has the potential to be directly applied to most, if not all, basic PTM research. PMID:20596523

  5. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  6. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering.

  7. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  8. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  9. ChIP-Seq to Analyze the Binding of Replication Proteins to Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, A Zachary; Viggiani, Christopher J; Aparicio, Jennifer G; Aparicio, Oscar M

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a widely used method to study interactions between proteins and discrete chromosomal loci in vivo. ChIP was originally developed for in vivo analysis of protein associations with candidate DNA sequences known or suspected to bind the protein of interest. The advent of DNA microarrays enabled the unbiased, genome-scale identification of all DNA sequences enriched by ChIP, providing a genomic map of a protein's chromatin binding. This method, termed ChIP-chip, is broadly applicable and has been particularly valuable in DNA replication studies to map potential replication origins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other organisms based on the specific association of certain replication proteins with these chromosomal elements, which are distributed throughout the genome. More recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have replaced microarrays as the preferred method for genomic analysis of ChIP experiments, and this combination is termed ChIP-Seq. We present a detailed ChIP-Seq protocol for S. cerevisiae that can be adapted for different HTS platforms and for different organisms. We also outline general schemes for data analysis; however, HTS data analyses usually must be tailored specifically for individual studies, depending on the experimental design, data characteristics, and the genome being analyzed.

  10. A bioinformatic survey of RNA-binding proteins in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Shrestha, Sony; Hart, Kevin J; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Cui, Liwang; Lindner, Scott E

    2015-11-02

    The malaria parasites in the genus Plasmodium have a very complicated life cycle involving an invertebrate vector and a vertebrate host. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are critical factors involved in every aspect of the development of these parasites. However, very few RBPs have been functionally characterized to date in the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Using different bioinformatic methods and tools we searched P. falciparum genome to list and annotate RBPs. A representative 3D models for each of the RBD domain identified in P. falciparum was created using I-TESSAR and SWISS-MODEL. Microarray and RNAseq data analysis pertaining PfRBPs was performed using MeV software. Finally, Cytoscape was used to create protein-protein interaction network for CITH-Dozi and Caf1-CCR4-Not complexes. We report the identification of 189 putative RBP genes belonging to 13 different families in Plasmodium, which comprise 3.5% of all annotated genes. Almost 90% (169/189) of these genes belong to six prominent RBP classes, namely RNA recognition motifs, DEAD/H-box RNA helicases, K homology, Zinc finger, Puf and Alba gene families. Interestingly, almost all of the identified RNA-binding helicases and KH genes have cognate homologs in model species, suggesting their evolutionary conservation. Exploration of the existing P. falciparum blood-stage transcriptomes revealed that most RBPs have peak mRNA expression levels early during the intraerythrocytic development cycle, which taper off in later stages. Nearly 27% of RBPs have elevated expression in gametocytes, while 47 and 24% have elevated mRNA expression in ookinete and asexual stages. Comparative interactome analyses using human and Plasmodium protein-protein interaction datasets suggest extensive conservation of the PfCITH/PfDOZI and PfCaf1-CCR4-NOT complexes. The Plasmodium parasites possess a large number of putative RBPs belonging to most of RBP families identified so far, suggesting the presence of extensive post

  11. Proteome-Wide Search Reveals Unexpected RNA-Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, Julia; Brown, Patrick O.

    2010-01-01

    The vast landscape of RNA-protein interactions at the heart of post-transcriptional regulation remains largely unexplored. Indeed it is likely that, even in yeast, a substantial fraction of the regulatory RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) remain to be discovered. Systematic experimental methods can play a key role in discovering these RBPs - most of the known yeast RBPs lack RNA-binding domains that might enable this activity to be predicted. We describe here a proteome-wide approach to identify RNA-protein interactions based on in vitro binding of RNA samples to yeast protein microarrays that represent over 80% of the yeast proteome. We used this procedure to screen for novel RBPs and RNA-protein interactions. A complementary mass spectrometry technique also identified proteins that associate with yeast mRNAs. Both the protein microarray and mass spectrometry methods successfully identify previously annotated RBPs, suggesting that other proteins identified in these assays might be novel RBPs. Of 35 putative novel RBPs identified by either or both of these methods, 12, including 75% of the eight most highly-ranked candidates, reproducibly associated with specific cellular RNAs. Surprisingly, most of the 12 newly discovered RBPs were enzymes. Functional characteristics of the RNA targets of some of the novel RBPs suggest coordinated post-transcriptional regulation of subunits of protein complexes and a possible link between mRNA trafficking and vesicle transport. Our results suggest that many more RBPs still remain to be identified and provide a set of candidates for further investigation. PMID:20844764

  12. Neurodegeneration and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    De Conti, Laura; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    In the eukaryotic nucleus, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a very important role in the life cycle of both coding and noncoding RNAs. As soon as they are transcribed, in fact, all RNA molecules within a cell are bound by distinct sets of RBPs that have the task of regulating its correct processing, transport, stability, and function/translation up to its final degradation. These tasks are particularly important in cells that have a complex RNA metabolism, such as neurons. Not surprisingly, therefore, recent findings have shown that the misregulation of genes involved in RNA metabolism or the autophagy/proteasome pathway plays an important role in the onset and progression of several neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we aim to review the recent advances that link neurodegenerative processes and RBP proteins. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1394. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1394 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  14. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-08

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  15. Whole genome protein microarrays for serum profiling of immunodominant antigens of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Kidd, Stephen P.; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Elmore, Michael J.; Charlton, Sue; Yeates, Annemarie; Cuthbertson, Hannah; Hallis, Bassam; Altmann, Daniel M.; Rogers, Mitch; Wattiau, Pierre; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Brooks, Tim; Vipond, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A commercial Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) whole genome protein microarray has been used to identify immunogenic Anthrax proteins (IAP) using sera from groups of donors with (a) confirmed B. anthracis naturally acquired cutaneous infection, (b) confirmed B. anthracis intravenous drug use-acquired infection, (c) occupational exposure in a wool-sorters factory, (d) humans and rabbits vaccinated with the UK Anthrax protein vaccine and compared to naïve unexposed controls. Anti-IAP responses were observed for both IgG and IgA in the challenged groups; however the anti-IAP IgG response was more evident in the vaccinated group and the anti-IAP IgA response more evident in the B. anthracis-infected groups. Infected individuals appeared somewhat suppressed for their general IgG response, compared with other challenged groups. Immunogenic protein antigens were identified in all groups, some of which were shared between groups whilst others were specific for individual groups. The toxin proteins were immunodominant in all vaccinated, infected or other challenged groups. However, a number of other chromosomally-located and plasmid encoded open reading frame proteins were also recognized by infected or exposed groups in comparison to controls. Some of these antigens e.g., BA4182 are not recognized by vaccinated individuals, suggesting that there are proteins more specifically expressed by live Anthrax spores in vivo that are not currently found in the UK licensed Anthrax Vaccine (AVP). These may perhaps be preferentially expressed during infection and represent expression of alternative pathways in the B. anthracis “infectome.” These may make highly attractive candidates for diagnostic and vaccine biomarker development as they may be more specifically associated with the infectious phase of the pathogen. A number of B. anthracis small hypothetical protein targets have been synthesized, tested in mouse immunogenicity studies and validated in parallel using human sera from

  16. Plastic protein microarray to investigate the molecular pathways of magnetic nanoparticle-induced nanotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingshuai; Li, Xuelian; Bao, Shujuan; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Qing; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (about 15 nm) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The molecular pathways of SPIONs-induced nanotoxicity was further investigated by protein microarrays on a plastic substrate from evaluation of cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis. The experimental results reveal that 50 μg ml-1 or higher levels of SPIONs cause significant loss of cell viability, considerable generation of ROS and cell apoptosis. It is proposed that high level SPIONs could induce cell apoptosis via a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway by activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and down-regulation of HSP70 and HSP90 survivor factors.

  17. A deep-blue OLED-based biochip for protein microarray fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Alessandro; Sblattero, Daniele; Cioarec, Cristina; Maiuri, Paolo; Melpignano, Patrizia

    2013-08-15

    Integrated biochips exploit a multi-disciplinary approach to produce portable point-of-care medical diagnostic systems that uncouple diagnosis from centralized laboratories. These portable devices are cost effective and have several advantages including broader accessibility to health care worldwide. Fluorescence detection of a disease-specific probe excited by an optical source is one of the most diffused methods for quantitative analysis on biochips. Here we designed and characterized a miniaturized biochip based on a novel deep-blue organic light-emitting diode. The molecular design of the diode was optimized to excite a fluorophore-conjugated antibody and tested on a protein microarray configuration with good sensitivity and specificity. These findings will be instrumental for the development of next generation point-of-care biochips. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Printing of protein microarrays via a capillary-free fluid jetting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Barron, J A; Young, H D; Dlott, D D; Darfler, M M; Krizman, D B; Ringeisen, B R

    2005-11-01

    Current proteomics experiments rely upon printing techniques such as ink jet, pin, or quill arrayers that were developed for the creation of cDNA microarrays. These techniques often do not meet the requirements needed for successful spotting of proteins to perform high-throughput, array-based proteomic profiling. Biological laser printing (BioLP) is a spotting technology that does not rely on solid pins, quill pins, or capillary-based fluidics. The non-contact mechanism of BioLP utilizes a focused laser pulse to transfer protein solutions, thereby eliminating the potential for orifice clogging, air bubbles, and unnecessary volume loss potentially encountered in commercially available spotting technologies. The speed and spot-to-spot reproducibility of BioLP is comparable to other techniques, while the minimum spot diameter and volume per printed droplet is significantly less at 30 microm and approximately 500 fL, respectively. The transfer of fluid by BioLP occurs through a fluid jetting mechanism, as observed by high-speed images of the printing process. Arraying a solution of BSA with subsequent immunodetection demonstrates the reproducible spotting of protein in an array format with CVs of <3%. Printing of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase followed by a positive reaction with a colorimetric substrate demonstrates that functional protein can be spotted using this laser-based printer.

  19. A Burkholderia pseudomallei protein microarray reveals serodiagnostic and cross-reactive antigens

    PubMed Central

    Felgner, Philip L.; Kayala, Matthew A.; Vigil, Adam; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Pablo, Jozelyn; Molina, Douglas M.; Hirst, Siddiqua; Chew, Janet S. W.; Wang, Dongling; Tan, Gladys; Duffield, Melanie; Yang, Ron; Neel, Julien; Chantratita, Narisara; Bancroft, Greg; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Davies, D. Huw; Baldi, Pierre; Peacock, Sharon; Titball, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the way in which the immune system responds to infection is central to the development of vaccines and many diagnostics. To provide insight into this area, we fabricated a protein microarray containing 1,205 Burkholderia pseudomallei proteins, probed it with 88 melioidosis patient sera, and identified 170 reactive antigens. This subset of antigens was printed on a smaller array and probed with a collection of 747 individual sera derived from 10 patient groups including melioidosis patients from Northeast Thailand and Singapore, patients with different infections, healthy individuals from the USA, and from endemic and nonendemic regions of Thailand. We identified 49 antigens that are significantly more reactive in melioidosis patients than healthy people and patients with other types of bacterial infections. We also identified 59 cross-reactive antigens that are equally reactive among all groups, including healthy controls from the USA. Using these results we were able to devise a test that can classify melioidosis positive and negative individuals with sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 83%, respectively, a significant improvement over currently available diagnostic assays. Half of the reactive antigens contained a predicted signal peptide sequence and were classified as outer membrane, surface structures or secreted molecules, and an additional 20% were associated with pathogenicity, adaptation or chaperones. These results show that microarrays allow a more comprehensive analysis of the immune response on an antigen-specific, patient-specific, and population-specific basis, can identify serodiagnostic antigens, and contribute to a more detailed understanding of immunogenicity to this pathogen. PMID:19666533

  20. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  1. Identification of seroreactive proteins of Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni using a high-density protein microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Lessa-Aquino, Carolina; Borges Rodrigues, Camila; Pablo, Jozelyn; Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algis; Liang, Li; Wunder, Elsio A; Ribeiro, Guilherme S; Vigil, Adam; Galler, Ricardo; Molina, Douglas; Liang, Xiaowu; Reis, Mitermayer G; Ko, Albert I; Medeiros, Marco Alberto; Felgner, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease worldwide. The lack of an adequate laboratory test is a major barrier for diagnosis, especially during the early stages of illness, when antibiotic therapy is most effective. Therefore, there is a critical need for an efficient diagnostic test for this life threatening disease. In order to identify new targets that could be used as diagnostic makers for leptopirosis, we constructed a protein microarray chip comprising 61% of Leptospira interrogans proteome and investigated the IgG response from 274 individuals, including 80 acute-phase, 80 convalescent-phase patients and 114 healthy control subjects from regions with endemic, high endemic, and no endemic transmission of leptospirosis. A nitrocellulose line blot assay was performed to validate the accuracy of the protein microarray results. We found 16 antigens that can discriminate between acute cases and healthy individuals from a region with high endemic transmission of leptospirosis, and 18 antigens that distinguish convalescent cases. Some of the antigens identified in this study, such as LipL32, the non-identical domains of the Lig proteins, GroEL, and Loa22 are already known to be recognized by sera from human patients, thus serving as proof-of-concept for the serodiagnostic antigen discovery approach. Several novel antigens were identified, including the hypothetical protein LIC10215 which showed good sensitivity and specificity rates for both acute- and convalescent-phase patients. Our study is the first large-scale evaluation of immunodominant antigens associated with naturally acquired leptospiral infection, and novel as well as known serodiagnostic leptospiral antigens that are recognized by antibodies in the sera of leptospirosis cases were identified. The novel antigens identified here may have potential use in both the development of new tests and the improvement of currently available assays for diagnosing this neglected tropical disease. Further

  2. Identification of Seroreactive Proteins of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Copenhageni Using a High-Density Protein Microarray Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lessa-Aquino, Carolina; Borges Rodrigues, Camila; Pablo, Jozelyn; Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algis; Liang, Li; Wunder, Elsio A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme S.; Vigil, Adam; Galler, Ricardo; Molina, Douglas; Liang, Xiaowu; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.; Medeiros, Marco Alberto; Felgner, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease worldwide. The lack of an adequate laboratory test is a major barrier for diagnosis, especially during the early stages of illness, when antibiotic therapy is most effective. Therefore, there is a critical need for an efficient diagnostic test for this life threatening disease. Methodology In order to identify new targets that could be used as diagnostic makers for leptopirosis, we constructed a protein microarray chip comprising 61% of Leptospira interrogans proteome and investigated the IgG response from 274 individuals, including 80 acute-phase, 80 convalescent-phase patients and 114 healthy control subjects from regions with endemic, high endemic, and no endemic transmission of leptospirosis. A nitrocellulose line blot assay was performed to validate the accuracy of the protein microarray results. Principal findings We found 16 antigens that can discriminate between acute cases and healthy individuals from a region with high endemic transmission of leptospirosis, and 18 antigens that distinguish convalescent cases. Some of the antigens identified in this study, such as LipL32, the non-identical domains of the Lig proteins, GroEL, and Loa22 are already known to be recognized by sera from human patients, thus serving as proof-of-concept for the serodiagnostic antigen discovery approach. Several novel antigens were identified, including the hypothetical protein LIC10215 which showed good sensitivity and specificity rates for both acute- and convalescent-phase patients. Conclusions Our study is the first large-scale evaluation of immunodominant antigens associated with naturally acquired leptospiral infection, and novel as well as known serodiagnostic leptospiral antigens that are recognized by antibodies in the sera of leptospirosis cases were identified. The novel antigens identified here may have potential use in both the development of new tests and the improvement of currently available assays for

  3. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  5. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF THE SWINE PROTEIN-ANNOTATED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY AND UTILITY OF THE ARRAYS FOR EQTL AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILING STUDIES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have evaluated the new Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray (http://www.pigoligoarray.org) by analyzing transcriptional profiles for longissimus dorsi muscle (LD), Bronchial lymph node (BLN) and Lung. Four LD samples were used to assess the stringency of hybridization conditions com...

  7. Identification of Annexin A1 protein expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma using proteomics and tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Gui-Tao; Xia, Yu; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1) protein in human gastric adenocarcinoma. This study was also designed to analyze the relationship between ANXA1 expression and the clinicopathological parameters of gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Purified gastric adenocarcinoma cells (GAC) and normal gastric epithelial cells (NGEC) were obtained from 15 patients with gastric cancer by laser capture microdissection. All of the peptide specimens were labeled as 18O/16O after trypsin digestion. Differential protein expressions were quantitatively identified between GAC and NGEC by nanoliter-reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry (nano-RPLC-MS/MS). The expressions of ANXA1 in GAC and NGEC were verified by western blot analysis. The tissue microarray containing the expressed ANXA1 in 75 pairs of gastric carcinoma and paracarcinoma specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The relationship between ANXA1 expression and clinicopathological parametes of gastric carcinoma was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 78 differential proteins were identified. Western blotting revealed that ANXA1 expression was significantly upregulated in GAC (2.17/1, P < 0.01). IHC results showed the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the clinicopathological parameters, including invasive depth (T stage), lymph node metastasis (N stage), distant metastasis (M stage) and tumour-lymph node metastasis stage (P < 0.01). However, the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the remaining clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, histological differentiation and the size of tumour were not found (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The upregulated ANXA1 expression may be associated with carcinogenesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of GAC. This protein could be considered as a biomarker of clinical prognostic prediction and targeted therapy of GAC. PMID:24282368

  8. BindML/BindML+: Detecting Protein-Protein Interaction Interface Propensity from Amino Acid Substitution Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; La, David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites in a protein structure provides important information for elucidating the mechanism of protein function and can also be useful in guiding a modeling or design procedures of protein complex structures. Since prediction methods essentially assess the propensity of amino acids that are likely to be part of a protein docking interface, they can help in designing protein-protein interactions. Here, we introduce BindML and BindML+ protein-protein interaction sites prediction methods. BindML predicts protein-protein interaction sites by identifying mutation patterns found in known protein-protein complexes using phylogenetic substitution models. BindML+ is an extension of BindML for distinguishing permanent and transient types of protein-protein interaction sites. We developed an interactive web-server that provides a convenient interface to assist in structural visualization of protein-protein interactions site predictions. The input data for the web-server are a tertiary structure of interest. BindML and BindML+ are available at http://kiharalab.org/bindml/ and http://kiharalab.org/bindml/plus/ .

  9. Multiple protein extract microarray for profiling human food-specific immunoglobulins A, M, G and E.

    PubMed

    Renault, N K; Gaddipati, S R; Wulfert, F; Falcone, F H; Mirotti, L; Tighe, P J; Wright, V; Alcocer, M J C

    2011-02-01

    Existing food immunoglobulin (Ig) tests require large volumes of serum, are limited to one immunoglobulin class, are not amenable to high throughput analysis and only give a limited picture of the immunological response to food antigens. Conversely a new generation of Component Resolved Diagnostic systems using pure proteins is highly specific and totally dependent on the availability of the protein in its recombinant or natural origin form. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-concept of a microarray test based on protein extracts of food components. Our approach relies on innovations on three different fronts: the novelty of using arrayed food samples sequentially extracted with detergent and chaotropic agents, the ability to measure four different Ig classes simultaneously and the ability to analyse the generated data via a suitable bioinformatics/statistical analysis interface. This approach combines high numerical power of microarrays with automation, high throughput analysis and enables detailed investigation of the Ig profiles to food antigens. The prototype shown contains extracts of approximately 350 food ingredients that cover most of the food products found in the UK. Here we showed that the use of a sequential extraction technique to solubilise and then denature food samples has its benefits in the assessment of variations in antigenicity when tested with human sera. A patient dependent degree of class specificity was observed with human sera (IgG specificity correlates well with IgA>IgM>IgE). Besides generating a simultaneous profile for IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE the array system has shown good discrimination between challenge responders in atopic and non-atopic individuals. Poly- and mono-specific IgE responders were easily identified. The mathematical modelling of specific IgE content showed good correlations when compared with established IgE antibody testing assay (UniCAP). Although in its proof-of-principle stages, the immune profiling technique described

  10. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; McGrath, J J; Reynolds, G P

    2002-09-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) such as calbindin, parvalbumin and calretinin are used as immunohistochemical markers for discrete neuronal subpopulations. They are particularly useful in identifying the various subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons that control output from prefrontal and cingulate cortices as well as from the hippocampus. The strategic role these interneurons play in regulating output from these three crucial brain regions has made them a focus for neuropathological investigation in schizophrenia. The number of pathological reports detailing subtle changes in these CBP-containing interneurons in patients with schizophrenia is rapidly growing. These proteins however are more than convenient neuronal markers. They confer survival advantages to neurons and can increase the neuron's ability to sustain firing. These properties may be important in the subtle pathophysiology of nondegenerative phenomena such as schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to introduce the reader to the functional properties of CBPs and to examine the emerging literature reporting alterations in these proteins in schizophrenia as well as draw some conclusions about the significance of these findings.

  11. Relating Promoter Sequences to the Proteins that Bind to Them: A Comparison Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Kimberly

    2007-03-01

    Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-ChIP) microarray data reveals that the proteins H3K9dimethyl and RNA-Polymerase II are exclusive regarding their binding to the promoter region of genes. When comparing the base pair sequences of the promoters that bind to Pol2 versus H3K9, striking differences appear. The mononucleotides have fundamentally different behaviors in each group. In addition, motifs that cluster before the transcriptional start site also generally have a strong enrichment in one group compared to the other. Using this knowledge a model can be developed that allows one to calculate a probability that a promoter will bind to either H3K9 or Pol2 based on its base pair sequence.

  12. Microarrays of recombinant Hevea brasiliensis proteins: a novel tool for the component-resolved diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Ott, H; Schröder, C; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Mahler, V; Ocklenburg, C; Merk, H F; Baron, J M

    2010-01-01

    Component-resolved diagnosis using microarray technology has recently been introduced in clinical allergology, but its applicability in patients with natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy has not been investigated. To evaluate the utility of microarray-based immunoglobulin (Ig) E detection in the diagnostic workup of NRL allergy and to compare this new diagnostic tool with established methods of NRL-specific IgE detection. We investigated 52 adults with immediate-type NRL allergy and 50 control patients. Determination of specific serum IgE against 8 recombinant Hevea brasiliensis allergen components was performed using a customized allergen microarray and a conventional fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). The panel of microarrayed allergen components was shown to represent a comprehensive repertoire of clinically relevant NRL proteins. NRL-specific IgE recognition patterns and sensitization rates determined by microarray analysis were similar to those obtained by conventional FEIA. The diagnostic sensitivity rates of combined single-component data were not significantly different for the respective recombinant test system, whereas the sensitivity level of extract-based FEIA analysis was markedly higher. The current study provides evidence that microarrays of recombinant NRL allergen components are a suitable new tool for the diagnosis of NRL-specific sensitization.They show performance characteristics comparable to those of current diagnostic tests and could be indicated in small children in whom only limited blood volumes are obtainable. Further large-scale studies in unselected patient populations and in high-risk groups are warranted before the microarray can be introduced into routine management of patients with NRL allergy.

  13. Conserved transcription factor binding sites of cancer markers derived from primary lung adenocarcinoma microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yee Leng; Wong, Maria P.; Zhang, Xue Wu; Hernandez, David; Gras, Robin; Smith, David K.; Danchin, Antoine

    2005-01-01

    Gene transcription in a set of 49 human primary lung adenocarcinomas and 9 normal lung tissue samples was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. A total of 3442 genes, called the set MAD, were found to be either up- or down-regulated by at least 2-fold between the two phenotypes. Genes assigned to a particular gene ontology term were found, in many cases, to be significantly unevenly distributed between the genes in and outside MAD. Terms that were overrepresented in MAD included functions directly implicated in the cancer cell metabolism. Based on their functional roles and expression profiles, genes in MAD were grouped into likely co-regulated gene sets. Highly conserved sequences in the 5 kb region upstream of the genes in these sets were identified with the motif discovery tool, MoDEL. Potential oncogenic transcription factors and their corresponding binding sites were identified in these conserved regions using the TRANSFAC 8.3 database. Several of the transcription factors identified in this study have been shown elsewhere to be involved in oncogenic processes. This study searched beyond phenotypic gene expression profiles in cancer cells, in order to identify the more important regulatory transcription factors that caused these aberrations in gene expression. PMID:15653641

  14. Glycan Masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for Probing Protein Binding Function and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Joel; Gurumoorthy, Sairam; Gibson, Claire; Melcher, Martin; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Wang, Ruobing; Schief, William R.; Smith, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s) lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development. PMID:23853575

  15. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  16. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    PubMed

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  17. Penicillin-binding proteins in Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Because some Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are β-lactam-producing bacteria, they have to have some self-resistant mechanism. The β-lactam biosynthetic gene clusters include genes for β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), suggesting that these are involved in self-resistance. However, direct evidence for the involvement of β-lactamases does not exist at the present time. Instead, phylogenetic analysis revealed that PBPs in Streptomyces are distinct in that Streptomyces species have much more PBPs than other Actinobacteria, and that two to three pairs of similar PBPs are present in most Streptomyces species examined. Some of these PBPs bind benzylpenicillin with very low affinity and are highly similar in their amino-acid sequences. Furthermore, other low-affinity PBPs such as SCLAV_4179 in Streptomyces clavuligerus, a β-lactam-producing Actinobacterium, may strengthen further the self-resistance against β-lactams. This review discusses the role of PBPs in resistance to benzylpenicillin in Streptomyces belonging to Actinobacteria.

  18. Latent TGF-β-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ian B.; Horiguchi, Masahito; Zilberberg, Lior; Dabovic, Branka; Hadjiolova, Krassimira; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The LTBPs (or latent transforming growth factor β binding proteins) are important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that interact with fibrillin microfibrils and have a number of different roles in microfibril biology. There are four LTBPs isoforms in the human genome (LTBP-1, -2, -3, and -4), all of which appear to associate with fibrillin and the biology of each isoform is reviewed here. The LTBPs were first identified as forming latent complexes with TGFβ by covalently binding the TGFβ propeptide (LAP) via disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum. LAP in turn is cleaved from the mature TGFβ precursor in the trans golgi network but LAP and TGFβ remain strongly bound through non-covalent interactions. LAP, TGFβ, and LTBP together form the large latent complex (LLC). LTBPs were originally thought to primarily play a role in maintaining TGFβ latency and targeting the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but it has also been shown that LTBP-1 participates in TGFβ activation by integrins and may also regulate activation by proteases and other factors. LTBP-3 appears to have a role in skeletal formation including tooth development. As well as having important functions in TGFβ regulation, TGFβ-independent activities have recently been identified for LTBP-2 and LTBP-4 in stabilizing microfibril bundles and regulating elastic fiber assembly. PMID:25960419

  19. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  20. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  1. A Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif revealed in an adenovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Christoph; Bru, Thierry; McBride, Ryan; Robison, Elizabeth; Nycholat, Corwin M; Kremer, Eric J; Paulson, James C

    2012-01-01

    Sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of transmembrane receptors that are well documented to play roles in regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. To see whether the features that define the molecular recognition of sialic acid were found in other sialic-acid-binding proteins, we analyzed 127 structures with bound sialic acids found in the Protein Data Bank database. Of these, the canine adenovirus 2-fiber knob protein showed close local structural relationship to Siglecs despite low sequence similarity. The fiber knob harbors a noncanonical sialic-acid recognition site, which was then explored for detailed specificity using a custom glycan microarray comprising 58 diverse sialosides. It was found that the adenoviral protein preferentially recognizes the epitope Neu5Acα2-3[6S]Galβ1-4GlcNAc, a structure previously identified as the preferred ligand for Siglec-8 in humans and Siglec-F in mice. Comparison of the Siglec and fiber knob sialic-acid-binding sites reveal conserved structural elements that are not clearly identifiable from the primary amino acid sequence, suggesting a Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif that comprises the consensus features of these proteins in complex with sialic acid. PMID:22522600

  2. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  3. A Combinatorial Protein Microarray for Probing Materials Interaction with Pancreatic Islet Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Delalat, Bahman; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Waibel, Michaela; Harding, Frances J.; Penko, Daniella; Drogemuller, Christopher J.; Loudovaris, Thomas; Coates, Patrick T. H.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has become a recognized therapy for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. During isolation from pancreatic tissue, the islet microenvironment is disrupted. The extracellular matrix (ECM) within this space not only provides structural support, but also actively signals to regulate islet survival and function. In addition, the ECM is responsible for growth factor presentation and sequestration. By designing biomaterials that recapture elements of the native islet environment, losses in islet function and number can potentially be reduced. Cell microarrays are a high throughput screening tool able to recreate a multitude of cellular niches on a single chip. Here, we present a screening methodology for identifying components that might promote islet survival. Automated fluorescence microscopy is used to rapidly identify islet derived cell interaction with ECM proteins and immobilized growth factors printed on arrays. MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells, mouse islets and, finally, human islets are progressively screened. We demonstrate the capability of the platform to identify ECM and growth factor protein candidates that support islet viability and function and reveal synergies in cell response. PMID:27600088

  4. MAPK target networks in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed using functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Sorina C; Popescu, George V; Bachan, Shawn; Zhang, Zimei; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2009-01-01

    Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs) cascades is a complex and fundamental process in eukaryotes, requiring MPK-activating kinases (MKKs) and MKK-activating kinases (MKKKs). However, to date only a limited number of MKK-MPK interactions and MPK phosphorylation substrates have been revealed. We determined which Arabidopsis thaliana MKKs preferentially activate 10 different MPKs in vivo and used the activated MPKs to probe high-density protein microarrays to determine their phosphorylation targets. Our analyses revealed known and novel signaling modules encompassing 570 MPK phosphorylation substrates; these substrates were enriched in transcription factors involved in the regulation of development, defense, and stress responses. Selected MPK substrates were validated by in planta reconstitution experiments. A subset of activated and wild-type MKKs induced cell death, indicating a possible role for these MKKs in the regulation of cell death. Interestingly, MKK7- and MKK9-induced death requires Sgt1, a known regulator of cell death induced during plant innate immunity. Our predicted MKK-MPK phosphorylation network constitutes a valuable resource to understand the function and specificity of MPK signaling systems.

  5. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, R. Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Saini, Harpreet K.; Tickle, Ian J.; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-01-01

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26655740

  6. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  7. An ent-kaurene that inhibits mitotic chromosome movement and binds the kinetochore protein ran-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Natalie T; Nelson, Jim; Flory, Mark R; Joseph, Jomon; Th'ng, John; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dasso, Mary; Andersen, Raymond J; Roberge, Michel

    2006-08-22

    Using a chemical genetics screen, we have identified ent-15-oxokaurenoic acid (EKA) as a chemical that causes prolonged mitotic arrest at a stage resembling prometaphase. EKA inhibits the association of the mitotic motor protein centromeric protein E with kinetochores and inhibits chromosome movement. Unlike most antimitotic agents, EKA does not inhibit the polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin. To identify EKA-interacting proteins, we used a cell-permeable biotinylated form that retains biological activity to isolate binding proteins from living cells. Mass spectrometric analysis identified six EKA-binding proteins, including Ran-binding protein 2, a kinetochore protein whose depletion by small interfering RNA causes a similar mitotic arrest phenotype.

  8. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  9. Identification of a fibronectin-binding protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rachel J; Henderson, Brian; Sharp, Lindsay J; Nair, Sean P

    2002-12-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has been reported to bind to a number of host cell extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin. Here we report the identification of a fibronectin-binding protein from S. epidermidis. A phage display library of S. epidermidis genomic DNA was constructed and panned against immobilized fibronectin. A number of phagemid clones containing overlapping inserts were identified, and one of these clones, pSE109FN, contained a 1.4-kb insert. Phage pSE109FN was found to bind to fibronectin but not to collagen, fibrinogen, laminin, or vitronectin. However, pSE109FN also bound to heparin, hyaluronate, and plasminogen, although to a lesser extent than it bound to fibronectin. Analysis of The Institute for Genomic Research S. epidermidis genome sequence database revealed a 1.85-kb region within a putative 30.5-kb open reading frame, to which the overlapping DNA inserts contained within the fibronectin-binding phagemids mapped. We have designated the gene encoding the fibronectin-binding domain embp. A recombinant protein, Embp32, which encompassed the fibronectin-binding domain of Embp, blocked the binding of S. epidermidis, but not the binding of Staphylococcus aureus, to fibronectin. In contrast, a recombinant protein, FnBPB[D1-D4], spanning the fibronectin-binding domain of the S. aureus fibronectin-binding protein FnBPB, blocked binding of S. aureus to fibronectin but had a negligible effect on the binding of S. epidermidis.

  10. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  11. Application of DNA microarray technology to gerontological studies.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Yuki; Nishida, Kensei; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression patterns change dramatically in aging and age-related events. The DNA microarray is now recognized as a useful device in molecular biology and widely used to identify the molecular mechanisms of aging and the biological effects of drugs for therapeutic purpose in age-related diseases. Recently, numerous technological advantages have led to the evolution of DNA microarrays and microarray-based techniques, revealing the genomic modification and all transcriptional activity. Here, we show the step-by-step methods currently used in our lab to handling the oligonucleotide microarray and miRNA microarray. Moreover, we introduce the protocols of ribonucleoprotein [RNP] immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis (RIP-chip) which reveal the target mRNA of age-related RNA-binding proteins.

  12. Discrimination of Influenza Infection (A/2009 H1N1) from Prior Exposure by Antibody Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    te Beest, Dennis; de Bruin, Erwin; Imholz, Sandra; Wallinga, Jacco; Teunis, Peter; Koopmans, Marion; van Boven, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Reliable discrimination of recent influenza A infection from previous exposure using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or virus neutralization tests is currently not feasible. This is due to low sensitivity of the tests and the interference of antibody responses generated by previous infections. Here we investigate the diagnostic characteristics of a newly developed antibody (HA1) protein microarray using data from cross-sectional serological studies carried out before and after the pandemic of 2009. The data are analysed by mixture models, providing a probabilistic classification of sera (susceptible, prior-exposed, recently infected). Estimated sensitivity and specificity for identifying A/2009 infections are low using HI (66% and 51%), and high when using A/2009 microarray data alone or together with A/1918 microarray data (96% and 95%). As a heuristic, a high A/2009 to A/1918 antibody ratio (>1.05) is indicative of recent infection, while a low ratio is indicative of a pre-existing response, even if the A/2009 titer is high. We conclude that highly sensitive and specific classification of individual sera is possible using the protein microarray, thereby enabling precise estimation of age-specific infection attack rates in the population even if sample sizes are small. PMID:25405997

  13. Graph Based Study of Allergen Cross-Reactivity of Plant Lipid Transfer Proteins (LTPs) Using Microarray in a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Palacín, Arantxa; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Rivas, Luis A.; Aguirre, Jacobo; Tordesillas, Leticia; Bartra, Joan; Blanco, Carlos; Carrillo, Teresa; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; de Frutos, Consolación; Álvarez-Eire, Genoveva García; Fernández, Francisco J.; Gamboa, Pedro; Muñoz, Rosa; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Sirvent, Sofía; Torres, María J.; Varela-Losada, Susana; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Parro, Victor; Blanca, Miguel; Salcedo, Gabriel; Díaz-Perales, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    The study of cross-reactivity in allergy is key to both understanding. the allergic response of many patients and providing them with a rational treatment In the present study, protein microarrays and a co-sensitization graph approach were used in conjunction with an allergen microarray immunoassay. This enabled us to include a wide number of proteins and a large number of patients, and to study sensitization profiles among members of the LTP family. Fourteen LTPs from the most frequent plant food-induced allergies in the geographical area studied were printed into a microarray specifically designed for this research. 212 patients with fruit allergy and 117 food-tolerant pollen allergic subjects were recruited from seven regions of Spain with different pollen profiles, and their sera were tested with allergen microarray. This approach has proven itself to be a good tool to study cross-reactivity between members of LTP family, and could become a useful strategy to analyze other families of allergens. PMID:23272072

  14. MAPPI-DAT: data management and analysis for protein-protein interaction data from the high-throughput MAPPIT cell microarray platform.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya; De Puysseleyr, Veronic; Van der Heyden, José; Maddelein, Davy; Lemmens, Irma; Lievens, Sam; Degroeve, Sven; Tavernier, Jan; Martens, Lennart

    2017-05-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) studies have dramatically expanded our knowledge about cellular behaviour and development in different conditions. A multitude of high-throughput PPI techniques have been developed to achieve proteome-scale coverage for PPI studies, including the microarray based Mammalian Protein-Protein Interaction Trap (MAPPIT) system. Because such high-throughput techniques typically report thousands of interactions, managing and analysing the large amounts of acquired data is a challenge. We have therefore built the MAPPIT cell microArray Protein Protein Interaction-Data management & Analysis Tool (MAPPI-DAT) as an automated data management and analysis tool for MAPPIT cell microarray experiments. MAPPI-DAT stores the experimental data and metadata in a systematic and structured way, automates data analysis and interpretation, and enables the meta-analysis of MAPPIT cell microarray data across all stored experiments. MAPPI-DAT is developed in Python, using R for data analysis and MySQL as data management system. MAPPI-DAT is cross-platform and can be ran on Microsoft Windows, Linux and OS X/macOS. The source code and a Microsoft Windows executable are freely available under the permissive Apache2 open source license at https://github.com/compomics/MAPPI-DAT. jan.tavernier@vib-ugent.be or lennart.martens@vib-ugent.be. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Partial characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, K.; Miyamoto-Shinohara, Y.; Furukawa, K.

    1987-08-14

    Six fractions of GTP-binding proteins separated by gel filtration of a mycelial extract containing membrane components of Neurospora crassa were partially characterized. (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S bound to GTP-binding protein was assayed by repeated treatments with a Norit solution and centrifugation. The binding of (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S to GTP-binding proteins was competitively prevented in the presence of 0.1 to 1 mM GTP but not in the presence of ATP. These GTP-binding proteins fractionated by the gel column had Km values of 20, 7, 4, 4, 80 and 2 nM. All six fractions of these GTP-binding proteins showed the capacity to be ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin.

  16. Identification of Tumor-associated Autoantigens for the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer in Serum Using High Density Protein Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Babel, Ingrid; Barderas, Rodrigo; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    There is a mounting evidence of the existence of autoantibodies associated to cancer progression. Antibodies are the target of choice for serum screening because of their stability and suitability for sensitive immunoassays. By using commercial protein microarrays containing 8000 human proteins, we examined 20 sera from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy subjects to identify autoantibody patterns and associated antigens. Forty-three proteins were differentially recognized by tumoral and reference sera (p value <0.04) in the protein microarrays. Five immunoreactive antigens, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, STK4, SRC, and FGFR4, showed the highest prevalence in cancer samples, whereas ACVR2B was more abundant in normal sera. Three of them, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B, were used for further validation. A significant increase in the expression level of these antigens on CRC cell lines and colonic mucosa was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A diagnostic ELISA based on the combination of MAPKAPK3 and ACVR2B proteins yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 73.9 and 83.3% (area under the curve, 0.85), respectively, for CRC discrimination after using an independent sample set containing 94 sera representative of different stages of progression and control subjects. In summary, these studies confirmed the presence of specific autoantibodies for CRC and revealed new individual markers of disease (PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B) with the potential to diagnose CRC with higher specificity and sensitivity than previously reported serum biomarkers. PMID:19638618

  17. Identification of tumor-associated autoantigens for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer in serum using high density protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Babel, Ingrid; Barderas, Rodrigo; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Casal, J Ignacio

    2009-10-01

    There is a mounting evidence of the existence of autoantibodies associated to cancer progression. Antibodies are the target of choice for serum screening because of their stability and suitability for sensitive immunoassays. By using commercial protein microarrays containing 8000 human proteins, we examined 20 sera from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy subjects to identify autoantibody patterns and associated antigens. Forty-three proteins were differentially recognized by tumoral and reference sera (p value <0.04) in the protein microarrays. Five immunoreactive antigens, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, STK4, SRC, and FGFR4, showed the highest prevalence in cancer samples, whereas ACVR2B was more abundant in normal sera. Three of them, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B, were used for further validation. A significant increase in the expression level of these antigens on CRC cell lines and colonic mucosa was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A diagnostic ELISA based on the combination of MAPKAPK3 and ACVR2B proteins yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 73.9 and 83.3% (area under the curve, 0.85), respectively, for CRC discrimination after using an independent sample set containing 94 sera representative of different stages of progression and control subjects. In summary, these studies confirmed the presence of specific autoantibodies for CRC and revealed new individual markers of disease (PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B) with the potential to diagnose CRC with higher specificity and sensitivity than previously reported serum biomarkers.

  18. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Identification of Novel and Noninvasive Biomarkers of Acute Cellular Rejection After Liver Transplantation by Protein Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Keita; Wada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tomokuni, Akira; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Kawamoto, Koichi; Kobayashi, Shogo; Marubashi, Shigeru; Nagano, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is one of the main factors in transplanted organ failure in liver transplantation. A precise marker for diagnosing or predicting rejection is not currently available; therefore, invasive liver biopsy is standard procedure. To develop a noninvasive method for precise diagnosis of ACR, we evaluated autoantibodies from patient sera as potential biomarkers using protein microarrays (seromics). Methods Sera from hepatitis C virus–positive ACR patients were compared to three hepatitis C virus cirrhosis control groups and healthy volunteers. The control groups consisted of 2 no-ACR groups obtained on postoperative day 28 and 1 year after transplantation and a preoperative group obtained 1 day before transplantation. For validation, we evaluated whether the candidate antibodies can distinguish ACR from other types of liver dysfunction after liver transplantation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Seromic analysis by weighted average difference (WAD) ranking and Mann-Whitney U test revealed a significant increase of 57 autoantibodies in the sera of ACR patients with liver dysfunction. Among the 57 candidates, autoantibodies to charged multivesicular body protein 2B, potassium channel tetramerization domain containing 14, voltage gated subfamily A regulatory beta subunit 3, and triosephosphate isomerase 1 were regarded as potential biomarkers of ACR after liver transplantation. Using 20 ACR patients with variable backgrounds for validation, the autoantibodies to charged multivesicular body protein 2B and triosephosphate isomerase 1 were significantly increased in ACR patients compared to other control groups. Conclusions A panel of autoantibodies identified by seromics as potential noninvasive biomarkers was clinically useful for diagnosing ACR after liver transplantation. PMID:27990483

  20. A Protein Microarray for the Rapid Screening of Patients Suspected of Infection with Various Food-Borne Helminthiases

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Lin; Chen, Jun-Hu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Zhang, Yong-Nian; Cai, Yu-Chun; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2012-01-01

    Background Food-borne helminthiases (FBHs) have become increasingly important due to frequent occurrence and worldwide distribution. There is increasing demand for developing more sensitive, high-throughput techniques for the simultaneous detection of multiple parasitic diseases due to limitations in differential clinical diagnosis of FBHs with similar symptoms. These infections are difficult to diagnose correctly by conventional diagnostic approaches including serological approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, antigens obtained from 5 parasite species, namely Cysticercus cellulosae, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Paragonimus westermani, Trichinella spiralis and Spirometra sp., were semi-purified after immunoblotting. Sera from 365 human cases of helminthiasis and 80 healthy individuals were assayed with semi-purified antigens by both a protein microarray and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity, specificity and simplicity of each test for the end-user were evaluated. The specificity of the tests ranged from 97.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 95.3–98.7%) to 100.0% (95% CI: 100.0%) in the protein microarray and from 97.7% (95% CI: 96.2–99.2%) to 100.0% (95% CI: 100.0%) in ELISA. The sensitivity varied from 85.7% (95% CI: 75.1–96.3%) to 92.1% (95% CI: 83.5–100.0%) in the protein microarray, while the corresponding values for ELISA were 82.0% (95% CI: 71.4–92.6%) to 92.1% (95% CI: 83.5–100.0%). Furthermore, the Youden index spanned from 0.83 to 0.92 in the protein microarray and from 0.80 to 0.92 in ELISA. For each parasite, the Youden index from the protein microarray was often slightly higher than the one from ELISA even though the same antigen was used. Conclusions/Significance The protein microarray platform is a convenient, versatile, high-throughput method that can easily be adapted to massive FBH screening. PMID:23209851

  1. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin) into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:21569443

  2. Automated formation of lipid membrane microarrays for ionic single-molecule sensing with protein nanopores.

    PubMed

    del Rio Martinez, Juan M; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Petersen, Sönke; Baaken, Gerhard; Behrends, Jan C

    2015-01-07

    Efficient use of membrane protein nanopores in ionic single-molecule sensing requires technology for the reliable formation of suspended molecular membranes densely arrayed in formats that allow high-resolution electrical recording. Here, automated formation of bimolecular lipid layers is shown using a simple process where a poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-coated magnetic bar is remotely actuated to perform a turning motion, thereby spreading phospholipid in organic solvent on a nonpolar surface containing a <1 mm(2) 4 × 4 array of apertures with embedded microelectrodes (microelectrode cavity array). Parallel and high-resolution single-molecule detection by single nanopores is demonstrated on the resulting bilayer arrays, which are shown to form by a classical but very rapid self-assembly process. The technique provides a robust and scalable solution for the problem of reliable, automated formation of multiple independent lipid bilayers in a dense microarray format, while preserving the favorable electrical properties of the microelectrode cavity array. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Biotin-binding proteins and biotin transport to oocytes.

    PubMed

    White, H B

    1985-01-01

    The eggs of chickens and other birds contain two proteins that bind biotin. Both are homotetrameric proteins of similar size. In contrast to the well-characterized egg white avidin, egg yolk biotin-binding protein has a very acidic isoelectric point, binds biotin with lower affinity, and is usually saturated with biotin. Like other egg yolk proteins, biotin-binding protein appears to be synthesized in the liver, transported by the blood stream to the ovary and deposited in the developing oocyte. Since the yolk of a chicken egg contains over 90% of the biotin in an egg and all of the biotin is bound to biotin-binding protein, the function of biotin-binding protein is undoubtedly to transport biotin to the egg for future use by the developing embryo. Avidin is produced by the oviduct and in the egg it is presumed to deter microbial growth around the oocyte by sequestering biotin. Among the eggs examined, those from turkeys have the lowest amount of biotin-binding protein and the highest amount of avidin. Furthermore, the majority of the biotin in turkey eggs can be bound to avidin in the egg white, suggesting a nutritional role for avidin in turkeys. An assay has been developed to conveniently measure apo- and holobiotin-binding proteins.

  4. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  5. Plasma protein binding: from discovery to development.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Tonika; Gan, Liang-Shang

    2013-09-01

    The importance of plasma protein binding (PPB) in modulating the effective drug concentration at pharmacological target sites has been the topic of significant discussion and debate amongst drug development groups over the past few decades. Free drug theory, which states that in absence of energy-dependent processes, after steady state equilibrium has been attained, free drug concentration in plasma is equal to free drug concentration at the pharmacologic target receptor(s) in tissues, has been used to explain pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics relationships in a large number of cases. Any sudden increase in free concentration of a drug could potentially cause toxicity and may need dose adjustment. Free drug concentration is also helpful to estimate the effective concentration of drugs that potentially can precipitate metabolism (or transporter)-related drug-drug interactions. Disease models are extensively validated in animals to progress a compound into development. Unbound drug concentration, and therefore PPB information across species is very informative in establishing safety margins and guiding selection of First in Human (FIH) dose and human efficacious dose. The scope of this review is to give an overview of reported role of PPB in several therapeutic areas, highlight cases where PPB changes are clinically relevant, and provide drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics recommendations in discovery and development settings.

  6. Informing the Human Plasma Protein Binding of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The free fraction of a xenobiotic in plasma (Fub) is an important determinant of chemical adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity, yet experimental plasma protein binding data is scarce for environmentally relevant chemicals. The presented work explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to predict Fub for environmentally relevant chemicals via machine learning techniques. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were constructed with k nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM), and random forest (RF) machine learning algorithms from a training set of 1045 pharmaceuticals. The models were then evaluated with independent test sets of pharmaceuticals (200 compounds) and environmentally relevant ToxCast chemicals (406 total, in two groups of 238 and 168 compounds). The selection of a minimal feature set of 10-15 2D molecular descriptors allowed for both informative feature interpretation and practical applicability domain assessment via a bounded box of descriptor ranges and principal component analysis. The diverse pharmaceutical and environmental chemical sets exhibit similarities in terms of chemical space (99-82% overlap), as well as comparable bias and variance in constructed learning curves. All the models exhibit significant predictability with mean absolute errors (MAE) in the range of 0.10-0.18 Fub. The models performed best for highly bound chemicals (MAE 0.07-0.12), neutrals (MAE 0

  7. Determination of binding affinities of retinoids to retinoic acid-binding protein and serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Brahma P.; Titus, Belinda C.; Banerjee, Chandra K.

    1978-01-01

    Binding affinities of retinoic acid and its synthetic analogues to intracellular retinoic acid-binding protein, which is a possible candidate for mediating their biological function, and to serum albumin, the plasma transport protein, were evaluated. A quantitative method involving elimination of interfering serum albumin by immunoprecipitation was developed to measure the binding efficiency of these retinoids, some of which are active in modifying epithelial differentiation and preventing tumorigenesis. Two cyclopentenyl analogues of retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid showed, like retinoic acid, a binding efficiency of 100% for the cellular binding protein. With the phenyl, dichlorophenyl and trimethylmethoxyphenyl analogues of retinoic acid, the binding efficiency increased as the substituents on the aromatic ring increased; thus the trimethylmethoxyphenyl analogue binds almost as efficiently as retinoic acid itself. However, the trimethylmethoxyphenyl analogue with a sulphur atom on the side chain has a much decreased binding affinity. The correlation noticed between the binding efficiency of these retinoids and their biological activity in differentiation and/or in the control of tumorigenesis particularly enhances the confidence in the present method of determining the relative binding efficiencies. None of the vitamins, hormones and cofactors tested, showed appreciable affinity for the retinoic acid-binding site. Studies on binding of retinoic acid and its analogues to serum albumin indicate that no correlation exists between binding affinity for albumin and their biological potency. PMID:666734

  8. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins.

  9. Alteration and localization of glycan-binding proteins in human hepatic stellate cells during liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yaogang; Qin, Yannan; Dang, Liuyi; Jia, Liyuan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Wu, Haoxiang; Cui, Jihong; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Glycan-binding proteins (GBPs) play an important role in cell adhesion, bacterial/viral infection, and cellular signaling pathways. However, little is known about the precision alteration of GBPs referred to pathological changes in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) during liver fibrosis. Here, the carbohydrate microarrays were used to probe the alteration of GBPs in the activated HSCs and quiescent HSCs. As a result, 12 carbohydrates (e.g. Gal, GalNAc, and Man-9Glycan) showed increased signal, while seven carbohydrates (e.g. NeuAc, Lac, and GlcNAc-O-Ser) showed decreased signal in activated HSCs. Three carbohydrates (Gal, GalNAc, and NeuAc) were selected and subsequently used to validate the results of the carbohydrate microarrays as well as assess the distribution and localization of their binding proteins in HSCs and liver tissues by cy/histochemistry; the results showed that GBPs mainly distributed in the cytoplasma membrane and perinuclear region of cytoplasm. The immunocytochemistry was further used to verify some GBPs really exist in Golgi apparatus of the cells. The precision alteration and localization of GBPs referred to pathological changes in HSCs may provide pivotal information to help understand the biological functions of glycans how to exert through their recognition by a wide variety of GBPs. This study could lead to the development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  10. Learning to Translate Sequence and Structure to Function: Identifying DNA Binding and Membrane Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Robert E; Carson, Matthew B; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    A protein's function depends in a large part on interactions with other molecules. With an increasing number of protein structures becoming available every year, a corresponding structural annotation approach identifying such interactions grows more expedient. At the same time, machine learning has gained popularity in bioinformatics because it provides robust annotation of genes and proteins without depending solely on sequence similarity. Here we developed a machine learning protocol to identify DNA-binding proteins and membrane-binding proteins. In general, there is no theory or even rule of thumb to pick the best machine learning algorithm. Thus, a systematic comparison of several classification algorithms known to perform well was investigated. Indeed, the boosted tree classifier was found to give the best performance, achieving 93% and 88% accuracy to discriminate non-homologous DNA-binding proteins and membrane-binding proteins respectively from non-binding proteins, significantly outperforming all previously published works. We also explored the importance of a protein's attributes in function prediction and the relationships between relevant attributes. A graphical model based on boosted trees was applied to study the important features in discriminating DNA-binding proteins. In summary, the current protocol identified physical features important in DNA- and membrane-binding, rather than annotating function through sequence similarity. PMID:17436108

  11. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  12. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  13. Sensitive immunoassay detection of multiple environmental chemicals on protein microarrays using DNA/dye conjugate as a fluorescent label.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ziyan; Keum, Young Soo; Li, Qing X; Shelver, Weilin L; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Indirect competitive immunoassays were developed on protein microarrays for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple environmental chemicals in one sample. In this assay, a DNA/SYTOX Orange conjugate was employed as an antibody label to increase the fluorescence signal and sensitivity of the immunoassays. Epoxy-modified glass slides were selected as the substrate for the production of 4 × 4 coating antigen microarrays. With this signal-enhancing system, competition curves for 17β-estradiol (E2), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) were obtained individually on the protein microarray. The IC(50) and calculated limit of detection (LOD) are 0.32 μg L(-1) and 0.022 μg L(-1) for E2, 37.2 μg L(-1) and 24.5 μg L(-1) for BaP, and 31.6 μg L(-1) and 2.8 μg L(-1) for BDE-47, respectively. LOD of E2 is 14-fold lower than the value reported in a previous study using Cy3 labeled antibody (Du et al., Clin. Chem, 2005, 51, 368-375). The results of the microarray immunoassay were within 15% of chromatographic analysis for all three pollutants in spiked river water samples, thus verifying the immunoassay. Simultaneous detection of E2, BaP and BDE-47 in one sample was demonstrated. There was no cross-reaction in the immunoassay between these three environmental chemicals. These results suggest that microarray-based immunoassays with DNA/dye conjugate labels are useful tools for the rapid, sensitive, and high throughput screening of multiple environmental contaminants.

  14. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-08-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L.

  15. Odorant-Binding Protein: Localization to Nasal Glands and Secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevsner, Jonathan; Sklar, Pamela B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1986-07-01

    An odorant-binding protein (OBP) was isolated from bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosa. We have produced polyclonal antisera to this protein and report its immunohistochemical localization to mucus-secreting glands of the olfactory and respiratory mucosa. Although OBP was originally isolated as a pyrazine binding protein, both rat and bovine OBP also bind the odorants [3H]methyldihydrojasmonate and 3,7-dimethyl-octan-1-ol as well as 2-isobutyl-3-[3H]methoxypyrazine. We detect substantial odorant-binding activity attributable to OBP in secreted rat nasal mucus and tears but not in saliva, suggesting a role for OBP in transporting or concentrating odorants.

  16. Grating coupled SPR microarray analysis of proteins and cells in blood from mice with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Torrisi, D M; Sell, S; Cady, N C; Lawrence, D A

    2016-01-21

    Biomarker discovery for early disease diagnosis is highly important. Of late, much effort has been made to analyze complex biological fluids in an effort to develop new markers specific for different cancer types. Recent advancements in label-free technologies such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors have shown promise as a diagnostic tool since there is no need for labeling or separation of cells. Furthermore, SPR can provide rapid, real-time detection of antigens from biological samples since SPR is highly sensitive to changes in surface-associated molecular and cellular interactions. Herein, we report a lab-on-a-chip microarray biosensor that utilizes grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) and grating-coupled surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (GCSPCF) imaging to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a mouse model (FVB-MMTV-PyVT). GCSPR and GCSPCF analysis was accomplished by spotting antibodies to surface cell markers, cytokines and stress proteins on a nanofabricated GCSPR microchip and screening blood samples from FVB control mice or FVB-MMTV-PyVT mice with developing mammary carcinomas. A transgenic MMTV-PyVT mouse derived cancer cell line was also analyzed. The analyses indicated that CD24, CD44, CD326, CD133 and CD49b were expressed in both cell lines and in blood from MMTV-PyVT mice. Furthermore, cytokines such as IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, along with heat shock proteins HSP60, HSP27, HSc70(HSP73), HSP90 total, HSP70/HSc70, HSP90, HSP70, HSP90 alpha, phosphotyrosine and HSF-1 were overexpressed in MMTV-PyVT mice.

  17. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  18. Xenopus interspersed RNA families, Ocr and XR, bind DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Guttridge, K L; Smith, L D

    1995-05-01

    Interspersed RNA makes up two-thirds of cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA in Xenopus and sea urchin eggs. Although it has no known function, previous work has suggested that at least one family of interspersed RNA, XR, binds Xenopus oocyte proteins, and can influence the rate of translation. We have used two Xenopus repeat families, Ocr and XR, to explore their protein binding abilities. Ocr RNA binds the same pattern of highly abundant oocyte proteins that XR RNA binds, which are believed to be messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle proteins. In addition, we show that Ocr RNA binds the Oct-60 protein, a member of the POU-domain family of transcription factors found in Xenopus oocytes. Using a 32 base pair sequence from the XR repeat in a DNA affinity column two proteins were isolated, 66 kDa and 92 kDa, that together form a complex with XR DNA. One of these proteins (92 kDa) also binds XR RNA. We suggest that the role of at least a subset of interspersed RNAs in development may be to bind, and sequester in the cytoplasm, DNA-binding proteins until the end of oogenesis.

  19. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    PubMed Central

    Teyra, Joan; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Anders, Gerd; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs) might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions. The hierarchical

  20. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  1. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  2. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  3. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G; Moses, John E; Oldham, Neil J

    2016-11-16

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  4. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  5. Determination of specific antibody responses to the six species of ebola and Marburg viruses by multiplexed protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Teddy; Natesan, Mohan; Warfield, Kelly; Aman, M Javad; Ulrich, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    Infectious hemorrhagic fevers caused by the Marburg and Ebola filoviruses result in human mortality rates of up to 90%, and there are no effective vaccines or therapeutics available for clinical use. The highly infectious and lethal nature of these viruses highlights the need for reliable and sensitive diagnostic methods. We assembled a protein microarray displaying nucleoprotein (NP), virion protein 40 (VP40), and glycoprotein (GP) antigens from isolates representing the six species of filoviruses for use as a surveillance and diagnostic platform. Using the microarrays, we examined serum antibody responses of rhesus macaques vaccinated with trivalent (GP, NP, and VP40) virus-like particles (VLP) prior to infection with the Marburg virus (MARV) (i.e., Marburg marburgvirus) or the Zaire virus (ZEBOV) (i.e., Zaire ebolavirus). The microarray-based assay detected a significant increase in antigen-specific IgG resulting from immunization, while a greater level of antibody responses resulted from challenge of the vaccinated animals with ZEBOV or MARV. Further, while antibody cross-reactivities were observed among NPs and VP40s of Ebola viruses, antibody recognition of GPs was very specific. The performance of mucin-like domain fragments of GP (GP mucin) expressed in Escherichia coli was compared to that of GP ectodomains produced in eukaryotic cells. Based on results with ZEBOV and MARV proteins, antibody recognition of GP mucins that were deficient in posttranslational modifications was comparable to that of the eukaryotic cell-expressed GP ectodomains in assay performance. We conclude that the described protein microarray may translate into a sensitive assay for diagnosis and serological surveillance of infections caused by multiple species of filoviruses.

  6. Identification of a common hyaluronan binding motif in the hyaluronan binding proteins RHAMM, CD44 and link protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B; Yang, B L; Savani, R C; Turley, E A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two hyaluronan (HA) binding domains in the HA receptor, RHAMM, that occur near the carboxyl-terminus of this protein. We show here that these two HA binding domains are the only HA binding regions in RHAMM, and that they contribute approximately equally to the HA binding ability of this receptor. Mutation of domain II using recombinant polypeptides of RHAMM demonstrates that K423 and R431, spaced seven amino acids apart, are critical for HA binding activity. Domain I contains two sets of two basic amino acids, each spaced seven residues apart, and mutation of these basic amino acids reduced their binding to HA--Sepharose. These results predict that two basic amino acids flanking a seven amino acid stretch [hereafter called B(X7)B] are minimally required for HA binding activity. To assess whether this motif predicts HA binding in the intact RHAMM protein, we mutated all basic amino acids in domains I and II that form part of these motifs using site-directed mutagenesis and prepared fusion protein from the mutated cDNA. The altered RHAMM protein did not bind HA, confirming that the basic amino acids and their spacing are critical for binding. A specific requirement for arginine or lysine residues was identified since mutation of K430, R431 and K432 to histidine residues abolished binding. Clustering of basic amino acids either within or at either end of the motif enhanced HA binding activity while the occurrence of acidic residues between the basic amino acids reduced binding. The B(X7)B motif, in which B is either R or K and X7 contains no acidic residues and at least one basic amino acid, was found in all HA binding proteins molecularly characterized to date. Recombinant techniques were used to generate chimeric proteins containing either the B(X7)B motifs present in CD44 or link protein, with the amino-terminus of RHAMM (amino acids 1-238) that does not bind HA. All chimeric proteins containing the motif bound HA in transblot analyses

  7. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  8. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  9. Identification of an imidazoline binding protein: Creatine kinase and an imidazoline-2 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Atsuko; Tyacke, Robin J.; Robinson, James J.; Husbands, Stephen M.; Minchin, Michael C.W.; Nutt, David J.; Hudson, Alan L.

    2009-01-01

    Drugs that bind to imidazoline binding proteins have major physiological actions. To date, three subtypes of such proteins, I1, I2 and I3, have been proposed, although characterisations of these binding proteins are lacking. I2 binding sites are found throughout the brain, particularly dense in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Selective I2 ligands demonstrate antidepressant-like activity and the identity of the proteins that respond to such ligands remained unknown until now. Here we report the isolation of a ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein from rabbit and rat brain using a high affinity ligand for the I2 subtype, 2-BFI, to generate an affinity column. Following protein sequencing of the isolated ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein, we identified it to be brain creatine kinase (B-CK). B-CK shows high binding capacity to selective I2 ligands; [3H]-2-BFI (5 nM) specifically bound to B-CK (2330 ± 815 fmol mg protein− 1). We predicted an I2 binding pocket near the active site of B-CK using molecular modelling. Furthermore, B-CK activity was inhibited by a selective I2 irreversible ligand, where 20 μM BU99006 reduced the enzyme activity by 16%, confirming the interaction between B-CK and the I2 ligand. In summary, we have identified B-CK to be the ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein and we have demonstrated the existence of an I2 binding site within this enzyme. The importance of B-CK in regulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release may well explain the various actions of I2 ligands in brain and the alterations in densities of I2 binding sites in psychiatric disorders. PMID:19410564

  10. Hepatitis B viral core protein disrupts human host gene expression by binding to promoter regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The core protein (HBc) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated in the malignant transformation of chronically-infected hepatocytes and displays pleiotropic functions, including RNA- and DNA-binding activities. However, the mechanism by which HBc interacts with the human genome to exert effects on hepatocyte function remains unknown. This study investigated the distribution of HBc binding to promoters in the human genome and evaluated its effects on the related genes’ expression. Results Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-on-chip) analysis was used to identify HBc-bound human gene promoters. Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were performed on related genes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to verify ChIP-on-chip results. Five novel genes were selected for luciferase reporter assay evaluation to assess the influence of HBc promoter binding. The HBc antibody immunoprecipitated approximately 3100 human gene promoters. Among these, 1993 are associated with known biological processes, and 2208 regulate genes with defined molecular functions. In total, 1286 of the related genes mediate primary metabolic processes, and 1398 encode proteins with binding activity. Sixty-four of the promoters regulate genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and 41 regulate Wnt/beta-catenin pathway genes. The reporter gene assay indicated that HBc binding up-regulates proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC), type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2), and down-regulates v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene (HRAS). Conclusion HBc has the ability to bind a large number of human gene promoters, and can disrupt normal host gene expression. Manipulation of the transcriptional profile in HBV-infected hepatocytes may represent a key pathogenic mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:23088787

  11. Fibrinogen and Fibronectin Binding Activity and Immunogenic Nature of Choline Binding Protein M

    PubMed Central

    AFSHAR, Davoud; POURMAND, Mohammad Reza; JEDDI-TEHRANI, Mahmood; SABOOR YARAGHI, Ali Akbar; AZARSA, Mohammad; SHOKRI, Fazel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choline-binding proteins (CBPs) are a group of surface-exposed proteins, which play crucial and physiological roles in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The novel member of CBPs, choline-binding protein M (CbpM) may have binding activity to plasma proteins. This study aimed to clone and express CbpM and demonstrate its interaction with plasma proteins and patients’ sera. Methods: The total length of cbpM gene was cloned in pET21a vector and expressed in BL21 expression host. Verification of recombinant protein was evaluated by Western blot using anti-His tag monoclonal antibody. Binding ability of the recombinant protein to plasma proteins and the interaction with patients’ sera were assessed by Western blot and ELISA methods. Results: The cbpM gene was successfully cloned into pET21a and expressed in BL21 host. Binding activity to fibronectin and fibrinogen and antibody reaction of CbpM to patients’ sera was demonstrated by Western blot and ELISA methods, respectively. Conclusion: CbpM is one of the pneumococcal surface-exposed proteins, which mediates pneumococcal binding to fibronectin and fibrinogen proteins. PMID:28053927

  12. Binding of globular proteins to DNA from surface tension measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A; Chattoraj, D K; Chakraborty, P

    2001-10-01

    Extent of binding (gammap) of globular proteins to calf-thymus DNA have been measured in mole per mole of nucleotide as function of equilibrium protein concentration. We have exploited measurement of the surface tension of the protein solution in the presence and absence of DNA to calculate the binding ration (gammap). Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH, ionic strength and in presence of Ca2+. Interaction of BSA with denatured DNA has also been investigated. Binding isotherms for other globular proteins like beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme have been compared under identical physicochemical condition. It has been noted with considerable interest that globular form of protein is important to some extent in protein-DNA interaction. An attempt has been made to explain the significance of difference in binding ratios of these two biopolymers in aqueous medium for different systems in the light of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects. Values of maximum binding ration (gammap(m)) at saturated level for different systems have been also presented. The Gibb's free energy decrease (-deltaG0) of the binding of proteins to DNA has been compared more precisely for the saturation of binding sites in the DNA with the change of activity of protein in solution from zero to unity in the rational mole fraction scale.

  13. Thermodynamic parameters of the binding of retinol to binding proteins and to membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, N.; Xu, Z.J. )

    1990-04-24

    Retinol (vitamin A alcohol) is a hydrophobic compound and distributes in vivo mainly between binding proteins and cellular membranes. To better clarify the nature of the interactions of retinol with these phases which have a high affinity for it, the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions were studied. The temperature-dependence profiles of the binding of retinol to bovine retinol binding protein, bovine serum albumin, unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, and plasma membranes from rat liver were determined. It was found that binding of retinol to retinol binding protein is characterized by a large increase in entropy and no change in enthalpy. Binding to albumin is driven by enthalpy and is accompanied by a decrease in entropy. Partitioning of retinal into unilamellar vesicles and into plasma membranes is stabilized both by enthalpic and by entropic components. The implications of these finding are discussed.

  14. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  15. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  16. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  17. Design of protein-interaction specificity affords selective bZIP-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Reinke, Aaron W.; Keating, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    Interaction specificity is a required feature of biological networks and a necessary characteristic of protein or small-molecule reagents and therapeutics. The ability to alter or inhibit protein interactions selectively would advance basic and applied molecular science. Assessing or modelling interaction specificity requires treating multiple competing complexes, which presents computational and experimental challenges. Here we present a computational framework for designing protein interaction specificity and use it to identify specific peptide partners for human bZIP transcription factors. Protein microarrays were used to characterize designed, synthetic ligands for all but one of 20 bZIP families. The bZIP proteins share strong sequence and structural similarities and thus are challenging targets to bind specifically. Yet many of the designs, including examples that bind the oncoproteins cJun, cFos and cMaf, were selective for their targets over all 19 other families. Collectively, the designs exhibit a wide range of novel interaction profiles, demonstrating that human bZIPs have only sparsely sampled the possible interaction space accessible to them. Our computational method provides a way to systematically analyze tradeoffs between stability and specificity and is suitable for use with many types of structure-scoring functions; thus it may prove broadly useful as a tool for protein design. PMID:19370028

  18. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  19. A Comparison between Manual and Automated Evaluations of Tissue Microarray Patterns of Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Arthur W.; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M.; Rodrigues, Bruna R.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Torres, Luiz Fernando B.; Martins, Vilma R.; da Cunha, Isabela W.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue microarray technology enables us to evaluate the pattern of protein expression in large numbers of samples. However, manual data acquisition and analysis still represent a challenge because they are subjective and time-consuming. Automated analysis may thus increase the speed and reproducibility of evaluation. However, the reliability of automated analysis systems should be independently evaluated. Herein, the expression of phosphorylated AKT and mTOR was determined by ScanScope XT (Aperio; Vista, CA) and ACIS III (Dako; Glostrup, Denmark) and compared with the manual analysis by two observers. The percentage of labeled pixels or nuclei analysis had a good correlation between human observers and automated systems (κ = 0.855 and 0.879 for ScanScope vs. observers and κ = 0.765 and 0.793 for ACIS III vs. observers). The intensity of labeling determined by ScanScope was also correlated with that found by the human observers (correlation index of 0.946 and 0.851 for pAKT and 0.851 and 0.875 for pmTOR). However, the correlation between ACIS III and human observation varied for labeling intensity and was considered poor in some cases (correlation index of 0.718 and 0.680 for pAKT and 0.223 and 0.225 for pmTOR). Thus, the percentage of positive pixels or nuclei determination was satisfactorily performed by both systems; however, labeling intensity was better identified by ScanScope XT. PMID:23340270

  20. Tissue microarray analysis for epithelial membrane protein-2 as a novel biomarker for gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lawrance K; Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Chan, Ann M; Demos, Joanna V; Lagman, Carlito; Sheppard, John P; Nguyen, Thien; Chang, Yu-Ling; Hojat, Seyed A; Prins, Robert M; Liau, Linda M; Nghiemphu, Leia; Lai, Albert; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Yong, William H; Gordon, Lynn K; Wadehra, Madhuri; Yang, Isaac

    2017-09-08

    Epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2) expression is noted in many human cancers. We evaluated EMP2 as a biomarker in gliomas. A large tissue microarray of lower grade glioma (WHO grades II-III, n = 19 patients) and glioblastoma (GBM) (WHO grade IV, n = 50 patients) was stained for EMP2. EMP2 expression was dichotomized to low or high expression scores and correlated with clinical data. The mean EMP2 expression was 1.68 in lower grade gliomas versus 2.20 in GBMs (P = 0.01). The percentage of samples with high EMP2 expression was greater in GBMs than lower grade gliomas (90.0 vs. 52.6%, P = 0.001). No significant difference was found between median survival among patients with GBM tumors exhibiting high EMP2 expression and survival of those with low EMP2 expression (8.38 vs. 10.98 months, P = 0.39). However, EMP2 expression ≥2 correlated with decreased survival (r = -0.39, P = 0.001). The EMP2 expression level also correlated with Ki-67 positivity (r = 0.34, P = 0.008). The mortality hazard ratio for GBM patients with EMP2 score of 3 or higher was 1.92 (CI 0.69-5.30). Our findings suggest that elevated EMP2 expression is associated with GBM. With other biomarkers, EMP2 may have use as a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of gliomas.

  1. Binding of perfluorooctanoic acid to rat and human plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Han, Xing; Snow, Timothy A; Kemper, Raymond A; Jepson, Gary W

    2003-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a commercially important organic fluorochemical and is considered to have a long half-life in human blood. In this paper, PFOA binding to rat and human plasma proteins was investigated. On the basis of results from size-exclusion chromatography and ligand blotting, most PFOA was in protein-bound form in male and female rat plasma, and the primary PFOA binding protein in plasma was serum albumin. PFOA binding to rat serum albumin (RSA) in the gas phase was observed by electrospray ionization MS. (19)F NMR experiments revealed that binding to RSA caused peak broadening and chemical shift changes of PFOA resonances, and on the basis of this observation, the dissociation constant was determined to be approximately 0.3 mM. The dissociation constants for PFOA binding to RSA and human serum albumin (HSA) and the numbers of PFOA binding sites on RSA and HSA were also determined by a separation method using microdesalting columns. No significant difference was found between PFOA binding to RSA and PFOA binding to HSA. The dissociation constants for binding of PFOA to RSA or HSA and the numbers of PFOA binding sites were in the range of 0.3-0.4 mM and 6-9, respectively. On the basis of these binding parameters and the estimated plasma concentration of serum albumin, greater than 90% of PFOA would be bound to serum albumin in both rat and human blood.

  2. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  3. RNA Binding Proteins Posttranscriptionally Regulate Genes Involved In Oncogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Cloning and characterization of HuR, a ubiquitously expressed Elav-like protein . J Biol Chem 1996, 271(14):8144-8151. 21. Meisner NC, Hackermuller J...Hauptmann S: Expression of the ELAV-like protein HuR is associated with higher tumor grade and increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human breast...SH3 domain, ankyrin repeat and pH domain 3 tumor microarray reveals 47 annotated genes up regulated in the HA-HuR overexpressing tumors as compared to

  4. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Hui-di; Yu, Lu-shan; Zeng, Su

    2013-08-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body. The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity, which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles. In this review, the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and lipoprotein, three most important proteins in human plasma, are detailed. Furthermore, the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed. Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding, enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described. Additionally, the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed.

  5. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qi; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Hui-di; Yu, Lu-shan; Zeng, Su

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body. The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity, which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles. In this review, the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and lipoprotein, three most important proteins in human plasma, are detailed. Furthermore, the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed. Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding, enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described. Additionally, the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed. PMID:23852086

  6. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca(2+) -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  8. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  9. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  10. Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Beardslee, T; Zeece, M; Sarath, G; Markwell, J

    2001-11-01

    Soy lecithin is widely used as an emulsifier in processed foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Soy lecithin is composed principally of phospholipids; however, it has also been shown to contain IgE-binding proteins, albeit at a low level. A few clinical cases involving allergic reactions to soy lecithin have been reported. The purpose of this investigation is to better characterize the IgE-binding proteins typically found in lecithin. Soy lecithin proteins were isolated following solvent extraction of lipid components and then separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separated lecithin proteins were immunoblotted with sera from soy-sensitive individuals to determine the pattern of IgE-binding proteins. The identity of IgE-reactive bands was determined from their N-terminal sequence. The level of protein in six lecithin samples obtained from commercial suppliers ranged from 100 to 1,400 ppm. Lecithin samples showed similar protein patterns when examined by SDS-PAGE. Immunoblotting with sera from soy-sensitive individuals showed IgE binding to bands corresponding to 7, 12, 20, 39 and 57 kD. N-terminal analysis of these IgE-binding bands resulted in sequences for 3 components. The 12-kD band was identified as a methionine-rich protein (MRP) and a member of the 2S albumin class of soy proteins. The 20-kD band was found to be soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The 39-kD band was matched to a soy protein with unknown function. Soy lecithin contains a number of IgE-binding proteins; thus, it might represent a source of hidden allergens. These allergens are a more significant concern for soy-allergic individuals consuming lecithin products as a health supplement. In addition, the MRP and the 39-kD protein identified in this study represent newly identified IgE-binding proteins. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Methodological Challenges in Protein Microarray and Immunohistochemistry for the Discovery of Novel Autoantibodies in Paediatric Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Peschl, Patrick; Ramberger, Melanie; Höftberger, Romana; Jöhrer, Karin; Baumann, Matthias; Rostásy, Kevin; Reindl, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare autoimmune-mediated demyelinating disease affecting mainly children and young adults. Differentiation to multiple sclerosis is not always possible, due to overlapping clinical symptoms and recurrent and multiphasic forms. Until now, immunoglobulins reactive to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG antibodies) have been found in a subset of patients with ADEM. However, there are still patients lacking autoantibodies, necessitating the identification of new autoantibodies as biomarkers in those patients. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel autoantibody targets in ADEM patients. Sixteen ADEM patients (11 seronegative, 5 seropositive for MOG antibodies) were analysed for potential new biomarkers, using a protein microarray and immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue to identify antibodies against intracellular and surface neuronal and glial antigens. Nine candidate antigens were identified in the protein microarray analysis in at least two patients per group. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue did not reveal new target antigens. Although no new autoantibody targets could be found here, future studies should aim to identify new biomarkers for therapeutic and prognostic purposes. The microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry methods used here have several limitations, which should be considered in future searches for biomarkers. PMID:28327523

  12. Methodological Challenges in Protein Microarray and Immunohistochemistry for the Discovery of Novel Autoantibodies in Paediatric Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peschl, Patrick; Ramberger, Melanie; Höftberger, Romana; Jöhrer, Karin; Baumann, Matthias; Rostásy, Kevin; Reindl, Markus

    2017-03-22

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare autoimmune-mediated demyelinating disease affecting mainly children and young adults. Differentiation to multiple sclerosis is not always possible, due to overlapping clinical symptoms and recurrent and multiphasic forms. Until now, immunoglobulins reactive to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG antibodies) have been found in a subset of patients with ADEM. However, there are still patients lacking autoantibodies, necessitating the identification of new autoantibodies as biomarkers in those patients. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel autoantibody targets in ADEM patients. Sixteen ADEM patients (11 seronegative, 5 seropositive for MOG antibodies) were analysed for potential new biomarkers, using a protein microarray and immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue to identify antibodies against intracellular and surface neuronal and glial antigens. Nine candidate antigens were identified in the protein microarray analysis in at least two patients per group. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue did not reveal new target antigens. Although no new autoantibody targets could be found here, future studies should aim to identify new biomarkers for therapeutic and prognostic purposes. The microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry methods used here have several limitations, which should be considered in future searches for biomarkers.

  13. DNA Shape versus Sequence Variations in the Protein Binding Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-02-02

    The binding process of a protein with a DNA involves three stages: approach, encounter, and association. It has been known that the complexation of protein and DNA involves mutual conformational changes, especially for a specific sequence association. However, it is still unclear how the conformation and the information in the DNA sequences affects the binding process. What is the extent to which the DNA structure adopted in the complex is induced by protein binding, or is instead intrinsic to the DNA sequence? In this study, we used the multiscale simulation method to explore the binding process of a protein with DNA in terms of DNA sequence, conformation, and interactions. We found that in the approach stage the protein can bind both the major and minor groove of the DNA, but uses different features to locate the binding site. The intrinsic conformational properties of the DNA play a significant role in this binding stage. By comparing the specific DNA with the nonspecific in unbound, intermediate, and associated states, we found that for a specific DNA sequence, ∼40% of the bending in the association forms is intrinsic and that ∼60% is induced by the protein. The protein does not induce appreciable bending of nonspecific DNA. In addition, we proposed that the DNA shape variations induced by protein binding are required in the early stage of the binding process, so that the protein is able to approach, encounter, and form an intermediate at the correct site on DNA. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative serum protein binding of anthracycline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1996-01-01

    The binding of doxorubicin, iododoxorubicin, daunorubicin, epirubicin, pirarubicin, zorubicin, aclarubicin, and mitoxantrone to 600 microM human serum albumin and 50 microM alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was studied by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection. Binding to albumin (600 microM) varied from 61% (daunorubicin) to 94% (iododoxorubicin). The binding to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (50 microM) was more variable, ranging from 31% (epirubicin) to 64% (zorubicin), and was essentially related to the hydrophobicity of the derivatives. Simulations showed that the total serum binding varied over a broad range from 71% (doxorubicin) to 96% (iododoxorubicin). We recently reported that the binding to lipoproteins of a series of eight anthracycline analogues could be ascribed to chemicophysical determinants of lipophilicity [2]. The present study was conducted to evaluate in vitro the contribution of albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein to the total serum binding of these drugs.

  15. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-06

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Structure and Function of Nematode RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kaymak, Ebru; Wee, L.M.; Ryder, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are critical effectors of gene expression. They guide mRNA localization, translation, and stability, and potentially play a role in regulating mRNA synthesis. The structural basis for RNA recognition by RNA-binding proteins is the key to understanding how they target specific transcripts for regulation. Compared to other metazoans, nematode genomes contain a significant expansion in several RNA-binding protein families, including Pumilio-FBF (PUF), TTP-like zinc finger (TZF), and argonaute-like (AGO) proteins. Genetic data suggest that individual members of each family have distinct functions, presumably due to sequence variations that alter RNA binding specificity or protein interaction partners. In this review, we highlight example structures and identify the variable regions that likely contribute to functional divergence in nematodes. PMID:20418095

  17. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-01

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26751491

  18. Stage specific kinetoplast DNA-binding proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, J E; Acosta-Viana, K; Guzmán-Marín, E; Rosado-Barrera, M E; Rosales-Encina, J L

    2000-09-18

    Knowledge regarding kinetoplast DNA organization in all members of the Trypanosomatid family is incomplete. Recently, the presence of kinetoplast-associated proteins in condensing kDNA networks in Crithidia fasciculata has been described and a role for these proteins in the maintenance of these complex structures was suggested. To investigate the presence of protein components in Trypanosoma cruzi kinetoplast, we previously described seven epimastigote kinetoplast-associated proteins. We report here the existence of kinetoplast binding proteins in amastigote and trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi, which could bind both mini and maxicircles components with a stage specific elements for every infective form of the parasite. We propose three major classes of kinetoplast-associated proteins related to the basic processes of this intricate disc structure and suggest a possible function of these binding proteins in the T. cruzi mitochondrial DNA organization.

  19. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared to patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. PMID:22086767

  20. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides with consideration of binding partners.

    PubMed

    Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-06-01

    In recent years several computational methods have been developed to predict RNA-binding sites in protein. Most of these methods do not consider interacting partners of a protein, so they predict the same RNA-binding sites for a given protein sequence even if the protein binds to different RNAs. Unlike the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein, the problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received little attention mainly because it is much more difficult and shows a lower accuracy on average. In our previous study, we developed a method that predicts protein-binding nucleotides from an RNA sequence. In an effort to improve the prediction accuracy and usefulness of the previous method, we developed a new method that uses both RNA and protein sequence data. In this study, we identified effective features of RNA and protein molecules and developed a new support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein-binding nucleotides from RNA and protein sequence data. The new model that used both protein and RNA sequence data achieved a sensitivity of 86.5%, a specificity of 86.2%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 72.6%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.8% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.69 in a 10-fold cross validation; it achieved a sensitivity of 58.8%, a specificity of 87.4%, a PPV of 65.1%, a NPV of 84.2% and MCC of 0.48 in independent testing. For comparative purpose, we built another prediction model that used RNA sequence data alone and ran it on the same dataset. In a 10 fold-cross validation it achieved a sensitivity of 85.7%, a specificity of 80.5%, a PPV of 67.7%, a NPV of 92.2% and MCC of 0.63; in independent testing it achieved a sensitivity of 67.7%, a specificity of 78.8%, a PPV of 57.6%, a NPV of 85.2% and MCC of 0.45. In both cross-validations and independent testing, the new model that used both RNA and protein sequences showed a better performance than the model that used RNA sequence data alone in

  2. Multiple epitope presentation and surface density control enabled by chemoselective immobilization lead to enhanced performance in IgE-binding fingerprinting on peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gori, Alessandro; Cretich, Marina; Vanna, Renzo; Sola, Laura; Gagni, Paola; Bruni, Giulia; Liprino, Marta; Gramatica, Furio; Burastero, Samuele; Chiari, Marcella

    2017-08-29

    Multiple ligand presentation is a powerful strategy to enhance the affinity of a probe for its corresponding target. A promising application of this concept lies in the analytical field, where surface immobilized probes interact with their corresponding targets in the context of complex biological samples. Here we investigate the effect of multiple epitope presentation (MEP) in the challenging context of IgE-detection in serum samples using peptide microarrays, and evaluate the influence of probes surface density on the assay results. Using the milk allergen alpha-lactalbumin as a model, we have synthesized three immunoreactive epitope sequences in a linear, branched and tandem form and exploited a chemoselective click strategy (CuAAC) for their immobilization on the surface of two biosensors, a microarray and an SPR chip both modified with the same clickable polymeric coating. We first demonstrated that a fine tuning of the surface peptide density plays a crucial role to fully exploit the potential of oriented and multiple peptide display. We then compared the three multiple epitope presentations in a microarray assay using sera samples from milk allergic patients, confirming that a multiple presentation, in particular that of the tandem construct, allows for a more efficient characterization of IgE-binding fingerprints at a statistically significant level. To gain insights on the binding parameters that characterize antibody/epitopes affinity, we selected the most reactive epitope of the series (LAC1) and performed a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi) analysis comparing different epitope architectures (linear versus branched versus tandem). We demonstrated that the tandem peptide provides an approximately twofold increased binding capacity with respect to the linear and branched peptides, that could be attributed to a lower rate of dissociation (Kd). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microarray Data Analysis and Mining Tools

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Saravanakumar; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2011-01-01

    Microarrays are one of the latest breakthroughs in experimental molecular biology that allow monitoring the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. Arrays have been applied to studies in gene expression, genome mapping, SNP discrimination, transcription factor activity, toxicity, pathogen identification and many other applications. In this paper we concentrate on discussing various bioinformatics tools used for microarray data mining tasks with its underlying algorithms, web resources and relevant reference. We emphasize this paper mainly for digital biologists to get an aware about the plethora of tools and programs available for microarray data analysis. First, we report the common data mining applications such as selecting differentially expressed genes, clustering, and classification. Next, we focused on gene expression based knowledge discovery studies such as transcription factor binding site analysis, pathway analysis, protein- protein interaction network analysis and gene enrichment analysis. PMID:21584183

  4. Microarray data analysis and mining tools.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Saravanakumar; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2011-04-22

    Microarrays are one of the latest breakthroughs in experimental molecular biology that allow monitoring the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. Arrays have been applied to studies in gene expression, genome mapping, SNP discrimination, transcription factor activity, toxicity, pathogen identification and many other applications. In this paper we concentrate on discussing various bioinformatics tools used for microarray data mining tasks with its underlying algorithms, web resources and relevant reference. We emphasize this paper mainly for digital biologists to get an aware about the plethora of tools and programs available for microarray data analysis. First, we report the common data mining applications such as selecting differentially expressed genes, clustering, and classification. Next, we focused on gene expression based knowledge discovery studies such as transcription factor binding site analysis, pathway analysis, protein- protein interaction network analysis and gene enrichment analysis.

  5. 9S binding protein for androgens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E M; Lea, O A; French, F S

    1977-05-01

    A steroid binding protein fraction with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 9 S (molecular weight approximately equal to 200,000) has been identified in 105,000 X g supernatants of several androgen-responsive organs. Highest concentrations were found in epididymis and testis, but small amounts were detected in prostate, seminal vesicle, kidney, submandibular gland, and lung. The 9S protein binds [3H]dihydrotestosterone (17beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-3-one) and [3H]progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione) with equilibrium binding constants of approximately 10(5) M-1 and 10(6) M-1, respectively. The concentration of 9S binding sites in epididymis is approximately 10(-11) mol/mg of supernatant protein, which is at least 10(5) times greater than the concentration of androgen receptor. 9S binding protein appears to be a nonsecretory, intracellular protein and has properties different from the andorgen receptor. It is unretarded on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography at pH 8.0, and its sedimentation rate on sucrose gradients is not altered at high ionic strength (0.4 M KCl). Like the androgen receptor, its binding activity, which is maximal between pH 7 and 9.5, is heat labile, decreased by sulfhydryl reagents, and enhanced by 2-mercaptoethanol. It is suggested that because of its high concentration and low affinity, 9S binding protein may function in the intracellular accumulation of compartmentalization of androgens or progesterone.

  6. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  7. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  8. Protein surface-distribution and protein-protein interactions in the binding of peripheral proteins to charged lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1995-01-01

    The binding of native cytochrome c to negatively charged lipid dispersions of dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths. Not only is the strength of protein binding found to decrease rapidly with increasing ionic strength, but also the binding curves reach an apparent saturation level that decreases rapidly with increasing ionic strength. Analysis of the binding isotherms with a general statistical thermodynamic model that takes into account not only the free energy of the electrostatic double layer, but also the free energy of the surface distribution of the protein, demonstrates that the apparent saturation effects could arise from a competition between the out-of-plane binding reaction and the lateral in-plane interactions between proteins at the surface. It is found that association with nonlocalized sites results in binding isotherms that display the apparent saturation effect to a much more pronounced extent than does the Langmuir adsorption isotherm for binding to localized sites. With the model for nonlocalized sites, the binding isotherms of native cytochrome c can be described adequately by taking into account only the entropy of the surface distribution of the protein, without appreciable enthalpic interactions between the bound proteins. The binding of cytochrome c to dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol dispersions at a temperature at which the bound protein is denatured on the lipid surface, but is nondenatured when free in solution, has also been studied. The binding curves for the surface-denatured protein differ from those for the native protein in that the apparent saturation at high ionic strength is less pronounced. This indicates the tendency of the denatured protein to aggregate on the lipid surface, and can be described by the binding isotherms for nonlocalized sites only if attractive interactions between the surface-bound proteins are included in addition to the distributional entropic terms. Additionally

  9. Terahertz dielectric assay of solution phase protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Knab, J. R.; Ye, Shuji; He, Yunfen; Markelz, A. G.

    2007-06-01

    The authors demonstrate a method for rapid determination of protein-ligand binding on solution phase samples using terahertz dielectric spectroscopy. Measurements were performed using terahertz time domain spectroscopy on aqueous solutions below the liquid-solid transition for water. Small ligand binding sensitivity was demonstrated using triacetylglucosamine and hen egg white lysozyme with a decrease in dielectric response with binding. The magnitude of the change increases with frequency.

  10. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  11. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  13. De-novo protein function prediction using DNA binding and RNA binding proteins as a test case.

    PubMed

    Peled, Sapir; Leiderman, Olga; Charar, Rotem; Efroni, Gilat; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Ofran, Yanay

    2016-11-21

    Of the currently identified protein sequences, 99.6% have never been observed in the laboratory as proteins and their molecular function has not been established experimentally. Predicting the function of such proteins relies mostly on annotated homologs. However, this has resulted in some erroneous annotations, and many proteins have no annotated homologs. Here we propose a de-novo function prediction approach based on identifying biophysical features that underlie function. Using our approach, we discover DNA and RNA binding proteins that cannot be identified based on homology and validate these predictions experimentally. For example, FGF14, which belongs to a family of secreted growth factors was predicted to bind DNA. We verify this experimentally and also show that FGF14 is localized to the nucleus. Mutating the predicted binding site on FGF14 abrogated DNA binding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of automated de-novo function prediction based on identifying function-related biophysical features.

  14. De-novo protein function prediction using DNA binding and RNA binding proteins as a test case

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Sapir; Leiderman, Olga; Charar, Rotem; Efroni, Gilat; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Ofran, Yanay

    2016-01-01

    Of the currently identified protein sequences, 99.6% have never been observed in the laboratory as proteins and their molecular function has not been established experimentally. Predicting the function of such proteins relies mostly on annotated homologs. However, this has resulted in some erroneous annotations, and many proteins have no annotated homologs. Here we propose a de-novo function prediction approach based on identifying biophysical features that underlie function. Using our approach, we discover DNA and RNA binding proteins that cannot be identified based on homology and validate these predictions experimentally. For example, FGF14, which belongs to a family of secreted growth factors was predicted to bind DNA. We verify this experimentally and also show that FGF14 is localized to the nucleus. Mutating the predicted binding site on FGF14 abrogated DNA binding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of automated de-novo function prediction based on identifying function-related biophysical features. PMID:27869118

  15. Prediction of DNA-binding proteins from relational features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of protein-DNA binding has an essential role in the biological processing of genetic information. We use relational machine learning to predict DNA-binding propensity of proteins from their structures. Automatically discovered structural features are able to capture some characteristic spatial configurations of amino acids in proteins. Results Prediction based only on structural relational features already achieves competitive results to existing methods based on physicochemical properties on several protein datasets. Predictive performance is further improved when structural features are combined with physicochemical features. Moreover, the structural features provide some insights not revealed by physicochemical features. Our method is able to detect common spatial substructures. We demonstrate this in experiments with zinc finger proteins. Conclusions We introduced a novel approach for DNA-binding propensity prediction using relational machine learning which could potentially be used also for protein function prediction in general. PMID:23146001

  16. Ca2+ signaling and intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Niki, I; Yokokura, H; Sudo, T; Kato, M; Hidaka, H

    1996-10-01

    Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations evoke a wide range of cellular responses and intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins are the key molecules to transduce Ca2+ signaling via enzymatic reactions or modulation of protein/protein interations (Fig.1). The EF hand proteins, like calmodulin and S100 proteins, are considered to exert Ca(2+)-dependent actions in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. The Ca2+/phospholipid binding proteins are classified into two groups, the annexins and the C2 region proteins. These proteins, distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, translocate to the plasma membrane in response to an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and function in the vicinity of the membrane. Ca2+ storage proteins in the endoplasmic or sarcoplasmic reticulum provide the high Ca2+ capacity of the Ca2+ store sites, which regulate intracellular Ca2+ distribution. The variety and complexity of Ca2+ signaling result from the cooperative actions of specific Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This review describes biochemical properties of intracellular Ca(2+)-binding proteins and their proposed roles in mediating Ca2+ signaling.

  17. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  18. A new aspect of serum protein binding of tolbutamide.

    PubMed

    Ayanoğlu, G; Uihlein, M; Grigoleit, H G

    1986-02-01

    Tolbutamide is known to bind highly to serum proteins. Quite different values have, however, been reported for binding, ranging from 80 to 99 percent. In this study, in vivo and in vitro binding of increasing concentrations of tolbutamide to human serum proteins were evaluated. In vitro studies were done serum from three healthy males and for in vivo studies serum samples from eight healthy males who had received 1,000 mg tolbutamide were used. Protein binding was determined by equilibrium dialysis, using DIANORM system. Tolbutamide concentrations were determined by HPLC method of Uihlein and Hack. The results suggest that there is an increase in percent tolbutamide bound with increasing concentrations of tolbutamide. Generally, an inverse relationship between the total concentration of a drug in serum and its bound fraction is observed. Our findings seem to be contrary to this, at least within the concentration range studied. There exist at least two binding sites on albumin with different affinities for tolbutamide and most probably, at low concentrations, the drug binds mainly to the high affinity sites, whereas at higher concentrations additional drug will bind to the lower affinity sites leading to the observed increase in fraction bound with concentration. In conclusion it may be said that serum protein binding is a much more complicated phenomenon than generally stated and that the normal observations are only true for some ideal compounds where only one site of adsorption has to be taken into account.

  19. Protein binding to expanded telomere repeats in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jennifer M; Gana, Joyce Ache; Petcherskaia, Marina; Kirk, Karen E

    2003-01-01

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes are protected by DNA-protein structures called telomeres. Telomeric DNA is highly conserved, usually consisting of long tracts of a repeating G-rich sequence. Tetrahymena thermophila telomeric DNA consists of alternating blocks of GGGG and TT sequences (i.e. a G4T2 repeat sequence). We examined the relative importance of the guanine and thymine elements of the repeat sequence in promoting in vitro binding by T. thermophila proteins. We identified single- and, for the first time, double-stranded telomere binding activities from a crude T. thermophila protein extract and tested the binding of these activities to altered telomere repeat sequences. All deletions or substitutions made to the guanine element virtually abolished binding, indicating that four G's are essential for recognition by the binding activity. However, G's alone are not sufficient for efficient binding, as elimination of the thymine element dramatically reduced binding. By contrast, substantial expansion of the thymine element was well tolerated, even though one such change, G4T4, is lethal in vivo. We tested up to a four-fold expansion of the thymine element and found that highly efficient binding was still achieved. These results suggest a minimal recognition sequence for T. thermophila proteins, with the T element providing an important spacer between essential G elements.

  20. Nucleic acid-binding specificity of human FUS protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueyin; Schwartz, Jacob C.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    FUS, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, plays multiple roles in RNA processing. Five specific FUS-binding RNA sequence/structure motifs have been proposed, but their affinities for FUS have not been directly compared. Here we find that human FUS binds all these sequences with Kdapp values spanning a 10-fold range. Furthermore, some RNAs that do not contain any of these motifs bind FUS with similar affinity. FUS binds RNA in a length-dependent manner, consistent with a substantial non-specific component to binding. Finally, investigation of FUS binding to different nucleic acids shows that it binds single-stranded DNA with three-fold lower affinity than ssRNA of the same length and sequence, while binding to double-stranded nucleic acids is weaker. We conclude that FUS has quite general nucleic acid-binding activity, with the various proposed RNA motifs being neither necessary for FUS binding nor sufficient to explain its diverse binding partners. PMID:26150427

  1. Erythrocyte Protein 4.1 Binds and Regulates Myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gary R.; Racusen, Richard H.

    1989-12-01

    Myosin was recently identified in erythrocytes and was shown to partition both with membrane and cytosolic fractions, suggesting that it may be loosely bound to membranes [Fowler, V. M., Davis, J. Q. & Bennett, V. (1985) J. Cell Biol. 100, 47-55, and Wong, A. J., Kiehart, D. P. & Pollard, T. D. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 46-49]; however, the molecular basis for this binding was unclear. The present studies employed immobilized monomeric myosin to examine the interaction of myosin with erythrocyte protein 4.1. In human erythrocytes, protein 4.1 binds to integral membrane proteins and mediates spectrin-actin assembly. Protein 4.1 binds to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with a Kd = 140 nM and a stoichiometry consistent with 1:1 binding. Heavy meromyosin competes for protein 4.1 binding with Ki = 36-54 nM; however, the S1 fragment (the myosin head) competes less efficiently. Affinity chromatography of partial chymotryptic digests of protein 4.1 on immobilized myosin identified a 10-kDa domain of protein 4.1 as the myosin-binding site. In functional studies, protein 4.1 partially inhibited the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with Ki = 51 nM. Liver cytosolic and erythrocyte myosins preactivated with myosin light-chain kinase were similarly inhibited by protein 4.1. These studies show that protein 4.1 binds, modulates, and thus may regulate myosin. This interaction might serve to generate the contractile forces involved in Mg2+-ATP-dependent shape changes in erythrocytes and may additionally serve as a model for myosin organization and regulation in non-muscle cells.

  2. Identification of multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins using two high throughput screens

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Park, Sang-Wook; Choi, Hyong Woo; Fei, Zhangjun; Friso, Giulia; Asif, Muhammed; Manosalva, Patricia; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Shi, Kai; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; O'Doherty, Inish; Schroeder, Frank C.; van Wijk, Klass J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important hormone involved in many diverse plant processes, including floral induction, stomatal closure, seed germination, adventitious root initiation, and thermogenesis. It also plays critical functions during responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. The role(s) of SA in signaling disease resistance is by far the best studied process, although it is still only partially understood. To obtain insights into how SA carries out its varied functions, particularly in activating disease resistance, two new high throughput screens were developed to identify novel SA-binding proteins (SABPs). The first utilized crosslinking of the photo-reactive SA analog 4-AzidoSA (4AzSA) to proteins in an Arabidopsis leaf extract, followed by immuno-selection with anti-SA antibodies and then mass spectroscopy-based identification. The second utilized photo-affinity crosslinking of 4AzSA to proteins on a protein microarray (PMA) followed by detection with anti-SA antibodies. To determine whether the candidate SABPs (cSABPs) obtained from these screens were true SABPs, recombinantly-produced proteins were generated and tested for SA-inhibitable crosslinking to 4AzSA, which was monitored by immuno-blot analysis, SA-inhibitable binding of the SA derivative 3-aminoethylSA (3AESA), which was detected by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, or SA-inhibitable binding of [3H]SA, which was detected by size exclusion chromatography. Based on our criteria that true SABPs must exhibit SA-binding activity in at least two of these assays, nine new SABPs are identified here; nine others were previously reported. Approximately 80 cSABPs await further assessment. In addition, the conflicting reports on whether NPR1 is an SABP were addressed by showing that it bound SA in all three of the above assays. PMID:25628632

  3. Lectin-based protein microarray analysis of differences in serum alpha-2-macroglobulin glycosylation between patients with colorectal cancer and persons without cancer.

    PubMed

    Šunderić, Miloš; Šedivá, Alena; Robajac, Dragana; Miljuš, Goran; Gemeiner, Peter; Nedić, Olgica; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is co- and posttranslational modifications affecting proteins. The glycopattern changes are associated with changes in biological function and are involved in many diseases including cancer. We present the lectin-based protein microarray method enabling determination of differences in protein glycosylation. The method involves isolation of targeted protein from samples by immunoprecipitation, spotting of protein from multiple samples into arrays on a microarray slide, incubation with set of biotinylated lectins, the reaction with fluorescent conjugate of streptavidin, and detection of fluorescent intensities by microarray scanner. Lectin-based protein microarray was applied in investigation of differences in alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M) glycosylation isolated from sera samples of healthy persons and patients with colorectal cancer (CC). From 14 lectins used in analysis, statistically significant differences (Student's t-test, P < 0.05) between two groups of samples (persons without cancer and CC patients) were found for 5 of them. α2M molecules isolated from sera of CC patients have higher content of α2,6 sialic acid, N-acetylglucosamine and mannose residues, and tri-/tetraantennary complex type high-mannose N-glycans. A novel lectin-based protein microarray developed and described can serve as a suitable analytical technique for sensitive, simple, fast, and high-throughput determination of differences in protein glycosylation isolated from serum or other samples. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Carbohydrate-binding protein identification by coupling structural similarity searching with binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; von Itzstein, Mark; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-11-15

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) are potential biomarkers and drug targets. However, the interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are challenging to study experimentally and computationally because of their low binding affinity, high flexibility, and the lack of a linear sequence in carbohydrates as exists in RNA, DNA, and proteins. Here, we describe a structure-based function-prediction technique called SPOT-Struc that identifies carbohydrate-recognizing proteins and their binding amino acid residues by structural alignment program SPalign and binding affinity scoring according to a knowledge-based statistical potential based on the distance-scaled finite-ideal gas reference state (DFIRE). The leave-one-out cross-validation of the method on 113 carbohydrate-binding domains and 3442 noncarbohydrate binding proteins yields a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.56 for SPalign alone and 0.63 for SPOT-Struc (SPalign + binding affinity scoring) for CBP prediction. SPOT-Struc is a technique with high positive predictive value (79% correct predictions in all positive CBP predictions) with a reasonable sensitivity (52% positive predictions in all CBPs). The sensitivity of the method was changed slightly when applied to 31 APO (unbound) structures found in the protein databank (14/31 for APO versus 15/31 for HOLO). The result of SPOT-Struc will not change significantly if highly homologous templates were used. SPOT-Struc predicted 19 out of 2076 structural genome targets as CBPs. In particular, one uncharacterized protein in Bacillus subtilis (1oq1A) was matched to galectin-9 from Mus musculus. Thus, SPOT-Struc is useful for uncovering novel carbohydrate-binding proteins. SPOT-Struc is available at http://sparks-lab.org.

  5. In Vitro Biochemical Characterization of Cytokinesis Actin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Morganthaler, Alisha N; Kovar, David R; Suarez, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the biochemical and biophysical properties of purified proteins is critical to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms that facilitate complicated cellular processes such as cytokinesis. Here we outline in vitro assays to investigate the effects of cytokinesis actin-binding proteins on actin filament dynamics and organization. We describe (1) multicolor single-molecule TIRF microscopy actin assembly assays, (2) "bulk" pyrene actin assembly/disassembly assays, and (3) "bulk" sedimentation actin filament binding and bundling assays.

  6. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  7. Binding of exogenous brain protein kinase C to liver nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, U.K.; Wolf, M.; Besterman, J.; Cuatrecasas, P.; Sahyoun, N.

    1986-05-01

    Protein kinase C is found both in the cytosol and bound to membranes. Binding of the enzyme to plasma membranes is controlled by calcium whereas enzyme activators regulate both its membrane binding and enzyme catalysis. Activation of protein kinase C has been implicated in several regulatory processes including gene expression. Accordingly, the possibility of direct interaction of protein kinase C with the nucleus was examined utilizing /sup 3/H-PDBu binding to detect the enzyme. Purified protein kinase C from rat brain could bind to purified rat liver nuclei at 4/sup 0/C or at 21/sup 0/C, and the reaction was completed by 20 min. The binding was linearly dependent on protein kinase C concentration and required free Ca/sup 2 +/ with a K/sub m/sub app// of 0.5 ..mu..M. Chelation of Ca/sup 2 +/ with EGTA resulted in a rapid dissociation of protein kinase C from the nuclei. Differential extraction experiments suggested that about 50% of the enzyme was bound to chromatin and 25% was associated with the nuclear matrix. Moreover, protein kinase C bound to nuclei was able to phosphorylate several endogenous nuclear substrates, including chromatin proteins, in a Ca/sup 2 +/ phosphatidyl serine dependent reaction.

  8. Theoretical studies of protein-protein and protein-DNA binding rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A.

    Proteins are folded chains of amino acids. Some of the amino acids (e.g. Lys, Arg, His, Asp, and Glu) carry charges under physiological conditions. Proteins almost always function through binding to other proteins or ligands, for example barnase is a ribonuclease protein, found in the bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaceus. Barnase degrades RNA by hydrolysis. For the bacterium to inhibit the potentially lethal action of Barnase within its own cell it co-produces another protein called barstar which binds quickly, and tightly, to barnase. The biological function of this binding is to block the active site of barnase. The speeds (rates) at which proteins associate are vital to many biological processes. They span a wide range (from less than 103 to 108 M-1s-1 ). Rates greater than ˜ 106 M -1s-1 are typically found to be manifestations of enhancements by long-range electrostatic interactions between the associating proteins. A different paradigm appears in the case of protein binding to DNA. The rate in this case is enhanced through attractive surface potential that effectively reduces the dimensionality of the available search space for the diffusing protein. This thesis presents computational and theoretical models on the rate of association of ligands/proteins to other proteins or DNA. For protein-protein association we present a general strategy for computing protein-protein rates of association. The main achievements of this strategy is the ability to obtain a stringent reaction criteria based on the landscape of short-range interactions between the associating proteins, and the ability to compute the effect of the electrostatic interactions on the rates of association accurately using the best known solvers for Poisson-Boltzmann equation presently available. For protein-DNA association we present a mathematical model for proteins targeting specific sites on a circular DNA topology. The main achievements are the realization that a linear DNA with reflecting ends

  9. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    PubMed

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  10. Construction and evaluation of an automated light directed protein-detecting microarray synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Marthandan, N; Klyza, S; Li, S; Kwon, Y U; Kodadek, T; Garner, H R

    2008-03-01

    We have designed, constructed, and evaluated an automated instrument that has produced high-density arrays with more than 30 000 peptide features within a 1.5 cm(2) area of a glass slide surface. These arrays can be used for high throughput library screening for protein binding ligands, for potential drug candidate molecules, or for discovering biomarkers. The device consists of a novel fluidics system, a relay control electrical system, an optics system that implements Texas Instruments' digital micromirror device (DMD), and a microwave source for accelerated synthesis of peptide arrays. The instrument implements two novel solid phase chemical synthesis strategies for producing peptide and peptoid arrays. Biotin-streptavidin and DNP anti-DNP (dinitrophenol) models of antibody small molecule interactions were used to demonstrate and evaluate the instrument's capability to produce high-density protein detecting arrays. Several screening assay and detection schemes were explored with various levels of efficiency and assays with sensitivity of 10 nM were also possible.

  11. Characterization of binding of N'-nitrosonornicotine to protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent activation of the carcinogenic nitrosamine, N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) to a reactive intermediate which binds covalently to protein was assessed using male Sprague-Dawley rat liver and lung microsomes. The NADPH-dependent covalent binding of (/sup 14/C)NNN to liver and lung microsomes was linear with time up to 90 and 45 min, respectively and was also linear with protein concentrations up to 3.0 and 2.0 mg/ml, respectively. The apparent K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ of the NADPH-dependent binding to liver microsomes were determined from the initial velocities. Addition of the thiols glutathione, cystein, N-acetylcysteine or 2-mercapthoethanol significantly decreased the non-NADPH-dependent binding to liver microsomal protein, but did not affect the NADPH-dependent binding. Glutathione was required in order to observe any NADPH-dependent binding to lung microsomal protein. In lung microsomes, SKF-525A significantly decreased the NADPH-dependent binding by 79%. Replacement of an air atmosphere with N/sub 2/ or CO:O/sub 2/ (8:2) significantly decreased the NADPH-dependent binding of (/sup 14/C)NNN to liver microsomal protein by 40% or 27% respectively. Extensive covalent binding of (/sup 14/C)NNN to liver and muscle microsomal protein occurred in the absence of an NADPH-generating system, in the presence of 50% methanol and also to bovine serum albumin, indicating a nonenzymatic reaction. These data indicate that cytochrome P-450 is at least in part responsible for the metabolic activation of the carcinogen NNN, but also suggest additional mechanisms of activation.

  12. Identification and characterisation of human apoptosis inducing proteins using cell-based transfection microarrays and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ella L; Miller, Andrew D; Freeman, Tom C

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell-based microarrays were first described by Ziauddin and Sabatini in 2001 as a powerful new approach for performing high throughput screens of gene function. An important application of cell-based microarrays is in screening for proteins that modulate gene networks. To this end, cells are grown over the surface of arrays of RNAi or expression reagents. Cells growing in the immediate vicinity of the arrayed reagents are transfected and the arrays can then be scanned for cells showing localised changes in function. Here we describe the construction of a large-scale microarray using expression plasmids containing human genes, its use in screening for genes that induce apoptosis when over-expressed and the characterisation of a number of these genes by following the transcriptional response of cell cultures during their induction of apoptosis. Results High-density cell-based arrays were successfully fabricated using 1,959 un-tagged open reading frames (ORFs) taken from the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) in mammalian expression vectors. The arrays were then used to screen for genes inducing apoptosis in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK293T) cells. Using this approach, 10 genes were clearly identified and confirmed to induce apoptosis. Some of these genes have previously been linked to apoptosis, others not. The mechanism of action of three of the 10 genes were then characterised further by following the transcriptional events associated with apoptosis induction using expression profiling microarrays. This data demonstrates a clear pro-apoptotic transcriptional response in cells undergoing apoptosis and also suggests the use of common apoptotic pathways regardless of the nature of the over-expressed protein triggering cell death. Conclusion This study reports the design and use of the first truly large-scale cell-based microarrays for over-expression studies. Ten genes were confirmed to induce apoptosis, some of which were not previously known to possess this

  13. Convertase Inhibitory Properties of Staphylococcal Extracellular Complement-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jongerius, Ilse; Garcia, Brandon L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus secretes several complement evasion molecules to combat the human immune response. Extracellular complement-binding protein (Ecb) binds to the C3d domain of C3 and thereby blocks C3 convertases of the alternative pathway and C5 convertases via all complement pathways. Inhibition of C5 convertases results in complete inhibition of C5a generation and subsequent neutrophil migration. Here, we show that binding of Ecb to the C3d domain of C3b is crucial for inhibition of C5 convertases. Ecb does not interfere with substrate binding to convertases but prevents formation of an active convertase enzyme. PMID:20304920

  14. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  15. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA cross-linking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5' → 3' exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATAC-seq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches.

  16. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  17. The presence of zinc-binding proteins in brain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M; Ebadi, M; Swanson, S

    1983-09-01

    Zinc is one of the most abundant divalent metal ions in the brain, its concentration being greater than those of copper and manganese. Since free zinc ion is a potent inhibitor of sulfhydryl enzymes, we postulated that zinc in the brain most probably exists bound to macromolecules. As zinc-binding proteins in brain have not been characterized, we attempted to discover the occurrence and properties of these proteins. By using Sephadex G-75 column chromatography calibrated with proteins of known molecular weights, and by other techniques, we detected separate zinc-binding proteins, with apparent estimated molecular weights ranging from 15,000 to 210,000. Unlike the hepatic or renal zinc thioneins, the zinc-binding proteins in brain are not inducible following administration of zinc. Our interpretation of the results is that the major portion of the existing zinc in the brain is bound, and does not exist in free form.

  18. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  19. A sliding selectivity scale for lipid binding to membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Marty, Michael T.; Gault, Joseph; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes form barriers that are essential for cellular integrity and compartmentalisation. Proteins that reside in the membrane have co-evolved with their hydrophobic lipid environment which serves as a solvent for proteins with very diverse requirements. As a result, membrane protein-lipid interactions range from completely non-selective to highly discriminating. Mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations, enables us to monitor how lipids interact with intact membrane protein complexes and assess their effects on structure and dynamics. Recent studies illustrate the ability to differentiate specific lipid binding, preferential interactions with lipid subsets, and nonselective annular contacts. In this review, we consider the biological implications of different lipid-binding scenarios and propose that binding occurs on a sliding selectivity scale, in line with the view of biological membranes as facilitators of dynamic protein and lipid organization. PMID:27155089

  20. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  5. A Protein Allergen Microarray Detects Specific IgE to Pollen Surface, Cytoplasmic, and Commercial Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A.; Conrad, Donald F.; Preuss, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Background Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts). To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. Conclusions/Significance These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual responses over time

  6. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Y.; Akino, T. )

    1991-02-15

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed.

  7. Interaction of ruthenium red with Ca2(+)-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Charuk, J.H.; Pirraglia, C.A.; Reithmeier, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The interaction of ruthenium red, ((NH3)5Ru-O-Ru(NH3)4-O-Ru(NH3)5)Cl6.4H2O, with various Ca2(+)-binding proteins was studied. Ruthenium red inhibited Ca2+ binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein, calsequestrin, immobilized on Sepharose 4B. Furthermore, ruthenium red bound to calsequestrin with high affinity (Kd = 0.7 microM; Bmax = 218 nmol/mg protein). The dye stained calsequestrin in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or on nitrocellulose paper and was displaced by Ca2+ (Ki = 1.4 mM). The specificity of ruthenium red staining of several Ca2(+)-binding proteins was investigated by comparison with two other detection methods, 45Ca2+ autoradiography and the Stains-all reaction. Ruthenium red bound to the same proteins detected by the 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Ruthenium red stained both the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter and the Ca2(+)-ATPase of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. Ruthenium red also stained the EF hand conformation Ca2(+)-binding proteins, calmodulin, troponin C, and S-100. This inorganic dye provides a simple, rapid method for detecting various types of Ca2(+)-binding proteins following electrophoresis.

  8. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  9. Modulation of Auxin-Binding Proteins in Cell Suspensions 1

    PubMed Central

    LoSchiavo, Fiorella; Filippini, Francesco; Cozzani, Fabrizio; Vallone, Daniela; Terzi, Mario

    1991-01-01

    This paper shows that the level of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in the medium determines the level of auxin-binding proteins in the membranes of carrot, Daucus carota, cells grown in suspension. This induction takes slightly more than 2 hours to complete and can be elicited by natural as well as synthetic auxins. The auxin binding sites thus generated, which are pronase-sensitive, bind 2,4-D, indoleacetic acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA) equally well. However both α- and β-NAA bind, whereas only α-NAA is effective in the inductive process. Cells committed to embryogeny (proembryogenic masses) do not respond to auxin, i.e. their level of auxin-binding proteins remains very low, and they do not seem to synthesize the hormone, as indicated by inhibitor studies. Sensitivity to, and production of, auxin, begins when the embryo becomes polarized, i.e. at postglobular stage. PMID:16668416

  10. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, R.Y.; Golenbock, D.T.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/ (10/sup 9/ dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS.

  11. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  12. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the "fly-casting" hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  13. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  14. Metal-binding proteins as metal pollution indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, H.F.

    1986-03-01

    The fact that metal-binding proteins are a consequence of elevated metal concentration in organisms is well known. What has been overlooked is that the presence of these proteins provides a unique opportunity to reformulate the criteria of metal pollution. The detoxification effect of metal-binding proteins in animals from polluted areas has been cited, but there have been only very few studies relating metal-binding proteins to pollution. This lack is due partly to the design of most experiments, which were aimed at isolation of metal-binding proteins and hence were of too short duration to allow for correlation to adverse physiological effects on the organism. In this study metal-binding proteins were isolated and characterized from five different marine animals (rock lobster, Jasus lalandii; hermit crab, Diogenes brevirostris; sandshrimp, Palaemon pacificus; black mussel, Choromytilus meridionalis; and limpet, Patella granularis). These animals were kept under identical metal-enriched conditions, hence eliminating differences in method and seasons. The study animals belonged to different phyla; varied in size, mass, age, behavior, food requirements and life stages; and accumulated metals at different rates. It is possible to link unseasonal moulting in crustacea, a known physiological effect due to a metal-enriched environment, to the production of the metal-binding protein without evidence of obvious metal body burden. Thus a new concept of pollution is defined: the presence of metal-binding proteins confirms toxic metal pollution. This concept was then tested under field conditions in the whelk Bullia digitalis and in metal-enriched grass.

  15. Metal-binding proteins as metal pollution indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, H F

    1986-01-01

    The fact that metal-binding proteins are a consequence of elevated metal concentration in organisms is well known. What has been overlooked is that the presence of these proteins provides a unique opportunity to reformulate the criteria of metal pollution. The detoxification effect of metal-binding proteins in animals from polluted areas has been cited, but there have been only very few studies relating metal-binding proteins to pollution. This lack is due partly to the design of most experiments, which were aimed at isolation of metal-binding proteins and hence were of too short duration to allow for correlation to adverse physiological effects on the organism. In this study metal-binding proteins were isolated and characterized from five different marine animals (rock lobster, Jasus lalandii; hermit crab, Diogenes brevirostris; sandshrimp, Palaemon pacificus; black mussel, Choromytilus meridionalis; and limpet, Patella granularis). These animals were kept under identical metal-enriched conditions, hence eliminating differences in method and seasons. The study animals belonged to different phyla; varied in size, mass, age, behavior, food requirements and life stages; and accumulated metals at different rates. It is possible to link unseasonal moulting in crustacea, a known physiological effect due to a metal-enriched environment, to the production of the metal-binding protein without evidence of obvious metal body burden. Thus a new concept of pollution is defined: the presence of metal-binding proteins confirms toxic metal pollution. This concept was then tested under field conditions in the whelk Bullia digitalis and in metal-enriched grass. PMID:3709437

  16. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza. PMID:26938453

  17. Protein binding elements in the human beta-polymerase promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Englander, E W; Wilson, S H

    1990-01-01

    The core promoter for human DNA polymerase beta contains discrete binding sites for mammalian nuclear proteins, as revealed by DNasel footprinting and gel mobility shift assays. Two sites correspond to sequences identical with the Sp1 factor binding element, and a third site includes an eight residue palindromic sequence, TGACGTCA, known as the CRE element of several cAMP responsive promoters; the 5 to 10 residues flanking this palindrome on each side have no apparent sequence homology with known elements in other promoters. Nuclear extract from a variety of tissues and cells were examined; these included rat liver and testes and cultured cells of human and hamster origin. The DNasel footprint is strong over and around the palindromic element for each of the extracts and is equivalent in size (approximately 22 residues); footprinting over the Sp1 binding sites is seen also. Two potential tissue-specific binding sites, present in liver but not in testes, were found corresponding to residues -13 to -10 and +33 to +48, respectively. Protein binding to the palindromic element was confirmed by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the core promoter as probe. Binding specificity of the 22 residue palindromic element, as revealed by oligonucleotide competition, is different from that of AP-1 binding element. Controlled proteolysis with trypsin was used to study structural properties of proteins forming the mobility shift bands. Following digestion with trypsin, most of the palindrome binding activity of each extract corresponded to a sharp, faster migrating band, potentially representing a DNA binding domain of the palindrome binding protein. Images PMID:2315044

  18. Odorant-binding protein: localization to nasal glands and secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Pevsner, J; Sklar, P B; Snyder, S H

    1986-01-01

    An odorant-binding protein (OBP) was isolated from bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosa. We have produced polyclonal antisera to this protein and report its immunohistochemical localization to mucus-secreting glands of the olfactory and respiratory mucosa. Although OBP was originally isolated as a pyrazine binding protein, both rat and bovine OBP also bind the odorants [3H]methyldihydrojasmonate and 3,7-dimethyl-octan-1-ol as well as 2-isobutyl-3-[3H]methoxypyrazine. We detect substantial odorant-binding activity attributable to OBP in secreted rat nasal mucus and tears but not in saliva, suggesting a role for OBP in transporting or concentrating odorants. Images PMID:3523479

  19. A Correlation between Protein Function and Ligand Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Bokemper, Michael; Copeland, Jennifer C.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We report that proteins with the same function bind the same set of small molecules from a standardized chemical library. This observation led to a quantifiable and rapidly adaptable method for protein functional analysis using experimentally-derived ligand binding profiles. Ligand binding is measured using a high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screen with a structurally diverse chemical library. The method was demonstrated using a set of 19 proteins with a range of functions. A statistically significant similarity in ligand binding profiles was only observed between the two functionally identical albumins and between the five functionally similar amylases. This new approach is independent of sequence, structure or evolutionary information, and therefore, extends our ability to analyze and functionally annotate novel genes. PMID:21366353

  20. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  1. Binding and measuring natural rubber latex proteins on glove powder.

    PubMed

    Tomazic-Jezic, Vesna J; Lucas, Anne D; Sanchez, Beatriz A

    2004-01-01

    Cornstarch used as a donning powder on natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves adsorbs NRL proteins. During glove use, powder-carried proteins can be aerosolized and can cause allergic reactions in NRL sensitized individuals. The amount of NRL proteins bound to glove powder and its relative relationship to the total amount of proteins on the glove has not been studied, due to the difficulty in measuring proteins on powder. Using the ELISA inhibition assay for NRL proteins [Standard test method for the immunological measurement of antigenic protein in natural rubber and its products. In: The Annual Book of ASTM Standards; ASTM: West Conshohocken, PA, 2000; ASTM D 64-0] we have investigated possible protocol modifications in order to include measurement of proteins bound to glove powder, as well as the water-extractable glove proteins. Possible interference of the starch itself was evaluated by adding clean cornstarch to the assay. No significant interference was observed with powder concentrations below 5 mg/mL. We analyzed 19 extracts of powdered surgical and examination gloves before and after removal of the particulate component. Comparison of NRL glove extracts with, and without, the cornstarch powder fraction indicated significant variations in the ratios of powder-bound protein and corresponding water-extractable protein. The ratios did not appear to correlate with either the total protein on the glove, the glove weight, or the total amount of powder on the glove. However, when virgin glove powders were exposed to NRL proteins, binding was proportional to the protein concentration in the suspension. Temperature in the range from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C, did not affect binding intensity, while a higher pH resulted in a higher level of protein associated with, or bound to, the starch. The major differences in the propensity for NRL protein binding were observed among different glove powders. The data indicate that the amount of protein that binds to glove powder

  2. Elevated HGF Levels in Sera from Breast Cancer Patients Detected Using a Protein Microarray ELISA

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Ronald L. ); Varnum, Susan M. ); Zangar, Richard C. )

    2002-01-01

    We developed an ELISA in high-density microassay format to detect hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in human serum. The microassay can detect HGF at sub-pg/mL concentrations in sample volumes of 100 uL or less. The microassay is also quantitative and was used to detect elevated HGF levels in sera from recurrent breast cancer patients. The microarray format provides the potential for high-throughput quantitation of multiple biomarkers in parallel.

  3. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  4. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values) and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs) were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that, except for few specific

  5. Identification of potential genes/proteins regulated by Tiam1 in colorectal cancer by microarray analysis and proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Qingling; Ding, Yanqing

    2008-10-01

    Tiam1 (T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Rac, is a colorectal cancer metastasis-related gene. In this study, we aimed to better understand the mechanism underlying Tiam1-mediated metastasis. We applied gene microarray and proteome analysis and compared expression of genes and proteins in a stable Tiam1-silencing colorectal cancer cell line and in a control cell line. Our analysis identified three genes, high-mobility group box1 (HMGB1), annexin IV (ANXA4) and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) that were associated with Tiam1. Analysis of these proteins, which may be directly or indirectly regulated by Tiam1, may provide insight into the role and mechanism of Tiam1 in colorectal cancer metastasis.

  6. Assembly of a π-π stack of ligands in the binding site of an acetylcholine-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Stornaiuolo, Mariano; De Kloe, Gerdien E; Rucktooa, Prakash; Fish, Alexander; van Elk, René; Edink, Ewald S; Bertrand, Daniel; Smit, August B; de Esch, Iwan J P; Sixma, Titia K

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine-binding protein is a water-soluble homologue of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of cys-loop receptors. It is used as a structurally accessible prototype for studying ligand binding to these pharmaceutically important pentameric ion channels, in particular to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, due to conserved binding site residues present at the interface between two subunits. Here we report that an aromatic conjugated small molecule binds acetylcholine-binding protein in an ordered π-π stack of three identical molecules per binding site, two parallel and one antiparallel. Acetylcholine-binding protein stabilizes the assembly of the stack by aromatic contacts. Thanks to the plasticity of its ligand-binding site, acetylcholine-binding protein can accommodate the formation of aromatic stacks of different size by simple loop repositioning and minimal adjustment of the interactions. This type of supramolecular binding provides a novel paradigm in drug design.

  7. Mining the characteristic interaction patterns on protein-protein binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Zhihai; Han, Li; Li, Chengke; Wang, Renxiao

    2013-09-23

    Protein-protein interactions are observed in various biological processes. They are important for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and can be potential targets for developing small-molecule regulators of such processes. Previous studies suggest that certain residues on protein-protein binding interfaces are "hot spots". As an extension to this concept, we have developed a residue-based method to identify the characteristic interaction patterns (CIPs) on protein-protein binding interfaces, in which each pattern is a cluster of four contacting residues. Systematic analysis was conducted on a nonredundant set of 1,222 protein-protein binding interfaces selected out of the entire Protein Data Bank. Favored interaction patterns across different protein-protein binding interfaces were retrieved by considering both geometrical and chemical conservations. As demonstrated on two test tests, our method was able to predict hot spot residues on protein-protein binding interfaces with good recall scores and acceptable precision scores. By analyzing the function annotations and the evolutionary tree of the protein-protein complexes in our data set, we also observed that protein-protein interfaces sharing common characteristic interaction patterns are normally associated with identical or similar biological functions.

  8. Immunochemical analysis of acetaminophen covalent binding to proteins. Partial characterization of the major acetaminophen-binding liver proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartolone, J B; Birge, R B; Sparks, K; Cohen, S D; Khairallah, E A

    1988-12-15

    A sensitive immunoassay for detecting acetaminophen (APAP) bound to proteins was developed using an affinity purified antibody directed against the N-acetylated end of the APAP molecule. Western blots of electrophoretically resolved liver proteins taken from mice given an hepatotoxic dose of APAP demonstrated that nearly 85% of the total detectable protein-bound APAP was covalently associated with proteins of 44 and 58 kD. Pretreatment of liver extracts with the sulfhydryl-specific reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), prior to derivatization with the reactive metabolite of APAP, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), greatly reduced immunochemically detectable APAP-protein adducts and indicated that the antibody detects protein-thiol conjugates of APAP. To investigate the basis of the binding selectivity in vivo, a variety of systems which yielded APAP-protein adducts were analyzed. Systems which activate APAP enzymatically, as in hepatocyte suspensions or in post-mitochondrial (S9) fractions fortified with an NADPH-regenerating system, resulted in a protein binding profile similar to that produced in vivo. Conversely, when extracts or cells were treated with chemically synthesized NAPQI, an alternative protein binding profile was obtained. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of the reduced protein thiol (PSH) content of liver proteins using [3H]NEM labeling revealed that the 58 kD APAP-binding proteins were rich in PSH, whereas the major 44 kD binding protein had virtually no detectable PSH. Many PSH-rich proteins that were not arylated in vivo did bind NAPQI in vitro. However, the 44 kD proteins were not arylated when chemically synthesized NAPQI was added to homogenates or cell suspensions. The present data further suggest that, in addition to the amount and reactivity of free protein sulfhydryls, the cellular localization with respect to the cytochrome P-450 activation site may influence the susceptibility of proteins to NAPQI binding. These findings signal

  9. Structural mechanism of the simultaneous binding of two drugs to a multidrug-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A; Miller, Marshall C; Brennan, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    The structural basis of simultaneous binding of two or more different drugs by any multidrug-binding protein is unknown and also how this can lead to a noncompetitive, uncompetitive or cooperative binding mechanism. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug-binding transcription repressor, QacR, bound simultaneously to ethidium (Et) and proflavin (Pf). The structure underscores the plasticity of the multidrug-binding pocket and reveals an alternative, Pf-induced binding mode for Et. To monitor the simultaneous binding of Pf and Et to QacR, as well as to determine the effects on the binding affinity of one drug when the other drug is prebound, a novel application of near-ultraviolet circular dichroism (UVCD) was developed. The UVCD equilibrium-binding studies revealed identical affinities of Pf for QacR in the presence or absence of Et, but significantly diminished affinity of Et for QacR when Pf is prebound, findings that are readily explicable by their structures. The principles for simultaneous binding of two different drugs discerned here are likely employed by the multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:15257299

  10. Ligand binding to a high-energy partially unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Joseph R; Park, Chiwook

    2015-01-01

    The conformational energy landscape of a protein determines populations of all possible conformations of the protein and also determines the kinetics of the conversion between the conformations. Interaction with ligands influences the conformational energy landscapes of proteins and shifts populations of proteins in different conformational states. To investigate the effect of ligand binding on partial unfolding of a protein, we use Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its functional ligand NADP(+) as a model system. We previously identified a partially unfolded form of DHFR that is populated under native conditions. In this report, we determined the free energy for partial unfolding of DHFR at varying concentrations of NADP(+) and found that NADP(+) binds to the partially unfolded form as well as the native form. DHFR unfolds partially without releasing the ligand, though the binding affinity for NADP(+) is diminished upon partial unfolding. Based on known crystallographic structures of NADP(+) -bound DHFR and the model of the partially unfolded protein we previously determined, we propose that the adenosine-binding domain of DHFR remains folded in the partially unfolded form and interacts with the adenosine moiety of NADP(+) . Our result demonstrates that ligand binding may affect the conformational free energy of not only native forms but also high-energy non-native forms.

  11. Inhibition of tristetraprolin deadenylation by poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Robert M.; Chrestensen, Carol A.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Harp, Mary G.; Pelo, Jared W.; Shabanowitz, Jeffery; DeRose, Robert; Hunt, Donald F.; Sturgill, Thomas W.; Worthington, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype for a family of RNA binding proteins that bind the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) messenger RNA AU-rich element (ARE), causing deadenylation of the TNF poly(A) tail, RNA decay, and silencing of TNF protein production. Using mass spectrometry sequencing we identified poly(A) binding proteins-1 and -4 (PABP1 and PABP4) in high abundance and good protein coverage from TTP immunoprecipitates. PABP1 significantly enhanced TNF ARE binding by RNA EMSA and prevented TTP-initiated deadenylation in an in vitro macrophage assay of TNF poly(A) stability. Neomycin inhibited TTP-promoted deadenylation at concentrations shown to inhibit the deadenylases poly(A) ribonuclease and CCR4. Stably transfected RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing PABP1 do not oversecrete TNF; instead they upregulate TTP protein without increasing TNF protein production. The PABP1 inhibition of deadenylation initiated by TTP does not require the poly(A) binding regions in RRM1 and RRM2, suggesting a more complicated interaction than simple masking of the poly(A) tail from a 3′-exonuclease. Like TTP, PABP1 is a substrate for p38 MAP kinase. Finally, PABP1 stabilizes cotransfected TTP in 293T cells and prevents the decrease in TTP levels seen with p38 MAP kinase inhibition. These findings suggest several levels of functional antagonism between TTP and PABP1 that have implications for regulation of unstable mRNAs like TNF. PMID:18467502

  12. A Binding Model and Similarity for Flexible Modular Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máté, Gabriell; Feinauer, Christoph J.; Hofmann, Andreas; Goldt, Sebastian; Liu, Lei; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    Modular proteins are one of the most commonly found disordered protein motifs. An example is CTCF, a protein that has been named the master waver of the genome i.e., the organizer of the 3D structure of the chromosomes. Using NMR and numerical simulations, much progress has been made in understanding their various functions and ways of binding. Modular proteins are often composed of protein modules interconnected by flexible linkers. They can be imagined as ``beads on a string.'' We argue that when the number of beads is small, these structures behave like a self avoiding random walk. Nevertheless, when binding to a target, linkers can fold in more ordered and stable states. At the same time, folding can influence functional roles. We show that the flexibility of the linkers can boost binding affinity. As a result of flexibility, the conformations of these proteins before and after binding are different. So this implies that generic binding site prediction methods may fail. To deal with this we introduce a new methodology to characterize and compare these flexible structures. Employing topological concepts we propose a method which intrinsically fuses topology and geometry. GM gratefully acknowledges support from the HGS-MathComp and the RTG 1653.

  13. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  14. Important amino acid residues involved in folding and binding of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulandaisamy, A; Lathi, V; ViswaPoorani, K; Yugandhar, K; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions perform diverse functions in living organism. The integrative analysis of binding and stabilizing residues will provide insights on the functions of protein-protein complexes. In this work, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 261 protein-protein complexes and identified binding site residues, stabilizing residues and common to both binding and stabilizing, termed as "key residues". We found that 6.1% of residues are involved in binding and 6.8% of residues are important for folding and stability. Among them, only 2% are involved in both folding and binding, which shows the importance and specific roles played by these residues. The key residues have been analyzed based on protein function, binding affinity, rigid and flexible complexes, amino acid preference and structure based parameters. We found that high affinity complexes have more key residues than low affinity complexes. In addition, key residues are enriched with the combination of specific hydrophobic and charged/polar residues. Atomic contacts between interacting proteins have distinct preferences of polar-polar, nonpolar-nonpolar and polar-nonpolar contacts in different functional classes of protein-protein complexes. Further, the influence of sequence and structural parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, solvent accessibility, secondary structure, long-range order and conservation score has been discussed. The analysis can be used to comprehend the interplay between stability and binding in protein-protein complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P < 0.1). mRNAs related to ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA processing, and translation were upregulated during overnight nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P < 0.01-0.1). Transcripts of genes associated with lysosomal degradation showed consistently lower expression during TPN while mRNAs for ubiquitin-mediated degradation of proteins as well as transcripts related to intracellular signaling pathways, PI3 kinase/MAPkinase, were either increased or decreased. In conclusion, muscle mRNA alterations during overnight standard TPN infusions at constant rate altered mRNAs associated with mTOR signaling; increased initiation of protein translation; and suppressed autophagy/lysosomal degradation of proteins. This indicates that overnight preoperative parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The

  16. Dose-dependency of theophylline clearance and protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Fleetham, J A; Bird, C E; Nakatsu, K; Wigle, R D; Munt, P W

    1981-01-01

    Dose-dependency in theophylline pharmacokinetics and protein binding characteristics was examined in 10 healthy male volunteers. Theophylline disposition was determined after an intravenous infusion of both 1 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg aminophylline in a randomised crossover study. There was considerable intrasubject variability in theophylline clearance but no significant dose-dependency. Theophylline protein binding was assessed by equilibrium dialysis at varying theophylline concentrations. The percentage of free non-protein bound theophylline was significantly increased at high theophylline concentrations. This increase in free theophylline would lead to a non-linear increase in the risk of toxicity with increasing drug concentration. Images PMID:7314008

  17. Actin and Actin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    Organisms from all domains of life depend on filaments of the protein actin to provide structure and to support internal movements. Many eukaryotic cells use forces produced by actin polymerization for their motility, and myosin motor proteins use ATP hydrolysis to produce force on actin filaments. Actin polymerizes spontaneously, followed by hydrolysis of a bound adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Dissociation of the γ-phosphate prepares the polymer for disassembly. This review provides an overview of the properties of actin and shows how dozens of proteins control both the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments. These players catalyze nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, initiate polymerization, promote phosphate dissociation, cap the ends of polymers, cross-link filaments to each other and other cellular components, and sever filaments. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. cDNA Microarrays as a Tool for Identification of Biomineralization Proteins in the Coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Patrick; Bowers, Robert M.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Fanelli, Michael A.; Olszova, Daniela; Read, Betsy A.

    2006-01-01

    Marine unicellular coccolithophore algae produce species-specific calcite scales otherwise known as coccoliths. While the coccoliths and their elaborate architecture have attracted the attention of investigators from various scientific disciplines, our knowledge of the underpinnings of the process of biomineralization in this alga is still in its infancy. The processes of calcification and coccolithogenesis are highly regulated and likely to be complex, requiring coordinated expression of many genes and pathways. In this study, we have employed cDNA microarrays to investigate changes in gene expression associated with biomineralization in the most abundant coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi. Expression profiling of cultures grown under calcifying and noncalcifying conditions has been carried out using cDNA microarrays corresponding to approximately 2,300 expressed sequence tags. A total of 127 significantly up- or down-regulated transcripts were identified using a P value of 0.01 and a change of >2.0-fold. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to test the overall validity of the microarray data, as well as the relevance of many of the proteins predicted to be associated with biomineralization, including a novel gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (A. R. Soto, H. Zheng, D. Shoemaker, J. Rodriguez, B. A. Read, and T. M. Wahlund, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5500-5511, 2006). Differentially regulated genes include those related to cellular metabolism, ion channels, transport proteins, vesicular trafficking, and cell signaling. The putative function of the vast majority of candidate transcripts could not be defined. Nonetheless, the data described herein represent profiles of the transcription changes associated with biomineralization-related pathways in E. huxleyi and have identified novel and potentially useful targets for more detailed analysis. PMID:16885305

  19. DNA-binding proteins in plant mitochondria: implications for transcription.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, José M; Kühn, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    The structural complexity of plant mitochondrial genomes correlates with the variety of single-strand DNA-binding proteins found in plant mitochondria. Most of these are plant-specific and have roles in homologous recombination and genome maintenance. Mitochondrial nucleoids thus differ fundamentally between plants and yeast or animals, where the principal nucleoid protein is a DNA-packaging protein that binds double-stranded DNA. Major transcriptional cofactors identified in mitochondria of non-plant species are also seemingly absent from plants. This article reviews current knowledge on plant mitochondrial DNA-binding proteins and discusses that those may affect the accessibility and conformation of transcription start sites, thus functioning as transcriptional modulators without being dedicated transcription factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  1. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1982-01-01

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with ..beta..-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to ..beta..-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants (lipids/detergents).

  2. [Characterization of propofol binding to plasma proteins and possible interactions].

    PubMed

    Garrido, M J; Jiménez, R M; Rodríguez-Sasiaín, J M; Aguirre, C; Aguilera, L; Calvo, R

    1994-01-01

    a) To study the binding of propofol to proteins in plasma samples from healthy volunteers and in solutions of albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGA); b) to describe the nature of the bond and possible interactions with other substances that are potential displacers: salicylate, phenylbutazone, sulfisoxazole, tolbutamide, sodium valproate, sodium oleate and penbutolol; c) to assess the effect of propofol on the binding of specific markers and possible binding sites in the following proteins: 14C-warfarin, 3H-diazepam, 3H-midazolam, 3H-imidazole, 3H-penbutolol and 3H-morphine. The free fraction was obtained in all samples by ultrafiltration and measurement of the free concentration of propofol by liquid chromatography and of the markers by scintillation spectrometry. The free fraction of propofol in plasma was 0.98 +/- 0.12% and binding was not saturable. Albumin seems to play an important role (95% bound), whereas the participation of AGA was low (54% bound). Propofol did not affect the binding of any of the markers studied. Nor did the presence of other drugs at therapeutic plasma concentrations affect the binding of propofol. The binding of propofol to plasma proteins seems unlikely to cause drug interactions in clinical practice.

  3. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) – a drug’s ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a

  4. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain