Science.gov

Sample records for protein breakdown represents

  1. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  2. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen.

  3. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants. PMID:26260516

  4. Role of the alpha-amino group of protein in ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Heller, H; Eytan, E; Kaklij, G; Rose, I A

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin to NH2 groups of proteins is required for protein breakdown. We now show that the selective modification of NH2-terminal alpha-NH2 groups of globin and lysozyme prevents their degradation by the ubiquitin proteolytic system from reticulocytes. The conjugation by ubiquitin of epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues, usually seen in multiples, was also inhibited in alpha-NH2-blocked proteins. Naturally occurring N alpha-acetylated proteins are not degraded by the ubiquitin system at a significant rate, while their nonacetylated counterparts from other species are good substrates. This suggests that one function of N alpha-acetylation of cellular proteins is to prevent their degradation by the ubiquitin system. alpha-NH2-blocked proteins can have their activity as substrates for degradation increased by incorporation of alpha-NH2 groups through the introduction of polyalanine side chains. Proteins in which most epsilon-NH2 groups are blocked but the alpha-NH2 group is free are degraded by the ubiquitin system, but at a reduced rate. It is therefore suggested that the exposure of a free NH2 terminus of proteins is required for degradation and probably initiates the formation of ubiquitin conjugates committed for degradation. Images PMID:6095265

  5. Elastin: a representative ideal protein elastomer.

    PubMed

    Urry, D W; Hugel, T; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E; Sheiba, L; Dea, J; Xu, J; Parker, T

    2002-02-28

    During the last half century, identification of an ideal (predominantly entropic) protein elastomer was generally thought to require that the ideal protein elastomer be a random chain network. Here, we report two new sets of data and review previous data. The first set of new data utilizes atomic force microscopy to report single-chain force-extension curves for (GVGVP)(251) and (GVGIP)(260), and provides evidence for single-chain ideal elasticity. The second class of new data provides a direct contrast between low-frequency sound absorption (0.1-10 kHz) exhibited by random-chain network elastomers and by elastin protein-based polymers. Earlier composition, dielectric relaxation (1-1000 MHz), thermoelasticity, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses are presented, that combine with the new data to contrast with random-chain network rubbers and to detail the presence of regular non-random structural elements of the elastin-based systems that lose entropic elastomeric force upon thermal denaturation. The data and analyses affirm an earlier contrary argument that components of elastin, the elastic protein of the mammalian elastic fibre, and purified elastin fibre itself contain dynamic, non-random, regularly repeating structures that exhibit dominantly entropic elasticity by means of a damping of internal chain dynamics on extension.

  6. Elastin: a representative ideal protein elastomer.

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D W; Hugel, T; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E; Sheiba, L; Dea, J; Xu, J; Parker, T

    2002-01-01

    During the last half century, identification of an ideal (predominantly entropic) protein elastomer was generally thought to require that the ideal protein elastomer be a random chain network. Here, we report two new sets of data and review previous data. The first set of new data utilizes atomic force microscopy to report single-chain force-extension curves for (GVGVP)(251) and (GVGIP)(260), and provides evidence for single-chain ideal elasticity. The second class of new data provides a direct contrast between low-frequency sound absorption (0.1-10 kHz) exhibited by random-chain network elastomers and by elastin protein-based polymers. Earlier composition, dielectric relaxation (1-1000 MHz), thermoelasticity, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses are presented, that combine with the new data to contrast with random-chain network rubbers and to detail the presence of regular non-random structural elements of the elastin-based systems that lose entropic elastomeric force upon thermal denaturation. The data and analyses affirm an earlier contrary argument that components of elastin, the elastic protein of the mammalian elastic fibre, and purified elastin fibre itself contain dynamic, non-random, regularly repeating structures that exhibit dominantly entropic elasticity by means of a damping of internal chain dynamics on extension. PMID:11911774

  7. Effects of oral meal feeding on whole body protein breakdown and protein synthesis in cachectic pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David PJ; van de Poll, Marcel CG; Moses, Alastair GW; Preston, Thomas; Olde Damink, Steven WM; Rensen, Sander S; Deutz, Nicolaas EP; Soeters, Peter B; Ross, James A; Fearon, Kenneth CH; Dejong, Cornelis HC

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is often accompanied by cachexia, a syndrome of severe weight loss and muscle wasting. A suboptimal response to nutritional support may further aggravate cachexia, yet the influence of nutrition on protein kinetics in cachectic patients is poorly understood. Methods Eight cachectic pancreatic cancer patients and seven control patients received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of l-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and l-[3,3-2H2]tyrosine for 8 h and ingested sips of water with l-[1-13C]phenylalanine every 30 min. After 4 h, oral feeding was started. Whole body protein breakdown, protein synthesis, and net protein balance were calculated. Results are given as median with interquartile range. Results Baseline protein breakdown and protein synthesis were higher in cachectic patients compared with the controls (breakdown: 67.1 (48.1–79.6) vs. 45.8 (42.6–46.3) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, P = 0.049; and synthesis: 63.0 (44.3–75.6) vs. 41.8 (37.6–42.5) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, P = 0.021). During feeding, protein breakdown decreased significantly to 45.5 (26.9–51.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.012) in the cachexia group and to 33.7 (17.4–37.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.018) in the control group. Protein synthesis was not affected by feeding in cachectic patients: 58.4 (46.5–76.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, but was stimulated in controls: 47.9 (41.8–56.7) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.018). Both groups showed a comparable positive net protein balance during feeding: cachexia: 19.7 (13.1–23.7) and control: 16.3 (13.6–25.4) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.908). Conclusion Cachectic pancreatic cancer patients have a higher basal protein turnover. Both cachectic patients and controls show a comparable protein anabolism during feeding, albeit through a different pattern of protein kinetics. In cachectic patients, this is primarily related to reduced protein breakdown, whereas in controls, both protein breakdown and

  8. In vivo breakdown products of the 32 kDa thylakoid herbicide binding protein. [Spirodela oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Gaba, V.; Edelman, M.

    1986-04-01

    The 32 kDa herbicide binding protein of PSII is degraded rapidly in the light. This phenomenon was investigated in Spirodela oligorrhiza. When fronds were radiolabeled in the presence of cycloheximide only the chloroplast-encoded proteins were labeled. Under these conditions, a breakdown product of 23.5 kDa was observed. This polypeptide was further degraded with kinetics similar to that of the 32 kDa protein. The 23.5 kDa polypeptide cross-reacted with an antibody specific to the 32 kDa protein. By protease digestion it was determined that the 23.5 kDa polypeptide is the intact N-terminal piece of the 32 kDa protein. Thus, this product corresponds to the membrane anchor of the 32 kDa protein. Using the same antibody, breakdown products of 16 kDa, 14 kDa and 12 kDa were observed. These products have also been observed in Zea mays and Solanum nigrum. Using DCMU during pulse-chase experiments at different light intensities, evidence was obtained that the 23.5 kDa breakdown product is generated in vivo.

  9. Does exercise stimulate protein breakdown in humans. Isotopic approaches to the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Protein metabolism in exercise has been investigated for 100 yr, yet it is still unclear if exercise induces an increased rate of protein breakdown. We have recently addressed this general question in a series of experiments in human subjects using stable isotopic tracers. In this paper, the results of those studies are reviewed. We have found that in light exercise the de-carboxylation of leucine is increased. However, urea production is not increased correspondingly, nor is the rate of incorporation into urea of nitrogen from either leucine or lysine. Further complicating the picture is the fact that lysine de-carboxylation is not markedly elevated in exercise. From these studies, we must conclude that isotopic techniques which have achieved general acceptance in other circumstances cannot reliably be used to answer the question of whether exercise stimulates protein breakdown in humans. However, these methods do provide results which enable a better understanding of the metabolism of the individual amino acids in exercise.

  10. Effect of filaggrin breakdown products on growth of and protein expression by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Miajlovic, Helen; Fallon, Padraic G.; Irvine, Alan D.; Foster, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colonization of the skin by Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with atopic dermatitis exacerbates inflammation. Atopic dermatitis is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene, accompanied by reduced levels of filaggrin breakdown products on the skin. Objective To assess the affect of growth in the presence of the filaggrin breakdown products urocanic acid (UCA) and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA) on fitness of and protein expression by S aureus. Methods S aureus was grown for 24 hours in the presence of UCA and PCA, and the density of the cultures was monitored by recording OD600 values. Cell wall extracts and secreted proteins of S aureus were isolated and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Cell wall–associated proteins known to be involved in colonization and immune evasion including clumping factor B, fibronectin binding proteins, protein A, iron-regulated surface determinant A, and the serine-aspartate repeat proteins were examined by Western immunoblotting. Results Acidification of growth media caused by the presence of UCA and PCA resulted in reduced growth rates and reduced final cell density of S aureus. At the lower pH, reduced expression of secreted and cell wall–associated proteins, including proteins involved in colonization (clumping factor B, fibronectin binding protein A) and immune evasion (protein A), was observed. Decreased expression of iron-regulated surface determinant A due to growth with filaggrin breakdown products appeared to be independent of the decreased pH. Conclusion S aureus grown under mildly acidic conditions such as those observed on healthy skin expresses reduced levels of proteins that are known to be involved in immune evasion. PMID:21036388

  11. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  12. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    PubMed

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  13. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    PubMed

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases. PMID:27346352

  14. The effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on protein synthesis and breakdown in murine C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamolrat, Torkamol; Gray, Stuart R.

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► EPA can enhance protein synthesis and retard protein breakdown in muscle cells. ► These effects were concurrent with increases in p70s6k and FOXO3a phosphorylation. ► EPA may be a useful tool in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions. -- Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been found to stimulate protein synthesis with little information regarding their effects on protein breakdown. Furthermore whether there are distinct effects of EPA and DHA remains to be established. The aim of the current study was to determine the distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein synthesis, protein breakdown and signalling pathways in C2C12 myotubes. Fully differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated for 24 h with 0.1% ethanol (control), 50 μM EPA or 50 μM DHA prior to experimentation. After serum (4 h) and amino acid (1 h) starvation cells were stimulated with 2 mM L-leucine and protein synthesis measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine. Protein breakdown was measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine and signalling pathways (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, 4EBP1, rps6 and FOXO3a) via Western blots. Data revealed that after incubation with EPA protein synthesis was 25% greater (P < 0.05) compared to control cells, with no effect of DHA. Protein breakdown was 22% (P < 0.05) lower, compared to control cells, after incubation with EPA, with no effect of DHA. Analysis of signalling pathways revealed that both EPA and DHA incubation increased (P < 0.05) p70s6k phosphorylation, EPA increased (P < 0.05) FOXO3a phosphorylation, with no alteration in other signalling proteins. The current study has demonstrated distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein metabolism with EPA showing a greater ability to result in skeletal muscle protein accretion.

  15. Feeding Aspergillus awamori reduces skeletal muscle protein breakdown and stimulates growth in broilers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ahmed A; Eid, Yahya Z; Ebeid, Tarek A; Ohtsuka, Akira; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Kunioki

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to show that dietary supplementation of a fungus, Aspergillus awamori called Koji in Japan, reduces skeletal muscle protein breakdown and stimulates growth in broiler chickens. A total of 30 chicks at 15 days of age was divided into control and two treatment groups (10 birds per treatment). Control group was fed basal diet and treatment groups were fed the basal diets supplemented with A. awamori at levels of 0.05% and 0.2%. The birds were raised for 12 days from 15 to 27 days of age and then the effect on growth, organ weights and plasma 3-methylhistidine concentration and digestibilities of protein and energy was evaluated. The messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of atrogin-1, ubiquitin, proteasome, m-calpain, µ-calpain, β-actin, myosin and pax-7 in the breast muscle were also measured. Body weight gain and breast muscle weight were increased, although feed intake was decreased by the fungus and thus feed efficiency was increased. Protein and energy digestibilities were increased. Furthermore, plasma 3-methylhistidine concentration was decreased by the fungus. The mRNAs of atrogin-1, ubiquitin, proteasome, m-calpain and µ-calpain were all decreased. The mRNA of β-actin but not myosin and pax-7 was slightly increased by the fungus. In conclusion, feeding A. awamori improves growth performance because skeletal muscle proteolytic activity is reduced and digestibilities of energy and protein are increased.

  16. SUN proteins facilitate the removal of membranes from chromatin during nuclear envelope breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Turgay, Yagmur; Champion, Lysie; Balazs, Csaba; Held, Michael; Toso, Alberto; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Meraldi, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    SUN proteins reside in the inner nuclear membrane and form complexes with KASH proteins of the outer nuclear membrane that connect the nuclear envelope (NE) to the cytoskeleton. These complexes have well-established functions in nuclear anchorage and migration in interphase, but little is known about their involvement in mitotic processes. Our analysis demonstrates that simultaneous depletion of human SUN1 and SUN2 delayed removal of membranes from chromatin during NE breakdown (NEBD) and impaired the formation of prophase NE invaginations (PNEIs), similar to microtubule depolymerization or down-regulation of the dynein cofactors NudE/EL. In addition, overexpression of dominant-negative SUN and KASH constructs reduced the occurrence of PNEI, indicating a requirement for functional SUN–KASH complexes in NE remodeling. Codepletion of SUN1/2 slowed cell proliferation and resulted in an accumulation of morphologically defective and disoriented mitotic spindles. Quantification of mitotic timing revealed a delay between NEBD and chromatin separation, indicating a role of SUN proteins in bipolar spindle assembly and mitotic progression. PMID:24662567

  17. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Autoantibody Response against Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Its Breakdown Products

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J.; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S.; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-chun May; Dave, Jitendra R.; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38–50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0–1 days) to late (7–10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients. PMID:24667434

  18. Epinephrine depletion exacerbates the fasting-induced protein breakdown in fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Graça, Flávia A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Silveira, Wilian A; Lira, Eduardo C; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia; Zanon, Neusa M; Garófalo, Maria Antonieta R; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C C

    2013-12-01

    The physiological role of epinephrine in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein metabolism under fasting is unknown. We examined the effects of plasma epinephrine depletion, induced by adrenodemedullation (ADMX), on muscle protein metabolism in fed and 2-day-fasted rats. In fed rats, ADMX for 10 days reduced muscle mass, the cross-sectional area of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, and the phosphorylation levels of Akt. In addition, ADMX led to a compensatory increase in muscle sympathetic activity, as estimated by the rate of norepinephrine turnover; this increase was accompanied by high rates of muscle protein synthesis. In fasted rats, ADMX exacerbated fasting-induced proteolysis in EDL but did not affect the low rates of protein synthesis. Accordingly, ADMX activated lysosomal proteolysis and further increased the activity of the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS). Moreover, expression of the atrophy-related Ub ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and the autophagy-related genes LC3b and GABARAPl1 were upregulated in EDL muscles from ADMX-fasted rats compared with sham-fasted rats, and ADMX reduced cAMP levels and increased fasting-induced Akt dephosphorylation. Unlike that observed for EDL muscles, soleus muscle proteolysis and Akt phosphorylation levels were not affected by ADMX. In isolated EDL, epinephrine reduced the basal UPS activity and suppressed overall proteolysis and atrogin-1 and MuRF1 induction following fasting. These data suggest that epinephrine released from the adrenal medulla inhibits fasting-induced protein breakdown in fast-twitch skeletal muscles, and these antiproteolytic effects on the UPS and lysosomal system are apparently mediated through a cAMP-Akt-dependent pathway, which suppresses ubiquitination and autophagy.

  19. Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is necessary for nuclear envelope breakdown

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The role of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) in nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) was investigated in sea urchin eggs. The eggs contain a 56-kD polypeptide which appears to be a homologue of neuronal CaM kinase. For example, it undergoes Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent autophosphorylation that converts it to a Ca2(+)-independent species, a hallmark of multifunctional CaM kinase. It is homologous to the alpha subunit of rat brain CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation by the sea urchin egg kinase are inhibited in vitro by CaMK(273-302), a synthetic peptide corresponding to the autoinhibitory domain of the neuronal CaM kinase. This peptide inhibited NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. Only one mAb to the neuronal enzyme immunoprecipitated the 56-kD polypeptide. Only this antibody blocked or significantly delayed NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. These results suggest that sea urchin eggs contain multifunctional CaM kinase, and that this enzyme is involved in the control of NEB during mitotic division. PMID:2229172

  20. Effects of protein kinase C activators on germinal vesicle breakdown and polar body emission of mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bornslaeger, E.A.; Poueymirou, W.T.; Mattei, P.; Schultz, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase is instrumental in maintaining meiotic arrest of mouse oocytes. To assess whether protein phosphorylation mediated by calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) might also inhibit the resumption of meiosis, oocytes were treated with activators of this enzyme. The active phorbol esters 12-O-tetra-decanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 4..beta..-phorbol, 12,13-didecanoate (4..beta..-PDD) inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), as did a more natural activator of protein kinase, C, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/). An inactive phorbol ester, 4a-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4..cap alpha..-PDD), did not inhibit GVBD. TPA did not inhibit the maturation-associated decrease in oocyte cAMP. Microinjected heat-stable protein inhibitor of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase failed to induce GVBD in the presence of TPA. Both TPA and diC/sub 8/ partially inhibited specific changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are tightly correlated with resumption of meiosis; these agents also induced the apparent phosphorylation of specific oocyte proteins. These results suggest that protein kinase C activators may inhibit resumption of meiosis by acting distal to a decrease in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, but prior to changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are presumably required for resumption of meiosis.

  1. Intra-crystalline protein diagenesis (IcPD) in Patella vulgata. Part II: Breakdown and temperature sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, B.; Collins, M.J.; Tomiak, P.J.; Davies, B.J.; Penkman, K.E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial diagenesis of the intra-crystalline proteins isolated from Patella vulgata was induced by isothermal heating at 140 °C, 110 °C and 80 °C. Protein breakdown was quantified for multiple amino acids, measuring the extent of peptide bond hydrolysis, amino acid racemisation and decomposition. The patterns of diagenesis are complex; therefore the kinetic parameters of the main reactions were estimated by two different methods: 1) a well-established approach based on fitting mathematical expressions to the experimental data, e.g. first-order rate equations for hydrolysis and power-transformed first-order rate equations for racemisation; and 2) an alternative model-free approach, which was developed by estimating a “scaling” factor for the independent variable (time) which produces the best alignment of the experimental data. This method allows the calculation of the relative reaction rates for the different temperatures of isothermal heating. High-temperature data were compared with the extent of degradation detected in sub-fossil Patella specimens of known age, and we evaluated the ability of kinetic experiments to mimic diagenesis at burial temperature. The results highlighted a difference between patterns of degradation at low and high temperature and therefore we recommend caution for the extrapolation of protein breakdown rates to low burial temperatures for geochronological purposes when relying solely on kinetic data. PMID:23956808

  2. Skeletal Muscle Protein Breakdown Remains Elevated in Pediatric Burn Survivors up to One-Year Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tony; Herndon, David N; Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Chaidemenou, Anastasia; Abdelrahman, Doaa Reda; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Andersen, Clark; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-11-01

    Acute alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism are a well-established event associated with the stress response to burns. Nevertheless, the long-lasting effects of burn injury on skeletal muscle protein turnover are incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate fractional synthesis (FSR) and breakdown (FBR) rates of protein in skeletal muscle of pediatric burn patients (n  =  42, >30% total body surface area burns) for up to 1 year after injury. Skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured in the post-prandial state following bolus injections of C6 and N phenylalanine stable isotopes. Plasma and muscle phenylalanine enrichments were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the FSR in burn patients was 2- to 3-fold higher than values from healthy men previously reported in the literature (P ≤ 0.05). The FBR was 4- to 6-fold higher than healthy values (P  <  0.01). Therefore, net protein balance was lower in burn patients compared with healthy men from 2 weeks to 12 months post-injury (P  <  0.05). These findings show that skeletal muscle protein turnover stays elevated for up to 1 year after burn, an effect attributable to simultaneous increases in FBR and FSR. Muscle FBR exceeds FSR during this time, producing a persistent negative net protein balance, even in the post-prandial state, which likely contributes to the prolonged cachexia seen in burned victims.

  3. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway.

  4. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  5. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance-A Qualitative Review.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as "simple" atrophy) and insulin resistance are "non-pathological" events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear-especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state "anabolic resistance." While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic "marker" studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  6. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols.

  7. Effect of short-term cold exposure on skeletal muscle protein breakdown in rats.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L H; Zanon, N M; Garófalo, M A; Navegantes, L C C; Kettelhut, I C

    2013-11-01

    Although it is well established that carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are profoundly altered by cold stress, the effects of short-term cold exposure on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle are still poorly understood. Because cold acclimation requires that an organism adjust its metabolic flux, and muscle amino acids may be an important energy source for heat production, we hypothesize that muscle proteolysis is increased and protein synthesis is decreased under such a stress condition. Herein, cold exposure for 24 h decreased rates of protein synthesis and increased overall proteolysis in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, but it did not affect muscle weight. An increase in proteolysis was accompanied by hyperactivity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in both soleus and EDL, and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in EDL. Furthermore, muscles of rats exposed to cold showed increased mRNA and protein levels of atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger enzyme-1 (MuRF1). Additionally, cold stress reduced phosphorylation of Akt and Forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1), a well-known effect that increases FoxO translocation to the nucleus and leads to activation of proteolysis. Plasma insulin levels were lower, whereas catecholamines, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones were higher in cold-exposed rats compared with control rats. The present data provide the first direct evidence that short-term cold exposure for 24 h decreases rates of protein synthesis and increases the UPS and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic processes, and increases expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscles of young rats. The activation of atrophy induced by acute cold stress seems to be mediated at least in part through the inactivation of Akt/FoxO signaling and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  8. Nuclear envelope breakdown may deliver an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 which triggers cyclin B translation in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lapasset, Laure; Pradet-Balade, Bérengère; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Peaucellier, Gérard; Picard, André

    2005-09-01

    In vertebrates, enhanced translation of mRNAs in oocytes and early embryos entering M-phase is thought to occur through polyadenylation, involving binding, hyperphosphorylation and proteolytic degradation of Aurora-activated CPEB. In starfish, an unknown component of the oocyte nucleus is required for cyclin B synthesis following the release of G2/prophase block by hormonal stimulation. We have found that CPEB cannot be hyperphosphorylated following hormonal stimulation in starfish oocytes from which the nucleus has been removed. Activation of Aurora kinase, known to interact with protein phosphatase 1 and its specific inhibitor Inh-2, is also prevented. The microinjection of Inh-2 restores Aurora activation, CPEB hyperphosphorylation and cyclin B translation in enucleated oocytes. Nevertheless, we provide evidence that CPEB is in fact hyperphosphorylated by cdc2, without apparent involvement of Aurora or MAP kinase, and that cyclin B synthesis can be stimulated without previous degradation of phosphorylated CPEB. Thus, the regulation of cyclin B synthesis necessary for progression through meiosis can be explained by an equilibrium between CPEB phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and both aspects of this control may rely on the sole activation of Cdc2 and subsequent nuclear breakdown.

  9. Enthalpic Breakdown of Water Structure on Protein Active-Site Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Haider, Kamran; Wickstrom, Lauren; Ramsey, Steven; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The principles underlying water reorganization around simple nonpolar solutes are well understood and provide the framework for the classical hydrophobic effect, whereby water molecules structure themselves around solutes so that they maintain favorable energetic contacts with both the solute and the other water molecules. However, for certain solute surface topographies, water molecules, due to their geometry and size, are unable to simultaneously maintain favorable energetic contacts with both the surface and neighboring water molecules. In this study, we analyze the solvation of ligand-binding sites for six structurally diverse proteins using hydration site analysis and measures of local water structure, in order to identify surfaces at which water molecules are unable to structure themselves in a way that maintains favorable enthalpy relative to bulk water. These surfaces are characterized by a high degree of enclosure, weak solute-water interactions, and surface constraints that induce unfavorable pair interactions between neighboring water molecules. Additionally, we find that the solvation of charged side chains in an active site generally results in favorable enthalpy but can also lead to pair interactions between neighboring water molecules that are significantly unfavorable relative to bulk water. We find that frustrated local structure can occur not only in apolar and weakly polar pockets, where overall enthalpy tends to be unfavorable, but also in charged pockets, where overall water enthalpy tends to be favorable. The characterization of local water structure in these terms may prove useful for evaluating the displacement of water from diverse protein active-site environments.

  10. Task breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlich, Jane

    1990-01-01

    The topics concerning the Center for Space Construction (CSC) space construction breakdown structure are presented in viewgraph form. It is concluded that four components describe a task -- effecting, information gathering, analysis, and regulation; uncertainties effect the relative amount of information gathering and analysis that occurs; and that task timing requirements drive the 'location in time' of cognition.

  11. Proposed role of ATP in protein breakdown: conjugation of protein with multiple chains of the polypeptide of ATP-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Ciechanover, A; Heller, H; Haas, A L; Rose, I A

    1980-01-01

    The heat-stable polypeptide ATP-dependent proteolysis factor 1 (APF-1) of the reticulocyte proteolytic system forms covalent compounds with proteins in an ATP-requiring reaction. APF-1 and lysozyme, a good substrate for ATP-dependent proteolysis, form multiple conjugates, as was shown by comigration of label from each upon gel electrophoresis. Multiple bands were also seen with other substrates of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system, such as globin or alpha-lactalbumin. Analysis of the ratio of APF-1 to lysozyme radioactivities and of the molecular weights of the bands indicated that they consist of increasing numbers of the APF-1 polypeptide bound to one molecule of lysozyme. The covalent linkage is probably of an isopeptide nature, because it is stable to hydroxylamine and alkali, and polylysine is able to give conjugates of APF-1. Removal of ATP after formation of the 125I-labeled APF-1 conjugates with endogenous proteins caused the regeneration of APF-1, indicating presence of an amidase. This reaction is thought to compete with proteases that may act on APF-1-protein conjugates, especially those containing several APF-1 ligands. A sequence of reactions in which the linkage of APF-1 to the substrate is followed by the proteolytic breakdown of the substrate is proposed to explain the role of ATP. Images PMID:6990414

  12. Protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion of sterilised model systems of liquid infant formula.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Stefano; Stuknytė, Milda; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2017-02-15

    Protein modifications occurring during sterilisation of infant formulas can affect protein digestibility and release of bioactive peptides. The effect of glycation and cross-linking on protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins was evaluated during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion (GID) of six sterilised model systems of infant formula. Protein degradation during in vitro GID was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and by measuring the nitrogen content of ultrafiltration (3kDa) permeates before and after in vitro GID of model IFs. Glycation strongly hindered protein breakdown, whereas cross-linking resulting from β-elimination reactions had a negligible effect. Only β-casomorphin 7 (β-CM7) was detected (0.187-0.858mgL(-1)) at the end of the intestinal digestion in all untreated IF model systems. The level of β-CM7 in the sterilised model systems prepared without addition of sugars ranged from 0.256 to 0.655mgL(-1). The release of this peptide during GID was hindered by protein glycation. PMID:27664661

  13. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  14. Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Predicts Tissue Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Break-Down Products and Therapeutic Efficacy after Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Johnson, David; Tortella, Frank C; Dave, Jitendra R; Shear, Deborah A; Schmid, Kara E

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neurological dysfunction, changes in brain proteins, and increased serum biomarkers. However, the relationship between these brain proteins and serum biomarkers, and the ability of these serum biomarkers to indicate a neuroprotective/therapeutic response, remains elusive. Penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) was used to systematically analyze several key TBI biomarkers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its break-down products (BDPs)-ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), α-II spectrin, and α-II spectrin BDPs (SBDPs)-in brain tissues and serum during an extended acute-subacute time-frame. In addition, neurological improvement and serum GFAP theranostic value was evaluated after neuroprotective treatment. In brain tissues, total GFAP increased more than three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI. However, this change was primarily due to GFAP-BDPs which increased to 2.7-4.8 arbitrary units (AU). Alpha-II spectrin was nearly ablated 3 d after PBBI, but somewhat recovered after 7 d. In conjunction with α-II spectrin loss, SBDP-145/150 increased approximately three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI (vs. sham, p<0.05). UCH-L1 protein levels were slightly decreased 7 d after PBBI but otherwise were unaffected. Serum GFAP was elevated by 3.2- to 8.8-fold at 2 to 4 h (vs. sham; p<0.05) and the 4 h increase was strongly correlated to 3 d GFAP-BDP abundance (r=0.66; p<0.05). Serum GFAP showed such a strong injury effect that it also was evaluated after therapeutic intervention with cyclosporin A (CsA). Administration of 2.5 mg/kg CsA significantly reduced serum GFAP elevation by 22.4-fold 2 h after PBBI (vs. PBBI+vehicle; p<0.05) and improved neurological function 1 d post-injury. Serum biomarkers, particularly GFAP, may be correlative tools of brain protein changes and feasible theranostic markers of TBI progression and recovery.

  15. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  16. Obesity Appears to Be Associated With Altered Muscle Protein Synthetic and Breakdown Responses to Increased Nutrient Delivery in Older Men, but Not Reduced Muscle Mass or Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Murton, Andrew J; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Mallinson, Joanne E; Selby, Anna L; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is increasing, yet despite the necessity of maintaining muscle mass and function with age, the effect of obesity on muscle protein turnover in older adults remains unknown. Eleven obese (BMI 31.9 ± 1.1 kg · m(-2)) and 15 healthy-weight (BMI 23.4 ± 0.3 kg · m(-2)) older men (55-75 years old) participated in a study that determined muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and leg protein breakdown (LPB) under postabsorptive (hypoinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and postprandial (hyperinsulinemic hyperaminoacidemic-euglycemic clamp) conditions. Obesity was associated with systemic inflammation, greater leg fat mass, and patterns of mRNA expression consistent with muscle deconditioning, whereas leg lean mass, strength, and work done during maximal exercise were no different. Under postabsorptive conditions, MPS and LPB were equivalent between groups, whereas insulin and amino acid administration increased MPS in only healthy-weight subjects and was associated with lower leg glucose disposal (LGD) (63%) in obese men. Blunting of MPS in the obese men was offset by an apparent decline in LPB, which was absent in healthy-weight subjects. Lower postprandial LGD in obese subjects and blunting of MPS responses to amino acids suggest that obesity in older adults is associated with diminished muscle metabolic quality. This does not, however, appear to be associated with lower leg lean mass or strength. PMID:26015550

  17. YcgC represents a new protein deacetylase family in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Jiang, He-Wei; Ge, Feng; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yang; Qi, Bang-Ruo; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Cole, Philip A; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is one of the most important protein posttranslational modifications that plays essential roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, only a few lysine deacetylases (KDACs) have been identified in prokaryotes, perhaps in part due to their limited sequence homology. Herein, we developed a ‘clip-chip’ strategy to enable unbiased, activity-based discovery of novel KDACs in the Escherichia coli proteome. In-depth biochemical characterization confirmed that YcgC is a serine hydrolase involving Ser200 as the catalytic nucleophile for lysine deacetylation and does not use NAD+ or Zn2+ like other established KDACs. Further, in vivo characterization demonstrated that YcgC regulates transcription by catalyzing deacetylation of Lys52 and Lys62 of a transcriptional repressor RutR. Importantly, YcgC targets a distinct set of substrates from the only known E. coli KDAC CobB. Analysis of YcgC’s bacterial homologs confirmed that they also exhibit KDAC activity. YcgC thus represents a novel family of prokaryotic KDACs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05322.001 PMID:26716769

  18. Electrical breakdown of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiong; Sun, Hongyu; Dai, Sheng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    Instantaneous electrical breakdown measurements of GaN and Ag nanowires are performed by an in situ transmission electron microscopy method. Our results directly reveal the mechanism that typical thermally heated semiconductor nanowires break at the midpoint, while metallic nanowires breakdown near the two ends due to the stress induced by electromigration. The different breakdown mechanisms for the nanowires are caused by the different thermal and electrical properties of the materials.

  19. Chlorophyll breakdown: Pheophorbide a oxygenase is a Rieske-type iron–sulfur protein, encoded by the accelerated cell death 1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Pružinská, Adriana; Tanner, Gaby; Anders, Iwona; Roca, Maria; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) breakdown during senescence is an integral part of plant development and leads to the accumulation of colorless catabolites. The loss of green pigment is due to an oxygenolytic opening of the porphyrin macrocycle of pheophorbide (pheide) a followed by a reduction to yield a fluorescent chl catabolite. This step is comprised of the interaction of two enzymes, pheide a oxygenase (PaO) and red chl catabolite reductase. PaO activity is found only during senescence, hence PaO seems to be a key regulator of chl catabolism. Whereas red chl catabolite reductase has been cloned, the nature of PaO has remained elusive. Here we report on the identification of the PaO gene of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPaO). AtPaO is a Rieske-type iron–sulfur cluster-containing enzyme that is identical to Arabidopsis accelerated cell death 1 and homologous to lethal leaf spot 1 (LLS1) of maize. Biochemical properties of recombinant AtPaO were identical to PaO isolated from a natural source. Production of fluorescent chl catabolite-1 required ferredoxin as an electron source and both substrates, pheide a and molecular oxygen. By using a maize lls1 mutant, the in vivo function of PaO, i.e., degradation of pheide a during senescence, could be confirmed. Thus, lls1 leaves stayed green during dark incubation and accumulated pheide a that caused a light-dependent lesion mimic phenotype. Whereas proteins were degraded similarly in wild type and lls1, a chl-binding protein was selectively retained in the mutant. PaO expression correlated positively with senescence, but the enzyme appeared to be post-translationally regulated as well. PMID:14657372

  20. Chlorophyll breakdown: pheophorbide a oxygenase is a Rieske-type iron-sulfur protein, encoded by the accelerated cell death 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pruzinská, Adriana; Tanner, Gaby; Anders, Iwona; Roca, Maria; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2003-12-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) breakdown during senescence is an integral part of plant development and leads to the accumulation of colorless catabolites. The loss of green pigment is due to an oxygenolytic opening of the porphyrin macrocycle of pheophorbide (pheide) a followed by a reduction to yield a fluorescent chl catabolite. This step is comprised of the interaction of two enzymes, pheide a oxygenase (PaO) and red chl catabolite reductase. PaO activity is found only during senescence, hence PaO seems to be a key regulator of chl catabolism. Whereas red chl catabolite reductase has been cloned, the nature of PaO has remained elusive. Here we report on the identification of the PaO gene of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPaO). AtPaO is a Rieske-type iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme that is identical to Arabidopsis accelerated cell death 1 and homologous to lethal leaf spot 1 (LLS1) of maize. Biochemical properties of recombinant AtPaO were identical to PaO isolated from a natural source. Production of fluorescent chl catabolite-1 required ferredoxin as an electron source and both substrates, pheide a and molecular oxygen. By using a maize lls1 mutant, the in vivo function of PaO, i.e., degradation of pheide a during senescence, could be confirmed. Thus, lls1 leaves stayed green during dark incubation and accumulated pheide a that caused a light-dependent lesion mimic phenotype. Whereas proteins were degraded similarly in wild type and lls1, a chl-binding protein was selectively retained in the mutant. PaO expression correlated positively with senescence, but the enzyme appeared to be post-translationally regulated as well.

  1. An LRR-only protein representing a new type of pattern recognition receptor in Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Yi, Qilin; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-only proteins could mediate protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions and were involved in the immune response. In the present study, an LRR-only protein (designed as CfLRRop-1) was cloned from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri. The complete cDNA sequence of CfLRRop-1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1377 bp, which encoded a protein of 458 amino acids. An LRRNT motif, an LRR_7 motif and seven LRR motifs were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of CfLRRop-1. And these seven LRR motifs contained a conserved signature sequence LxxLxLxxNxL. The mRNA transcripts of CfLRRop-1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), glucan (GLU) and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the mRNA transcripts of CfLRRop-1 in haemocytes all increased firstly within the first 6 h and secondly during 12-24 h post stimulation. The mRNA expression level of CfLRRop-1 was continuously up-regulated, after the expression of CfTLR (previously identified Toll-like receptor in C. farreri) was suppressed via RNA interference (RNAi). The recombinant CfLRRop-1 protein could directly bind LPS, PGN, GLU and poly I:C, and induce the release of TNF-α in mixed primary cultured scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfLRRop-1 would function as a powerful pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and play a pivotal role in the immune response of scallops.

  2. A method for computing association rate constants of atomistically represented proteins under macromolecular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sanbo; Cai, Lu; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    In cellular environments, two protein molecules on their way to form a specific complex encounter many bystander macromolecules. The latter molecules, or crowders, affect both the energetics of the interaction between the test molecules and the dynamics of their relative motion. In earlier work (Zhou and Szabo 1991 J. Chem. Phys. 95 5948-52), it has been shown that, in modeling the association kinetics of the test molecules, the presence of crowders can be accounted for by their energetic and dynamic effects. The recent development of the transient-complex theory for protein association in dilute solutions makes it possible to easily incorporate the energetic and dynamic effects of crowders. The transient complex refers to a late on-pathway intermediate, in which the two protein molecules have near-native relative separation and orientation, but have yet to form the many short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The transient-complex theory predicts the association rate constant as ka = ka0exp( - ΔG*el/kBT), where ka0 is the ‘basal’ rate constant for reaching the transient complex by unbiased diffusion, and the Boltzmann factors captures the influence of long-range electrostatic interactions between the protein molecules. Crowders slow down the diffusion, therefore reducing the basal rate constant (to kac0), and induce an effective interaction energy ΔGc. We show that the latter interaction energy for atomistic proteins in the presence of spherical crowders is ‘long’-ranged, allowing the association rate constant under crowding to be computed as kac = kac0exp[ - (ΔG*el + ΔG*c)/kBT]. Applications demonstrate that this computational method allows for realistic modeling of protein association kinetics under crowding.

  3. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  4. Structures of Two Arabidopsis thaliana Major Latex Proteins Represent Novel Helix-Grip Folds

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    The major latex proteins (MLP) are a protein family first identified in the latex of opium poppy. They are found only in plants and have 24 identified members in Arabidopsis alone as well as in other plants such as peach, strawberry, melon, cucumber, and soybean. While the function of the MLPs is unknown, they have been associated with fruit and flower development and in pathogen defense responses. Based on modest sequence similarity, they have been characterized as members of the Bet v 1 protein superfamily; however, no structures have yet been reported. As part of an ongoing structural genomics effort, we determined the structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana MLPs: the solution structure of MLP28 (gene product of At1g70830.1) and the crystal structure of At1g24000.1. The structures revealed distinct differences when compared to one another and to the typical Bet v 1 fold. Nevertheless, NMR titration experiments demonstrated that the characteristic Bet v 1 hydrophobic binding pocket of At1g24000.1 is able to bind a ligand, suggesting that it plays a role in the function of the MLPs. A structure-based sequence analysis identified conserved hydrophobic residues in the long alpha helix that contribute to the binding cavity and may specify preferred ligands for the MLP family. PMID:19326460

  5. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H; Burk, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  6. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H.; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution. PMID:26086730

  7. The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct protein lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koeduka, Takao; Louie, Gordon V.; Orlova, Irina; Kish, Christine M.; Ibdah, Mwafaq; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Baiga, Thomas J.; Noel, Joseph P.; Dudareva, Natalia; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Summary Many plants synthesize the volatile phenylpropene compounds eugenol and isoeugenol to serve in defense against herbivores and pathogens and to attract pollinators. Clarkia breweri flowers emit a mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol, while Petunia hybrida flowers emit mostly isoeugenol with small amounts of eugenol. We recently reported the identification of a petunia enzyme, PhIGS1, that catalyzes the formation of isoeugenol, and an Ocimum basilicum (basil) enzyme, ObEGS1, that produces eugenol. ObEGS1 and PhIGS1 both utilize coniferyl acetate, are 52% sequence identical, and belong to a family of NADPH-dependent reductases involved in secondary metabolism. Here we show that C. breweri flowers have two closely related proteins (96% identity), CbIGS1 and CbEGS1, that are similar to ObEGS1 (58% and 59%) and catalyze the formation of isoeugenol and eugenol, respectively. In vitro mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that substitution of only a single residue can substantially affect the product specificity of these enzymes. A third C. breweri enzyme identified, CbEGS2, also catalyzes the formation of eugenol from coniferyl acetate and is only 46% identical to CbIGS1 and CbEGS1 but more similar (>70%) to other types of reductases. We also found that petunia flowers contain an enzyme, PhEGS1, that is highly similar to CbEGS2 (82% identity) and that converts coniferyl acetate to eugenol. Our results indicate that plant enzymes with EGS and IGS activities have arisen multiple times and in different protein lineages. PMID:18208524

  8. Structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana major latex proteins represent novel helix-grip folds

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2009-06-02

    Here we report the first structures of two major latex proteins (MLPs) which display unique structural differences from the canonical Bet v 1 fold described earlier. MLP28 (SwissProt/TrEMBL ID Q9SSK9), the product of gene At1g70830.1, and the At1g24000.1 gene product (Swiss- Prot/TrEMBL ID P0C0B0), proteins which share 32% sequence identity, were independently selected as foldspace targets by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics. The structure of a single domain (residues 17-173) of MLP28 was solved by NMR spectroscopy, while the full-length At1g24000.1 structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. MLP28 displays greater than 30% sequence identity to at least eight MLPs from other species. For example, the MLP28 sequence shares 64% identity to peach Pp-MLP119 and 55% identity to cucumber Csf2.20 In contrast, the At1g24000.1 sequence is highly divergent (see Fig. 1), containing a gap of 33 amino acids when compared with all other known MLPs. Even when the gap is excluded, the sequence identity with MLPs from other species is less than 30%. Unlike some of the MLPs from other species, none of the A. thaliana MLPs have been characterized biochemically. We show by NMR chemical shift mapping that At1g24000.1 binds progesterone, demonstrating that despite its sequence dissimilarity, the hydrophobic binding pocket is conserved and, therefore, may play a role in its biological function and that of the MLP family in general.

  9. 3PFDB+: improved search protocol and update for the identification of representatives of protein sequence domain families.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel P; Shingate, Prashant; Upadhyay, Atul K; Sowdhamini, R

    2014-01-01

    Protein domain families are usually classified on the basis of similarity of amino acid sequences. Selection of a single representative sequence for each family provides targets for structure determination or modeling and also enables fast sequence searches to associate new members to a family. Such a selection could be challenging since some of these domain families exhibit huge variation depending on the number of members in the family, the average family sequence length or the extent of sequence divergence within a family. We had earlier created 3PFDB database as a repository of best representative sequences, selected from each PFAM domain family on the basis of high coverage. In this study, we have improved the database using more efficient strategies for the initial generation of sequence profiles and implement two independent methods, FASSM and HMMER, for identifying family members. HMMER employs a global sequence similarity search, while FASSM relies on motif identification and matching. This improved and updated database, 3PFDB+ generated in this study, provides representative sequences and profiles for PFAM families, with 13 519 family representatives having more than 90% family coverage. The representative sequence is also highlighted in a two-dimensional plot, which reflects the relative divergence between family members. Representatives belonging to small families with short sequences are mainly associated with low coverage. The set of sequences not recognized by the family representative profiles, highlight several potential false or weak family associations in PFAM. Partial domains and fragments dominate such cases, along with sequences that are highly diverged or different from other family members. Some of these outliers were also predicted to have different secondary structure contents, which reflect different putative structure or functional roles for these domain sequences. Database URL: http://caps.ncbs.res.in/3pfdbplus/.

  10. Rv1698 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Represents a New Class of Channel-forming Outer Membrane Proteins*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Siroy, Axel; Mailaender, Claudia; Harder, Daniel; Koerber, Stephanie; Wolschendorf, Frank; Danilchanka, Olga; Wang, Ying; Heinz, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane composed of mycolic acids and a large variety of other lipids. Its protective function is an essential virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only OmpA, which has numerous homologs in Gram-negative bacteria, is known to form channels in the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis so far. Rv1698 was predicted to be an outer membrane protein of unknown function. Expression of rv1698 restored the sensitivity to ampicillin and chloramphenicol of a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant lacking the main porin MspA. Uptake experiments showed that Rv1698 partially complemented the permeability defect of the M. smegmatis porin mutant for glucose. These results indicated that Rv1698 provides an unspecific pore that can partially substitute for MspA. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that purified Rv1698 is an integral membrane protein that indeed produces channels. The main single channel conductance is 4.5 ± 0.3 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Zero current potential measurements revealed a weak preference for cations. Whole cell digestion of recombinant M. smegmatis with proteinase K showed that Rv1698 is surface-accessible. Taken together, these experiments demonstrated that Rv1698 is a channel protein that is likely involved in transport processes across the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. Rv1698 has single homologs of unknown functions in Corynebacterineae and thus represents the first member of a new class of channel proteins specific for mycolic acid-containing outer membranes. PMID:18434314

  11. Partial cloning of CYP2C23a genes and hepatic protein expression in eight representative avian species.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K P; Kawai, Y K; Nakayama, S M M; Ikenaka, Y; Mizukawa, H; Takaesu, N; Ito, M; Ikushiro, S-I; Sakaki, T; Ishizuka, M

    2015-04-01

    Large interspecies differences in avian xenobiotic metabolism have been revealed by microsome-based studies, but specific enzyme isoforms in different bird species have not yet been compared. We have previously shown that CYP2C23 genes are the most induced CYP isoforms in chicken liver. In this study, we collected partial CYP2C23a gene sequences from eight avian species (ostrich, blue-eared pheasant, snowy owl, great-horned owl, Chilean flamingo, peregrin falcon, Humboldt penguin, and black-crowned night heron) selected to cover the whole avian lineage: Paleognathae, Galloanserae, and Neoaves. Genetic analysis showed that CYP2C23 genes of Galloanserae species (chicken and blue-eared pheasant) had unique characteristics. We found some duplicated genes (CYP2C23a and CYP2C23b) and two missing amino acid residues in Galloanserae compared to the other two lineages. The genes have lower homology than in other avian lineages, which suggests Galloanserae-specific rapid evolutionary changes. These genetic features suggested that the Galloanserae are not the most representative avian species, considering that the Neoaves comprise more than 95% of birds. Moreover, we succeeded in synthesizing an antipeptide polyclonal antibody against the region of CYP2C23 protein conserved in avians. However, comparative quantitation of CYP2C23 proteins in livers from six species showed that expression levels of these proteins differed no more than fourfold. Further study is needed to clarify the function of avian CYP2C23 proteins. PMID:25229839

  12. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  13. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  14. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  15. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  16. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes.

  17. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20(th) century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  18. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Isoaspartic acid is present at specific sites in myelin basic protein from multiple sclerosis patients: could this represent a trigger for disease onset?

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Michael G; Hancock, Sarah E; Raftery, Mark J; Truscott, Roger J W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with breakdown of the myelin sheath that coats neurons in the central nervous system. The cause of MS is not known, although the pathogenesis involves destruction of myelin by the immune system. It was the aim of this study to examine the abundant myelin protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), to determine if there are sites of modification that may be characteristic for MS. MBP from the cerebellum was examined from controls and MS patients across the age range using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Amino acid racemization data indicated that myelin basic protein is long-lived and proteomic analysis of MBP showed it to be highly modified. A common modification of MBP was racemization of Asp and this was significantly greater in MS patients. In long-lived proteins, L-Asp and L-Asn can racemize to three other isomers, D-isoAsp, L-isoAsp and D-Asp and this is significant because isoAsp formation in peptides renders them immunogenic.Proteomic analysis revealed widespread modifications of MBP with two surface regions that are altered in MS. In particular, isoAsp was significantly elevated at these sites in MS patients. The generation of isoAsp could be responsible for eliciting an immune response to modified MBP and therefore be implicated in the etiology of MS. PMID:27519525

  20. Isoaspartic acid is present at specific sites in myelin basic protein from multiple sclerosis patients: could this represent a trigger for disease onset?

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Michael G; Hancock, Sarah E; Raftery, Mark J; Truscott, Roger J W

    2016-08-12

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with breakdown of the myelin sheath that coats neurons in the central nervous system. The cause of MS is not known, although the pathogenesis involves destruction of myelin by the immune system. It was the aim of this study to examine the abundant myelin protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), to determine if there are sites of modification that may be characteristic for MS. MBP from the cerebellum was examined from controls and MS patients across the age range using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Amino acid racemization data indicated that myelin basic protein is long-lived and proteomic analysis of MBP showed it to be highly modified. A common modification of MBP was racemization of Asp and this was significantly greater in MS patients. In long-lived proteins, L-Asp and L-Asn can racemize to three other isomers, D-isoAsp, L-isoAsp and D-Asp and this is significant because isoAsp formation in peptides renders them immunogenic.Proteomic analysis revealed widespread modifications of MBP with two surface regions that are altered in MS. In particular, isoAsp was significantly elevated at these sites in MS patients. The generation of isoAsp could be responsible for eliciting an immune response to modified MBP and therefore be implicated in the etiology of MS.

  1. Work breakdown structure guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-06

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  2. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  3. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  4. Dispersible amyloid β-protein oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent diffusible but not soluble aggregates: their role in neurodegeneration in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Kosterin, Irina; Abramowski, Dorothee; Kumar, Sathish; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Walter, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregates have been identified in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Dispersed Aβ aggregates in the brain parenchyma are different from soluble, membrane-associated and plaque-associated solid aggregates. They are in mixture with the extra- or intracellular fluid but can be separated from soluble proteins by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of dispersible Aβ aggregates for neurodegeneration we analyzed 2 different amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse models. APP23 mice overexpress human mutant APP with the Swedish mutation. APP51/16 mice express high levels of human wild type APP. Both mice develop Aβ-plaques. Dendritic degeneration, neuron loss, and loss of asymmetric synapses were seen in APP23 but not in APP51/16 mice. The soluble and dispersible fractions not separated from one another were received as supernatant after centrifugation of native forebrain homogenates at 14,000 × g. Subsequent ultracentrifugation separated the soluble, i.e., the supernatant, from the dispersible fraction, i.e., the resuspended pellet. The major biochemical difference between APP23 and APP51/16 mice was that APP23 mice exhibited higher levels of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils precipitated with oligomer (A11) and protofibril/fibril (B10AP) specific antibodies than APP51/16 mice. These differences, rather than soluble Aβ and Aβ plaque pathology were associated with dendritic degeneration, neuron, and synapse loss in APP23 mice in comparison with APP51/16 mice. Immunoprecipitation of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils revealed that they were associated with APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs). These results indicate that dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent an important pool of Aβ aggregates in the brain that critically interact with membrane-associated APP C-terminal fragments. The concentration of dispersible Aβ aggregates, thereby, presumably determines

  5. Nanopore formation by controlled electrical breakdown: Efficient molecular-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Abdel-Daiem, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    A controlled electrical breakdown is used to produce efficient nanopore (NP) sensors. This phenomenon can be used to precisely fabricate these nanopore (NP) sensors through the membranes of the polydimethylsiloxane microarrays. This can be carried out, when localizing the electrical potential through a suitable microfluidic channel. Organic molecules, and other different protein-molecules, can be easily and precisely detected using this procedure referred to as controlled electrical breakdown technique.

  6. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 may represent the molecular link between oxidative stress and vascular stiffness in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalfino, G; Simone, S; Porreca, S; Cosola, C; Balestra, C; Manno, C; Schena, F P; Grandaliano, G; Pertosa, G

    2010-08-01

    Oxidative stress and vascular calcifications are emergent risk factors for the accelerated atherosclerosis process featuring chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification is an active process similar to bone modelling, where BMP-2 may play a pathogenic role. Aim of our study was to investigate the link between oxidative stress, BMP-2 protein expression and vascular disease in CKD. We enrolled 85 CKD patients (K-DOQI stage II or higher) and 41 healthy individuals. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was used as a marker of oxidative stress. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was used as a measure of arterial stiffness. BMP-2 serum levels were significantly higher in CKD patients than in controls (p<0.0001). Serum 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher in CKD patients compared to controls (p<0.05). BMP-2 serum levels were inversely associated with eGFR (r=-0.3; p=0.01) and directly correlated with 8-OHdG serum concentrations (r=-0.3; p=0.03). Arterial stiffness was inversely correlated with eGFR (r=-0.4; p=0.001) and directly correlated with BMP-2 (r=0.3; p=0.03), 8-OHdG (r=0.4, p=0.02) and phosphorus serum levels (r=0.3; p=0.007). In a multiple regression model, phosphorus and BMP-2 were independently correlated with baPWV. In vitro exposure to H(2)O(2) induced a time and dose-dependent increase in BMP-2 expression in an immortalized endothelial cell line. Moreover, H(2)O(2) pre-incubation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cell enhanced the BMP-2-induced up-regulation of ALPL, an osteoblastic phenotype marker. Our data suggest that in CKD BMP-2 may represent the molecular link between oxidative stress and arterial stiffness due to vascular calcification. PMID:20537331

  7. Topology representing network enables highly accurate classification of protein images taken by cryo electron-microscope without masking.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko; Iwasaki, Kenji; Sato, Chikara

    2003-09-01

    In single-particle analysis, a three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein is constructed using electron microscopy (EM). As these images are very noisy in general, the primary process of this 3-D reconstruction is the classification of images according to their Euler angles, the images in each classified group then being averaged to reduce the noise level. In our newly developed strategy of classification, we introduce a topology representing network (TRN) method. It is a modified method of a growing neural gas network (GNG). In this system, a network structure is automatically determined in response to the images input through a growing process. After learning without a masking procedure, the GNG creates clear averages of the inputs as unit coordinates in multi-dimensional space, which are then utilized for classification. In the process, connections are automatically created between highly related units and their positions are shifted where the inputs are distributed in multi-dimensional space. Consequently, several separated groups of connected units are formed. Although the interrelationship of units in this space are not easily understood, we succeeded in solving this problem by converting the unit positions into two-dimensional (2-D) space, and by further optimizing the unit positions with the simulated annealing (SA) method. In the optimized 2-D map, visualization of the connections of units provided rich information about clustering. As demonstrated here, this method is clearly superior to both the multi-variate statistical analysis (MSA) and the self-organizing map (SOM) as a classification method and provides a first reliable classification method which can be used without masking for very noisy images. PMID:14572474

  8. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  9. Three structural representatives of the PF06855 protein domain family from Staphyloccocus aureus and Bacillus subtilis have SAM domain-like folds and different functions

    PubMed Central

    Swapna, G.V.T.; Rossi, Paolo; Montelione, Alexander F.; Benach, Jordi; Yu, Bomina; Abashidze, Mariam; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Protein domain family PF06855 (DUF1250) is a family of small domains of unknown function found only in bacteria, and mostly in the order Bacillales and Lactobacillales. Here we describe the solution NMR or X-ray crystal structures of three representatives of this domain family, MW0776 and MW1311 from Staphyloccocus aureus and yozE from Bacillus subtilis. All three proteins adopt a four-helix motif similar to sterile alpha motif (SAM) domains. Phylogenetic analysis classifies MW1311 and yozE as functionally equivalent proteins of the UPF0346 family of unknown function, but excludes MW0776, which likely has a different biological function. Our structural characterization of the three domains supports this separation of function. The structures of MW0776, MW1311, and yozE constitute the first structural representatives from this protein domain family. PMID:22843344

  10. Phenylbutyrate improves nitrogen disposal via alternative pathway without eliciting an increase in protein breakdown and catabolism in control and ornithine transcarbamylace-deficient patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a drug used in urea cycle disorder patients to elicit alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. However, PB decreases plasma branched chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations and prior research suggests that PB may increase leucine oxidation, indicating increased protein degra...

  11. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  12. Delaying vortex breakdown by waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, M. F.; Jiang, L. B.; Wu, J. Z.; Ma, H. Y.; Pan, J. Y.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of spiral waves on delaying vortex breakdown in a tube is studied experimentally and theoretically. When a harmonic oscillation was imposed on one of guiding vanes in the tube, the breakdown was observed to be postponed appreciately. According to the generalized Lagrangian mean theory, proper forcing spiral waves may produce an additional streaming momentum, of which the effect is favorable and similar to an axial suction at downstream end. The delayed breakdown position is further predicted by using nonlinear wave theory. Qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and experimental comparison of the effects due to forcing spiral wave and axial suction is made.

  13. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  14. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning.

  15. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  16. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.

    1985-01-01

    The breakdown of an isolated axisymmetric vortex embedded in an unbounded uniform flow is examined by numerical integration of the complete Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady axisymmetric flow. Results show that if the vortex strength is small, the solution approaches a steady flow and the vortex is stable. If the strength is large enough, the solution remains unsteady and a recirculating zone will appear near the axis, its form and internal structure resembling those of the axisymmetric breakdown bubbles with multi-cells observed by Faler and Leibovich (1978). For apppropriate combinations of flow parameters, the flow reveals quasi-periodicity. Parallel calculations with the quasi-cylindrical approximation indicate that so far as predicting of breakdown is concerned, its results coincide quite well with the results mentioned above. Both show that the vortex breakdown has little concern with the Reynolds number or with the critical classification of the upstream flow, at least for the lower range of Reynolds numbers.

  17. Apparent inhibition of. beta. -fructosidase secretion by tunicamycin may be explained by breakdown of the unglycosylated protein during secretion. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Faye, L. ); Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-03-01

    Suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells synthesize and secrete {beta}-fructosidase, a glycoprotein with asparagine-linked glycans. Treatment of the cells with tunicamycin completely inhibits the apparent secretion of {beta}-fructosidase as measured by the accumulation of the {sup 35}S-labelled protein in the cell wall or the culture medium. In the past, such a result has been interpreted as an inhibition of secretion by tunicamycin, but we suggest another explanation based on the following results. In the presence of tunicamycin, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase is synthesized and is associated with an endoplasmic-reticulum-rich microsomal fraction. Pulse-chase experiments show that the unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase does not remain in the cells and appears to be secreted in the same way as glycosylated {beta}-fructosidase; however, no radioactive, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase accumulates extracellularly (cell wall or medium). Protoplasts obtained from carrot cells secrete {beta}-fructosidase protein and activity, and treatment of the protoplasts with tunicamycin results in the synthesis of unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase. In the presence of tunicamycin, there is no accumulation of {beta}-fructosidase activity or unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase polypeptide in the protoplast incubation medium. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the glycans of {beta}-fructosidase are necessary for its stability, and that in these suspension-cultured cells, the unglycosylated enzyme is degraded during the last stage(s) of secretion, or immediately after its arrival in the wall.

  18. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  19. Influence of pigments and protein aging on protein identification in historically representative casein-based paints using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fang; Atlasevich, Natalya; Baade, Brian; Loike, John; Arslanoglu, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study on the influence of pigments and sample aging on casein identification was performed on 30 reconstructed paints. The protein in all the paints was extracted into solution for analysis. The amount of protein that can be retrieved for solution-based analysis in each of the reconstructed paints was studied with a well-developed NanoOrange method before and after artificial aging. The results showed that in the paints with calcium phosphate (in bone black) and copper carbonate, hydroxide, or acetate (in verdigris and azurite), the amount of protein that can be retrieved for liquid-phase analysis is much smaller than the other paints, indicating that the protein degradation was accelerated significantly in those paints. Carbon (in vine black), calcium carbonate (in natural chalk), and calcium sulfate (terra alba gypsum and ground alabaster) did not affect much the amount of protein that can be retrieved in the paints compared to non-pigmented binder, meaning that the protein degradation rate was not affected much by those pigments. Artificial aging was observed to decrease the amount of retrievable protein in all the reconstructed paints that were studied. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was applied to the 28 reconstructed paints (except two verdigris paints) to assess the protein identification. The ELISA responses from the different paints were compared at fixed protein concentrations. Natural chalk, bone black, raw sienna, stack lead white, and cochineal red-violet lake had the lowest ELISA signal in this study, which indicated that the binding sites (epitopes) on the target protein in these paints are likely to deteriorate more than those in the other paints. Artificial aging did not influence the ELISA response as much as the pigments when the protein concentration was kept the same for the paints that were studied. PMID:26472321

  20. Dielectric breakdown of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Pilwat, G; Riemann, F

    1974-11-01

    With human and bovine red blood cells and Escherichia coli B, dielectric breakdown of cell membranes could be demonstrated using a Coulter Counter (AEG-Telefunken, Ulm, West Germany) with a hydrodynamic focusing orifice. In making measurements of the size distributions of red blood cells and bacteria versus increasing electric field strength and plotting the pulse heights versus the electric field strength, a sharp bend in the otherwise linear curve is observed due to the dielectric breakdown of the membranes. Solution of Laplace's equation for the electric field generated yields a value of about 1.6 V for the membrane potential at which dielectric breakdown occurs with modal volumes of red blood cells and bacteria. The same value is also calculated for red blood cells by applying the capacitor spring model of Crowley (1973. Biophys. J. 13:711). The corresponding electric field strength generated in the membrane at breakdown is of the order of 4 . 10(6) V/cm and, therefore, comparable with the breakdown voltages for bilayers of most oils. The critical detector voltage for breakdown depends on the volume of the cells. The volume-dependence predicted by Laplace theory with the assumption that the potential generated across the membrane is independent of volume, could be verified experimentally. Due to dielectric breakdown the red blood cells lose hemoglobin completely. This phenomenon was used to study dielectric breakdown of red blood cells in a homogeneous electric field between two flat platinum electrodes. The electric field was applied by discharging a high voltage storage capacitor via a spark gap. The calculated value of the membrane potential generated to produce dielectric breakdown in the homogeneous field is of the same order as found by means of the Coulter Counter. This indicates that mechanical rupture of the red blood cells by the hydrodynamic forces in the orifice of the Coulter Counter could also be excluded as a hemolysing mechanism. The detector

  1. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are Representative of a Widely Distributed Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    A Barb; J Cort; J Seetharaman; S Lew; H Lee; T Acton; L Tong; G Montelione; J Prestegard; et al.

    2011-12-31

    YbbR domains are widespread throughout Eubacteria and are expressed as monomeric units, linked in tandem repeats or cotranslated with other domains. Although the precise role of these domains remains undefined, the location of the multiple YbbR domain-encoding ybbR gene in the Bacillus subtilis glmM operon and its previous identification as a substrate for a surfactin-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase suggests a role in cell growth, division, and virulence. To further characterize the YbbR domains, structures of two of the four domains (I and IV) from the YbbR-like protein of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51 were solved by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The structures show the domains to have nearly identical topologies despite a low amino acid identity (23%). The topology is dominated by {beta}-strands, roughly following a 'figure 8' pattern with some strands coiling around the domain perimeter and others crossing the center. A similar topology is found in the C-terminal domain of two stress-responsive bacterial ribosomal proteins, TL5 and L25. Based on these models, a structurally guided amino acid alignment identifies features of the YbbR domains that are not evident from naive amino acid sequence alignments. A structurally conserved cis-proline (cis-Pro) residue was identified in both domains, though the local structure in the immediate vicinities surrounding this residue differed between the two models. The conservation and location of this cis-Pro, plus anchoring Val residues, suggest this motif may be significant to protein function.

  2. Representing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaztambide-Fernandez, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Handbooks denote representative authority, which gives their content normative value and through which editors and authors can emphasize certain views and orientations within a field. The representative authority of a handbook is reinforced in various ways, both obvious and subtle. The "SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" is no exception…

  3. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  4. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now.

  5. Determination of an ensemble of structures representing the intermediate state of the bacterial immunity protein Im7

    PubMed Central

    Gsponer, Joerg; Hopearuoho, Harri; Whittaker, Sara B.-M.; Spence, Graham R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Paci, Emanuele; Radford, Sheena E.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    We present a detailed structural characterization of the intermediate state populated during the folding and unfolding of the bacterial immunity protein Im7. We achieve this result by incorporating a variety of experimental data available for this species in molecular dynamics simulations. First, we define the structure of the exchange-competent intermediate state of Im7 by using equilibrium hydrogen-exchange protection factors. Second, we use this ensemble to predict Φ-values and compare the results with the experimentally determined Φ-values of the kinetic refolding intermediate. Third, we predict chemical-shift measurements and compare them with the measured chemical shifts of a mutational variant of Im7 for which the kinetic folding intermediate is the most stable state populated at equilibrium. Remarkably, we found that the properties of the latter two species are predicted with high accuracy from the exchange-competent intermediate that we determined, suggesting that these three states are characterized by a similar architecture in which helices I, II, and IV are aligned in a native-like, but reorganized, manner. Furthermore, the structural ensemble that we obtained enabled us to rationalize the results of tryptophan fluorescence experiments in the WT protein and a series of mutational variants. The results show that the integration of diverse sets of experimental data at relatively low structural resolution is a powerful approach that can provide insights into the structural organization of this conformationally heterogeneous three-helix intermediate with unprecedented detail and highlight the importance of both native and non-native interactions in stabilizing its structure. PMID:16371468

  6. Determination of an ensemble of structures representing the intermediate state of the bacterial immunity protein Im7.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, Joerg; Hopearuoho, Harri; Whittaker, Sara B-M; Spence, Graham R; Moore, Geoffrey R; Paci, Emanuele; Radford, Sheena E; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    We present a detailed structural characterization of the intermediate state populated during the folding and unfolding of the bacterial immunity protein Im7. We achieve this result by incorporating a variety of experimental data available for this species in molecular dynamics simulations. First, we define the structure of the exchange-competent intermediate state of Im7 by using equilibrium hydrogen-exchange protection factors. Second, we use this ensemble to predict Phi-values and compare the results with the experimentally determined Phi-values of the kinetic refolding intermediate. Third, we predict chemical-shift measurements and compare them with the measured chemical shifts of a mutational variant of Im7 for which the kinetic folding intermediate is the most stable state populated at equilibrium. Remarkably, we found that the properties of the latter two species are predicted with high accuracy from the exchange-competent intermediate that we determined, suggesting that these three states are characterized by a similar architecture in which helices I, II, and IV are aligned in a native-like, but reorganized, manner. Furthermore, the structural ensemble that we obtained enabled us to rationalize the results of tryptophan fluorescence experiments in the WT protein and a series of mutational variants. The results show that the integration of diverse sets of experimental data at relatively low structural resolution is a powerful approach that can provide insights into the structural organization of this conformationally heterogeneous three-helix intermediate with unprecedented detail and highlight the importance of both native and non-native interactions in stabilizing its structure.

  7. Measurement of breakdown current in dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhotin, V. A.; Zakrevskii, V. A.; Sudar', N. T.

    2015-08-01

    A new method to determine the resistance of the breakdown channel, current, and characteristic time is based on the measurements of the breakdown current pulse in a wide range of parameters of the measurement circuit. A problem with time-dependent resistance of the breakdown channel is numerically solved. An experimental variation in the resistance of the breakdown channel can be used to estimate the breakdown time. The method is tested with the aid of computer experiments and employed in the analysis of oscillograms of breakdown current in experiments with a dielectric polymer.

  8. A PM6 study of Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila light harvesting center II B800 bacteriochlorophylls in representative protein environment.

    PubMed

    Türeli, Sina; Varnalı, Tereza

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial light-harvesting II (LH-II) centers contain two types of Bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl). One is named B800 and found as a single molecule within one monomer of the complex while the other named B850 is found as a dimer. Their names indicate their peak of UV absorbance around red spectrum. Both types of molecules are attached to the protein chain via ligation of their central Magnesium atom to an either Histidine or Deoxymethionine amino acid. They are also coordinated by peripheral hydrogen bonds that they accept with their carboxyl side group. Both the ligation and the hydrogen bonding are thought to have an effect on electronic structure of the Bchl hence its UV absorbance and energy transfer rate. Experiments and theoretic studies performed on this subject support the above idea. This theoretical molecular modeling study case aims to mimic the experimental mutations performed on certain amino acids in silico and study its effects on the electronic structure of Bchl. By comparison with experimental results it was observed that the likely place for the nearby Arginine is not below the plane of the Bchl as in the X-ray crystallographic structure but above the plane defined by the four nitrogen atoms and their rings. It was also seen that the coordination of the acetyl group is very sensitive to changes in ligation of the Bchl molecule.

  9. Measurement of the glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products GFAP-BDP biomarker for the detection of traumatic brain injury compared to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Paul J; Panczykowski, David M; Yue, John K; Puccio, Ava M; Inoue, Tomoo; Sorani, Marco D; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Valadka, Alex B; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Manley, Geoffrey T; Okonkwo, David O

    2015-04-15

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are brain-specific proteins released into serum as part of the pathophysiological response after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We performed a multi-center trial to validate and characterize the use of GFAP-BDP levels in the diagnosis of intracranial injury in a broad population of patients with a positive clinical screen for head injury. This multi-center, prospective, cohort study included patients 16-93 years of age presenting to three level 1 trauma centers with suspected TBI (loss of consciousness, post-trauma amnesia, and so on). Serum GFAP-BDP levels were drawn within 24 h and analyzed, in a blinded fashion, using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ability of GFAP-BDP to predict intracranial injury on admission computed tomography (CT) as well as delayed magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed by multiple regression and assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Utility of GFAP-BDP to predict injury and reduce unnecessary CT scans was assessed utilizing decision curve analysis. A total of 215 patients were included, of which 83% suffered mild TBI, 4% moderate, and 12% severe; mean age was 42.1±18 years. Evidence of intracranial injury was present in 51% of the sample (median Rotterdam Score, 2; interquartile range, 2). GFAP-BDP demonstrated very good predictive ability (AUC=0.87) and demonstrated significant discrimination of injury severity (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). Use of GFAP-BDP yielded a net benefit above clinical screening alone and a net reduction in unnecessary scans by 12-30%. Used in conjunction with other clinical information, rapid measurement of GFAP-BDP is useful in establishing or excluding the diagnosis of radiographically apparent intracranial injury throughout the spectrum of TBI. As an adjunct to current screening practices, GFAP-BDP may help avoid unnecessary CT scans without sacrificing

  10. Measurement of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Its Breakdown Products GFAP-BDP Biomarker for the Detection of Traumatic Brain Injury Compared to Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Paul J.; Panczykowski, David M.; Yue, John K.; Puccio, Ava M.; Inoue, Tomoo; Sorani, Marco D.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Valadka, Alex B.; Yuh, Esther L.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Casey, Scott S.; Cheong, Maxwell; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Hricik, Allison J.; Lawless, Kerri; Menon, David; Schnyer, David M.; Vassar, Mary J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are brain-specific proteins released into serum as part of the pathophysiological response after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We performed a multi-center trial to validate and characterize the use of GFAP-BDP levels in the diagnosis of intracranial injury in a broad population of patients with a positive clinical screen for head injury. This multi-center, prospective, cohort study included patients 16–93 years of age presenting to three level 1 trauma centers with suspected TBI (loss of consciousness, post-trauma amnesia, and so on). Serum GFAP-BDP levels were drawn within 24 h and analyzed, in a blinded fashion, using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ability of GFAP-BDP to predict intracranial injury on admission computed tomography (CT) as well as delayed magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed by multiple regression and assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Utility of GFAP-BDP to predict injury and reduce unnecessary CT scans was assessed utilizing decision curve analysis. A total of 215 patients were included, of which 83% suffered mild TBI, 4% moderate, and 12% severe; mean age was 42.1±18 years. Evidence of intracranial injury was present in 51% of the sample (median Rotterdam Score, 2; interquartile range, 2). GFAP-BDP demonstrated very good predictive ability (AUC=0.87) and demonstrated significant discrimination of injury severity (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–1.64). Use of GFAP-BDP yielded a net benefit above clinical screening alone and a net reduction in unnecessary scans by 12–30%. Used in conjunction with other clinical information, rapid measurement of GFAP-BDP is useful in establishing or excluding the diagnosis of radiographically apparent intracranial injury throughout the spectrum of TBI. As an adjunct to current screening practices, GFAP-BDP may help avoid unnecessary CT scans without

  11. Threshold criteria for undervoltage breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-05-01

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The minimum number of injected electrons required to achieve breakdown in a parallel-plate gap is measured in argon at pd values of 3-10 Torr m using ultraviolet laser pulses to photoelectrically release electrons from the cathode. This value was found to scale inversely with voltage at constant pd and with pressure within the parameter range explored. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and numerically solved. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low gain. It is also found that fewer electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (α process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the α process to electric field is enhanced by increasing the gas pressure. A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that the breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space-charge distortion is greatest.

  12. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  13. Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold

    SciTech Connect

    Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-08-28

    To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures

  14. Degradation of some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mays L. cv PR32-B10.

    PubMed

    Barone, Roberto; de Biasi, Margherita-Gabriella; Piccialli, Vincenzo; de Napoli, Lorenzo; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2016-10-01

    The ability of the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mais L. cv. PR32-B10 to degrade some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), has been evaluated. Surface sterilized seeds of corn (Zea mais L. Pioneer cv. PR32-B10) were hydroponically cultivated in a growth chamber under no-stressful conditions. The water-soluble protein extracts isolated from maize tissues showed peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and catalase activities. Incubation of the extracts with naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene, led to formation of oxidized and/or degradation products. GC-MS and TLC monitoring of the processes showed that naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and pyrene underwent 100%, 78%, 92% and 65% oxidative degradation, respectively, after 120 min. The chemical structure of the degradation products were determined by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS spectrometry. PMID:27391049

  15. Degradation of some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mays L. cv PR32-B10.

    PubMed

    Barone, Roberto; de Biasi, Margherita-Gabriella; Piccialli, Vincenzo; de Napoli, Lorenzo; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2016-10-01

    The ability of the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mais L. cv. PR32-B10 to degrade some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), has been evaluated. Surface sterilized seeds of corn (Zea mais L. Pioneer cv. PR32-B10) were hydroponically cultivated in a growth chamber under no-stressful conditions. The water-soluble protein extracts isolated from maize tissues showed peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and catalase activities. Incubation of the extracts with naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene, led to formation of oxidized and/or degradation products. GC-MS and TLC monitoring of the processes showed that naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and pyrene underwent 100%, 78%, 92% and 65% oxidative degradation, respectively, after 120 min. The chemical structure of the degradation products were determined by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS spectrometry.

  16. Dielectric breakdown model for composite materials.

    PubMed

    Peruani, F; Solovey, G; Irurzun, I M; Mola, E E; Marzocca, A; Vicente, J L

    2003-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of dielectric breakdown in composite materials. The dielectric breakdown model was generalized to describe dielectric breakdown patterns in conductor-loaded composites. Conducting particles are distributed at random in the insulating matrix, and the dielectric breakdown propagates according to new rules to take into account electrical properties and particle size. Dielectric breakdown patterns are characterized by their fractal dimension D and the parameters of the Weibull distribution. Studies are carried out as a function of the fraction of conducting inhomogeneities, p. The fractal dimension D of electrical trees approaches the fractal dimension of a percolation cluster when the fraction of conducting particles approximates the percolation limit. PMID:16241318

  17. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The initiation of the breakdown process for axially symmetric compressible flows is investigated using a numerical solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. The vortex is isolated, with its axis parallel to the direction of the main stream, and the core radius is small compared to the breakdown length. Computations for several flowfields indicate that the breakdown of the solution is shifted further downstream with increasing Mach number until breakdown is no longer observed. In the subsonic case, the influence of the initial temperature distribution on the breakdown length of the solution is more pronounced than in the supersonic case, with heating of the core enhancing breakdown, and cooling delaying it. The breakdown of the solution is seen to always occur for nonvanishing axial velocity components.

  18. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  19. Predicting Flow Breakdown Probability and Duration in Stochastic Network Models: Impact on Travel Time Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jing; Mahmassani, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to produce random flow breakdown endogenously in a mesoscopic operational model, by capturing breakdown probability and duration. Based on previous research findings that probability of flow breakdown can be represented as a function of flow rate and the duration can be characterized by a hazard model. By generating random flow breakdown at various levels and capturing the traffic characteristics at the onset of the breakdown, the stochastic network simulation model provides a tool for evaluating travel time variability. The proposed model can be used for (1) providing reliability related traveler information; (2) designing ITS (intelligent transportation systems) strategies to improve reliability; and (3) evaluating reliability-related performance measures of the system.

  20. KIAA1199 interacts with glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) to promote glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sakai, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-08-30

    The KIAA1199 gene was first discovered to be associated with non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, several reports have shown that the up-regulation of KIAA1199 is associated with cancer cell migration or invasion and a poor prognosis. These findings indicate that KIAA1199 may be a novel target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we explored in detail the function of KIAA1199 in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of KIAA1199 protein with intracellular proteins in cancer cells. To this end, we expressed KIAA1199-MBP fusion protein and performed a pull-down assay. In addition, KIAA1199-overexpressing cancer cell lines were constructed using a retroviral vector and were used for further experiments. A pull-down analysis showed that the glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) interacted with the C-terminal region of KIAA1199 protein. Furthermore, we observed the interaction of KIAA1199 with glycogen phosphorylase brain form (PYGB) under serum-free conditions. The interaction promoted glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 plays an important role in glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival and that it may represent a novel target for cancer therapy.

  1. KIAA1199 interacts with glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) to promote glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sakai, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A.; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The KIAA1199 gene was first discovered to be associated with non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, several reports have shown that the up-regulation of KIAA1199 is associated with cancer cell migration or invasion and a poor prognosis. These findings indicate that KIAA1199 may be a novel target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we explored in detail the function of KIAA1199 in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of KIAA1199 protein with intracellular proteins in cancer cells. To this end, we expressed KIAA1199-MBP fusion protein and performed a pull-down assay. In addition, KIAA1199-overexpressing cancer cell lines were constructed using a retroviral vector and were used for further experiments. A pull-down analysis showed that the glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) interacted with the C-terminal region of KIAA1199 protein. Furthermore, we observed the interaction of KIAA1199 with glycogen phosphorylase brain form (PYGB) under serum-free conditions. The interaction promoted glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 plays an important role in glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival and that it may represent a novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:25051373

  2. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  3. Time dependent breakdown in silicon dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, C.; Shumka, A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the possible existence of a time-dependent breakdown mechanism in thermal oxides of the type used as gate oxide in MOS circuits. Questions of device fabrication are discussed along with details concerning breakdown measurements and the determination of C-V characteristics. A relatively large prebreakdown current observed in one of the cases is related to the time-dependent breakdown.

  4. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  5. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  6. Scaling and Volatility of Breakouts and Breakdowns in Stock Price Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Wei, Jianrong; Huang, Jiping

    2013-01-01

    Background Because the movement of stock prices is not only ubiquitous in financial markets but also crucial for investors, extensive studies have been done to understand the law behind it. In particular, since the financial crisis in 2008, researchers have a more interest in investigating large market volatilities in order to grasp changing market trends. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we analyze the breakouts and breakdowns of both the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index in the US stock market and the Shanghai Composite Index in the Chinese stock market. The breakout usually represents an ongoing upward trend in technical analysis while the breakdown represents an ongoing downward trend. Based on the renormalization method, we introduce two parameters to quantize breakouts and breakdowns, respectively. We discover scaling behavior, characterized by power-law distributions for both the breakouts and breakdowns in the two financial markets with different power-law exponents, which reflect different market volatilities. In detail, the market volatility for breakdowns is usually larger than that for breakouts. Moreover, as an emerging market, the Chinese stock market has larger market volatilities for both the breakouts and breakdowns than the US stock market (a mature market). Further, the short-term volatilities show similar features for both the US stock market and the Chinese stock market. However, the medium-term volatilities in the US stock market are almost symmetrical for the breakouts and breakdowns, whereas those in the Chinese stock market appear to be asymmetrical for the breakouts and breakdowns. Conclusions/Signicance The methodology presented here provides a way to understand scaling and hence volatilities of breakouts and breakdowns in stock price dynamics. Our findings not only reveal the features of market volatilities but also make a comparison between mature and emerging financial markets. PMID:24376577

  7. Leaf breakdown in streams differing in catchment land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, M.J.; Meyer, J.L.; Couch, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    1. The impact of changes in land use on stream ecosystem function is poorly understood. We studied leaf breakdown, a fundamental process of stream ecosystems, in streams that represent a range of catchment land use in the Piedmont physiographic province of the south-eastern United States. 2. We placed bags of chalk maple (Acer barbatum) leaves in similar-sized streams in 12 catchments of differing dominant land use: four forested, three agricultural, two suburban and three urban catchments. We measured leaf mass, invertebrate abundance and fungal biomass in leaf bags over time. 3. Leaves decayed significantly faster in agricultural (0.0465 day-1) and urban (0.0474 day-1) streams than in suburban (0.0173 day-1) and forested (0.0100 day-1) streams. Additionally, breakdown rates in the agricultural and urban streams were among the fastest reported for deciduous leaves in any stream. Nutrient concentrations in agricultural streams were significantly higher than in any other land-use type. Fungal biomass associated with leaves was significantly lower in urban streams; while shredder abundance in leaf bags was significantly higher in forested and agricultural streams than in suburban and urban streams. Storm runoff was significantly higher in urban and suburban catchments that had higher impervious surface cover than forested or agricultural catchments. 4. We propose that processes accelerating leaf breakdown in agricultural and urban streams were not the same: faster breakdown in agricultural streams was due to increased biological activity as a result of nutrient enrichment, whereas faster breakdown in urban streams was a result of physical fragmentation resulting from higher storm runoff. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  8. Thermal dielectric breakdown with cylindrical electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, B. L.; Odwyer, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Solutions to the equations of thermal breakdown are computed for cylindrial electrodes with different boundary conditions. The development of the electric field and the temperature distributions are followed as functions of time, consequent on the application of a constant interelectrode voltage. The implications for possible breakdown by modes other than thermal are briefly discussed.

  9. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  10. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős-Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  11. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős-Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis.

  12. Breakdown properties of irradiated MOS capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, A.; Candelori, A. |; Milani, A.; Formigoni, E.; Ghidini, G.; Drera, D.; Pellizzer, F. |; Fuochi, P.G.; Lavale, M.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have studied the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the breakdown properties of different types of MOS capacitors, with thick (200 nm) and thin (down to 8 nm) oxides. In general, no large variations of the average breakdown field, time-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown values have been observed after high dose irradiation (20 Mrad(Si) 9 MeV electrons on thin and thick oxides, 17(Si) Mrad Co{sup 60} gamma and 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2} only on thick oxides). However, some modifications of the cumulative failure distributions have been observed in few of the oxides tested.

  13. Characterization of the murine antibody response to peptides representing the variable domains of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, E M; Cheng, X; Qu, Z; de La Maza, L M

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to gain more knowledge about the immunogenicity of the variable domains (VDs) of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia pneumoniae, peptides representing these areas were used to immunize BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Antisera to the peptides and to peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) were characterized by their ability to recognize the immunizing peptide and elementary bodies (EBs) of C. pneumoniae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (immunoblot). In addition, antiserum was analyzed for its molecular specificity by a pepscan as well as its in vitro neutralizing ability. In general, results obtained with antisera to the peptides paralleled the results obtained with the antisera to the KLH-conjugated peptides except that the titers or strength of reaction in the assays was less. Antisera to the VDs in both strains of mice gave ELISA titers to the homologous VD peptide ranging from 1,000 to >64,000. The strength of reactivity with the reduced MOMP as judged by Western blot, in most cases, paralleled the ELISA titer to the peptide. However, only antisera raised in both strains of mice to the VD1 and VD4 peptides reacted strongly with the EBs, suggesting surface exposure of these VDs. In addition, antisera to VD3 from C57BL/6 mice gave strong reactivity to EBs. By pepscan analysis antisera from both strains of mice reacted with several VD1 and VD3 octameric peptides, with weaker reactivity being seen with the octameric peptides in the other two VDs. This was in contrast to antisera raised to EBs of C. pneumoniae TW-183, which identified two immunogenic regions, one in VD1 and the other mapped to VD4. While antisera raised to EBs strongly neutralized the infectivity of C. pneumoniae, none of the peptide antisera was able to neutralize. In addition, peptides to the VDs were not able to block the neutralizing ability of the antisera to EBs of C. pneumoniae. Therefore, these results suggest that the VDs of

  14. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  15. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  16. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  17. Electrical Breakdown of Submillimeter Water Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Cooper, J.; Garner, A.; Goan, B.; Joshi, R. P.; Kolb, J.; Katsuki, S.; Kono, S.; Laroussi, M.; Leipold, F.; Lu, X.; Mallot, C.; Quian, J.; Xiao, S.

    2002-12-01

    Electrical breakdown and recovery processes in water have been studied using electrical and nanosecond optical diagnostics. The breakdown electric field in submillimeter gaps with 200 ns voltage pulses applied has been measured as 1 MV/cm, the rate of current rise during breakdown reaches 4ṡ1011 A/s. The switch recovery time is determined by expansion and decay of a vapor bubble. The experimental results, together with the results of a model with a percolative approach, provide design criteria for compact, high power, high repetition rate, liquid-switch pulse generators.

  18. Microwave gas breakdown in elliptical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Koufogiannis, I. D.; Sorolla, E. Mattes, M.

    2014-01-15

    This paper analyzes the microwave gas discharge within elliptical waveguides excited by the fundamental mode. The Rayleigh-Ritz method has been applied to solve the continuity equation. The eigenvalue problem defined by the breakdown condition has been solved and the effective diffusion length of the elliptical waveguide has been calculated, what is used to find the corona threshold. This paper extends the microwave breakdown model developed for circular waveguides and shows the better corona withstanding capabilities of elliptical waveguides. The corona breakdown electric field threshold obtained with the variational method has been compared with the one calculated with the Finite Elements Method, showing excellent agreement.

  19. [Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-07-01

    We developed and experimentally tested physical models for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models are ``point defect models,`` in which the growth and breakdown are described in terms of movement of anion and cation vacancies. The work during the past 5 years resulted in: theory of growth and breakdown of passive films, theory of corrosion-resistant alloys, electronic structure of passive films, and estimation of damage functions for energy systems. Proposals are give for the five ongoing tasks. 10 figs.

  20. Microwave air breakdown enhanced with metallic initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, G. C.; Popovic, S.

    2008-03-31

    We have determined X-band (9.4 GHz) electric field strengths required to obtain air breakdown at atmospheric pressure in the presence of metallic initiators, which are irradiated with repetitive (30 pulses/s) microwave pulses of 3 {mu}s duration and 200 kW peak power. Using a half-wavelength initiator, a factor of 40 reduction (compared to no initiator) was observed in the electric field required to achieve breakdown. The present measurements are compared to a previously published model for air breakdown, which was originally validated with S-band (3 GHz) frequencies and single 40 {mu}s pulses. We find good agreement between this previous model and our present measurements of breakdown with X-band frequencies and repetitive 3 {mu}s pulses.

  1. Contributions to theory of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.; Uberoi, M. S.

    A study is made of vortex breakdown in stratified flows, and it is found that a positive stratification in the vortex where the density is increasing away from the axis, postpones the vortex breakdown and vice versa. This is apparent due to the density increasing in a direction opposite to that of an effective gravity which would correspond to a topheavy arrangement under gravity. It is also shown that a wavemotion promotes the possibility of axisymmetric flow downstream of the transaction.

  2. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The onset of vortex breakdown in compressible flows is investigated analytically for the case in which the flow is axially symmetric, the vortex is isolated, its axis is parallel to the main flow, and the vortex radius is small compared to the breakdown length. The conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy are formulated and solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme, as described by Krause (1985); numerical results are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  3. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.

    1996-04-23

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed. 13 figs.

  4. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, Gerald J.; Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed.

  5. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  6. Electromechanics and Electrical Breakdown of Particulate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, Bizhan G. R.

    A comprehensive theory of the electromechanics and electrical breakdown of a current-carrying particulate layer is developed, which takes into account its inhomogeneous nature and mode of compaction. The theory treates the general case of combined surface and volume conduction and takes account of self-compression of the layer due to electrical forces. The electromechanical theory predicts the existence of a remarkably large electrical cohesive stress in the layer due to a strong field enhancement in and around the contact regions. Furthermore, it shows a decrease in the apparent resistivity of the layer with increasing electric field as a result of self-compression. The analysis of electrical breakdown of current -carrying particulate layer predicts the onset of breakdown of the layer in the form of intermittent microsparks in the gap between the contacting particles when the electric field at the contact or in the surrounding gap exceeds the threshold breakdown value. An analysis of the behavior of the layer after breakdown in terms of a simplified equivalent lumped circuit predicts increases of sparking frequency and average current as the applied average field exceeds the threshold average field for the onset of breakdown. The results of measurements on layers of glass beads and fly-ash in a standard resistivity cell are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for the field-dependent resistivity characteristics. The work has particular significance for electrostatic precipitation and addresses the phenomenon of backdischarge and the questions of the retention, rapping, and reentrainment of precipitation ash layers.

  7. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  8. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  9. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown by the vortex-filament method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The vortex-filament method was applied to the simulation of vortex breakdown. The principal vortex region was represented by multiple filaments, and an axial velocity component was induced by a spiral winding of the filaments. An accuracy check was performed for a cylindrical swirling flow with simple analytical expressions for the axial and theta velocities. The result suggests that the flow field can be simulated to any accuracy by increasing the number of filaments. An axisymmetric-type vortex breakdown was simulated, with experimental data serving as upstream conditions. The calculated axial- and theta-velocity contours show the breakdown of the vortex, including a rapid change in the vortex core, followed axially by a recovery zone and then a second breakdown. When three dimensional initial data are used the second breakdown appears to be of the spiral type in correspondence with experimental observations. The present method can easily be used to simulate other types of vortex breakdown or other vortex flows with axial velocity.

  10. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  11. Dielectric breakdown in mineral oil ITO 100 based magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudelcik, J.; Bury, P.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    The development of dielectric breakdown and the DC dielectric breakdown voltage of magnetic fluids based on inhibited transformer oil ITO 100 were investigated in parallel orientations of external magnetic field. It was shown that the breakdown voltage is strongly influenced by the magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic fluids with the volume concentration 1and 0.2% had better dielectric properties than pure transformer oil. The increase of breakdown voltage was interpreted on the base of the bubble theory of breakdown.

  12. Obstacle-induced spiral vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasche, Simon; Gallaire, François; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation on vortex breakdown dynamics is performed. An adverse pressure gradient is created along the axis of a wing-tip vortex by introducing a sphere downstream of an elliptical hydrofoil. The instrumentation involves high-speed visualizations with air bubbles used as tracers and 2D Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Two key parameters are identified and varied to control the onset of vortex breakdown: the swirl number, defined as the maximum azimuthal velocity divided by the free-stream velocity, and the adverse pressure gradient. They were controlled through the incidence angle of the elliptical hydrofoil, the free-stream velocity and the sphere diameter. A single helical breakdown of the vortex was systematically observed over a wide range of experimental parameters. The helical breakdown coiled around the sphere in the direction opposite to the vortex but rotated along the vortex direction. We have observed that the location of vortex breakdown moved upstream as the swirl number or the sphere diameter was increased. LDV measurements were corrected using a reconstruction procedure taking into account the so-called vortex wandering and the size of the LDV measurement volume. This allows us to investigate the spatio-temporal linear stability properties of the flow and demonstrate that the flow transition from columnar to single helical shape is due to a transition from convective to absolute instability.

  13. Electrical breakdown of water in microgaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl; Kolb, Juergen; Xiao, Shu; Katsuki, Sunao; Minamitani, Yasushi; Joshi, Ravindra

    2008-05-01

    Experimental and modeling studies on electrical breakdown in water in submillimeter gaps between pin and plane electrodes have been performed. Prebreakdown, breakdown and recovery of the water gaps were studied experimentally by using optical and electrical diagnostics with a temporal resolution on the order of one nanosecond. By using Mach-Zehnder interferometry, the electric field distribution in the prebreakdown phase was determined by means of the Kerr effect. Electric fields values in excess of the computed electric fields, which reach >4 MV cm-1 for applied electrical pulses of 20 ns duration, were recorded at the tip of the pin electrode, an effect which can be explained by a reduced permittivity of water at high electric fields. Breakdown of the gaps, streamer-to-arc transition, was recorded by means of high-speed electrical diagnostics, and through high-speed photography. It was shown, through simulations, that breakdown is initiated by field emission at the interface of preexisting microbubbles. Impact ionization within the micro-bubble's gas then contributes to plasma development. Experiments using pulse-probe methods and Schlieren diagnostics allowed us to follow the development of the disturbance caused by the breakdown over a time of more than milliseconds and to determine the recovery time of a water switch. In order to trigger water switches a trigger electrode with a triple point has been utilized. The results of this research have found application in the construction of compact pulse power generators for bioelectric applications.

  14. Changes in the Cytoplasmic Composition of Amino Acids and Proteins Observed in Staphylococcus aureus during Growth under Variable Growth Conditions Representative of the Human Wound Site

    PubMed Central

    Alreshidi, Mousa M.; Dunstan, R. Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a high proportion of nosocomial infections. This study was conducted to assess the bacterial responses in the cytoplasmic composition of amino acids and ribosomal proteins under various environmental conditions designed to mimic those on the human skin or within a wound site: pH6-8, temperature 35–37°C, and additional 0–5% NaCl. It was found that each set of environmental conditions elicited substantial adjustments in cytoplasmic levels of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, alanine and glycine (P< 0.05). These alterations generated characteristic amino acid profiles assessed by principle component analysis (PCA). Substantial alterations in cytoplasmic amino acid and protein composition occurred during growth under conditions of higher salinity stress implemented via additional levels of NaCl in the growth medium. The cells responded to additional NaCl at pH 6 by reducing levels of ribosomal proteins, whereas at pH 8 there was an upregulation of ribosomal proteins compared with the reference control. The levels of two ribosomal proteins, L32 and S19, remained constant across all experimental conditions. The data supported the hypothesis that the bacterium was continually responding to the dynamic environment by modifying the proteome and optimising metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27442022

  15. Photoreceptor proteins, "star actors of modern times": a review of the functional dynamics in the structure of representative members of six different photoreceptor families.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Michael A; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2004-01-01

    Six well-characterized photoreceptor families function in Nature to mediate light-induced signal transduction: the rhodopsins, phytochromes, xanthopsins, cryptochromes, phototropins, and BLUF proteins. The first three catalyze E/Z isomerization of retinal, phytochromobilin, and p-coumaric acid, respectively, while the last three all have a different flavin-based photochemistry. For many of these photoreceptor proteins, (many of) the details of the conversion of the light-induced change in configuration of their chromophore into a signaling state and eventually a biological response have been resolved. Some members of the rhodopsins, the xanthopsins, and the phototropins are so well characterized that they function as model systems to study (receptor) protein dynamics and (un)folding.

  16. Enzymatic breakdown of raffinose oligosaccharides in pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Hofmann, Julia; Richter, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    Both alkaline and acidic alpha-galactosidases (alpha-D: -galactoside galactohydrolases, E.C.3.2.1.22) isolated from various plant species have been described, although little is known about their co-occurrence and functions in germinating seeds. Here, we report on the isolation of two cDNAs, encoding for alpha-galactosidases from maturing and germinating seeds of Pisum sativum. One was identified as a member of the acidic alpha-galactosidase of the family 27 glycosyl hydrolase cluster and the other as a member of the family of alkaline alpha-galactosidases, which are highly homologous to seed imbibition proteins (SIPs). PsGAL1 transcripts, encoding for the ACIDIC alpha-GALACTOSIDASE, were predominately expressed during seed maturation and acidic enzyme activities were already present in dry seeds, showing little changes during seed germination. Compartmentation studies revealed that acidic alpha-galactosidases were located in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs). PsAGA1, encoding for the ALKALINE alpha-GALACTOSIDASE, was only expressed after radicle protrusion, when about 50% of RFOs have already been broken down. RFO breakdown was markedly decreased when the translation of the alkaline enzyme was inhibited, providing evidence that PsAGA1 indeed functioned in RFO degradation. Based on these data, we present an integrated model of RFO breakdown by two sequentially active alpha-galactosidases in pea seeds.

  17. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  18. Signaling Proteins Are Represented in Tissue Fluid/Lymph from Soft Tissues of Normal Human Legs at Concentrations Different from Serum

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Marzanna; Durlik, Marek; Miller, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The mobile intercellular fluid flowing to and in the lymphatics contains filtered plasma products and substances synthesized and excreted by tissue cells. Among them are signaling proteins such as cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors. They act locally in autocrine and paracrine systems regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and formation of the ground matrix. They play an immunoregulatory role in infections, wound healing, and tumor cell growth. Methods and Results: In this study we measured the concentration of selected cytokines, chemokines, tissue enzymes, and growth factors in tissue fluid/lymph drained from normal human leg soft tissues. Legs exposed to infections and trauma often result in development of lymphedema. Lymph was drained from superficial calf lymphatics using microsurgical techniques. Our studies showed generally higher concentrations of cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors in lymph than in serum. The total protein L/S ratio was 0.22, whereas that of various lymph signaling proteins ranged between 1 and 10. Conclusions: This indicates that in addition to proteins filtered from blood, local cells contribute to lymph concentration by own production, depending on the actual cell requirement. Moreover, there were major individual differences of lymph levels with simultaneous stable serum levels. This suggests existence of a local autonomous regulatory humoral mechanism in tissues, not reflected in serum. PMID:24364843

  19. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  20. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny.

  1. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. PMID:27393920

  2. Outer membrane protein D15 is conserved among Haemophilus influenzae species and may represent a universal protective antigen against invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Loosmore, S M; Yang, Y P; Coleman, D C; Shortreed, J M; England, D M; Klein, M H

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the d15 gene from two strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and two strains of nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI). The nucleotide and deduced protein sequences of d15 are highly conserved, with only a small variable region identified near the carboxyl terminus of the protein. Analysis of upstream sequences revealed that the H. influenzae d15 gene may be part of a large potential operon of closely spaced open reading frames, including one with significant homology to the Escherichia coli cds gene encoding CDP-diglyceride synthetase. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the d15 gene is also present in H. influenzae types a, c, d, e, and f and in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. A recombinant D15 (rD15) protein was expressed in good quantity in E. coli from the inducible T7 promoter, and monospecific anti-rD15 antibodies were raised. Immunoblot analysis of H. influenzae serotypes a, b, c, d, e, and f, NTHI, and H. parainfluenzae lysates revealed that they all expressed a cross-reactive D15-like protein. Purified rD15 was found to be highly immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits, and passive transfer of anti-rD15 antibodies protected infant rats from challenge with H. influenzae type b or type a in infant rat models of bacteremia. Thus, D15 is a highly conserved antigen that is protective in animal models and it may be a useful component of a universal subunit vaccine against Haemophilus infection and disease. PMID:9284140

  3. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  4. Fear of breakdown and the unlived life.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2014-04-01

    Winnicott's Fear of breakdown is an unfinished work that requires that the reader be not only a reader, but also a writer of this work which often gestures toward meaning as opposed to presenting fully developed ideas. The author's understanding of the often confusing, sometimes opaque, argument of Winnicott's paper is as follows. In infancy there occurs a breakdown in the mother-infant tie that forces the infant to take on, by himself, emotional events that he is unable to manage. He short-circuits his experience of primitive agony by generating defense organizations that are psychotic in nature, i.e., they substitute self-created inner reality for external reality, thus foreclosing his actually experiencing critical life events. By not experiencing the breakdown of the mother-infant tie when it occurred in infancy, the individual creates a psychological state in which he lives in fear of a breakdown that has already happened, but which he did not experience. The author extends Winnicott's thinking by suggesting that the driving force of the patient's need to find the source of his fear is his feeling that parts of himself are missing and that he must find them if he is to become whole. What remains of his life feels to him like a life that is mostly an unlived life. PMID:24620827

  5. Modeling of breakdown behavior in radio-frequency argon discharges with improved secondary emission model

    SciTech Connect

    Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2005-06-15

    This work represents the investigation of the dependence of the breakdown voltage on the gas pressure and on the frequency in radio-frequency argon discharges. Calculations were performed by using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code with three velocity components with a new secondary emission model. The obtained results show that the multivalued nature of the left-hand branch of the breakdown curve can be achieved only by taking into account energy dependence of the yield per ion. The multivalued nature of the left-hand branch of the breakdown curve is attributed to the influence of the secondary emission characteristics of the electrodes on the breakdown voltage. Simulation results show a good agreement with the available experimental data. Disagreements between simulation results and theoretical predictions based on the phenomenological method indicate that a more accurate determination of molecular constants is needed. As a result of the satisfactory agreement between simulation and experimental data for dependence of the breakdown voltage on the frequency, a frequency scaling law is proposed.

  6. Modeling of breakdown behavior in radio-frequency argon discharges with improved secondary emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radmilović-Radjenović, M.; Lee, J. K.

    2005-06-01

    This work represents the investigation of the dependence of the breakdown voltage on the gas pressure and on the frequency in radio-frequency argon discharges. Calculations were performed by using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code with three velocity components with a new secondary emission model. The obtained results show that the multivalued nature of the left-hand branch of the breakdown curve can be achieved only by taking into account energy dependence of the yield per ion. The multivalued nature of the left-hand branch of the breakdown curve is attributed to the influence of the secondary emission characteristics of the electrodes on the breakdown voltage. Simulation results show a good agreement with the available experimental data. Disagreements between simulation results and theoretical predictions based on the phenomenological method indicate that a more accurate determination of molecular constants is needed. As a result of the satisfactory agreement between simulation and experimental data for dependence of the breakdown voltage on the frequency, a frequency scaling law is proposed.

  7. Robustness of SuperJunction structures against cosmic ray induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, Marina; Udrea, Florin; Bauer, Friedhelm

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a new design approach which dramatically improves the robustness of power semiconductor device against cosmic rays induced breakdown. This failure mode occurs during continuous operation at a DC rail voltage, which in practice is well below the breakdown rating (typically half of the breakdown). This failure is more prominent for higher breakdown rated devices (above 2 kV) and represents one of the main causes of concern, especially if the power systems are operated at higher altitude. Using a mathematical model for the calculation of the cosmic ray breakdown failure rate proposed by Zeller [1], we show that by employing a SuperJunction structure in the drift region of a high voltage diode we can achieve a great improvement in the robustness of the device against cosmic ray radiation. Since the cosmic ray failure rate is strongly dependent on the electric field distribution, the two-dimensional nature of the SuperJunction electric field with lower peaks and more even distribution offers a huge advantage over the use of standard PiN devices. Finally, a physical two-dimensional electric field model for the SuperJunction structures is developed which is then imported into Zeller's model to compute the cosmic ray failure rate for different DC voltage rails.

  8. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe-S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe-S clusters featuring (Cys)3 (His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe-S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe-S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe-S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved.

  9. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  10. The Latitude Dependence of Dielectric Breakdown on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Hayne, P. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Solar energetic particles may cause dielectric breakdown on the nightside of the Moon. We predict that breakdown weathering may have melted or vaporized about 4-11 wt% of impact gardened regolith on the Moon.

  11. Electrical Breakdown of Plasma-Polymerized Styrene Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikita, Masayuki; Matsuda, Akinori; Nagao, Masayuki; Sawa, Goro; Ieda, Masayuki

    1982-03-01

    The electrical breakdown of plasma-polymerized styrene thin film (PPS) was studied by taking advantage of self-healing. The electric strength FB was almost independent of temperature from -196 to 200°C, and strongly depended on the rate of voltage increase even at a slow rate of increase. The breakdown characteristics were influenced by the electrode metal and the ambient atmosphere, but not by X-ray irradiation or photoillumination. The experimental results are used to discuss the breakdown mechanism of PPS through existing breakdown theories. As a result, no single breakdown process was considered as a possible breakdown mechanism, and we thus obtained important conditions for presenting a new breakdown model; the breakdown of PPS will be determined by a thermal criterion, and it will be closely related to a temperature-independent injection process.

  12. Solution conformation of a peptide fragment representing a proposed RNA-binding site of a viral coat protein studied by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    van der Graaf, M.; van Mierlo, C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A. )

    1991-06-11

    The first 25 amino acids of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus are essential for binding the encapsidated RNA. Although an {alpha}-helical conformation has been predicted for this highly positively charged N-terminal region. No experimental evidence for this conformation has been presented so far. In this study, two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on a chemically synthesized pentacosapeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of this coat protein. All resonances could be assigned by a combined use of two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy carried out at four different temperatures. Various NMR parameters indicate the presence of a conformational ensemble consisting of helical structures rapidly converting into more extended states. Differences in chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that lowering the temperature induces a shift of the dynamic equilibrium toward more helical structures. At 10{degrees}C, a perceptible fraction of the conformational ensemble consists of structures with an {alpha}-helical conformation between residues 9 and 17, likely starting with a turnlike structure around Thr9 and Arg10. Both the conformation and the position of this helical region agree well with the secondary structure predictions mentioned above.

  13. Dielectric breakdown in nano-porous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Juan Pablo

    Unknown to most computer users and mobile device enthusiasts, we have finally entered into a critical age of chip manufacturing. January of 2014 marks the official start of the quest by the semiconductor industry to successfully integrate sub 14nm process technology nodes in accordance to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). The manufacturing of nano-scale features represents a major bottleneck of its own. However, a bigger challenge lies in reliably isolating the massive chip interconnect network. The present work is aimed at generating a theoretical and experimental framework to predict dielectric breakdown for thin films used in computer chip components. Here, a set of experimental techniques are presented to assess and study dielectric failure in novel thin films. A theory of dielectric breakdown in thin nano-porous films is proposed to describe combined intrinsic and metal ion catalyzed failure. This theory draws on experimental evidence as well as fundamental concepts from mass and electronic charge transport. The drift of metal species was found to accelerate intrinsic dielectric failure. The solubility of metals species such as Cu was found to range from 7.0x1025 ions/m3 to 1.86x1026 ions/m3 in 7% porous SiCOH films. The diffusion coefficient for Cu species was found to span from 4.2x10-19 m2/s to 1.86x10-21 m2/s. Ramped voltage stress experiments were used to identify intrinsic failure from metal catalyzed failure. Intrinsic breakdown is defined when time to failure against applied field ramp rate results in ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) ≈ -1. Intrinsic failure was studied using Au. Here, ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) ≈ -0.95, which is an experimental best case scenario for intrinsic failure. Au is commonly reluctant to ionize which means that failure occurs in the absence of ionic species. Metal catalyzed failure was investigated using reactive electrodes such as Cu, and Ag. Here, trends for ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) significantly

  14. Experimental breakdown of selected anodized aluminum samples in dilute plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, Norman T.; Domitz, Stanley

    1992-01-01

    Anodized aluminum samples representative of Space Station Freedom structural material were tested for electrical breakdown under space plasma conditions. In space, this potential arises across the insulating anodized coating when the spacecraft structure is driven to a negative bias relative to the external plasma potential due to plasma-surface interaction phenomena. For anodized materials used in the tests, it was found that breakdown voltage varied from 100 to 2000 volts depending on the sample. The current in the arcs depended on the sample, the capacitor, and the voltage. The level of the arc currents varied from 60 to 1000 amperes. The plasma number density varied from 3 x 10 exp 6 to 10 exp 3 ions per cc. The time between arcs increased as the number density was lowered. Corona testing of anodized samples revealed that samples with higher corona inception voltage had higher arcing inception voltages. From this it is concluded that corona testing may provide a method of screening the samples.

  15. Synthetic peptides representing two protective, linear B-cell epitopes of outer membrane protein F of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elicit whole-cell-reactive antibodies that are functionally pseudomonad specific.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, L B; Gilleland, H E

    1995-01-01

    Peptide 9 (TDAYNQKLSERRAN) and peptide 10 (NATAEGRAINRRVE) represent surface-exposed epitopes of outer membrane protein F of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rats immunized with four intramuscular inoculations on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 with either peptide 9 or peptide 10 conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were afforded protection against pulmonary lesions when examined 7 days subsequent to challenge (day 56) via intratracheal inoculation of P. aeruginosa-containing agar beads. Peptide 9 shares considerable homology with other OmpA-related outer membrane proteins in various bacteria, whereas peptide 10 displays little homology with these other proteins. Antisera directed to peptide 9 reacted weakly with cell envelope proteins from the various other OmpA-associated bacteria upon immunoblot analysis. However, antisera directed to peptide 10 reacted only with Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope proteins upon immunoblot analysis. Antisera to both peptides 9 and 10 reacted at minimal titers with whole cells of the various other bacteria in a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) but antisera to each of the peptides reacted at high titers when various strains of P. aeruginosa were used as the ELISA antigen. Antibodies to peptides 9 and 10 were protective, reactive to all strain of P. aeruginosa tested except for a protein F-deficient mutant, and functionally specific against pseudomonads. PMID:7539410

  16. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  17. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of the disorder-to-α-helical transition of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein reveals an equilibrium intermediate representing the most compact conformation.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Jenkins, Andrew D; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2015-05-22

    The intrinsically disordered, 18.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a peripheral membrane protein that is essential to proper myelin formation in the central nervous system. MBP acts in oligodendrocytes both to adjoin membrane leaflets to each other in forming myelin and as a hub in numerous protein-protein and protein-membrane interaction networks. Like many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), MBP multifunctionality arises from its high conformational plasticity and its ability to undergo reversible disorder-to-order transitions. One such transition is the disorder-to-α-helical conformational change that is induced upon MBP-membrane binding. Here, we have investigated the disorder-to-α-helical transition of MBP-derived α-peptides and the full-length 18.5-kDa protein. This transition was induced through titration of the membrane-mimetic solvent trifluoroethanol into both protein and peptide solutions, and conformational change was monitored using circular dichroism spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid binding, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, and Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer measurements. The data suggest that the disorder-to-α-helical transition of MBP follows a 3-state model: disordered↔intermediate↔α-helical, with each of the identified equilibrium states likely representing a conformational ensemble. The disordered state is characterized by slight compaction with little regular secondary structure, whereas the intermediate is also disordered but globally more compact. Surprisingly, the α-helical conformation is less compact than the intermediate. This study suggests that multifunctionality in MBP could arise from differences in the population of energetically distinct ensembles under different conditions and also provides an example of an IDP that undergoes cooperative global conformation change.

  19. Protein turnover, ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Yves

    2011-03-01

    The major processes discussed below are protein turnover (degradation and synthesis), degradation into urea, or conversion into glucose (gluconeogenesis, Figure 1). Daily protein turnover is a dynamic process characterized by a double flux of amino acids: the amino acids released by endogenous (body) protein breakdown can be reutilized and reconverted to protein synthesis, with very little loss. Daily rates of protein turnover in humans (300 to 400 g per day) are largely in excess of the level of protein intake (50 to 80 g per day). A fast growing rate, as in premature babies or in children recovering from malnutrition, leads to a high protein turnover rate and a high protein and energy requirement. Protein metabolism (synthesis and breakdown) is an energy-requiring process, dependent upon endogenous ATP supply. The contribution made by whole-body protein turnover to the resting metabolic rate is important: it represents about 20 % in adults and more in growing children. Metabolism of proteins cannot be disconnected from that of energy since energy balance influences net protein utilization, and since protein intake has an important effect on postprandial thermogenesis - more important than that of fats or carbohydrates. The metabolic need for amino acids is essentially to maintain stores of endogenous tissue proteins within an appropriate range, allowing protein homeostasis to be maintained. Thanks to a dynamic, free amino acid pool, this demand for amino acids can be continuously supplied. The size of the free amino acid pool remains limited and is regulated within narrow limits. The supply of amino acids to cover physiological needs can be derived from 3 sources: 1. Exogenous proteins that release amino acids after digestion and absorption 2. Tissue protein breakdown during protein turnover 3. De novo synthesis, including amino acids (as well as ammonia) derived from the process of urea salvage, following hydrolysis and microflora metabolism in the hind gut

  20. Effect of diet and absence of protozoa on the rumen microbial community and on the representativeness of bacterial fractions used in the determination of microbial protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Belanche, A; de la Fuente, G; Pinloche, E; Newbold, C J; Balcells, J

    2012-11-01

    Accurate estimates of microbial synthesis in the rumen are vital to optimize ruminant nutrition. Liquid- (LAB) and solid-associated bacterial fractions (SAB) harvested from the rumen are generally considered as microbial references when microbial yield is calculated; however, factors that determine their composition are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diet and absence or presence of rumen protozoa on the rumen microbial community. It was hypothesized that these treatments could modify the composition and representativeness of LAB and SAB. Twenty twin lambs (Ovis aries) were used; one-half of the twins were kept protozoa-free, and each respective twin sibling was faunated. At 6 mo of age, 5 animals from each group were randomly allocated to the experimental diets consisting of either alfalfa hay as the sole diet, or 50:50 mixed with ground barley grain. After 15 d of adaptation to the diet, animals were euthanized, rumen and abomasum contents were sampled, and LAB and SAB isolated. The presence of protozoa buffered the effect of diet on the rumen bacterial population. Faunated animals fed alfalfa hay had a greater abundance of F. succinogenes, anaerobic fungi and methanogens, as well as an enhanced rumen bacterial diversity. Cellulolytic bacteria were more abundant in SAB, whereas the abomasal abundance of most of the microorganisms studied was closer to those values observed in LAB. Rumen and abomasal samples showed similar bacterial DNA concentrations, but the fungal and protozoal DNA concentration in the abomasum was only 69% and 13% of that observed in the rumen, respectively, suggesting fungal and protozoal sequestration in the rumen or possible preferential degradation of fungal and protozoal DNA in the abomasum, or both. In conclusion, absence of protozoa and type of diet extensively modified the chemical composition of LAB and SAB as a consequence of changes in the microbial composition of these fractions.

  1. Protein tyrosine kinase inhibition and cell proliferation: is the [3H]-thymidine uptake assay representative of the T-lymphocyte proliferation rate?

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Pagliacci, M C; Agea, E; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Nicoletti, I

    1995-01-01

    T-cell growth is controlled to a large degree by extracellular signals that bind to specific receptors on the surface of cells. A number of these receptors have intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity. Their action on second messenger generation, and thus on cell proliferation, has been indirectly demonstrated by the decrease in [3H]-thymidine (TdR) uptake that follows co-stimulation of T-cells with mitogens and PTK inhibitors such as genistein (GEN). In this paper we report that the [3H]-TdR uptake assay is not a valid and reliable tool for investigating the proliferative activity of certain T-cell lines. In fact, a concomitant assessment of both [3H]-TdR uptake and cell cycle progression demonstrated that GEN is able to block G2/M progression of Jurkat T-lymphocytes even at doses (5 micrograms/ml) that do not influence [3H]-TdR uptake. Pretreatment with sodium o-vanadate (100 nM) could not reverse the GEN-related cell cycle perturbation, but was able to restore optimal [3H]-TdR uptake. Finally, GEN treatment was able to induce concentration-dependent apoptotic cell death of Jurkat T-cells. The control of cell activation, proliferation and programmed cell death is undoubtedly influenced by receptor-associated PTKs. The final effect on cell survival is almost entirely dependent on the activation state of the cell. The [3H]-TdR uptake assay seems to be inadequate for a correct interpretation of the expected results. PMID:7655707

  2. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  3. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  4. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  5. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  6. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-05-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures.

  7. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids.

    PubMed

    Herchl, F; Marton, K; Tomčo, L; Kopčanský, P; Timko, M; Koneracká, M; Kolcunová, I

    2008-05-21

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m(-1). Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions. PMID:21694240

  8. Interchangeability of vortex-breakdown types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaka, M.; Kikuchi, M.; Hirano, K.; Yuge, T.; Inoue, H.

    In order to investigate the connection between the bubble and the spiral form of vortex breakdown, experiments were conducted: an external disturbance in the form of an azimuthally spinning waveform was imposed in a pipe. The azimuthal wave number was varied by adjusting the phase difference among four oscillating pistons mounted circumferentially on the pipe. By imposing a disturbance of zero azimuthal wave number, a spiral was transformed into a bubble, and this occurred only for selective piston frequencies; the vortex breakdown which altered from the spiral to the bubble moved upstream, where it remained as a bubble as long as the external disturbance remained. Once the disturbance was removed, the bubble returned to a spiral. By imposing a disturbance of azimuthal wave number +1 (the first circumferential mode rotating in the same direction as the mean swirl), a bubble was transformed into a spiral for selective piston frequencies, and the spiral moved downstream. These preferred frequencies were found to be the same as the unexcited frequencies observed in the spiral in its natural state. As long as the external disturbance was imposed, the breakdown altered from the bubble to the spiral remained as a spiral; once the disturbance was removed, the spiral reverted to a bubble. By imposing a disturbance with azimuthal wave number -1 (the first circumferential mode rotating in the opposite direction to the mean swirl), no change was detected in either a bubble or a spiral. By imposing a disturbance with azimuthal wave number 2 (the second circumferential mode), for selective piston frequencies a bubble was transformed into what appears to be the so-called two-tailed type. Thus, it appears that hydrodynamic instability plays a role in interchanging vortex breakdown types, and a comparison with available stability theories is discussed.

  9. Locating Initial Breakdown Pulses of Lightning Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Betz, H.; Wieczorek, G.

    2010-12-01

    Lightning flashes often begin with a series of bipolar pulses, 1-5 us in width, called initial breakdown pulses or characteristic pulses. In this presentation we show electric field change data of initial breakdown pulses collected with a network of 5 flat-plate antennas with a bandwidth of 0 - 5 MHz. These pulses were obtained at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the summer of 2010. The (x, y, z, t) positions of these pulses have been determined using a time of arrival technique [Koshak and Solakiewicz, JGR, 1996] for several lightning flashes. In addition, we also collected magnetic field change data with a LINET system [e.g., Betz et al., GRL, 2004], which consisted of 7 crossed-loop sensors having a bandwidth of 5 - 200 kHz; the pulse locations detected by this system were also determined by time of arrival. The locations of the initial breakdown pulses from both systems will be compared to locations of VHF lightning sources made with the KSC LDAR2 system (with a center frequency of 63 MHz and a bandwidth of 6 MHz). Possible implications of the pulse locations derived from the three different sets of sensors on lightning initiation and propagation will be discussed.

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  12. Breakdown analysis of multilayer amorphous silicon photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian

    1993-06-01

    The breakdown mechanism of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been investigated. It has been shown that the acceptance of the surface potential of an a-Si:H photoreceptor is very sensitive to the micro-roughness of the substrate surface. This is because the junction between the metal substrate (usually aluminum) and the blocking layer (p+ or n+ a-Si:H) is strongly affected by the micro-roughness of the substrate surface. A model is proposed to expound this phenomenon, which indicates that the existence of micro- defects on the substrate surface results in the bending of the metal-semiconductor junction at these defect positions; that is, the original parallel plane junction changes into a spherical abrupt junction. Compared to the former, the curved junction has a lower breakdown voltage, therefore, it will more easily break down at these defect positions during charging. An a-Si:H photoreceptor was prepared on the drum substrate half covered with a thin aluminum film to confirm the model. The experiment result was qualitatively in agreement with the analysis mentioned above. In addition, the effects of PVD-like deposition processes (e.g., high power or high argon diluted silane deposition) on the microstructure and breakdown of a-Si:H photoreceptors are reviewed.

  13. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  14. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  15. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, Milic M.; Denic, Dragan B.; Pejovic, Momcilo M.; Nesic, Nikola T.; Vasovic, Nikola

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  16. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices.

    PubMed

    Pejović, Milić M; Denić, Dragan B; Pejović, Momčilo M; Nešić, Nikola T; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  17. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  18. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  19. Discrimination of microbiological samples using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu, Jin; Bossu, Myriam; Jovelet, Julien; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Amodeo, Tanguy; Fréjafon, Emeric; Laloi, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the authors have analyzed five different species of bacterium. Line emissions from six trace mineral elements, Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, and Fe, have been clearly detected. Their intensities correspond to relative concentrations of these elements contained in the analyzed samples. The authors demonstrate that the concentration profile of trace elements allows unambiguous discrimination of different bacteria. Quantitative differentiation has been made by representing bacteria in a six-dimension hyperspace with each of its axis representing a detected trace element. In such hyperspace, representative points of different species of bacterium are gathered in different and distinct volumes.

  20. The protein ORF80 from the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus binds highly site-specifically to double-stranded DNA and represents a novel type of basic leucine zipper protein

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, Georg; Ibanez, Pablo; Stroessenreuther, Thomas; Hekimian, Katya; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    The cryptic high copy number plasmid pRN1 from the thermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus islandicus shares three conserved open reading frames with other S.islandicus plasmids. One of the open reading frames, namely orf80, encodes a 9.5 kDa protein that has no homology to any characterised protein. Recombinant ORF80 purified from Escherichia coli binds to double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner as suggested by EMSA experiments and DNase I footprints. Two highly symmetrical binding sites separated by ∼60 bp were found upstream of the orf80 gene. Both binding sites contain two TTAA motifs as well as other conserved bases. Fluorescence measurements show that short duplex DNAs derived from a single binding site sequence are bound with submicromolar affinity and moderate cooperativity by ORF80. On DNA fragments carrying both binding sites, a rather large protein–DNA complex is formed in a highly cooperative manner. ORF80 contains an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a highly basic domain at its C-terminus. Compared to all known basic leucine zipper proteins the order of the domains is reversed in ORF80. ORF80 may therefore constitute a new subclass of basic leucine zipper DNA-binding proteins. PMID:11812827

  1. The cell proliferation-associated antigen of antibody Ki-67: a very large, ubiquitous nuclear protein with numerous repeated elements, representing a new kind of cell cycle-maintaining proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The antigen defined by mAb Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein the expression of which is strictly associated with cell proliferation and which is widely used in routine pathology as a "proliferation marker" to measure the growth fraction of cells in human tumors. Ki-67 detects a double band with apparent molecular weights of 395 and 345 kD in immunoblots of proteins from proliferating cells. We cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA, identified two differentially spliced isoforms of mRNA with open reading frames of 9,768 and 8,688 bp encoding for this cell proliferation-associated protein with calculated molecular weights of 358,761 D and 319,508 D, respectively. New mAbs against a bacterially expressed part and a synthetic polypeptide deduced from the isolated cDNA react with the native Ki-67 antigen, thus providing a circle of evidence that we have cloned the authentic Ki-67 antigen cDNA. The central part of the Ki-67 antigen cDNA contains a large 6,845-bp exon with 16 tandemly repeated 366-bp elements, the "Ki-67 repeats", each including a highly conserved new motif of 66 bp, the "Ki-67 motif", which encodes for the epitope detected by Ki-67. Computer analysis of the nucleic acid and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Ki-67 antigen confirmed that the cDNA encodes for a nuclear and short-lived protein without any significant homology to known sequences. Ki-67 antigen-specific antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 cell line cells, indicating that the Ki-67 antigen may be an absolute requirement for maintaining cell proliferation. We conclude that the Ki-67 antigen defines a new category of cell cycle-associated nuclear nonhistone proteins. PMID:8227122

  2. Magnetic control of breakdown: Toward energy-efficient hollow-cathode magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Kumar, S.; Zong, X. X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-03-15

    Characteristics of electrical breakdown of a planar magnetron enhanced with an electromagnet and a hollow-cathode structure, are studied experimentally and numerically. At lower pressures the breakdown voltage shows a dependence on the applied magnetic field, and the voltage necessary to achieve the self-sustained discharge regime can be significantly reduced. At higher pressures, the dependence is less sensitive to the magnetic field magnitude and shows a tendency of increased breakdown voltage at the stronger magnetic fields. A model of the magnetron discharge breakdown is developed with the background gas pressure and the magnetic field used as parameters. The model describes the motion of electrons, which gain energy by passing the electric field across the magnetic field and undergo collisions with neutrals, thus generating new bulk electrons. The electrons are in turn accelerated in the electric field and effectively ionize a sufficient amount of neutrals to enable the discharge self-sustainment regime. The model is based on the assumption about the combined classical and near-wall mechanisms of electron conductivity across the magnetic field, and is consistent with the experimental results. The obtained results represent a significant advance toward energy-efficient multipurpose magnetron discharges.

  3. Nanolaminates: increasing dielectric breakdown strength of composites.

    PubMed

    Fillery, Scott P; Koerner, Hilmar; Drummy, Lawrence; Dunkerley, Erik; Durstock, Michael F; Schmidt, Daniel F; Vaia, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    Processable, low-cost, high-performance hybrid dielectrics are enablers for a vast array of green technologies, including high-temperature electrical insulation and pulsed power capacitors for all-electric transportation vehicles. Maximizing the dielectric breakdown field (E(BD)), in conjunction with minimization of leakage current, directly impacts system performance because of the field's quadratic relationship with electrostatic energy storage density. On the basis of the extreme internal interfacial area and ultrafine morphology, polymer-inorganic nanocomposites (PNCs) have demonstrated modest increases in E(BD) at very low inorganic loadings, but because of insufficient control of the hierarchal morphology of the blend, have yielded a precipitous decline in E(BD) at intermediate and high inorganic volume fractions. Here in, we demonstrate that E(BD) can be increased up to these intermediate inorganic volume fractions by creating uniform one-dimensional nanocomposites (nanolaminates) rather than blends of spherical inorganic nanoparticles and polymers. Free standing nanolaminates of highly aligned and dispersed montmorillonite in polyvinyl butyral exhibited enhancements in E(BD) up to 30 vol % inorganic (70 wt % organically modified montmorillonite). These relative enhancements extend up to five times the inorganic fraction observed for random nanoparticle dispersions, and are anywhere from two to four times greater than observed at comparable volume fraction of nanoparticles. The breakdown characteristics of this model system suggested a trade-off between increased path tortuosity and polymer-deficient structural defects. This implies that an idealized PNC morphology to retard the breakdown cascade perpendicular to the electrodes will occur at intermediate volume fractions and resemble a discotic nematic phase where highly aligned, high-aspect ratio nanometer thick plates are uniformly surrounded by nanoscopic regions of polymer.

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  5. Breakdown criteria for nonvacuum Einstein equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Arick

    We generalize a recent "breakdown criterion" result of S. Klainerman and I. Rodnianski, which states roughly that an Einstein vacuum spacetime, given as a CMC foliation, can be extended if the second fundamental form and the derivative of the lapse of the foliation are uniformly bounded. We adapt this theorem and its proof to Einstein-scalar and Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes. In particular, we deal with additional issues resulting from nontrivial Ricci curvature and the coupling between the Einstein and the field equations. The results we prove can be directly extended to Einstein-Klein-Gordon and Einstein-Yang-Mills spacetimes.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  7. Kinetic theory of runaway air-breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  8. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A. ); Gurevich, A.V. ); Tunnell, T. ); Milikh, G.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The kinetic theory for an air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper [Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992)] is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  9. Time-dependent MOS breakdown. [of Na contaminated capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Bates, E. T.; Maserjian, J.

    1976-01-01

    A general model for time-dependent breakdown in metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) structures is developed and related to experimental measurements on samples deliberately contaminated with Na. A statistical method is used for measuring the breakdown probability as a function of log time and applied field. It is shown that three time regions of breakdown can be explained respectively in terms of silicon surface defects, ion emission from the metal interface, and lateral ion diffusion at the silicon interface.

  10. Effect of droplet-induced breakdown on CARS temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D. ); Switzer, G.L. ); Obringer, C.A.; Jackson, T. )

    1990-07-20

    This research examines the potential for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) to rovide reliable gas temperature measurements in the presence of liquid droplets. The droplets cause dielectric breakdown by focusing the CARS laser beams. This breakdown produces a plasma that can disrupt or obscure the CARS signal. Specifically, we examine the influence of laser induced breakdown on the CARS signal, and we determine the importance of droplet position relative to the CARS focal volume and droplet concentration on the reliability of CARS temperature measurements in droplet-laden flows. In addition, we propose a reliable data reduction procedure to minimize the disruptive influence of laser induced breakdown on CARS temperature.

  11. Laser radiation attenuation by sparks of optical breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitskii, O. A.

    1989-06-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases. Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  12. Laser Radiation Attenuation By Sparks Of Optical Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitsky, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases, Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  13. Simulations of avalanche breakdown statistics: probability and timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Jo Shien; Tan, Chee Hing; David, John P. R.

    2010-04-01

    Important avalanche breakdown statistics for Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs), such as avalanche breakdown probability, dark count rate, and the distribution of time taken to reach breakdown (providing mean time to breakdown and jitter), were simulated. These simulations enable unambiguous studies on effects of avalanche region width, ionization coefficient ratio and carrier dead space on the avalanche statistics, which are the fundamental limits of the SPADs. The effects of quenching resistor/circuit have been ignored. Due to competing effects between dead spaces, which are significant in modern SPADs with narrow avalanche regions, and converging ionization coefficients, the breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics from different avalanche region widths are fairly close to each other. Concerning avalanche breakdown timing at given value of breakdown probability, using avalanche material with similar ionization coefficients yields fast avalanche breakdowns with small timing jitter (albeit higher operating field), compared to material with dissimilar ionization coefficients. This is the opposite requirement for abrupt breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics. In addition, by taking band-to-band tunneling current (dark carriers) into account, minimum avalanche region width for practical SPADs was found to be 0.3 and 0.2 μm, for InP and InAlAs, respectively.

  14. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  15. Locating Preliminary Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lightning flashes often begin with a series of bipolar pulses, 1-5 us in width, called initial breakdown pulses or characteristic pulses. In 2010 we showed that these pulses can be located (find x, y, z, t) using Time of arrival method (TOA) [Koshak and Solakiewicz, JGR, 1996]. Electric field change data was obtained at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the summer of 2010 at 5 stations with a band width of 0-0.5MHz and time accuracy of 1us. We concluded that in order to increase the accuracy positions; time accuracy, band width and number of stations should be increased. In summer of 2011, we placed electric field change meters with band width of 0-5Mhz and time accuracy of 0.1us at the KSC. We have doubled the number of stations (10 stations). We use TOA technique with different algorithm to locate positions of beginning pulses with greater accuracy. The locations will be compared to locations of VHF lightning sources made with the KSC LDAR2 system (which has a center frequency of 63 MHz and a bandwidth of 6 MHz). A monte-carlo method will be used to calculate the error of the locations. A statistical comparison between our TOA positions and LDAR2 positions will be presented along with possible physical connections between the preliminary breakdown pulses, the LDAD2 sources, and the developing lightning leader.

  16. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  17. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  18. Effect of sample preparation on the discrimination of bacterial isolates cultured in liquid nutrient media using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between 2 genera of gram-negative bacteria and 2 genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination relies primarily ...

  19. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients.

  20. Confusion and its dynamics during device comprehension with breakdown scenarios.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sidney; Graesser, Art

    2014-09-01

    The incidence and dynamics of confusion during complex learning and problem solving were investigated in an experiment where participants first read illustrated texts on everyday devices (e.g., an electric bell) followed by breakdown scenarios reflecting device malfunctions (e.g., "When a person rang the bell there was a short ding and then no sound was heard"). The breakdown scenarios were expected to trigger impasses and put participants in a state of cognitive disequilibrium where they would experience confusion and engage in effortful confusion resolution activities in order to restore equilibrium. The results confirmed that participants reported more confusion when presented with the breakdown scenarios compared to control scenarios that involved focusing on important device components in the absence of malfunctions. A second-by-second analysis of the dynamics of confusion yielded two characteristic trajectories that distinguished participants who partially resolved their confusion from those who remained confused. Participants who were successful in partial confusion resolution while processing the breakdowns outperformed their counterparts on knowledge assessments after controlling for scholastic aptitude, engagement, and frustration. This effect was amplified for those who were highly confused by the breakdowns. There was no direct breakdown vs. control effect on learning, but being actively engaged and partially resolving confusion during breakdown processing were positive predictors of increased learning with the breakdown compared to control scenarios. Implications of our findings for theories that highlight the role of impasses, cognitive disequilibrium, and confusion to learning are discussed.

  1. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  2. Modeling optical breakdown in dielectrics during ultrafast laser processing.

    PubMed

    Fan, C H; Longtin, J P

    2001-06-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in micromachining, manufacturing, thin-film formation, and bioengineering applications. During laser ablation the removal of material and quality of the features depend strongly on the optical breakdown region induced by the laser irradiance. The recent advent of amplified ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of less than 1 ps has generated considerable interest because of the ability of the lasers to process virtually all materials with high precision and minimal thermal damage. With ultrashort pulse widths, however, traditional breakdown models no longer accurately capture the laser-material interaction that leads to breakdown. A femtosecond breakdown model for dielectric solids and liquids is presented that characterizes the pulse behavior and predicts the time- and position-dependent breakdown region. The model includes the pulse propagation and small spatial extent of ultrashort laser pulses. Model results are presented and compared with classical breakdown models for 1-ns, 1-ps, and 150-fs pulses. The results show that the revised model is able to model breakdown accurately in the focal region for pulse durations of less than 10 ps. The model can also be of use in estimating the time- and position-resolved electron density in the interaction volume, the breakdown threshold of the material, shielding effects, and temperature distributions during ultrafast processing. PMID:18357333

  3. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  4. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breakdown on component materials. 141.87 Section 141.87 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  6. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Ting-Bi; Hou, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Lu, Ji-Dong; Ding, Hong-Bin; Zeng, Xiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been regarded as a future superstar for chemical analysis for years due to its unique features such as little or no sample preparation, remote sensing, and fast and multi-element analysis. Chinese LIBS community is one of the most dynamically developing communities in the World. The aim of the work is to inspect what have been done in China for LIBS development and, based on the understanding of the overall status, to identify the challenges and opportunities for the future development. In this paper, the scientific contributions from Chinese LIBS community are reviewed for the following four aspects: fundamentals, instrumentation, data processing and modeling, and applications; and the driving force of LIBS development in China is analyzed, the critical issues for successful LIBS application are discussed, and in our opinion, the potential direction to improve the technology and to realize large scale commercialization in China is proposed.

  8. State Regulation, Family Breakdown, and Lone Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Using a range of parish records, records from the Registrar General of Scotland, charity organizations, and media reports, this article contributes to the historiography which evaluates the effects of World War I in Britain as well as the history of lone mothers and their children. It highlights how during the war, women, especially lone mothers, made significant gains through the welfare system, changing approaches to illegitimacy and the plentiful nature of women’s work but also how in doing so this brought them under greater surveillance by the state, local parishes, and charity organizations. Moreover, as this article will demonstrate, many of the gains made by women were short-lived and in fact the war contributed to high levels of family breakdown and gendered and intergenerational poverty endured by lone mothers and their children. PMID:26538794

  9. Runaway breakdown and hydrometeors in lightning initiation.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Karashtin, A N

    2013-05-01

    The particular electric pulse discharges are observed in thunderclouds during the initiation stage of negative cloud-to-ground lightning. The discharges are quite different from conventional streamers or leaders. A detailed analysis reveals that the shape of the pulses is determined by the runaway breakdown of air in the thundercloud electric field initiated by extensive atmospheric showers (RB-EAS). The high amplitude of the pulse electric current is due to the multiple microdischarges at hydrometeors stimulated and synchronized by the low-energy electrons generated in the RB-EAS process. The series of specific pulse discharges leads to charge reset from hydrometeors to the free ions and creates numerous stretched ion clusters, both positive and negative. As a result, a wide region in the thundercloud with a sufficiently high fractal ion conductivity is formed. The charge transport by ions plays a decisive role in the lightning leader preconditioning. PMID:23683210

  10. Vortex Breakdown-Aircraft Tail Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younjong; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    The interaction of vortex breakdown with the tail of an aircraft can lead to severe unsteady loading and vibration. A technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed to characterize the instantaneous and averaged structure of a broken-down vortex with a generic tail configuration. Interaction of the primary (incident) vortex with the tail results in formation of a relatively large-scale cluster of secondary vorticity. The coexistence of these primary and secondary vortical structures is intimately associated with the unsteadiness of the vortex system, and thereby the near-surface fluctuations associated with buffet loading. Instantaneous and averaged representations of the vortex-tail interaction provide insight into the complex physics. Furthermore, a low order POD model is employed to characterize the most energetic modes of the vortex-tail interaction.

  11. Quasiparticle breakdown in a quantum spin liquid.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew B; Zaliznyak, Igor A; Hong, Tao; Broholm, Collin L; Reich, Daniel H

    2006-03-01

    Much of modern condensed matter physics is understood in terms of elementary excitations, or quasiparticles--fundamental quanta of energy and momentum. Various strongly interacting atomic systems are successfully treated as a collection of quasiparticles with weak or no interactions. However, there are interesting limitations to this description: in some systems the very existence of quasiparticles cannot be taken for granted. Like unstable elementary particles, quasiparticles cannot survive beyond a threshold where certain decay channels become allowed by conservation laws; their spectrum terminates at this threshold. Such quasiparticle breakdown was first predicted for an exotic state of matter--super-fluid 4He at temperatures close to absolute zero, a quantum Bose liquid where zero-point atomic motion precludes crystallization. Here we show, using neutron scattering, that quasiparticle breakdown can also occur in a quantum magnet and, by implication, in other systems with Bose quasiparticles. We have measured spin excitations in a two-dimensional quantum magnet, piperazinium hexachlorodicuprate (PHCC), in which spin-1/2 copper ions form a non-magnetic quantum spin liquid, and find remarkable similarities with excitations in superfluid 4He. We observe a threshold momentum beyond which the quasiparticle peak merges with the two-quasiparticle continuum. It then acquires a finite energy width and becomes indistinguishable from a leading-edge singularity, so that excited states are no longer quasiparticles but occupy a wide band of energy. Our findings have important ramifications for understanding excitations with gapped spectra in many condensed matter systems, ranging from band insulators to high-transition-temperature superconductors.

  12. Quasiparticle breakdown in a quantum spin liquid.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew B; Zaliznyak, Igor A; Hong, Tao; Broholm, Collin L; Reich, Daniel H

    2006-03-01

    Much of modern condensed matter physics is understood in terms of elementary excitations, or quasiparticles--fundamental quanta of energy and momentum. Various strongly interacting atomic systems are successfully treated as a collection of quasiparticles with weak or no interactions. However, there are interesting limitations to this description: in some systems the very existence of quasiparticles cannot be taken for granted. Like unstable elementary particles, quasiparticles cannot survive beyond a threshold where certain decay channels become allowed by conservation laws; their spectrum terminates at this threshold. Such quasiparticle breakdown was first predicted for an exotic state of matter--super-fluid 4He at temperatures close to absolute zero, a quantum Bose liquid where zero-point atomic motion precludes crystallization. Here we show, using neutron scattering, that quasiparticle breakdown can also occur in a quantum magnet and, by implication, in other systems with Bose quasiparticles. We have measured spin excitations in a two-dimensional quantum magnet, piperazinium hexachlorodicuprate (PHCC), in which spin-1/2 copper ions form a non-magnetic quantum spin liquid, and find remarkable similarities with excitations in superfluid 4He. We observe a threshold momentum beyond which the quasiparticle peak merges with the two-quasiparticle continuum. It then acquires a finite energy width and becomes indistinguishable from a leading-edge singularity, so that excited states are no longer quasiparticles but occupy a wide band of energy. Our findings have important ramifications for understanding excitations with gapped spectra in many condensed matter systems, ranging from band insulators to high-transition-temperature superconductors. PMID:16525467

  13. Rotation prevents finite-time breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailiang; Tadmor, Eitan

    2004-02-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) convection model augmented with the rotational Coriolis forcing, Ut+ U·∇ xU=2 kU⊥, with a fixed 2 k being the inverse Rossby number. We ask whether the action of dispersive rotational forcing alone, U⊥, prevents the generic finite-time breakdown of the free nonlinear convection. The answer provided in this work is a conditional yes. Namely, we show that the rotating Euler equations admit global smooth solutions for a subset of generic initial configurations. With other configurations, however, finite-time breakdown of solutions may and actually does occur. Thus, global regularity depends on whether the initial configuration crosses an intrinsic, O(1) critical threshold (CT), which is quantified in terms of the initial vorticity, ω0=∇× U0, and the initial spectral gap associated with the 2×2 initial velocity gradient, η0≔ λ2(0)- λ1(0), λj(0)= λj(∇ U0). Specifically, global regularity of the rotational Euler equation is ensured if and only if 4kω 0(α)+η 20(α)<4k 2,∀α∈ R2. We also prove that the velocity field remains smooth if and only if it is periodic. An equivalent Lagrangian formulation reconfirms the CT and shows a global periodicity of velocity field as well as the associated particle orbits. Moreover, we observe yet another remarkable periodic behavior exhibited by the gradient of the velocity field. The spectral dynamics of the Eulerian formulation [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 33 (2001) 930] reveals that the vorticity and the divergence of the flow evolve with their own path-dependent period. We conclude with a kinetic formulation of the rotating Euler equation.

  14. Calpain-mediated androgen receptor breakdown in apoptotic prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanjie; Murthy, Shalini; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Sheng, Shijie; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-12-01

    Since androgen receptor (AR) plays an important role in prostate cancer development and progression, androgen-ablation has been the frontline therapy for treatment of advanced prostate cancer even though it is rarely curative. A curative strategy should involve functional and structural elimination of AR from prostate cancer cells. We have previously reported that apoptosis induced by medicinal proteasome-inhibitory compound celastrol is associated with a decrease in AR protein levels. However celastrol-stimulated events contributing to this AR decrease have not been elucidated. Here, we report that a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, including proteasome inhibitors, a topoisomerase inhibitor, DNA-damaging agents and docetaxel that cause cell death, decrease AR levels in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. This decrease in AR protein levels was not due to the suppression of AR mRNA expression in these cells. We observed that a proteolytic activity residing in cytosol of prostate cancer cells is responsible for AR breakdown and that this proteolytic activity was stimulated upon induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor celastrol- and chemotherapeutic drug VP-16-stimulated AR breakdown was attenuated by calpain inhibitors calpastatin and N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-methioninal. Furthermore, AR proteolytic activity pulled down by calmodulin-agarose beads from celastrol-treated PC-3 cells showed immunoreactivity to a calpain antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate calpain involvement in proteasome inhibitor-induced AR breakdown, and suggest that AR degradation is intrinsic to the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

  15. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  16. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  17. Does Initial Leaf Chemistry Affect the Contribution of Insects, Fungi, and Bacteria to Leaf Breakdown in a Lowland Tropical Stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon, M.; Pringle, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    We examined effects of initial leaf chemistry of six common riparian species on the relative contribution of fungi, bacteria, and invertebrates to leaf breakdown in a lowland stream in Costa Rica. We hypothesized that fungi and bacteria would contribute more to the breakdown of species with low concentrations of secondary (tannins and phenolics) and structural (cellulose and lignin) compounds, while invertebrates would be more important in the processing of species with high concentrations of secondary and structural compounds. We incubated single species leaf bags of six common riparian species, representing a range in secondary and structural compounds, in a third-order stream at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We measured leaf chemistry during the breakdown process. We determined fungal biomass using ergosterol methods, bacteria using DAPI counts, and invertebrate biomass using length-weight regressions. We then used biomass estimates for each group to determine their contribution to the overall breakdown process. Breakdown rates ranged from very fast (Trema integerima, k = 0.23 day-1) to slow (Zygia longifolia , k = 0.011 day-1). While analyses are still under way, preliminary results support our initial hypothesis that fungi contribute more to the break down of leaves from tree species with low concentrations of secondary and structural compounds.

  18. Evidences of endocytosis via caveolae following blood-brain barrier breakdown by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    PubMed

    Soares, Edilene Siqueira; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Irazusta, Silvia Pierre; Coope, Andressa; Stávale, Leila Miguel; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2014-09-17

    Spider venoms contain neurotoxic peptides aimed at paralyzing prey or for defense against predators; that is why they represent valuable tools for studies in neuroscience field. The present study aimed at identifying the process of internalization that occurs during the increased trafficking of vesicles caused by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom (PNV)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Herein, we found that caveolin-1α is up-regulated in the cerebellar capillaries and Purkinje neurons of PNV-administered P14 (neonate) and 8- to 10-week-old (adult) rats. The white matter and granular layers were regions where caveolin-1α showed major upregulation. The variable age played a role in this effect. Caveolin-1 is the central protein that controls caveolae formation. Caveolar-specialized cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane sub-domains are involved in endocytosis, transcytosis, mechano-sensing, synapse formation and stabilization, signal transduction, intercellular communication, apoptosis, and various signaling events, including those related to calcium handling. PNV is extremely rich in neurotoxic peptides that affect glutamate handling and interferes with ion channels physiology. We suggest that the PNV-induced BBB opening is associated with a high expression of caveolae frame-forming caveolin-1α, and therefore in the process of internalization and enhanced transcytosis. Caveolin-1α up-regulation in Purkinje neurons could be related to a way of neurons to preserve, restore, and enhance function following PNV-induced excitotoxicity. The findings disclose interesting perspectives for further molecular studies of the interaction between PNV and caveolar specialized membrane domains. It proves PNV to be excellent tool for studies of transcytosis, the most common form of BBB-enhanced permeability.

  19. Representing Substantive Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Fred N.; Stewart, James

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of Schwab's "substantive structures" of a discipline in terms of science philosophy. Presents three techniques for representing substantive structures and discusses some of their uses in science education research. (SK)

  20. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  1. Representing properties locally.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  2. Behavioral and spermatogenic hybrid male breakdown in Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Clark, M E; O'Hara, F P; Chawla, A; Werren, J H

    2010-03-01

    Several reproductive barriers exist within the Nasonia species complex, including allopatry, premating behavioral isolation, postzygotic inviability and Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility. Here we show that hybrid males suffer two additional reproductive disadvantages, an inability to properly court females and decreased sperm production. Hybrid behavioral sterility, characterized by a reduced ability of hybrids to perform necessary courtship behaviors, occurs in hybrids between two species of Nasonia. Hybrid males produced in crosses between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti courted females at a reduced frequency (23-69%), compared with wild-type N. vitripennis and N. giraulti males (>93%). Reduced courtship frequency was not a simple function of inactivity among hybrids. A strong effect of cytoplasmic (mitochondrial) background was also found in N. vitripennis and N. giraulti crosses; F2 hybrids with giraulti cytoplasm showing reduced ability at most stages of courtship. Hybrids produced between a younger species pair, N. giraulti and N. longicornis, were behaviorally fertile. All males possessed motile sperm, but sperm production is greatly reduced in hybrids between the older species pair, N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. This effect on hybrid males, lowered sperm counts rather than nonfunctional sperm, is different from most described cases of hybrid male sterility, and may represent an earlier stage of hybrid sperm breakdown. The results add to previous studies of F2 hybrid inviability and behavioral sterility, and indicate that Wolbachia-induced hybrid incompatibility has arisen early in species divergence, relative to behavioral sterility and spermatogenic infertility.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  4. High Voltage Breakdown Levels in Various EPC Potting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm, David S.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews exploration activities at JPL into various potting materials. Since high power space-borne microwave transmitters invariably use a vacuum tube as a final power amplifier, and this tube requires high electrode voltages for operation. The associated high voltage insulation typically represents a significant fraction of the mass of the transmitter. Since mass is always a premium resource on board spacecraft, we have been investigating materials with the potential to reduce the mass required for our applications here at JPL. This paper describes electrical breakdown results obtained with various potting materials. Conathane EN-11 (polyurethane) is the traditional HVPS encapsulant at JPL, but due to temperature limitations and durability issues it was deemed inappropriate for the particular application (i.e., CloudSat radar). The choices for the best available materials were epoxies, or silicones. Epoxies are too rigid, and were deemed inadvisable. Two silicones were further investigated (i.e.,ASTM E595- 93e2: GE RTV566(R) and Dow Corning 93-500X(R), another compound was considered (i.e., DC material, Sylgard 184(R)). "Loading" (adding filler materials) the potting compound will frequently alter the final material properties. Powdered alumina and borosilicate glass known as "microballoons" were investigated as possible loading materials. The testing of the materials is described. Each of the two loading materials offers advantages and disadvantages. The advantages and disadvantages are described.

  5. The representative animal

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The anthropocentric approach to the study of animal behavior uses representative nonhuman animals to understand human behavior. This approach raises problems concerning the comparison of the behavior of two different species. The datum of behavior analysis is the behavior of humans and representative animal phenotypes. The behavioral phenotype is the product of the ontogeny and phylogeny of each species, and this requires that contributions of genotype as well as behavioral history to experimental performance be considered. Behavior analysis tends to favor the ontogenetic over the phylogenetic component, yet both components are responsible for the performance of each individual animal. This paper raises questions about the role of genotype variables in the use of representative animals to understand human behavior. Examples indicating the role of genotype in human behavior are also discussed. The final section of the paper deals with considerations of genotype in the design of animal experiments. PMID:22478186

  6. Implications of dielectric breakdown weathering for the lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) penetrate the lunar regolith to depths of ~1 mm and cause deep dielectric charging. The greatest charging occurs in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs), where temperatures make the electrical conductivity extremely low, which inhibits dissipating the charge buildup. Charging by very large SEP events may create subsurface electric fields that are strong enough to cause dielectric breakdown, or sparking, in the upper ~1 mm. Previous work has shown that, in PSRs, this breakdown weathering may have affected 10-25% of the meteoritically gardened regolith in PSRs and may thus be comparable to meteoritic weathering. But even regolith at lower latitudes can reach temperatures <100 K at night, causing it to dissipate charging in a few days--still enough to allow significant charging during large SEP events. Consequently, regolith at lower latitudes may also be susceptible to breakdown. We show how up to a few percent of gardened regolith at lower latitudes may have experienced breakdown. We also estimate the percentage of regolith that experienced breakdown during the two events detected in January and March 2012 by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Finally, we discuss what this more global view of breakdown weathering implies about the possibility of Apollo and Luna soil samples containing material that may have experienced breakdown.

  7. Environmental representative program

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, B.P.

    1984-05-01

    As new pollution regulations are created and existing regulations are made more complex, it is becoming more important for plant personnel to have a knowlege of the environment. The Environmental Representative Program is designed to train plant personnel and is aimed at preventing fines, citations, and negative publicity. The goal of the program is on-going daily compliance assurance, and is divided into two segments: 1) program initiation (general considerations, representative selection, and authorization by management); and 2) program implementation (requirements training, responsibilities development, incorporation into annual goals, and program maintenance). A discussion of how each part of the program is accomplished is presented.

  8. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  9. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  10. Observations of fast VHF-bright positive breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Positive breakdown during lightning discharges is generally considered to be weak and slowly propagating, as high speed video observations show it to be optically weak, and studies of the development of cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) flashes show development in the negative charge region to be slow. With the proper instrumentation, however, fast positive breakdown is a relatively common feature of both CG and IC flashes. The breakdown is bright at VHF, but is smoothly continuous so that time-of-arrival VHF mapping systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array are usually unable to detect or locate its occurrence. However, the breakdown is easily locatable using interferometric mapping techniques. Such an interferometer was developed at NM Tech in the 1980s and used in the CaPE studies at Kennedy Space Center in 1991, where it observed fast (1-6 × 107 m/s), VHF-bright positive leaders propagating away from the source region of negative CG return strokes (Shao et al., 1995). Here we report new observations of fast positive breakdown, obtained with Langmuir Laboratory's flash-continuous broadband VHF interferometer, that confirm and substantially expand our understanding of the phenomena. Numerous examples have been observed following return strokes of negative CG flashes, including bolt-from-blue discharges, and during K-processes of both IC and CG flashes. The breakdown typically propagates a few kilometers at speeds on the order of 107 m/s and frequently produces some of the brightest radiation of the flash. A particularly interesting feature of the breakdown is that it propagates into regions of previously un-ionized air. Then following the breakdown, frequently no further VHF emission is seen along or beyond its channel, indicating that the channel formed is not conducting. But on occasion, especially during cloud-to-ground flashes, the end of the fast positive breakdown turns into a normal, slowly propagating positive leader.

  11. Mentoring: A Representative Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Cheryl S.

    This annotated bibliography provides a representative sample of the available literature on mentoring. It reviews both qualitative and quantitative research, and covers specific mentoring programs, program implementation, and testimonials to the benefits of mentoring. Materials covered include 40 journal articles, conference papers, books, and…

  12. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  13. Electrical Breakdown in a Martian Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. I.; Nelson, E.

    2003-01-01

    The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely result in airborne dust that is highly charged. On Earth, potential gradients up to 5 kV/m have been recorded and in some cases resulted in lightning. Although the Martian atmosphere is not conducive to lightning generation, it is widely believed that electrical discharge in the form of a corona occurs. In order to understand the breakdown of gases, Paschen measurements are taken which relate the minimum potential required to spark across a gap between two electrodes. The minimum potential is plotted versus the pressure-distance value for electrodes of a given geometry. For most gases, the potential decreases as the pressure decreases. For CO2, the minimum in the curve happens to be at Mars atmospheric pressures (5-7 mm Hg) for many distances and geometries. However, a very small amount (<0.1%) of mixing gases radically changes the curve, as noted by Leach. Here, we present the first experimental results of a Paschen curve for a Mars gas mixture compared with 100% pure CO2.

  14. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  15. Magnetic breakdown in double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Harff, N.E. |; Simmons, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Boebinger, G.S.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    The authors find that a sufficiently large perpendicular magnetic field (B{sub {perpendicular}}) causes magnetic breakdown (MB) in coupled double quantum wells (QWs) that are subject to an in-plane magnetic field (B{sub {parallel}}). B{sub {parallel}} shifts one QW dispersion curve with respect to that of the other QW, resulting in an anticrossing and an energy gap. When the gap is below the Fermi level the resulting Fermi surface (FS) consists of two components, a lens-shaped inner orbit and an hour-glass shaped outer orbit. B{sub {perpendicular}} causes Landau level formation and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations for each component of the FS. MB occurs when the magnetic forces from B{sub {perpendicular}} become dominant and the electrons move on free-electron circular orbits rather than on the lens and hour-glass orbits. MB is observed by identifying the peaks present in the Fourier power spectrum of the longitudinal resistance vs. 1/B{sub {perpendicular}} at constant B{sub {parallel}}, an arrangement achieved with an in-situ tilting sample holder. Results are presented for two strongly coupled GaAs/AlGaAs DQW samples.

  16. Nanopore fabrication by controlled dielectric breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Harold; Briggs, Kyle; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Nanofabrication techniques for achieving dimensional control at the nanometer scale are generally equipment-intensive and time-consuming. The use of energetic beams of electrons or ions has placed the fabrication of nanopores in thin solid-state membranes within reach of some academic laboratories, yet these tools are not accessible to many researchers and are poorly suited for mass-production. Here we describe a fast and simple approach for fabricating a single nanopore down to 2-nm in size with sub-nm precision, directly in solution, by controlling dielectric breakdown at the nanoscale. The method relies on applying a voltage across an insulating membrane to generate a high electric field, while monitoring the induced leakage current. We show that nanopores fabricated by this method produce clear electrical signals from translocating DNA molecules. Considering the tremendous reduction in complexity and cost, we envision this fabrication strategy would not only benefit researchers from the physical and life sciences interested in gaining reliable access to solid-state nanopores, but may provide a path towards manufacturing of nanopore-based biotechnologies.

  17. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  18. Novel laser breakdown spectrometer for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Lee, Wonwoo; Martyshkin, Dmitri V.; Mirov, Olga D.; Randolph, Jeremy J.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Orlovskii, Yurii V.; Alimov, Olimkhon K.; Vorob'ev, Ivan N.

    1999-11-01

    A novel experimental set-up using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for environmental analyses of heavy metals is described in this paper. It is based on state-of-the-art spectroscopic equipment, advanced detectors, and laser atomizers: a 0.75 m spectrometer ARC-750, intensified TE- cooled 256 X 1024 CCD camera, probe with fiber optic guide for signal transportation, and Nd:YAG laser plasma atomizers with two different methods for sample delivery. In the first method the liquid solution containing the atoms to be investigated is drawn into the chamber of the nebulizer. The mixture passes through the nozzle, accompanied by argon gas along with formed aerosol, and enters the plasma plume, which is generated by the laser spark in argon. The second method is based on direct generating of the plasma in the water jet of a continuously circulating sample. LIBS testing of samples containing Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cr ions was compared with results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Initial indications showed good agreement between these two methods. Detection levels of less than 100 ppb were observed for copper and chromium. The described spectroscopic system exhibits high sensitivity, accumulation of luminescence spectrum in real time; and high dynamic range for concentrations detection from 100 ppb to 1000 ppm.

  19. On the Evolution of Localized Disturbances and their Spanwise Interactions Leading to Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi

    2007-01-01

    Localized disturbances in a laminar boundary layer represent a more realistic model of transition than the extensively studies, two or quasi three-dimensional perturbations regardless of the fact if they evolve in a linear manner or not. Localized disturbances can originate by surface imperfections, insects or dust. The disturbances can be harmonic (i.e. containing a single frequency and a complete set of spanwise wave numbers) or Pulsed (i.e. containing a band of streamwise and spanwise wave numbers). At sufficiently low amplitudes localized disturbances behave according to a linear stability model. It is highly probably that in a natural transition process such localized disturbances will overslap and interact. These interactions could either delay transition because of a partial wave cancellation resulting in an attenuation of the disturbance, or adversely enhance it by promoting nonlinear interactions. The nonlinearity could be simply amplitude dependent or cause a triad resonance. Nonlinear processes in a wave packet lead to breakdown and to the formation of turbulent spots. When the amplitude of the harmonic disturbance saturates, nonlinear processes widen the band of the lower amplified frequencies adjacent to the frequency of excitation. Experimental results describing the spanwise interactions of harmonic and pulsed localized disturbances leading to breakdown will be presented and discussed. A comparison to the evolution and breakdown of a single localized disturbance will be provided.

  20. Fast vacuum slag analysis in a steel works by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, V.; Schmitz, H.-U.; Reuter, T.; Fleige, R.; Noll, R.

    2008-10-01

    Samples taken from the liquid slag layer in a vacuum degasser station of a steel works are analyzed after solidification by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any further sample preparation. The mass fractions of the major components of the vacuum slags are in the range of 50-60% for CaO, 0.5-12% for SiO 2 and 20-40% for Al 2O 3. The species are distributed heterogeneously in the solid samples having diameters of 35 mm. Furthermore the color and structure of the samples is varying significantly. A fast spatial averaging of representative sample areas is realized by spatial laser beam shaping. Multivariate calibration and its validation is carried out with calibration and validation sets of production samples which are analyzed by X-ray fluorescence measurements or as borate beads for reference. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument is installed in the steel works at a distance of about 10 m from the vacuum degasser. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis runs automatically after the sample placement and it takes 80 s including data transfer to the host computer of the steel works. Operational tests are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of a fast slag analysis in the harsh environment of the vacuum degasser plant.

  1. Breakdown simulations in a focused microwave beam within the simplified model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-07-01

    The simplified model is proposed to simulate numerically air breakdown in a focused microwave beam. The model is 1D from the mathematical point of view, but it takes into account the spatial non-uniformity of microwave field amplitude along the beam axis. The simulations are completed for different frequencies and different focal lengths of microwave beams. The results demonstrate complicated regimes of the breakdown evolution which represents a series of repeated ionization waves. These waves start at the focal point and propagate towards incident microwave radiation. The ionization wave parameters vary during propagation. At relatively low frequencies, the propagation regime of subsequent waves can also change qualitatively. Each next ionization wave is less pronounced than the previous one, and the breakdown evolution approaches the steady state with relatively small plasma density. The ionization wave parameters are sensitive to the weak source of external ionization, but the steady state is independent on such a source. As the beam focal length decreases, the stationary plasma density increases and the onset of the steady state occurs faster.

  2. The anabolic response to a meal containing different amounts of protein is not limited by the maximal stimulation of protein synthesis in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J; Azhar, Gohar; Ferrando, Arny A; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    We have determined whole body protein kinetics, i.e., protein synthesis (PS), breakdown (PB), and net balance (NB) in human subjects in the fasted state and following ingestion of ~40 g [moderate protein (MP)], which has been reported to maximize the protein synthetic response or ~70 g [higher protein (HP)] protein, more representative of the amount of protein in the dinner of an average American diet. Twenty-three healthy young adults who had performed prior resistance exercise (X-MP or X-HP) or time-matched resting (R-MP or R-HP) were studied during a primed continuous infusion of l-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and l-[(2)H2]tyrosine. Subjects were randomly assigned into an exercise (X, n = 12) or resting (R, n = 11) group, and each group was studied at the two levels of dietary protein intake in random order. PS, PB, and NB were expressed as increases above the basal, fasting values (mg·kg lean body mass(-1)·min(-1)). Exercise did not significantly affect protein kinetics and blood chemistry. Feeding resulted in positive NB at both levels of protein intake: NB was greater in response to the meal containing HP vs. MP (P < 0.00001). The greater NB with HP was achieved primarily through a greater reduction in PB and to a lesser extent stimulation of protein synthesis (for all, P < 0.0001). HP resulted in greater plasma essential amino acid responses (P < 0.01) vs. MP, with no differences in insulin and glucose responses. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance improves with greater protein intake above that previously suggested to maximally stimulating muscle protein synthesis because of a simultaneous reduction in protein breakdown. PMID:26530155

  3. D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH UPCOILER. BACKUP ROLLS, 40 TONS. WORK ROLLS, 20 TONS., C. 1900. OPERATING SPEED, 600'/MINUTE. AUTOMATIC GAUGE CONTROL. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  4. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  5. Suppressing the cellular breakdown in silicon supersaturated with titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S.; Hübner, R.; Yuan, Ye; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-06-01

    Hyper doping Si with up to 6 at.% Ti in solid solution was performed by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser annealing and flash lamp annealing. In both cases, the implanted Si layer can be well recrystallized by liquid phase epitaxy and solid phase epitaxy, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of Ti-implanted Si after liquid phase epitaxy shows the so-called growth interface breakdown or cellular breakdown owing to the occurrence of constitutional supercooling in the melt. The appearance of cellular breakdown prevents further recrystallization. However, the out-diffusion and cellular breakdown can be effectively suppressed by solid phase epitaxy during flash lamp annealing due to the high velocity of amorphous-crystalline interface and the low diffusion velocity for Ti in the solid phase.

  6. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  7. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, I. V.; Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  8. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the...

  9. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the...

  10. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the...

  11. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the...

  12. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  13. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-12-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  14. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  15. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  17. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  19. OSMOSE experiment representativity studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-10

    The OSMOSE program aims at improving the neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through measurements in the MINERVE facility at the CEA-Cadarache (France) on samples containing the following separated actinides: Th-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-244 and Cm-245. The goal of the experimental measurements is to produce a database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the separated heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark for integral reactivity-worth measurements to verify and validate reactor analysis codes and integral cross-section values for the isotopes tested. In particular, the OSMOSE experimental program will produce very accurate sample reactivity-worth measurements for a series of actinides in various spectra, from very thermalized to very fast. The objective of the analytical program is to make use of the experimental data to establish deficiencies in the basic nuclear data libraries, identify their origins, and provide guidelines for nuclear data improvements in coordination with international programs. To achieve the proposed goals, seven different neutron spectra can be created in the MINERVE facility: UO2 dissolved in water (representative of over-moderated LWR systems), UO2 matrix in water (representative of LWRs), a mixed oxide fuel matrix, two thermal spectra containing large epithermal components (representative of under-moderated reactors), a moderated fast spectrum (representative of fast reactors which have some slowing down in moderators such as lead-bismuth or sodium), and a very hard spectrum (representative of fast reactors with little moderation from reactor coolant). The different spectra are achieved by changing the experimental lattice within the MINERVE reactor. The experimental lattice is the replaceable central part of MINERVE, which establishes the spectrum at the sample location. This configuration

  20. Extrapolation of electrical breakdown currents from the laboratory to Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Carruth, Melvin R., Jr.; Katz, Ira; Mandell, Myron J.; Jongeward, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted in a plasma chamber at NASA/MSFC on anodized aluminum coatings representative of Space Station Freedom design show that if the aluminum used as a thermal control coating is biased more than 80 V negative with respect to the plasma, the anodization will experience dielectric breakdown. As the thin anodization layer creates a capacitive charge buildup, large currents are observed during the arc. How plasma generation at the arc site can support large currents and discharge the surface charge layer is investigated. The importance for Space Station Freedom is that currents similar to those observed in the laboratory can be observed on orbit.

  1. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  2. Role of delayed nuclear envelope breakdown and mitosis in Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Tram, Uyen; Sullivan, William

    2002-05-10

    The bacterium Wolbachia manipulates reproduction in millions of insects worldwide; the most common effect is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). We found that CI resulted from delayed nuclear envelope breakdown of the male pronucleus in Nasonia vitripennis. This caused asynchrony between the male and female pronuclei and, ultimately, loss of paternal chromosomes at the first mitosis. When Wolbachia were present in the egg, synchrony was restored, which explains suppression of CI in these crosses. These results suggest that Wolbachia target cell cycle regulatory proteins. A striking consequence of CI is that it alters the normal pattern of reciprocal centrosome inheritance in Nasonia.

  3. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  4. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in swirling jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billant, Paul; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Patrick

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the various breakdown states taking place in a swirling water jet as the swirl ratio S and Reynolds number Re are varied. A pressure-driven water jet discharges into a large tank, swirl being imparted by means of a motor which sets into rotation a honeycomb within a settling chamber. The experiments are conducted for two distinct jet diameters by varying the swirl ratio S while maintaining the Reynolds number Re fixed in the range 300Breakdown is observed to occur when S reaches a well defined threshold Sc[approximate]1.3 1.4 which is independent of Re and nozzle diameter used. This critical value is found to be in good agreement with a simple criterion derived in the same spirit as the first stage of Escudier & Keller's (1983) theory. Four distinct forms of vortex breakdown are identified: the well documented bubble state, a new cone configuration in which the vortex takes the form of an open conical sheet, and two associated asymmetric bubble and asymmetric cone states, which are only observed at large Reynolds numbers. The two latter configurations differ from the former by the precession of the stagnation point around the jet axis in a co-rotating direction with respect to the upstream vortex flow. The two flow configurations, bubble or cone, are observed to coexist above the threshold Sc at the same values of the Reynolds number Re and swirl parameter S. The selection of breakdown state is extremely sensitive to small temperature inhomogeneities present in the apparatus. When S reaches Sc, breakdown gradually sets in, a stagnation point appearing in the downstream turbulent region of the flow and slowly moving upstream until it reaches an equilibrium location. In an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, the breakdown threshold displays hysteresis lying in the ability of the breakdown state to remain stable for Sbreakdown, i.e. when 0

  5. Quenching of vortex breakdown oscillations via harmonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Cui, Y. D.; Marques, F.; Lim, T. T.

    Vortex breakdown is a phenomenon inherent to many practical problems, such as leading-edge vortices on aircraft, atmospheric tornadoes, and flame-holders in combustion devices. The breakdown of these vortices is associated with the stagnation of the axial velocity on the vortex axis and the development of a near-axis recirculation zone. For large enough Reynolds number, the breakdown can be time-dependent. The unsteadiness can have serious consequences in some applications, such as tail-buffeting in aircraft flying at high angles of attack. There has been much interest in controlling the vortex breakdown phenomenon, but most efforts have focused on either shifting the threshold for the onset of steady breakdown or altering the spatial location of the recirculation zone. There has been much less attention paid to the problem of controlling unsteady vortex breakdown. Here we present results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of vortex breakdown in an enclosed cylinder in which low-amplitude modulations of the rotating endwall that sets up the vortex are used as an open-loop control. As expected, for very low amplitudes of the modulation, variation of the modulation frequency reveals typical resonance tongues and frequency locking, so that the open-loop control allows us to drive the unsteady vortex breakdown to a prescribed periodicity within the resonance regions. For modulation amplitudes above a critical level that depends on the modulation frequency (but still very low), the result is a periodic state synchronous with the forcing frequency over an extensive range of forcing frequencies. Of particular interest is the spatial form of this forced periodic state: for modulation frequencies less than about twice the natural frequency of the unsteady breakdown, the oscillations of the near-axis recirculation zone are amplified, whereas for modulation frequencies larger than about twice the natural frequency the oscillations of the recirculation

  6. 42GHz ECRH assisted Plasma Breakdown in tokamak SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. K.; Pradhan, S.; Patel, Paresh; Babu, Rajan; Patel, Jatin; Patel, Harshida; Dhorajia, Pragnesh; Tanna, V.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Gupta, Manoj; Joisa, Shankar; Gupta, C. N.; Danial, Raju; Singh, Prashant; Jha, R.; Bora, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SST-1, 42GHz ECRH system has been commissioned to carry out breakdown and heating experiments at 0.75T and 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic fields. The 42GHz ECRH system consists of high power microwave source Gyrotron capable to deliver 500kW microwave power for 500ms duration, approximately 20 meter long transmission line and a mirror based launcher. The ECRH power in fundamental O-mode & second harmonic X-mode is launched from low field side (radial port) of the tokamak. At 0.75T operation, approximately 300 kW ECH power is launched in second harmonic X-mode and successful ECRH assisted breakdown is achieved at low loop_voltage ~ 3V. The ECRH power is launched around 45ms prior to loop voltage. The hydrogen pressure in tokamak is maintained ~ 1×10-5mbar and the pre-ionized density is ~ 4×1012/cc. At 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic field, the ECH power is launched in fundamental O-mode. The ECH power at fundamental harmonic is varied from 100 kW to 250 kW and successful breakdown is achieved in all ECRH shots. In fundamental harmonic there is no delay in breakdown while at second harmonic ~ 40ms delay is observed, which is normal in case of second harmonic ECRH assisted breakdown.

  7. Aerosol-induced laser breakdown thresholds: wavelength dependence.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, R G; Chylek, P; Jarzembski, M; Creegan, E; Srivastava, V; Fernandez, G; Pendleton, J D; Biswas, A

    1988-03-01

    Aerosol-induced loser breakdown thresholds have been measured for liquid droplets at wavelengths lambda= 1.064, 0.532, 0.355, 0.266 microm using a Nd:YAG laser with 5-10-ns pulse duration. Breakdown thresholds are 2-3 orders of magnitude below those for clean air and range from 4 x 10(7) to 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2) for nominal 50-microm diam droplets, depending on laser wavelength and droplet composition. Thresholds decrease with decreasing wavelength; they also decrease for droplets having a higher real refractive index. For water droplets the breakdown threshold intensity varies approximately as lambda(0.5). The wavelength dependence of breakdown thresholds can be qualitatively explained by considering (1) the effect of enhancement of internal fields and energy density within and near droplets and (2) the increasing importance of multiphoton absorption processes at shorter wavelengths. Laser transmission losses through the breakdown plasma and observations of the suppression of stimulated Raman scattering by the addition of small quantitites of absorbing material to water and carbon tetrachloride droplets are also reported.

  8. Detectable initial breakdown pulses and the following discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Lu, W.; Zheng, D.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown which was descripted by so-called BIL model is an important discharge process. Bipolar pulses as important signals of initial breakdown process, were usually used in the research. However, the detectability of the pulses is different in different researches. At the same time, the discharge process from initial breakdown to return stroke is not always the simple BIL model. In the research, using electric field waveforms of lightning discharges observed in Beijing and Guangzhou, the detectable initial breakdown (preliminary breakdown, PB) pulses and the following discharges are analyzed. The results show that, (1) Although, the percentage of detectable PB pulse trains is just as a function of latitude in large range of latitude, the values are similar in Beijing and Guangzhou, which indicate that the characteristic of storm also play a key role in detectable PB besides the latitude. (2)According to the difference in discharge process of following PB pulse, three discharge types, which exhibits PB pulses followed by inverted IC, hybrid flash, leader and RS, can be identified. And the fourth type only exhibits a RS waveform without detectable PB pulses. (3)The discharge with undetectable PB pulse is dominant in Beijing and Guangzhou. But the percentage of each discharge type is obvious different in the two regions. The occurrence of different discharge types and different percentage in Beijing and Guangzhou can be contributed to the difference in low positive charge region.

  9. Delta Wing Vortex Breakdown Suppression by Vortex Core Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Charles

    2000-11-01

    The flow over a delta wing is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices that can undergo a sudden radial expansion at high angles of attack known as vortex breakdown. Downstream of this breakdown is a region of organized unsteady flow that can cause tail buffeting and structural fatigue, especially on twin-tailed aircraft. The recent self-induction theory of vortex breakdown points to the "pile-up" of vorticity due to the linear addition of vorticity in the spiraling shear layer that surrounds the vortex core as a principal cause of vortex breakdown (Kurosaka 1998). Based on that theory, this research attempts to relieve vorticity pile-up by altering the straight-line path of the vortex core and preventing the linear addition of vorticity. This is accomplished by applying a combination of periodic blowing and suction with low mass and momentum flux. The blowing and suction are directed normal to the low-pressure surface and supplied from ports under the vortex core which are near the forward tip of the delta wing. This oscillating input causes the vortex core to transition into a spiral formation downstream of the input ports. Initial results indicate that this change in the vortex core path may prevent vortex breakdown over the surface of the delta wing.

  10. Chlorophyll breakdown and chlorophyll catabolites in leaves and fruit†

    PubMed Central

    Kräutler, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Chlorophyll metabolism probably is the most visible manifestation of life. Total annual turnover of chlorophyll has been estimated to involve more than 1000 million tons. Surprisingly, chlorophyll catabolism has remained an enigma until less than twenty years ago, when a colorless chlorophyll catabolite from senescent plant leaves was identified and its structure was elucidated. In the meantime, chlorophyll breakdown products have been identified in a variety of plant leaves and their structural features have been elucidated. Most recently, chlorophyll breakdown products have also been identified in some ripening fruit. Chlorophyll breakdown in vascular plants only fleetingly involves enzyme-bound colored intermediates. The stage of fluorescent catabolites is also passed rapidly, as these isomerize further to colorless nonfluorescent tetrapyrrolic catabolites. The latter accumulate in the vacuoles of de-greened leaves and are considered the final products of controlled chlorophyll breakdown. The same tetrapyrroles are also found in ripening fruit and are effective antioxidants. Chlorophyll breakdown leads to tetrapyrroles that appear to have physiologically beneficial chemical properties, and it may thus not merely be a detoxification process. PMID:18846275

  11. Children and Family Breakdown. Report on a WHO Meeting (Kiel, West Germany, December 4-7, 1984). EURO Reports and Studies 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This booklet is the report of the Working Group on Children and Family Breakdown: The Positive Role of Nurses and Midwives, which was convened by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe and was attended by members of health disciplines, representatives of community groups, and journalists from the nursing and popular press. These…

  12. Thermoelastic stresses on airless bodies and implications for rock breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Jamie; Byrne, Shane

    2015-04-01

    Thermomechanical breakdown of rocks is thought to be an active process in the solar system, especially on airless bodies that experience large diurnal temperature changes and/or have high thermal cycling rates. Researchers have suggested it may operate on (among others) the Earth, Moon, Mercury, Eros, and Phaethon, however the extent of the damage produced as a result is unknown. Propagation of microcracks occurs due to stresses from expansion/contraction caused by changes in temperature, and mismatches in elastic behavior of adjacent mineral grains. Here we link surface temperatures to actual stresses near rock surfaces in order to better judge the efficacy of thermal weathering on different planetary bodies. Modeling of grain scale thermoelastic behavior on airless bodies provides insight into the magnitude and distribution of stresses produced. In this study, we imposed solar and conductive fluxes on a microstructure over one solar day, and solved the heat and displacement equations. The microstructures are grids of hexagonal grains that are assigned properties of plagioclase and pyroxene. Results indicate that lunar surfaces experience a diurnal maximum stress of 150 MPa while under tension. Examination of the microstructures during this state reveals that maximum stresses are concentrated along surface-parallel boundaries between mineral types, suggesting that temperature and rock heterogeneity dominate thermoelastic behavior. Examination of microstructures over time reveals an anti-correlation between high stresses and large spatiotemporal temperature gradients, indicating that they are not an effective proxy for grain scale stress. Model runs done for arbitrary solar system bodies with varying rotation period and solar distance indicate that bodies that rotate slowly and/or are close to the sun are subjected to the highest stresses. This suggests that certain groups of asteroids, particularly NEAs, may be highly susceptible to thermal breakdown. For example

  13. Optoelectronic switching in diamond and optical surface breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, E I; Tarasenko, V F

    2008-03-31

    The optoelectronic switching in two natural diamond samples of type 2-A is studied at voltages up to 1000 V and the energy density of control 60-ns, 308-nm laser pulses up to 0.6 J cm{sup -2}. It is shown that the design of a diamond switch affects the switching efficiency. When the energy density exceeds 0.2 J cm{sup -2} and the interelectrode surface is completely illuminated, the surface breakdown is initiated by UV radiation, which shunts the current flow through the diamond crystal. When the illumination of the interelectrode surface is excluded, the surface breakdown does not occur. The threshold radiation densities sufficient for initiating the surface breakdown are determined for electric field strengths up to 10 kV cm{sup -1}. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  15. Fundamentals of undervoltage breakdown through the Townsend mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain, DC discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The phenomenon is relevant to fundamental understanding of breakdown physics, to switching applications such as triggered spark gaps and discharge initiation in pulsed-plasma thrusters, and to gas-avalanche particle counters. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and solved numerically. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low avalanche-ionization gain, when an electron undergoes fewer than approximately 10 ionizing collisions during one gap transit. It is also found that fewer injected electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (alpha process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the alpha process to electric field is enhanced by decreasing the reduced electric field (electric field divided by pressure, E/p). A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space charge distortion is greatest. A dimensionless, theoretical study of the development of this avalanche reveals a critical value of the reduced electric field to be the value at the Paschen curve minimum divided by 1.6. Below this value, the net result of the electric field distortion is to increase ionization for subsequent avalanches, making undervoltage breakdown possible. Above this value, ionization for subsequent avalanches will be suppressed and undervoltage breakdown is not possible. Using an experimental apparatus in which ultraviolet laser pulses are directed onto a photo-emissive cathode of a parallel-plate discharge gap, it is found that undervoltage breakdown can occur through a Townsend-like mechanism through the buildup of successively larger avalanche generations. The minimum number of injected

  16. Establishing Causality in Complex Human Interactions: Identifying Breakdowns of Intentionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodison, Peter; Johnson, Peter; Thoms, Joanne

    People in complex scenarios face the challenge of understanding the purpose and effect of other human and computational behaviour on their own goals through intent recognition. They are left asking what caused person or system ‘x’ to do that? The necessity to provide this support human-computer interaction has increased alongside the deployment of autonomous systems that are to some degree unsupervised. This paper aims to examine intent recognition as a form of decision making about causality in complex systems. By finding the needs and limitations of this decision mechanism it is hoped this can be applied to the design of systems to support the awareness of information cues and reduce the number of intent recognition breakdowns between people and autonomous systems. The paper outlines theoretical foundations for this approach using simulation theory and process models of intention. The notion of breakdowns is then applied to intent recognition breakdowns in a diary study to gain insight into the phenomena.

  17. Dielectric breakdown studies of Teflon perfluoroalkoxy at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suthar, J. L.; Laghari, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Teflon perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) was evaluated for use as a dielectric material in high-temperature high-voltage capacitors for space applications. The properties that were characterized included the dc dielectric strength at temperatures up to 250 C and the permittivity and dielectric loss as a function of frequency, temperature and voltage. To understand the breakdown mechanism taking place at high temperatures, the pre-breakdown discharge and conduction currents, and the dependence of dielectric strength on thickness of the film were determined. Confocal laser microscopy was performed to diagnose for microimperfections within the film structure. The results obtained show a significant decrease in the dielectric strength and an increase in dielectric loss with an increase in temperature, suggesting that impulse thermal breakdown could be a responsible mechanism in PFA film at temperatures above 150 C.

  18. Surface Breakdown Characteristics of Silicone Oil for Electric Power Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Junichi; Nakajima, Akitoshi; Miyahara, Hideyuki; Takuma, Tadasu; Okabe, Shigemitu; Kohtoh, Masanori; Yanabu, Satoru

    This paper describes the surface breakdown characteristics of the silicone oil which has the possibility of the application to innovative switchgear as an insulating medium. At the first step, we have experimentally studied on the impulse breakdown characteristics of the configuration with a triple-junction where a solid insulator is in contact with the electrode. The test configurations consist of solid material (Nomex and pressboard) and liquid insulation oil (silicone and mineral oil). We have discussed the experimental results based on the maximal electric field at a triple-junction. As the second step, we have studied the configuration which may improve the surface breakdown characteristics by lowering the electric field near the triple-junction.

  19. Transient apical breakdown following subluxation injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Boyd, K S

    1995-02-01

    Transient apical breakdown has been reported to occur in cases in which a periapical radiolucency develops and resolves without treatment following luxation injury. Diagnostic errors are inevitable if periapical breakdown is used as the sole criterion or as an overriding criterion in the decision to initiate root canal treatment. A clinical case report is presented in which transient apical breakdown occurred after a subluxation injury. The threshold to sensitivity tests increased yet sensitivity remained positive with the appearance of the periapical radiolucency. The decision was made not to initiate root canal treatment in spite of the radiographic appearance periapically. At the 10-month recall the tooth remained responsive to sensitivity tests and the apical radiolucency had disappeared.

  20. Reversible electrical breakdown of squid giant axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Benz, R; Conti, F

    1981-07-01

    Charge pulse relaxation experiments were performed on squid giant axon. In the low voltage range, the initial voltage across squid axon membrane was a linear function of the injected charge. For voltages of the order of 1 V this relationship between injected charge and voltage across the membrane changes abruptly. Because of a high conductance state caused by these large electric fields the voltage across the membrane cannot be made large enough to exceed a critical value, Vc, defined as the breakdown voltage, Vc has for squid axon membrane a value of 1.1 V at 12 degrees C. During breakdown the specific membrane conductance exceeds 1 S. cm-2. Electrical breakdown produced by charge pulses of few microseconds duration have no influence on the excitability of the squid axon membrane. The resealing process of the membrane is so fast that a depolarizing breakdown is followed by the falling phase of a normal action potential. Thus, membrane voltages close to Vc open the sodium channels in few microseconds, but do not produce a decrease of the time constant of potassium activation large enough to cause the opening of a significant percentage of channels in a time of about 10 mus. It is probable that the reversible electrical breakdown is mainly caused by mechanical instability produced by electrostriction of the membrane (electrochemical model), but the decrease in the Born energy for ion injection into the membrane, accompanying the decrease in membrane thickness, may play also an important role. Because of the high conductance of the membrane during breakdown it seems very likely that this results in pore formation.

  1. Rf breakdown studies in copper electron linac structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of rf breakdown-limited electric fields observed in experimental linac structures at SLAC and a discussion of how these experiments can be interpreted against the background of existing, yet incomplete, theories. The motivation of these studies, begun in 1984, is to determine the maximum accelerating field gradients that might be used safely in future e/sup /+-// colliders, to contribute to the basic understanding of the rf breakdown mechanism, and to discover if a special surface treatment might make it possible to supersede the field limits presently reachable in room temperature copper structures. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Electrical breakdown of soil under nonlinear pulsed current spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Pecherkin, V. Ya; Vetchinin, S. P.; Panov, V. A.; Son, E. E.; Efimov, B. V.; Danilin, A. N.; Kolobov, V. V.; Selivanov, V. N.; Ivonin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Laboratory investigations on pulsed current spreading from spherical electrodes and evolution of electrical breakdown of silica sand with different water contents under a 15-20 kV voltage pulse were carried out. A sharp nonlinear decrease in the pulsed resistance of soil was observed when the current density exceeded a certain threshold value. Then ionization-overheating instability develops and leads to current contraction and plasma channel formation in the soil. The method for determination of the threshold electric field for ionization is proposed. Electrical discharge in wet sand was found to develop with a significant delay time for long discharge gaps similar to thermal breakdown.

  3. Ejection of atoms by laser produced optical breakdown plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.R.; Meng, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    High-power CO/sub 2/ laser radiation has been used to study the optical breakdown plasma on various solid targets (NaCl, KBr, ZnSe, and Ge). The breakdown threshold for irreversible changes of the optical characteristics was determined as well as the evaporation threshold of Na atoms from NaCl samples by CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation; the latter value was about 2.8 x 10/sup 7/ W/cm/sup 2/. The time profiles of the ejected Na atoms and the propagation of the atoms in front of the sample was measured with the laser fluorescence method.

  4. Breakdown voltage of discrete capacitors under single-pulse conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingos, H.; Scaturro, J.; Hayes, L.

    1981-01-01

    For electrostatic capacitors the breakdown voltage is inherently related to the properties of the dielectric, with the important parameters being the dielectric field strength which is related to the dielectric constant and the dielectric thickness. These are not necessarily related to the capacitance value and the rated voltage, but generally the larger values of capacitance have lower breakdown voltages. Foil and wet slug electrolytics can withstand conduction currents pulses without apparent damage (in either direction for foil types). For solid tantalums, damage occurs whenever the capacitor charges to the forming voltage.

  5. A high protein diet upregulated whole-body protein turnover during energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of higher protein diets and sustained energy deficit (ED) on whole-body protein turnover (WBPTO) are not well described. This study examined whether dietary protein level influences whole-body protein breakdown (Ra), non-oxidative leucine disposal (NOLD), and oxidation (Ox) during ED. ...

  6. A relationship between statistical time to breakdown distributions and pre-breakdown negative differential resistance at nanometric scale

    SciTech Connect

    Foissac, R.; Blonkowski, S.; Delcroix, P.; Kogelschatz, M.

    2014-07-14

    Using an ultra-high vacuum Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) current voltage, pre-breakdown negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics are measured together with the time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) distributions of Si/SiON (1.4 and 2.6 nm thick). Those experimental characteristics are systematically compared. The NDR effect is modelled by a conductive filament growth. It is showed that the Weibull TDDB statistic distribution scale factor is proportional to the growth rate of an individual filament and then has the same dependence on the electric field. The proportionality factor is a power law of the ratio between the surfaces of the CAFM tip and the filament's top. Moreover, it was found that, for the high fields used in those experiments, the TDDB acceleration factor as the growth rate characteristic is proportional to the Zener tunnelling probability. Those observations are discussed in the framework of possible breakdown or forming mechanism.

  7. Marital Breakdown, Shame, and Suicidality in Men: A Direct Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The influence of feelings of shame originating from marital breakdown on suicidality is examined. The role of mental health problems as probable mediating factors is also considered. Internalized shame, state (related to separation) shame, and mental health problems were significantly correlated with the score for suicidality during separation in…

  8. Conduction breakdown in lightly doped p-type germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, R. N.; Zhang, Xuesong

    1992-08-01

    In Ge samples with net acceptor concentrations ~1012 cm-3, the hole concentration changes by four orders of magnitude in conduction breakdown at 4.2 K. The data are in good agreement with a hot-carrier model in which the process of impact ionization is in detailed balance with its inverse, Auger recombination.

  9. Effects of streamwise vortex breakdown on supersonic combustion.

    PubMed

    Hiejima, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation study of the combustion structure of streamwise vortex breakdown at Mach number 2.48. Hydrogen fuel is injected into a combustor at sonic speed from the rear of a hypermixer strut that can generate streamwise vortices. The results show that the burning behavior is enhanced at the points of the shock waves that are incident on the vortex and therefore the vortex breakdown in the subsonic region occurs due to combustion. The breakdown domain in the mainstream is found to form a flame-holding region suited to combustion and to lead to a stable combustion field with detached flames. In this way, streamwise vortex breakdown has an essential role in combustion enhancement and the formation of flames that hold under supersonic inflow conditions. Finally, the combustion property defined here is shown to coincide with the produced-water mass flow. This property shows that the amount of combustion is saturated at equivalence ratios over 0.4, although there is a slight increase beyond 1.

  10. Inhibitory effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol breakdown in pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Peppin, J.F.; Tsukamoto, H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the physiological relationship between the phospholipid effect and secretagogue-induced cellular function has begun to be understood. In this study, the authors investigated acute and chronic effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini. Five pairs of male Wistar rats were intragastrically infused for 30 days with high fat diet (25% total calories) plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose. After intoxication, isolated in HEPES media, followed by 30 min incubation with CCK-8 (0, 100, 300 or 600 pM) and ethanol (0 or 100 mM). Acinar lipids were extracted and counted for labeled PI. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into alcoholic acinar PI was reduced to 38.2% of that in controls. A percent maximal PI break down by CCK-8 was similar in the two groups (13-24% of basal). However, the magnitude of PI breakdown was markedly lower in alcoholic acini (482 vs 1081 dpm) due to the decreased PI synthesis rate. The presence of 100 mM ethanol in the media further inhibited the breakdown by 50% in this group. These results strongly indicate that chronic ethanol intoxication inhibits PI synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini, and that this inhibition can be potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  11. A numerical study of three-dimensional vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of bubble-type vortex breakdown using a unique discrete form of the full 3-D, unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was performed. The Navier-Stokes equations were written in a vorticity-velocity form and the physical problem was not restricted to axisymmetric flow. The problem was parametized on a Rossby- Reynolds-number basis. Utilization of this parameter duo was shown to dictate the form of the free-field boundary condition specification and allowed control of axial breakdown location within the computational domain. The structure of the breakdown bubble was studied through time evolution plots of planar projected velocity vectors as well as through plots of particle traces and vortex lines. These results compared favorably with previous experimental studies. In addition, profiles of all three velocity components are presented at various axial stations and a Fourier analysis was performed to identify the dominant circumferential modes. The dynamics of the breakdown process were studied through plots of axial variation of rate of change of integrated total energy and rate of change of integrated enstrophy, as well as through contour plots of velocity, vorticity and pressure.

  12. Using Work Breakdown Structure Models to Develop Unit Treatment Costs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article presents a new cost modeling approach called work breakdown structure (WBS), designed to develop unit costs for drinking water technologies. WBS involves breaking the technology into its discrete components for the purposes of estimating unit costs. The article dem...

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children Adopted after Early Care Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Leadbitter, Kathy; Kay, Catherine; Sharma, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Syndromic autism has been described in children adopted after orphanage rearing. We investigated whether the same existed in children adopted after family breakdown. Families of 54/60 adopted children aged 6-11 years (mean 102 months; SD 20; 45% male) returned screening questionnaires for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 21/54 (39%) screened…

  14. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, H. C.; Furno, E. J.; Sturtz, J. P.

    1980-07-01

    Techniques for examining high voltage breakdowns (HVBs) in vacuum devices are discussed. Photography in conjunction with other diagnostic techniques is used to establish the validity of these techniques. The techniques examined are to measure the voltage applied to the device (or the current through the device) and also to look for X-rays generated by the device during an HVB.

  15. Radio-frequency breakdown in oxygen and synthetic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Zoran Lj; Savic, Marija; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Marija

    2015-09-01

    Parallel plate rf discharges have a long history in the materials processing industry, but much of their behavior is still poorly understood, particularly processes taking place during the breakdown. In order to test some simple models of RF breakdown we have performed detailed simulations using well tested Monte Carlo code that allows also verification against RF and DC benchmarks but also treatment of temporal spatial non-localities. This work contains our simulation results of the breakdown voltage curves in oxygen and synthetic air. At first, electrons were released from the middle of the gap and any further development is due to the applied field, random number generator and solutions of kinetic and balance equations. The obtained results qualitatively agree with the existing experimental and simulation results. In addition, spatial distributions of electron concentration, energy and rates of elastic scattering and ionization are also presented and discussed in light of the processes leading to the breakdown. We analyze the role of low threshold inelastic collisions and non-conservative attachment as compared to the previous results for argon. Supported by MESTD projects ON171037 and III41011.

  16. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51... progresses the color of the affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but...

  18. Controlled electron emission and vacuum breakdown with nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seznec, B.; Dessante, Ph; Caillault, L.; Babigeon, J.-L.; Teste, Ph; Minea, T.

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum electron sources exploiting field emission are generally operated in direct current (DC) mode. The development of nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed power supplies facilitates the emission of compact bunches of electrons of high density. The breakdown level is taken as the highest value of the voltage avoiding the thermo-emission instability. The effect of such ultra-fast pulses on the breakdown voltage and the emitted electron current is discussed as a result of the thermo-emission modelling applied to a significant protrusion. It is found that pulsing very rapidly the vacuum breakdown occurs at higher voltage values than for the DC case, because it rises faster than the heat diffusion. In addition, the electron emission current increases significantly regardless of the theoretical approach is used. A comparative study of this theoretical work is discussed for several different forms of the protrusion (elliptic and hyperbolic) and different metals (hence varying the melting point), particularly refractory (tungsten) versus conductor (titanium). Pulsed mode operation can provide an increase on breakdown voltage (up to 18%) and a significant increase (up to 330%) of the electron extracted current due to its high non-linear dependency with the voltage, for the case for the case with a hyperbolic protrusion.

  19. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-02-22

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM{sub 01} mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects.

  20. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51... progresses the color of the affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but...

  1. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  2. RF Breakdown Studies in X-Band Klystron Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Fowkes, R.; Menegat, A.; Scheitrum, G. P.; Whittum, D. H.

    1997-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of the microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of the linacs. RF breakdown studies are presently being carried out at SLAC with klystron cavities in a traveling wave resonator (TWR). Different kinds of fabrication methods and several kinds of semiconducting and insulating coatings have been applied to X-Band TM01 cavities. RF breakdown thresholds up to 250 MV/m have been obtained. Dark current levels from TiN-coated and single-point diamond turned cavities are two to three orders of magnitude less than those from traditional machined cavities. A new TM020 mode cavity with demountable electrodes will be used to test a variety of other materials, coatings, and processes. In order to get more information about the RF breakdown, a pinhole camera will image the x-ray output from the electrodes. An optical port in the cavity backwall will be used to measure visible and infrared output from the field emission sites on the electrode surfaces.

  3. The chlorophyllases AtCLH1 and AtCLH2 are not essential for senescence-related chlorophyll breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Nicole; Schelbert, Silvia; Kanwischer, Marion; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E; Dörmann, Peter; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2007-11-27

    One important reaction of chlorophyll (chl) breakdown during plant senescence is the removal of the lipophilic phytol moiety by chlorophyllase. AtCLH1 and AtCLH2 were considered to be required for this reaction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we present evidence against this assumption. Using green fluorescent protein fusions, neither AtCLH isoform localizes to chloroplasts, the predicted site of chlorophyll breakdown. Furthermore, clh1 and clh2 single and double knockout lines are still able to degrade chlorophyll during senescence. From our data we conclude that AtCLHs are not required for senescence-related chlorophyll breakdown in vivo and propose that genuine chlorophyllase has not yet been molecularly identified.

  4. EWS-FLI1 impairs aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation by blocking tryptophan breakdown via the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutz, Cornelia N; Schwentner, Raphaela; Kauer, Maximilian O; Katschnig, Anna M; Kromp, Florian; Aryee, Dave N T; Erhardt, Sophie; Goiny, Michel; Alonso, Javier; Fuchs, Dietmar; Kovar, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive pediatric tumor driven by the fusion protein EWS-FLI1. We report that EWS-FLI1 suppresses TDO2-mediated tryptophan (TRP) breakdown in ES cells. Gene expression and metabolite analyses reveal an EWS-FLI1-dependent regulation of TRP metabolism. TRP consumption increased in the absence of EWS-FLI1, resulting in kynurenine and kynurenic acid accumulation, both aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Activated AHR binds to the promoter region of target genes. We demonstrate that EWS-FLI1 knockdown results in AHR nuclear translocation and activation. Our data suggest that EWS-FLI1 suppresses autocrine AHR signaling by inhibiting TDO2-catalyzed TRP breakdown.

  5. Flow-field in a vortex with breakdown above sharp edged delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Nakaya, T.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of vortex-flow, accompanied with breakdown, formed above sharp-edged delta wings, was studied experimentally as well as theoretically. Emphasis is placed particularly on the criterion for the breakdown at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers

  6. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  7. Statistical time lags in low-pressure SF6 breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, G. A.; Ogle, D. B.

    1989-10-01

    Statistical time lags have been measured in a discharge tube containing SF6 at a pressure of 1 Torr, with the aim of determining the source of the electrons which initiate breakdownY`Te,hf cx pressure SF6. Measurements with and without careful shielding of the discharge tube give similar values of mean statistical time lag showing that the initiating electrons are not produced by external radiation. Measurements, in which the time between the 500 successive breakdowns used for a single measurement of mean statistical time lag is increased over the range 1-103 s, provide values of mean statistical time lag which increase over the range 10-5-10-2s: This reveals that the breakdown process is controlled by the time since the discharge produced by a previous breakdown. Data from further such measurements, made for different applied tube voltages, are shown to fit well with the Fowler-Nordheim theory of field emission. The conclusion drawn is that the initiating electrons are produced at the cathode surface by field emission, and that the state of the surface at any time depends primarily on the intensity of the previous discharge and the length of time since it took place. During the time between successive breakdowns, a surface layer on the cathode surface is continually developing and reducing the rate of field emission from the cathode. Although the applied electric fields are well below that required for field emission, microscopic fields exist at protrusions and craters on the cathode surface which are high enough to provide field emission: This is supported by experiments on electron emission made with the discharge tube evacuated below 10-6 Torr.

  8. Detection and Classification of Live and Dead Escherichia coli by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, P.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Taleh, L.; Biddle, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity. Key Words: E. coli—Trace elements—Live and dead cells—Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy—Atomic force microscopy. Astrobiology 15, 144–153. PMID:25683088

  9. A severe form of breakdown in communication in the psychoanalysis of an ill adolescent.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R

    1990-01-01

    The paper focuses on a particularly severe kind of breakdown in communication that can arise in the psychoanalysis of ill adolescents who have experienced a real breakdown in functioning, such as a severe suicide attempt or one or more psychotic breakdowns. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a suicidal and self-mutilating adolescent as an illustration of the theme. Included is a discussion of different types of breakdown in communication. PMID:2365550

  10. An AlGaN/GaN HEMT with enhanced breakdown and a near-zero breakdown voltage temperature coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Gang; Tang, Cen; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qing; Zhang, Bo; Sheng, Kuang; Wai, Tung Ng

    2013-02-01

    An AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with a novel source-connected air-bridge field plate (AFP) is experimentally verified. The device features a metal field plate that jumps from the source over the gate region and lands between the gate and drain. When compared to a similar size HEMT device with a conventional field plate (CFP) structure, the AFP not only minimizes the parasitic gate to source capacitance, but also exhibits higher OFF-state breakdown voltage and one order of magnitude lower drain leakage current. In a device with a gate to drain distance of 6 μm and a gate length of 0.8 μm, three times higher forward blocking voltage of 375 V was obtained at VGS = -5 V. In contrast, a similar sized HEMT with a CFP can only achieve a breakdown voltage no higher than 125 V using this process, regardless of device dimensions. Moreover, a temperature coefficient of 0 V/K for the breakdown voltage is observed. However, devices without a field plate (no FP) and with an optimized conventional field plate (CFP) exhibit breakdown voltage temperature coefficients of -0.113 V/K and -0.065 V/K, respectively.

  11. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called “open mitosis.” In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed “closed mitosis” in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called “anaphase II”) when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This “virtual” nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis. PMID:26870731

  12. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis. PMID:26870731

  13. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  14. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  15. In Vivo Participation of Red Chlorophyll Catabolite Reductase in Chlorophyll Breakdown[W

    PubMed Central

    Pružinská, Adriana; Anders, Iwona; Aubry, Sylvain; Schenk, Nicole; Tapernoux-Lüthi, Esther; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A central reaction of chlorophyll breakdown, porphyrin ring opening of pheophorbide a to the primary fluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (pFCC), requires pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO) and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR), with red chlorophyll catabolite (RCC) as a presumably PAO-bound intermediate. In subsequent steps, pFCC is converted to different fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) and nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs). Here, we show that RCCR-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates RCC and three RCC-like pigments during senescence, as well as FCCs and NCCs. We also show that the stereospecificity of Arabidopsis RCCR is defined by a small protein domain and can be reversed by a single Phe-to-Val exchange. Exploiting this feature, we prove the in vivo participation of RCCR in chlorophyll breakdown. After complementation of RCCR mutants with RCCRs exhibiting alternative specificities, patterns of chlorophyll catabolites followed the specificity of complementing RCCRs. Light-dependent leaf cell death observed in different RCCR-deficient lines strictly correlated with the accumulation of RCCs and the release of singlet oxygen, and PAO induction preceded lesion formation. These findings suggest that RCCR absence causes leaf cell death as a result of the accumulation of photodynamic RCC. We conclude that RCCR (together with PAO) is required for the detoxification of chlorophyll catabolites and discuss the biochemical role(s) for this enzyme. PMID:17237353

  16. In vivo participation of red chlorophyll catabolite reductase in chlorophyll breakdown.

    PubMed

    Pruzinská, Adriana; Anders, Iwona; Aubry, Sylvain; Schenk, Nicole; Tapernoux-Lüthi, Esther; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A central reaction of chlorophyll breakdown, porphyrin ring opening of pheophorbide a to the primary fluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (pFCC), requires pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO) and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR), with red chlorophyll catabolite (RCC) as a presumably PAO-bound intermediate. In subsequent steps, pFCC is converted to different fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) and nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs). Here, we show that RCCR-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates RCC and three RCC-like pigments during senescence, as well as FCCs and NCCs. We also show that the stereospecificity of Arabidopsis RCCR is defined by a small protein domain and can be reversed by a single Phe-to-Val exchange. Exploiting this feature, we prove the in vivo participation of RCCR in chlorophyll breakdown. After complementation of RCCR mutants with RCCRs exhibiting alternative specificities, patterns of chlorophyll catabolites followed the specificity of complementing RCCRs. Light-dependent leaf cell death observed in different RCCR-deficient lines strictly correlated with the accumulation of RCCs and the release of singlet oxygen, and PAO induction preceded lesion formation. These findings suggest that RCCR absence causes leaf cell death as a result of the accumulation of photodynamic RCC. We conclude that RCCR (together with PAO) is required for the detoxification of chlorophyll catabolites and discuss the biochemical role(s) for this enzyme.

  17. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  18. 48 CFR 252.236-7000 - Modification proposals-price breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-price breakdown. 252.236-7000 Section 252.236-7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.236-7000 Modification proposals—price breakdown. As prescribed in 236.570(a), use the following clause: Modification Proposals—Price Breakdown (DEC 1991) (a)...

  19. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  20. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  1. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  2. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ault, Jesse T; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-08-19

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized. PMID:27588859

  3. Physical mechanism of progressive breakdown in gate oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Felix; Lombardo, Salvatore; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The definition of the basic physical mechanisms of the dielectric breakdown (BD) phenomenon is still an open area of research. In particular, in advanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits, the BD of gate dielectrics occurs in the regime of relatively low voltage and very high electric field; this is of enormous technological importance, and thus widely investigated but still not well understood. Such BD is characterized by a gradual, progressive growth of the gate leakage through a localized BD spot. In this paper, we report for the first time experimental data and a model which provide understanding of the main physical mechanism responsible for the progressive BD growth. We demonstrate the ability to control the breakdown growth rate of a number of gate dielectrics and provide a physical model of the observed behavior, allowing to considerably improve the reliability margins of CMOS circuits by choosing a correct combination of voltage, thickness, and thermal conductivity of the gate dielectric.

  4. Critical effects of downstream boundary conditions on vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used to study the critical effects of the downstream boundary conditions on the supersonic vortex breakdown. The present study is applied to two supersonic vortex breakdown cases. In the first case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct, and in the second case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling jet, that is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic jet of lower Mach number, is considered. For the configured duct flow, four different types of downstream boundary conditions are used, and for the swirling jet flow from the nozzle, two types of downstream boundary conditions are used. The solutions are time accurate which are obtained using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme.

  5. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  6. High breakdown-strength composites from liquid silicone rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul; Yu, Liyun; Sager Hassouneh, Suzan; Benslimane, Mohamed; Ladegaard Skov, Anne

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) as dielectric elastomer transducers. Commonly used silicones in this application include room-temperature vulcanisable (RTV) silicone elastomers and composites thereof. Pure LSRs and their composites with commercially available fillers (an anatase TiO2, a core-shell TiO2-SiO2 and a CaCu3Ti4O12 filler) are evaluated with respect to dielectric permittivity, elasticity (Young’s modulus) and electrical breakdown strength. Film formation properties are also evaluated. The best-performing formulations are those with anatase TiO2 nanoparticles, where the highest relative dielectric permittivity of 5.6 is obtained, and with STX801, a core-shell morphology TiO2-SiO2 filler from Evonik, where the highest breakdown strength of 173 V μm-1 is obtained.

  7. Development of microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yuji; Moon, Ahsa; Kaneko, Masashi

    2010-05-01

    We propose microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy with the same measurement and analysis processes as in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, but with a different plasma generation mechanism. The size and lifetime of the plasma generated can contribute to increased measurement accuracy and expand its applicability to industrial measurement, such as an exhaust gas analyzer for automobile engine development and its regulation, which has been hard to operate by laser at an engineering evaluation site. The use of microwaves in this application helps lower the cost, reduce the system size, and increase the ease of operation to make it commercially viable. A microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to enhance the volume and lifetime of the plasma at atmospheric condition even at elevated pressure.

  8. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse T.; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K.; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-08-01

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized.

  9. Unsteady three-dimensional marginal separation, including breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    A situation involving a three-dimensional marginal separation is considered, where a (steady) boundary layer flow is on the verge of separating at a point (located along a line of symmetry/centerline). At this point, a triple-deck is included, thereby permitting a small amount of interaction to occur. Unsteadiness is included within this interaction region through some external means. It is shown that the problem reduces to the solution of a nonlinear, unsteady, partial-integro system, which is solved numerically by means of time-marching together with a pseudo-spectral method spatially. A number of solutions to this system are presented which strongly suggest a breakdown of this system may occur, at a finite spatial position, at a finite time. The structure and details of this breakdown are then described.

  10. Breakdown and defect generation in ultrathin gate oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depas, M.; Vermeire, B.; Heyns, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    In this work the dielectric reliability of thermally grown ultrathin 3 nm SiO2 layers in poly-Si/SiO2/Si structures is examined. This is compared with a study of the defect generation in the 3 nm gate oxide during tunnel injection of electrons. In these ultrathin SiO2 layers, direct tunneling of electrons becomes very important. An increase of the direct tunnel and Fowler-Nordheim tunnel current during high-field stressing was observed and is explained by the creation of a positive charge in the oxide associated with slow interface traps. It is demonstrated that a higher current instability corresponds with a lower charge to breakdown value (QBD) of the oxide. From these results we conclude that the creation of slow interface traps is an important precursor effect for the 3 nm gate oxide breakdown.

  11. Gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    The appearance of resonant structures in metamaterials coupled to plasmas motivates the systematic investigation of gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators over a frequency range of 0.5-9 GHz. In co-planar electrode gaps of 100 μm, the breakdown voltage amplitude decreases from 280 V to 225 V over this frequency range in atmospheric argon. At the highest frequency, a microplasma can be sustained using only 2 mW of power. At 20 mW, we measure a central electron density of 2 × 1020 m-3. The plasma-electrode overlap plays a key role in the microplasma impedance and causes the sheath impedance to dominate the plasma resistance at very low power levels. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  12. The rf breakdown voltage curves-similarity law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savic, Marija; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Marija; Suvakov, Milovan; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) discharges are attracting an increased attention due to their wide applications in many technological processes such as plasma etching for semiconductor materials, thin film deposition and plasma cleaning. One of the crucial problem in optimizing plasma technological process is determination of the plasma operating conditions which can be obtained from the breakdown voltage. It was shown that the RF breakdown voltage curves obey similarity law: Vrf =f(pd,f .d =const), where p is the gas pressure, d is the interelectrode distance and f is t the operating frequency. We have performed calculations in argon by using Monte Carlo code considering only electrons motion. Simulation conditions were based on the experimental conditions. The obtain results confirm similarity law and satisfactorily agree with the available experimental data. This work was supported by the MNTR, Serbia, under Contracts ON171037 and III41011.

  13. Breakdown and discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of runaway electrons (REs) at high values of the ratio field intensity/gas number density {ital E}/{ital N} and {ital N} up to the Loshmidt number {ital N}{sub {ital L}}{approx_equal}2.7{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} is described. REs are shown to govern the breakdown and discharges at such condition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Anisotropic Dielectric Breakdown of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is considered as ideal substrate for 2D material devises. However, the reliability of insulating properties of h-BN itself has not been clarified yet. In this study, the anisotropic dielectric breakdown of h-BN is studied. We have found that the dielectric breakdown in c axis direction using a conductive atomic force microscope proceeded in the layer-by-layer manner. The obtained dielectric field strength was ~12 MV/cm, which is comparable to the conventional SiO2. On the other hand, to estimate the dielectric field strength in a direction perpendicular to c axis, voltage is applied to a relatively thick h-BN (10-60 nm) through Cr/Au electrodes fabricated on the h-BN. We realized that the absorbed water on h-BN significantly affect the IV characters and the breakdown voltage. After the adsorbed water was removed by the heating in vacuum, the dielectric field strength was determined to be ~3 MV/cm, which is the same order as that in c axis direction. This value could be increased when we consider the effect of electric field concentration around the metal electrode. Although the large difference in dielectric filed strength for two directions was initially expected due to the highly-anisotropic layered structure with the van der Waals bonding, it was not the case because the sp2 bonding should be broken for dielectric breakdown regardless of its direction. This research was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas and for Research Activity Start-up by MEXT, Japan.

  15. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy:. AN Application on Multilayered Archeological Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponterio, R.; Trusso, S.; Vasi, C.; Aragona, S.; Mavilia, L.

    2004-10-01

    In this work we show an example of application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in combination with another laser-based technique: Raman micro-spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and glaze on pottery found archaeological excavations in Amendolea castle site (south of Italy in Calabrian peninsula); the objects belong to medieval period. The spectral data indicates the qualitative elemental composition of the examined materials and, in addition, give us useful information on the stratigraphy of the paint layers.

  16. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  18. Accelerated pericyte degeneration and blood-brain barrier breakdown in apolipoprotein E4 carriers with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Matthew R; Rege, Sanket V; Ma, Qingyi; Zhao, Zhen; Miller, Carol A; Winkler, Ethan A; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the entry of neurotoxic blood-derived products and cells into the brain that is required for normal neuronal functioning and information processing. Pericytes maintain the integrity of the BBB and degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The BBB is damaged in AD, particularly in individuals carrying apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) gene, which is a major genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. The mechanisms underlying the BBB breakdown in AD remain, however, elusive. Here, we show accelerated pericyte degeneration in AD APOE4 carriers >AD APOE3 carriers >non-AD controls, which correlates with the magnitude of BBB breakdown to immunoglobulin G and fibrin. We also show accumulation of the proinflammatory cytokine cyclophilin A (CypA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in pericytes and endothelial cells in AD (APOE4 >APOE3), previously shown to lead to BBB breakdown in transgenic APOE4 mice. The levels of the apoE lipoprotein receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), were similarly reduced in AD APOE4 and APOE3 carriers. Our data suggest that APOE4 leads to accelerated pericyte loss and enhanced activation of LRP1-dependent CypA–MMP-9 BBB-degrading pathway in pericytes and endothelial cells, which can mediate a greater BBB damage in AD APOE4 compared with AD APOE3 carriers.

  19. Detecting excess ionizing radiation by electromagnetic breakdown of air

    SciTech Connect

    Granatstein, Victor L.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2010-09-15

    A scheme is proposed for detecting a concealed source of ionizing radiation by observing the occurrence of breakdown in atmospheric air by an electromagnetic wave whose electric field surpasses the breakdown field in a limited volume. The volume is chosen to be smaller than the reciprocal of the naturally occurring concentration of free electrons. The pulse duration of the electromagnetic wave must exceed the avalanche breakdown time (10-200 ns) and could profitably be as long as the statistical lag time in ambient air (typically, microseconds). Candidate pulsed electromagnetic sources over a wavelength range, 3 mm>{lambda}>10.6 {mu}m, are evaluated. Suitable candidate sources are found to be a 670 GHz gyrotron oscillator with 200 kW, 10 {mu}s output pulses and a Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser with 30 MW, 100 ns output pulses. A system based on 670 GHz gyrotron would have superior sensitivity. A system based on the TEA CO{sub 2} laser could have a longer range >100 m.

  20. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  1. Ion behavior and interelectrode breakdown voltage of a drift tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hao; Zhao, Zhong-Jun; Duan, Yi-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    We experimentally studied ion behavior and interelectrode breakdown voltage. The ion behavior of a drift tube directly influences the detection of ion intensity, and then influences the detection sensitivity of a system. Interelectrode voltage and pressure directly influence the ion behavior. Gas discharge between electrodes influences the adjustments required for interelectrode voltage. The experimental results show: ion intensity increases exponentially with the increment of voltage between drift electrodes; ion intensity decreases exponentially as pressure increases; with the increment of pressure, the breakdown voltage at first decreases, and then increases; ion injection has a significant influence on breakdown voltage, and this influence depends on the pressure and shapes of the electrodes. We explain the results above through assumptions and by mathematical methods. Supported by Financial Support from the National Major Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Funds (2011YQ030113), National Recruitment Program of Global Experts (NRPGE), the Hundred Talents Program of Sichuan Province (HTPSP) and the Startup Funding of Sichuan University for Setting up the Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation

  2. Breakdown in vapors of alcohols: methanol and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Sivos, Jelena; Skoro, Nikola; Maric, Dragana; Malovic, Gordana

    2014-10-01

    Breakdown data for vapors of the two simplest alcohols - methanol and ethanol - are presented. The breakdown is achieved between plan-parallel electrodes, where cathode is made of copper and anode is a thin film of platinum deposited on quartz window. Diameter of electrodes is 5.4 cm and electrode gap 1.1 cm. We compare breakdown voltages (Paschen curves) for methyl and ethyl alcohol in the pressure range 0.1--2 Torr. In both vapors, the pressure is kept well below the vapor pressure, to prevent formation of liquid droplets. For each point of Paschen curves corresponding axial profiles of emission are recorded by ICCD camera in visual part of the spectra. Axial intensity distributions reveal important processes of excitation. Both vapors show strong emission peak near the cathode at all pd values covered by measurements, which indicates that excitation by ions and fast neutrals play important role in the discharge. Preliminary spectrally resolved measurements of the discharge structure with optical filters show that dominantly emission comes from CH band at 431 nm. There is a very low intensity of H α emission detected in ethanol vapor at high E/N, while it is much stronger in methanol even at lower E/N. It is interesting to note that H α emission in methanol exhibits exponential increase of intensity from the cathode to the anode, so it comes mainly from excitation by electrons, not heavy particles. Supported by MESTD Projects ON171037 and III41011.

  3. High Breakdown Strength, Multilayer Ceramics for Compact Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, B.; Huebner, W.; Krogh, M.L.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Pate, R.C.; Rinehart, L.F.; Schultz, B.C.; Zhang, S.C.

    1999-07-20

    Advanced ceramics are being developed for use in large area, high voltage devices in order to achieve high specific energy densities (>10 6 J/m 3 ) and physical size reduction. Initial materials based on slip cast TiO2 exhibited a high bulk breakdown strength (BDS >300 kV/cm) and high permittivity with low dispersion (e�100). However, strong area and thickness dependencies were noted. To increase the BDS, multilayer dielectric compositions are being developed based on glass/TiO2 composites. The addition of glass increases the density (�99.8% theoretical), forms a continuous grain boundary phase, and also allows the use of high temperature processes to change the physical shape of the dielectric. The permittivity can also be manipulated since the volume fraction and connectivity of the glassy phase can be readily shifted. Results from this study on bulk breakdown of TiO2 multilayer structures with an area of 2cm 2 and 0.1cm thickness have measured 650 kV/cm. Furthermore, a strong dependence of breakdown strength and permittivity has been observed and correlated with microstructure and the glass composition. This paper presents the interactive effects of manipulation of these variables.

  4. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  5. Theoretical analysis of breakdown probabilities and jitter in single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. L.; Ong, D. S.; Yow, H. K.

    2007-08-01

    A simple random ionization path length model is used to investigate the breakdown probabilities and jitter in single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) with submicron multiplication widths. The simulation results show that increasing the multiplication width may not necessarily increase the breakdown probability relative to the breakdown voltage, as the effect of dead space becomes more dominant in thinner multiplication regions at realistic ionization threshold energies for GaAs. On the other hand, reducing the multiplication width results in smaller breakdown time and jitter, despite the increased dead space. The effect of dead space in degrading breakdown time and jitter is relatively weak and further compensated by the stronger influence of large feedback ionization at high fields. Thus, SPAD designs that can minimize the dark count rate may potentially benefit from enhanced breakdown probability, breakdown time, and jitter by reducing the thickness of the multiplication region.

  6. Numerical simulations of high power microwave dielectric interface breakdown involving outgassing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Cai Libing; Zhu Xiangqin; Wang Yue; Xuan Chun

    2010-06-15

    With the development of high power microwave (HPM) technology, the power and pulse duration of the HPM source increase substantially, the breakdown of the dielectric window of the HPM source feed has been becoming the major factor of limiting the transmission and radiation of HPM. This paper presents an electrostatic particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collisions method for simulating the breakdown on HPM dielectric surface and establishes a physical model of HPM dielectric surface breakdown involving outgassing. The breakdown process including the main physical mechanisms, such as the field emission, multipactor, outgassing, and collision of gas ionization, is simulated. The influence of outgassing on the dielectric window breakdown is studied by simulating the breakdown with different outgassing speeds. The similarity between the dc and HPM dielectric surface breakdown is discussed.

  7. Rational design and evolutional fine tuning of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for biomass breakdown.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Conferring biomass hydrolysis activity on yeast through genetic engineering has paved the way for the development of groundbreaking processes for producing liquid fuels and commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. However, the overproduction and misfolding of heterologous and endogenous proteins can trigger cellular stress, increasing the metabolic burden and retarding growth. Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic breakdown requires engineering of yeast secretory pathway based on system-wide metabolic analysis as well as DNA constructs for enhanced cellulase gene expression with advanced molecular biology tools. Also, yeast is subjected to severe stress due to toxic compounds generated during lignocellulose pretreatment in consolidated saccharification and fermentation processes. The prospect for development of robust yeast strains makes combining evolutionary and rational engineering strategies.

  8. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Microdrop Analysis at subppm Level.

    PubMed

    De Giacomo, Alessandro; Koral, Can; Valenza, Gabriele; Gaudiuso, Rosalba; Dell'Aglio, Marcella

    2016-05-17

    In this paper, nanoparticle enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (NELIBS) was applied to the elemental chemical analysis of microdrops of solutions with analyte concentration at subppm level. The effect on laser ablation of the strong local enhancement of the electromagnetic field allows enhancing the optical emission signal up to more than 1 order of magnitude, enabling LIBS to quantify ppb concentration and notably decreasing the limit of detection (LOD) of the technique. At optimized conditions, it was demonstrated that NELIBS can reach an absolute LOD of few picograms for Pb and 0.2 pg for Ag. The effect of field enhancement in NELIBS was tested on biological solutions such as protein solutions and human serum, in order to improve the sensitivity of LIBS with samples where the formation and excitation of the plasma are not as efficient as with metals. Even in these difficult cases, a significant improvement with respect to conventional LIBS was observed. PMID:27109702

  9. Towards a two-dimensional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy mapping of liquefied petroleum gas and electrolytic oxy-hydrogen flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Hwan; Hahn, H. Thomas; Yoh, Jack J.

    2013-10-01

    Two-dimensional mapping of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal of chemical species information in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and electrolytic oxy-hydrogen (EOH) flames was performed with in situ flame diagnostics. Base LIBS signals averaged from measurements at wavelengths of 320 nm to 350 nm describe the density information of a flame. The CN LIBS signal provides the concentration of fuel, while the H/O signal represents the fuel/air equivalence ratio. Here, we demonstrate the meaningful use of two-dimensional LIBS mappings to provide key combustion information, such as density, fuel concentration, and fuel/air equivalence ratio.

  10. Bovine tuberculosis in Northern Ireland: Risk factors associated with duration and recurrence of chronic herd breakdowns.

    PubMed

    Doyle, L P; Courcier, E A; Gordon, A W; O'Hagan, M J H; Menzies, F D

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated 8058 bovine tuberculosis (bTB) confirmed breakdowns occurring in Northern Ireland during the period 2005-2010 inclusive. The methodology used two case-control studies; one determined the risk factors associated with long duration bTB breakdowns and the other with recurrent bTB breakdowns. The analyses were implemented using a generalized linear mixed model analysis with variables relating to repeated measures on herds, locality and year of breakdown included as random effects. The case definition for long duration breakdowns (n=679) was any confirmed bTB disclosure with duration greater than one year. The case definition for recurrent breakdowns (n=657) was any confirmed bTB disclosure with duration less than one year, followed by two or more bTB breakdowns within 2 years from the end of the initial bTB breakdown. In the multivariable model based on duration of bTB breakdowns, significant factors were local area bTB prevalence, number of associated cattle herds, total years restricted in the previous five years, total number of bTB reactors during the breakdown and the presence of a bTB lesion at routine slaughter (LRS). The number of bTB reactors at the disclosing test was also significant; with increased numbers associated to reduced odds of a long duration breakdown. In the second analysis based on recurrence of bTB breakdowns, high local area prevalence, movement intensity into the herd, total years restricted in the previous five years, herd size, total number of TB reactors during the restricted breakdown and presence of a LRS were all statistically significant. PMID:27544245

  11. Representing Learning With Graphical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models are being used widely in artificial intelligence, for instance, in diagnosis and expert systems, as a unified qualitative and quantitative framework for representing and reasoning with probabilities and independencies. Their development and use spans several fields including artificial intelligence, decision theory and statistics, and provides an important bridge between these communities. This paper shows by way of example that these models can be extended to machine learning, neural networks and knowledge discovery by representing the notion of a sample on the graphical model. Not only does this allow a flexible variety of learning problems to be represented, it also provides the means for representing the goal of learning and opens the way for the automatic development of learning algorithms from specifications.

  12. Non-invasive Technology to Study Local Passivity Breakdown of Metal Alloys in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M. Shipley

    2005-03-09

    Little is known about the basic mechanisms of passive oxide breakdown, repair, and localized corrosion of metals. A non-invasive instrument and methods have been developed to study local events and mechanisms that initiate passivity breakdown and subsequent corrosion of metals in aqueous media. The ''difference viewer imaging technique'' (DVIT) is a rapid, real time, non-invasive assay to study metal surfaces in corrosive solutions. It has a spatial resolution of less than 10.0 ?m (1cm x 1cm sample, 1000 x 1000 pixel CCD) to observe initial corrosion processes of the order of seconds. DVIT is a software-controlled video microscopy system and methods to collect and analyze pixel changes in video images. These images are recorded from a digital CCD video camera and frame grabber package using visible light for illumination. The DVIT system detects changes in video images that represent initial corrosive events that lead to passivity breakdown and re-passivation on metal surfaces in situ. This visual technique is easy to use and apply. It compliments other metal surface measurement techniques and can be used simultaneously with them. DVIT has proven to be more sensitive in detecting changes than scanning microelectrode techniques. DVIT is also much easier than other methods to apply and operate. It has the further advantage of providing a real time image of the entire metal surface under study instead of waiting for a microelectrode to scan a number of data points over a sample then plot the results. This project has fulfilled all specifications as outlined in the Department of Energy solicitation responsible for this grant application and award and exceeded a number of the specifications. Applicable Electronics, Inc. now has a marketable instrument and software package available for sale now. Further development of the system will be ongoing as driven by customer needs and discoveries. This technology has immediate applications in corrosion labs to further study

  13. Breakdowns in coordinated decision making at and above the incident management team level: an analysis of three large scale Australian wildfires.

    PubMed

    Bearman, Chris; Grunwald, Jared A; Brooks, Benjamin P; Owen, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Emergency situations are by their nature difficult to manage and success in such situations is often highly dependent on effective team coordination. Breakdowns in team coordination can lead to significant disruption to an operational response. Breakdowns in coordination were explored in three large-scale bushfires in Australia: the Kilmore East fire, the Wangary fire, and the Canberra Firestorm. Data from these fires were analysed using a top-down and bottom-up qualitative analysis technique. Forty-four breakdowns in coordinated decision making were identified, which yielded 83 disconnects grouped into three main categories: operational, informational and evaluative. Disconnects were specific instances where differences in understanding existed between team members. The reasons why disconnects occurred were largely consistent across the three sets of data. In some cases multiple disconnects occurred in a temporal manner, which suggested some evidence of disconnects creating states that were conducive to the occurrence of further disconnects. In terms of resolution, evaluative disconnects were nearly always resolved however operational and informational disconnects were rarely resolved effectively. The exploratory data analysis and discussion presented here represents the first systematic research to provide information about the reasons why breakdowns occur in emergency management and presents an account of how team processes can act to disrupt coordination and the operational response.

  14. Vacancy condensation as the precursor to passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-05-01

    This paper outlines the events that are envisaged to occur, according to the Point Defect Model (PDM), during ``chemically-induced`` breakdown of the barrier layer on passivated metals and alloys in aqueous environments. The essential hypothesis of the model is that the local generation of cation vacancies at the barrier layer/environment interface, due to the autocatalytic adsorption of a damaging species such as chloride ion into the oxygen vacancy structure, leads to an enhanced flux of cation vacancies across the film. If the vacancies that arrive at the metal/film interface cannot be annihilated by cation ejection from the metal, the vacancies will condense leading to the local decohesion of the barrier layer from the metal. A combination of film dissolution at the barrier layer/environment interface and residual stresses in the oxide film leads to the physical rupture of the film, marking a passivity breakdown event. The PDM accounts for a variety of empirically-established relationships for the nucleation of pits, including the fact that the breakdown voltage (V{sub c}) and induction time (t{sub ind}) are distributed quantities; that V{sub c} = V{sub c}{sup o} - blog (a{sub Cl{minus}}), where b > 2.303RT/F; and that log (t{sub ind}){alpha} 1/{Delta}V, where {Delta}V = V (applied voltage) - V{sub c}. Also, the model has been extended to account for alloying effects and, indeed, new alloys are now being designed on the basis of rules that have been derived from the PDM.

  15. PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

  16. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  17. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  19. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown in large transparent water droplets.

    PubMed

    Chang, R K; Eickmans, J H; Hsieh, W F; Wood, C F; Zhang, J Z; Zheng, J B

    1988-06-15

    Recent experiments on the laser-induced breakdown (LIB) of large transparent liquid droplets are reviewed. A physical model of LIB processes is presented with the aim of integrating the following recent results: (1) the internal and near-field distributions for large transparent spheres; (2) the location of LIB initiation based on spatially resolved plasma emission spectroscopic techniques; (3) spatially resolved but time-averaged density of the plasma plumes and temperature of the atomic species within the plasma; (4) the plasma front propagation velocities inside and outside the droplet; and (5) the fate of the remaining superheated droplet and the expelled material.

  1. The work breakdown structure in software project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A work breakdown structure (WBS) is defined as an enumeration of all work activities in hierarchic refinement of detail which organizes work to be done into short manageable tasks with quantifiable inputs, outputs, schedules, and assigned responsibilities. Some of the characteristics and benefits of the WBS are reviewed, and ways in which these can be developed and applied in software implementation projects are discussed. Although the material is oriented principally toward new-software production tasks, many of the concepts are applicable to continuing maintenance and operations tasks.

  2. Mechanical vibrations induced resonant breakdown of the Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Shevyrin, A. A.; Plotnikov, A. E.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Influence of forced mechanical vibrations of a suspended single-electron transistor on electron tunneling through the quantum dot limited by the Coulomb blockade is investigated. It is shown that mechanical oscillations of the quantum dot lead to the Coulomb blockade breakdown, shown in sharp resonant peaks in the transistor conductance dependence on the excitation frequency at values corresponding to the mechanical oscillations eigen modes. The observed effect is presumably connected with oscillations of the mutual electrical capacitances between the quantum dot and surrounding electrodes.

  3. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in paintings and sculptures research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, A.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Marczak, J.

    2007-07-01

    Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for investigation of chemical constitution and stratigraphy of artworks, and metallic objects with multilayer structures is described in the paper. Physical phenomena accompanying LIBS investigations, especially temporal evolution and spectral lines broadening are described. Operational characteristics of experimental equipment are shown. Results obtained with use of two different echelle spectrometers are compared. Pigments used in oil paintings are analyzed and analysis results are presented. Experimental results of measurements of various objects like paintings, sculptures and artifacts are shown. Works on dating of investigated paintings are described.

  4. Delayed reheating and the breakdown of coherent oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Easther, Richard; Flauger, Raphael; Gilmore, James B. E-mail: raphael.flauger@yale.edu

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the evolution of the perturbations in the inflaton field and metric following the end of inflation. We present accurate analytic approximations for the perturbations, showing that the coherent oscillations of the post-inflationary condensate necessarily break down long before any current phenomenological constraints require the universe to become radiation dominated. Further, the breakdown occurs on length-scales equivalent to the comoving post-inflationary horizon size. This work has implications for both the inflationary ''matching'' problem, and the possible generation of a stochastic gravitational wave background in the post-inflationary universe.

  5. Breakdown of the dipole approximation in strong-field ionization.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, A; Maurer, J; Mayer, B W; Phillips, C R; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2014-12-12

    We report the breakdown of the electric dipole approximation in the long-wavelength limit in strong-field ionization with linearly polarized few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses at intensities on the order of 10¹³ W/cm². Photoelectron momentum distributions were recorded by velocity map imaging and projected onto the beam propagation axis. We observe an increasing shift of the peak of this projection opposite to the beam propagation direction with increasing laser intensities. From a comparison with semiclassical simulations, we identify the combined action of the magnetic field of the laser pulse and the Coulomb potential as the origin of our observations. PMID:25541770

  6. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown via 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. H.; Mege, P.; Morchoisne, Y.

    1990-06-01

    The long term goal is the modeling of vortex breakdown that occurs in some aerodynamic configurations at high angle of attack, (i.e., fighters with highly swept delta wings or missiles). A numerical simulation was made based on solving the 3-D Euler equations for an usteady incompressible flow. Preliminary results were obtained using a pressure-velocity formulation with periodic boundary conditions, the Euler equations being discretized by 2nd order finite difference schemes. The continuation to this work by implementing more realistic boundary conditions and 4th order finite difference discretization schemes are presented.

  7. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  8. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  9. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  10. Application Of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique In Investigation Of Historical Metal Threads

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Khedr, A.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2009-09-27

    Analysis of the composition of an object is a necessary step in the documentation of the properties of this object for estimating its condition. Also this is an important task for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the result of the application of the suggested treatments. There has been an important evolution in the methods used for analysis of metal threads since the second half of the twentieth century. Today, the main considerations of selecting a method are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal threads. In this study various historical metal threads collected from different museums were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal thread samples were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDX) which is reported in conservation field as the best method, to determine the chemical composition, and corrosion of investigated metal threads. The results show that all investigated metal threads in the present study are too dirty, strongly damaged and corroded with different types of corrosion products. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal threads. It is, in fact, very useful tool as a noninvasive method for analysis of historical metal threads. The first few laser shots are very useful for the investigation of the corrosion and dirt layer, while the following shots are very useful and effective for investigating the coating layer. Higher number of laser shots are very useful for the main

  11. The Breakdown of Stored Triacylglycerols Is Required during Light-Induced Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Lan, Jue; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Dodd, Antony N; Larson, Tony; Baker, Alison; Hõrak, Hanna; Kollist, Hannes; He, Zhesi; Graham, Ian; Mickelbart, Michael V; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2016-03-01

    Stomata regulate the uptake of CO2 and the loss of water vapor [1] and contribute to the control of water-use efficiency [2] in plants. Although the guard-cell-signaling pathway coupling blue light perception to ion channel activity is relatively well understood [3], we know less about the sources of ATP required to drive K(+) uptake [3-6]. Here, we show that triacylglycerols (TAGs), present in Arabidopsis guard cells as lipid droplets (LDs), are involved in light-induced stomatal opening. Illumination induces reductions in LD abundance, and this involves the PHOT1 and PHOT2 blue light receptors [3]. Light also induces decreases in specific TAG molecular species. We hypothesized that TAG-derived fatty acids are metabolized by peroxisomal β-oxidation to produce ATP required for stomatal opening. In silico analysis revealed that guard cells express all the genes required for β-oxidation, and we showed that light-induced stomatal opening is delayed in three TAG catabolism mutants (sdp1, pxa1, and cgi-58) and in stomata treated with a TAG breakdown inhibitor. We reasoned that, if ATP supply was delaying light-induced stomatal opening, then the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase should be reduced at this time. Monitoring changes in apoplastic pH in the mutants showed that this was the case. Together, our results reveal a new role for TAGs in vegetative tissue and show that PHOT1 and PHOT2 are involved in reductions in LD abundance. Reductions in LD abundance in guard cells of the lycophyte Selaginella suggest that TAG breakdown may represent an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in light-induced stomatal opening. PMID:26898465

  12. The Nature of Emission from Optical Breakdown Induced by Pulses of fs and ns Duration

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Demange, P; Kucheyev, S; Shirk, M D; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2004-11-09

    Spectral emission from optical breakdown in the bulk of a transparent dielectric contains information about the nature of the breakdown medium. We have made time resolved measurements of the breakdown induced emission caused by nanosecond and femtosecond infrared laser pulses. We previously demonstrated that the emission due to ns pulses is blackbody in nature allowing determination of the fireball temperature and pressure during and after the damage event. The emission due to femtosecond pulse breakdown is not blackbody in nature; two different spectral distributions being noted. In one case, the peak spectral distribution occurs at the second harmonic of the incident radiation, in the other the distribution is broader and flatter and presumably due to continuum generation. The differences between ns and fs breakdown emission can be explained by the differing breakdown region geometries for the two pulse durations. The possibility to use spectral emission as a diagnostic of the emission region morphology will be discussed.

  13. Observation of temporal evolution following laser triggered rf breakdown in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Yingchao; Gai, Wei; Huang, Wenhui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wang, Faya; Yan, Lixin

    2014-07-01

    Radio frequency breakdown is one of the fundamental phenomena that limits the operational performance of most of high power and high gradient vacuum rf devices. We report on experimental results of rf breakdown in an S-band photocathode gun triggered by an intensity controlled laser. Through measurement and analysis of the time dependence of the collected current at the gun exit and the stored rf energy in the cavity, one can gain insight into the time evolution of the rf breakdown process. Multiple breakdowns were observed within one rf pulse due to power flow between cells after the initial emission. Similarities of the laser-triggered breakdowns to those occurring in the course of cavity conditioning and normal operation are found by comparing the postbreakdown signals in both cases. It is shown that an intense laser can offer a more controllable and flexible method for rf breakdown studies.

  14. Peculiarities of formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbanismailov, V. S. Omarov, O. A.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Bairkhanova, M. G.; Kattaa, A. J.

    2011-12-15

    The experimental results on the formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in atmospheric-pressure argon at townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms for different initial conditions are presented. A streamer channel is shown to be initiated by bright luminescence formed at the point of critical avalanche amplification at different distances from the cathode depending on overvoltage. Prebreakdown currents are experimentally measured for the townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms and peculiarities of spark channel formation for these mechanisms are studied.

  15. Correlation among the laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases.

    PubMed

    Bettis, J R

    1992-06-20

    A simple expression is developed that permits a correlation among laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases. It is shown that the breakdown thresholds for the bulk of solid dielectrics, linear liquids, and gases all follow a linear fit to the expression N(2/3)/(n(2) - 1), where N is the atomic number density and n is the refractive index. The gas breakdown threshold versus pressure is compared with the predicted dependence. PMID:20725310

  16. Fully kinetic model of breakdown during sheath expansion after interruption of vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Haoran; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    Research on sheath expansion is critical to the understanding of the dielectric recovery process in a vacuum interrupter after interruption of vacuum arcs. In this paper, we investigated how residual plasma affects breakdown in the sheath expansion period after the current zero. To simulate sheath expansion and breakdown, we developed a fully kinetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model with one spatial dimension and three velocity dimensions. The model accounted for various collisions, including ionization, excitation, elastic collisions, charge exchange, and momentum exchange, and we added an external circuit to the model to make the calculations self-consistent. The existence of metal vapor slowed the sheath expansion in the gap and caused high electric field formation in front of the cathode surface. The initial residual plasma, which was at sufficiently low density, seemed to have a limited impact on breakdown, and the metal vapor dominated the breakdown in this case. Additionally, the breakdown probability was sensitive to the initial plasma density if the value exceeded a specific threshold, and plasma at sufficiently high density could mean that breakdown would occur more easily. We found that if the simulation does not take the residual plasma into account, it could overestimate the critical value of the metal vapor density, which is always used to describe the boundary of breakdown after interruption of vacuum arcs. We discussed the breakdown mechanism in sheath expansion, and the breakdown is determined by a combination of metal vapor, residual plasma, and the electric field in front of the cathode surface.

  17. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown of plasma-exposed porous organosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, M. T.; Sinha, H.; Wiltbank, C. A.; Antonelli, G. A.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2012-03-01

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is a major concern for low-k organosilicate dielectrics. To examine the effect of plasma exposure on TDDB degradation, time-to-breakdown measurements were made on porous SiCOH before and after exposure to plasma. A capillary-array window was used to separate charged particle and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon bombardment. Samples exposed to VUV photons, and a combination of VUV photons and ion bombardment exhibited significant degradation in breakdown time. The samples exposed to VUV photons and ion bombardment showed more degradation in breakdown time in comparison to samples exposed to VUV photons alone.

  18. Electrical breakdown of a bubble in a water-filled capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, P.J.; Leys, C.A.; Vierendeels, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    In this Communication, the electrical breakdown of a static bubble in a water-filled capillary generated in a dc electrical field is studied. We present experimental results which indicate that the liquid layer between capillary and bubble wall can have an important influence on the breakdown mechanism of the bubble. The breakdown electrical field (atmospheric pressure) without a liquid layer in a (vapor) bubble is 18 kV/cm. When a liquid layer is present, the electrical breakdown of an air bubble is observed at electrical fields typically two times smaller. Local plasma formation is observed in this case possibly due to bubble deformation.

  19. Dielectric breakdown of polycrystalline alumina: A weakest-link failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Benjamin

    The effects of varying electrode geometry (ball and ring) and size (radius), dielectric media (castor oil and DialaRTM oil), specimen thickness, and concentration of defects on the dielectric breakdown strength of commercial-grade alumina and high-purity fine-grained (HPFG) alumina were investigated. The breakdown strength was expressed in terms of the maximum electric field in the ceramic at the breakdown voltage calculated by finite element analysis (FEA). The breakdown strength decreased systematically with increasing electrode radius and specimen thickness. The breakdown strength increased with decreasing concentration of defects. The breakdown strength was higher in the Diala RTM oil (dielectric constant, epsilonr = 2.3 +/- 0.12) as compared to the castor oil (epsilonr = 4.59 +/- 0.06). The breakdown strength was higher for the HPFG alumina as compared to the commercial- grade alumina. These effects of the electrode geometry, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the dielectric media were analyzed with a weakest-link failure model employing the Laplace and Weibull distributions for a population of defects in the material. The measured size or scaling effects of the electrodes, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the liquid media on breakdown strength were in better agreement with the Laplace distribution for the population. The measured concentration of surface defects was in good agreement with the concentration of surface defects estimated from the surface area scaling of the breakdown field with the Laplace distribution.

  20. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  1. Coupled ion redistribution and electronic breakdown in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Doo Hyun; Randall, Clive Furman, Eugene Lanagan, Michael

    2015-08-28

    Dielectrics with high electrostatic energy storage must have exceptionally high dielectric breakdown strength at elevated temperatures. Another important consideration in designing a high performance dielectric is understanding the thickness and temperature dependence of breakdown strengths. Here, we develop a numerical model which assumes a coupled ionic redistribution and electronic breakdown is applied to predict the breakdown strength of low-alkali glass. The ionic charge transport of three likely charge carriers (Na{sup +}, H{sup +}/H{sub 3}O{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}) was used to calculate the ionic depletion width in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate which can further be used for the breakdown modeling. This model predicts the breakdown strengths in the 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9 }V/m range and also accounts for the experimentally observed two distinct thickness dependent regions for breakdown. Moreover, the model successfully predicts the temperature dependent breakdown strength for low-alkali glass from room temperature up to 150 °C. This model showed that breakdown strengths were governed by minority charge carriers in the form of ionic transport (mostly sodium) in these glasses.

  2. Breakdown of model aircraft radome dielectric shell in artificial charged aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnikov, A. G.; Chernenskii, L. L.; Orlov, A. V.; Antonenko, S. S.

    2011-10-01

    The breakdown of a model aircraft radome dielectric shell in artificial charged aqueous aerosol clouds has been experimentally studied. It is established that, in most cases, electric breakdown of a model shell takes place without explicit discharge development between a charged aqueous aerosol cloud and a model antenna arranged under the radome shell. The probabilities of the dielectric shell breakdown have been determined for various radome models. A possible mechanism of the shell breakdown in hollow dielectric radomes interacting with charged aqueous aerosol clouds and electric discharges in these clouds is proposed that takes into account the accumulation of charges of opposite signs on the internal and external surface of the radome.

  3. Breakdown in hydrogen and deuterium gases in static and radio-frequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Korolov, I. Donkó, Z.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of a combined experimental and modeling study of the electrical breakdown of hydrogen and deuterium in static (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) electric fields. For the simulations of the breakdown events, simplified models are used and only electrons are traced by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental DC Paschen curve of hydrogen is used for the determination of the effective secondary electron emission coefficient. A very good agreement between the experimental and the calculated RF breakdown characteristics for hydrogen is found. For deuterium, on the other hand, presently available cross section sets do not allow a reproduction of RF breakdown characteristics.

  4. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-05-15

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times.

  5. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  6. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  7. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  8. Breakdown of the few-level approximation in collective systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kiffner, M.; Evers, J.; Keitel, C. H.

    2007-07-15

    The validity of the few-level approximation in dipole-dipole interacting collective systems is discussed. As an example system, we study the archetype case of two dipole-dipole interacting atoms, each modeled by two complete sets of angular momentum multiplets. We establish the breakdown of the few-level approximation by first proving the intuitive result that the dipole-dipole induced energy shifts between collective two-atom states depend on the length of the vector connecting the atoms, but not on its orientation, if complete and degenerate multiplets are considered. A careful analysis of our findings reveals that the simplification of the atomic level scheme by artificially omitting Zeeman sublevels in a few-level approximation generally leads to incorrect predictions. We find that this breakdown can be traced back to the dipole-dipole coupling of transitions with orthogonal dipole moments. Our interpretation enables us to identify special geometries in which partial few-level approximations to two- or three-level systems are valid.

  9. Hydrogen leak detection using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ball, A J; Hohreiter, V; Hahn, D W

    2005-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated as a technique for real-time monitoring of hydrogen gas. Two methodologies were examined: The use of a 100 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced breakdown directly in a sample gas stream, and the use of a 55 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced plasma on a solid substrate surface, with the expanding plasma sampling the gas stream. Various metals were analyzed as candidate substrate surfaces, including aluminum, copper, molybdenum, stainless steel, titanium, and tungsten. Stainless steel was selected, and a detailed analysis of hydrogen detection in binary mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was performed. Both the gaseous plasma and the plasma initiated on the stainless steel surface generated comparable hydrogen emission signals, using the 656.28 Halpha emission line, and exhibited excellent signal linearity. The limit of detection is about 20 ppm (mass) as determined for both methodologies, with the solid-initiated plasma yielding a slightly better value. Overall, LIBS is concluded to be a viable candidate for hydrogen sensing, offering a combination of high sensitivity with a technique that is well suited to implementation in field environments.

  10. Plasma Conductivity and Ionization Growth in Flame Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo-Martinez, Arturo; Hernandez, J. Luis

    2000-10-01

    An investigation into the properties of flame breakdown is reported. A series of DC discharge tests were performed in a set of parallel plane electrodes bridged by flames from a bunsen burner. The experimental setup aims to reproduce the conditions found in waste-disposal reactors where the combined effect of fire and an electrical arc degrade noxious substances. The current was simultaneously monitored in different points of the discharge zone. As the applied voltage is increased, it is found that initially the ionization from the flame controls discharge growth but that in later stages avalanche growth takes over. The slope of the I-V characteristics was used for estimating the Townsend ionization coefficients. The overall plasma conductivity was estimated from both the external circuit measurements and the plasma parameters. The results obtained are compared with previous investigations in which mean discharge resistivity is a relevant parameter, employed for designing applications. The effect of gap separation and height over the burner top were also analyzed. This way it was observed that the temperature profile of the flame dictates the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity and thus of breakdown.

  11. Preliminary Breakdown: Physical Mechanisms and Potential for Energetic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the preliminary breakdown phase of virgin negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning strokes will be presented. Of primary interest are the physical processes responsible for the fast electric field "characteristic" pulses that are often observed during this phase. The pulse widths of characteristic pulses are shown to occur as a superposed bimodal distribution, with the short and long modes having characteristic timescales on the order of 1 microsecond and 10 microseconds, respectively. Analysis of these pulses is based on comparison with laboratory observations of long spark discharge processes and with recently acquired high-speed video observations of a single -CG event. It will be argued that the fast electric field bimodal distribution is the result of conventional discharge processes operating in an extensive strong ambient electric field environment. An important related topic will also be discussed, where it will be argued that preliminary breakdown discharges are capable of generating energetic electrons and may therefore seed relativistic electron avalanches that go on to produce pulsed energetic photon emissions.

  12. Challenges in computational modelling of food breakdown and flavour release.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Simon M; Cleary, Paul W; Eyres, Graham; Sinnott, Matthew D; Lundin, Leif

    2014-11-01

    A dynamic, three dimensional (3D) computational model that predicts the breakdown of food and the release of tastants and aromas could enhance the understanding of how food is perceived during consumption. This model could also shorten the development process of new foods because many virtual foods could be assessed, and discarded if unsuitable, before any physical prototyping is required. The construction and testing of a complete 3D model of mastication presents many challenges including an accurate representation of: the anatomical movements of the oral cavity (including the teeth, tongue, cheeks and palates), the breakdown behaviour of the food, the interactions between comminuted food and saliva as the bolus is formed, the release and transport of taste and aromas and how these physical and chemical processes are perceived by a person. These challenges are discussed in reference to previous experimental and simulation work and using results of new applications of a coupled biomechanical-smoothed particle hydrodynamics (B-SPH) model. The B-SPH model is demonstrated to simulate several complicated aspects of mastication including: (1) the sensitivity of particle size to changes in the movements of the jaw and tongue; (2) large strain behaviour of food due to softening by heating; (3) interactions between solid and liquid food components; (3) the release of tastants into the saliva; and (4) the transport of tastants to the taste buds. These applications show the possibilities of a model to viably simulate mastication, but highlight the many modelling and experimental challenges that remain. PMID:25277842

  13. Altitude deviations: Breakdowns of an error-tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett A.; Hutchins, Edwin L.; Ritter, Richard D.; Vancleemput, Inge

    1993-01-01

    Pilot reports of aviation incidents to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) provide a window on the problems occurring in today's airline cockpits. The narratives of 10 pilot reports of errors made in the automation-assisted altitude-change task are used to illustrate some of the issues of pilots interacting with automatic systems. These narratives are then used to construct a description of the cockpit as an information processing system. The analysis concentrates on the error-tolerant properties of the system and on how breakdowns can occasionally occur. An error-tolerant system can detect and correct its internal processing errors. The cockpit system consists of two or three pilots supported by autoflight, flight-management, and alerting systems. These humans and machines have distributed access to clearance information and perform redundant processing of information. Errors can be detected as deviations from either expected behavior or as deviations from expected information. Breakdowns in this system can occur when the checking and cross-checking tasks that give the system its error-tolerant properties are not performed because of distractions or other task demands. Recommendations based on the analysis for improving the error tolerance of the cockpit system are given.

  14. Breakdown Behavior of a Wireless Communication Network Under UWB Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohe, M.; Koch, M.

    Systems with high priority to safety and reliability such as monitoring systems on airports have to work properly. Fast information transmission, continuous access to databases, as well as the management of air traffic are most important for effective and safe operation. Sources of Intentional Electromagnetic Interference can be manufactured relatively easy using commercially available components by civilian persons with relevant expertise and can be used for sabotage or blackmail purposes. For analyzing the weak points of a system existing on airports, it is necessary to reproduce its setup. In this investigation a UHF transmitter of a wireless communication device is developed and its breakdown behavior to unipolar fast rise pulses (UWB) is determined. A breakdown is a non-permanent damage, but includes a type of upset, that requires manual reset or at least stops communications for some period of time. The transmitter consists of three main components connected by data cables: power supply, microcontroller, and loop antenna. The immunity tests are accomplished as a function of the electromagnetic field direction to the device using an open TEM waveguide.

  15. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  16. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism. Key Points Preliminary breakdown pulses can be reproduced by simulated channel extension Channel heating and corona sheath formation are crucial to proper pulse shape Extension processes and channel orientation significantly affect observations PMID:26664815

  17. A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, Mary C. (Editor); Brearley, J. Alexander; Haas, Randall; Viles, Heather A.

    2007-01-01

    A primary goal of geomorphological enquiry is to make genetic associations between process and form. In rock breakdown studies, the links between process, inheritance and lithology are not well constrained. In particular, there is a need to establish an understanding of feature persistence. That is, to determine the extent to which in situ rock breakdown (e.g., aeolian abrasion or salt weathering) masks signatures of earlier geomorphic transport processes (e.g., fluvial transport or crater ejecta). Equally important is the extent to which breakdown during geomorphic transport masks the imprint of past weathering. The use of rock features in this way raises the important question: Can features on the surface of a rock reliably indicate its geomorphic history? This has not been determined for rock surfaces on Earth or other planets. A first step towards constraining the links between process, inheritance, and morphology is to identify pristine features produced by different process regimes. The purpose of this atlas is to provide a comprehensive image collection of breakdown features commonly observed on boulders in different geomorphic environments. The atlas is intended as a tool for planetary geoscientists and their students to assist in identifying features found on rocks on planetary surfaces. In compiling this atlas, we have attempted to include features that have formed 'recently' and where the potential for modification by another geomorphic process is low. However, we acknowledge that this is, in fact, difficult to achieve when selecting rocks in their natural environment. We group breakdown features according to their formative environment and process. In selecting images for inclusion in the atlas we were mindful to cover a wide range of climatic zones. For example, in the weathering chapter, clast features are shown from locations such as the hyper-arid polar desert of Antarctica and the semi-arid canyons of central Australia. This is important as some

  18. The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Yadav, Brijesh S; Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Shai, Ben; Obolski, Uri; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Shani, Eilon; Jander, Georg; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol functions in cruciferous vegetables as a protective agent against foraging insects. While the toxic and deterrent effects of glucosinolate breakdown on herbivores and pathogens have been studied extensively, the secondary responses that are induced in the plant by indole-3-carbinol remain relatively uninvestigated. Here we examined the hypothesis that indole-3-carbinol plays a role in influencing plant growth and development by manipulating auxin signaling. We show that indole-3-carbinol rapidly and reversibly inhibits root elongation in a dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition is accompanied by a loss of auxin activity in the root meristem. A direct interaction between indole-3-carbinol and the auxin perception machinery was suggested, as application of indole-3-carbinol rescues auxin-induced root phenotypes. In vitro and yeast-based protein interaction studies showed that indole-3-carbinol perturbs the auxin-dependent interaction of Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR1) with auxin/3-indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAAs) proteins, further supporting the possibility that indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist. The results indicate that chemicals whose production is induced by herbivory, such as indole-3-carbinol, function not only to repel herbivores, but also as signaling molecules that directly compete with auxin to fine tune plant growth and development.

  19. Representing and acquiring geographic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a theory of how knowledge of a large-scale neighborhood can be represented symbolically in a computer program, accessed for use, and increased by experience. The discussion analyzes related work in the field, presents an actual computer implementation, and suggests areas for further research.

  20. Representing and acquiring geographic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for researchers and students in AI, cognitive psychology, and computational geometry, this work presents an original theory of how knowledge of a large-scale neighborhood can be represented symbolically in a computer program, accessed for use, and increased by experience. The discussion analyzes related work in the field, presents an actual computer implementation, and suggests areas for further research.

  1. Breakdown of phase D by formation of aluminous bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, T.; Ishii, T.; Miyajima, N.; Petitgirard, S.; McCammon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    A certain amount of water is considered to be transported into the deep mantle through subduction in the forms of hydrous minerals. Although the major constituent minerals can host significant amounts of water in the upper mantle, bridgmantite (Brm) and ferropericlase (fPc) can incorporate only a limited amount of water. Therefore, if water is transported into the lower mantle through subduction, it must be hosted by dense hydrous magnesium silicates (DHMSs) such as phase D. However, it is not clear whether the DHMSs can exist in the lower mantle. Brm contains significant amounts of Fe3+ (Fe3+/ΣFe > 0.1) even in coexistence with metallic iron. The amounts of Fe3+ increase with increasing Al2O3 content in Brm, and the Fe3+/ΣFe ratio exceeds 0.5 in the lower-mantle Brm. Since the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios are only 0.01-0.03 and 0.10-0.14 in the upper-mantle peridotite and MORB, respectively, formation of Brm would take oxygen out of other minerals. Hence, we expect breakdown of DHMS by reduction of OH into H2 through the Brm formation. To test this hypothesis, we conducted the following experiments. The starting material consisted of an assemblage of a pre-synthesized phase D together with an natural olivine single crystal or a pyroxene aggregate with bulk composition of pyrolite minus fPc (Pyr-fPc) synthesized at an PO2 ≈ IW, T = 1100 K and ambient pressure. The two-phase samples were pressurized to 28 GPa and heated to 1100 K for 1 hour. First SEM observation of recovered samples shows that a 2-µm thick SiO2-rich fine-grained layer has formed on the boundary between phase D and Pyr-fPc Brm indicating the breakdown of phase D, while no evidence of breakdown of phase D was observed in the experiments with the olivine single crystal. The present result suggests that, although water can be transported into the top of the lower mantle in a form of phase D through subduction, phase D will decompose by reduction at the depth to 720 km. The produced H2 should be re

  2. Gloss optical elementary representative surface.

    PubMed

    Vernhes, Pierre; Bloch, Jean-Francis; Blayo, Anne; Pineaux, Bernard

    2008-10-10

    Roughness measurements are of main importance in characterizing the optical properties of papers and prints. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the surface size and the spacing of the measures to be optically representative of the surface structure. Paper is a multiscale medium, and the roughness parameters extracted from the three-dimensional (3D) surface mapping depend on both the size and the step of discretization. Ray tracing, based on optical geometry, could be a tool to model the light reflection on a paper surface. Ray-tracer software was therefore developed. A new optical device was used to measure paper surface topographies at various scales. Ray tracing simulations were then performed on the 3D mapping and compared to the scattering indicatrix obtained with a classical goniometer. Hence it was possible to identify a magnification for various types of paper grades that is optically representative of the specular gloss.

  3. Flight representative positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1977-01-01

    Resolutions were developed for each problem encountered and a tradeoff analysis was performed to select a final configuration for a flight representative PID (Positive Isolation Disconnect) that is reduced in size and comparable in weight and pressure drop to the developmental PID. A 6.35 mm (1/4-inch) line size PID was fabricated and tested. The flight representative PID consists of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation. Future development efforts for the Space Shuttle subsystems that would benefit from the use of the positive isolation disconnect are also recommended. Customary units were utilized for principal measurements and calculations with conversion factors being inserted in equations to convert the results to the international system of units.

  4. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  5. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  6. Identifying representative trees from ensembles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Ding, Ying; Noone, Anne-Michelle

    2012-07-10

    Tree-based methods have become popular for analyzing complex data structures where the primary goal is risk stratification of patients. Ensemble techniques improve the accuracy in prediction and address the instability in a single tree by growing an ensemble of trees and aggregating. However, in the process, individual trees get lost. In this paper, we propose a methodology for identifying the most representative trees in an ensemble on the basis of several tree distance metrics. Although our focus is on binary outcomes, the methods are applicable to censored data as well. For any two trees, the distance metrics are chosen to (1) measure similarity of the covariates used to split the trees; (2) reflect similar clustering of patients in the terminal nodes of the trees; and (3) measure similarity in predictions from the two trees. Whereas the latter focuses on prediction, the first two metrics focus on the architectural similarity between two trees. The most representative trees in the ensemble are chosen on the basis of the average distance between a tree and all other trees in the ensemble. Out-of-bag estimate of error rate is obtained using neighborhoods of representative trees. Simulations and data examples show gains in predictive accuracy when averaging over such neighborhoods. We illustrate our methods using a dataset of kidney cancer treatment receipt (binary outcome) and a second dataset of breast cancer survival (censored outcome).

  7. Transport and Breakdown of Organic Matter in Urban and Forested Streams: The Effects of Altered Hydrology and Landscape Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, K. T.; Swan, C. M.; Pouyat, R. V.; Kaushal, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Stack, W. P.; Fisher, G. T.

    2006-05-01

    A better understanding of how urbanization and trees interact to alter organic matter transport and cycling is needed to assess retention in catchments and streams, as well as to estimate the magnitude of carbon fluxes to the atmosphere and to downstream aquatic ecosystems. The influx of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM/DOC) to headwater streams normally originates within or near riparian areas, and is important to aquatic food webs in stream ecosystems. Urban catchments, however, have huge effective drainage densities (due to storm drainage infrastructure), which facilitate a POM/DOC "gutter subsidy" to streams that dwarfs riparian inputs and alters benthic litter quality (and represents a major short-circuit in the carbon vegetation-soil cycle.) We measured in-situ leaf litter breakdown rates, flows, DOC, BOD and nutrients in forested, suburban and urban streams of the BES LTER and Baltimore City DPW sampling networks, which encompassed a variety of urban and rural landscapes. Sycamore and Planetree leaf litter in-situ experiments revealed faster breakdown rates for suburban and urban landscape litter than for riparian litter, with rates being much faster than literature values for forested catchments. DOC, BOD and nutrient data (storm and dry weather) from BES/DPW stream sites showed much higher concentrations and loads in the more urbanized catchments and indicate the streams are likely heterotrophic and experience transient but high dissolved oxygen demands. High nutrient concentrations, faster litter breakdown rates, and substantially higher upland urban fluxes of organic matter (particulate and dissolved) in urban streams suggest that export rates are likely substantially higher than in forested systems and that carbon loads to both downstream aquatic systems and to the atmosphere (as CO2) are substantial.

  8. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: I. MICROSPARKING DESCRIBED BY PASCHEN'S LAW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a study of the onset of electrical breakdown in dust layers, for hand-deposited dust layers in a parallel-plate geometry. It was found that the breakdown was an ordinary electron-avalanche process originating in voids within the dust layer and obeying Paschen...

  9. Electrical breakdown characteristics of an atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shouzhe; Kang, Jung G.; Uhm, Han S.

    2005-09-15

    The electrical breakdown characteristics of the rf capacitive plasma source are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The plasma source is the electrode type consisting of the concentric cylinders for generating nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. The theoretical model based on the diffusion-controlled breakdown mechanism is proposed to analyze the electrical breakdown phenomenon in this rf capacitive plasma source of the coaxial cylinders. The electron temperature at the electrical breakdown is calculated from the theoretical model, thereby evaluating the electrical breakdown voltages. The experimental data of the electrical breakdown voltage are measured with respect to the variation of the geometric parameters of plasma source, the gas temperature, and the concentration of the foreign reactive gases (oxygen and nitrogen) mixed in the helium gas. The theoretical results of the electrical breakdown voltage agree remarkably well with experimental data. This indicates that not only the electron temperature is important in determining the electrical breakdown voltage, but also the geometric variables, the gas temperature, and the scattering cross sections of molecules play significant roles.

  10. Scaling law for direct current field emission-driven microscale gas breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2012-12-15

    The effects of field emission on direct current breakdown in microscale gaps filled with an ambient neutral gas are studied numerically and analytically. Fundamental numerical experiments using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions method are used to systematically quantify microscale ionization and space-charge enhancement of field emission. The numerical experiments are then used to validate a scaling law for the modified Paschen curve that bridges field emission-driven breakdown with the macroscale Paschen law. Analytical expressions are derived for the increase in cathode electric field, total steady state current density, and the ion-enhancement coefficient including a new breakdown criterion. It also includes the effect of all key parameters such as pressure, operating gas, and field-enhancement factor providing a better predictive capability than existing microscale breakdown models. The field-enhancement factor is shown to be the most sensitive parameter with its increase leading to a significant drop in the threshold breakdown electric field and also to a gradual merging with the Paschen law. The proposed scaling law is also shown to agree well with two independent sets of experimental data for microscale breakdown in air. The ability to accurately describe not just the breakdown voltage but the entire pre-breakdown process for given operating conditions makes the proposed model a suitable candidate for the design and analysis of electrostatic microscale devices.

  11. Blueprint for Breakdown: Three Mile Island and the Media before the Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses media coverage of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant before and during the disaster. Concludes that there was a communication breakdown prior to the accident. Outlines the causes and offers suggestions for avoiding similar breakdowns in the future. (JMF)

  12. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  13. Effect of temperature on the electric breakdown strength of dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Chen, Hualing; Sheng, Junjie; Zhang, Junshi; Wang, Yongquan; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-03-01

    DE (dielectric elastomer) is one of the most promising artificial muscle materials for its large strain over 100% under driving voltage. However, to date, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are prone to failure due to the temperature-dependent electric breakdown. Previously studies had shown that the electrical breakdown strength was mainly related to the temperature-dependent elasticity modulus and the permittivity of dielectric substances. This paper investigated the influence of ambient temperature on the electric breakdown strength of DE membranes (VHB4910 3M). The electric breakdown experiment of the DE membrane was conducted at different ambient temperatures and pre-stretch levels. The real breakdown strength was obtained by measuring the deformation and the breakdown voltage simultaneously. Then, we found that with the increase of the environment temperature, the electric breakdown strength decreased obviously. Contrarily, the high pre-stretch level led to the large electric breakdown strength. What is more, we found that the deformations of DEs were strongly dependent on the ambient temperature.

  14. MICROBIAL COLONIZATION, RESPIRATION, AND BREAKDOWN OF MAPLE LEAVES ALONG A STREAM-MARSH CONTINUUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breakdown rates, macroinvertebrate and bacterial colonization, and microbial respiration were measured on decaying maple (Acer saccharum) leaves at three sites along a stream-marsh continuum. Breakdown rates (-k+-SE) were 0.0284+-0.0045 d-1 for leaves in a high-gradient, non-tida...

  15. MICROBIAL COLONIZATION, RESPIRATION AND BREAKDOWN OF MAPLE LEAVES ALONG A STREAM-MARSH CONTINUUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breakdown rates, macroinvertebrate and bacterial colonization, and microbial respiration were measured on decaying maple leaves at three sites along a stream-marsh continuum. Breakdown rates were 0.0284+/-0.0045 d-1 for leaves in a high-gradient, non-tidal stream; 0.0112 +/- 0.0...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit B-3 to Subpart I of... - Pre-Construction and Construction Phase Breakdown

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 1944.417(b) of this subpart. II. Determining technical assistance (TA) cost per unit. A. Equivalent... 10 Phase II 10 10 Construction: Phase III 80 21-100 B. Using the Description of Phase Breakdown as a... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Pre-Construction and Construction Phase Breakdown...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit B-3 to Subpart I of... - Pre-Construction and Construction Phase Breakdown

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 1944.417(b) of this subpart. II. Determining technical assistance (TA) cost per unit. A. Equivalent... 10 Phase II 10 10 Construction: Phase III 80 21-100 B. Using the Description of Phase Breakdown as a... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-Construction and Construction Phase Breakdown...

  18. Power Dissipation and Electrical Breakdown in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Han, Shu-Jen; Avouris, Phaedon

    2015-10-14

    We report operating temperatures and heating coefficients measured in a multilayer black phosphorus device as a function of injected electrical power. By combining micro-Raman spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements, we have observed a linear temperature increase up to 600 K at a power dissipation rate of 0.896 K μm(3)/mW. By further increasing the bias voltage, we determined the threshold power and temperature for electrical breakdown and analyzed the fracture in the black phosphorus layer that caused the device failure by means of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results will benefit the research and development of electronics and optoelectronics based on novel two-dimensional materials.

  19. Gas breakdown limits for inverse Cherenkov laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-07-01

    The probability of avalanche, tunneling and multiphoton ionization induced by a CO{sub 2} laser in H{sub 2} gas has been calculated. Laser light screening by a self-induced plasma density gradient is considered as the limiting factor for upscaling a CO{sub 2} laser-driven Inverse Cherenkov Laser Accelerator beyond 650 MeV/m. However, in near-resonance inverse Cherenkov acceleration where a shorter wavelength laser is used at a wavelength near the resonance of the gas (e.g. 248nm in H{sub 2}), the formation of a plasma is not a problem because the plasma density is below the critical density. In that case, the laser beam propagates unaffected through the plasma and the acceleration gradient is not limited by gas breakdown. Gradients > 1 GeV/m are possible.

  20. The breakdown of fibrous structures in directionally grown monotectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Hellawell, A.

    1984-01-01

    The breakdown of aligned steady-state metallic growth products from the reversible monotectic reaction liquid (L1) yields solid (S1) + liquid (L2) is analyzed experimentally. Consideration is given to the temperatures of the monotectic horizontal, to upper consolute temperature of the liquid miscibility gap which through the relative liquid and solid surface energies determines whether the reaction is capable of steady-state growth; the growth characteristics of the solid (faceted or nonfaceted); and the relative whetting characteristics of parent and product phases with the glass cell walls. Schematic drawings and composite photographs are provided which illustrate the development of steady-state growth and the related changes in phase sickness of the reaction product.

  1. Discontinuity breakdown on shock wave interaction with nanosecond discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskaya, I. A.; Koroteev, D. A.; Lutsky, A. E.

    2008-05-15

    Discontinuity breakdown conditions were experimentally realized by instant energy input in front of a plane shock wave. A shock tube and a special type of transversal nanosecond electric discharge with plasma electrodes were used for this research. A two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation under experimental conditions has been undertaken. The pressure, density, temperature, and velocity fields have been examined. A comparison of numerical data and shadow images of a 2D flow after shock wave interaction with the discharge area was conducted. The geometry of the disturbed flowfield was found to be in good correspondence with one from numerical calculations. The results of the investigation also showed that, by using the described experimental setup, it is possible to achieve a special type of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability without applying an additional curved diaphragm.

  2. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development. PMID:27338704

  3. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing.

    PubMed

    Barba, Francisco J; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  4. Evaluating Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekry, O.; El-Batanouny, M. H.; El-Begawy, M. B.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), is an excellent tool for trace elemental analysis, was exploited for a detecting concentrations of calcium and magnesium in malignant tissues before and after PDT. Calcium and magnesium concentrations are known tobe high in malignancy. Tissues were injected with methylene blue photosensitizer with concentrations 0.5%, 1% and 2%. Two different light sources were used with two different energy densities/each light sources. The results showed a decrease in tissue elements content after PDT application for both calcium and magnesium compared to before PDT application as shown in the tissue spectral lines' intensities which has been reflected in. Type of light source showed no effect on tissue elements content which showed slight differences among the different energy densities. It has been shown that LIBS technique can be adopted method to monitor tumor photodynamic therapy applications.

  5. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  6. The tropospheric-stratospheric polar vortex breakdown of January 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An extraordinary warming of the stratosphere in December-January 1976-77 was followed by tropospheric warming in the polar region and cooling in middle latitudes. During January 10-20, the associated polar anticyclone extended from the surface to 10 mb. Antecedents of the polar vortex breakdown are reviewed with the aid of results of zonal-harmonic analyses of planetary waves, for heights of the pressure surfaces (700-10 mb), temperature, and mean stratospheric temperature (the latter determined from satellite radiation measurements). Wave 1 in height and temperature played a dominant role in the stratosphere, attaining amplitudes of 1600 gpm and 25 C, respectively, at 10 mb. On the other hand, superposition of retrogressing wave 1 and quasi-stationary wave 2 in the height of the 300-mb surface, with individual amplitudes exceeding 300 gpm, is judged to have been an important factor in the overall development.

  7. Study of breakdown in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-10-15

    Breakdown in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) must be studied in order to design new types of APPTs and measure particular parameters. In this paper, we studied a parallel-plate ablative pulsed plasma thruster that used a coaxial semiconductor spark plug. By operating the APPT about 500 times with various capacitor voltages and electrode gaps, we measured and analyzed the voltage of the spark plug, the voltage between the electrodes, and the discharge current. These experiments revealed a time delay (∼1–10 μs) between spark plug ignition and capacitor discharge, which may affect the performance of high-pulsing-rate (>10 kHz) and double-discharge APPTs, and the measurements of some of the APPT parameters. The delay time decreased as the capacitor voltage increased, and it increased with an increasing electrode gap and increasing number of ignitions. We explain our results through a simple theoretical analysis.

  8. Breakdown of the Fermi Liquid Description for Strongly Interacting Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, Yoav; Drake, Tara E.; Paudel, Rabin; Chapurin, Roman; Jin, Deborah S.

    2015-02-01

    The nature of the normal state of an ultracold Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover regime is an intriguing and controversial topic. While the many-body ground state remains a condensate of paired fermions, the normal state must evolve from a Fermi liquid to a Bose gas of molecules as a function of the interaction strength. How this occurs is still largely unknown. We explore this question with measurements of the distribution of single-particle energies and momenta in a nearly homogeneous gas above Tc . The data fit well to a function that includes a narrow, positively dispersing peak that corresponds to quasiparticles and an "incoherent background" that can accommodate broad, asymmetric line shapes. We find that the quasiparticle's spectral weight vanishes abruptly as the strength of interactions is modified, which signals the breakdown of a Fermi liquid description. Such a sharp feature is surprising in a crossover.

  9. A Dual-Moded Cavity for RF Breakdown Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The phenomenon of rf breakdown presents a technological limitation in the application of high-gradient particle acceleration in normal conducting rf structures. Attempts to understand the onset of this phenomenon and to study its limits with different materials, cell shapes, and pulse widths has been driven in recent years by linear collider development. One question of interest is the role magnetic field plays relative to electric field. A design is presented for a single, nonaccelerating, rf cavity resonant in two modes, which, driven independently, allow the rf magnetic field to be increased on the region of highest electric field without affecting the latter. The design allows for the potential reuse of the cavity with different samples in the high-field region. High power data is not yet available.

  10. Vortex equations: Singularities, numerical solution, and axisymmetric vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossel, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method of weighted residuals for the computation of rotationally symmetric quasi-cylindrical viscous incompressible vortex flow is presented and used to compute a wide variety of vortex flows. The method approximates the axial velocity and circulation profiles by series of exponentials having (N + 1) and N free parameters, respectively. Formal integration results in a set of (2N + 1) ordinary differential equations for the free parameters. The governing equations are shown to have an infinite number of discrete singularities corresponding to critical values of the swirl parameters. The computations point to the controlling influence of the inner core flow on vortex behavior. They also confirm the existence of two particular critical swirl parameter values: one separates vortex flow which decays smoothly from vortex flow which eventually breaks down, and the second is the first singularity of the quasi-cylindrical system, at which point physical vortex breakdown is thought to occur.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loree, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, or LIBS, is a laser-based form of atomic emission spectroscopy that can be used for the in-situ elemental analysis of coal gasifier product streams. At this point, LIBS has been deployed in three gasifier field tests, and C, H, O, N, Na, K, S, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb, Se, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Li, and Mn were qualitatively detected in the various product streams. In laboratory experiments on quantitative detection, a detection limit of 4 ppB was demonstrated for sodium. The long-range goal of this program is add the trace elements As, B, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn to the detection list, and to develop the capability of quantitative detection in real time for the trace elements. 4 figures.

  12. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  13. Measuring breakdown voltage for objectively detecting ignition in fire research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoterena, R.; Försth, M.; Elfsberg, Mattias; Larsson, Anders

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a method intended for detecting the initiation of combustion and the presence of smoke in confined or open spaces by continuously applying an intermittent high-voltage pulse between the electrodes. The method is based on an electrical circuit which generates an electrical discharge measuring simultaneously the breakdown voltage between the electrodes. It has been successfully used for the detection of particle-laden aerosols and flames. However, measurements in this study showed that detecting pyrolysis products with this methodology is challenging and arduous. The method presented here is robust and exploits the necessity of having an ignition system which at the same time can automatically discern between clean air, flames or particle-laden aerosols and can be easily implemented in the existing cone calorimeter with very minor modifications.

  14. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  15. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  16. Breakdown of cross-modal function in dementia.

    PubMed

    Freedman, M; Oscar-Berman, M

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the possibility that specific language abnormalities in dementia are related to impaired cross-modal ability, the authors studied patients with Alzheimer's disease (which is characterized by a generalized language breakdown or aphasia) and patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia (a disorder associated more with selective deficits in naming than with aphasia). Both groups were initially equated for severity of dementia. Compared with nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease and age-equivalent healthy controls, patients with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia showed significant deficits in cross-modal ability. Moreover, the cross-modal deficits were significantly associated with object-naming ability. Results support the concept that language capacity and cross-modal functions are interrelated. PMID:9150510

  17. Technology Development Benefits and the Economics Breakdown Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and application of the EBS (Economics Breakdown Structure) in evaluating technology investments across multiple systems and organizations, illustrated with examples in space transportation technology. The United States Government (USG) has a long history of investing in technology to enable its missions. Agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have evaluated their technology development programs primarily on their effects on mission performance and cost. More and more, though, USG agencies are being evaluated on their technology transfer to the commercial sector. In addition, an increasing number of USG missions are being accomplished by industry-led or joint efforts, where the USG provides technology and funding but tasks industry with development and operation of the mission systems.

  18. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  20. Persistence and breakdown of strand symmetry in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shang-Hong

    2015-04-01

    Afreixo, V., Bastos, C.A.C., Garcia, S.P., Rodrigues, J.M.O.S., Pinho, A.J., Ferreira, P.J.S.G., 2013. The breakdown of the word symmetry in the human genome. J. Theor. Biol. 335, 153-159 analyzed the word symmetry (strand symmetry or the second parity rule) in the human genome. They concluded that strand symmetry holds for oligonucleotides up to 6 nt and is no longer statistically significant for oligonucleotides of higher orders. However, although they provided some new results for the issue, their interpretation would not be fully justified. Also, their conclusion needs to be further evaluated. Further analysis of their results, especially those of equivalence tests and word symmetry distance, shows that strand symmetry would persist for higher-order oligonucleotides up to 9 nt in the human genome, at least for its overall frequency framework (oligonucleotide frequency pattern). PMID:25576243

  1. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  2. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Francisco J.; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  3. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K; Thakur, Surya N; Rai, Pradeep K; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  4. Inhibition of raffinose oligosaccharide breakdown delays germination of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are almost ubiquitous in seeds and have been hypothesized to constitute an important energy source during germination. To test this hypothesis we applied a specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitor (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, DGJ) to germinating pea seeds, resulting in a complete blocking of RFO breakdown. The germination rates of DGJ-treated seeds dropped drastically to about 25% of controls two days after imbibition. Similarly, the activities of the key enzymes in the galactose salvage pathway galactokinase, UDP-galactose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase, were also significantly lower in seeds treated with the inhibitor. The inhibitory effect on germination could be relieved by galactose but only partially by sucrose, indicating that galactose, in addition to providing easily available energy for growth, may also be an important component of the sugar signaling pathway during germination. Taken together our study, for the first time, provides clear evidence that RFOs play an important role for early germination.

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the discrimination of Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Ugena, L; Tornero-Lopéz, J; Martín, H; Molina, M; Camacho, J J; Cáceres, J O

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Neural Networks (NN) for the discrimination of different strains of various species of Candida. This genus of yeast was selected due to its medical relevance as it is commonly found in cases of fungal infection in humans. Twenty one strains belonging to seven species of Candida were included in the study. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) was employed as a complementary technique to provide information about elemental composition of Candida cells. The use of LIBS spectra in combination with optimized NN models provided reliable discrimination among the distinct Candida strains with a high spectral correlation index for the samples analyzed, without any false positive or false negative. Therefore, this study indicates that LIBS-NN based methodology has the potential to be used as fast fungal identification or even diagnostic method.

  6. A New Vortex-Breakdown Device: Use of Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, Eric H.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    1996-11-01

    To complement our theoretical and computational work regarding the nature of interaction of vortex lines during the process of vortex breakdown, a new experimental device is developed. The geometry under consideration is an eccentric spherical gap. In previous studies using this device an inner sphere was driven by a shaft which penetrated the outer spherical cavity axisymmetrically. We desire a completely non-intrusive device, coupled with non-intrusive visualization, as well as the ability to shift the spin axis (breaking axisymmetry) to test our hypotheses. All these requirements suggest a magnetically suspended and driven inner sphere. The controls algorithms and expertise developed for magnetic bearings were extended to address the difficult problem of large fluid gaps (inches as opposed to mils). We will report on the design and construction of the device, and argue for the feasibility of magnetics when absolute non-intrusion is necessary.

  7. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  8. Analysis and control of supersonic vortex breakdown flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis and computation of steady, compressible, quasi-axisymmetric flow of an isolated, slender vortex are considered. The compressible, Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a simpler set by using the slenderness and quasi-axisymmetry assumptions. The resulting set along with a compatibility equation are transformed from the diverging physical domain to a rectangular computational domain. Solving for a compatible set of initial profiles and specifying a compatible set of boundary conditions, the equations are solved using a type-differencing scheme. Vortex breakdown locations are detected by the failure of the scheme to converge. Computational examples include isolated vortex flows at different Mach numbers, external axial-pressure gradients and swirl ratios.

  9. Temporal breakdown and Borel resummation in the complex Langevin method

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A. Niedermaier, M.

    2013-02-15

    We reexamine the Parisi-Klauder conjecture for complex e{sup i{theta}/2}{phi}{sup 4} measures with a Wick rotation angle 0{<=}{theta}/2{<=}{pi}/2 interpolating between Euclidean signature and Lorentzian signature. Our main result is that the asymptotics for short stochastic times t encapsulates information also about the equilibrium aspects. The moments evaluated with the complex measure and with the real measure defined by the stochastic Langevin equation have the same t{yields}0 asymptotic expansion which is shown to be Borel summable. The Borel transform correctly reproduces the time dependent moments of the complex measure for all t, including their t{yields}{infinity} equilibrium values. On the other hand the results of a direct numerical simulation of the Langevin moments are found to disagree from the 'correct' result for t larger than a finite t{sub c}. The breakdown time t{sub c} increases powerlike for decreasing strength of the noise's imaginary part but cannot be excluded to be finite for purely real noise. To ascertain the discrepancy we also compute the real equilibrium distribution for complex noise explicitly and verify that its moments differ from those obtained with the complex measure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Parisi-Klauder conjecture is reexamined for complex e{sup i{theta}/2}{phi}{sup 4} measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time dependent moments are evaluated by temporal Borel resummation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results disagree with the Langevin simulations beyond a critical time t{sub c}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer t{sub c} increases with decreasing strength of the noise's imaginary part. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The technical reason for the breakdown is identified.

  10. Femtosecond laser threshold: retinal damage versus induced breakdown mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Stein, Cindy D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    Threshold measurements at 90 femtoseconds (fs) and 600 fs have been made for minimum visible lesions (MVLs) using Dutch Belted rabbit and Rhesus monkey eyes. Laser induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds on biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water are reported along with irradiance calculations utilizing nonlinear transmission properties including self-focusing. At both pulsewidths the ED50 dose required for the Rhesus monkey eye was less than half the value determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye, all thresholds being 1 microjoule ((mu) J) or less. Measurements on the Rhesus eye at 600 fs found the ED50 dose (0.26 (mu) J) to be much lower than the ED50 dose at 90 fs (0.43 (mu) J). But for these two pulsewidths, almost the same energy level was determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye (0.94 (mu) J vs. 1.0 (mu) J). LIB threshold measurements at 100 fs and 300 fs using a simulated eye with isolated vitreous found the ED50 dosages to be 3.5 and 6.0 (mu) J respectively. We found in all cases that the ED50 dosages required to produce MVLs in 24 hours for rabbit and monkey eyes were less than the ED50 values measured for LIB in vitreous or saline or any other breakdown values reported. Also observed was the fact that many of the threshold lesions did not appear in the 1-hour postexposure check but clearly showed up at the 24-hour reading which provided for a much lower threshold dose after 24 hours. We discuss the energy levels and peak powers at which nonlinear effects can begin to occur.

  11. Microwave cavity diagnostics of microwave breakdown plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstrom, D.J.; Williams, M.S.

    1989-08-01

    We have performed microwave cavity perturbation measurements in the LLNL AIM facility using a 329-MHz cavity that allow us to examine in detail the plasma formation and decay processes for electron densities between approximately 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 3}. We believe these to be the lowest density plasmas ever studied in microwave breakdown experiments, and as such they allow us to determine the power and energy required to produce plasmas suitable for HF radar reflection as well as the effective lifetimes of these plasmas before re-ionization is required. Analyses of these results leads to the following conclusions. (1) For microwave breakdown pulses varying from 0.6 to 2.4 {mu}s, the threshold power required to produce measurable plasmas is 30 to 12 MW/m{sup 2} at 0.01 torr, decreasing to 3.5 to 1.8 MW/m{sup 2} at 1 to 3 torr, and then increasing to 5 to 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} at 30 torr. The threshold power in each case decreases with increasing pulse length, but the required pulse energy increases with decreasing power or increasing pulse length. (2) The effective electron density decay rates are approximately 100/s for 0.1 to 1 torr, after which they increase linearly with pressure. Thus, the useful plasma lifetimes are in the range of 20 to 40 ms at the lower pressures and decrease to about 1 ms at 30 torr. These decay rates and lifetimes are comparable to those that would exist for artificially ionized regions in the upper atmosphere. (3) The collision frequencies measured at pressures of 1 torr and above correspond to electron temperatures of 800 K or less. In fact, the inferred temperatures for p > 3 torr are below room temperature. This may be due to a contribution to the measured conductivity by negative ions.

  12. Breakdown characteristics and conditioning of carbon and refractory metal electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    High voltage carbon and refractory metal electrodes employed in devices used in space, such as ion thrusters and traveling wave tubes, can be easily damaged by electrical breakdown and arcing events. Modification of the electrode surfaces due to these events can impact the voltage hold off capability of the surfaces, which could lead to additional arcing, further damage, and the potential for device failure. On the cathode-potential surface, the arc energy is deposited by all of the processes at the surface ultimately responsible for net electron emission, such as melting, vapor and particulate formation, sputtering, ion bombardment, etc. On the anode-potential surface, the energy is deposited from the plasma or electron stream that crosses the gap, which causes surface damage by local heating. In spite of this energy dependence on the damage, many systems that use arc discharges characterize the amount of material removed from the surfaces and the lifetime of the device for voltage hold-off by the amount of current that passes through the arc, or the 'Coulomb-rating'. The results of a series of tests that were preformed on the boltage hold off capability and damage to carbon-carbon composite surfaces and molybdenum surfaces due to induced arcing will be presented and discussed. Damage to the surfaces was characterized by the field emission performance after the arc initiation and SEM photographs for the different energy and coulomb-transfer arc conditions. Both conditioning and damage to the surfaces were observed, and will be related to the characteristics of the electrical breakdown.

  13. Numerical Study of Freestream Waves Receptivity and Nonlinear Breakdown in Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jia

    Laminar-turbulent transition prediction in hypersonic boundary layer remains one of the most challenging topics in the design of hypervelocity vehicle. It requires thorough understanding of the physical mechanisms underlay freestream wave receptivity and nonlinear breakdown process. Freestream wave receptivity concerns the evolution of freestream disturbance passing through the shock and exciting the boundary layer normal modes that eventually become unstable. Nonlinear breakdown focuses on the study of the relevant mechanisms in the secondary instability region that leads to laminar-turbulent transition. These two topics have been extensively studied separately for decades. Significant progress has been made in terms of understanding how the instability waves form and develop in the early region as well as what are the viable paths from breakdown to turbulent. However, the linkage between receptivity and breakdown is still not well understood. The nature transition process commonly observed in hypersonic boundary layer consists of the following ingredients: freestream wave receptivity, linear growth, secondary instability and breakdown to turbulent. The transition location highly depends on the freestream wave disturbance profile. In order to attain a better understanding of the natural transition process, it is necessary to conduct a complete simulation from freestream wave receptivity all the way to nonlinear breakdown. This kind of simulation is considered beyond the capability of current computer power. The objective of current research is to devise a new three-step approach to simulate the flow from receptivity process to breakdown. In order to achieve the goal, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are performed over various freestream conditions and cone geometries to investigate the hypersonic boundary layer stability, freestream wave receptivity and nonlinear breakdown. In the study of nose bluntness effect on hypersonic boundary layer stability, three cone

  14. A Dioxobilin-Type Fluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolite as a Transient Early Intermediate of the Dioxobilin-Branch of Chlorophyll Breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Süssenbacher, Iris; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    Chlorophyll breakdown in higher plants occurs by the so called "PaO/phyllobilin" path. It generates two major types of phyllobilins, the characteristic 1-formyl-19-oxobilins and the more recently discovered 1,19-dioxobilins. The hypothetical branching point at which the original 1-formyl-19-oxobilins are transformed into 1,19-dioxobilins is still elusive. Here, we clarify this hypothetical crucial transition on the basis of the identification of the first natural 1,19-dioxobilin-type fluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (DFCC). This transient chlorophyll breakdown intermediate was isolated from leaf extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana at an early stage of senescence. The fleetingly existent DFCC was then shown to represent the direct precursor of the major nonfluorescent 1,19-dioxobilin that accumulated in fully senescent leaves.

  15. Experimental Study on the Dielectric Breakdown Voltage of the Insulating Oil Mixed with Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Kim, Woo-Young

    In this study, we have measured the dielectric breakdown voltage of transformer oil-based nanofluids in accordance with IEC 156 standard and have investigated the dielectric breakdown performance with the application of an external magnetic field and different volume concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles. It is confirmed that the dielectric breakdown voltage of pure transformer oil is about 10 kV with a gap distance of 1 mm between electrodes. In the case of our transformer oil-based nanofluids with 0.08% < Φ < 0.39% (Φ means the volume concentration of magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid), the dielectric breakdown voltage is three times higher than that of pure transformer oil. Furthermore, when the external magnetic field is applied under the experimental vessel, the dielectric breakdown voltage of the nanofluids is above 40 kV, which is 30% higher than that without the external magnetic field.

  16. Quantitative statistical analysis of dielectric breakdown in zirconia-based self-assembled nanodielectrics.

    PubMed

    Schlitz, Ruth A; Ha, Young-geun; Marks, Tobin J; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2012-05-22

    Uniformity of the dielectric breakdown voltage distribution for several thicknesses of a zirconia-based self-assembled nanodielectric was characterized using the Weibull distribution. Two regimes of breakdown behavior are observed: self-assembled multilayers >5 nm thick are well described by a single two-parameter Weibull distribution, with β ≈ 11. Multilayers ≤5 nm thick exhibit kinks on the Weibull plot of dielectric breakdown voltage, suggesting that multiple characteristic mechanisms for dielectric breakdown are present. Both the degree of uniformity and the effective dielectric breakdown field are observed to be greater for one layer than for two layers of Zr-SAND, suggesting that this multilayer is more promising for device applications.

  17. DC breakdown characteristics of silicone polymer composites for HVDC insulator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byung-Jo; Seo, In-Jin; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Hwang, Young-Ho; Yang, Hai-Won

    2015-11-01

    Critical components for HVDC transmission systems are polymer insulators, which have stricter requirements that are more difficult to achieve compared to those of HVAC insulators. In this study, we investigated the optimal design of HVDC polymer insulators by using a DC electric field analysis and experiments. The physical properties of the polymer specimens were analyzed to develop an optimal HVDC polymer material, and four polymer specimens were prepared for DC breakdown experiments. Single and reverse polarity breakdown tests were conducted to analyze the effect of temperature on the breakdown strength of the polymer. In addition, electric fields were analyzed via simulations, in which a small-scale polymer insulator model was applied to prevent dielectric breakdown due to electric field concentration, with four DC operating conditions taken into consideration. The experimental results show that the electrical breakdown strength and the electric field distribution exhibit significant differences in relation to different DC polarity transition procedures.

  18. Fast shut-down protection system for radio frequency breakdown and multipactor testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, T P; Hanson, P; Michaelson, J M; Farkas, A D; Hubble, A A

    2014-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) breakdown such as multipactor or ionization breakdown is a device-limiting phenomenon for on-orbit spacecraft used for communication, navigation, or other RF payloads. Ground testing is therefore part of the qualification process for all high power components used in these space systems. This paper illustrates a shut-down protection system to be incorporated into multipactor/ionization breakdown ground testing for susceptible RF devices. This 8 channel system allows simultaneous use of different diagnostic classes and different noise floors. With initiation of a breakdown event, diagnostic signals increase above a user-specified level, which then opens an RF switch to eliminate RF power from the high power amplifier. Examples of this system in use are shown for a typical setup, illustrating the reproducibility of breakdown threshold voltages and the lack of multipactor conditioning. This system can also be utilized to prevent excessive damage to RF components in tests with sensitive or flight hardware. PMID:24593380

  19. Review of recent theories and experiments for improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Liu Guozhi; Tang Chuanxiang; Chen Changhua; Fang Jinyong

    2011-05-15

    Dielectric window breakdown is a serious challenge in high-power microwave (HPM) transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric. Methods of improving breakdown thresholds are key challenges in HPM systems. First, the main theoretical and experimental progress is reviewed. Next, the mechanisms of multipactor suppression for periodic rectangular and triangular surface profiles by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations are surveyed. Improved HPM breakdown thresholds are demonstrated by proof-of-principle and multigigawatt experiments. The current theories and experiments of using dc magnetic field to resonantly accelerate electrons to suppress multipactor are also synthesized. These methods of periodic profiles and magnetic field may solve the key issues of HPM vacuum dielectric breakdown.

  20. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  1. Variables associated with family breakdown in healthy and obese/ overweigh adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Carla Cristina J. N.; Mora, Paula de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Valmir Aparecido; João, Camila Aparecida; João, Carolina Regina; Riccio, Ana Carolina; de Almeida, Carlos Alberto N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the presence of family breakdown factors among eutrophic and overweight/obese adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 242 students aged between 14 and 19 years old, from a public school. Each student was weighed, measured and answered a questionnaire with closed questions addressing the presence of family breakdown factors. The adolescents were divided in two groups: euthophic and overweight/obese. The answers of both groups were compared by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of the studied factors between the two groups. Comparing the number of positive answers (presence of family breakdown factors) and negative ones (absence of family breakdown factors), no difference was observed between the groups. Conclusions: The inclusion of a control group showed that factors of family breakdown, usually identified as associated with obesity in adolescents, may also be present in eutrophic adolescents. PMID:24676193

  2. Representing objects, relations, and sequences.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Stephen I; Okaywe, T Wendy

    2013-08-01

    Vector symbolic architectures (VSAs) are high-dimensional vector representations of objects (e.g., words, image parts), relations (e.g., sentence structures), and sequences for use with machine learning algorithms. They consist of a vector addition operator for representing a collection of unordered objects, a binding operator for associating groups of objects, and a methodology for encoding complex structures. We first develop constraints that machine learning imposes on VSAs; for example, similar structures must be represented by similar vectors. The constraints suggest that current VSAs should represent phrases ("The smart Brazilian girl") by binding sums of terms, in addition to simply binding the terms directly. We show that matrix multiplication can be used as the binding operator for a VSA, and that matrix elements can be chosen at random. A consequence for living systems is that binding is mathematically possible without the need to specify, in advance, precise neuron-to-neuron connection properties for large numbers of synapses. A VSA that incorporates these ideas, Matrix Binding of Additive Terms (MBAT), is described that satisfies all constraints. With respect to machine learning, for some types of problems appropriate VSA representations permit us to prove learnability rather than relying on simulations. We also propose dividing machine (and neural) learning and representation into three stages, with differing roles for learning in each stage. For neural modeling, we give representational reasons for nervous systems to have many recurrent connections, as well as for the importance of phrases in language processing. Sizing simulations and analyses suggest that VSAs in general, and MBAT in particular, are ready for real-world applications. PMID:23607563

  3. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages . Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological

  4. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH3I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I+, CH3, CH2, CH, H, and I2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I2∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I2∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I∗(4P) and CH3I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH3I.

  5. Collector optimization for improving the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Fu; Wanrong, Zhang; Dongyue, Jin; Yanxiao, Zhao; Lianghao, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Compared with BVCEO, BVCES is more related to collector optimization and more practical significance, so that BVCES × fT rather than BVCEO × fT is employed in representing the limit of the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT for collector engineering design. Instead of a single decrease in collector doping to improve BVCES × fT and BVCEO × fT, a novel thin composite of N- and P+ doping layers inside the CB SCR is presented to improve the well-known tradeoff between the breakdown voltage and cut-off frequency in SiGe HBT, and BVCES and BVCEO are improved respectively with slight degradation in fT. As a result, the BVCES × fT product is improved from 537.57 to 556.4 GHz·V, and the BVCEO × fT product is improved from 309.51 to 326.35 GHz·V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60776051, 61006059, 61006044), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 4082007, 4143059, 4142007, 4122014), and the Beijing Municipal Education Committee (Nos. KM200710005015, KM200910005001).

  6. Growth Arrest Specific 2 (GAS2) is a Critical Mediator of Germ Cell Cyst Breakdown and Folliculogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    York, J. Philippe; Ren, Yi Athena; Zeng, Jie; Bin Zhang; Wang, Fang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Jianqiao; Xia, Xuefeng; Zhang, Pumin

    2016-01-01

    In the mouse ovary, the primordial follicle pool is established through a diverse array of signaling pathways and tissue remodeling events. Growth arrest specific gene two (GAS2) is a highly conserved cytoskeleton-associated protein whose in vivo function remains unclear. In Drosophila, loss of the GAS2 homolog, Pigs, results in infertility. We demonstrate herein that, in the mouse ovary, GAS2 is expressed in the stromal cells surrounding the oocyte cysts on 16.5 dpc, and in stromal cells surrounding growing follicles during juvenile and adult life. We have generated genetically engineered mice with inactivated Gas2. Gas2 homozygous mutant mice are viable but have severely impaired fertility in females, in which oocyte cyst breakdown is disrupted and follicle growth is impaired, with significantly reduced numbers of large antral follicles and corpora lutea. In these mutant mice, the organization of the basal lamina surrounding developing follicles is severely defective at multiple stages of folliculogenesis. We also found that Notch signaling activity was altered in ovaries from Gas2 null mice around the time of birth and during follicular development later in life. These results indicate that GAS2 is a critical and novel regulator of tissue remodeling in the ovary during oocyte cyst breakdown and folliculogenesis. PMID:27734842

  7. Detection and classification of live and dead Escherichia coli by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Fernández-Bravo, A; Taleh, L; Biddle, J F; Melikechi, N

    2015-02-01

    A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity.

  8. Multi-elemental mapping of a speleothem using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q. L.; Motto-Ros, V.; Lei, W. Q.; Boueri, M.; Zheng, L. J.; Zeng, H. P.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Ayalon, A.; Panczer, G.; Yu, J.

    2010-08-01

    Speleothems represent an important record of the paleoclimate, and more generally past environmental changes thanks to their laminar structure which is related to variations in rainfall and vegetation throughout the seasons and to their elemental as well as structural compositions which are sensitive to climatic and environmental conditions during their growth. Studies of their composition, especially those with spatial resolution, reveal rich information for paleoclimatology. In this paper, we demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a suitable tool for elemental analysis and especially for 2-dimensional elemental mapping of speleothems. Main, minor, as well as trace elements can be analyzed with this technique. The temporal evolution of the induced plasma is first studied in order to determine a suitable detection window for emission spectrum recording following the impact of the laser pulse on the sample. The matrix effect is then evaluated with a scan on the sample surface by measuring the electron density and the temperature of the plasmas at different positions of the analyzed surface. Concentration mapping is performed for minor and trace elements such as Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Fe and Sr, by measuring relative variations of line emission intensities from these elements. Finally, correlations in concentration among detected elements are determined. Groups of correlated elements can be attributed to different mineralogical phases.

  9. Understanding the signature of rock coatings in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Nina L.; Ollila, Ann M.; Cousin, Agnes; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel; Mangold, Nicolas; Bridges, Nathan; Cooper, Daniel; Schmidt, Mariek; Berger, Jeffrey; Arvidson, Raymond; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Tokar, Robert; Hardgrove, Craig; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Jackson, Ryan S.; Clark, Benton; Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Nachon, Marion; Anderson, Ryan B.; Blank, Jennifer; Deans, Matthew; Delapp, Dorothea; Léveillé, Richard; McInroy, Rhonda; Martinez, Ronald; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pinet, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Surface compositional features on rocks such as coatings and weathering rinds provide important information about past aqueous environments and water-rock interactions. The search for these features represents an important aspect of the Curiosity rover mission. With its unique ability to do fine-scale chemical depth profiling, the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) onboard Curiosity can be used to both identify and analyze rock surface alteration features. In this study we analyze a terrestrial manganese-rich rock varnish coating on a basalt rock in the laboratory with the ChemCam engineering model to determine the LIBS signature of a natural rock coating. Results show that there is a systematic decrease in peak heights for elements such as Mn that are abundant in the coating but not the rock. There is significant spatial variation in the relative abundance of coating elements detected by LIBS depending on where on the rock surface sampled; this is due to the variability in thickness and spatial discontinuities in the coating. Similar trends have been identified in some martian rock targets in ChemCam data, suggesting that these rocks may have coatings or weathering rinds on their surfaces.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for light elements detection in steel: State of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khater, Mohamed A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of a direct, rapid, and sensitive spectroscopic method for the analytical quantification of light (low atomic number) elements represents an important ongoing challenge. For the first time, we review the evolution of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for trace analysis of light elements in steels. We present studies carried out in both far/vacuum UV and UV-visible spectral regions, and focus on the elements carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and nitrogen as their presence and content determine key properties of all steel products. In order to facilitate tracking down the evolution of the technique for a particular element/matrix, the review is organized in such a way that a chronological order has always been obeyed. Moreover, important information regarding characterization of a specific element in a given steel sample is tabulated, so that interested readers can easily locate relevant resources. Furthermore, typical examples of recent developments and advances in terms of LIBS instrumentation and systems regarding light elements in steels are summarized. Finally, the article suggests in brief some approaches for further raising the analytical capability and figures of merit of LIBS regarding trace compositional analysis of light elements. In this respect, we suggest combining LIBS with recently developed diode laser-based techniques such as DLIFS and DLAAS.

  11. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  12. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovský, J.; Čermák, P.; Musset, O.; Veis, P.

    2014-11-01

    In this review, we present person-transportable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) devices that have previously been developed and reported in the literature as well as their applications. They are compared with X-ray fluorescent (XRF) devices, which represent their strongest competition. Although LIBS devices have advantages over XRF devices, such as sensitivity to the light elements, high spatial resolution and the possibility to distinguish between different layers of the sample, there are also disadvantages and both are discussed here. Furthermore, the essential portable LIBS instrumentation (laser, spectrograph and detector) is presented, and published results related to new laser sources (diode-pumped solid-state, microchip and fiber lasers) used in LIBS are overviewed. Compared to conventional compact flashlamp pumped solid-state lasers, the new laser sources provide higher repetition rates, higher efficiency (less power consumption) and higher beam quality, resulting in higher fluences, even for lower energies, and could potentially increase the figure of merit of portable LIBS instruments. Compact spectrometers used in portable LIBS devices and their parts (spectrograph, detector) are also discussed.

  13. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  14. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire.

  15. Understanding the signature of rock coatings in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanza, Nina L.; Ollila, Ann M.; Cousin, Agnes; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Mangold, Nicolas; Bridges, Nathan; Cooper, Daniel; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Tokar, Robert; Hardgrove, Craig; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Jackson, Ryan S.; Clark, Benton C.; Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Nachon, Marion; Anderson, Ryan B.; Blank, Jennifer; Deans, Matthew; Delapp, Dorothea; Léveillé, Richard; McInroy, Rhonda; Martinez, Ronald; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pinet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Surface compositional features on rocks such as coatings and weathering rinds provide important information about past aqueous environments and water–rock interactions. The search for these features represents an important aspect of the Curiosity rover mission. With its unique ability to do fine-scale chemical depth profiling, the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) onboard Curiosity can be used to both identify and analyze rock surface alteration features. In this study we analyze a terrestrial manganese-rich rock varnish coating on a basalt rock in the laboratory with the ChemCam engineering model to determine the LIBS signature of a natural rock coating. Results show that there is a systematic decrease in peak heights for elements such as Mn that are abundant in the coating but not the rock. There is significant spatial variation in the relative abundance of coating elements detected by LIBS depending on where on the rock surface sampled; this is due to the variability in thickness and spatial discontinuities in the coating. Similar trends have been identified in some martian rock targets in ChemCam data, suggesting that these rocks may have coatings or weathering rinds on their surfaces.

  16. Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of scales from petroleum pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, G. H.; Rocha, A. A.; Damasceno, R. N.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L.; Palleschi, V.

    2013-09-01

    Pipeline scales from the Campos Bay Petroleum Field near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil have been analyzed by both Raman spectroscopy and by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using a double-pulse, calibration-free approach. Elements that are characteristic of petroleum (e.g. C, H, N, O, Mg, Na, Fe and V) were detected, in addition to the Ca, Al, and Si which form the matrix of the scale. The LIBS results were compared with the results of micro-Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed the nature of the incrustations inferred by the LIBS analysis. Results of this preliminary study suggest that diffusion of pipe material into the pipeline intake column plays an important role in the growth of scale. Thanks to the simplicity and relative low cost of equipment and to the fact that no special chemical pre-treatment of the samples is needed, LIBS can offer very fast acquisition of data and the possibility of in situ measurements. LIBS could thus represent an alternative or complementary method for the chemical characterization of the scales by comparison to conventional analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction or X-ray fluorescence.

  17. Validation of an Academic Listening Test: Effects of "Breakdown" Tests and Test Takers' Cognitive Awareness of Listening Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Youngshin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the breakdown effect of a listening comprehension test, whether test takers are affected in comprehending lectures by impediments, and collected test takers' cognitive awareness on test tasks which contain listening breakdown factors how they perceived these impediments. In this context of the study, a "Breakdown" is a test…

  18. Incorporating turnover in estimates of protein retention efficiency for different body tissues.

    PubMed

    Roux, C Z

    2006-02-01

    Formulated in terms of protein synthesis (PS) and protein retention (PR), a definition of turnover-related protein retention efficiency (kP) allows the expression kP=[1+(PS/PR)/6](-1), 6 representing the ratio of the energy equivalent of protein to the cost of synthesis. By combining plausible hormonal and cellular control mechanisms of protein (P) growth, it is possible to derive (PS/PR)=[Q{(P/alpha)(-(4/9)Y)-1}](-1)+1, allowing the calculation of kP by substitution. The symbol alpha represents the limit value of protein growth, while the term 4/9 derives from the power in the relationship between the concentration of growth factor-related activator in the nucleus and cell volume (cv). Y is the power in the relationship between cv and total tissue protein, and Q represents the proportion of growth factor-activated nuclei in a tissue. The proportion Q can be estimated from simple functions of intake rates or blood growth factor concentrations. Estimates of Y are derived from histological considerations or calculated from experimental observations; Y=1 for multinucleated skeletal muscle fibres and Y=1/3, 1/2, 1/6 on average for mononucleated cell tissues, skin or bone and viscera, respectively. To apply kP to the whole body, an average value of Y=1/2 can be taken. Experimental observations on tissue protein synthesis and breakdown rates yield direct estimates of kP in satisfactory agreement with comparable theoretical predictions.

  19. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya

    2009-01-22

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including 1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, 2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, 3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and 4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width.

  20. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Faya

    2008-11-12

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including (1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, (2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, (3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and (4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width.

  1. Electric properties and carrier multiplication in breakdown sites in multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneemann, Matthias; Carius, Reinhard; Rau, Uwe; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2015-05-28

    This paper studies the effective electrical size and carrier multiplication of breakdown sites in multi-crystalline silicon solar cells. The local series resistance limits the current of each breakdown site and is thereby linearizing the current-voltage characteristic. This fact allows the estimation of the effective electrical diameters to be as low as 100 nm. Using a laser beam induced current (LBIC) measurement with a high spatial resolution, we find carrier multiplication factors on the order of 30 (Zener-type breakdown) and 100 (avalanche breakdown) as new lower limits. Hence, we prove that also the so-called Zener-type breakdown is followed by avalanche multiplication. We explain that previous measurements of the carrier multiplication using thermography yield results higher than unity, only if the spatial defect density is high enough, and the illumination intensity is lower than what was used for the LBIC method. The individual series resistances of the breakdown sites limit the current through these breakdown sites. Therefore, the measured multiplication factors depend on the applied voltage as well as on the injected photocurrent. Both dependencies are successfully simulated using a series-resistance-limited diode model.

  2. RF breakdown experiments in "cold" slow wave structures under experimental circumstances of high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Jin, Zhenxing; Yang, Jianhua; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhou, Shengyue

    2015-07-01

    RF breakdown tests in "cold" slow wave structures (SWSs) are executed under experimental circumstance of high power microwave (HPM). All the SWSs under tests are made of stainless steel and are designed as traveling wave structures, which operate at π/2 mode of TM01 wave. The "cold" SWSs are fed by an X-band overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillator, which generates TM01 mode at 9.46 GHz with power around 1.8 GW, pulse duration about 100 ns, and repetition rate of 30 Hz. In the tests, the variances of peak surface electric field (Es-max, 0.53 MV/cm-1.79 MV/cm), number of periods (2-6 periods) of SWSs, and external magnetic field (Bext, 0-2.5 T) versus RF breakdown effects are recorded. The tests results indicate that the input microwave energy is mainly absorbed, not reflected by the RF breakdown process in traveling wave SWSs. Both larger magnitude of Es-max and more numbers of periods of SWSs aggravate the microwave absorption in the breakdown process and bring about shorter transmission pulse width. However, little correlation between RF breakdown effects and Bext is observed in the tests. Further theoretical and experimental studies would be helpful for understanding of the effects of Bext on RF breakdown and breakdown mechanisms under the experimental circumstances of HPM sources.

  3. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwitz, S.; Jostlein, H.

    2016-03-01

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. A model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  4. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGES

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  5. Interplay of voltage and temperature acceleration of oxide breakdown for ultra-thin gate oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, E.; Suñé, J.; Lai, W.; Nowak, E.; McKenna, J.; Vayshenker, A.; Harmon, D.

    2002-11-01

    In this work, we resolved several seemingly conflicting experimental observations regarding temperature dependence of oxide breakdown in the context of change of voltage acceleration factors with reducing voltages. It is found that voltage acceleration factor is temperature dependent at a fixed voltage while voltage acceleration factors are temperature independent at a fixed TBD. We unequivocally demonstrated that strong temperature dependence of time(charge)-to-breakdown, TBD( QBD), observed on ultra-thin gate oxides (<5 nm) is not a thickness effect as previously suggested. It is a consequence of two experimental facts: (1) voltage-dependent voltage acceleration and (2) temperature-independent voltage acceleration at a fixed TBD window. For the first time, time-to-breakdown at low temperature of -50 °C is reported. It is found that Weibull slopes are insensitive to temperature variations using accurate area-scaling method. The stress-induced leakage current (SILC) was used as a measure of defect-generation rate and critical defect density to investigate its correlation with the directly measured breakdown data, QBD( TBD). The comprehensive and statistical measurements of SILC at breakdown as a function of temperature are presented in detail for the first time. Based on these results, we conclude that SILC-based measurements cannot adequately explain the temperature dependence of oxide breakdown. Finally, we provide a global picture for time-to-breakdown in voltage and temperature domains constructed from two important empirical relations based on comprehensive experimental database.

  6. Investigating the Physics of Microwave Induced Breakdown in Metamaterials with Multi-Resonant Constituting Unit Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Hao; Neher, Joel; Booske, John; Behdad, Nader

    2013-10-01

    Recently, metamaterials are receiving significant attention in the high-power microwave area for applications ranging from amplifier design to HPM spatial filters. In this work, we investigate the impact of microwave-induced breakdown on the responses of high-power metamaterials that exploit multi-resonant constituting unit cells. We recently demonstrated a single-layer metasurface, the unit cell of which consisted of two different resonators, that showed a discrete nonlinear response under HPM illumination. We observed that when breakdown occurred in this structure, both resonators break down simultaneously despite their considerably different expected breakdown power levels. In this structure, breakdown in the resonator that has a lower breakdown threshold level mitigates the breakdown in the second resonator. In this work, we examine VUV radiation and electron diffusion as potential culprits for this phenomenon. We first will shield the two resonators physically using a VUV transparent material to block possible movement of electrons from one resonator to the other. We will subsequently repeat the same breakdown experiments using a VUV opaque material. The results will be used to determine if either of these potential culprits is responsible for this phenomenon or not.

  7. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  8. Functional metagenomics reveals novel pathways of prebiotic breakdown by human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Davide A; Laville, Elisabeth; Laguerre, Sandrine; Robe, Patrick; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Henrissat, Bernard; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; Monsan, Pierre; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine hosts a complex bacterial community that plays a major role in nutrition and in maintaining human health. A functional metagenomic approach was used to explore the prebiotic breakdown potential of human gut bacteria, including non-cultivated ones. Two metagenomic libraries, constructed from ileum mucosa and fecal microbiota, were screened for hydrolytic activities on the prebiotic carbohydrates inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose. The DNA inserts of 17 clones, selected from the 167 hits that were identified, were pyrosequenced in-depth, yielding in total 407, 420 bp of metagenomic DNA. From these sequences, we discovered novel prebiotic degradation pathways containing carbohydrate transporters and hydrolysing enzymes, for which we provided the first experimental proof of function. Twenty of these proteins are encoded by genes that are also present in the gut metagenome of at least 100 subjects, whatever are their ages or their geographical origin. The sequence taxonomic assignment indicated that still unknown bacteria, for which neither culture conditions nor genome sequence are available, possess the enzymatic machinery to hydrolyse the prebiotic carbohydrates tested. The results expand the vision on how prebiotics are metabolized along the intestine, and open new perspectives for the design of functional foods.

  9. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  10. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  11. Physical Mechanism of Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown stage of a lightning flash encompasses its first several to tens of milliseconds and it is characterized by a sequence of pulses typically detected with electric field change sensors on the ground [e.g., Villanueva et al., JGR, 99, D7, 1994]. A typical (referred to as "classical") initial breakdown pulse (IBP) has duration of tens of microseconds and it is one of the largest pulses at the beginning of a lightning flash, but a wide range of pulse durations and amplitudes also occur [e.g., Nag et al., Atmos. Res., 91, 316, 2009]. Recent results by Marshall et al. [JGR, 119, 445, 2014] suggest that IBPs should be observable in all lightning discharges. Complementarily, Stolzenburg et al. [JGR, 118, 2918, 2013] correlated individual IBPs to bursts of light that appear to be illumination of a lightning leader channel and Karunarathne et al. [JGR, 118, 7129, 2013] have determined that as a flash evolves the location of IBP sources inside the cloud coincide with the position of negative leaders as determined by a VHF lightning mapping system. In view of the above listed properties of IBPs, we have developed a new numerical model to investigate the electromagnetic signatures associated with these events and to relate them to the initial lightning leader development. The model is built on a bidirectional (zero-net-charge) lightning leader concept [e.g., Mazur and Ruhnke, JGR, 103, D18, 1998]. We simulate a finite-length finite-conductivity leader elongating in the thunderstorm electric field and we solve a set of integro-differential equations to retrieve the full dynamics of charges and currents induced in it. Our proposed approach is a generalization of the transmission-line [e.g., Nag and Rakov, JGR, 115, D20102, 2010] and electrostatic [e.g., Pasko, GRL, 41, 179, 2014] approximations used for analysis of in-cloud discharge processes. We also allow for different propagation mechanisms at the different polarity leader extremities, i.e., continuous

  12. Investigation of historical metal objects using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  13. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    SciTech Connect

    Meshchanov, A. V.; Korshunov, A. N.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Dyatko, N. A.

    2015-08-15

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given.

  14. Analytical investigation of electrical breakdown properties in a nitrogen-SF{sub 6} mixture gas

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Byeon, Yong S.; Song, Ki B.; Choi, Eun H.; Ryu, Han-Yong; Lee, Jaimin

    2010-11-15

    The electrical breakdown properties in nitrogen gas mixed with SF{sub 6} are analytically investigated in this article by making use of the ionization and attachment coefficients of the mixed gas. The ionization coefficients of nitrogen and SF{sub 6} gas are obtained in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of the electron energy. The attachment coefficient of SF{sub 6} gas is also obtained in terms of the gas temperature T{sub e}. An algebraic equation is obtained, relating explicitly the electron breakdown temperature T{sub b} in terms of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction {chi}. It was found from this equation that the breakdown temperature T{sub b} increases from approximately 2 to 5.3 eV as the mole fraction {chi} increases from zero to unity. The breakdown temperature T{sub b} of the electrons increases very rapidly from a small value and then approaches 5.3 eV slowly as the SF{sub 6} mole fraction increases from zero to unity. This indicates that even a small mole fraction of SF{sub 6} in the gas dominates the electron behavior in the breakdown system. The breakdown electric field E{sub b} derived is almost linearly proportional to the breakdown electron temperature T{sub b}. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results. Therefore, it is concluded that even a small fraction of SF{sub 6} gas dominates nitrogen in determining the breakdown field. In this context, nearly 25% of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction provides a reasonable enhancement of the breakdown field for practical applications.

  15. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  16. Projectile penetration into representative targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, George W.

    1994-10-01

    The differential equation representing the penetration of a 'hard' projectile into semi-infinite, homogeneous target materials is solved for several generic combinations of the target material/projectile characteristics. A 'hard' projectile is defined as one that does not change size or shape and does not lose mass during the penetration process. The target materials evaluated range from the structurally 'soft' materials (liquids) to structurally 'hard' materials (armor plate) with viscous and fluid dynamic drag considered. The solutions to the differential equation(s) are expanded in series form to demonstrate the underlying parameters governing projectile penetration and the way they interact to limit penetration in a given target material. It is shown that the fundamental parameter governing projectile penetration into structurally 'firm' materials is the initial kinetic energy of the projectile divided by the frontal area of the projectile and the inherent structural characteristic of the target. Experimental data on the penetration of steel spheres into ballistic gelatin and for armor piercing bullets into armor plate materials are used to verify the characteristics of the solutions to the equation of motion for the projectile and to demonstrate how penetration can vary with projectile size and target characteristics. The penetration equation for a single 'hard' target material is used to develop a solution for the penetration of multilayered 'hard' target materials.

  17. Want change? Call your representative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischhoff, Ilya R.

    2011-07-01

    During my tenure as an AGU Congressional Science Fellow, which began in September 2010 and continues until November 2011, my time has been shared between working with the U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resource Committee Democratic staff and in the office of Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass., ranking Democrat on the committee). I appreciate getting to work with staff, fellows, and interns who inspire me, make me laugh, and know their issues cold. Much of my work on the committee is related to fish, wildlife, oceans, lands, and water issues and is directly related to my background in ecology and evolutionary biology (I studied zebra ecology and behavior in Kenya). My assignments have included asking the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) about why it has not changed the allowed usage of certain pesticides that the National Marine Fisheries Service has found to jeopardize the recovery of endangered Pacific salmon; helping to identify research needs and management options to combat the swiftly spreading and catastrophic white nose syndrome in North American bats; and inquiring as to whether a captive-ape welfare bill, if passed without amendment, could thwart development of a vaccine to stop the Ebola virus from continuing to cause mass mortality in endangered wild apes.

  18. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale for predicting skin breakdown in neonates.

    PubMed

    Huffines, B; Logsdon, M C

    1997-01-01

    An instrument was developed to assess neonates at risk for skin breakdown, based on the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk in adults. Using such an instrument to predict, and thus prevent, skin breakdown could decrease costs associated with prolonged hospital stays in neonates. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) was piloted with 32 neonates. Reliability was high for the subscales of general physical condition, activity, and nutrition, but low in the other three subscales. For predictive validity, sensitivity was 83% and specificity was 81%. The NSRAS appears to be useful in predicting days most likely for skin breakdown to occur.

  19. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  20. On the accuracy of the rate coefficients used in plasma fluid models for breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical breakdown of air depends on the balance between creation and loss of charged particles. In fluid models, datasets of the rate coefficients used are obtained either from fits to experimental data or by solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Here, we study the accuracy of the commonly used models for ionization and attachment frequencies and their impact on the prediction of the breakdown threshold for air. We show that large errors can occur depending on the model and propose the most accurate dataset available for modeling of air breakdown phenomena.