Science.gov

Sample records for protein breakdown represents

  1. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  2. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants.

  3. Role of the alpha-amino group of protein in ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Heller, H; Eytan, E; Kaklij, G; Rose, I A

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin to NH2 groups of proteins is required for protein breakdown. We now show that the selective modification of NH2-terminal alpha-NH2 groups of globin and lysozyme prevents their degradation by the ubiquitin proteolytic system from reticulocytes. The conjugation by ubiquitin of epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues, usually seen in multiples, was also inhibited in alpha-NH2-blocked proteins. Naturally occurring N alpha-acetylated proteins are not degraded by the ubiquitin system at a significant rate, while their nonacetylated counterparts from other species are good substrates. This suggests that one function of N alpha-acetylation of cellular proteins is to prevent their degradation by the ubiquitin system. alpha-NH2-blocked proteins can have their activity as substrates for degradation increased by incorporation of alpha-NH2 groups through the introduction of polyalanine side chains. Proteins in which most epsilon-NH2 groups are blocked but the alpha-NH2 group is free are degraded by the ubiquitin system, but at a reduced rate. It is therefore suggested that the exposure of a free NH2 terminus of proteins is required for degradation and probably initiates the formation of ubiquitin conjugates committed for degradation. Images PMID:6095265

  4. Corticosteroids increase protein breakdown and loss in newly diagnosed pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Steven J; Noe, Joshua D; Denne, Scott C

    2011-11-01

    Children with Crohn disease have altered growth and body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated decreased protein breakdown after either corticosteroid or anti-TNF-α therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whole body protein metabolism during corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease. Children with suspected Crohn disease and children with abdominal symptoms not consistent with Crohn disease underwent outpatient metabolic assessment. Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease and prescribed corticosteroid therapy returned in 2 wk for repeat metabolic assessment. Using the stable isotopes [d5] phenylalanine, [1-(13)C] leucine, and [(15)N(2)] urea, protein kinetics were determined in the fasting state. Thirty-one children (18 controls and 13 newly diagnosed with Crohn disease) completed the study. There were no significant differences in protein breakdown or loss between patients with Crohn disease at diagnosis and controls. After corticosteroid therapy in patients with Crohn disease, the rates of appearance of phenylalanine (32%) and leucine (26%) increased significantly, reflecting increased protein breakdown, and the rate of appearance of urea also increased significantly (273%), reflecting increased protein loss. Whole body protein breakdown and loss increased significantly after 2 wk of corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease, which may have profound effects on body composition.

  5. Elastin: a representative ideal protein elastomer.

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D W; Hugel, T; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E; Sheiba, L; Dea, J; Xu, J; Parker, T

    2002-01-01

    During the last half century, identification of an ideal (predominantly entropic) protein elastomer was generally thought to require that the ideal protein elastomer be a random chain network. Here, we report two new sets of data and review previous data. The first set of new data utilizes atomic force microscopy to report single-chain force-extension curves for (GVGVP)(251) and (GVGIP)(260), and provides evidence for single-chain ideal elasticity. The second class of new data provides a direct contrast between low-frequency sound absorption (0.1-10 kHz) exhibited by random-chain network elastomers and by elastin protein-based polymers. Earlier composition, dielectric relaxation (1-1000 MHz), thermoelasticity, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses are presented, that combine with the new data to contrast with random-chain network rubbers and to detail the presence of regular non-random structural elements of the elastin-based systems that lose entropic elastomeric force upon thermal denaturation. The data and analyses affirm an earlier contrary argument that components of elastin, the elastic protein of the mammalian elastic fibre, and purified elastin fibre itself contain dynamic, non-random, regularly repeating structures that exhibit dominantly entropic elasticity by means of a damping of internal chain dynamics on extension. PMID:11911774

  6. Effects of oral meal feeding on whole body protein breakdown and protein synthesis in cachectic pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David PJ; van de Poll, Marcel CG; Moses, Alastair GW; Preston, Thomas; Olde Damink, Steven WM; Rensen, Sander S; Deutz, Nicolaas EP; Soeters, Peter B; Ross, James A; Fearon, Kenneth CH; Dejong, Cornelis HC

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is often accompanied by cachexia, a syndrome of severe weight loss and muscle wasting. A suboptimal response to nutritional support may further aggravate cachexia, yet the influence of nutrition on protein kinetics in cachectic patients is poorly understood. Methods Eight cachectic pancreatic cancer patients and seven control patients received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of l-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and l-[3,3-2H2]tyrosine for 8 h and ingested sips of water with l-[1-13C]phenylalanine every 30 min. After 4 h, oral feeding was started. Whole body protein breakdown, protein synthesis, and net protein balance were calculated. Results are given as median with interquartile range. Results Baseline protein breakdown and protein synthesis were higher in cachectic patients compared with the controls (breakdown: 67.1 (48.1–79.6) vs. 45.8 (42.6–46.3) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, P = 0.049; and synthesis: 63.0 (44.3–75.6) vs. 41.8 (37.6–42.5) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, P = 0.021). During feeding, protein breakdown decreased significantly to 45.5 (26.9–51.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.012) in the cachexia group and to 33.7 (17.4–37.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.018) in the control group. Protein synthesis was not affected by feeding in cachectic patients: 58.4 (46.5–76.1) µmol/kg lean body mass/h, but was stimulated in controls: 47.9 (41.8–56.7) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.018). Both groups showed a comparable positive net protein balance during feeding: cachexia: 19.7 (13.1–23.7) and control: 16.3 (13.6–25.4) µmol/kg lean body mass/h (P = 0.908). Conclusion Cachectic pancreatic cancer patients have a higher basal protein turnover. Both cachectic patients and controls show a comparable protein anabolism during feeding, albeit through a different pattern of protein kinetics. In cachectic patients, this is primarily related to reduced protein breakdown, whereas in controls, both protein breakdown and

  7. Does exercise stimulate protein breakdown in humans. Isotopic approaches to the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Protein metabolism in exercise has been investigated for 100 yr, yet it is still unclear if exercise induces an increased rate of protein breakdown. We have recently addressed this general question in a series of experiments in human subjects using stable isotopic tracers. In this paper, the results of those studies are reviewed. We have found that in light exercise the de-carboxylation of leucine is increased. However, urea production is not increased correspondingly, nor is the rate of incorporation into urea of nitrogen from either leucine or lysine. Further complicating the picture is the fact that lysine de-carboxylation is not markedly elevated in exercise. From these studies, we must conclude that isotopic techniques which have achieved general acceptance in other circumstances cannot reliably be used to answer the question of whether exercise stimulates protein breakdown in humans. However, these methods do provide results which enable a better understanding of the metabolism of the individual amino acids in exercise.

  8. Effects of anabolic agents on protein breakdown in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F J; Francis, G L

    1983-01-01

    1. Protein degradation in rat L6 myoblasts is inhibited by high concentrations of insulin as well as by foetal bovine serum and bovine colostrum, mixtures rich in growth-factor activity. 2. Growth factors achieve maximal effects within 2 h after addition to the cell cultures, but these diminish with time. Indeed, during incubations greater than 12 h, foetal calf serum actually stimulates protein breakdown. The changed response, however, is not due to the depletion of growth factors from serum. 3. Protein breakdown is stimulated by dexamethasone by a process that takes several hours to be expressed, but is more pronounced over a 4 h measurement period than over 18h. The glucocorticoid response is prevented by insulin or by cycloheximide. 4. Anabolic agents such as trenbolone, diethylstilboestrol and testosterone do not alter rates of intracellular protein breakdown and do not interfere with the glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response. 5. The results are consistent with anabolic steroids and related agents acting indirectly on muscle, perhaps via altering concentrations of growth factors of the somatomedin type. PMID:6342615

  9. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  10. Determination of steady-state protein breakdown rate in vivo by the disappearance of protein-bound tracer-labeled amino acids: a method applicable in humans.

    PubMed

    Holm, Lars; O'Rourke, Bruce; Ebenstein, David; Toth, Michael J; Bechshoeft, Rasmus; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Kjaer, Michael; Matthews, Dwight E

    2013-04-15

    A method to determine the rate of protein breakdown in individual proteins was developed and tested in rats and confirmed in humans, using administration of deuterium oxide and incorporation of the deuterium into alanine that was subsequently incorporated into body proteins. Measurement of the fractional breakdown rate of proteins was determined from the rate of disappearance of deuterated alanine from the proteins. The rate of disappearance of deuterated alanine from the proteins was calculated using an exponential decay, giving the fractional breakdown rate (FBR) of the proteins. The applicability of this protein-specific FBR approach is suitable for human in vivo experimentation. The labeling period of deuterium oxide administration is dependent on the turnover rate of the protein of interest.

  11. Validity of 3-methylhistidine excretion as an indicator of skeletal muscle protein breakdown in humans.

    PubMed

    Long, C L; Dillard, D R; Bodzin, J H; Geiger, J W; Blakemore, W S

    1988-09-01

    The urinary excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3MEH) in humans and animals has been used as a biologic marker for skeletal muscle protein breakdown. In rats, it has been recently suggested that there is a significant contribution of 3MEH in urine from the gastrointestinal tract due to the rapid turnover of protein in that tissue. To evaluate this point in humans, six patients with short bowel were evaluated. They were placed on three-day meat-free diets while 24-hour urine collections were obtained. The mean +/- SEM 3MEH in the short-bowel group was 3.27 +/- 0.34 mumol/kg/d and the mean +/- SEM molar ratio of 3MEH to creatinine was 0.0212 +/- 0.0012. These data were not significantly different from the control group at 95% confidence level. The results suggest that the contribution of the small intestine appears to be negligible, therefore urinary 3MEH should continue to be a valid index of skeletal muscle breakdown in man.

  12. The effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on protein synthesis and breakdown in murine C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamolrat, Torkamol; Gray, Stuart R.

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► EPA can enhance protein synthesis and retard protein breakdown in muscle cells. ► These effects were concurrent with increases in p70s6k and FOXO3a phosphorylation. ► EPA may be a useful tool in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions. -- Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been found to stimulate protein synthesis with little information regarding their effects on protein breakdown. Furthermore whether there are distinct effects of EPA and DHA remains to be established. The aim of the current study was to determine the distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein synthesis, protein breakdown and signalling pathways in C2C12 myotubes. Fully differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated for 24 h with 0.1% ethanol (control), 50 μM EPA or 50 μM DHA prior to experimentation. After serum (4 h) and amino acid (1 h) starvation cells were stimulated with 2 mM L-leucine and protein synthesis measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine. Protein breakdown was measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine and signalling pathways (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, 4EBP1, rps6 and FOXO3a) via Western blots. Data revealed that after incubation with EPA protein synthesis was 25% greater (P < 0.05) compared to control cells, with no effect of DHA. Protein breakdown was 22% (P < 0.05) lower, compared to control cells, after incubation with EPA, with no effect of DHA. Analysis of signalling pathways revealed that both EPA and DHA incubation increased (P < 0.05) p70s6k phosphorylation, EPA increased (P < 0.05) FOXO3a phosphorylation, with no alteration in other signalling proteins. The current study has demonstrated distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein metabolism with EPA showing a greater ability to result in skeletal muscle protein accretion.

  13. Effects of Pharmacological Interventions on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Breakdown in Recovery from Burns

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Eva C.; Herndon, David N.; Porter, Craig; Sidossis, Labros S.; Suman, Oscar E.; Børsheim, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    Objective The pathophysiological response to burn injury disturbs the balance between skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown, resulting in severe muscle wasting. Muscle loss after burn injury is related to increased mortality and morbidity. Consequently, mitigation of this catabolic response has become a focus in the management of these patients. The aim of this review is to discuss the literature pertaining to pharmacological interventions aimed at attenuating skeletal muscle catabolism in severely burned patients. Data selection Review of the literature related to skeletal muscle protein metabolism following burn injury was conducted. Emphasis was on studies utilizing stable isotope tracer kinetics to assess the impact of pharmacological interventions on muscle protein metabolism in severely burned patients. Conclusion Data support the efficacy of testosterone, oxandrolone, human recombinant growth hormone, insulin, metformin, and propranolol in improving skeletal muscle protein net balance in patients with severe burns. The mechanisms underlying the improvement of protein net balance differ between types and dosages of drugs, but their main effect is on protein synthesis. Finally, the majority of studies have been conducted during the acute hypermetabolic phase of the injury. Except for oxandrolone, the effects of drugs on muscle protein kinetics following discharge from the hospital are largely unknown. PMID:25468473

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based Protein Assay for Cereal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Banu; Bilge, Gonca; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-12-14

    Protein content is an important quality parameter in terms of price, nutritional value, and labeling of various cereal samples. However, conventional analysis methods, namely, Kjeldahl and Dumas, have major drawbacks such as long analysis time, titration mistakes, and carrier gas dependence with high purity. For this reason, there is an urgent need for rapid, reliable, and environmentally friendly technologies for protein analysis. The present study aims to develop a new method for protein analysis in wheat flour and whole meal by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which is a multielemental, fast, and simple spectroscopic method. Unlike the Kjeldahl and Dumas methods, it has potential to analyze a high number of samples in considerably short time. In the study, nitrogen peaks in LIBS spectra of wheat flour and whole meal samples with different protein contents were correlated with results of the standard Dumas method with the aid of chemometric methods. A calibration graph showed good linearity with the protein content between 7.9 and 20.9% and a 0.992 coefficient of determination (R(2)). The limit of detection was calculated as 0.26%. The results indicated that LIBS is a promising and reliable method with its high sensitivity for routine protein analysis in wheat flour and whole meal samples.

  15. Skeletal muscle protein breakdown remains elevated in pediatric burn survivors up to one year post injury

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tony; Herndon, David N.; Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Chaidemenou, Anastasia; Abdelrahman, Doaa Reda; Bohanon, Fredrick J.; Andersen, Clark; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism are a well-established event associated with the stress response to burns. Nevertheless, the long-lasting effects of burn injury on skeletal muscle protein turnover are incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate fractional synthesis (FSR) and breakdown (FBR) rates in skeletal muscle of pediatric burn patients (N=42, >30% total body surface area burns) for up to 1 year after injury. Skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured in the postprandial state following bolus injections of 13C6 and 15N phenylalanine stable isotopes. Plasma and muscle phenylalanine enrichments were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the FSR in burn patients was 2- to 3-fold higher than values from healthy men previously reported in the literature (p≤0.05). The FBR was 4- to 6-fold higher than healthy values (p<0.01). Therefore, net protein balance was lower in burn patients compared to healthy men from 2 weeks to 12 months post injury (p<0.05). These findings show that skeletal muscle protein turnover stays elevated for up to 1 year after burn, an effect attributable to simultaneous increases in FBR and FSR. Muscle FBR exceeds FSR during this time, producing a persistent net negative protein balance, even in the postprandial state, which likely contributes to the prolonged cachexia seen in burned victims. PMID:26263438

  16. Epinephrine depletion exacerbates the fasting-induced protein breakdown in fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Graça, Flávia A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Silveira, Wilian A; Lira, Eduardo C; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia; Zanon, Neusa M; Garófalo, Maria Antonieta R; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C C

    2013-12-01

    The physiological role of epinephrine in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein metabolism under fasting is unknown. We examined the effects of plasma epinephrine depletion, induced by adrenodemedullation (ADMX), on muscle protein metabolism in fed and 2-day-fasted rats. In fed rats, ADMX for 10 days reduced muscle mass, the cross-sectional area of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, and the phosphorylation levels of Akt. In addition, ADMX led to a compensatory increase in muscle sympathetic activity, as estimated by the rate of norepinephrine turnover; this increase was accompanied by high rates of muscle protein synthesis. In fasted rats, ADMX exacerbated fasting-induced proteolysis in EDL but did not affect the low rates of protein synthesis. Accordingly, ADMX activated lysosomal proteolysis and further increased the activity of the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS). Moreover, expression of the atrophy-related Ub ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and the autophagy-related genes LC3b and GABARAPl1 were upregulated in EDL muscles from ADMX-fasted rats compared with sham-fasted rats, and ADMX reduced cAMP levels and increased fasting-induced Akt dephosphorylation. Unlike that observed for EDL muscles, soleus muscle proteolysis and Akt phosphorylation levels were not affected by ADMX. In isolated EDL, epinephrine reduced the basal UPS activity and suppressed overall proteolysis and atrogin-1 and MuRF1 induction following fasting. These data suggest that epinephrine released from the adrenal medulla inhibits fasting-induced protein breakdown in fast-twitch skeletal muscles, and these antiproteolytic effects on the UPS and lysosomal system are apparently mediated through a cAMP-Akt-dependent pathway, which suppresses ubiquitination and autophagy.

  17. Effects of protein kinase C activators on germinal vesicle breakdown and polar body emission of mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bornslaeger, E.A.; Poueymirou, W.T.; Mattei, P.; Schultz, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase is instrumental in maintaining meiotic arrest of mouse oocytes. To assess whether protein phosphorylation mediated by calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) might also inhibit the resumption of meiosis, oocytes were treated with activators of this enzyme. The active phorbol esters 12-O-tetra-decanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 4..beta..-phorbol, 12,13-didecanoate (4..beta..-PDD) inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), as did a more natural activator of protein kinase, C, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/). An inactive phorbol ester, 4a-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4..cap alpha..-PDD), did not inhibit GVBD. TPA did not inhibit the maturation-associated decrease in oocyte cAMP. Microinjected heat-stable protein inhibitor of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase failed to induce GVBD in the presence of TPA. Both TPA and diC/sub 8/ partially inhibited specific changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are tightly correlated with resumption of meiosis; these agents also induced the apparent phosphorylation of specific oocyte proteins. These results suggest that protein kinase C activators may inhibit resumption of meiosis by acting distal to a decrease in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, but prior to changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are presumably required for resumption of meiosis.

  18. Intra-crystalline protein diagenesis (IcPD) in Patella vulgata. Part II: Breakdown and temperature sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, B.; Collins, M.J.; Tomiak, P.J.; Davies, B.J.; Penkman, K.E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial diagenesis of the intra-crystalline proteins isolated from Patella vulgata was induced by isothermal heating at 140 °C, 110 °C and 80 °C. Protein breakdown was quantified for multiple amino acids, measuring the extent of peptide bond hydrolysis, amino acid racemisation and decomposition. The patterns of diagenesis are complex; therefore the kinetic parameters of the main reactions were estimated by two different methods: 1) a well-established approach based on fitting mathematical expressions to the experimental data, e.g. first-order rate equations for hydrolysis and power-transformed first-order rate equations for racemisation; and 2) an alternative model-free approach, which was developed by estimating a “scaling” factor for the independent variable (time) which produces the best alignment of the experimental data. This method allows the calculation of the relative reaction rates for the different temperatures of isothermal heating. High-temperature data were compared with the extent of degradation detected in sub-fossil Patella specimens of known age, and we evaluated the ability of kinetic experiments to mimic diagenesis at burial temperature. The results highlighted a difference between patterns of degradation at low and high temperature and therefore we recommend caution for the extrapolation of protein breakdown rates to low burial temperatures for geochronological purposes when relying solely on kinetic data. PMID:23956808

  19. Skeletal Muscle Protein Breakdown Remains Elevated in Pediatric Burn Survivors up to One-Year Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tony; Herndon, David N; Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Chaidemenou, Anastasia; Abdelrahman, Doaa Reda; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Andersen, Clark; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-11-01

    Acute alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism are a well-established event associated with the stress response to burns. Nevertheless, the long-lasting effects of burn injury on skeletal muscle protein turnover are incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate fractional synthesis (FSR) and breakdown (FBR) rates of protein in skeletal muscle of pediatric burn patients (n  =  42, >30% total body surface area burns) for up to 1 year after injury. Skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured in the post-prandial state following bolus injections of C6 and N phenylalanine stable isotopes. Plasma and muscle phenylalanine enrichments were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the FSR in burn patients was 2- to 3-fold higher than values from healthy men previously reported in the literature (P ≤ 0.05). The FBR was 4- to 6-fold higher than healthy values (P  <  0.01). Therefore, net protein balance was lower in burn patients compared with healthy men from 2 weeks to 12 months post-injury (P  <  0.05). These findings show that skeletal muscle protein turnover stays elevated for up to 1 year after burn, an effect attributable to simultaneous increases in FBR and FSR. Muscle FBR exceeds FSR during this time, producing a persistent negative net protein balance, even in the post-prandial state, which likely contributes to the prolonged cachexia seen in burned victims.

  20. MES16, a member of the methylesterase protein family, specifically demethylates fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites during chlorophyll breakdown in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Christ, Bastien; Schelbert, Silvia; Aubry, Sylvain; Süssenbacher, Iris; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    During leaf senescence, chlorophyll (Chl) is broken down to nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs). These arise from intermediary fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) by an acid-catalyzed isomerization inside the vacuole. The chemical structures of NCCs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) indicate the presence of an enzyme activity that demethylates the C13(2)-carboxymethyl group present at the isocyclic ring of Chl. Here, we identified this activity as methylesterase family member 16 (MES16; At4g16690). During senescence, mes16 leaves exhibited a strong ultraviolet-excitable fluorescence, which resulted from large amounts of different FCCs accumulating in the mutants. As confirmed by mass spectrometry, these FCCs had an intact carboxymethyl group, which slowed down their isomerization to respective NCCs. Like a homologous protein cloned from radish (Raphanus sativus) and named pheophorbidase, MES16 catalyzed the demethylation of pheophorbide, an early intermediate of Chl breakdown, in vitro, but MES16 also demethylated an FCC. To determine the in vivo substrate of MES16, we analyzed pheophorbide a oxygenase1 (pao1), which is deficient in pheophorbide catabolism and accumulates pheophorbide in the chloroplast, and a mes16pao1 double mutant. In the pao1 background, we additionally mistargeted MES16 to the chloroplast. Normally, MES16 localizes to the cytosol, as shown by analysis of a MES16-green fluorescent protein fusion. Analysis of the accumulating pigments in these lines revealed that pheophorbide is only accessible for demethylation when MES16 is targeted to the chloroplast. Together, these data demonstrate that MES16 is an integral component of Chl breakdown in Arabidopsis and specifically demethylates Chl catabolites at the level of FCCs in the cytosol.

  1. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway.

  2. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  3. Task breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlich, Jane

    1990-01-01

    The topics concerning the Center for Space Construction (CSC) space construction breakdown structure are presented in viewgraph form. It is concluded that four components describe a task -- effecting, information gathering, analysis, and regulation; uncertainties effect the relative amount of information gathering and analysis that occurs; and that task timing requirements drive the 'location in time' of cognition.

  4. G/sub o/ protein of fat cells: role in hormonal regulation of agonist-stimulated phosphatidyl inositol breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Rapiejko, P.J.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1986-05-01

    Incubating rat fat cell membranes in the presence of (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and pertussis toxin (PT) results in the ADP-ribosylation of two peptides (M/sub r/ = 41,000 and 40,000). The 41,000-M/sub r/ peptide is the inhibitory G-protein of adenylate cyclase (G/sub i/). The 40,000-M/sub r/ peptide radiolabeled in the presence of (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and PT has been purified from rabbit heart and bovine brain, but has not been identified uniformly in membranes of fat cells. Two rabbit polyclonal antisera raised against the alpha-subunit of bovine brain G/sub o/ were used to probe the nature of the 40,000-M/sub r/ peptide in rat fat cell membranes that had been separated by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and transferred electrophoretically to nitrocellulose. Both antisera specific for the alpha-subunit of G/sub o/ recognized the M/sub r/ = 40,000 peptide of fat cells that is ADP-ribosylated in the presence of PT. PT treatment of rat fat cells blocks epinephrine-stimulated inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) generation. The inhibition of IP/sub 3/ generation by PT suggests a role for either G/sub i/ or G/sub o/ in receptor-mediated phosphatidyl inositol breakdown in the rat fat cell.

  5. Protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion of sterilised model systems of liquid infant formula.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Stefano; Stuknytė, Milda; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2017-02-15

    Protein modifications occurring during sterilisation of infant formulas can affect protein digestibility and release of bioactive peptides. The effect of glycation and cross-linking on protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins was evaluated during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion (GID) of six sterilised model systems of infant formula. Protein degradation during in vitro GID was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and by measuring the nitrogen content of ultrafiltration (3kDa) permeates before and after in vitro GID of model IFs. Glycation strongly hindered protein breakdown, whereas cross-linking resulting from β-elimination reactions had a negligible effect. Only β-casomorphin 7 (β-CM7) was detected (0.187-0.858mgL(-1)) at the end of the intestinal digestion in all untreated IF model systems. The level of β-CM7 in the sterilised model systems prepared without addition of sugars ranged from 0.256 to 0.655mgL(-1). The release of this peptide during GID was hindered by protein glycation.

  6. Beta-AMYLASE4, a noncatalytic protein required for starch breakdown, acts upstream of three active beta-amylases in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Daniel C; Stettler, Michaela; Mettler, Tabea; Vaughan, Cara K; Li, Jing; Francisco, Perigio; Gil, Manuel; Reinhold, Heike; Eicke, Simona; Messerli, Gaëlle; Dorken, Gary; Halliday, Karen; Smith, Alison M; Smith, Steven M; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2008-04-01

    This work investigated the roles of beta-amylases in the breakdown of leaf starch. Of the nine beta-amylase (BAM)-like proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, at least four (BAM1, -2, -3, and -4) are chloroplastic. When expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, BAM1, BAM2, and BAM3 had measurable beta-amylase activity but BAM4 did not. BAM4 has multiple amino acid substitutions relative to characterized beta-amylases, including one of the two catalytic residues. Modeling predicts major differences between the glucan binding site of BAM4 and those of active beta-amylases. Thus, BAM4 probably lost its catalytic capacity during evolution. Total beta-amylase activity was reduced in leaves of bam1 and bam3 mutants but not in bam2 and bam4 mutants. The bam3 mutant had elevated starch levels and lower nighttime maltose levels than the wild type, whereas bam1 did not. However, the bam1 bam3 double mutant had a more severe phenotype than bam3, suggesting functional overlap between the two proteins. Surprisingly, bam4 mutants had elevated starch levels. Introduction of the bam4 mutation into the bam3 and bam1 bam3 backgrounds further elevated the starch levels in both cases. These data suggest that BAM4 facilitates or regulates starch breakdown and operates independently of BAM1 and BAM3. Together, our findings are consistent with the proposal that beta-amylase is a major enzyme of starch breakdown in leaves, but they reveal unexpected complexity in terms of the specialization of protein function.

  7. A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunguang; Schaack, Dominik; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K; Sarukhanyan, Edita; Giese, Anne; Pagels, Martin; Romanov, Natalie; Pané-Farré, Jan; Fuchs, Stephan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-02-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a refined strain comparison combining ribosomal RNA, MLST markers, and looking at highly-conserved regions shared between strains. This analysis shows three sub-clades (A-C) for S. aureus. As calculations are complex and strain annotation is quite time consuming we compare here key representatives of each clade with each other: model strains COL, USA300, Newman, and HG001 (clade A), model strain N315 and Mu50 (clade B) and ED133 and MRSA252 (clade C). We look at these individual proteomes and compare them to a background of 64 S. aureus strains. There are overall 13,284 S. aureus proteins not part of the core proteome which are involved in different strain-specific or more general complexes requiring detailed annotation and new experimental data to be accurately delineated. By comparison of the eight representative strains, we identify strain-specific proteins (e.g., 18 in COL, 105 in N315 and 44 in Newman) that characterize each strain and analyze pathogenicity islands if they contain such strain-specific proteins. We identify strain-specific protein repertoires involved in virulence, in cell wall metabolism, and phosphorylation. Finally we compare and analyze protein complexes conserved and well-characterized among S. aureus (a total of 103 complexes), as well as predict and analyze several individual protein complexes, including structure modeling in the three clades.

  8. A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chunguang; Schaack, Dominik; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K.; Sarukhanyan, Edita; Giese, Anne; Pagels, Martin; Romanov, Natalie; Pané-Farré, Jan; Fuchs, Stephan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a refined strain comparison combining ribosomal RNA, MLST markers, and looking at highly-conserved regions shared between strains. This analysis shows three sub-clades (A–C) for S. aureus. As calculations are complex and strain annotation is quite time consuming we compare here key representatives of each clade with each other: model strains COL, USA300, Newman, and HG001 (clade A), model strain N315 and Mu50 (clade B) and ED133 and MRSA252 (clade C). We look at these individual proteomes and compare them to a background of 64 S. aureus strains. There are overall 13,284 S. aureus proteins not part of the core proteome which are involved in different strain-specific or more general complexes requiring detailed annotation and new experimental data to be accurately delineated. By comparison of the eight representative strains, we identify strain-specific proteins (e.g., 18 in COL, 105 in N315 and 44 in Newman) that characterize each strain and analyze pathogenicity islands if they contain such strain-specific proteins. We identify strain-specific protein repertoires involved in virulence, in cell wall metabolism, and phosphorylation. Finally we compare and analyze protein complexes conserved and well-characterized among S. aureus (a total of 103 complexes), as well as predict and analyze several individual protein complexes, including structure modeling in the three clades. PMID:28248218

  9. Catalytically-inactive beta-amylase BAM4 required for starch breakdown in Arabidopsis leaves is a starch-binding-protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Francisco, Perigio; Zhou, Wenxu; Edner, Christoph; Steup, Martin; Ritte, Gerhard; Bond, Charles S; Smith, Steven M

    2009-09-01

    Of the four chloroplast beta-amylase (BAM) proteins identified in Arabidopsis, BAM3 and BAM4 were previously shown to play the major roles in leaf starch breakdown, although BAM4 apparently lacks key active site residues and beta-amylase activity. Here we tested multiple BAM4 proteins with different N-terminal sequences with a range of glucan substrates and assay methods, but detected no alpha-1,4-glucan hydrolase activity. BAM4 did not affect BAM1, BAM2 or BAM3 activity even when added in 10-fold excess, nor the BAM3-catalysed release of maltose from isolated starch granules in the presence of glucan water dikinase. However, BAM4 binds to amylopectin and to amylose-Sepharose whereas BAM2 has very low beta-amylase activity and poor glucan binding. The low activity of BAM2 may be explained by poor glucan binding but absence of BAM4 activity is not. These results suggest that BAM4 facilitates starch breakdown by a mechanism involving direct interaction with starch or other alpha-1,4-glucan.

  10. Trafficking of TRPP2 by PACS proteins represents a novel mechanism of ion channel regulation

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Michael; Benzing, Thomas; Simmen, Thomas; Tauber, Robert; Buchholz, Björn; Feliciangeli, Sylvain; Huber, Tobias B; Schermer, Bernhard; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Höpker, Katja; Simmen, Katia Carmine; Tschucke, Christoph Carl; Sandford, Richard; Kim, Emily; Thomas, Gary; Walz, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    The trafficking of ion channels to the plasma membrane is tightly controlled to ensure the proper regulation of intracellular ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Mutations of polycystin-2, a member of the TRP family of cation channels, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, a disorder characterized by renal cysts and progressive renal failure. Polycystin-2 functions as a calcium-permeable nonselective cation channel; however, it is disputed whether polycystin-2 resides and acts at the plasma membrane or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that the subcellular localization and function of polycystin-2 are directed by phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein (PACS)-1 and PACS-2, two adaptor proteins that recognize an acidic cluster in the carboxy-terminal domain of polycystin-2. Binding to these adaptor proteins is regulated by the phosphorylation of polycystin-2 by the protein kinase casein kinase 2, required for the routing of polycystin-2 between ER, Golgi and plasma membrane compartments. Our paradigm that polycystin-2 is sorted to and active at both ER and plasma membrane reconciles the previously incongruent views of its localization and function. Furthermore, PACS proteins may represent a novel molecular mechanism for ion channel trafficking, directing acidic cluster-containing ion channels to distinct subcellular compartments. PMID:15692563

  11. Improved K-means clustering algorithm for exploring local protein sequence motifs representing common structural property.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2005-09-01

    Information about local protein sequence motifs is very important to the analysis of biologically significant conserved regions of protein sequences. These conserved regions can potentially determine the diverse conformation and activities of proteins. In this work, recurring sequence motifs of proteins are explored with an improved K-means clustering algorithm on a new dataset. The structural similarity of these recurring sequence clusters to produce sequence motifs is studied in order to evaluate the relationship between sequence motifs and their structures. To the best of our knowledge, the dataset used by our research is the most updated dataset among similar studies for sequence motifs. A new greedy initialization method for the K-means algorithm is proposed to improve traditional K-means clustering techniques. The new initialization method tries to choose suitable initial points, which are well separated and have the potential to form high-quality clusters. Our experiments indicate that the improved K-means algorithm satisfactorily increases the percentage of sequence segments belonging to clusters with high structural similarity. Careful comparison of sequence motifs obtained by the improved and traditional algorithms also suggests that the improved K-means clustering algorithm may discover some relatively weak and subtle sequence motifs, which are undetectable by the traditional K-means algorithms. Many biochemical tests reported in the literature show that these sequence motifs are biologically meaningful. Experimental results also indicate that the improved K-means algorithm generates more detailed sequence motifs representing common structures than previous research. Furthermore, these motifs are universally conserved sequence patterns across protein families, overcoming some weak points of other popular sequence motifs. The satisfactory result of the experiment suggests that this new K-means algorithm may be applied to other areas of bioinformatics

  12. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  13. Obesity Appears to Be Associated With Altered Muscle Protein Synthetic and Breakdown Responses to Increased Nutrient Delivery in Older Men, but Not Reduced Muscle Mass or Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Murton, Andrew J; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Mallinson, Joanne E; Selby, Anna L; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is increasing, yet despite the necessity of maintaining muscle mass and function with age, the effect of obesity on muscle protein turnover in older adults remains unknown. Eleven obese (BMI 31.9 ± 1.1 kg · m(-2)) and 15 healthy-weight (BMI 23.4 ± 0.3 kg · m(-2)) older men (55-75 years old) participated in a study that determined muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and leg protein breakdown (LPB) under postabsorptive (hypoinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and postprandial (hyperinsulinemic hyperaminoacidemic-euglycemic clamp) conditions. Obesity was associated with systemic inflammation, greater leg fat mass, and patterns of mRNA expression consistent with muscle deconditioning, whereas leg lean mass, strength, and work done during maximal exercise were no different. Under postabsorptive conditions, MPS and LPB were equivalent between groups, whereas insulin and amino acid administration increased MPS in only healthy-weight subjects and was associated with lower leg glucose disposal (LGD) (63%) in obese men. Blunting of MPS in the obese men was offset by an apparent decline in LPB, which was absent in healthy-weight subjects. Lower postprandial LGD in obese subjects and blunting of MPS responses to amino acids suggest that obesity in older adults is associated with diminished muscle metabolic quality. This does not, however, appear to be associated with lower leg lean mass or strength.

  14. A method for computing association rate constants of atomistically represented proteins under macromolecular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sanbo; Cai, Lu; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    In cellular environments, two protein molecules on their way to form a specific complex encounter many bystander macromolecules. The latter molecules, or crowders, affect both the energetics of the interaction between the test molecules and the dynamics of their relative motion. In earlier work (Zhou and Szabo 1991 J. Chem. Phys. 95 5948-52), it has been shown that, in modeling the association kinetics of the test molecules, the presence of crowders can be accounted for by their energetic and dynamic effects. The recent development of the transient-complex theory for protein association in dilute solutions makes it possible to easily incorporate the energetic and dynamic effects of crowders. The transient complex refers to a late on-pathway intermediate, in which the two protein molecules have near-native relative separation and orientation, but have yet to form the many short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The transient-complex theory predicts the association rate constant as ka = ka0exp( - ΔG*el/kBT), where ka0 is the ‘basal’ rate constant for reaching the transient complex by unbiased diffusion, and the Boltzmann factors captures the influence of long-range electrostatic interactions between the protein molecules. Crowders slow down the diffusion, therefore reducing the basal rate constant (to kac0), and induce an effective interaction energy ΔGc. We show that the latter interaction energy for atomistic proteins in the presence of spherical crowders is ‘long’-ranged, allowing the association rate constant under crowding to be computed as kac = kac0exp[ - (ΔG*el + ΔG*c)/kBT]. Applications demonstrate that this computational method allows for realistic modeling of protein association kinetics under crowding.

  15. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  16. Structures of Two Arabidopsis thaliana Major Latex Proteins Represent Novel Helix-Grip Folds

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    The major latex proteins (MLP) are a protein family first identified in the latex of opium poppy. They are found only in plants and have 24 identified members in Arabidopsis alone as well as in other plants such as peach, strawberry, melon, cucumber, and soybean. While the function of the MLPs is unknown, they have been associated with fruit and flower development and in pathogen defense responses. Based on modest sequence similarity, they have been characterized as members of the Bet v 1 protein superfamily; however, no structures have yet been reported. As part of an ongoing structural genomics effort, we determined the structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana MLPs: the solution structure of MLP28 (gene product of At1g70830.1) and the crystal structure of At1g24000.1. The structures revealed distinct differences when compared to one another and to the typical Bet v 1 fold. Nevertheless, NMR titration experiments demonstrated that the characteristic Bet v 1 hydrophobic binding pocket of At1g24000.1 is able to bind a ligand, suggesting that it plays a role in the function of the MLPs. A structure-based sequence analysis identified conserved hydrophobic residues in the long alpha helix that contribute to the binding cavity and may specify preferred ligands for the MLP family. PMID:19326460

  17. Structure of human guanylate-binding protein 1 representing a unique class of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, B; Praefcke, G J; Renault, L; Wittinghofer, A; Herrmann, C

    2000-02-03

    Interferon-gamma is an immunomodulatory substance that induces the expression of many genes to orchestrate a cellular response and establish the antiviral state of the cell. Among the most abundant antiviral proteins induced by interferon-gamma are guanylate-binding proteins such as GBP1 and GBP2. These are large GTP-binding proteins of relative molecular mass 67,000 with a high-turnover GTPase activity and an antiviral effect. Here we have determined the crystal structure of full-length human GBP1 to 1.8 A resolution. The amino-terminal 278 residues constitute a modified G domain with a number of insertions compared to the canonical Ras structure, and the carboxy-terminal part is an extended helical domain with unique features. From the structure and biochemical experiments reported here, GBP1 appears to belong to the group of large GTP-binding proteins that includes Mx and dynamin, the common property of which is the ability to undergo oligomerization with a high concentration-dependent GTPase activity.

  18. Virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kojidani, Tomoko; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Sato, Mamiko; Ding, Da-Qiao; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-11-09

    Asymmetric localization of Ran regulators (RanGAP1 and RanGEF/RCC1) produces a gradient of RanGTP across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope breaks down as the cell enters mitosis (designated "open" mitosis). This nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) leads to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and the diffusion of nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules in the cell, resulting in irreversible progression of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in many fungi, chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD (designated "closed" mitosis). Here we report that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complex remaining intact throughout both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles, nuclear proteins diffuse into the cytoplasm transiently for a few minutes at the onset of anaphase of meiosis II. We also found that nuclear protein diffusion into the cytoplasm occurred coincidently with nuclear localization of Rna1, an S. pombe RanGAP1 homolog that is usually localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that nuclear localization of RanGAP1 and depression of RanGTP activity in the nucleus may be mechanistically tied to meiosis-specific diffusion of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This nucleocytoplasmic shuffling of RanGAP1 and nuclear proteins represents virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  19. The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct protein lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koeduka, Takao; Louie, Gordon V.; Orlova, Irina; Kish, Christine M.; Ibdah, Mwafaq; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Baiga, Thomas J.; Noel, Joseph P.; Dudareva, Natalia; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Summary Many plants synthesize the volatile phenylpropene compounds eugenol and isoeugenol to serve in defense against herbivores and pathogens and to attract pollinators. Clarkia breweri flowers emit a mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol, while Petunia hybrida flowers emit mostly isoeugenol with small amounts of eugenol. We recently reported the identification of a petunia enzyme, PhIGS1, that catalyzes the formation of isoeugenol, and an Ocimum basilicum (basil) enzyme, ObEGS1, that produces eugenol. ObEGS1 and PhIGS1 both utilize coniferyl acetate, are 52% sequence identical, and belong to a family of NADPH-dependent reductases involved in secondary metabolism. Here we show that C. breweri flowers have two closely related proteins (96% identity), CbIGS1 and CbEGS1, that are similar to ObEGS1 (58% and 59%) and catalyze the formation of isoeugenol and eugenol, respectively. In vitro mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that substitution of only a single residue can substantially affect the product specificity of these enzymes. A third C. breweri enzyme identified, CbEGS2, also catalyzes the formation of eugenol from coniferyl acetate and is only 46% identical to CbIGS1 and CbEGS1 but more similar (>70%) to other types of reductases. We also found that petunia flowers contain an enzyme, PhEGS1, that is highly similar to CbEGS2 (82% identity) and that converts coniferyl acetate to eugenol. Our results indicate that plant enzymes with EGS and IGS activities have arisen multiple times and in different protein lineages. PMID:18208524

  20. Structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana major latex proteins represent novel helix-grip folds

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2009-06-02

    Here we report the first structures of two major latex proteins (MLPs) which display unique structural differences from the canonical Bet v 1 fold described earlier. MLP28 (SwissProt/TrEMBL ID Q9SSK9), the product of gene At1g70830.1, and the At1g24000.1 gene product (Swiss- Prot/TrEMBL ID P0C0B0), proteins which share 32% sequence identity, were independently selected as foldspace targets by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics. The structure of a single domain (residues 17-173) of MLP28 was solved by NMR spectroscopy, while the full-length At1g24000.1 structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. MLP28 displays greater than 30% sequence identity to at least eight MLPs from other species. For example, the MLP28 sequence shares 64% identity to peach Pp-MLP119 and 55% identity to cucumber Csf2.20 In contrast, the At1g24000.1 sequence is highly divergent (see Fig. 1), containing a gap of 33 amino acids when compared with all other known MLPs. Even when the gap is excluded, the sequence identity with MLPs from other species is less than 30%. Unlike some of the MLPs from other species, none of the A. thaliana MLPs have been characterized biochemically. We show by NMR chemical shift mapping that At1g24000.1 binds progesterone, demonstrating that despite its sequence dissimilarity, the hydrophobic binding pocket is conserved and, therefore, may play a role in its biological function and that of the MLP family in general.

  1. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H; Burk, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  2. Loss of lysosomal association of cystatin B proteins representing progressive myoclonus epilepsy, EPM1, mutations.

    PubMed

    Alakurtti, Kirsi; Weber, Ekkehard; Rinne, Riitta; Theil, Gerit; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Lindhout, Dick; Salmikangas, Paula; Saukko, Pekka; Lahtinen, Ulla; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2005-02-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the cystatin B (CSTB), a cysteine protease inhibitor, gene underlie progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1), characterized by myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizures, ataxia and a progressive course. A minisatellite repeat expansion in the promoter region of the CSTB gene is the most common mutation in EPM1 patients and leads to reduced mRNA levels. Seven other mutations altering the structure of CSTB, or predicting altered splicing, have been described. Using a novel monoclonal CSTB antibody and organelle-specific markers in human primary myoblasts, we show here that endogenous CSTB localizes not only to the nucleus and cytoplasm but also associates with lysosomes. Upon differentiation to myotubes, CSTB becomes excluded from the nucleus and lysosomes, suggesting that the subcellular distribution of CSTB is dependent on the differentiation status of the cell. Four patient mutations altering the CSTB polypeptide were transiently expressed in BHK-21 cells. The p.Lys73fsX2-truncated mutant protein shows diffuse cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution, whereas p.Arg68X is rapidly degraded. Two missense mutations, the previously described p.Gly4Arg affecting the highly conserved glycine, critical for cathepsin binding, and a novel mutation, p.Gln71Pro, fail to associate with lysosomes. These data imply an important lysosome-associated physiological function for CSTB and suggest that loss of this association contributes to the molecular pathogenesis of EPM1.

  3. Large oncosomes contain distinct protein cargo and represent a separate functional class of tumor-derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Minciacchi, Valentina R; You, Sungyong; Spinelli, Cristiana; Morley, Samantha; Zandian, Mandana; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Ciardiello, Chiara; Reis Sobreiro, Mariana; Morello, Matteo; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Tomlinson Guns, Emma; Gleave, Martin; Gho, Yong Song; Mathivanan, Suresh; Yang, Wei; Freeman, Michael R; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2015-05-10

    Large oncosomes (LO) are atypically large (1-10 µm diameter) cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), originating from the shedding of membrane blebs and associated with advanced disease. We report that 25% of the proteins, identified by a quantitative proteomics analysis, are differentially represented in large and nano-sized EVs from prostate cancer cells. Proteins enriched in large EVs included enzymes involved in glucose, glutamine and amino acid metabolism, all metabolic processes relevant to cancer. Glutamine metabolism was altered in cancer cells exposed to large EVs, an effect that was not observed upon treatment with exosomes. Large EVs exhibited discrete buoyant densities in iodixanol (OptiPrep(TM)) gradients. Fluorescent microscopy of large EVs revealed an appearance consistent with LO morphology, indicating that these structures can be categorized as LO. Among the proteins enriched in LO, cytokeratin 18 (CK18) was one of the most abundant (within the top 5th percentile) and was used to develop an assay to detect LO in the circulation and tissues of mice and patients with prostate cancer. These observations indicate that LO represent a discrete EV type that may play a distinct role in tumor progression and that may be a source of cancer-specific markers.

  4. Surface breakdown of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, R. J.; Senitzky, B.

    1991-07-01

    The surface electrical breakdown of n(+)nn(+) rectangular solid blocks of silicon was investigated. Studies were performed in air at pressures of 10 to the -6th torr and 1 atm, and in transformer oil, ethylene glycol, and deionized water, under pulsed electrical excitation. The breakdown voltage (BV) of these devices was found to increase as the dielectric constant of the ambient increased. Glow discharge cleaning of the surface in vacuum was found to have no effect on the BV. A theory of surface charging leading to field enhancement along the surface is developed on the basis of these findings.

  5. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  6. Partial cloning of CYP2C23a genes and hepatic protein expression in eight representative avian species.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K P; Kawai, Y K; Nakayama, S M M; Ikenaka, Y; Mizukawa, H; Takaesu, N; Ito, M; Ikushiro, S-I; Sakaki, T; Ishizuka, M

    2015-04-01

    Large interspecies differences in avian xenobiotic metabolism have been revealed by microsome-based studies, but specific enzyme isoforms in different bird species have not yet been compared. We have previously shown that CYP2C23 genes are the most induced CYP isoforms in chicken liver. In this study, we collected partial CYP2C23a gene sequences from eight avian species (ostrich, blue-eared pheasant, snowy owl, great-horned owl, Chilean flamingo, peregrin falcon, Humboldt penguin, and black-crowned night heron) selected to cover the whole avian lineage: Paleognathae, Galloanserae, and Neoaves. Genetic analysis showed that CYP2C23 genes of Galloanserae species (chicken and blue-eared pheasant) had unique characteristics. We found some duplicated genes (CYP2C23a and CYP2C23b) and two missing amino acid residues in Galloanserae compared to the other two lineages. The genes have lower homology than in other avian lineages, which suggests Galloanserae-specific rapid evolutionary changes. These genetic features suggested that the Galloanserae are not the most representative avian species, considering that the Neoaves comprise more than 95% of birds. Moreover, we succeeded in synthesizing an antipeptide polyclonal antibody against the region of CYP2C23 protein conserved in avians. However, comparative quantitation of CYP2C23 proteins in livers from six species showed that expression levels of these proteins differed no more than fourfold. Further study is needed to clarify the function of avian CYP2C23 proteins.

  7. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  8. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  9. VUV Radiation and Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    ultraviolet light on surface breakdown. The first experimental setup was designed so that VUV emission from an excited surface flashover event is focused onto...name attached. Garrett Rogers An experimental setup used to study pulsed dielectric surface flashover in various gases at atmospheric pressure...radiation on streamer propagation. A significant amount of VUV emission was observed from excited surface flashover events, and most of this

  10. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  11. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  13. Research into vortex breakdown control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Anthony M.; Délery, Jean

    2001-05-01

    Vortex breakdown remains a significant and intriguing phenomenon that can have detrimental or beneficial effects, depending on the application. Thus there is a strong need to both better understand the phenomenon and to control it, either to prevent breakdown or to promote it. For the past 50 years, multiple flow control techniques have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vortex breakdown location over slender delta wings at high angles of attack. An extensive historical review of these diverse control methods, mechanical and pneumatic, steady or periodic, is presented and discussed; however, none of these techniques has clearly demonstrated a superior efficiency or effectiveness in controlling either the vortical flow structure or the vortex breakdown location. Each technique, does, on the other hand, provide a unique approach to the control of the vortex breakdown depending on the desired outcome. There are still major obstacles to overcome before the control of vortex breakdown is implemented in flight. For example, oscillations of the vortex breakdown locations are difficult to quantify and to identify. The often poor effectiveness of control techniques can be in great part attributed to insufficient knowledge of breakdown and in an inability to accurately predict breakdown. When considering the large quantity of studies aimed at vortex breakdown control and their relative success, it is clear that decisive progress in this domain will require further basic investigations to clearly elucidate the physics of the phenomenon and to improve the predictive capability.

  14. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  15. Subnanosecond Breakdown of Insulating Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-29

    50so O0 PRESSURE Itorr] Fig. 6. Breakdown voltage for argon and air with 100 kV pulser amplitude Breakdown voltages for surface flashover differ from the...developments in the field of high speed/high power electromagnetics applica- tions, such as Ultrawideband (UWB) radar, plasma limiters, and fast general...voltages for short pulses is of relevance for many switching and insulation tasks, for both volume breakdown in differ- ent media as well as for surface

  16. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  17. Control of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H.; Shtern, F.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    The paper develops means of vortex breakdown (VB) control with the help of Controlling Vortex Generators (CVGs). Vortex breakdown plays the crucial role in many practical swirling flows, e.g. (a) leading-edge vortices above delta wings create a strong lift and (b) trailing vortices behind large aircraft disturbances are potentially dangerous to subsequent aircraft. It is useful to prevent VB in case (a) and to stimulate VB in case (b). We have recently obtained significant theoretical and experimental results related to swirling flow prediction and control. Firstly, a theory has been developed which models jump transitions in swirling flow (e.g. jumps in VB locations) and predicts ranges of control parameters where multiple stable states occur. Secondly, our experiments have revealed that effective control (enhancement and suppression) of VB can be achieved using CVGs. In our experiments we have used a thin rotaing rod as a CVG, placed along the axis of the basic swirling flow in a sealed cylinder driven by the rotating bottom disc. The effect of the rod depends on the direction of the rotation. With increasing rod co-rotational speed, the VB 'bubble' (VBB) becomes smaller and then disappear, and a cone-shaped wake forms. Counter-rotation of the rod causes increases VBBs' diameter and makes the flow unsteady. The VBBs begin to advect downstream, undergo tearing and pairing, and, hence, enhance mixing.

  18. Direct effects of TNF-α on local fuel metabolism and cytokine levels in the placebo-controlled, bilaterally infused human leg: increased insulin sensitivity, increased net protein breakdown, and increased IL-6 release.

    PubMed

    Bach, Ermina; Nielsen, Roni R; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Møller, Andreas B; Jessen, Niels; Buhl, Mads; K-Hafstrøm, Thomas; Holm, Lars; Pedersen, Steen B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Biensø, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Niels

    2013-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has widespread metabolic actions. Systemic TNF-α administration, however, generates a complex hormonal and metabolic response. Our study was designed to test whether regional, placebo-controlled TNF-α infusion directly affects insulin resistance and protein breakdown. We studied eight healthy volunteers once with bilateral femoral vein and artery catheters during a 3-h basal period and a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. One artery was perfused with saline and one with TNF-α. During the clamp, TNF-α perfusion increased glucose arteriovenous differences (0.91 ± 0.17 vs. 0.74 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P = 0.012) and leg glucose uptake rates. Net phenylalanine release was increased by TNF-α perfusion with concomitant increases in appearance and disappearance rates. Free fatty acid kinetics was not affected by TNF-α, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) release increased. Insulin and protein signaling in muscle biopsies was not affected by TNF-α. TNF-α directly increased net muscle protein loss, which may contribute to cachexia and general protein loss during severe illness. The finding of increased insulin sensitivity, which could relate to IL-6, is of major clinical interest and may concurrently act to provide adequate tissue fuel supply and contribute to the occurrence of systemic hypoglycemia. This distinct metabolic feature places TNF-α among the rare insulin mimetics of human origin.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: On the Accuracy of the TIP4P-D Water Model and the Representativeness of Protein Disorder Models.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João; Skepö, Marie

    2016-07-12

    Here, we first present a follow-up to a previous work by our group on the problematic of molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) [ Henriques et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2015 , 11 , 3420 - 3431 ], using the recently developed TIP4P-D water model. When used in conjunction with the standard AMBER ff99SB-ILDN force field and applied to the simulation of Histatin 5, our IDP model, we obtain results which are in excellent agreement with the best performing IDP-suitable force field from the earlier study and with experiment. We then assess the representativeness of the IDP models used in these and similar studies, finding that most are too short in comparison to the average IDP and contain a bias toward hydrophilic amino acid residues. Moreover, several key order- and disorder-promoting residues are also found to be misrepresented. It seems appropriate for future studies to address these issues.

  20. Nanopore formation by controlled electrical breakdown: Efficient molecular-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Abdel-Daiem, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    A controlled electrical breakdown is used to produce efficient nanopore (NP) sensors. This phenomenon can be used to precisely fabricate these nanopore (NP) sensors through the membranes of the polydimethylsiloxane microarrays. This can be carried out, when localizing the electrical potential through a suitable microfluidic channel. Organic molecules, and other different protein-molecules, can be easily and precisely detected using this procedure referred to as controlled electrical breakdown technique.

  1. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  2. Postinjury Vagal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael; Peterson, Carrie; Loomis, William; Hageny, Ann-Marie; Wolf, Paul; Reys, Luiz; Putnam, James; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Bansal, Vishal; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) can have a marked anti-inflammatory effect. We have previously shown that preinjury VNS prevented intestinal barrier breakdown and preserved epithelial tight junction protein expression. However, a pretreatment model has little clinical relevance for the care of the trauma patient. Therefore, we postulated that VNS conducted postinjury would also have a similar protective effect on maintaining gut epithelial barrier integrity. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to a 30% total body surface area, full-thickness steam burn followed by right cervical VNS at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 minutes postinjury. Intestinal barrier dysfunction was quantified by permeability to 4 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-Dextran, histologic evaluation, gut tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of tight junction proteins (myosin light chain kinase, occludin, and ZO-1) using immunoblot and immunoflourescence. Results Histologic examination documented intestinal villi appearance similar to sham if cervical VNS was performed within 90 minutes of burn insult. VNS done after injury decreased intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-Dextran when VNS was ≤90 minutes after injury. Burn injury caused a marked increase in intestinal TNF-α levels. VNS-treated animals had TNF-α levels similar to sham when VNS was performed within 90 minutes of injury. Tight junction protein expression was maintained at near sham values if VNS was performed within 90 minutes of burn, whereas expression was significantly altered in burn. Conclusion Postinjury VNS prevents gut epithelial breakdown when performed within 90 minutes of thermal injury. This could represent a therapeutic window and clinically relevant strategy to prevent systemic inflammatory response distant organ injury after trauma. PMID:21610431

  3. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  4. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  5. Phenylbutyrate improves nitrogen disposal via alternative pathway without eliciting an increase in protein breakdown and catabolism in control and ornithine transcarbamylace-deficient patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a drug used in urea cycle disorder patients to elicit alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. However, PB decreases plasma branched chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations and prior research suggests that PB may increase leucine oxidation, indicating increased protein degra...

  6. Dark current related breakdown mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faya; Ge, Lixin

    2012-12-01

    High power tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity for the Muon Collider program have shown that the breakdown related damage increases and the sustainable gradient decreases with the application of a strong external magnetic field. To try to explain these results, a model of dark current associated breakdown was formulated and simulated with the Track3P code. The results show in general how the gradient could be reduced as function of magnetic field. This paper summarizes these studies to date.

  7. A UPF0118 family protein with uncharacterized function from the moderate halophile Halobacillus andaensis represents a novel class of Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ping; Wang, Lidan; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Chen, Jin; Yan, Mingxue; Chen, Huiwen; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jincheng; Abdel-Motaal, Heba; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-04-04

    In this study, genomic DNA was screened from Halobacillus andaensis NEAU-ST10-40(T) by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. One gene designated upf0118 exhibiting Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was finally cloned. Protein alignment showed that UPF0118 shares the highest identity of 81.5% with an unannotated gene encoding a protein with uncharacterized protein function belonging to UPF0118 family from H. kuroshimensis, but shares no identity with all known specific Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes or genes with Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Growth test, western blot and Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport assay revealed that UPF0118 as a transmembrane protein exhibits pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that UPF0118 clustered with all its homologs belonging to UPF0118 family at a wide range of 22-82% identities with the bootstrap value of 92%, which was significantly distant with all known specific single-gene Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters and single-gene proteins with the Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Taken together, we propose that UPF0118 should represent a novel class of Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the functional analysis of a protein with uncharacterized protein function as a representative of UPF0118 family containing the domain of unknown function, DUF20.

  8. A UPF0118 family protein with uncharacterized function from the moderate halophile Halobacillus andaensis represents a novel class of Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ping; Wang, Lidan; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Chen, Jin; Yan, Mingxue; Chen, Huiwen; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jincheng; Abdel-motaal, Heba; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, genomic DNA was screened from Halobacillus andaensis NEAU-ST10-40T by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na+/H+ antiporters. One gene designated upf0118 exhibiting Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity was finally cloned. Protein alignment showed that UPF0118 shares the highest identity of 81.5% with an unannotated gene encoding a protein with uncharacterized protein function belonging to UPF0118 family from H. kuroshimensis, but shares no identity with all known specific Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter genes or genes with Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Growth test, western blot and Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport assay revealed that UPF0118 as a transmembrane protein exhibits pH-dependent Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that UPF0118 clustered with all its homologs belonging to UPF0118 family at a wide range of 22–82% identities with the bootstrap value of 92%, which was significantly distant with all known specific single-gene Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporters and single-gene proteins with the Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Taken together, we propose that UPF0118 should represent a novel class of Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the functional analysis of a protein with uncharacterized protein function as a representative of UPF0118 family containing the domain of unknown function, DUF20. PMID:28374790

  9. Apparent inhibition of. beta. -fructosidase secretion by tunicamycin may be explained by breakdown of the unglycosylated protein during secretion. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Faye, L. ); Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-03-01

    Suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells synthesize and secrete {beta}-fructosidase, a glycoprotein with asparagine-linked glycans. Treatment of the cells with tunicamycin completely inhibits the apparent secretion of {beta}-fructosidase as measured by the accumulation of the {sup 35}S-labelled protein in the cell wall or the culture medium. In the past, such a result has been interpreted as an inhibition of secretion by tunicamycin, but we suggest another explanation based on the following results. In the presence of tunicamycin, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase is synthesized and is associated with an endoplasmic-reticulum-rich microsomal fraction. Pulse-chase experiments show that the unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase does not remain in the cells and appears to be secreted in the same way as glycosylated {beta}-fructosidase; however, no radioactive, unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase accumulates extracellularly (cell wall or medium). Protoplasts obtained from carrot cells secrete {beta}-fructosidase protein and activity, and treatment of the protoplasts with tunicamycin results in the synthesis of unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase. In the presence of tunicamycin, there is no accumulation of {beta}-fructosidase activity or unglycosylated {beta}-fructosidase polypeptide in the protoplast incubation medium. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the glycans of {beta}-fructosidase are necessary for its stability, and that in these suspension-cultured cells, the unglycosylated enzyme is degraded during the last stage(s) of secretion, or immediately after its arrival in the wall.

  10. Representing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaztambide-Fernandez, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Handbooks denote representative authority, which gives their content normative value and through which editors and authors can emphasize certain views and orientations within a field. The representative authority of a handbook is reinforced in various ways, both obvious and subtle. The "SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" is no exception…

  11. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  12. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown by the vortex-filament method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The vortex filament method was applied to the simulation of vortex breakdown. The principal vortex region was represented by multiple filaments, and an axial velocity component was induced by a spiral winding of the filaments. First, an accuracy check was performed for a cylindrical swirling flow with simple analytical expressions for the axial and theta velocities. The result suggests that the flow field is simulated to any accuracy by increasing the number of filaments. Second, an axisymmetric type vortex breakdown was simulated, with experimental data serving as upstream conditions. The calculated axial and theta velocity contours show the breakdown of the vortex, including a rapid change in the vortex core, followed axially by a recovery zone and then a second breakdown. When three dimensional initial data are used the second breakdown appears to be of the spiral type in correspondence with experimental observations. The present method is easily used to simulate other types of vortex breakdown or other vortex flows with axial velocity.

  13. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are Representative of a Widely Distributed Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    A Barb; J Cort; J Seetharaman; S Lew; H Lee; T Acton; L Tong; G Montelione; J Prestegard; et al.

    2011-12-31

    YbbR domains are widespread throughout Eubacteria and are expressed as monomeric units, linked in tandem repeats or cotranslated with other domains. Although the precise role of these domains remains undefined, the location of the multiple YbbR domain-encoding ybbR gene in the Bacillus subtilis glmM operon and its previous identification as a substrate for a surfactin-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase suggests a role in cell growth, division, and virulence. To further characterize the YbbR domains, structures of two of the four domains (I and IV) from the YbbR-like protein of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51 were solved by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The structures show the domains to have nearly identical topologies despite a low amino acid identity (23%). The topology is dominated by {beta}-strands, roughly following a 'figure 8' pattern with some strands coiling around the domain perimeter and others crossing the center. A similar topology is found in the C-terminal domain of two stress-responsive bacterial ribosomal proteins, TL5 and L25. Based on these models, a structurally guided amino acid alignment identifies features of the YbbR domains that are not evident from naive amino acid sequence alignments. A structurally conserved cis-proline (cis-Pro) residue was identified in both domains, though the local structure in the immediate vicinities surrounding this residue differed between the two models. The conservation and location of this cis-Pro, plus anchoring Val residues, suggest this motif may be significant to protein function.

  14. Structures of domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Adam W; Cort, John R; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Lew, Scott; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Acton, Thomas; Xiao, Rong; Kennedy, Michael A; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Prestegard, James H

    2011-01-01

    YbbR domains are widespread throughout Eubacteria and are expressed as monomeric units, linked in tandem repeats or cotranslated with other domains. Although the precise role of these domains remains undefined, the location of the multiple YbbR domain-encoding ybbR gene in the Bacillus subtilis glmM operon and its previous identification as a substrate for a surfactin-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase suggests a role in cell growth, division, and virulence. To further characterize the YbbR domains, structures of two of the four domains (I and IV) from the YbbR-like protein of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51 were solved by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The structures show the domains to have nearly identical topologies despite a low amino acid identity (23%). The topology is dominated by β-strands, roughly following a “figure 8” pattern with some strands coiling around the domain perimeter and others crossing the center. A similar topology is found in the C-terminal domain of two stress-responsive bacterial ribosomal proteins, TL5 and L25. Based on these models, a structurally guided amino acid alignment identifies features of the YbbR domains that are not evident from naïve amino acid sequence alignments. A structurally conserved cis-proline (cis-Pro) residue was identified in both domains, though the local structure in the immediate vicinities surrounding this residue differed between the two models. The conservation and location of this cis-Pro, plus anchoring Val residues, suggest this motif may be significant to protein function. PMID:21154411

  15. Evidence of a role for foliar salicylic acid in regulating the rate of post-ingestive protein breakdown in ruminants and contributing to landscape pollution

    PubMed Central

    Kingston-Smith, Alison H.; Davies, Teri E.; Edwards, Joan; Gay, Alan; Mur, Luis A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Ruminant farming is important to global food security, but excessive proteolysis in the rumen causes inefficient use of nitrogenous plant constituents and environmental pollution. While both plant and microbial proteases contribute to ruminal proteolysis, little is known about post-ingestion regulation of plant proteases except that activity in the first few hours after ingestion of fresh forage can result in significant degradation of foliar protein. As the signal salicylic acid (SA) influences cell death during both biotic and abiotic stresses, Arabidopsis wild-type and mutants were used to test the effect of SA on proteolysis induced by rumen conditions (39 °C and anaerobic in a neutral pH). In leaves of Col-0, SA accumulation was induced by exposure to a rumen microbial inoculum. Use of Arabidopsis mutants with altered endogenous SA concentrations revealed a clear correlation with the rate of stress-induced proteolysis; rapid proteolysis occurred in leaves of SA-accumulating mutants cpr5-1 and dnd1-1 whereas there was little or no proteolysis in sid2-1 which is unable to synthesize SA. Reduced proteolysis in npr1-1 (Non-expressor of Pathogenesis Related genes) demonstrated a dependence on SA signalling. Slowed proteolysis in sid2-1 and npr1-1 was associated with the absence of a 34.6 kDa cysteine protease. These data suggest that proteolysis in leaves ingested by ruminants is modulated by SA. It is therefore suggested that influencing SA effects in planta could enable the development of forage crops with lower environmental impact and increased production potential. PMID:22378947

  16. Evidence of a role for foliar salicylic acid in regulating the rate of post-ingestive protein breakdown in ruminants and contributing to landscape pollution.

    PubMed

    Kingston-Smith, Alison H; Davies, Teri E; Edwards, Joan; Gay, Alan; Mur, Luis A J

    2012-05-01

    Ruminant farming is important to global food security, but excessive proteolysis in the rumen causes inefficient use of nitrogenous plant constituents and environmental pollution. While both plant and microbial proteases contribute to ruminal proteolysis, little is known about post-ingestion regulation of plant proteases except that activity in the first few hours after ingestion of fresh forage can result in significant degradation of foliar protein. As the signal salicylic acid (SA) influences cell death during both biotic and abiotic stresses, Arabidopsis wild-type and mutants were used to test the effect of SA on proteolysis induced by rumen conditions (39 °C and anaerobic in a neutral pH). In leaves of Col-0, SA accumulation was induced by exposure to a rumen microbial inoculum. Use of Arabidopsis mutants with altered endogenous SA concentrations revealed a clear correlation with the rate of stress-induced proteolysis; rapid proteolysis occurred in leaves of SA-accumulating mutants cpr5-1 and dnd1-1 whereas there was little or no proteolysis in sid2-1 which is unable to synthesize SA. Reduced proteolysis in npr1-1 (Non-expressor of Pathogenesis Related genes) demonstrated a dependence on SA signalling. Slowed proteolysis in sid2-1 and npr1-1 was associated with the absence of a 34.6 kDa cysteine protease. These data suggest that proteolysis in leaves ingested by ruminants is modulated by SA. It is therefore suggested that influencing SA effects in planta could enable the development of forage crops with lower environmental impact and increased production potential.

  17. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now.

  18. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  19. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  20. Solvable models of material breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leath, P. L.; Duxbury, P. M.

    The history of the study of fracture of materials is briefly reviewed. Then the importance of analytically solvable models in understanding material breakdown is illustrated by a review of the work of Duxbury, Leath and Beale on simple analytically solvable models of fuse network breakdown in brittle systems. We then review recent work extending this analytically to include close pairs of clusters of defects or double clusters, which also exhibit the double-exponential failure distribution. Finally, a new analytic recursion method is presented for breakdown of systems with linear cracks, but a continuous distribution of breaking strengths. Remarkably, these systems exhibit an optimum sample size where the failure probability can, at low stress, be reduced by many orders of magnitude below that of a single bond.

  1. The ATM- and ATR-related SCD domain is over-represented in proteins involved in nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Cara, Lukas; Baitemirova, Medina; Follis, Jack; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

    2016-01-08

    ATM and ATR are cellular kinases with a well-characterized role in the DNA-damage response. Although the complete set of ATM/ATR targets is unknown, they often contain clusters of S/TQ motifs that constitute an SCD domain. In this study, we identified putative ATM/ATR targets that have a conserved SCD domain across vertebrates. Using this approach, we have identified novel putative ATM/ATR targets in pathways known to be under direct control of these kinases. Our analysis has also unveiled significant enrichment of SCD-containing proteins in cellular pathways, such as vesicle trafficking and actin cytoskeleton, where a regulating role for ATM/ATR is either unknown or poorly understood, hinting at a much broader and overarching role for these kinases in the cell. Of particular note is the overrepresentation of conserved SCD-containing proteins involved in pathways related to neural development. This finding suggests that ATM/ATR could be directly involved in controlling this process, which may be linked to the adverse neurological effects observed in patients with mutations in ATM.

  2. A functional comparison of cardiac troponin C from representatives of three vertebrate taxa: Linking phylogeny and protein function.

    PubMed

    Sears, Elizabeth J; Gillis, Todd E

    2016-12-01

    The Ca(2+) affinity of cardiac troponin C (cTnC) from rainbow trout is significantly greater than that of cTnC from mammalian species. This high affinity is thought to enable cardiac function in trout at low physiological temperatures and is due to residues Asn(2), Ile(28), Gln(29), and Asp(30) (Gillis et al., 2005, Physiol Genomics, 22, 1-7). Interestingly, the cTnC of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (frog cTnC) contains Gln(29) and Asp(30) but the residues at positions 2 and 28 are those found in all mammalian cTnC isoforms (Asp(2) and Val(28)). The purpose of this study was to determine the Ca(2+) affinity of frog cTnC, and to determine how these three protein orthologs influence the function of complete troponin complexes. Measurements of Ca(2+) affinity and the rate of Ca(2+) dissociation from the cTnC isoforms and cTn complexes were made by monitoring the fluorescence of anilinonapthalenesulfote iodoacetamide (IAANS) engineered into the cTnC isoforms to report changes in protein conformation. The results demonstrate that the Ca(2+) affinity of frog cTnC is greater than that of trout cTnC and human cTnC. We also found that replacing human cTnC with frog cTnC in a mammalian cTn complex increased the Ca(2+) affinity of the complex by 5-fold, which is also greater than complexes containing trout cTnC. Together these results suggest that frog cTnC has the potential to increase the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation by the mammalian heart.

  3. Proteomic profiling of fetal esophageal epithelium, esophageal cancer, and tumor-adjacent esophageal epithelium and immunohistochemical characterization of a representative differential protein, PRX6

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Hui; Xing, Guo-Lan; Fang, Xin-Hui; Wu, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Zong-Min; Wang, Li-Dong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To understand the molecular mechanism of esophageal cancer development and provide molecular markers for screening high-risk populations and early diagnosis. METHODS Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry were adopted to screen differentially expressed proteins in nine cases of fetal esophageal epithelium, eight cases of esophageal cancer, and eight cases of tumor-adjacent normal esophageal epithelium collected from fetuses of different gestational age, or esophageal cancer patients from a high-risk area of esophageal cancer in China. Immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex method) was used to detect the expression of peroxiredoxin (PRX)6 in 91 cases of esophageal cancer, tumor-adjacent normal esophageal tissue, basal cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, as well as 65 cases of esophageal epithelium from fetuses at a gestational age of 3-9 mo. RESULTS After peptide mass fingerprint analysis and search of protein databases, 21 differential proteins were identified; some of which represent a protein isoform. Varying degrees of expression of PRX6 protein, which was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, were detected in adult and fetal normal esophageal tissues, precancerous lesions, and esophageal cancer. With the progression of esophageal lesions, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend (P < 0.05). In fetal epithelium from fetuses at gestational age 3-6 mo, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend with age (P < 0.05). PRX6 protein expression was significantly higher in well-differentiated esophageal cancer tissues than in poorly differentiated esophageal cancer tissues (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Development and progression of esophageal cancer result from interactions of genetic changes (accumulation or superposition). PRX6 protein is associated with fetal esophageal development and cancer differentiation. PMID:28293090

  4. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  5. Representing dispositions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dispositions and tendencies feature significantly in the biomedical domain and therefore in representations of knowledge of that domain. They are not only important for specific applications like an infectious disease ontology, but also as part of a general strategy for modelling knowledge about molecular interactions. But the task of representing dispositions in some formal ontological systems is fraught with several problems, which are partly due to the fact that Description Logics can only deal well with binary relations. The paper will discuss some of the results of the philosophical debate about dispositions, in order to see whether the formal relations needed to represent dispositions can be broken down to binary relations. Finally, we will discuss problems arising from the possibility of the absence of realizations, of multi-track or multi-trigger dispositions and offer suggestions on how to deal with them. PMID:21995952

  6. Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold

    SciTech Connect

    Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-08-28

    To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures

  7. Second Harmonic Breakdown in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. S.; England, A. C.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.

    2007-09-28

    An 84-GHz electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system is being installed on the KSTAR tokamak. KSTAR adopts ECH-assisted start-up for the flexibility and reliability of the KSTAR operation with the plasma breakdown voltage reduced. The available maximum power of the 84 GHz ECH system is presently 500 kW with maximum duration of 2 s. Currently, the second harmonic ECH-assisted start-up is under consideration because a low toroidal field of B{sub T}{approx}1.5 T is desirable for safety and also for the high-beta experiments in the initial operation phase. The studies in this paper are on the effectiveness of the second harmonic breakdown using a 0-D time dependent plasma evolution code and the comparison with the recent DIII-D experimental results on the second harmonic pre-ionization.

  8. Breakdown mechanisms in electrostatic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, M.; Cuttone, G.; Zappalà, E.; Passarello, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Electrostatic Beam Deflectors for the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron are the most critical elements of the beam extraction system. It has been carried out an accurate investigation from the microscopic point of view, leading to a better comprehension of the complex phenomena taking part in the breakdown process. The environmental conditions are high electric field (up to 130 kV/cm), high magnetic field (up to 5 T) in addition with high energy (70 MeV/u) and high power ion beam. It has been found that all the materials constituent the electrostatic deflector, and not only the electrodes, give an important contribute to the mechanism of breakdown that occurs in two main ways: insulator metalization and enhanced electrodes electron emission. These two effects are involved in a positive feedback process which amplifies the effects leading to a fast breakdown. These phenomena are here shown and some possible solutions are at the moment under test using several bulk (Mo, Ti, Cu) and coating materials (TiN, Diamond Like Carbon).

  9. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The initiation of the breakdown process for axially symmetric compressible flows is investigated using a numerical solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. The vortex is isolated, with its axis parallel to the direction of the main stream, and the core radius is small compared to the breakdown length. Computations for several flowfields indicate that the breakdown of the solution is shifted further downstream with increasing Mach number until breakdown is no longer observed. In the subsonic case, the influence of the initial temperature distribution on the breakdown length of the solution is more pronounced than in the supersonic case, with heating of the core enhancing breakdown, and cooling delaying it. The breakdown of the solution is seen to always occur for nonvanishing axial velocity components.

  10. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  11. New phenomenology of gas breakdown in DC and RF fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sivoš, Jelena; Savić, Marija; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović Radenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Gocić, Saša; Marić, Dragana

    2014-05-01

    This paper follows a review lecture on the new developments in the field of gas breakdown and low current discharges, usually covered by a form of Townsend's theory and phenomenology. It gives an overview of a new approach to identifying which feedback agents provide breakdown, how to model gas discharge conditions and reconcile the results with binary experiments and how to employ that knowledge in modelling gas discharges. The next step is an illustration on how to record volt-ampere characteristics and use them on one hand to obtain the breakdown voltage and, on the other, to identify the regime of operation and model the secondary electron yields. The second aspect of this section concerns understanding the different regimes, their anatomy, how those are generated and how free running oscillations occur. While temporal development is the most useful and interesting part of the new developments, the difficulty of presenting the data in a written form precludes an easy publication and discussion. Thus, we shall only mention some of the results that stem from these measurements. Most micro discharges operate in DC albeit with complex geometries. Thus, parallel plate micro discharge measurements were needed to establish that Townsend's theory, with all its recent extensions, is still valid until some very small gaps. We have shown, for example, how a long-path breakdown puts in jeopardy many experimental observations and why a flat left-hand side of the Paschen curve often does not represent good physics. We will also summarize a kinetic representation of the RF breakdown revealing a somewhat more complex picture than the standard model. Finally, we will address briefly the breakdown in radially inhomogeneous conditions and how that affects the measured properties of the discharge. This review has the goal of summarizing (rather than developing details of) the current status of the low-current DC discharges formation and operation as a discipline which, in spite of

  12. Predicting Flow Breakdown Probability and Duration in Stochastic Network Models: Impact on Travel Time Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jing; Mahmassani, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to produce random flow breakdown endogenously in a mesoscopic operational model, by capturing breakdown probability and duration. Based on previous research findings that probability of flow breakdown can be represented as a function of flow rate and the duration can be characterized by a hazard model. By generating random flow breakdown at various levels and capturing the traffic characteristics at the onset of the breakdown, the stochastic network simulation model provides a tool for evaluating travel time variability. The proposed model can be used for (1) providing reliability related traveler information; (2) designing ITS (intelligent transportation systems) strategies to improve reliability; and (3) evaluating reliability-related performance measures of the system.

  13. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  14. High Voltage Water Breakdown Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Terman [20] gives the following equation for a rectangle that has sides that are S1 by S2 and is made up of a rectangular bar that is b by c, L = 0.02339...Dielectrics," Proc. Tenth IEEE Pulsed Power Confer- ence, June, 1995, p. 574. (UNCLASSIFIED) 86 (20) Terman , F. E., Radio Engineers’ Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book...34 Conference Rec- ord, Eighth International Conference on Conduction and Breakdown in Dielectric Liquids, pp. 176-179, July, 1984. Lewis , T. J., High

  15. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  16. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  17. Characteristics of edge breakdowns on Teflon samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadlowsky, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of electrical discharges induced on silverbacked Teflon samples irradiated by a monoenergetic electron beam have been studied under controlled laboratory conditions. Measurements of breakdown threshold voltages indicate a marked anisotropy in the electrical breakdown properties of Teflon: differences of up to 10 kV in breakdown threshold voltage are observed depending on the sample orientation. The material anisotropy can be utilized in spacecraft construction to reduce the magnitude of discharge currents.

  18. RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview May 7, 2015 Preston T. Partridge Antenna Systems Department Communication Systems Implementation...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C...5 - 7, 2015 RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 James Farrell, Boeing Satellite Systems Dr. Jeffrey P. Tate, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Preston

  19. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  20. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  2. Hybrid Breakdown in Cichlid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Stelkens, Rike Bahati; Schmid, Corinne; Seehausen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Studies from a wide diversity of taxa have shown a negative relationship between genetic compatibility and the divergence time of hybridizing genomes. Theory predicts the main breakdown of fitness to happen after the F1 hybrid generation, when heterosis subsides and recessive allelic (Dobzhansky-Muller) incompatibilities are increasingly unmasked. We measured the fitness of F2 hybrids of African haplochromine cichlid fish bred from species pairs spanning several thousand to several million years divergence time. F2 hybrids consistently showed the lowest viability compared to F1 hybrids and non-hybrid crosses (crosses within the grandparental species), in agreement with hybrid breakdown. Especially the short- and long-term survival (2 weeks to 6 months) of F2 hybrids was significantly reduced. Overall, F2 hybrids showed a fitness reduction of 21% compared to F1 hybrids, and a reduction of 43% compared to the grandparental, non-hybrid crosses. We further observed a decrease of F2 hybrid viability with the genetic distance between grandparental lineages, suggesting an important role for negative epistatic interactions in cichlid fish postzygotic isolation. The estimated time window for successful production of F2 hybrids resulting from our data is consistent with the estimated divergence time between the multiple ancestral lineages that presumably hybridized in three major adaptive radiations of African cichlids. PMID:25996870

  3. Leaf breakdown in streams differing in catchment land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, M.J.; Meyer, J.L.; Couch, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    1. The impact of changes in land use on stream ecosystem function is poorly understood. We studied leaf breakdown, a fundamental process of stream ecosystems, in streams that represent a range of catchment land use in the Piedmont physiographic province of the south-eastern United States. 2. We placed bags of chalk maple (Acer barbatum) leaves in similar-sized streams in 12 catchments of differing dominant land use: four forested, three agricultural, two suburban and three urban catchments. We measured leaf mass, invertebrate abundance and fungal biomass in leaf bags over time. 3. Leaves decayed significantly faster in agricultural (0.0465 day-1) and urban (0.0474 day-1) streams than in suburban (0.0173 day-1) and forested (0.0100 day-1) streams. Additionally, breakdown rates in the agricultural and urban streams were among the fastest reported for deciduous leaves in any stream. Nutrient concentrations in agricultural streams were significantly higher than in any other land-use type. Fungal biomass associated with leaves was significantly lower in urban streams; while shredder abundance in leaf bags was significantly higher in forested and agricultural streams than in suburban and urban streams. Storm runoff was significantly higher in urban and suburban catchments that had higher impervious surface cover than forested or agricultural catchments. 4. We propose that processes accelerating leaf breakdown in agricultural and urban streams were not the same: faster breakdown in agricultural streams was due to increased biological activity as a result of nutrient enrichment, whereas faster breakdown in urban streams was a result of physical fragmentation resulting from higher storm runoff. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  4. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős–Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  5. Statistics of vacuum breakdown in the high-gradient and low-rate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensch, Walter; Degiovanni, Alberto; Calatroni, Sergio; Korsbäck, Anders; Djurabekova, Flyura; Rajamäki, Robin; Giner-Navarro, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In an increasing number of high-gradient linear accelerator applications, accelerating structures must operate with both high surface electric fields and low breakdown rates. Understanding the statistical properties of breakdown occurrence in such a regime is of practical importance for optimizing accelerator conditioning and operation algorithms, as well as of interest for efforts to understand the physical processes which underlie the breakdown phenomenon. Experimental data of breakdown has been collected in two distinct high-gradient experimental set-ups: A prototype linear accelerating structure operated in the Compact Linear Collider Xbox 12 GHz test stands, and a parallel plate electrode system operated with pulsed DC in the kV range. Collected data is presented, analyzed and compared. The two systems show similar, distinctive, two-part distributions of number of pulses between breakdowns, with each part corresponding to a specific, constant event rate. The correlation between distance and number of pulses between breakdown indicates that the two parts of the distribution, and their corresponding event rates, represent independent primary and induced follow-up breakdowns. The similarity of results from pulsed DC to 12 GHz rf indicates a similar vacuum arc triggering mechanism over the range of conditions covered by the experiments.

  6. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  7. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  8. Calculations of Second Breakdown in Silicon Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Diodes Area I ’ x 10-4 cm 2 *****~*... ... *.*. 35 "Mai" 1. INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of second breakdown was first reported in diodes by Tauc ...written for study of electrical breakdown in gases, 8 modified for study of 1 J. Tauc and A . Abraham, Thermal Breakdown in Silicon P-N Junctions...this plot was chosen to be the first time that VB, (80 V) was attained. Both figures 13 and 14 110 , 0 loI --- - - 1 0 100 10 1 ,0 Figure 13. Dynamic

  9. Electrodynamic thermal breakdown of a capacitor insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'Yanov, O. A.

    2011-11-01

    A mechanism of the electrical breakdown is proposed for modern metal-field capacitors with the well-known property of self-healing of the breakdown strength. Upon an increase in the working voltage, the self-healing time increases to tens of microseconds, and the heating of adjacent insulator layers becomes significant. The propagating thermally activated conduction wave facilitates the enhancement of the electric field up to breakdown values. Analysis of the dynamics of electric field increase is carried out for capacitors based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric.

  10. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  11. Edge overload breakdown in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2002-09-01

    We investigate growing networks based on Barabási and Albert's algorithm for generating scale-free networks, but with edges sensitive to overload breakdown. The load is defined through edge betweenness centrality. We focus on the situation where the average number of connections per vertex is, like the number of vertices, linearly increasing in time. After an initial stage of growth, the network undergoes avalanching breakdowns to a fragmented state from which it never recovers. This breakdown is much less violent if the growth is by random rather than by preferential attachment (as defines the Barabási and Albert model). We briefly discuss the case where the average number of connections per vertex is constant. In this case no breakdown avalanches occur. Implications to the growth of real-world communication networks are discussed.

  12. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The onset of vortex breakdown in compressible flows is investigated analytically for the case in which the flow is axially symmetric, the vortex is isolated, its axis is parallel to the main flow, and the vortex radius is small compared to the breakdown length. The conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy are formulated and solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme, as described by Krause (1985); numerical results are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  13. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  14. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  16. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base of the nipple as a grayish...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  20. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  1. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  2. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  3. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  4. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  5. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  6. Investigating Electrical Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Nathaniel; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNS nEDM experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) at the 3x10-28 level. The experiment is currently in the critical component demonstration phase. The design of the experiment calls for an electric field of 75 kV/cm across the experimental cells between electrodes within a bath of liquid helium (LHe). However, the electric breakdown phenomenon in LHe is poorly understood. Experiments investigating the breakdown of LHe were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory using a small-scale high voltage (SSHV) test apparatus at temperatures from 1.7K to 4K. Effects of varying temperature, pressure, and electrode surface conditions on LHe breakdown were investigated. Results and their implications to the SNS nEDM experiment will be presented.

  7. Changes in the Cytoplasmic Composition of Amino Acids and Proteins Observed in Staphylococcus aureus during Growth under Variable Growth Conditions Representative of the Human Wound Site

    PubMed Central

    Alreshidi, Mousa M.; Dunstan, R. Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a high proportion of nosocomial infections. This study was conducted to assess the bacterial responses in the cytoplasmic composition of amino acids and ribosomal proteins under various environmental conditions designed to mimic those on the human skin or within a wound site: pH6-8, temperature 35–37°C, and additional 0–5% NaCl. It was found that each set of environmental conditions elicited substantial adjustments in cytoplasmic levels of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, alanine and glycine (P< 0.05). These alterations generated characteristic amino acid profiles assessed by principle component analysis (PCA). Substantial alterations in cytoplasmic amino acid and protein composition occurred during growth under conditions of higher salinity stress implemented via additional levels of NaCl in the growth medium. The cells responded to additional NaCl at pH 6 by reducing levels of ribosomal proteins, whereas at pH 8 there was an upregulation of ribosomal proteins compared with the reference control. The levels of two ribosomal proteins, L32 and S19, remained constant across all experimental conditions. The data supported the hypothesis that the bacterium was continually responding to the dynamic environment by modifying the proteome and optimising metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27442022

  8. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  9. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  10. Global synthesis of the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter breakdown in streams and rivers.

    PubMed

    Follstad Shah, Jennifer J; Kominoski, John S; Ardón, Marcelo; Dodds, Walter K; Gessner, Mark O; Griffiths, Natalie A; Hawkins, Charles P; Johnson, Sherri L; Lecerf, Antoine; LeRoy, Carri J; Manning, David W P; Rosemond, Amy D; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Swan, Christopher M; Webster, Jackson R; Zeglin, Lydia H

    2016-12-31

    Streams and rivers are important conduits of terrestrially derived carbon (C) to atmospheric and marine reservoirs. Leaf litter breakdown rates are expected to increase as water temperatures rise in response to climate change. The magnitude of increase in breakdown rates is uncertain, given differences in litter quality and microbial and detritivore community responses to temperature, factors that can influence the apparent temperature sensitivity of breakdown and the relative proportion of C lost to the atmosphere vs. stored or transported downstream. Here, we synthesized 1025 records of litter breakdown in streams and rivers to quantify its temperature sensitivity, as measured by the activation energy (Ea , in eV). Temperature sensitivity of litter breakdown varied among twelve plant genera for which Ea could be calculated. Higher values of Ea were correlated with lower-quality litter, but these correlations were influenced by a single, N-fixing genus (Alnus). Ea values converged when genera were classified into three breakdown rate categories, potentially due to continual water availability in streams and rivers modulating the influence of leaf chemistry on breakdown. Across all data representing 85 plant genera, the Ea was 0.34 ± 0.04 eV, or approximately half the value (0.65 eV) predicted by metabolic theory. Our results indicate that average breakdown rates may increase by 5-21% with a 1-4 °C rise in water temperature, rather than a 10-45% increase expected, according to metabolic theory. Differential warming of tropical and temperate biomes could result in a similar proportional increase in breakdown rates, despite variation in Ea values for these regions (0.75 ± 0.13 eV and 0.27 ± 0.05 eV, respectively). The relative proportions of gaseous C loss and organic matter transport downstream should not change with rising temperature given that Ea values for breakdown mediated by microbes alone and microbes plus detritivores were similar at the global

  11. Signaling Proteins Are Represented in Tissue Fluid/Lymph from Soft Tissues of Normal Human Legs at Concentrations Different from Serum

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Marzanna; Durlik, Marek; Miller, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The mobile intercellular fluid flowing to and in the lymphatics contains filtered plasma products and substances synthesized and excreted by tissue cells. Among them are signaling proteins such as cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors. They act locally in autocrine and paracrine systems regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and formation of the ground matrix. They play an immunoregulatory role in infections, wound healing, and tumor cell growth. Methods and Results: In this study we measured the concentration of selected cytokines, chemokines, tissue enzymes, and growth factors in tissue fluid/lymph drained from normal human leg soft tissues. Legs exposed to infections and trauma often result in development of lymphedema. Lymph was drained from superficial calf lymphatics using microsurgical techniques. Our studies showed generally higher concentrations of cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors in lymph than in serum. The total protein L/S ratio was 0.22, whereas that of various lymph signaling proteins ranged between 1 and 10. Conclusions: This indicates that in addition to proteins filtered from blood, local cells contribute to lymph concentration by own production, depending on the actual cell requirement. Moreover, there were major individual differences of lymph levels with simultaneous stable serum levels. This suggests existence of a local autonomous regulatory humoral mechanism in tissues, not reflected in serum. PMID:24364843

  12. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny.

  13. Repression of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 expression by ciglitazone via Egr-1 represents a new approach for inhibition of lung cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ) ligands have been shown to inhibit the growth of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain incompletely elucidated. Methods Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by cell viability, MTT and caspase3/7 activity assays. Phosphorylation/protein expression and gene silence/overexpression of AMPKα, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), Egr-1 and PPARγ were performed by Western blot and siRNA/transfection assays. Dual-Luciferase Reporter Kit was used to measure the PPAR response elements (PPRE) reporter and PDK1 promoter activities, and ChIP assay was used to detect the Egr-1 protein binding to the DNA site in the PDK1 gene promoter. Results We found that ciglitazone, one synthetic PPARγ ligand, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of NSCLC cells through decreased expression of PDK1, which was not blocked by GW9662 (a specific PPARγ antagonist). Overexpression of PDK1 overcame the effect of ciglitazone on cell growth and caspase 3/7 activity. Ciglitazone increased the phosphorylation of AMPKα and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibitor of AMPK (compound C), but not JNK (SP600125), reversed the effect of ciglitazone on PDK1 protein expression. Ciglitazone reduced PDK1 gene promoter activity, which was not observed in cells exposed to compound C, but not silenced of PPARγ siRNA. Combination of ciglitazone and metformin further reduced PDK1 expression and promoter activity. Furthermore, we showed that ciglitazone induced the protein expression of Egr-1, which was not observed in cells silencing of AMPKα. Moreover, silencing of Egr-1 abrogated the effect of ciglitazone on PDK1 promoter activity and cell growth. On the contrary, overexpression of Egr-1 enhanced the effect of ciglitazone on PDK1 gene promoter activity. ChIP assays demonstrated that ciglitazone induced Egr-1 protein bind to the specific DNA site

  14. Predicting protein structural class by incorporating patterns of over-represented k-mers into the general form of Chou's PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu-Fang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Jie; Liu, Tai-Gang; Zheng, Xiao-Qi

    2012-04-01

    Computational prediction of protein structural class based on sequence data remains a challenging problem in current protein science. In this paper, a new feature extraction approach based on relative polypeptide composition is introduced. This approach could take into account the background distribution of a given k-mer under a Markov model of order k-2, and avoid the curse of dimensionality with the increase of k by using a T-statistic feature selection strategy. The selected features are then fed to a support vector machine to perform the prediction. To verify the performance of our method, jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on four widely used benchmark datasets. Comparison of our results with existing methods shows that our method provides satisfactory performance for structural class prediction.

  15. Effect of Axial Pressure Gradient on the Bifurcation Structure of Viscous Vortex Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazmina, Elena; Nichols, Joseph; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Schmid, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Incompressible open swirling flows are studied by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS) and linear stability analysis. The bifurcation structure is obtained by varying control parameters including: the swirl parameter S, the Reynolds number Re, and the nondimensional external pressure gradientβ. Nonlinear steady states are traced by pseudo-arclength continuation using the Recursive Projection Method (RPM) applied to the fully nonlinear DNS. For zero pressure gradient and large Re, the bifurcation curve shows a characteristic fold representing the existence of multiple solutions associated with vortex breakdown. Large favorable pressure gradients prevent vortex breakdown giving access to new stable or unstable branches corresponding to high swirl number, breakdown-free states. These branches are traced back to the case with zero pressure gradient by applying continuation into the pressure gradient parameter.

  16. Factors affecting foster care breakdown in Spain.

    PubMed

    López López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    2011-05-01

    Breakdown of foster care has been defined as the situation in which one of the involved parties terminates the intervention before having achieved the goals established for the case plan. This work presents a study carried out with a Spanish sample of 318 closed cases of children who were placed in foster homes and kinship care. The data were collected through the exhaustive review of the child protection and foster placement files, complemented with interviews of the welfare workers in charge of each case. The rate of breakdown of the entire sample was 26.1%, although it was significantly different in kinship care (19.7%) and foster care (31.2%). The results of this study indicate that the variables related to breakdown depend on the placement modality, either in foster care or kinship care. In the first case, the variables related to the child's characteristics are noteworthy, especially behavior and academic problems, with special relevance in the 9-12-year-old group, and in children who were previously in residential care. In contrast, in kinship care, the parents' problems (prison, mental health) and having some measure of guardianship are the most important. The fact of undergoing foster placement after having lived in various residential homes is transcendental. Lastly, the availability of economic resources and even the foster carers' studies seem to be related to foster breakdown.

  17. Breakdown mechanism in buried silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Santos; Suehle, John S.; Roitman, Peter

    1993-09-01

    Charge injection leading to catastrophic breakdown has been used to study the dielectric properties of the buried oxide layer in silicon implanted with high-energy oxygen ions. Current versus gate bias, current versus time, and capacitance versus gate bias were used to characterize, at various temperatures, MOS metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with areas in the 1×10-4-1×10-2 cm2 range fabricated with commercially available single- or triple-implant separation by implanted oxygen silicon wafers. The data show that injected charge accumulates in the buried oxide at donorlike oxide traps ultimately leading to catastrophic breakdown. Both Poole-Frenkel and Fowler-Nordheim conduction, as well as impact-ionization mechanisms, have been identified in the oxide. The charge and field to breakdown in the best buried oxides are, respectively, near 1 C cm-2 and 10 MV cm-1, similar to the thermally grown oxide parameters. Cumulative distributions of these parameters measured over a large number of capacitors show that the frequency of breakdown events caused by extrinsic defects is scaled with the capacitor area. Intrinsic and extrinsic defect distributions are broader than with thermally grown oxides.

  18. Electrical Breakdown Phenomena Involving Material Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    vol. 119, pp. 520-524, 1960. [14] H. P. Hjalmarson, R. L. Pease, and R. A. B. Devine, “Calculations of radiation dose-rate sensitivity of bipolar ... transistors ,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., vol. 55, pp. 3009– 3015, 2008. [15] J. M. Meek and J. D. Craggs, Electrical Breakdown of Gases. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953. 798

  19. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Laser Induced Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    consistent dependence on the temperature of the medium. The theory of the temperature dependence of LIB and experimental observations for all pulse...durations and their implications for retinal damage are discussed. Laser Induced Breakdown, Temperature dependence , Threshold valve, Nanosecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, laser pulses.

  1. Interleukin-13 receptors on human prostate carcinoma cell lines represent a novel target for a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Maini, A; Hillman, G; Haas, G P; Wang, C Y; Montecillo, E; Hamzavi, F; Pontes, J E; Leland, P; Pastan, I; Debinski, W; Puri, R K

    1997-09-01

    We have discovered a new cell surface protein in the form of interleukin-13 receptor on several solid tumor cells, including human renal cell carcinoma cells (Obiri et al., 1995; Debinski et al., 1995). This study reports that human prostate cancer cell lines also express high affinity IL-13 receptors (Kd = 159 pM). These receptors are functional because IL-13 surprisingly increased proliferation of all three prostate cancer cell lines studied as determined by thymidine uptake and clonogenic assays. IL-13 receptors on prostate cancer cell lines were targeted using a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38QQR). This molecule, termed IL13-PE38QQR, has been found cytotoxic to all three prostate cancer cell lines as determined by the inhibition of protein synthesis. The IC50 ranged between 1 nmol/l, to 15 nmol/l. These data were confirmed by clonogenic assays in which IL13-PE38QQR almost completely inhibited colony formation at 10 nmol/l. IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to cells that express little or no IL-13R. Heat inactivated IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells indicating specificity. IL13-PE38QQR was also cytotoxic to colonies when they were allowed to form first for several days before the addition of toxins. Our data suggest that additional studies should be performed to target IL-13 receptor bearing prostate cancer.

  2. ICGA-PSO-ELM approach for accurate multiclass cancer classification resulting in reduced gene sets in which genes encoding secreted proteins are highly represented.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, Saras; Sundaram, Suresh; Sundararajan, Narasimhan; Zimmermann, Michael; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2011-01-01

    A combination of Integer-Coded Genetic Algorithm (ICGA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), coupled with the neural-network-based Extreme Learning Machine (ELM), is used for gene selection and cancer classification. ICGA is used with PSO-ELM to select an optimal set of genes, which is then used to build a classifier to develop an algorithm (ICGA_PSO_ELM) that can handle sparse data and sample imbalance. We evaluate the performance of ICGA-PSO-ELM and compare our results with existing methods in the literature. An investigation into the functions of the selected genes, using a systems biology approach, revealed that many of the identified genes are involved in cell signaling and proliferation. An analysis of these gene sets shows a larger representation of genes that encode secreted proteins than found in randomly selected gene sets. Secreted proteins constitute a major means by which cells interact with their surroundings. Mounting biological evidence has identified the tumor microenvironment as a critical factor that determines tumor survival and growth. Thus, the genes identified by this study that encode secreted proteins might provide important insights to the nature of the critical biological features in the microenvironment of each tumor type that allow these cells to thrive and proliferate.

  3. Mutations in Rice yellow mottle virus Polyprotein P2a Involved in RYMV2 Gene Resistance Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Pinel-Galzi, Agnès; Dubreuil-Tranchant, Christine; Hébrard, Eugénie; Mariac, Cédric; Ghesquière, Alain; Albar, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) is one of the major diseases of rice in Africa. The high resistance of the Oryza glaberrima Tog7291 accession involves a null allele of the RYMV2 gene, whose ortholog in Arabidopsis, CPR5, is a transmembrane nucleoporin involved in effector-triggered immunity. To optimize field deployment of the RYMV2 gene and improve its durability, which is often a weak point in varietal resistance, we analyzed its efficiency toward RYMV isolates representing the genetic diversity of the virus and the molecular basis of resistance breakdown. Tog7291 resistance efficiency was highly variable depending on the isolate used, with infection rates ranging from 0 to 98% of plants. Back-inoculation experiments indicated that infection cases were not due to an incomplete resistance phenotype but to the emergence of resistance-breaking (RB) variants. Interestingly, the capacity of the virus to overcome Tog7291 resistance is associated with a polymorphism at amino-acid 49 of the VPg protein which also affects capacity to overcome the previously studied RYMV1 resistance gene. This polymorphism appeared to be a main determinant of the emergence of RB variants. It acts independently of the resistance gene and rather reflects inter-species adaptation with potential consequences for the durability of resistance. RB mutations were identified by full-length or partial sequencing of the RYMV genome in infected Tog7291 plants and were validated by directed mutagenesis of an infectious viral clone. We found that Tog7291 resistance breakdown involved mutations in the putative membrane anchor domain of the polyprotein P2a. Although the precise effect of these mutations on rice/RYMV interaction is still unknown, our results offer a new perspective for the understanding of RYMV2 mediated resistance mechanisms. Interestingly, in the susceptible IR64 variety, RB variants showed low infectivity and frequent reversion to the wild-type genotype, suggesting that Tog7291

  4. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  5. Characterisation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates from pigs associated with vaccine breakdowns.

    PubMed

    Eamens, G J; Forbes, W A; Djordjevic, S P

    2006-07-20

    Swine erysipelas vaccines are routinely used to protect pigs against peracute and acute/urticarial forms of Erysipelothrix. Between 1995 and 1998, 34 swine herds across four Australian states experienced vaccine failure. Forty-four isolates of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae of serovars 2, 1a, 1b and 1bx21 were recovered from 15 of these 34 vaccine breakdown herds. These isolates were characterised by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses using RsaI and AluI on whole cell DNA and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Results were compared with those of 20 isolates from 16 herds unaffected by vaccine breakdown and 13 isolates representing 10 reference strains. The majority of breakdown herds possessed isolates of serovar 2 (9/15 herds), followed by serovar 1a (5 herds). No geographic predominance of a single serovar was evident. The identification of 10 RsaI profiles from whole cell DNA among the 44 isolates from 15 breakdown herds indicated that a single, new clonal lineage of E. rhusiopathiae was not responsible for vaccine failure. RsaI RFLP analyses detected a further 14 distinct profiles among 20 field strains unassociated with vaccine breakdowns, and none matched profiles of the 10 serovar reference strains for serovars 1a, 1b, 2 or 21. This technique is recommended for epidemiological studies of E. rhusiopathiae strains.

  6. Electrical breakdown of carbon nanotube devices and the predictability of breakdown position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated electrical transport properties of long (>10 μm) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NTs) by dividing individuals into several segments of identical length. Each segment has different resistance because of the random distribution of defect density in an NT and is corroborated by Raman studies. Higher is the resistance, lower is the current required to break the segments indicating that breakdown occurs at the highly resistive segment/site and not necessarily at the middle. This is consistent with the one-dimensional thermal transport model. We have demonstrated the healing of defects by annealing at moderate temperatures or by current annealing. To strengthen our mechanism, we have carried out electrical breakdown of nitrogen doped NTs (NNTs) with diameter variation from one end to the other. It reveals that the electrical breakdown occurs selectively at the narrower diameter region. Overall, we believe that our results will help to predict the breakdown position of both semiconducting and metallic NTs.

  7. RF Breakdown in High Vacuum Multimegawatt X-Band Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-06-15

    Increasing the power handling capabilities of rf components is an important issue for the design of rf accelerators and rf sources. RF breakdown is a phenomena that limit the high power performance. A major concern is the damage that can occur in rf components from breakdown. To better understand this damage, we have studied rf breakdown in a rectangular waveguide experimentally and theoretically. The breakdown process in a waveguide is both easier to measure and simulate than breakdown in a complex geometry such as an accelerating structure. We used a particle tracking code and a Particle-In-Cell code to model the breakdown behavior. Models developed for the waveguide were applied to the breakdown in accelerating structures. RF breakdown in traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures was simulated. We compare the experimental data with results of the simulations for the accelerating structures.

  8. The Latitude Dependence of Dielectric Breakdown on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Hayne, P. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Solar energetic particles may cause dielectric breakdown on the nightside of the Moon. We predict that breakdown weathering may have melted or vaporized about 4-11 wt% of impact gardened regolith on the Moon.

  9. The Hcp proteins fused with diverse extended-toxin domains represent a novel pattern of antibacterial effectors in type VI secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiale; Pan, Zihao; Huang, Jinhu; Sun, Min; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun

    2017-01-06

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread molecular weapon deployed by many bacterial species to target eukaryotic host cells or rival bacteria. Using a dynamic injection mechanism, diverse effectors can be delivered by T6SS directly into recipient cells. Here, we report a new family of T6SS effectors encoded by extended Hcps carrying diverse toxin domains. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that these Hcps with C-terminal extension toxins, designated as Hcp-ET, exist widely in the Enterobacteriaceae. To verify our findings, Hcp-ET1 was tested for its antibacterial effect, and showed effective inhibition of target cell growth via the predicted HNH-DNase activity by T6SS-dependent delivery. Further studies showed that Hcp-ET2 mediated interbacterial antagonism via a Tle1 phospholipase (encoded by DUF2235 domain) activity. Notably, comprehensive analyses of protein homology and genomic neighborhoods revealed that Hcp-ET3-4 is fused with 2 toxin domains (Pyocin S3 and Colicin-DNase) C-terminally, and its encoding gene is followed 3 duplications of the cognate immunity genes. However, some bacteria encode a separated hcp-et3 and an orphan et4 (et4O1) genes caused by a termination-codon mutation in the fusion region between Pyocin S3 and Colicin-DNase encoding fragments. Our results demonstrated that both of these toxins had antibacterial effects. Further, all duplications of the cognate immunity protein contributed to neutralize the DNase toxicity of Pyocin S3 and Colicin, which has not been reported previously. In conclusion, we propose that Hcp-ET proteins are polymorphic T6SS effectors, and thus present a novel encoding pattern of T6SS effectors.

  10. Immunoreactivity and differential developmental expression of known and putative Chlamydia trachomatis membrane proteins for biologically variant serovars representing distinct disease groups.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João P; Hsia, Ru-ching; Mead, Sally; Borrego, Maria J; Dean, Deborah

    2005-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an intracellular bacterium that causes ocular and urogenital diseases worldwide. Membrane proteins have only been partially characterized, and the discovery of a nine-member polymorphic membrane protein gene family has enhanced interest in defining their function. We previously reported two putative insertion sequence-like elements in pmpC for biovariant Ba and one each for G and L2, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Because of this and the tissue tropism differences for these biovariants, we analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR pmpC expression relative to immunogenic protein genes ompA, groEL and gseA throughout development. Sera from infected adolescents were reacted by immunoblot against recombinant (r)PmpC and rMOMP. ompA and groEL revealed different developmental transcriptome profiles among the biovariants. pmpC expression occurred at 2 h, peaked at 18 for L2 (at 24 for Ba and G), with the highest mRNA levels throughout development for L2. pmpC expression as a function of time paralleled ompA expression with higher mRNA levels compared with groEL later in development. Only sera from D-, E- and G-infected patients reacted to rPmpC; all infected patients reacted to rMOMP. pmpC expression during logarithmic growth suggests a role in membrane building and/or integrity, which is supported by the presence of a signal peptidase and C-terminal phenylalanine in PmpC. Because phylogenetic analyses of pmpC segregate serovars according to tissue tropism, we speculate that biovariant transcriptome differences may contribute to this tropism. The heterogeneous biovariant pmpC expression throughout development and differential PmpC immunoreactivity also suggest a role for pmpC in antigenic variation.

  11. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe–S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe–S clusters featuring (Cys)3(His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe–S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe–S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe–S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved. PMID:26235649

  12. Dielectric breakdown in nano-porous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Juan Pablo

    Unknown to most computer users and mobile device enthusiasts, we have finally entered into a critical age of chip manufacturing. January of 2014 marks the official start of the quest by the semiconductor industry to successfully integrate sub 14nm process technology nodes in accordance to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). The manufacturing of nano-scale features represents a major bottleneck of its own. However, a bigger challenge lies in reliably isolating the massive chip interconnect network. The present work is aimed at generating a theoretical and experimental framework to predict dielectric breakdown for thin films used in computer chip components. Here, a set of experimental techniques are presented to assess and study dielectric failure in novel thin films. A theory of dielectric breakdown in thin nano-porous films is proposed to describe combined intrinsic and metal ion catalyzed failure. This theory draws on experimental evidence as well as fundamental concepts from mass and electronic charge transport. The drift of metal species was found to accelerate intrinsic dielectric failure. The solubility of metals species such as Cu was found to range from 7.0x1025 ions/m3 to 1.86x1026 ions/m3 in 7% porous SiCOH films. The diffusion coefficient for Cu species was found to span from 4.2x10-19 m2/s to 1.86x10-21 m2/s. Ramped voltage stress experiments were used to identify intrinsic failure from metal catalyzed failure. Intrinsic breakdown is defined when time to failure against applied field ramp rate results in ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) ≈ -1. Intrinsic failure was studied using Au. Here, ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) ≈ -0.95, which is an experimental best case scenario for intrinsic failure. Au is commonly reluctant to ionize which means that failure occurs in the absence of ionic species. Metal catalyzed failure was investigated using reactive electrodes such as Cu, and Ag. Here, trends for ∂(ln(TTF))/∂(ln(R)) significantly

  13. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  14. Bulk charging and breakdown in electron-irradiated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electron irradiations were performed in an experimental and theoretical study of ten common polymers. Breakdowns were monitored by measuring currents between the electrodes on each side of the planar samples. Sample currents as a function of time during irradiation are compared with theory. Breakdowns are correlated with space charge electric field strength and polarity. Major findings include evidence that all polymers tested broke down, breakdowns remove negligible bulk charge and no breakdowns are seen below 20 million V/m.

  15. Solution conformation of a peptide fragment representing a proposed RNA-binding site of a viral coat protein studied by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    van der Graaf, M.; van Mierlo, C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A. )

    1991-06-11

    The first 25 amino acids of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus are essential for binding the encapsidated RNA. Although an {alpha}-helical conformation has been predicted for this highly positively charged N-terminal region. No experimental evidence for this conformation has been presented so far. In this study, two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on a chemically synthesized pentacosapeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of this coat protein. All resonances could be assigned by a combined use of two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy carried out at four different temperatures. Various NMR parameters indicate the presence of a conformational ensemble consisting of helical structures rapidly converting into more extended states. Differences in chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that lowering the temperature induces a shift of the dynamic equilibrium toward more helical structures. At 10{degrees}C, a perceptible fraction of the conformational ensemble consists of structures with an {alpha}-helical conformation between residues 9 and 17, likely starting with a turnlike structure around Thr9 and Arg10. Both the conformation and the position of this helical region agree well with the secondary structure predictions mentioned above.

  16. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  2. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  3. On the measurement of laser-induced plasma breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Brieschenk, Stefan; Kleine, Harald; O'Byrne, Sean

    2013-09-07

    The breakdown threshold of a gas exposed to intense laser-radiation is a function of gas and laser properties. Breakdown thresholds reported in the literature often vary greatly and these differences can partially be traced back to the method that is typically used to determine breakdown thresholds. This paper discusses the traditional method used to determine breakdown thresholds and the potential errors that can arise using this approach, and presents an alternative method which can yield more accurate data especially when determining breakdown thresholds as functions of gas pressure.

  4. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herchl, F.; Marton, K.; Tomčo, L.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Koneracká, M.; Kolcunová, I.

    2008-05-01

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m-1. Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions.

  5. Franck-Condon breakdown from Cooper minima.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, K.; McKoy, V.

    1996-05-01

    We report Cooper minima-induced Franck-Condon breakdown for N2 2σ_u-1 photoionization. The measurements are over an extended energy range (230 eV), and we find that the v^+= 2/v^+= 0 and v^+= 1/v^+= 0 vibrational branching ratios vary strongly over a 100 eV range. This is a dramatic deviation from Franck-Condon predictions, and calculations show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. To our knowledge, this is the only example of a broad-range Franck-Condon breakdown due to a non-resonant mechanism, and is the broadest deviation from Franck-Condon behavior observed to date. The ubiquitous nature of Cooper minima suggests this effect to be common in molecular systems.

  6. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-05-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures.

  7. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  8. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  9. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  10. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  11. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  12. Human T-cell recognition of synthetic peptides representing conserved and variant sequences from the merozoite surface protein 2 of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Theander, T G; Hviid, L; Dodoo, D; Afari, E A; Jensen, J B; Rzepczyk, C M

    1997-06-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) is a malaria vaccine candidate currently undergoing clinical trials. We analyzed the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) response to synthetic peptides corresponding to conserved and variant regions of the FCQ-27 allelic form of MSP2 in Ghanaian individuals from an area of hyperendemic malaria transmission and in Danes without exposure to malaria. PBMC from 20-39% of Ghanaians responded to each of the peptides by proliferation and 29-36% had PBMC which produced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in response to peptide stimulation. In Danes, there was no proliferation to two of the peptides and only PBMC from 5% of the individuals proliferated to the other three peptides. IFN-gamma production was not detected to any peptide. In both Danes and Ghanaians in only a few instances was IL-4 detected in the PBMC cultures. Overall PBMC from 79% of the Ghanaians responded by proliferation and/or cytokine secretion to at least one of three peptides tested, whereas responses were only observed in 14% of Danes (P = 0.002). These data suggest that the Ghanaians had expanded peripheral blood T-cell populations recognizing the peptides as a result of natural infection. The findings are encouraging for the development of a vaccine based on these T-epitope containing regions of MSP2, as the peptides were broadly recognized suggesting that they can bind to diverse HLA alleles and also because they include conserved MSP2 sequences. Immunisation with a vaccine construct incorporating the sequences present in these peptides could thus be expected to be immunogenic in a high percentage of individuals and lead to the establishment of memory T-cells, which can be boosted through natural infection.

  13. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  14. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  16. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  17. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Denić, Dragan B.; Pejović, Momčilo M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  18. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, Milic M.; Denic, Dragan B.; Pejovic, Momcilo M.; Nesic, Nikola T.; Vasovic, Nikola

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  19. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices.

    PubMed

    Pejović, Milić M; Denić, Dragan B; Pejović, Momčilo M; Nešić, Nikola T; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  20. Space platform expendables resupply concept definition study. Volume 3: Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Space Platform Expendables Resupply Concept Definition Study is described. The WBS consists of a list of WBS elements, a dictionary of element definitions, and an element logic diagram. The list and logic diagram identify the interrelationships of the elements. The dictionary defines the types of work that may be represented by or be classified under each specific element. The Space Platform Expendable Resupply WBS was selected mainly to support the program planning, scheduling, and costing performed in the programmatics task (task 3). The WBS is neither a statement-of-work nor a work authorization document. Rather, it is a framework around which to define requirements, plan effort, assign responsibilities, allocate and control resources, and report progress, expenditures, technical performance, and schedule performance. The WBS element definitions are independent of make-or-buy decisions, organizational structure, and activity locations unless exceptions are specifically stated.

  1. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  2. Discrimination of microbiological samples using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu, Jin; Bossu, Myriam; Jovelet, Julien; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Amodeo, Tanguy; Fréjafon, Emeric; Laloi, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Using femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the authors have analyzed five different species of bacterium. Line emissions from six trace mineral elements, Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, and Fe, have been clearly detected. Their intensities correspond to relative concentrations of these elements contained in the analyzed samples. The authors demonstrate that the concentration profile of trace elements allows unambiguous discrimination of different bacteria. Quantitative differentiation has been made by representing bacteria in a six-dimension hyperspace with each of its axis representing a detected trace element. In such hyperspace, representative points of different species of bacterium are gathered in different and distinct volumes.

  3. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Proteomic analysis of hypoxia-induced tube breakdown of an in vitro capillary model composed of HUVECs: potential role of p38-regulated reduction of HSP27.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Naitou, Hirotaka; Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Ayuzawa, Rie; Fujimori, Yoshihiro; Ohashi, Norio; Kaji, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Toshiro

    2008-07-01

    We recently reported that hypoxia could induce the breakdown of capillary-like tubes formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that this breakdown was regulated by p38 and not by a caspase cascade, although the exact molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to identify proteins that regulated hypoxia-induced tube breakdown through p38-regulated and caspase-independent mechanisms. The involvement of adhesion proteins, integrins, VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and occludin was first investigated. Although some of these proteins decreased after hypoxia, none of them met the conditions of being quantitatively restored by p38 inhibition but not by caspase inhibition. We then conducted 2-D DIGE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS to identify altered protein expression. The differential proteomic analysis of tube-forming HUVECs treated with normoxia or hypoxia and treated with hypoxia in the presence or absence of SB203580, a specific p38 inhibitor, revealed the involvement of heat shock proteins in this tube breakdown. We also confirmed that the amount of HSP27 and HSP70 changed in a p38-regulated and caspase-independent manner during hypoxia. Knocking down HSP27 expression using RNAi further augmented hypoxia-induced tube breakdown. Taken together, it was shown that p38-regulated and caspase-independent reduction of HSP27 plays an important role in hypoxia-induced tube breakdown.

  5. Magnetic control of breakdown: Toward energy-efficient hollow-cathode magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Kumar, S.; Zong, X. X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-03-15

    Characteristics of electrical breakdown of a planar magnetron enhanced with an electromagnet and a hollow-cathode structure, are studied experimentally and numerically. At lower pressures the breakdown voltage shows a dependence on the applied magnetic field, and the voltage necessary to achieve the self-sustained discharge regime can be significantly reduced. At higher pressures, the dependence is less sensitive to the magnetic field magnitude and shows a tendency of increased breakdown voltage at the stronger magnetic fields. A model of the magnetron discharge breakdown is developed with the background gas pressure and the magnetic field used as parameters. The model describes the motion of electrons, which gain energy by passing the electric field across the magnetic field and undergo collisions with neutrals, thus generating new bulk electrons. The electrons are in turn accelerated in the electric field and effectively ionize a sufficient amount of neutrals to enable the discharge self-sustainment regime. The model is based on the assumption about the combined classical and near-wall mechanisms of electron conductivity across the magnetic field, and is consistent with the experimental results. The obtained results represent a significant advance toward energy-efficient multipurpose magnetron discharges.

  6. Kinetic theory of runaway air-breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  9. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A. ); Gurevich, A.V. ); Tunnell, T. ); Milikh, G.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The kinetic theory for an air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper [Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992)] is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  10. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  11. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  12. The cell proliferation-associated antigen of antibody Ki-67: a very large, ubiquitous nuclear protein with numerous repeated elements, representing a new kind of cell cycle-maintaining proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The antigen defined by mAb Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein the expression of which is strictly associated with cell proliferation and which is widely used in routine pathology as a "proliferation marker" to measure the growth fraction of cells in human tumors. Ki-67 detects a double band with apparent molecular weights of 395 and 345 kD in immunoblots of proteins from proliferating cells. We cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA, identified two differentially spliced isoforms of mRNA with open reading frames of 9,768 and 8,688 bp encoding for this cell proliferation-associated protein with calculated molecular weights of 358,761 D and 319,508 D, respectively. New mAbs against a bacterially expressed part and a synthetic polypeptide deduced from the isolated cDNA react with the native Ki-67 antigen, thus providing a circle of evidence that we have cloned the authentic Ki-67 antigen cDNA. The central part of the Ki-67 antigen cDNA contains a large 6,845-bp exon with 16 tandemly repeated 366-bp elements, the "Ki-67 repeats", each including a highly conserved new motif of 66 bp, the "Ki-67 motif", which encodes for the epitope detected by Ki-67. Computer analysis of the nucleic acid and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Ki-67 antigen confirmed that the cDNA encodes for a nuclear and short-lived protein without any significant homology to known sequences. Ki-67 antigen-specific antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 cell line cells, indicating that the Ki-67 antigen may be an absolute requirement for maintaining cell proliferation. We conclude that the Ki-67 antigen defines a new category of cell cycle-associated nuclear nonhistone proteins. PMID:8227122

  13. SIMULATION OF RF BREAKDOWN EFFECTS ON NLC BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    The linacs of the Next Linear Collider / Global Linear Collider will contain several thousand traveling wave X-band accelerator structures operating at an input power of about 60 MW. At this input power, prototypes of NLC/GLC structures have breakdown rates lower than one breakdown in ten hours. RF breakdowns disrupt flow of energy inside the structure and create arcs with electron and ion currents. Electromagnetic fields of these currents interact with the NLC beam. The authors simulated the deflection of the NLC beam caused by breakdown currents using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. In this paper they present modeling considerations and simulation results.

  14. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  15. NASA Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Jon F.; Poole, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule and budget development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  16. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  17. Electrostatic Breakdown Analysis using EMsolve and BEMSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D

    2005-05-27

    Computer simulations modeling electrostatic behavior were used to simulate dielectric breakdown problems. These simulations modeled composite dielectric and conducting structures to see how much voltage difference or charge accumulation could occur before dielectric breakdown occurred in an air region. Two different computer codes were used for the analysis; EMSolve and BEMSTER. EMSolve, an existing LLNL internal finite element code, requires that a complete volume mesh of the problem be constructed. BEMSTER, a boundary-element code, was developed from an extension of the FEMSTER libraries which power EMSolve. The boundary-integral code offers the advantages of solving for accumulated charge and maximum electric field directly, and of only requiring a surface mesh. However, because it does not automatically solve for the voltage and electric field everywhere in space, post-processing and visualization are slightly more difficult than with EMSolve. Both codes were compared to several analytical solutions, and then applied to the structures of interest. Both codes showed good agreement with the analytic solution and with each other.

  18. Effect of sample preparation on the discrimination of bacterial isolates cultured in liquid nutrient media using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between 2 genera of gram-negative bacteria and 2 genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination relies primarily ...

  19. Representing Substantive Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Fred N.; Stewart, James

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of Schwab's "substantive structures" of a discipline in terms of science philosophy. Presents three techniques for representing substantive structures and discusses some of their uses in science education research. (SK)

  20. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients.

  1. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown for combustion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzagianni, M.; Couris, S.

    2012-06-25

    The focused beam of a 100 fs, 800 nm laser is used to induce a spark in some laminar premixed air-methane flames operating with variable fuel content (equivalence ratio). The analysis of the light escaping from the plasma revealed that the Balmer hydrogen lines, H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}}, and some molecular origin emissions were the most prominent spectral features, while the CN ({Beta}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) band intensity was found to depend linearly with methane content, suggesting that femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be a useful tool for the in-situ determination and local mapping of fuel content in hydrocarbon-air combustible mixtures.

  2. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  3. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  4. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  5. State Regulation, Family Breakdown, and Lone Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Using a range of parish records, records from the Registrar General of Scotland, charity organizations, and media reports, this article contributes to the historiography which evaluates the effects of World War I in Britain as well as the history of lone mothers and their children. It highlights how during the war, women, especially lone mothers, made significant gains through the welfare system, changing approaches to illegitimacy and the plentiful nature of women’s work but also how in doing so this brought them under greater surveillance by the state, local parishes, and charity organizations. Moreover, as this article will demonstrate, many of the gains made by women were short-lived and in fact the war contributed to high levels of family breakdown and gendered and intergenerational poverty endured by lone mothers and their children. PMID:26538794

  6. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  7. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  8. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  9. Intrinsic laser-induced breakdown of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Leonid B.

    2002-03-01

    This paper is a survey of experimental results in laser- induced damage observed mainly at State Optical Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia; at School of Optics/CREOL (Orlando, FL) which expounds conditions of observation of an intrinsic breakdown of high-purity silicate glasses and proposes the general idea of its mechanism. It is shown that the surface laser-induced breakdown of dielectrics is resulted from photo- and thermo-ionization of surface defects but not from interaction of laser radiation with dielectric material itself. Conditions of thermal ionization of the volume of dielectric materials are determined in dependence on features of absorption of material and temporal features of laser radiation. Statistical properties of laser-induced breakdown of high-purity glasses are caused by statistical properties of laser radiation while the breakdown itself is a deterministic process. Elimination of impact of self-focusing on the results of the breakdown threshold measurements is observed if the spot size of laser radiation in focal plane is less than the wavelength. No photoionization of glass matrix is detected before laser- induced breakdown, and there is no effect of photoionization of impurities and defects on intrinsic breakdown. A mechanism of intrinsic laser-induced breakdown is proposed which is a spasmodic transformation of the electronic level structure in a wide-bandgap dielectric caused by the electric field of laser radiation. This is a collective process converting a transparent material to the opaque state but not an individual process of any type of ionization.

  10. Representing properties locally.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  11. Investigation of breakdown in porous ceramics initiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Morozov, P. A.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2012-07-01

    Breakdown delay times are measured and velocities of forming a conductive channel in aluminum oxide based porous ceramic materials impregnated with transformer oil are determined for pulsed electrical breakdown initiated by nanosecond pulses at a voltage of 140 kV. The breakdown delay times are also measured in monolithic aluminum oxide ceramics and leuco-sapphire single crystals. It is demonstrated that in porous ceramics, the average velocity of breakdown channel propagation decreases with increasing volume of the sample occupied by the liquid dielectric in comparison with single crystal and monolythic ceramics; it makes 50% of the velocity of breakdown channel propagation in leuco-sapphire and exceeds 3 times the corresponding value in transformer oil measured at the same voltage and pulse duration.

  12. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  13. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-08-11

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output.

  14. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  15. Does Initial Leaf Chemistry Affect the Contribution of Insects, Fungi, and Bacteria to Leaf Breakdown in a Lowland Tropical Stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon, M.; Pringle, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    We examined effects of initial leaf chemistry of six common riparian species on the relative contribution of fungi, bacteria, and invertebrates to leaf breakdown in a lowland stream in Costa Rica. We hypothesized that fungi and bacteria would contribute more to the breakdown of species with low concentrations of secondary (tannins and phenolics) and structural (cellulose and lignin) compounds, while invertebrates would be more important in the processing of species with high concentrations of secondary and structural compounds. We incubated single species leaf bags of six common riparian species, representing a range in secondary and structural compounds, in a third-order stream at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We measured leaf chemistry during the breakdown process. We determined fungal biomass using ergosterol methods, bacteria using DAPI counts, and invertebrate biomass using length-weight regressions. We then used biomass estimates for each group to determine their contribution to the overall breakdown process. Breakdown rates ranged from very fast (Trema integerima, k = 0.23 day-1) to slow (Zygia longifolia , k = 0.011 day-1). While analyses are still under way, preliminary results support our initial hypothesis that fungi contribute more to the break down of leaves from tree species with low concentrations of secondary and structural compounds.

  16. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  17. Environmental representative program

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, B.P.

    1984-05-01

    As new pollution regulations are created and existing regulations are made more complex, it is becoming more important for plant personnel to have a knowlege of the environment. The Environmental Representative Program is designed to train plant personnel and is aimed at preventing fines, citations, and negative publicity. The goal of the program is on-going daily compliance assurance, and is divided into two segments: 1) program initiation (general considerations, representative selection, and authorization by management); and 2) program implementation (requirements training, responsibilities development, incorporation into annual goals, and program maintenance). A discussion of how each part of the program is accomplished is presented.

  18. Structure of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution: the first structural representative of a new protein family that may play a role in carbohydrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Andrew P.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT2081 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (GenBank accession code NP_810994.1) is a member of a novel protein family consisting of over 160 members, most of which are found in the different classes of Bacteroidetes. Genome-context analysis lends support to the involvement of this family in carbohydrate metabolism, which plays a key role in B. thetaiotaomicron as a predominant bacterial symbiont in the human distal gut microbiome. The crystal structure of BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution represents the first structure from this new protein family. BT2081 consists of an N-terminal domain, which adopts a β-sandwich immunoglobulin-like fold, and a larger C-terminal domain with a β-sandwich jelly-roll fold. Structural analyses reveal that both domains are similar to those found in various carbohydrate-active enzymes. The C-terminal β-jelly-roll domain contains a potential carbohydrate-binding site that is highly conserved among BT2081 homologs and is situated in the same location as the carbohydrate-binding sites that are found in structurally similar glycoside hydrolases (GHs). However, in BT2081 this site is partially occluded by surrounding loops, which results in a deep solvent-accessible pocket rather than a shallower solvent-exposed cleft. PMID:20944224

  19. The breakdown of meaning and adolescent problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Hazani, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts to account for the upsurge of adolescents' problem behavior in high-income countries in terms of Lifton's paradigm of symbolic immortality. Whilst most of the works dealing with this subject focus on the level of the individual adolescent and his or her surrounding, Lifton shows that societal processes can affect the individual. Drawing upon his approach, it was argued that desymbolization,--the collapse of society's symbols system--produces "divided selves," individuals who harbor an 'aggressor-victim double' in their psyche, wherein an internal conflict between the aggressor and the victim engenders self-destructive impulses. In this study it is hypothesized that problem behaviors are external manifestations of underlying self-destructiveness. Thirty-four Jewish-Israeli adolescents involved in sexual promiscuity, drug abuse, anorexia nervosa, and violence were interviewed. It was found that despite individual and social dissimilarities, and the different problem behaviors, the participants were marked by inner-directed destructiveness as well as a sense of meaninglessness of life and lack of symbolic relationship to what transcends their here-and-now selves. Significantly, violent adolescents whose aggression is other-directed were found to be marked by underlying self-directed aggression as well. If the findings of this study are representative of Israeli society at large or of other affluent societies, then the epidemic proportions of youth problem behavior may indicate that these societies are undergoing desymbolization, a psychocultural breakdown.

  20. Behavioral and spermatogenic hybrid male breakdown in Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Clark, M E; O'Hara, F P; Chawla, A; Werren, J H

    2010-03-01

    Several reproductive barriers exist within the Nasonia species complex, including allopatry, premating behavioral isolation, postzygotic inviability and Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility. Here we show that hybrid males suffer two additional reproductive disadvantages, an inability to properly court females and decreased sperm production. Hybrid behavioral sterility, characterized by a reduced ability of hybrids to perform necessary courtship behaviors, occurs in hybrids between two species of Nasonia. Hybrid males produced in crosses between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti courted females at a reduced frequency (23-69%), compared with wild-type N. vitripennis and N. giraulti males (>93%). Reduced courtship frequency was not a simple function of inactivity among hybrids. A strong effect of cytoplasmic (mitochondrial) background was also found in N. vitripennis and N. giraulti crosses; F2 hybrids with giraulti cytoplasm showing reduced ability at most stages of courtship. Hybrids produced between a younger species pair, N. giraulti and N. longicornis, were behaviorally fertile. All males possessed motile sperm, but sperm production is greatly reduced in hybrids between the older species pair, N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. This effect on hybrid males, lowered sperm counts rather than nonfunctional sperm, is different from most described cases of hybrid male sterility, and may represent an earlier stage of hybrid sperm breakdown. The results add to previous studies of F2 hybrid inviability and behavioral sterility, and indicate that Wolbachia-induced hybrid incompatibility has arisen early in species divergence, relative to behavioral sterility and spermatogenic infertility.

  1. Structure and Mechanism of Enzymes Involved in Biosynthesis and Breakdown of the Phosphonates Fosfomycin, Dehydrophos, and Phosphinothricin

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the mechanistic and structural information on enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis and breakdown of naturally occurring phosphonates. This review focuses on these recent developments with an emphasis on those enzymes that have been characterized crystallographically in the past five years, including proteins involved in the biosynthesis of phosphinothricin, fosfomycin, and dehydrophos and proteins involved in resistance mechanisms. PMID:20854789

  2. Gas Temperature Effects on Electrical Breakdown in Cylindrical Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han; Jung, She

    2002-11-01

    One of the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma is in the corona discharge system, for the potential reduction of NOx and SOx gas emissions from diesel engines. However, the conventional corona discharge system for the emission control application requires a high electrical voltage (typically 45 kV or higher), making its high voltage modulator heavy and bulky with insulating material. We, therefore, investigate the influence of the gas temperature on the electrical breakdown properties in the cylindrical electrode system. A theoretical model of the electrical breakdown in a cylindrical electrode system is briefly summarized, by making use of Paschen¡¯s law. The breakdown voltage increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the aspect ratio a/b increases from 0.01 to unity, where a and b are radii of the inner and outer electrodes, respectively. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical predictions. The breakdown voltage V in a high gas temperature Tg is given by V = (Tr/Tg)V0, where V0 is the breakdown voltage at the room temperature Tr. Obviously, the breakdown voltage decreases as the gas temperature Tg increases. The experimental data agree well with the theoretical values. It is, therefore, concluded that the breakdown voltage is inversely proportional to the gas temperature Tg as predicted from the theoretical analysis.

  3. Reverse Bias Second Breakdown in Power Switching Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    AD-All0 145 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORSU) TEXAS TECH UNIV LUBBOCK W M PORTNOY MAY 83 AFWL-TR-82-139 F29601-81-K-0037...139 AFWL-TR-2 82-139 ADA1 O1 5 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORS W. M. Portnoy Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409...BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING Final Report TRANSISTORS 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) W. M. Portnoy F29601

  4. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  5. Theoretical studies of breakdown in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Failure initiates in local regions of a material microstructure which are either especially weak, or which carry an especially large field. The size and location of these weak or hotspots'' depends on the microstructure, and is especially sensitive to microstructural disorder. Using model random microstructures, we have developed analytic and numerical tools to predict where failure initiates, its initiation field, and how it propagates from the initiation sites. We have found it useful to divide the failure process into a nucleation stage, in which damage occurs quite randomly throughout the material, a localisation stage, where a critical crack nucleates, and a catastrophic failure stage during which an unstable crack propagates through the material. Results are being compared with experiments on: Highly porous materials (porous glass, and porous gold); dielectric breakdown of metal loaded insulators (e.g. aluminum in poly-ethyelene) and; the critical current of superconductors containing cracks (Nb and Nb[sub 3]Ge). This report summarises our efforts in these areas.

  6. Investigation of electrical breakdown in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Moeny, W.M.

    1991-07-11

    The program objectives are focused on increasing the voltage applied across an electron beam diode. Two objectives were pursued during the program. The first was to increase the total voltage applied to anelectron gun anode--cathode (A-K) structure by suppressing electron emission from regions other than the electron source. The second objective was to prevent surface flashover from the cathode surface due to fiber contamination from the carbon felt used to enhance electron emission from the source. The primary approach consisted of using a dielectric coating (or a surface treatment), to suppress undesired electron emission from non-emission areas of the cathode. In addition to the dielectric coating, the electrode surfaces were profiled to eliminate field enhancements in the transition areas. The program objectives were met by demonstrating 300 kv/cm fields across the gap during current conduction with no breakdown or surface flashover. This field value was obtained with electrodes coated with a dielectric polymer on the surfaces around the electron source (carbon felt) and with electrodes without the coating. Total pulse width duration was 300 nsec for electrodes with no emitter (carbon felt) and 100 nsec for electrodes with the emitter.

  7. Electrical Breakdown in a Martian Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. I.; Nelson, E.

    2003-01-01

    The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely result in airborne dust that is highly charged. On Earth, potential gradients up to 5 kV/m have been recorded and in some cases resulted in lightning. Although the Martian atmosphere is not conducive to lightning generation, it is widely believed that electrical discharge in the form of a corona occurs. In order to understand the breakdown of gases, Paschen measurements are taken which relate the minimum potential required to spark across a gap between two electrodes. The minimum potential is plotted versus the pressure-distance value for electrodes of a given geometry. For most gases, the potential decreases as the pressure decreases. For CO2, the minimum in the curve happens to be at Mars atmospheric pressures (5-7 mm Hg) for many distances and geometries. However, a very small amount (<0.1%) of mixing gases radically changes the curve, as noted by Leach. Here, we present the first experimental results of a Paschen curve for a Mars gas mixture compared with 100% pure CO2.

  8. Fire Whirls, Vortex Breakdown(?), and Blue Whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine; Xiao, Huahua; Gollner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    As we were investigating the efficiency of fire-whirl burning on water, we observed the usual transformation of a pool fire to a fire whirl, and then suddenly, we saw the fire undergo a third transition. A blue cup appeared around the base of the fire whirl, surrounding the yellow flame, the yellow flame receded into the cup and finally disappeared. What remained was a small, rapidly spinning blue flame that burned until the fuel on the water was consumed. The blue whirl was shaped like a spinning cup, closed at the bottom near the water surface, and spreading in radius moving upwards towards the rim. Above the blue cup lip, there was a purple cone-shaped mist. The fuel was usually n-heptane, but at one point it was crude oil, and still the blue whirl formed naturally. The height of the fire whirl on the laboratory pan was larger than a half meter, and this evolved into a blue whirl about 4-8 cm high. Occasionally the blue whirl would become "unstable" and revert to a transitional state of blue cup holding a yellow flame. When the blue whirl formed, turbulence seemed to disappear, and the flame became quiet. We will show videos of how this happened and discuss the evolution of the fire whirl to the blue whirl in vortex-breakdown concepts. This work was supported by and EAGER award from NSF and Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland.

  9. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  10. The AP-1 site at -150 bp, but not the NF-kappa B site, is likely to represent the major target of protein kinase C in the interleukin 2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of T cells with antigen results in activation of several kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC), that may mediate the later induction of activation-related genes. We have examined the potential role of PKC in induction of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) gene in T cells stimulated through the T cell receptor/CD3 complex. We have previously shown that prolonged treatment of the untransformed T cell clone Ar-5 with phorbol esters results in downmodulation of the alpha and beta isozymes of PKC, and abrogates induction of IL-2 mRNA and protein. Here we show that phorbol ester treatment also abolishes induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in Ar-5 cells transfected with a plasmid containing the IL-2 promoter linked to this reporter gene. The IL-2 promoter contains binding sites for nuclear factors including NFAT-1, Oct, NF-kappa B, and AP-1, which are all potentially sensitive to activation of PKC. We show that induction of a trimer of the NFAT and Oct sites is not sensitive to phorbol ester treatment, and that mutations in the NF-kappa B site have no effect on inducibility of the IL-2 promoter. In contrast, mutations in the AP-1 site located at - 150 bp almost completely abrogate induction of the IL-2 promoter, and appearance of an inducible nuclear factor binding to this site is sensitive to PKC depletion. Moreover, cotransfections with c-fos and c- jun expression plasmids markedly enhance induction of the IL-2 promoter in minimally stimulated T cells. Our results indicate that the AP-1 site at -150 bp represents a major, if not the only, site of PKC responsiveness in the IL-2 promoter. PMID:1740667

  11. Tomato heat stress transcription factor HsfB1 represents a novel type of general transcription coactivator with a histone-like motif interacting with the plant CREB binding protein ortholog HAC1.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kapil; Von Koskull-Döring, Pascal; Bharti, Sanita; Kumar, Pravir; Tintschl-Körbitzer, Angelika; Treuter, Eckardt; Nover, Lutz

    2004-06-01

    In contrast with the class A heat stress transcription factors (HSFs) of plants, a considerable number of HSFs assigned to classes B and C have no evident function as transcription activators on their own. However, in the following article, we provide evidence that tomato (Lycopersicon peruvianum) HsfB1 represents a novel type of coactivator cooperating with class A HSFs (e.g., with tomato HsfA1). Provided the appropriate promoter architecture, the two HSFs assemble into an enhanceosome-like complex, resulting in strong synergistic activation of reporter gene expression. Moreover, HsfB1 also cooperates in a similar manner with other activators, for example, with the ASF1/2 enhancer binding proteins of the 35S promoter of Cauliflower mosaic virus or with yet unidentified activators controlling housekeeping gene expression. By these effects, HsfB1 may help to maintain and/or restore expression of certain viral or housekeeping genes during ongoing heat stress. The coactivator function of HsfB1 depends on a histone-like motif in its C-terminal domain with an indispensable Lys residue in the center (GRGKMMK). This motif is required for recruitment of the plant CREB binding protein (CBP) ortholog HAC1. HsfA1, HsfB1, and HAC1/CBP form ternary complexes in vitro and in vivo with markedly enhanced efficiency in promoter recognition and transcription activation in plant and mammalian (COS7) cells. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knock down of HAC1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts, the crucial role for the coactivator function of HsfB1 was confirmed.

  12. OSMOSE experiment representativity studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-10

    The OSMOSE program aims at improving the neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through measurements in the MINERVE facility at the CEA-Cadarache (France) on samples containing the following separated actinides: Th-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-244 and Cm-245. The goal of the experimental measurements is to produce a database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the separated heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark for integral reactivity-worth measurements to verify and validate reactor analysis codes and integral cross-section values for the isotopes tested. In particular, the OSMOSE experimental program will produce very accurate sample reactivity-worth measurements for a series of actinides in various spectra, from very thermalized to very fast. The objective of the analytical program is to make use of the experimental data to establish deficiencies in the basic nuclear data libraries, identify their origins, and provide guidelines for nuclear data improvements in coordination with international programs. To achieve the proposed goals, seven different neutron spectra can be created in the MINERVE facility: UO2 dissolved in water (representative of over-moderated LWR systems), UO2 matrix in water (representative of LWRs), a mixed oxide fuel matrix, two thermal spectra containing large epithermal components (representative of under-moderated reactors), a moderated fast spectrum (representative of fast reactors which have some slowing down in moderators such as lead-bismuth or sodium), and a very hard spectrum (representative of fast reactors with little moderation from reactor coolant). The different spectra are achieved by changing the experimental lattice within the MINERVE reactor. The experimental lattice is the replaceable central part of MINERVE, which establishes the spectrum at the sample location. This configuration

  13. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island.

    PubMed

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroat-rainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species.

  14. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroat–rainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species. PMID:25567905

  15. alpha-Amylase is not required for breakdown of transitory starch in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tien-Shin; Zeeman, Samuel C; Thorneycroft, David; Fulton, Daniel C; Dunstan, Hannah; Lue, Wei-Ling; Hegemann, Björn; Tung, Shu-Yun; Umemoto, Takayuki; Chapple, Andrew; Tsai, Der-Long; Wang, Shue-Mei; Smith, Alison M; Chen, Jychian; Smith, Steven M

    2005-03-18

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes three alpha-amylase-like proteins (AtAMY1, AtAMY2, and AtAMY3). Only AtAMY3 has a predicted N-terminal transit peptide for plastidial localization. AtAMY3 is an unusually large alpha-amylase (93.5 kDa) with the C-terminal half showing similarity to other known alpha-amylases. When expressed in Escherichia coli, both the whole AtAMY3 protein and the C-terminal half alone show alpha-amylase activity. We show that AtAMY3 is localized in chloroplasts. The starch-excess mutant of Arabidopsis sex4, previously shown to have reduced plastidial alpha-amylase activity, is deficient in AtAMY3 protein. Unexpectedly, T-DNA knock-out mutants of AtAMY3 have the same diurnal pattern of transitory starch metabolism as the wild type. These results show that AtAMY3 is not required for transitory starch breakdown and that the starch-excess phenotype of the sex4 mutant is not caused simply by deficiency of AtAMY3 protein. Knock-out mutants in the predicted non-plastidial alpha-amylases AtAMY1 and AtAMY2 were also isolated, and these displayed normal starch breakdown in the dark as expected for extraplastidial amylases. Furthermore, all three AtAMY double knock-out mutant combinations and the triple knock-out degraded their leaf starch normally. We conclude that alpha-amylase is not necessary for transitory starch breakdown in Arabidopsis leaves.

  16. Improved model for window breakdown at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Chen, H. B.; Liu, G. Z.; Zhu, X. X.; Fang, J. Y.

    2009-03-15

    An improved global model is proposed to analyze high power microwave dielectric window breakdown at low pressure. The effect of ionization on the average momentum and energy of electrons is taken into account and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is adopted. The plasma energy flow and density loss to dielectric, and partially secondary electrons returning plasma to compensate the density loss, have been analytically considered. Space charge potential drop and the generalized Bohm criterion are deduced analytically. After considering the energy and density loss as well as the secondary electron compensation, the breakdown time by using numerical calculation under low pressure gets shorter compared with that under no wall loss condition. In other words, the dielectric surface breakdown time is lower than plasma volume breakdown time.

  17. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Altgilbers, Larry L.

    2010-07-15

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  18. Skin barrier breakdown: a renaissance in emollient therapy.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon

    Breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis). Research over the past five years has indicated that this arises as a result of the interaction of environmental agents such as soap and other detergents with the products of changes in several genes. These genetic changes predispose to the breakdown of the skin barrier, which allows the penetration of allergens, triggering a flare of atopic eczema. This new understanding of how breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema provides a rationale for a renaissance in the use of a complete emollient therapy regimen in atopic eczema and related skin barrier breakdown diseases, such as asteatotic eczema and irritant contact dermatitis.

  19. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  20. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  1. Laser-induced gas breakdown - Spectroscopic and chemical studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Montgolfier, PH.; Dumont, P.; Mille, Y.; Villermaux, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of several experimental investigations on laser-induced gas breakdown. The experiments included time-resolved spectroscopy, direct detection of H atoms with a TiO2 probe, and chemical reactions; each of them provided insight into the behavior of the medium at different times. Chemical reactions and explosions have been initiated by the laser beam when a plasma was created. No primary multiphotonic absorption and no macroscopic chemical reactions were observed below the breakdown threshold.

  2. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  3. Effects of Excess Charge Density on Dielectric Breakdown in Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-10

    insulator , and the associated light emission is ther- 1 11 2 mal in character. No new conduction mechansim has to be hypothesized in thermal breakdown...breakdown in solid insulators . In Chapter II, a short review of earlier experimental observations and theoretical work will be given as background...the sample. Local removal of the electrode material does not isolate this path because surface flashover from one electrode to the gaseous channel

  4. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  5. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  7. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  8. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  9. High-Power Microwave Breakdown of Dielectric Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calico, Steve Eugene

    A project to study the electrical breakdown of microwave windows due to high-power pulsed microwave fields was undertaken at Texas Tech University. The pulsed power equipment was acquired from the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, refurbished and redesigned as necessary, and serves as the high-power microwave source. The microwaves are used to test various vacuum to atmosphere interfaces (windows) in an attempt to isolate the mechanisms governing the electrical breakdown at the window. Windows made of three different materials and of three basic geometrical designs were tested in this experiment. Additionally, the surfaces of two windows were sanded with different grit sandpapers to determine the effect the surface texture has on the breakdown. The windows were tested in atmospheric pressure air, argon, helium, and to a lesser extent sulfur-hexafluoride. Estimates of the breakdown threshold in air and argon on a Lexan window were obtained as a consequence of these tests and were found to be considerably lower than that reported for pulsed microwave breakdown in gases. A hypothesis is presented in an attempt to explain the lower breakdown phenomena. A discussion of the comparative performance of the windows and an explanation as to the enhanced performance of some windows is given.

  10. Layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown of hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2015-01-27

    Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) is widely used as a substrate and gate insulator for two-dimensional (2D) electronic devices. The studies on insulating properties and electrical reliability of BN itself, however, are quite limited. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the dielectric breakdown characteristics of BN using conductive atomic force microscopy. The electric field strength was found to be ∼ 12 MV/cm, which is comparable to that of conventional SiO2 oxides because of the covalent bonding nature of BN. After the hard dielectric breakdown, the BN fractured like a flower into equilateral triangle fragments. However, when the applied voltage was terminated precisely in the middle of the dielectric breakdown, the formation of a hole that did not penetrate to the bottom metal electrode was clearly observed. Subsequent I-V measurements of the hole indicated that the BN layer remaining in the hole was still electrically inactive. On the basis of these observations, layer-by-layer breakdown was confirmed for BN with regard to both physical fracture and electrical breakdown. Moreover, statistical analysis of the breakdown voltages using a Weibull plot suggested the anisotropic formation of defects. These results are unique to layered materials and unlike the behavior observed for conventional 3D amorphous oxides.

  11. Extrapolation of electrical breakdown currents from the laboratory to Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Carruth, Melvin R., Jr.; Katz, Ira; Mandell, Myron J.; Jongeward, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted in a plasma chamber at NASA/MSFC on anodized aluminum coatings representative of Space Station Freedom design show that if the aluminum used as a thermal control coating is biased more than 80 V negative with respect to the plasma, the anodization will experience dielectric breakdown. As the thin anodization layer creates a capacitive charge buildup, large currents are observed during the arc. How plasma generation at the arc site can support large currents and discharge the surface charge layer is investigated. The importance for Space Station Freedom is that currents similar to those observed in the laboratory can be observed on orbit.

  12. Experimental studies of breakdown characteristics in pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, W. G.; Zhang, X.; Gu, J. L.; Ding, Z. F.

    2016-12-01

    The influences of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage of the first pulse and the stable pulse discharge (having repeatedly undergone a process of ignition, maintenance, and extinction) are experimentally investigated in a pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric pressure argon discharge. The experimental results show that the first pulse discharge breakdown voltage decreases, but the stable pulse discharge breakdown voltage increases with increasing the pulse off-time. In a large region of the pulse off-time, the luminescence property of the initial breakdown stage is studied using a high speed camera. The captured images at different pulse off-times demonstrate that the gas breakdown exhibits five key characteristics: single-point random breakdown, multi-point random breakdown, stable uniform breakdown, stable glow mixed with pattern breakdown, and stable nonuniform pattern breakdown. The physical reasons for these results are discussed.

  13. Acute intensive insulin therapy exacerbates diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Poulaki, Vassiliki; Qin, Wenying; Joussen, Antonia M.; Hurlbut, Peter; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rudge, John; Yancopoulos, George D.; Adamis, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Acute intensive insulin therapy is an independent risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. Here we demonstrate that acute intensive insulin therapy markedly increases VEGF mRNA and protein levels in the retinae of diabetic rats. Retinal nuclear extracts from insulin-treated rats contain higher hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels and demonstrate increased HIF-1α–dependent binding to hypoxia-responsive elements in the VEGF promoter. Blood-retinal barrier breakdown is markedly increased with acute intensive insulin therapy but can be reversed by treating animals with a fusion protein containing a soluble form of the VEGF receptor Flt; a control fusion protein has no such protective effect. The insulin-induced retinal HIF-1α and VEGF increases and the related blood-retinal barrier breakdown are suppressed by inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, but not inhibitors of p42/p44 MAPK or protein kinase C. Taken together, these findings indicate that acute intensive insulin therapy produces a transient worsening of diabetic blood-retinal barrier breakdown via an HIF-1α–mediated increase in retinal VEGF expression. Insulin-induced VEGF expression requires p38 MAPK and PI 3-kinase, whereas hyperglycemia-induced VEGF expression is HIF-1α–independent and requires PKC and p42/p44 MAPK. To our knowledge, these data are the first to identify a specific mechanism for the transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy, specifically blood-retinal barrier breakdown, that follows the institution of intensive insulin therapy. PMID:11901189

  14. Novel Ca2+ increases in the maturing oocytes of starfish during the germinal vesicle breakdown.

    PubMed

    Limatola, Nunzia; Chun, Jong T; Kyozuka, Keiichiro; Santella, Luigia

    2015-11-01

    It has been known that the intracellular Ca(2+) level transiently rises at the specific stages of mitosis such as the moment of nuclear envelope breakdown and at the metaphase-anaphase transition. Comparable intracellular Ca(2+) increases may also take place during meiosis, as was intermittently reported in mouse, Xenopus, and starfish oocytes. In a majority of starfish species, the maturing oocytes display an intracellular Ca(2+) increase within few minutes after the addition of the maturation hormone, 1-methyladenine (1-MA). Although starfish oocytes at meiosis also manifest a Ca(2+) increase at the time of polar body extrusion, a similar Ca(2+) increase has never been observed during the envelope breakdown of the nucleus (germinal vesicle, GV). Here, we report, for the first time, the existence of an additional Ca(2+) response in the maturing oocytes of Asterina pectinifera at the time of GV breakdown. In contrast to the immediate early Ca(2+) response to 1-MA, which is independent of external Ca(2+) and takes a form of intracellular Ca(2+) wave traveling three times as fast as that in the fertilized eggs, this late stage Ca(2+) response comprised a train of numerous spikes representing Ca(2+) influx. These Ca(2+) spikes coinciding with GV breakdown were mostly eliminated when the GV was removed from the oocytes prior to the addition of 1-MA, suggesting that the Ca(2+) spikes are rather a consequence of the GV breakdown. In support of the idea that these Ca(2+) spikes play a physiological role, the oocytes matured in calcium-free seawater had a higher rate of cleavage failure 2h after the fertilization in natural seawater. Specific inhibitors of L-type Ca(2+) channels, verapamil and diltiazem, severely suppressed the amplitude of the individual Ca(2+) spikes, but not their frequencies. On the other hand, latrunculin-A (LAT-A), which promotes net depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton, had a dual effect on this late Ca(2+) response. When added immediately

  15. Transition in vortex breakdown modes in a coaxial isothermal unconfined swirling jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, R.; Miglani, Ankur; Basu, Saptarshi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports first observations of transition in recirculation pattern from an open-bubble type axisymmetric vortex breakdown to partially open bubble mode through an intermediate, critical regime of conical sheet formation in an unconfined, co-axial isothermal swirling flow. This time-mean transition is studied for two distinct flow modes which are characterized based on the modified Rossby number (Rom), i.e., Rom ≤ 1 and Rom > 1. Flow modes with Rom ≤ 1 are observed to first undergo cone-type breakdown and then to partially open bubble state as the geometric swirl number (SG) is increased by ˜20% and ˜40%, respectively, from the baseline open-bubble state. However, the flow modes with Rom > 1 fail to undergo such sequential transition. This distinct behavior is explained based on the physical significance associated with Rom and the swirl momentum factor (ξ). In essence, ξ represents the ratio of angular momentum distributed across the flow structure to that distributed from central axis to the edge of the vortex core. It is observed that ξ increases by ˜100% in the critical swirl number band where conical breakdown occurs as compared to its magnitude in the SG regime where open bubble state is seen. This results from the fact that flow modes with Rom ≤ 1 are dominated by radial pressure gradient due to swirl/rotational effect when compared to radial pressure deficit arising from entrainment (due to the presence of co-stream). Consequently, the imparted swirl tends to penetrate easily towards the central axis causing it to spread laterally and finally undergo conical sheet breakdown. However, the flow modes with Rom > 1 are dominated by pressure deficit due to entrainment effect. This blocks the radial inward penetration of imparted angular momentum thus preventing the lateral spread of these flow modes. As such these structures fail to undergo cone mode of vortex breakdown which is substantiated by a mere 30%-40% rise in ξ in the critical

  16. The anabolic response to a meal containing different amounts of protein is not limited by the maximal stimulation of protein synthesis in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J; Azhar, Gohar; Ferrando, Arny A; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    We have determined whole body protein kinetics, i.e., protein synthesis (PS), breakdown (PB), and net balance (NB) in human subjects in the fasted state and following ingestion of ~40 g [moderate protein (MP)], which has been reported to maximize the protein synthetic response or ~70 g [higher protein (HP)] protein, more representative of the amount of protein in the dinner of an average American diet. Twenty-three healthy young adults who had performed prior resistance exercise (X-MP or X-HP) or time-matched resting (R-MP or R-HP) were studied during a primed continuous infusion of l-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and l-[(2)H2]tyrosine. Subjects were randomly assigned into an exercise (X, n = 12) or resting (R, n = 11) group, and each group was studied at the two levels of dietary protein intake in random order. PS, PB, and NB were expressed as increases above the basal, fasting values (mg·kg lean body mass(-1)·min(-1)). Exercise did not significantly affect protein kinetics and blood chemistry. Feeding resulted in positive NB at both levels of protein intake: NB was greater in response to the meal containing HP vs. MP (P < 0.00001). The greater NB with HP was achieved primarily through a greater reduction in PB and to a lesser extent stimulation of protein synthesis (for all, P < 0.0001). HP resulted in greater plasma essential amino acid responses (P < 0.01) vs. MP, with no differences in insulin and glucose responses. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance improves with greater protein intake above that previously suggested to maximally stimulating muscle protein synthesis because of a simultaneous reduction in protein breakdown.

  17. The anabolic response to a meal containing different amounts of protein is not limited by the maximal stimulation of protein synthesis in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J.; Azhar, Gohar; Ferrando, Arny A.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    We have determined whole body protein kinetics, i.e., protein synthesis (PS), breakdown (PB), and net balance (NB) in human subjects in the fasted state and following ingestion of ∼40 g [moderate protein (MP)], which has been reported to maximize the protein synthetic response or ∼70 g [higher protein (HP)] protein, more representative of the amount of protein in the dinner of an average American diet. Twenty-three healthy young adults who had performed prior resistance exercise (X-MP or X-HP) or time-matched resting (R-MP or R-HP) were studied during a primed continuous infusion of l-[2H5]phenylalanine and l-[2H2]tyrosine. Subjects were randomly assigned into an exercise (X, n = 12) or resting (R, n = 11) group, and each group was studied at the two levels of dietary protein intake in random order. PS, PB, and NB were expressed as increases above the basal, fasting values (mg·kg lean body mass−1·min−1). Exercise did not significantly affect protein kinetics and blood chemistry. Feeding resulted in positive NB at both levels of protein intake: NB was greater in response to the meal containing HP vs. MP (P < 0.00001). The greater NB with HP was achieved primarily through a greater reduction in PB and to a lesser extent stimulation of protein synthesis (for all, P < 0.0001). HP resulted in greater plasma essential amino acid responses (P < 0.01) vs. MP, with no differences in insulin and glucose responses. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance improves with greater protein intake above that previously suggested to maximally stimulating muscle protein synthesis because of a simultaneous reduction in protein breakdown. PMID:26530155

  18. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  19. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  20. Top predator absence enhances leaf breakdown in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-12-01

    Current biodiversity loss is characterized by the extinction of top predators, but small-bodied freshwater fish are often overlooked in research and conservation management even when threatened because they usually lack commercial value. Therefore, the ecosystem impacts of their possible loss remain mostly unknown. We assessed whether the presence/absence of an endangered predatory fish (Barbus meridionalis (A. Risso, 1827)) in an intermittent stream affects leaf fungal biomass and leaf quality (i.e. leaf carbon:nitrogen ratio and leaf toughness), macroinvertebrate assemblages colonizing leaf packs, and leaf breakdown rates. We conducted a leaf bag experiment comparing a control reach with a population of B. meridionalis with an adjacent upstream fishless reach. In the fishless reach, leaf fungal biomass and microbially mediated breakdown rate were lower compared to the control reach. This was probably caused by the lack of the bottom-up stimulation through nutrient recycling by fish. Shredders and scrapers were found at higher abundance and biomass in the fishless compared to the control reach, and the whole macroinvertebrate community composition changed with fish absence. Consequently, macroinvertebrate mediated leaf breakdown was faster in the fishless than in the control reach, not only compensating for the lower microbially mediated leaf breakdown in the fishless reach, but accelerating the overall leaf breakdown rate. Our study contributes to understand the potential cascading effects produced by the extirpation of endangered small-bodied fish.

  1. Basic study of transient breakdown voltage in solid dielectric cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, G.; Sosnowski, M.; Katz, C.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the technical and scientific publications relating to crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulated cables revealed that there is very little known with respect to the life expectancy, the final factory voltage test background and the mechanism of voltage breakdown of these cables. A new methodology for the investigation of breakdown voltages of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed which is based on the investigation of breakdown voltages at various voltage transients such as unipolarity pulses and dual-polarity pulses, and a.c. voltage at power and high frequency. Also, a new approach to statistical testing was developed which allows one to establish a correlation among the breakdown voltages obtained with various voltage transients. Finally, a method for the determination of threshold voltage regardless of the magnitude of apparent charge was developed. A model of breakdown and electrical aging of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed as well as life expectancy characteristics for high voltage stress XLPE insulated cables operated in a dry environment at room temperature and at 900 C.

  2. Acoustic localization of breakdown in radio frequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Peter

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  3. Study of the breakdown voltage of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmill, V.; Garutti, E.; Klanner, R.; Nitschke, M.; Schwandt, J.

    2017-02-01

    The breakdown behaviour of SiPMs (Silicon PhotoMultiplier) with pixel sizes of 15 × 15 , 25 × 25 , 50 × 50, and 100 × 100 μm2, manufactured by KETEK, has been investigated. From the current-voltage characteristics measured with and without illumination by LED light of 470 nm wavelength, the current-breakdown voltage, VI, and from linear fits of the voltage dependence of the SiPM gain, measured by recording pulse-area spectra, the gain-breakdown voltage, VG, have been obtained. The voltage dependence of the Geiger-breakdown probability was determined from the fraction of zero photoelectron events with LED illumination. By comparing the results to a model calculation, the photodetection-breakdown voltage, VPD, has been determined. Within experimental uncertainties, VI and VPD are equal and independent of pixel size. For VG, a dependence on pixel size is observed. The difference VI -VG is about 1 V for the SiPM with 15 μm pixels, decreases with pixel size and is compatible with zero for the SiPM with 100 μm pixels.

  4. Dramatically enhanced electrical breakdown strength in cellulose nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianwen; Zhou, Yuanxiang; Zhou, Zhongliu; Liu, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown behaviors of nanopaper prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) were investigated. Compared to conventional insulating paper made from micro softwood fibers, nanopaper has a dramatically enhanced breakdown strength. Breakdown field of nanopaper is 67.7 kV/mm, whereas that of conventional paper is only 20 kV/mm. Air voids in the surface of conventional paper are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Further analyses using mercury intrusion show that pore diameter of conventional paper is around 1.7 μ m , while that of nanopaper is below 3 nm. Specific pore size of nanopaper is determined to be approximately 2.8 nm by the gas adsorption technique. In addition, theoretical breakdown strengths of nanopaper and conventional paper are also calculated to evaluate the effect of pore size. It turns out that theoretical values agree well with experimental data, indicating that the improved strength in nanopaper is mainly attributed to the decreased pore size. Due to its outstanding breakdown strength, this study indicates the suitability of nanopaper for electrical insulation in ultra-high voltage convert transformers and other electrical devices.

  5. Pulsed electrical breakdown of a void-filled dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    We report breakdown strengths in a void-filled dielectric material, epoxy containing 48 vol % hollow glass microballoon filler, which is stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. The microballoon voids had mean diameters of approximately 40 μm and contained SO2 gas at roughly 30% atmospheric pressure. This void-filled material displays good dielectric strength (of the order of 100 kV mm-1) under these short-pulse test conditions. Results from a variety of electrode geometries are reported, including arrangements in which the electric stress is highly nonuniform. Conventional breakdown criteria based on mean or peak electric stress do not account for these data. A statistics-based predictive breakdown model is developed, in which the dielectric is divided into independent, microballoon-sized "discharge cells" and the spontaneous discharge of a single cell is presumed to launch full breakdown of the composite. We obtain two empirical parameters, the mean and standard deviation of the spontaneous discharge field, by fitting breakdown data from two electrode geometries having roughly uniform fields but with greatly differing volumes of electrically stressed material. This model accounts for many aspects of our data, including the inherent statistical scatter and the dependence on the stressed volume, and it provides informative predictions with electrode geometries giving highly nonuniform fields. Issues related to computational spatial resolution and cutoff distance are also discussed.

  6. Communication breakdowns and diagnostic errors: a radiology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel R.; Singh, Hardeep; Berlin, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Timely and accurate communication is essential to safe and effective health care. Despite increased awareness over the past decade of the frequency of medical errors and greater efforts directed towards improving patient safety, patient harm due to communication breakdowns remains a significant problem. Communication problems related to diagnostic testing may account for nearly half of all errors made by typical primary care physicians in their medical practices. This article provides an overview of communication breakdowns in the context of radiology related diagnostic errors. In radiology, communication breakdowns between radiologists, referring clinicians, and patients can lead to failure of critical information to be relayed, resulting in delayed or missed diagnosis. New technologies, such electronic health records (EHRs), contribute to the increasing complexity of communication in health care, but if used correctly, they can provide several benefits to safe and effective communication. To address the complexity of communication breakdowns, a multifaceted sociotechnical approach is needed to address both technical and non-technical aspects of health care delivery. The article also provides some future directions in reducing communication breakdowns related to diagnostic testing, including proactive risk assessment of communication practices using recently released SAFER self-assessment guides. PMID:27006890

  7. Suppression of vacuum breakdown using thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fleddermann, C.B.; Mayberry, C.S.; Wroblewski, B.; Schamiloglu, E.

    1993-12-01

    The use of thin film coatings for increasing the breakdown voltage in a parallel-plane high-voltage gap has been investigated. Both metallic and ceramic thin films were deposited at varying thicknesses and deposition conditions on a screen cathode using ion-beam sputtering. Improvements in breakdown voltage were observed for nearly any type of deposited film, with significant variations in breakdown voltage depending on film thickness and oxygen and partial pressure during ceramic film deposition. For 500 nm thick metallic or oxide films, breakdown voltage was nearly doubled compared to the bare stainless steel screen, which is attributed to the burying of surface imperfections on the cathode. For 200 nm thick films, the covering of imperfections is less effective; however, high breakdown voltages can still be obtained by choosing an appropriate oxygen partial pressure during film deposition. Electric fields as high as 60 kV/mm were sustained across a 1 mm gap for 10 {mu}sec pulses; lesser fields could be sustained for as long as 10 ms. These coatings allowed for the successful study of a planar liquid metal ion source.

  8. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Peter Gwin

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  9. Children and Family Breakdown. Report on a WHO Meeting (Kiel, West Germany, December 4-7, 1984). EURO Reports and Studies 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This booklet is the report of the Working Group on Children and Family Breakdown: The Positive Role of Nurses and Midwives, which was convened by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe and was attended by members of health disciplines, representatives of community groups, and journalists from the nursing and popular press. These…

  10. Structural characterization of soy protein nanoparticles from high shear microfluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  11. Characterization of soy protein nanoparticles prepared by high shear microfluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  12. Rf breakdown studies in a SLAC disk-loaded structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Loew, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rf breakdown studies in an S-band standing-wave disk-loaded accelerator structure have been completed. An equivalent traveling-wave accelerating gradient as high as 147 MV/m and a peak field in excess of 300 MV/m have been obtained. At these high gradients, considerable amounts of field emission and x-ray radiation are observed. Some of the field-emitted electrons are captured and focused by the rf fields and can be extracted on the axis of the structure. Their current, energy distribution and the x-ray radiation they produce are given. Rf processing as measured by the frequency of breakdown and the reduction in field emitted electron currents inside the structure can be speeded up considerably by the presence of argon. Some conjectures on the causes of breakdown are presented.

  13. Electrical breakdown gas detector featuring carbon nanotube array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongyul; Pal, Sunil; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate here detection of dichloro-difluoro-methane and oxygen in mixtures with helium using a carbon nanotube electrical breakdown sensor device. The sensor is comprised of an aligned array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes deposited on a nickel based super-alloy (Inconel 600) as the anode; the counter electrode is a planar nickel sheet. By monitoring the electrical breakdown characteristics of oxygen and dichloro-difluoro-methane in a background of helium, we find that the detection limit for dichloro-difluoro-methane is approximately 0.1% and the corresponding limit for oxygen is approximately 1%. A phenomenologigal model is proposed to describe the trends observed in detection of the two mixtures. These results indicate that carbon nanotube based electrical breakdown sensors show potential as end detectors in gas-chromatography devices.

  14. Breakdown Limit Studies in High-Rate Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Fonte, P.; Peskov, V.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high-rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable pin, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the breakgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  15. On sample preparation and dielectric breakdown in nanostructured epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, M.; Xu, Z.; Vaughan, A. S.; Lewin, P. L.

    2011-08-01

    There are many methods available to achieve a good dispersion of fillers within a polymeric matrix. This investigation considered several methods of dispersing three chosen fillers within an epoxy resin; the same processes were also performed on unfilled materials to investigate any effects they may have on the host material. For this investigation, the epoxy system (EP) was combined with sodium montmorillonite (MMT), micrometric silicon dioxide (SD) or nanometric silicon dioxide (NSD) as fillers. The effect of the different sample preparation routes on breakdown behaviour was then evaluated. While more thorough mixing protocols were found to lead to improved breakdown behaviour in the case of the various filled systems, surprisingly, an entirely equivalent form of behaviour was also seen in the unfilled epoxy. The influence of changes in sample geometry on the breakdown strength was established.

  16. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  17. Breakdown Strength in Electrical and Elastic Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Ortiz, Julio; Rajapakse, Chamith; Gunaratne, Gemunu

    2003-03-01

    Electrical or elastic networks provide a natural model to study transport processes such as dielectric breakdown to metal insulator transition in disordered inhomogeneous conductors. We present an expression for the mean breakdown strength of such networks. First, we introduce a method to evaluate the redistribution of current due to the removal of a finite number of elements from a hyper-cubic network of conductances. It is used to determine the reduction of breakdown strength due to a fracture of size κ. Numerical analysis is used to show that the analogous reduction due to random removal of elements from electrical and elastic networks follow a similar form. We discuss one possible application, namely the use of bone density as a diagnostic tools for osteoporosis.

  18. Exploration of Underwater Laser Breakdown Using Two Synchronized Gated Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwel, Lutz; Baumgart, Clayton; Betts, Susannah; Morgan, Thomas J.; Graham, William G.

    2014-10-01

    Using two synchronized intensified CCD cameras, we have studied spatial and temporal characteristics of optical breakdown in water created by a focused 10 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. For three water samples with different impurity content (ultrapure, distilled, and tap water), the plasma evolution was monitored up to 1 ms after breakdown. Images taken by the two cameras, systematically delayed relative to each other, reveal that the center of emission intensity does not remain at a fixed location. In single plasma events, the center first moves, on average, toward the incoming laser beam. Then, at about 100 to 200 ns, the apparent direction of motion reverses and the center returns towards the focal point. On the other hand, in repetitive breakdown the time averaged center moves steadily downstream with each subsequent pulse. Details of this behavior depend on repetition frequency. We will also present shadowgraphy results revealing time resolved speeds of both shockwave and bubble expansion.

  19. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  20. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  1. Modeling the Conductivity of a Subnanosecond Breakdown Gas Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinhui; Scott Tyo, J.; Jerald Buchenauer, C.

    We present two different modeling methods for understanding subnanosecond breakdown processes in gas plasma switches. The first method uses a finite element time domain method in order to understand experimental measurements of the remote electromagnetic (EM) fields. This method only models the EM fields and is good for analysis, but lacks a predictive capability for the full nonlinear plasma system. The second modeling method uses a PIC code, and is fully self consistent. We make comparisons with experimental measurements and conclude that the PIC model may provide a good understanding of the subnanosecond breakdown phenomena.

  2. Rf breakdown studies in copper electron linac structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of rf breakdown-limited electric fields observed in experimental linac structures at SLAC and a discussion of how these experiments can be interpreted against the background of existing, yet incomplete, theories. The motivation of these studies, begun in 1984, is to determine the maximum accelerating field gradients that might be used safely in future e/sup /+-// colliders, to contribute to the basic understanding of the rf breakdown mechanism, and to discover if a special surface treatment might make it possible to supersede the field limits presently reachable in room temperature copper structures. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Breakdown voltage of discrete capacitors under single-pulse conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingos, H.; Scaturro, J.; Hayes, L.

    1981-01-01

    For electrostatic capacitors the breakdown voltage is inherently related to the properties of the dielectric, with the important parameters being the dielectric field strength which is related to the dielectric constant and the dielectric thickness. These are not necessarily related to the capacitance value and the rated voltage, but generally the larger values of capacitance have lower breakdown voltages. Foil and wet slug electrolytics can withstand conduction currents pulses without apparent damage (in either direction for foil types). For solid tantalums, damage occurs whenever the capacitor charges to the forming voltage.

  4. Characterization of superconducting radiofrequency breakdown by two-mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Palczewski, Ari D.

    2014-01-14

    We show that thermal and magnetic contributions to the breakdown of superconductivity in radiofrequency (RF) fields can be separated by applying two RF modes simultaneously to a superconducting surface. We develop a simple model that illustrates how mode-mixing RF data can be related to properties of the superconductor. Within our model the data can be described by a single parameter, which can be derived either from RF or thermometry data. Our RF and thermometry data are in good agreement with the model. We propose to use mode-mixing technique to decouple thermal and magnetic effects on RF breakdown of superconductors.

  5. The dielectric breakdown limit of silicone dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Haus, Henry; Matysek, Marc; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Tropea, Cameron; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2014-02-01

    Soft silicone elastomers are used in a generation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) with improved actuation speed and durability compared to the commonly used, highly viscoelastic polyacrylate 3M VHB™ films. The maximum voltage-induced stretch of DEAs is ultimately limited by their dielectric breakdown field strength. We measure the dependence of dielectric breakdown field strength on thickness and stretch for a silicone elastomer, when voltage-induced deformation is prevented. The experimental results are combined with an analytic model of equi-biaxial actuation to show that accounting for variable dielectric field strength results in different values of optimal pre-stretch and thickness that maximize the DEA actuation.

  6. A relationship between statistical time to breakdown distributions and pre-breakdown negative differential resistance at nanometric scale

    SciTech Connect

    Foissac, R.; Blonkowski, S.; Delcroix, P.; Kogelschatz, M.

    2014-07-14

    Using an ultra-high vacuum Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) current voltage, pre-breakdown negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics are measured together with the time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) distributions of Si/SiON (1.4 and 2.6 nm thick). Those experimental characteristics are systematically compared. The NDR effect is modelled by a conductive filament growth. It is showed that the Weibull TDDB statistic distribution scale factor is proportional to the growth rate of an individual filament and then has the same dependence on the electric field. The proportionality factor is a power law of the ratio between the surfaces of the CAFM tip and the filament's top. Moreover, it was found that, for the high fields used in those experiments, the TDDB acceleration factor as the growth rate characteristic is proportional to the Zener tunnelling probability. Those observations are discussed in the framework of possible breakdown or forming mechanism.

  7. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  8. A numerical study of three-dimensional vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of bubble-type vortex breakdown using a unique discrete form of the full 3-D, unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was performed. The Navier-Stokes equations were written in a vorticity-velocity form and the physical problem was not restricted to axisymmetric flow. The problem was parametized on a Rossby- Reynolds-number basis. Utilization of this parameter duo was shown to dictate the form of the free-field boundary condition specification and allowed control of axial breakdown location within the computational domain. The structure of the breakdown bubble was studied through time evolution plots of planar projected velocity vectors as well as through plots of particle traces and vortex lines. These results compared favorably with previous experimental studies. In addition, profiles of all three velocity components are presented at various axial stations and a Fourier analysis was performed to identify the dominant circumferential modes. The dynamics of the breakdown process were studied through plots of axial variation of rate of change of integrated total energy and rate of change of integrated enstrophy, as well as through contour plots of velocity, vorticity and pressure.

  9. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  10. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-02-22

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM{sub 01} mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects.

  11. Using Work Breakdown Structure Models to Develop Unit Treatment Costs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article presents a new cost modeling approach called work breakdown structure (WBS), designed to develop unit costs for drinking water technologies. WBS involves breaking the technology into its discrete components for the purposes of estimating unit costs. The article dem...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51... progresses the color of the affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but...

  13. Numerical modeling of high power breakdown in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Pederson, Dylan; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials consist of sub-wavelength structural inclusions layered in a periodic fashion, which provide an effective response to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The electric or magnetic responses of these materials are based on the resonant nature of their constitutive micro-structures. Under high power EM radiation, these resonances can result in the production of high amplitude currents and field amplification. Depending on the background gas and supporting pressure, breakdown can occur. The formation of plasma can strongly modify the EM response of the metamaterial and thus a detailed study on the breakdown threshold, plasma localization and EM response modification is necessary. Here, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of high power - high frequency air breakdown in metamaterials. We use a self-consistent fluid description of the plasma formation and dynamics coupled with Maxwell's equations via the electron momentum equation. We study two typical (for metamaterials) micro-structures: The Split Ring Resonator and the Cut Wire pairs. Breakdown threshold is identified for both configurations. Calculations of transmittance and retrieval of the metamaterials' effective parameters help us quantify the effect of plasma formation on the EM response of these metamaterials.

  14. Marital Breakdown, Shame, and Suicidality in Men: A Direct Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The influence of feelings of shame originating from marital breakdown on suicidality is examined. The role of mental health problems as probable mediating factors is also considered. Internalized shame, state (related to separation) shame, and mental health problems were significantly correlated with the score for suicidality during separation in…

  15. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  16. Inhibitory effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol breakdown in pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Peppin, J.F.; Tsukamoto, H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the physiological relationship between the phospholipid effect and secretagogue-induced cellular function has begun to be understood. In this study, the authors investigated acute and chronic effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini. Five pairs of male Wistar rats were intragastrically infused for 30 days with high fat diet (25% total calories) plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose. After intoxication, isolated in HEPES media, followed by 30 min incubation with CCK-8 (0, 100, 300 or 600 pM) and ethanol (0 or 100 mM). Acinar lipids were extracted and counted for labeled PI. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into alcoholic acinar PI was reduced to 38.2% of that in controls. A percent maximal PI break down by CCK-8 was similar in the two groups (13-24% of basal). However, the magnitude of PI breakdown was markedly lower in alcoholic acini (482 vs 1081 dpm) due to the decreased PI synthesis rate. The presence of 100 mM ethanol in the media further inhibited the breakdown by 50% in this group. These results strongly indicate that chronic ethanol intoxication inhibits PI synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini, and that this inhibition can be potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  17. The electrical breakdown of thin dielectric elastomers: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Shamsul; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Benslimane, Mohamed Y.; Gernaey, Krist V.; Skov, Anne L.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are being developed for use in actuators, sensors and generators to be used in various applications, such as artificial eye lids, pressure sensors and human motion energy generators. In order to obtain maximum efficiency, the devices are operated at high electrical fields. This increases the likelihood for electrical breakdown significantly. Hence, for many applications the performance of the dielectric elastomers is limited by this risk of failure, which is triggered by several factors. Amongst others thermal effects may strongly influence the electrical breakdown strength. In this study, we model the electrothermal breakdown in thin PDMS based dielectric elastomers in order to evaluate the thermal mechanisms behind the electrical failures. The objective is to predict the operation range of PDMS based dielectric elastomers with respect to the temperature at given electric field. We performed numerical analysis with a quasi-steady state approximation to predict thermal runaway of dielectric elastomer films. We also studied experimentally the effect of temperature on dielectric properties of different PDMS dielectric elastomers. Different films with different percentages of silica and permittivity enhancing filler were selected for the measurements. From the modeling based on the fitting of experimental data, it is found that the electrothermal breakdown of the materials is strongly influenced by the increase in both dielectric permittivity and conductivity.

  18. Reducing bubbles in glass coatings improves electrical breakdown strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.

    1968-01-01

    Helium reduces bubbles in glass coatings of accelerator grids for ion thrustors. Fusing the coating in a helium atmosphere creates helium bubbles in the glass. In an argon atmosphere, entrapped helium diffuses out of the glass and the bubbles collapse. The resultant coating has a substantially enhanced electrical breakdown strength.

  19. Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children Adopted after Early Care Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Leadbitter, Kathy; Kay, Catherine; Sharma, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Syndromic autism has been described in children adopted after orphanage rearing. We investigated whether the same existed in children adopted after family breakdown. Families of 54/60 adopted children aged 6-11 years (mean 102 months; SD 20; 45% male) returned screening questionnaires for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 21/54 (39%) screened…

  20. Localization of RF Breakdowns in a Standing Wave Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Faya; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    At SLAC, a 5-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz), standing-wave (SW) cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  1. Report on possible routes to breakdown products of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Luman, F.M.

    1983-10-18

    This paper suggests possible routes to the formation of decontamination and breakdown products of the chemical agent Mustard Gas (HD). The terminal decontamination products, CaSO4 and CO2, are harmless to the environment. Oxathiane is formed by hydrolysis and dehydration reactions. Dithiane is formed with the application of heat in a low oxygen or nitrogen environment. (Author).

  2. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  3. Dielectric Barrier Discharges: Pulsed Breakdown, Electrical Characterization and Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    for pulsed driven Dielectric Barrier Discharges ( DBDs ) in particular. Fast electrical, optical and spectroscopic methods enable the study of...ignition, breakdown statistics and spatio- temporally resolved development of pulsed DBD microdischarges. The determination of electrical parameters such...equivalent circuit which is consistent with sinusoidal- voltage driven or miniature pulsed driven DBDs . The characterization of the dominant chemical

  4. Novel dielectric reduces corona breakdown in ac capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric system was developed which consists of two layers of 25-gage paper separated by one layer of 50-gage polypropylene to reduce corona breakdown in ac capacitors. System can be used in any alternating current application where constant voltage does not exceed 400 V rms. With a little research it could probably be increased to 700 to 800 V rms.

  5. Nuclear translocation of RanGAP1 coincides with virtual nuclear envelope breakdown in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2011-05-01

    In higher eukaryotes, mitosis proceeds with nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) and disassembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC); this is designated "open" mitosis. On the other hand, in many fungi, mitosis and chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD; this is designated "closed" mitosis. In a recent study on Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a closed mitosis organism, we reported a novel phenomenon that is equivalent to NEBD: a mixing of nuclear proteins and cytoplasmic proteins occurred transiently for a few minutes in meiosis without physical breakdown of the nuclear envelope. We designated this event virtual nuclear envelope breakdown (V-NEBD). In S. pombe, nuclear translocation of Rna1, a RanGAP1 homolog in S. pombe, occurs during meiosis, and this translocation of Rna1 leads to collapse of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear envelope and occurs coincidently with V-NEBD. Here, we describe possible roles of RanGAP1 in V-NEBD in S. pombe and provide insights into the roles V-NEBD may play in meiosis.

  6. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  7. Flow-field in a vortex with breakdown above sharp edged delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Nakaya, T.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of vortex-flow, accompanied with breakdown, formed above sharp-edged delta wings, was studied experimentally as well as theoretically. Emphasis is placed particularly on the criterion for the breakdown at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers

  8. EWS-FLI1 impairs aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation by blocking tryptophan breakdown via the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutz, Cornelia N; Schwentner, Raphaela; Kauer, Maximilian O; Katschnig, Anna M; Kromp, Florian; Aryee, Dave N T; Erhardt, Sophie; Goiny, Michel; Alonso, Javier; Fuchs, Dietmar; Kovar, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive pediatric tumor driven by the fusion protein EWS-FLI1. We report that EWS-FLI1 suppresses TDO2-mediated tryptophan (TRP) breakdown in ES cells. Gene expression and metabolite analyses reveal an EWS-FLI1-dependent regulation of TRP metabolism. TRP consumption increased in the absence of EWS-FLI1, resulting in kynurenine and kynurenic acid accumulation, both aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Activated AHR binds to the promoter region of target genes. We demonstrate that EWS-FLI1 knockdown results in AHR nuclear translocation and activation. Our data suggest that EWS-FLI1 suppresses autocrine AHR signaling by inhibiting TDO2-catalyzed TRP breakdown.

  9. Detection and Classification of Live and Dead Escherichia coli by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, P.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Taleh, L.; Biddle, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity. Key Words: E. coli—Trace elements—Live and dead cells—Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy—Atomic force microscopy. Astrobiology 15, 144–153. PMID:25683088

  10. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  11. Identification of ZOUPI Orthologs in Soybean Potentially Involved in Endosperm Breakdown and Embryogenic Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) is the world's most widely grown legume and provides an important source of protein and oil. Improvement of seed quality requires deep insights into the genetic regulation of seed development. The endosperm serves as a temporary source of nutrients that are transported from maternal to filial tissues, and it also generates signals for proper embryo formation. Endosperm cell death is associated with the processes of nutrient transfer and embryo expansion. The bHLH domain transcription factor AtZHOUPI (AtZOU) plays a key role in both the lysis of the transient endosperm and the formation of embryo cuticle in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are two copies of soybean GmZOU (GmZOU-1 and GmZOU-2), which fall into the same phylogenetic clade as AtZOU. These two copies share the same transcription orientation and are the result of tandem duplication. The expression of GmZOUs is limited to the endosperm, where it peaks during the heart embryo stage. When the exogenous GmZOU-1 and GmZOU-2 were expressed in the zou-4 mutant of Arabidopsis, only GmZOU-1 partially complemented the zou mutant phenotype, as indicated by endosperm breakdown and embryo cuticle formation in the transgenic lines. This research confirmed that the GmZOU-1 is a ZOU ortholog that may be responsible for endosperm breakdown and embryo cuticle formation in soybean.

  12. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  13. Identification of ZOUPI Orthologs in Soybean Potentially Involved in Endosperm Breakdown and Embryogenic Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) is the world’s most widely grown legume and provides an important source of protein and oil. Improvement of seed quality requires deep insights into the genetic regulation of seed development. The endosperm serves as a temporary source of nutrients that are transported from maternal to filial tissues, and it also generates signals for proper embryo formation. Endosperm cell death is associated with the processes of nutrient transfer and embryo expansion. The bHLH domain transcription factor AtZHOUPI (AtZOU) plays a key role in both the lysis of the transient endosperm and the formation of embryo cuticle in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are two copies of soybean GmZOU (GmZOU-1 and GmZOU-2), which fall into the same phylogenetic clade as AtZOU. These two copies share the same transcription orientation and are the result of tandem duplication. The expression of GmZOUs is limited to the endosperm, where it peaks during the heart embryo stage. When the exogenous GmZOU-1 and GmZOU-2 were expressed in the zou-4 mutant of Arabidopsis, only GmZOU-1 partially complemented the zou mutant phenotype, as indicated by endosperm breakdown and embryo cuticle formation in the transgenic lines. This research confirmed that the GmZOU-1 is a ZOU ortholog that may be responsible for endosperm breakdown and embryo cuticle formation in soybean. PMID:28228767

  14. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  15. Sample Preconcentration Utilizing Nanofractures Generated by Junction Gap Breakdown Assisted by Self-Assembled Monolayer of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Chun-Ping; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G.; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Yu-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The preconcentration of proteins with low concentrations can be used to increase the sensitivity and accuracy of detection. A nonlinear electrokinetic flow is induced in a nanofluidic channel due to the overlap of electrical double layers, resulting in the fast accumulation of proteins, referred to as the exclusion-enrichment effect. The proposed chip for protein preconcentration was fabricated using simple standard soft lithography with a polydimethylsiloxane replica. This study extends our previous paper, in which gold nanoparticles were manually deposited onto the surface of a protein preconcentrator. In the present work, nanofractures were formed by utilizing the self-assembly of gold-nanoparticle-assisted electric breakdown. This reliable method for nanofracture formation, involving self-assembled monolayers of nanoparticles at the junction gap between microchannels, also decreases the required electric breakdown voltage. The experimental results reveal that a high concentration factor of 1.5×104 for a protein sample with an extremely low concentration of 1 nM was achieved in 30 min by using the proposed chip, which is faster than our previously proposed chip at the same conditions. Moreover, an immunoassay of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA was carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed chip. PMID:25970592

  16. Representing Tactical Land Navigation Expertise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    they adjust and recalibrate tools dynamically; and (4) they visualize spatial information. Finally, a multi - agent system computationally represents the route planning portion of the performance model.

  17. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  18. Effects of polarization and absorption on laser induced optical breakdown threshold for skin rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Turco, Simona; Verhagen, Rieko

    2016-03-01

    Laser induced optical breakdown (LIOB) is a non-linear absorption process leading to plasma formation at locations where the threshold irradiance for breakdown is surpassed. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the influence of polarization and absorption on laser induced breakdown threshold in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms made from water suspensions of polystyrene microspheres. We demonstrate that radially polarized light yields a lower irradiance threshold for creating optical breakdown compared to linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that the thermal initiation pathway used for generating seed electrons results in a lower irradiance threshold compared to multiphoton initiation pathway used for optical breakdown.

  19. Grain-Scale Supercharging and Breakdown on Airless Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Hartzell, C.M.; Wang, X.; Horanyi, M.; Hurley, D. M.; Hibbitts, K.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of the solar wind and emitted photoelectrons with airless bodies have been studied extensively. However, the details of how charged particles interact with the regolith at the scale of a single grain have remained largely uncharacterized. Recent efforts have focused upon determining total surface charge under photoemission and solar wind bombardment and the associated electric field and potential. In this work, theory and simulations are used to show that grain-grain charge differences can exceed classical sheath predictions by several orders of magnitude, sometimes reaching dielectric breakdown levels. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity works against supercharging by allowing current to leak through individual grains; the balance between internal conduction and surface charging controls the maximum possible grain-to-grain electric field. Understanding the finer details of regolith grain charging, conductive equilibrium, and dielectric breakdown will improve future numerical studies of space weathering and dust levitation on airless bodies.

  20. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  1. Unsteady three-dimensional marginal separation, including breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    A situation involving a three-dimensional marginal separation is considered, where a (steady) boundary layer flow is on the verge of separating at a point (located along a line of symmetry/centerline). At this point, a triple-deck is included, thereby permitting a small amount of interaction to occur. Unsteadiness is included within this interaction region through some external means. It is shown that the problem reduces to the solution of a nonlinear, unsteady, partial-integro system, which is solved numerically by means of time-marching together with a pseudo-spectral method spatially. A number of solutions to this system are presented which strongly suggest a breakdown of this system may occur, at a finite spatial position, at a finite time. The structure and details of this breakdown are then described.

  2. RF breakdown studies in X-Band klystron cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    RF breakdown studies are presently being carried out at SLAC with klystron cavities in a traveling wave resonator (TWR). Different kinds of fabrication methods and several kinds of semiconducting and insulating coatings have been applied to X-Band TM{sub 010} cavities. RF breakdown thresholds up to 250 MV/m have been obtained. Dark current levels were found to be depressed on TiN-coated and single-point diamond turned cavities. A new TM{sub 020} cavity with demountable electrodes has been designed and will be used to test a variety of materials, coatings, and processes. Recent tests of klystron output windows at 119 MW are also presented in this paper.

  3. Grain-scale supercharging and breakdown on airless regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Hartzell, C. M.; Wang, X.; Horanyi, M.; Hurley, D. M.; Hibbitts, K.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of the solar wind and emitted photoelectrons with airless bodies have been studied extensively. However, the details of how charged particles interact with the regolith at the scale of a single grain have remained largely uncharacterized. Recent efforts have focused upon determining total surface charge under photoemission and solar wind bombardment and the associated electric field and potential. In this work, theory and simulations are used to show that grain-grain charge differences can exceed classical sheath predictions by several orders of magnitude, sometimes reaching dielectric breakdown levels. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity works against supercharging by allowing current to leak through individual grains; the balance between internal conduction and surface charging controls the maximum possible grain-to-grain electric field. Understanding the finer details of regolith grain charging, conductive equilibrium, and dielectric breakdown will improve future numerical studies of space weathering and dust levitation on airless bodies.

  4. Breakdown dynamics of electrically exploding thin metal wires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Caplinger, J.; Parada, F.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Using a two-frame intensified charge coupled device (iCCD) imaging system with a 2 ns exposure time, we observed the dynamics of voltage breakdown and corona generation in experiments of fast ns-time exploding fine Ni and stainless-steel (SS) wires in a vacuum. These experiments show that corona generation along the wire surface is subjected to temporal-spatial inhomogeneity. For both metal wires, we observed an initial generation of a bright cathode spot before the ionization of the entire wire length. This cathode spot does not expand with time. For 25.4 μm diameter Ni and SS wire explosions with positive polarity, breakdown starts from the ground anode and propagates to the high voltage cathode with speeds approaching 3500 km/s or approximately one percent of light speed.

  5. Partial discharges and breakdown in C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Traditional search processes of gases or gas mixtures for replacing SF6 involve time consuming measurements of partial discharges and breakdown behaviour for several voltage waveforms and different field configurations. Recently a model for prediction of this behaviour for SF6 was described in literature. The model only requires basic properties of the gas such as the critical field strength and the effective ionization coefficient, which can be obtained by swarm parameter measurements, and thermodynamic properties, which can be calculated. In this paper, we show for the well-known and electronegative gas octafluoropropane (C3F8) that it is possible to transfer the model developed for SF6 to this gas to describe the breakdown behaviour of C3F8. Thus the model can be beneficial in the screening process of new insulation gases.

  6. Possibility of increasing the optical breakdown threshold in KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bredikhin, V I; Ershov, V P; Burenina, V N; Mal'shakov, A N; Potemkin, A K

    2007-05-31

    The effect of various technological factors like the direction of crystal growth [(100) or (101)], acidity of the mother solution, growth rate, degree of filtration of the mother solution, purity of the starting raw material, specially introduced impurity (Pb), as well as after-growth thermal annealing, on the optical breakdown threshold of KDP crystals grown by the technique of rapid growth of profiled crystals is studied. It is shown that by using initial high-purity salts and fine filtration of solutions followed by after-growth annealing, it is possible to increase the optical breakdown threshold of profiled rapidly grown KDP crystals to values corresponding to the requirements of modern laser designs. (laser devices and elements)

  7. Optical characteristics of red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Symbalisty, E.M.; Taranenko, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The results of numerical calculations of intensity and spectra of optical emissions from red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown in the atmosphere are presented. It is shown that the optical emissions from red sprites consist of two components: (1) short-term (t{approx}0.3{endash}2thinspms) emissions produced as a result of dissipation of an energetic electron beam in air; (2) long-term (t{approx}2{endash}10thinspms) emissions produced by a population of low-energy electrons in an electric field. The long-term optical emissions are calculated for all low-energy electrons, including the secondary low-energy electrons produced by the relativistic electron beam, ambient background electrons, and electrons produced as a result of regular breakdown. The theoretical results are compared with observational data. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  8. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario; Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng; Larcher, Luca; Wu, Ernest

    2016-01-04

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO{sub 2}, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  9. Development of microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yuji; Moon, Ahsa; Kaneko, Masashi

    2010-05-01

    We propose microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy with the same measurement and analysis processes as in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, but with a different plasma generation mechanism. The size and lifetime of the plasma generated can contribute to increased measurement accuracy and expand its applicability to industrial measurement, such as an exhaust gas analyzer for automobile engine development and its regulation, which has been hard to operate by laser at an engineering evaluation site. The use of microwaves in this application helps lower the cost, reduce the system size, and increase the ease of operation to make it commercially viable. A microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to enhance the volume and lifetime of the plasma at atmospheric condition even at elevated pressure.

  10. The Social Breakdown syndrome in the elderly population living in the community: the Helping Study.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, T S; Hooper, F J; Gruenberg, E M

    1987-09-01

    A representative sample of elderly people residing in the community was examined to establish their psychiatric status. An interview with a close friend or relative, focusing on a one-week period in 1981, was used to investigate each subject's functional limitations and troublesome behaviour, these being the two components of the Social Breakdown Syndrome. The data from the sample were weighted to allow estimates of the characteristics of the general population. No cases of SBS at its most extreme were identified, and almost the entire population was found to be functioning at an adequate or near-adequate level: all cases of severe SBS were attributable to troublesome behaviour. Severe SBS was shown to increase with age and to be most common in non-white males. Persons with dementing disorders were more likely than their non-demented counterparts to show severe/moderate SBS, but in the majority of cases of SBS there was no mental disorder.

  11. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  13. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  14. Breakdown of Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; Rákos, A.; Schütz, G. M.

    2006-07-01

    We consider the behaviour of current fluctuations in the one-dimensional partially asymmetric zero-range process with open boundaries. Significantly, we find that the distribution of large current fluctuations does not satisfy the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry and that such a breakdown can generally occur in systems with unbounded state space. We also discuss the dependence of the asymptotic current distribution on the initial state of the system.

  15. Breakdown and discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of runaway electrons (REs) at high values of the ratio field intensity/gas number density {ital E}/{ital N} and {ital N} up to the Loshmidt number {ital N}{sub {ital L}}{approx_equal}2.7{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} is described. REs are shown to govern the breakdown and discharges at such condition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. The electrical breakdown characteristics of oil-paper insulation under steep front impulse voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermaar, A.J.; Wang, M.; Neilson, J.B. ); Srivastava, K.D. )

    1994-10-01

    Disconnecting switch operations in gas insulated equipment cause transient voltages with rise times as steep as 5 to 20 nanoseconds and magnitudes as high as 2.5 pu. There is very little information on the effect of these transients on oil-paper insulated equipment. There have been reports, however of transformer and bushing failures caused by these transients. The electrical breakdown characteristics of oil-paper insulation under steep front impulse were studied in this project, which was co-sponsored by the Canadian Electrical Association and B.C. Hydro. V[sub 50] (50% breakdown probability voltage) breakdown data was obtained with steep front (10 ns/2500 [mu]s), lightning and switching impulse waveforms. Insulation breakdown voltage vs breakdown time (V-t) data and multiple impulse breakdown data were obtained with the steep front impulse waveform. The V[sub 50] results showed that the breakdown strengths were lower for steep front impulses than for lightning impulses. The multiple impulse breakdown results showed that oil-paper insulation breakdown strength can be lower than 100 kV/mm. These results are alarming, since they suggest that oil-paper insulated equipment subjected to steep front transients will fail at voltages below the lightning impulse design level (BIL). The Volt-time data had a discontinuity. The breakdown process at risetime below about 50 ns was different from the breakdown process at rise times above 50 ns.

  17. Effect of ozone on the breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Bortnik, I.M.

    1995-12-31

    Electrical breakdown in air under the influence of electric fields demands the condition that the rate constant of ionization of gas molecules by electron impact exceeds the rate constant of electron attachment to a molecule. Elementary processes in the atmosphere involving ozone which lead to a reduction of the electric strength are considered. The oxygen dissociation by electron impacts leads to the ozone formation in the atmosphere. Ozone causes a decay of negative oxygen ions and thereby influence on the electrical breakdown. The critical reaction is: O{sub 3} + O{sup -} {implies} e + 20{sub 2}. In the presented paper we report the results of investigation on the influence of ozone impurity on the breakdown in air. The original power system to produce ozone consists of a pulse supply and a pulse-forming circuit. Power supply produces a voltage pulse with a rise time t{sub r} = 3-20 ns, half width t{sub h} 25-40 ns, peak voltage Vp = {+-}50 kV (max), and a frequency fp 100 Hz (max).

  18. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  19. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  20. Potential of tetracyclines to modify cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M E; Greenwald, R A; Golub, L M

    1996-05-01

    For several decades, it has been recognized that an imbalance between activated matrix metalloproteinases, generated locally by both infiltrating and resident cells, and their endogenous inhibitors may play a role in the pathologic breakdown of the joint extracellular matrix in osteoarthritis. This understanding has stimulated the search for a number of synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors that could serve as potential therapeutic agents. Tetracycline analogues are currently on the threshold of approval as anti-matrix metalloproteinases for another extracellular matrix-destructive disease, periodontitis, and this application could be extended to osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis therapy. In this regard, specially formulated low-dose regimens of a commercially available tetracycline, doxycycline, have been used in long-term clinical trials and were found to reduce extracellular matrix breakdown, including bone loss, in adult periodontitis. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition by tetracycline analogues is now recognized as complex, and multiple mechanisms have been proposed. A series of recently discovered nonantimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines are potent inhibitors of several classes of matrix metalloproteinases, preventing collagen breakdown and bone loss in a variety of animal models, although these analogues have not yet been approved for human use. Various tetracyclines have reduced the severity of osteoarthritis in animal models, indicating therapeutic potential for this class of compounds in the future.

  1. Magnetic breakdown in an array of overlapping Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadigrobov, A. M.; Radić, D.; Bjeliš, A.

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for a magnetic breakdown in an array of circular two-dimensional bands with a finite overlap of neighboring Fermi surfaces due to the presence of a presumably weak periodic potential, and apply the obtained results to the electron bands in carbon honeycomb structures of doped graphene and intercalated graphite compounds. In contrast to the standard treatment, inaugurated more than fifty years ago by Slutskin and Kadigrobov, with electron semiclassical trajectories encircling significantly overlapping Fermi surfaces, we examine a configuration in which bands are related in a way that the Fermi surfaces only slightly overlap, forming internal band pockets with areas of the size comparable to the area of the quantum magnetic flux for a given external magnetic field. Such band configuration has to be treated quantum mechanically. The calculation leads to the results for magnetic breakdown coefficients comprising an additional large factor with respect to the standard results, proportional to the ratio of the Fermi energy and the cyclotron energy. Also, these coefficients show oscillating dependence on energy, as well as on the wave number of periodic potential. Both mentioned elements enable the adjustment of the preferred wave vector of possible magnetic breakdown induced density wave instability at the highest possible critical temperature.

  2. High Breakdown Strength, Multilayer Ceramics for Compact Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, B.; Huebner, W.; Krogh, M.L.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Pate, R.C.; Rinehart, L.F.; Schultz, B.C.; Zhang, S.C.

    1999-07-20

    Advanced ceramics are being developed for use in large area, high voltage devices in order to achieve high specific energy densities (>10 6 J/m 3 ) and physical size reduction. Initial materials based on slip cast TiO2 exhibited a high bulk breakdown strength (BDS >300 kV/cm) and high permittivity with low dispersion (e�100). However, strong area and thickness dependencies were noted. To increase the BDS, multilayer dielectric compositions are being developed based on glass/TiO2 composites. The addition of glass increases the density (�99.8% theoretical), forms a continuous grain boundary phase, and also allows the use of high temperature processes to change the physical shape of the dielectric. The permittivity can also be manipulated since the volume fraction and connectivity of the glassy phase can be readily shifted. Results from this study on bulk breakdown of TiO2 multilayer structures with an area of 2cm 2 and 0.1cm thickness have measured 650 kV/cm. Furthermore, a strong dependence of breakdown strength and permittivity has been observed and correlated with microstructure and the glass composition. This paper presents the interactive effects of manipulation of these variables.

  3. Modeling of High-voltage Breakdown in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Sommerer, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the breakdown in extremely high reduced electric fields (E/N) between parallel-plate electrodes in helium. The left branch of the Paschen curve in the voltage range of 20-350kV and inter-electrode gap range of 0.5-3.5cm is studied analytically and with Monte-Carlo/PIC simulations. The model incorporates electron, ion, and fast neutral species whose energy-dependent anisotropic scattering, as well as backscattering at the electrodes, is carefully taken into account. Our model demonstrates that (1) anisotropic scattering is indispensable for producing reliable results at such high voltage and (2) due to the heavy species backscattered at cathode, breakdown can occur even without electron- and ion-induced ionization of the background gas. Fast atoms dominate in the breakdown process more and more as the applied voltage is increased, due to their increasing ionization cross-section and to the copious flux of energetic fast atoms generated in charge-exchange collisions.

  4. Anisotropic Dielectric Breakdown Strength of Single Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-10-11

    Dielectric breakdown has historically been of great interest from the perspectives of fundamental physics and electrical reliability. However, to date, the anisotropy in the dielectric breakdown has not been discussed. Here, we report an anisotropic dielectric breakdown strength (EBD) for h-BN, which is used as an ideal substrate for two-dimensional (2D) material devices. Under a well-controlled relative humidity, EBD values in the directions both normal and parallel to the c axis (EBD⊥c and EBD∥c) were measured to be 3 and 12 MV/cm, respectively. When the crystal structure is changed from sp(3) of cubic-BN (c-BN) to sp(2) of h-BN, EBD⊥c for h-BN becomes smaller than that for c-BN, while EBD∥c for h-BN drastically increases. Therefore, h-BN can possess a relatively high EBD concentrated only in the direction parallel to the c axis by conceding a weak bonding direction in the highly anisotropic crystal structure. This explains why the EBD∥c for h-BN is higher than that for diamond. Moreover, the presented EBD value obtained from the high quality bulk h-BN crystal can be regarded as the standard for qualifying the crystallinity of h-BN layers grown via chemical vapor deposition for future electronic applications.

  5. Numerical simulations of high power microwave dielectric interface breakdown involving outgassing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Cai Libing; Zhu Xiangqin; Wang Yue; Xuan Chun

    2010-06-15

    With the development of high power microwave (HPM) technology, the power and pulse duration of the HPM source increase substantially, the breakdown of the dielectric window of the HPM source feed has been becoming the major factor of limiting the transmission and radiation of HPM. This paper presents an electrostatic particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collisions method for simulating the breakdown on HPM dielectric surface and establishes a physical model of HPM dielectric surface breakdown involving outgassing. The breakdown process including the main physical mechanisms, such as the field emission, multipactor, outgassing, and collision of gas ionization, is simulated. The influence of outgassing on the dielectric window breakdown is studied by simulating the breakdown with different outgassing speeds. The similarity between the dc and HPM dielectric surface breakdown is discussed.

  6. Development of Numerical Methods to Estimate the Ohmic Breakdown Scenarios of a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Min-Gu; Kim, Jayhyun; An, Younghwa; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Shim, Seung Bo; Lee, Hae June; Na, Yong-Su

    2011-10-01

    The ohmic breakdown is a fundamental method to initiate the plasma in a tokamak. For the robust breakdown, ohmic breakdown scenarios have to be carefully designed by optimizing the magnetic field configurations to minimize the stray magnetic fields. This research focuses on development of numerical methods to estimate the ohmic breakdown scenarios by precise analysis of the magnetic field configurations. This is essential for the robust and optimal breakdown and start-up of fusion devices especially for ITER and its beyond equipped with low toroidal electric field (ET <= 0.3 V/m). A field-line-following analysis code based on the Townsend avalanche theory and a particle simulation code are developed to analyze the breakdown characteristics of actual complex magnetic field configurations including the stray magnetic fields in tokamaks. They are applied to the ohmic breakdown scenarios of tokamaks such as KSTAR and VEST and compared with experiments.

  7. Accelerated pericyte degeneration and blood–brain barrier breakdown in apolipoprotein E4 carriers with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Matthew R; Rege, Sanket V; Ma, Qingyi; Zhao, Zhen; Miller, Carol A; Winkler, Ethan A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the entry of neurotoxic blood-derived products and cells into the brain that is required for normal neuronal functioning and information processing. Pericytes maintain the integrity of the BBB and degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The BBB is damaged in AD, particularly in individuals carrying apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) gene, which is a major genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. The mechanisms underlying the BBB breakdown in AD remain, however, elusive. Here, we show accelerated pericyte degeneration in AD APOE4 carriers >AD APOE3 carriers >non-AD controls, which correlates with the magnitude of BBB breakdown to immunoglobulin G and fibrin. We also show accumulation of the proinflammatory cytokine cyclophilin A (CypA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in pericytes and endothelial cells in AD (APOE4 >APOE3), previously shown to lead to BBB breakdown in transgenic APOE4 mice. The levels of the apoE lipoprotein receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), were similarly reduced in AD APOE4 and APOE3 carriers. Our data suggest that APOE4 leads to accelerated pericyte loss and enhanced activation of LRP1-dependent CypA–MMP-9 BBB-degrading pathway in pericytes and endothelial cells, which can mediate a greater BBB damage in AD APOE4 compared with AD APOE3 carriers. PMID:25757756

  8. Detection of Minerals in Green Leafy Vegetables Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P.; Kumar, R.; Raib, A. Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of minerals in different green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, chenopodium, chickpea, mustard, and fenugreek, was calculated using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS can provide an easy, reliable, efficient, low-cost, and in situ chemical analysis with a reasonable precision. In situ LIBS spectra in the range 200-500 nm were carried out using fresh leaves and leaves in the pellet form. As the spectra suggest, magnesium and calcium are present in each vegetable; however, the amount of them varies. It is observed that the amount of iron is maximal in spinach. The nutrition value of the plants was analyzed, and it was revealed that they are low in calories and fat and high in protein, fiber, iron, calcium, and phytochemicals.

  9. NSP-Dependent Simple Nitrile Formation Dominates upon Breakdown of Major Aliphatic Glucosinolates in Roots, Seeds, and Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0

    PubMed Central

    Wittstock, Ute; Meier, Kathrin; Dörr, Friederike; Ravindran, Beena M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the best-studied plant defense systems, the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicales, is composed of thioglucosides known as glucosinolates and their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases. Tissue disruption brings these components together, and bioactive products are formed as a consequence of myrosinase-catalyzed glucosinolate hydrolysis. Among these products, isothiocyanates have attracted most interest as chemical plant defenses against herbivores and pathogens and health-promoting compounds in the human diet. Previous research has identified specifier proteins whose presence results in the formation of alternative product types, e.g., nitriles, at the expense of isothiocyanates. The biological roles of specifier proteins and alternative breakdown products are poorly understood. Here, we assessed glucosinolate breakdown product profiles obtained upon maceration of roots, seedlings and seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0. We identified simple nitriles as the predominant breakdown products of the major endogenous aliphatic glucosinolates in root, seed, and seedling homogenates. In agreement with this finding, genes encoding nitrile-specifier proteins (NSPs) are expressed in roots, seeds, and seedlings. Analysis of glucosinolate breakdown in mutants with T-DNA insertions in any of the five NSP genes demonstrated, that simple nitrile formation upon tissue disruption depended almost entirely on NSP2 in seeds and mainly on NSP1 in seedlings. In roots, about 70–80% of the nitrile-forming activity was due to NSP1 and NSP3. Thus, glucosinolate breakdown product profiles are organ-specifically regulated in A. thaliana Col-0, and high proportions of simple nitriles are formed in some parts of the plant. This should be considered in future studies on biological roles of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:27990154

  10. ADAMs 10 and 17 Represent Differentially Regulated Components of a General Shedding Machinery for Membrane Proteins Such as Transforming Growth Factor α, L-Selectin, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Sylvain M.; Bobé, Pierre; Reiss, Karina; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Niu, Xiao-Da; Lundell, Daniel; Gibb, David R.; Conrad, Daniel; Saftig, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Protein ectodomain shedding is a critical regulator of many membrane proteins, including epidermal growth factor receptor-ligands and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, providing a strong incentive to define the responsible sheddases. Previous studies identified ADAM17 as principal sheddase for transforming growth factor (TGF)-α and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, but Ca++ influx activated an additional sheddase for these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in Adam17−/− cells. Here, we show that Ca++ influx and stimulation of the P2X7R signaling pathway activate ADAM10 as sheddase of many ADAM17 substrates in Adam17−/− fibroblasts and primary B cells. Importantly, although ADAM10 can shed all substrates of ADAM17 tested here in Adam17−/− cells, acute treatment of wild-type cells with a highly selective ADAM17 inhibitor (SP26) showed that ADAM17 is nevertheless the principal sheddase when both ADAMs 10 and 17 are present. However, chronic treatment of wild-type cells with SP26 promoted processing of ADAM17 substrates by ADAM10, thus generating conditions such as in Adam17−/− cells. These results have general implications for understanding the substrate selectivity of two major cellular sheddases, ADAMs 10 and 17. PMID:19158376

  11. Representing Learning With Graphical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models are being used widely in artificial intelligence, for instance, in diagnosis and expert systems, as a unified qualitative and quantitative framework for representing and reasoning with probabilities and independencies. Their development and use spans several fields including artificial intelligence, decision theory and statistics, and provides an important bridge between these communities. This paper shows by way of example that these models can be extended to machine learning, neural networks and knowledge discovery by representing the notion of a sample on the graphical model. Not only does this allow a flexible variety of learning problems to be represented, it also provides the means for representing the goal of learning and opens the way for the automatic development of learning algorithms from specifications.

  12. Copper excess impairs mobilization of storage proteins in bean cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Karmous, Inès; El Ferjani, Ezzedine; Chaoui, Abdelilah

    2011-12-01

    Germination represents a limiting stage of plant life cycle. One of the underlying metabolic activities following imbibition of seed is the reserve mobilization. Seeds of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. soisson nain hatif) were germinated by soaking in distilled water or 200 μM CuCl(2). Storage proteins breakdown and amino acids freeing from reserve tissues were investigated. Compared to the control, Cu caused a reduction in germination rate, embryo growth, and in mobilization of cotyledonary biomass. The failure in albumin and globulin hydrolysis after the exposure to the pollutant was argued by (1) higher contents of remaining proteins than control ones, (2) persistence of some polypeptide bands resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of albumin and globulin-rich fractions, and (3) decrease in the availability of amino acids. Nitrogen starvation in embryonic axis should be associated with the Cu-imposed delay in growth.

  13. Generalized Chapman-Enskog continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Subramaniam, Sharanya; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-12-01

    The generalized Chapman-Enskog (GCE) method for rapid and slow thermochemical processes is employed to formulate a set of continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows. These GCE breakdown parameters are derived for one-temperature, two-temperature, and three-temperature models, through classification of the relevant thermochemical time scales relative to fast elastic collisional processes and slow flow processes associated with changes in macroscopic observables. Continuum breakdown mechanisms owing to multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, normal and shear stresses, Fourier-type heat fluxes based on translational, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, bulk viscosity, and relaxation pressure are presented for chemically reacting flows. The GCE breakdown parameters, derived from rigorous kinetic theory, capture the proper physical mechanism leading to continuum breakdown. These breakdown parameters are used to analyze continuum breakdown in a Mach 24 reacting air flow over a sphere and continuum breakdown is observed in the shock and close to the sphere surface. The flow field near the sphere surface is found to be characterized by sharp species concentration gradients due to gas-phase and surface reactions. Chemical reactions thus lead indirectly to the distortion of the velocity distribution function (VDF), providing a pathway to continuum breakdown that is captured by the GCE specieswise diffusion breakdown parameter.

  14. Non-invasive Technology to Study Local Passivity Breakdown of Metal Alloys in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M. Shipley

    2005-03-09

    Little is known about the basic mechanisms of passive oxide breakdown, repair, and localized corrosion of metals. A non-invasive instrument and methods have been developed to study local events and mechanisms that initiate passivity breakdown and subsequent corrosion of metals in aqueous media. The ''difference viewer imaging technique'' (DVIT) is a rapid, real time, non-invasive assay to study metal surfaces in corrosive solutions. It has a spatial resolution of less than 10.0 ?m (1cm x 1cm sample, 1000 x 1000 pixel CCD) to observe initial corrosion processes of the order of seconds. DVIT is a software-controlled video microscopy system and methods to collect and analyze pixel changes in video images. These images are recorded from a digital CCD video camera and frame grabber package using visible light for illumination. The DVIT system detects changes in video images that represent initial corrosive events that lead to passivity breakdown and re-passivation on metal surfaces in situ. This visual technique is easy to use and apply. It compliments other metal surface measurement techniques and can be used simultaneously with them. DVIT has proven to be more sensitive in detecting changes than scanning microelectrode techniques. DVIT is also much easier than other methods to apply and operate. It has the further advantage of providing a real time image of the entire metal surface under study instead of waiting for a microelectrode to scan a number of data points over a sample then plot the results. This project has fulfilled all specifications as outlined in the Department of Energy solicitation responsible for this grant application and award and exceeded a number of the specifications. Applicable Electronics, Inc. now has a marketable instrument and software package available for sale now. Further development of the system will be ongoing as driven by customer needs and discoveries. This technology has immediate applications in corrosion labs to further study

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying the breakdown of gametophytic self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Stone, J L

    2002-03-01

    The breakdown of self-incompatibility has occurred repeatedly throughout the evolution of flowering plants and has profound impacts on the genetic structure of populations. Recent advances in understanding of the molecular basis of self-incompatibility have provided insights into the mechanisms of its loss in natural populations, especially in the tomato family, the Solanaceae. In the Solanaceae, the gene that controls self-incompatibility in the style codes for a ribonuclease that causes the degradation of RNA in pollen tubes bearing an allele at the S-locus that matches either of the two alleles held by the maternal plant. The pollen component of the S-locus has yet to be identified. Loss of self-incompatibility can be attributed to three types of causes: duplication of the S-locus, mutations that cause loss of S-RNase activity, and mutations that do not cause loss of S-RNase activity. Duplication of the S-locus has been well studied in radiation-induced mutants but may be a relatively rare cause of the breakdown of self-incompatibility in nature. Point mutations within the S-locus that disrupt the production of S-RNase have been documented in natural populations. There are also a number of mutants in which S-RNase production is unimpaired, yet self-incompatibility is disrupted. The identity and function of these mutations is not well understood. Careful work on a handful of model organisms will enable population biologists to better understand the breakdown of self-incompatibility in nature.

  16. PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

  17. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  18. Breakdowns in coordinated decision making at and above the incident management team level: an analysis of three large scale Australian wildfires.

    PubMed

    Bearman, Chris; Grunwald, Jared A; Brooks, Benjamin P; Owen, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Emergency situations are by their nature difficult to manage and success in such situations is often highly dependent on effective team coordination. Breakdowns in team coordination can lead to significant disruption to an operational response. Breakdowns in coordination were explored in three large-scale bushfires in Australia: the Kilmore East fire, the Wangary fire, and the Canberra Firestorm. Data from these fires were analysed using a top-down and bottom-up qualitative analysis technique. Forty-four breakdowns in coordinated decision making were identified, which yielded 83 disconnects grouped into three main categories: operational, informational and evaluative. Disconnects were specific instances where differences in understanding existed between team members. The reasons why disconnects occurred were largely consistent across the three sets of data. In some cases multiple disconnects occurred in a temporal manner, which suggested some evidence of disconnects creating states that were conducive to the occurrence of further disconnects. In terms of resolution, evaluative disconnects were nearly always resolved however operational and informational disconnects were rarely resolved effectively. The exploratory data analysis and discussion presented here represents the first systematic research to provide information about the reasons why breakdowns occur in emergency management and presents an account of how team processes can act to disrupt coordination and the operational response.

  19. Delayed reheating and the breakdown of coherent oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Easther, Richard; Flauger, Raphael; Gilmore, James B. E-mail: raphael.flauger@yale.edu

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the evolution of the perturbations in the inflaton field and metric following the end of inflation. We present accurate analytic approximations for the perturbations, showing that the coherent oscillations of the post-inflationary condensate necessarily break down long before any current phenomenological constraints require the universe to become radiation dominated. Further, the breakdown occurs on length-scales equivalent to the comoving post-inflationary horizon size. This work has implications for both the inflationary ''matching'' problem, and the possible generation of a stochastic gravitational wave background in the post-inflationary universe.

  20. Glucosinolate Breakdown in Arabidopsis: Mechanism, Regulation and Biological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wittstock, Ute; Burow, Meike

    2010-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of thioglucosides in plants of the Brassicales order. Together with their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases, they constitute the ‘mustard oil bomb’ involved in plant defense. Here we summarize recent studies in Arabidopsis that have provided molecular evidence that the glucosinolate-myrosinase system is much more than a ‘two-component defense system,’ and started to unravel the roles of different glucosinolate breakdown pathways in the context of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:22303260

  1. The work breakdown structure in software project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A work breakdown structure (WBS) is defined as an enumeration of all work activities in hierarchic refinement of detail which organizes work to be done into short manageable tasks with quantifiable inputs, outputs, schedules, and assigned responsibilities. Some of the characteristics and benefits of the WBS are reviewed, and ways in which these can be developed and applied in software implementation projects are discussed. Although the material is oriented principally toward new-software production tasks, many of the concepts are applicable to continuing maintenance and operations tasks.

  2. Reconfigurable photonic crystal using self-initiated gas breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregório, José; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    We present a resonant photonic crystal for which transmission is time-modulated by a self-initiated gaseous plasma. A resonant cavity in the photonic crystal is used to amplify an incoming microwave field to intensities where gas breakdown is possible. The presence of the plasma in the resonant cavity alters the transmission spectrum of the device. We investigate both transient and steady-state operation with computational simulations using a time-domain model that couples Maxwell’s equations and plasma fluid equations. The predicted plasma ignition and stability are then experimentally verified.

  3. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Capabilities and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    hardness) to the ratio of the intensities of an ionized calcium atomic emission line, Ca II (396.8 nm) and a calcium atomic emission line, Ca I (422.6 nm...N.; McManus, C.; Harmon, R.; De Lucia, F.; Miziolek, A. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Analysis of Complex Silicate Minerals—Beryl. Anal...Analysis of Minerals: Carbonates and Silicates . Spectrochim. Acta, Part B 2007, 62B (12), 1528–1536. 30. Harmon, R. S.; Remus, J.; McMillan, N. J

  4. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  5. Breakdown of 1D water wires inside charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Shashank

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics approach we investigated the structure and dynamics of water confined inside pristine and charged 6,6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This study reports the breakdown of 1D water wires and the emergence of triangular faced water on incorporating charges in 6,6 CNTs. Incorporation of charges results in high potential barriers to flipping of water molecules due to the formation of large number of hydrogen bonds. The PMF analyses show the presence of ∼2 kcal/mol barrier for the movement of water inside pristine CNT and almost negligible barrier in charged CNTs.

  6. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  7. Global Franck-Condon Breakdown Resulting from Cooper Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, V.

    1996-04-01

    Using N2 2σ-1u photoionization as an example, we present the first measurements and calculations of photoion vibrational distributions for an extended energy range ( 5<=Ek<=230 eV). The results show a striking breakdown of the Franck-Condon approximation over a 100 eV range. We show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. Based on this mechanism, the effect is expected to be common for molecular systems.

  8. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  10. ZP3 is Required for Germinal Vesicle Breakdown in Mouse Oocyte Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei-Lei; Zhou, Chun-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Peng; Jin, Zhen; Zhu, Gang-Yi; Ma, Yang; Li, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Xia; Zhang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    ZP3 is a principal component of the zona pellucida (ZP) of mammalian oocytes and is essential for normal fertility, and knockout of ZP3 causes complete infertility. ZP3 promotes fertilization by recognizing sperm binding and activating the acrosome reaction; however, additional cellular roles for ZP3 in mammalian oocytes have not been yet reported. In the current study, we found that ZP3 was strongly expressed in the nucleus during prophase and gradually translocated to the ZP. Knockdown of ZP3 by a specific siRNA dramatically inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) (marking the beginning of meiosis), significantly reducing the percentage of MII oocytes. To investigate the ZP3-mediated mechanisms governing GVBD, we identified potential ZP3-interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. We identified Protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type K (Ptprk), Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (Aipl1), and Diaphanous related formin 2 (Diaph2) as potential candidates, and established a working model to explain how ZP3 affects GVBD. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence that ZP3 regulates Akt phosphorylation, lamin binding to the nuclear membrane via Aipl1, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton via Diaph2. These findings contribute to our understanding of a novel role played by ZP3 in GVBD. PMID:28145526

  11. The Breakdown of Stored Triacylglycerols Is Required during Light-Induced Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Lan, Jue; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Dodd, Antony N; Larson, Tony; Baker, Alison; Hõrak, Hanna; Kollist, Hannes; He, Zhesi; Graham, Ian; Mickelbart, Michael V; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2016-03-07

    Stomata regulate the uptake of CO2 and the loss of water vapor [1] and contribute to the control of water-use efficiency [2] in plants. Although the guard-cell-signaling pathway coupling blue light perception to ion channel activity is relatively well understood [3], we know less about the sources of ATP required to drive K(+) uptake [3-6]. Here, we show that triacylglycerols (TAGs), present in Arabidopsis guard cells as lipid droplets (LDs), are involved in light-induced stomatal opening. Illumination induces reductions in LD abundance, and this involves the PHOT1 and PHOT2 blue light receptors [3]. Light also induces decreases in specific TAG molecular species. We hypothesized that TAG-derived fatty acids are metabolized by peroxisomal β-oxidation to produce ATP required for stomatal opening. In silico analysis revealed that guard cells express all the genes required for β-oxidation, and we showed that light-induced stomatal opening is delayed in three TAG catabolism mutants (sdp1, pxa1, and cgi-58) and in stomata treated with a TAG breakdown inhibitor. We reasoned that, if ATP supply was delaying light-induced stomatal opening, then the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase should be reduced at this time. Monitoring changes in apoplastic pH in the mutants showed that this was the case. Together, our results reveal a new role for TAGs in vegetative tissue and show that PHOT1 and PHOT2 are involved in reductions in LD abundance. Reductions in LD abundance in guard cells of the lycophyte Selaginella suggest that TAG breakdown may represent an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in light-induced stomatal opening.

  12. Representing and acquiring geographic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for researchers and students in AI, cognitive psychology, and computational geometry, this work presents an original theory of how knowledge of a large-scale neighborhood can be represented symbolically in a computer program, accessed for use, and increased by experience. The discussion analyzes related work in the field, presents an actual computer implementation, and suggests areas for further research.

  13. Representing and acquiring geographic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a theory of how knowledge of a large-scale neighborhood can be represented symbolically in a computer program, accessed for use, and increased by experience. The discussion analyzes related work in the field, presents an actual computer implementation, and suggests areas for further research.

  14. Influence of absorption induced thermal initiation pathway on irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Jurna, Martin; Palero, Jonathan; Verhagen, Margaret Hortonand Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal initiation pathway on the irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms. We observed a transition from laser-induced optical breakdown to laser-induced thermal breakdown as the absorption coefficient of the medium is increased. We found that the irradiance threshold after correction for the path length dependent absorption and scattering losses in the medium is lower due to the thermal pathway for the generation of seed electrons compared to the laser-induced optical breakdown. Furthermore, irradiance threshold gradually decreases with the increase in the absorption properties of the medium. Creating breakdown with lower irradiance threshold that is specific at the target chromophore can provide intrinsic target selectivity and improve safety and efficacy of skin treatment methods that use laser induced breakdown. PMID:25909007

  15. The Nature of Emission from Optical Breakdown Induced by Pulses of fs and ns Duration

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Demange, P; Kucheyev, S; Shirk, M D; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2004-11-09

    Spectral emission from optical breakdown in the bulk of a transparent dielectric contains information about the nature of the breakdown medium. We have made time resolved measurements of the breakdown induced emission caused by nanosecond and femtosecond infrared laser pulses. We previously demonstrated that the emission due to ns pulses is blackbody in nature allowing determination of the fireball temperature and pressure during and after the damage event. The emission due to femtosecond pulse breakdown is not blackbody in nature; two different spectral distributions being noted. In one case, the peak spectral distribution occurs at the second harmonic of the incident radiation, in the other the distribution is broader and flatter and presumably due to continuum generation. The differences between ns and fs breakdown emission can be explained by the differing breakdown region geometries for the two pulse durations. The possibility to use spectral emission as a diagnostic of the emission region morphology will be discussed.

  16. Peculiarities of formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbanismailov, V. S. Omarov, O. A.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Bairkhanova, M. G.; Kattaa, A. J.

    2011-12-15

    The experimental results on the formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in atmospheric-pressure argon at townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms for different initial conditions are presented. A streamer channel is shown to be initiated by bright luminescence formed at the point of critical avalanche amplification at different distances from the cathode depending on overvoltage. Prebreakdown currents are experimentally measured for the townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms and peculiarities of spark channel formation for these mechanisms are studied.

  17. Gas Breakdown in the Sub-Nanosecond Regime with Voltages Below 15 KV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    protect devices from high power microwave radiation. Previous investigations of sub-nanosecond breakdown were mainly limited to high-pressure gases...which are doubled at the open gap before breakdown) delay times between start of the pulse and start of a measurable current flow (amplitude > several...using gas breakdown caused by the first cycle of incoming high power microwaves with frequencies in the GHz regime - Ultra-wideband radiation sources

  18. Laser-induced breakdown system for colloid characterization in dilute aqueous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, A; Mihardja, S; Palmer, C A; Wruck, D

    1999-08-11

    Detection and sizing of colloids by acoustic detection of laser-induced breakdown and elemental analysis of colloids by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy are investigated in dilute aqueous suspensions. Development and testing of the methods are performed with standard polystyrene suspensions and prepared suspensions of defined composition and particle size. Application of the methods to analysis of field and laboratory samples is discussed. Am atomic emission lines are observed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of an Am hydroxycarbonate suspension.

  19. The Magnification of Atomic Lines Intensity Originated by laser Breakdown in Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, A. V.; Nagorny, I. G.

    Atomic lines of some chemical elements like sodium and magnesium were investigated for laser breakdown of water with the ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of these atomic lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained. It is shown that the method of registration of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone allows to investigate thresholds and dynamics of laser breakdown which will be in accord with high-speed optical methods. The study revealed important practical applications of acoustic emission for breakdown and diagnostics of cavitation in opaque environments.

  20. Chiral symmetry breaking and pair-creation mediated Walker breakdown in magnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming; Andreas, Christian; Kákay, Attila; García-Sánchez, Felipe; Hertel, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes displays unusual effects, as revealed by a micromagnetic study. The left-right symmetry of the DW dynamics is broken, yielding markedly different DW mobilities for opposite propagation directions. This asymmetry arises from the tubular geometry and its impact on the DW structure. Also, the Walker breakdown field and velocity are found to be asymmetric for opposite directions. In certain cases, the breakdown can even be suppressed in one or both directions. Topological constraint requires a vortex-antivortex pair mediated breakdown, contrary to the single (anti)vortex in flat strips. This results in a higher breakdown velocity.

  1. Correlation between dielectric breakdown strength and interface polarization in barium strontium titanate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiajia; Zhang Yong; Ma Tao; Li Hongtao; Zhang Linwen

    2010-01-25

    The correlation between the dielectric breakdown performance and interface polarization was studied by the measurements of the dielectric breakdown strength and impedance spectroscopy as a function of sintering temperatures in a BaO-SrO-TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} glass ceramic system. It was found that dielectric breakdown strength strongly depends on the interface polarization. The sintering temperature dependence of breakdown strength is attributed to the variation in interfacial polarization based on the results of complex impedance analysis.

  2. Fully kinetic model of breakdown during sheath expansion after interruption of vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Haoran; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    Research on sheath expansion is critical to the understanding of the dielectric recovery process in a vacuum interrupter after interruption of vacuum arcs. In this paper, we investigated how residual plasma affects breakdown in the sheath expansion period after the current zero. To simulate sheath expansion and breakdown, we developed a fully kinetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model with one spatial dimension and three velocity dimensions. The model accounted for various collisions, including ionization, excitation, elastic collisions, charge exchange, and momentum exchange, and we added an external circuit to the model to make the calculations self-consistent. The existence of metal vapor slowed the sheath expansion in the gap and caused high electric field formation in front of the cathode surface. The initial residual plasma, which was at sufficiently low density, seemed to have a limited impact on breakdown, and the metal vapor dominated the breakdown in this case. Additionally, the breakdown probability was sensitive to the initial plasma density if the value exceeded a specific threshold, and plasma at sufficiently high density could mean that breakdown would occur more easily. We found that if the simulation does not take the residual plasma into account, it could overestimate the critical value of the metal vapor density, which is always used to describe the boundary of breakdown after interruption of vacuum arcs. We discussed the breakdown mechanism in sheath expansion, and the breakdown is determined by a combination of metal vapor, residual plasma, and the electric field in front of the cathode surface.

  3. Feasibility study of detection of dielectric breakdown of gate oxide film by using acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasashima, Yuji; Tabaru, Tatsuo; Uesugi, Fumihiko

    2016-12-01

    An in situ detection method for the dielectric breakdown of oxide films for MOS gates has been required in the plasma etching process. In this feasibility study, a conventional MOSFET device is used and an acoustic emission (AE) method is employed for the detection of the dielectric breakdown of a gate oxide film. A thin type AE sensor is attached at the backside of an electrostatic chuck (ESC), and the dielectric breakdown in a MOSFET, which is set on the ESC, is detected. The results demonstrate that the thin type AE sensor can detect the dielectric breakdown with an energy on the order of µJ.

  4. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-05-15

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times.

  5. Coupled ion redistribution and electronic breakdown in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Doo Hyun; Randall, Clive Furman, Eugene Lanagan, Michael

    2015-08-28

    Dielectrics with high electrostatic energy storage must have exceptionally high dielectric breakdown strength at elevated temperatures. Another important consideration in designing a high performance dielectric is understanding the thickness and temperature dependence of breakdown strengths. Here, we develop a numerical model which assumes a coupled ionic redistribution and electronic breakdown is applied to predict the breakdown strength of low-alkali glass. The ionic charge transport of three likely charge carriers (Na{sup +}, H{sup +}/H{sub 3}O{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}) was used to calculate the ionic depletion width in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate which can further be used for the breakdown modeling. This model predicts the breakdown strengths in the 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9 }V/m range and also accounts for the experimentally observed two distinct thickness dependent regions for breakdown. Moreover, the model successfully predicts the temperature dependent breakdown strength for low-alkali glass from room temperature up to 150 °C. This model showed that breakdown strengths were governed by minority charge carriers in the form of ionic transport (mostly sodium) in these glasses.

  6. Breakdown in hydrogen and deuterium gases in static and radio-frequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Korolov, I. Donkó, Z.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of a combined experimental and modeling study of the electrical breakdown of hydrogen and deuterium in static (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) electric fields. For the simulations of the breakdown events, simplified models are used and only electrons are traced by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental DC Paschen curve of hydrogen is used for the determination of the effective secondary electron emission coefficient. A very good agreement between the experimental and the calculated RF breakdown characteristics for hydrogen is found. For deuterium, on the other hand, presently available cross section sets do not allow a reproduction of RF breakdown characteristics.

  7. Dielectric breakdown of polycrystalline alumina: A weakest-link failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Benjamin

    The effects of varying electrode geometry (ball and ring) and size (radius), dielectric media (castor oil and DialaRTM oil), specimen thickness, and concentration of defects on the dielectric breakdown strength of commercial-grade alumina and high-purity fine-grained (HPFG) alumina were investigated. The breakdown strength was expressed in terms of the maximum electric field in the ceramic at the breakdown voltage calculated by finite element analysis (FEA). The breakdown strength decreased systematically with increasing electrode radius and specimen thickness. The breakdown strength increased with decreasing concentration of defects. The breakdown strength was higher in the Diala RTM oil (dielectric constant, epsilonr = 2.3 +/- 0.12) as compared to the castor oil (epsilonr = 4.59 +/- 0.06). The breakdown strength was higher for the HPFG alumina as compared to the commercial- grade alumina. These effects of the electrode geometry, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the dielectric media were analyzed with a weakest-link failure model employing the Laplace and Weibull distributions for a population of defects in the material. The measured size or scaling effects of the electrodes, specimen thickness, concentration of defects, and of the liquid media on breakdown strength were in better agreement with the Laplace distribution for the population. The measured concentration of surface defects was in good agreement with the concentration of surface defects estimated from the surface area scaling of the breakdown field with the Laplace distribution.

  8. Breakdown Behavior of a Wireless Communication Network Under UWB Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohe, M.; Koch, M.

    Systems with high priority to safety and reliability such as monitoring systems on airports have to work properly. Fast information transmission, continuous access to databases, as well as the management of air traffic are most important for effective and safe operation. Sources of Intentional Electromagnetic Interference can be manufactured relatively easy using commercially available components by civilian persons with relevant expertise and can be used for sabotage or blackmail purposes. For analyzing the weak points of a system existing on airports, it is necessary to reproduce its setup. In this investigation a UHF transmitter of a wireless communication device is developed and its breakdown behavior to unipolar fast rise pulses (UWB) is determined. A breakdown is a non-permanent damage, but includes a type of upset, that requires manual reset or at least stops communications for some period of time. The transmitter consists of three main components connected by data cables: power supply, microcontroller, and loop antenna. The immunity tests are accomplished as a function of the electromagnetic field direction to the device using an open TEM waveguide.

  9. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  10. Hydrogen leak detection using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ball, A J; Hohreiter, V; Hahn, D W

    2005-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated as a technique for real-time monitoring of hydrogen gas. Two methodologies were examined: The use of a 100 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced breakdown directly in a sample gas stream, and the use of a 55 mJ laser pulse to create a laser-induced plasma on a solid substrate surface, with the expanding plasma sampling the gas stream. Various metals were analyzed as candidate substrate surfaces, including aluminum, copper, molybdenum, stainless steel, titanium, and tungsten. Stainless steel was selected, and a detailed analysis of hydrogen detection in binary mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was performed. Both the gaseous plasma and the plasma initiated on the stainless steel surface generated comparable hydrogen emission signals, using the 656.28 Halpha emission line, and exhibited excellent signal linearity. The limit of detection is about 20 ppm (mass) as determined for both methodologies, with the solid-initiated plasma yielding a slightly better value. Overall, LIBS is concluded to be a viable candidate for hydrogen sensing, offering a combination of high sensitivity with a technique that is well suited to implementation in field environments.

  11. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  12. Three dimensional breakdown of an impulsively forced laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Theodoros; Kotsonis, Marios

    2016-11-01

    The spatio-temporal behaviour of a short laminar separation bubble is investigated experimentally. The bubble develops on a flat plate driven by an adverse pressure gradient wall at Reynolds number based on displacement thickness at separation of Reδs* = 975 . The boundary layer is impulsively forced by means of AC dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator located upstream of the separation point. The full four-dimensional flow development is captured by time resolved tomographic PIV measurements using the multi-pass light amplification technique. Immediately after forcing, a convectively unstable wave packet emerges due to selective amplification of modes which interacts with the reattachment process. The interaction becomes non-linear at the reattachment region, where Λ structures typical of laminar separation bubbles are captured before the occurrence of breakdown. The structures and breakdown are characterised in terms of temporal evolution, spanwise coherence and energy budget. The diminishing of Λ structures triggers a sharp reduction in size of the separation bubble by interfering with the natural shedding process. As a result, the bubble significantly elongates without shedding undergoing bursting before recovering to its unperturbed state.

  13. Preliminary Breakdown: Physical Mechanisms and Potential for Energetic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the preliminary breakdown phase of virgin negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning strokes will be presented. Of primary interest are the physical processes responsible for the fast electric field "characteristic" pulses that are often observed during this phase. The pulse widths of characteristic pulses are shown to occur as a superposed bimodal distribution, with the short and long modes having characteristic timescales on the order of 1 microsecond and 10 microseconds, respectively. Analysis of these pulses is based on comparison with laboratory observations of long spark discharge processes and with recently acquired high-speed video observations of a single -CG event. It will be argued that the fast electric field bimodal distribution is the result of conventional discharge processes operating in an extensive strong ambient electric field environment. An important related topic will also be discussed, where it will be argued that preliminary breakdown discharges are capable of generating energetic electrons and may therefore seed relativistic electron avalanches that go on to produce pulsed energetic photon emissions.

  14. Dielectric breakdown during Cs+ sputtering of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahoud, F.; Guillot, J.; Audinot, J. N.; Bertrand, P.; Delcorte, A.; Migeon, H. N.

    2014-02-01

    Thin films of insulating polymers are sometimes analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without the use of an electron gun. In this work, both SIMS and XPS have been used to study the chemical and structural modifications due to the charge effect during Cs+ sputtering of a thin film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The kinetic energy distribution study shows that at a small primary fluence ˜1015 Cs+ ions/cm2, the dielectric breakdown voltage of the PVC film is reached, i.e. the minimum voltage that causes a portion of an insulator to become electrically conductive. XPS study indicates that the conducting phase created in the PVC film after energetic Cs+ bombardment consists of graphitized carbon and metallic cesium clusters. After the dielectric breakdown of the film, the positive charge, previously accumulated on the surface, is neutralized through the conductive regions, which are created in the insulating film. During Cs+ sputtering of a PVC film, the chemical structure of the analyzed surface is completely modified and some ionic bonds such as CsC and CsCl are also created.

  15. Altitude deviations: Breakdowns of an error-tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett A.; Hutchins, Edwin L.; Ritter, Richard D.; Vancleemput, Inge

    1993-01-01

    Pilot reports of aviation incidents to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) provide a window on the problems occurring in today's airline cockpits. The narratives of 10 pilot reports of errors made in the automation-assisted altitude-change task are used to illustrate some of the issues of pilots interacting with automatic systems. These narratives are then used to construct a description of the cockpit as an information processing system. The analysis concentrates on the error-tolerant properties of the system and on how breakdowns can occasionally occur. An error-tolerant system can detect and correct its internal processing errors. The cockpit system consists of two or three pilots supported by autoflight, flight-management, and alerting systems. These humans and machines have distributed access to clearance information and perform redundant processing of information. Errors can be detected as deviations from either expected behavior or as deviations from expected information. Breakdowns in this system can occur when the checking and cross-checking tasks that give the system its error-tolerant properties are not performed because of distractions or other task demands. Recommendations based on the analysis for improving the error tolerance of the cockpit system are given.

  16. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism. Key Points Preliminary breakdown pulses can be reproduced by simulated channel extension Channel heating and corona sheath formation are crucial to proper pulse shape Extension processes and channel orientation significantly affect observations PMID:26664815

  17. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  18. Time-resolved shadowgraphy of optical breakdown in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. A.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Nguyen, V. H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Le, N. T.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2015-07-01

    Dynamics of a laser-induced optical breakdown in the bulk of fused silica initiated by a sub-nanosecond laser pulse of an energy fluence as high as 8.7 kJ/cm2 was investigated by using femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphy. Plasma ignition, growth of the damaged region and accompanying hydrodynamic motion were recorded from the moment directly before the arrival of the driving laser pulse, in the time steps adapted to the rate of the occurring processes. The growth rate of the plasma channel, curvature radii and velocities of the wave fronts were extracted from the shadowgrams. It was found that the plasma channel develops with a supersonic velocity and the first observed shock front tends to transform itself from the initial bowl-like shape to the final spherical one characterising an acoustic wave. Appearance of multiple fronts accompanying the main shock front was registered and used in more detailed analysis of the optical breakdown dynamics in the transparent dielectrics.

  19. Flight representative positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1977-01-01

    Resolutions were developed for each problem encountered and a tradeoff analysis was performed to select a final configuration for a flight representative PID (Positive Isolation Disconnect) that is reduced in size and comparable in weight and pressure drop to the developmental PID. A 6.35 mm (1/4-inch) line size PID was fabricated and tested. The flight representative PID consists of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation. Future development efforts for the Space Shuttle subsystems that would benefit from the use of the positive isolation disconnect are also recommended. Customary units were utilized for principal measurements and calculations with conversion factors being inserted in equations to convert the results to the international system of units.

  20. Representing videos in tangible products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fageth, Reiner; Weiting, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    Videos can be taken with nearly every camera, digital point and shoot cameras, DSLRs as well as smartphones and more and more with so-called action cameras mounted on sports devices. The implementation of videos while generating QR codes and relevant pictures out of the video stream via a software implementation was contents in last years' paper. This year we present first data about what contents is displayed and how the users represent their videos in printed products, e.g. CEWE PHOTOBOOKS and greeting cards. We report the share of the different video formats used, the number of images extracted out of the video in order to represent the video, the positions in the book and different design strategies compared to regular books.

  1. A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, Mary C. (Editor); Brearley, J. Alexander; Haas, Randall; Viles, Heather A.

    2007-01-01

    A primary goal of geomorphological enquiry is to make genetic associations between process and form. In rock breakdown studies, the links between process, inheritance and lithology are not well constrained. In particular, there is a need to establish an understanding of feature persistence. That is, to determine the extent to which in situ rock breakdown (e.g., aeolian abrasion or salt weathering) masks signatures of earlier geomorphic transport processes (e.g., fluvial transport or crater ejecta). Equally important is the extent to which breakdown during geomorphic transport masks the imprint of past weathering. The use of rock features in this way raises the important question: Can features on the surface of a rock reliably indicate its geomorphic history? This has not been determined for rock surfaces on Earth or other planets. A first step towards constraining the links between process, inheritance, and morphology is to identify pristine features produced by different process regimes. The purpose of this atlas is to provide a comprehensive image collection of breakdown features commonly observed on boulders in different geomorphic environments. The atlas is intended as a tool for planetary geoscientists and their students to assist in identifying features found on rocks on planetary surfaces. In compiling this atlas, we have attempted to include features that have formed 'recently' and where the potential for modification by another geomorphic process is low. However, we acknowledge that this is, in fact, difficult to achieve when selecting rocks in their natural environment. We group breakdown features according to their formative environment and process. In selecting images for inclusion in the atlas we were mindful to cover a wide range of climatic zones. For example, in the weathering chapter, clast features are shown from locations such as the hyper-arid polar desert of Antarctica and the semi-arid canyons of central Australia. This is important as some

  2. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  3. The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Yadav, Brijesh S; Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Shai, Ben; Obolski, Uri; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Shani, Eilon; Jander, Georg; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol functions in cruciferous vegetables as a protective agent against foraging insects. While the toxic and deterrent effects of glucosinolate breakdown on herbivores and pathogens have been studied extensively, the secondary responses that are induced in the plant by indole-3-carbinol remain relatively uninvestigated. Here we examined the hypothesis that indole-3-carbinol plays a role in influencing plant growth and development by manipulating auxin signaling. We show that indole-3-carbinol rapidly and reversibly inhibits root elongation in a dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition is accompanied by a loss of auxin activity in the root meristem. A direct interaction between indole-3-carbinol and the auxin perception machinery was suggested, as application of indole-3-carbinol rescues auxin-induced root phenotypes. In vitro and yeast-based protein interaction studies showed that indole-3-carbinol perturbs the auxin-dependent interaction of Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR1) with auxin/3-indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAAs) proteins, further supporting the possibility that indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist. The results indicate that chemicals whose production is induced by herbivory, such as indole-3-carbinol, function not only to repel herbivores, but also as signaling molecules that directly compete with auxin to fine tune plant growth and development.

  4. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages . Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological

  5. Judgments of and by Representativeness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-15

    Keprt 0 Judgments Of and By Representativeness,,I Jan. , *80agoAprO &1 i, 7. A. COPATaNRA ___ N00014-79-C-0077 Am;os /ftversky - ail hea S . PERFORMING...value and a variable; ..4 an instance and a category; I& a sample and a population; 4(1 an effect and a cause. The principles of representativenes...reduces it probability. Several studies of judgment are reported in which naive and sophi- DD I FjA017 1473 ITorION OF I Nov S IIS isoSOLETE Unclassified S

  6. Study of breakdown in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-10-15

    Breakdown in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) must be studied in order to design new types of APPTs and measure particular parameters. In this paper, we studied a parallel-plate ablative pulsed plasma thruster that used a coaxial semiconductor spark plug. By operating the APPT about 500 times with various capacitor voltages and electrode gaps, we measured and analyzed the voltage of the spark plug, the voltage between the electrodes, and the discharge current. These experiments revealed a time delay (∼1–10 μs) between spark plug ignition and capacitor discharge, which may affect the performance of high-pulsing-rate (>10 kHz) and double-discharge APPTs, and the measurements of some of the APPT parameters. The delay time decreased as the capacitor voltage increased, and it increased with an increasing electrode gap and increasing number of ignitions. We explain our results through a simple theoretical analysis.

  7. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-06-16

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism.

  8. Digital barcodes of suspension array using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    He, Qinghua; Liu, Yixi; He, Yonghong; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    We show a coding method of suspension array based on the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which promotes the barcodes from analog to digital. As the foundation of digital optical barcodes, nanocrystals encoded microspheres are prepared with self-assembly encapsulation method. We confirm that digital multiplexing of LIBS-based coding method becomes feasible since the microsphere can be coded with direct read-out data of wavelengths, and the method can avoid fluorescence signal crosstalk between barcodes and analyte tags, which lead to overall advantages in accuracy and stability to current fluorescent multicolor coding method. This demonstration increases the capability of multiplexed detection and accurate filtrating, expanding more extensive applications of suspension array in life science. PMID:27808270

  9. Flame-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Li, S; He, X N; Huang, X; Zhang, C F; Fan, L S; Wang, M X; Zhou, Y S; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2014-04-07

    Flame-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated to improve the sensitivity of LIBS. It was realized by generating laser-induced plasmas in the blue outer envelope of a neutral oxy-acetylene flame. Fast imaging and temporally resolved spectroscopy of the plasmas were carried out. Enhanced intensity of up to 4 times and narrowed full width at half maximum (FWHM) down to 60% for emission lines were observed. Electron temperatures and densities were calculated to investigate the flame effects on plasma evolution. These calculated electron temperatures and densities showed that high-temperature and low-density plasmas were achieved before 4 µs in the flame environment, which has the potential to improve LIBS sensitivity and spectral resolution.

  10. A Dual-Moded Cavity for RF Breakdown Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The phenomenon of rf breakdown presents a technological limitation in the application of high-gradient particle acceleration in normal conducting rf structures. Attempts to understand the onset of this phenomenon and to study its limits with different materials, cell shapes, and pulse widths has been driven in recent years by linear collider development. One question of interest is the role magnetic field plays relative to electric field. A design is presented for a single, nonaccelerating, rf cavity resonant in two modes, which, driven independently, allow the rf magnetic field to be increased on the region of highest electric field without affecting the latter. The design allows for the potential reuse of the cavity with different samples in the high-field region. High power data is not yet available.

  11. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  12. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P.; Christian, H.

    2015-06-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism.

  13. Size dependent breakdown of superconductivity in ultranarrow nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zgirski, Maciek; Riikonen, Karri-Pekka; Touboltsev, Vladimir; Arutyunov, Konstantin

    2005-06-01

    Below a certain temperature T(c) (typically cryogenic), some materials lose their electric resistance R entering a superconducting state. Following the general trend toward a large scale integration of a greater number of electronic components, it is desirable to use superconducting elements in order to minimize heat dissipation. It is expected that the basic property of a superconductor, i.e., dissipationless electric current, will be preserved at reduced scales required by modern nanoelectronics. Unfortunately, there are indications that for a certain critical size limit of the order of approximately 10 nm, below which a "superconducting" nanowire is no longer a superconductor in a sense that it acquires a finite resistance even at temperatures close to absolute zero. In the present paper we report experimental evidence for a superconductivity breakdown in ultranarrow quasi-1D aluminum nanowires.

  14. Technology Development Benefits and the Economics Breakdown Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and application of the EBS (Economics Breakdown Structure) in evaluating technology investments across multiple systems and organizations, illustrated with examples in space transportation technology. The United States Government (USG) has a long history of investing in technology to enable its missions. Agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have evaluated their technology development programs primarily on their effects on mission performance and cost. More and more, though, USG agencies are being evaluated on their technology transfer to the commercial sector. In addition, an increasing number of USG missions are being accomplished by industry-led or joint efforts, where the USG provides technology and funding but tasks industry with development and operation of the mission systems.

  15. Kondo Breakdown and Quantum Oscillations in SmB_{6}.

    PubMed

    Erten, Onur; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Coleman, Piers

    2016-01-29

    Recent quantum oscillation experiments on SmB_{6} pose a paradox, for while the angular dependence of the oscillation frequencies suggest a 3D bulk Fermi surface, SmB_{6} remains robustly insulating to very high magnetic fields. Moreover, a sudden low temperature upturn in the amplitude of the oscillations raises the possibility of quantum criticality. Here we discuss recently proposed mechanisms for this effect, contrasting bulk and surface scenarios. We argue that topological surface states permit us to reconcile the various data with bulk transport and spectroscopy measurements, interpreting the low temperature upturn in the quantum oscillation amplitudes as a result of surface Kondo breakdown and the high frequency oscillations as large topologically protected orbits around the X point. We discuss various predictions that can be used to test this theory.

  16. Kondo Breakdown and Quantum Oscillations in SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, Onur; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Coleman, Piers

    2016-01-01

    Recent quantum oscillation experiments on SmB6 pose a paradox, for while the angular dependence of the oscillation frequencies suggest a 3D bulk Fermi surface, SmB6 remains robustly insulating to very high magnetic fields. Moreover, a sudden low temperature upturn in the amplitude of the oscillations raises the possibility of quantum criticality. Here we discuss recently proposed mechanisms for this effect, contrasting bulk and surface scenarios. We argue that topological surface states permit us to reconcile the various data with bulk transport and spectroscopy measurements, interpreting the low temperature upturn in the quantum oscillation amplitudes as a result of surface Kondo breakdown and the high frequency oscillations as large topologically protected orbits around the X point. We discuss various predictions that can be used to test this theory.

  17. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  18. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  19. Global Franck-Condon breakdown: nonresonant molecular photoionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Aloke; Hardy, David; Aguilar, Alejandro; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Bozek, John D.; Poliakoff, Erwin D.

    2007-06-01

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy results of nonresonant Franck-Condon breakdown in the photoionization of CO and ICN. Most importantly, the deviations occur over a surprisingly wide range of energies. For the case of CO^+(X^2σ^+), the v^ + = 1/v^ + = 0 vibrational branching ratio is found to vary significantly (>50%) over a 200 eV range. While it is well understood that resonances can lead to coupling between photoelectron and molecular vibration, there is little information on nonresonant sources of coupling. It appears that Cooper minima may be responsible for the observations. Moreover, for ICN, the vibrationally resolved deviations from Franck-Condon behavior are vibrationally mode-specific. Studies on alternative molecular targets are planned to see whether they exhibit photoelectron dynamics that are geometry-dependent.

  20. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of electrode/electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Syzdek, Jaroslaw; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Kostecki, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Direct chemical analysis of electrode/electrolyte interfaces can provide critical information on surface phenomena that define and control the performance of Li-based battery systems. In this work, we introduce the use of ex situ femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy to probe compositional variations within the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. Nanometer-scale depth resolution was achieved for elemental and molecular depth profiling of SEI layers formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrodes in an organic carbonate-based electrolyte. This work demonstrates the unique ability of ultrafast laser spectroscopy as a highly versatile, light element-sensitive technique for direct chemical analysis of interfacial layers in electrochemical energy storage systems.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucia, Frank C.; Harmon, Russell S.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Winkel, Raymond J.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-10-01

    A number of energetic materials and explosives have been studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). They include black powder, neat explosives such as TNT, PETN, HMX, and RDX (in various forms), propellants such as M43 and JA2, and military explosives such as C4 and LX-14. Each of these materials gives a unique spectrum, and generally the spectra are reproducible shot to shot. We observed that the laser-produced microplasma did not initiate any of the energetic materials studied. Extensive studies of black powder and its ingredients by use of a reference spectral library have demonstrated excellent accuracy for unknown identification. Finally, we observed that these nitrogen- and oxygen-rich materials yield LIBS spectra in air that have correspondingly different O:N peak ratios compared with air. This difference can help in the detection and identification of such energetic materials.

  2. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  4. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  5. Transition and Breakdown to Turbulence in Incompressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a code where the nonlinear terms are treated implicitly. The equations are discretized using the two-point fourth order compact scheme in the y-direction and the backward Euler method in the x-direction. We investigated the transition process in a Blasius boundary layer due to fundamental type breakdown. With 8 modes in the w and 3 planes, we could compute the evolution of disturbances up to Re(x)=910, which is well into the strongly nonlinear region. The transition onset point is located around Re(x)=850. The comparison with the measurements and with the DNS computations are very good up to Re(x)=880.

  6. Analysis and control of supersonic vortex breakdown flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis and computation of steady, compressible, quasi-axisymmetric flow of an isolated, slender vortex are considered. The compressible, Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a simpler set by using the slenderness and quasi-axisymmetry assumptions. The resulting set along with a compatibility equation are transformed from the diverging physical domain to a rectangular computational domain. Solving for a compatible set of initial profiles and specifying a compatible set of boundary conditions, the equations are solved using a type-differencing scheme. Vortex breakdown locations are detected by the failure of the scheme to converge. Computational examples include isolated vortex flows at different Mach numbers, external axial-pressure gradients and swirl ratios.

  7. Breakdown in REM sleep circuitry underlies REM sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Peever, John; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, skeletal muscles are almost paralyzed. However, in REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is a rare neurological condition, muscle atonia is lost, leaving afflicted individuals free to enact their dreams. Although this may sound innocuous, it is not, given that patients with RBD often injure themselves or their bed-partner. A major concern in RBD is that it precedes, in 80% of cases, development of synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). This link suggests that neurodegenerative processes initially target the circuits controlling REM sleep. Clinical and basic neuroscience evidence indicates that RBD results from breakdown of the network underlying REM sleep atonia. This finding is important because it opens new avenues for treating RBD and understanding its link to neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Francisco J.; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  9. Analytical study of seashell using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, LI; Yanhong, GU; Ying, Zhang; Yuandong, LI; Yuan, LU

    2017-02-01

    Seashell has been applied as an indicator for ocean research and element analysis of the seashell is used to track biological or environmental evolution. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for elementary analysis of an ezo scallop-shell, and a graphite enrichment method was used as the assistance. It was found that LIBS signal intensity of Ca fluctuated less than 5%, in spite of the sampling positions, and Sr/Ca was related to the shell growth. A similar variation was also found when using a direct LIBS analysis on the shell surface, and it might be more practicable to track shell growth by investigating Sr/Ca ratio with Sr ionic line at 421.6 nm. The obtained results prove that calcium (Ca) is qualified as an internal reference for shell analysis, and LIBS is a potential analytical method for seashell study.

  10. Complex quantum networks: From universal breakdown to optimal transport.

    PubMed

    Mülken, Oliver; Dolgushev, Maxim; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2016-02-01

    We study the transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks with loops. For this we consider sequentially growing networks with different topologies of the sequential subgraphs. This can lead either to a universal complete breakdown of transport for complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs or to optimal transport for ringlike sequential subgraphs. The transition to optimal transport can be triggered by systematically reducing the number of loops of complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs in a small-world procedure. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  11. Complex quantum networks: From universal breakdown to optimal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülken, Oliver; Dolgushev, Maxim; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2016-02-01

    We study the transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks with loops. For this we consider sequentially growing networks with different topologies of the sequential subgraphs. This can lead either to a universal complete breakdown of transport for complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs or to optimal transport for ringlike sequential subgraphs. The transition to optimal transport can be triggered by systematically reducing the number of loops of complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs in a small-world procedure. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  12. The tropospheric-stratospheric polar vortex breakdown of January 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An extraordinary warming of the stratosphere in December-January 1976-77 was followed by tropospheric warming in the polar region and cooling in middle latitudes. During January 10-20, the associated polar anticyclone extended from the surface to 10 mb. Antecedents of the polar vortex breakdown are reviewed with the aid of results of zonal-harmonic analyses of planetary waves, for heights of the pressure surfaces (700-10 mb), temperature, and mean stratospheric temperature (the latter determined from satellite radiation measurements). Wave 1 in height and temperature played a dominant role in the stratosphere, attaining amplitudes of 1600 gpm and 25 C, respectively, at 10 mb. On the other hand, superposition of retrogressing wave 1 and quasi-stationary wave 2 in the height of the 300-mb surface, with individual amplitudes exceeding 300 gpm, is judged to have been an important factor in the overall development.

  13. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  14. The Rate of Dielectric Breakdown Weathering of Lunar Regolith in Permanently Shadowed Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Large solar energetic particle events may cause dielectric breakdown in the upper 1 mm of regolith in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). We estimate how the resulting breakdown weathering compares to meteoroid impact weathering. Although the SEP event rates measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) are too low for breakdown to have significantly affected the regolith over the duration of the LRO mission, regolith gardened by meteoroid impacts has been exposed to SEPs for approx.10(exp 6 yr. Therefore, we estimate that breakdown weathering's production rate of vapor and melt in the coldest PSRs is up to 1.8-3. 5 ×10(exp -7) kg/sq m/yr, which is comparable to that produced by meteoroid impacts. Thus, in PSRs, up to 10-25% of the regolith may have been melted or vaporized by dielectric breakdown. Breakdown weathering could also be consistent with observations of the increased porosity ("fairy castles") of PSR regolith. We also show that it is con- ceivable that breakdown-weathered material is present in Apollo soil samples. Consequently, breakdown weathering could be an important process within PSRs, and it warrants further investigation.

  15. Blueprint for Breakdown: Three Mile Island and the Media before the Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses media coverage of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant before and during the disaster. Concludes that there was a communication breakdown prior to the accident. Outlines the causes and offers suggestions for avoiding similar breakdowns in the future. (JMF)

  16. A breakdown model for the bipolar transistor to be used with circuit simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarz, A.A.; Raney, C.W.; Campbell, D.C.

    1993-08-01

    A breakdown model for the output characteristics of the bipolar transistor (bjt) has been developed. The behavioral modeling capability of PSPICE, a popular SPICE program (with Emphasis on Integrated circuits) was used to implement the macromodel. The model predicts bjt output characteristics under breakdown conditions. Experimental data was obtained to verify the macromodel. Good agreement exits between the measured and the simulated results.

  17. Interaction of Vortex Breakdown with a Flexible Fin and its Control, Phase-3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 INTERACTION OF VORTEX BREAKDOWN WITH A FLEXIBLE FIN AND ITS CONTROL, PHASE - 3 . Final Report submitted to Dr. Charbel N Raffoul Chief of Aeronautical...NUMBER F61775-01-WE006 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interaction of Vortex Breakdown with a Flexible Fin and its Control, Phase - 3 5c. PROGRAM

  18. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: I. MICROSPARKING DESCRIBED BY PASCHEN'S LAW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a study of the onset of electrical breakdown in dust layers, for hand-deposited dust layers in a parallel-plate geometry. It was found that the breakdown was an ordinary electron-avalanche process originating in voids within the dust layer and obeying Paschen...

  19. In-situ optical breakdown: studies for a large CO/sub 2/ laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; Bjurstrom, R.G.; Carpenter, J.P.; Coffelt, E.L.; Hayden, J.J.; Hebron, D.E.; McLeod, J.; Romero, V.

    1981-01-01

    We study optical breakdown from target reflected optical pulses in the Gemini laser system. We measure the retropulse fluence (or illuminance) leaving the amplifier in terms of the energy entering the breakdown region and find qualitative agreement but no quantitative agreement with theory. Particulates were observed on nucleopore filters through which gas samples were drawn.

  20. Long-distance remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Rohwetter, Philipp; Méjean, Guillaume; Yu, Jin; Salmon, Estelle; Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate remote elemental analysis at distances up to 90m, using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy scheme based on filamentation induced by the nonlinear propagation of unfocused ultrashort laser pulses. A detailed signal analysis suggests that this technique, remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy, can be extended up to the kilometer range.

  1. MICROBIAL COLONIZATION, RESPIRATION, AND BREAKDOWN OF MAPLE LEAVES ALONG A STREAM-MARSH CONTINUUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breakdown rates, macroinvertebrate and bacterial colonization, and microbial respiration were measured on decaying maple (Acer saccharum) leaves at three sites along a stream-marsh continuum. Breakdown rates (-k+-SE) were 0.0284+-0.0045 d-1 for leaves in a high-gradient, non-tida...

  2. MICROBIAL COLONIZATION, RESPIRATION AND BREAKDOWN OF MAPLE LEAVES ALONG A STREAM-MARSH CONTINUUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breakdown rates, macroinvertebrate and bacterial colonization, and microbial respiration were measured on decaying maple leaves at three sites along a stream-marsh continuum. Breakdown rates were 0.0284+/-0.0045 d-1 for leaves in a high-gradient, non-tidal stream; 0.0112 +/- 0.0...

  3. White Paper on Multicarrier Excitation of Multipactor Breakdown: A Survey of Current Methods and Research Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02548 White Paper on Multicarrier Excitation of Multipactor Breakdown: A Survey of Current Methods and...SUBTITLE White Paper on Multicarrier Excitation of Multipactor Breakdown: A Survey of Current Methods and Research Opportunities 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...verification. This white paper describes methods of assessment and possibly to mitigate multipactor for spacecraft components in multiple carrier

  4. [The breakdown of the African family: religions and migrations, dowry and polygamy].

    PubMed

    Trincaz, J; Trincaz, P

    1983-01-01

    The current breakdown of the institution of the family in Africa is examined, and the causes of this breakdown are discussed. Consideration is given to the influence of modern religions such as Christianity and Islam and of migration, with particular reference to their effect on the practice of the dowry and polygamy. (summary in ENG)

  5. The rate of dielectric breakdown weathering of lunar regolith in permanently shadowed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-02-01

    Large solar energetic particle events may cause dielectric breakdown in the upper 1 mm of regolith in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). We estimate how the resulting breakdown weathering compares to meteoroid impact weathering. Although the SEP event rates measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) are too low for breakdown to have significantly affected the regolith over the duration of the LRO mission, regolith gardened by meteoroid impacts has been exposed to SEPs for ∼106 yr. Therefore, we estimate that breakdown weathering's production rate of vapor and melt in the coldest PSRs is up to 1.8 - 3.5 ×10-7 kg m-2 yr-1 , which is comparable to that produced by meteoroid impacts. Thus, in PSRs, up to 10-25% of the regolith may have been melted or vaporized by dielectric breakdown. Breakdown weathering could also be consistent with observations of the increased porosity ("fairy castles") of PSR regolith. We also show that it is conceivable that breakdown-weathered material is present in Apollo soil samples. Consequently, breakdown weathering could be an important process within PSRs, and it warrants further investigation.

  6. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  7. Breakdown characteristics and conditioning of carbon and refractory metal electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    High voltage carbon and refractory metal electrodes employed in devices used in space, such as ion thrusters and traveling wave tubes, can be easily damaged by electrical breakdown and arcing events. Modification of the electrode surfaces due to these events can impact the voltage hold off capability of the surfaces, which could lead to additional arcing, further damage, and the potential for device failure. On the cathode-potential surface, the arc energy is deposited by all of the processes at the surface ultimately responsible for net electron emission, such as melting, vapor and particulate formation, sputtering, ion bombardment, etc. On the anode-potential surface, the energy is deposited from the plasma or electron stream that crosses the gap, which causes surface damage by local heating. In spite of this energy dependence on the damage, many systems that use arc discharges characterize the amount of material removed from the surfaces and the lifetime of the device for voltage hold-off by the amount of current that passes through the arc, or the 'Coulomb-rating'. The results of a series of tests that were preformed on the boltage hold off capability and damage to carbon-carbon composite surfaces and molybdenum surfaces due to induced arcing will be presented and discussed. Damage to the surfaces was characterized by the field emission performance after the arc initiation and SEM photographs for the different energy and coulomb-transfer arc conditions. Both conditioning and damage to the surfaces were observed, and will be related to the characteristics of the electrical breakdown.

  8. Microwave cavity diagnostics of microwave breakdown plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstrom, D.J.; Williams, M.S.

    1989-08-01

    We have performed microwave cavity perturbation measurements in the LLNL AIM facility using a 329-MHz cavity that allow us to examine in detail the plasma formation and decay processes for electron densities between approximately 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 3}. We believe these to be the lowest density plasmas ever studied in microwave breakdown experiments, and as such they allow us to determine the power and energy required to produce plasmas suitable for HF radar reflection as well as the effective lifetimes of these plasmas before re-ionization is required. Analyses of these results leads to the following conclusions. (1) For microwave breakdown pulses varying from 0.6 to 2.4 {mu}s, the threshold power required to produce measurable plasmas is 30 to 12 MW/m{sup 2} at 0.01 torr, decreasing to 3.5 to 1.8 MW/m{sup 2} at 1 to 3 torr, and then increasing to 5 to 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} at 30 torr. The threshold power in each case decreases with increasing pulse length, but the required pulse energy increases with decreasing power or increasing pulse length. (2) The effective electron density decay rates are approximately 100/s for 0.1 to 1 torr, after which they increase linearly with pressure. Thus, the useful plasma lifetimes are in the range of 20 to 40 ms at the lower pressures and decrease to about 1 ms at 30 torr. These decay rates and lifetimes are comparable to those that would exist for artificially ionized regions in the upper atmosphere. (3) The collision frequencies measured at pressures of 1 torr and above correspond to electron temperatures of 800 K or less. In fact, the inferred temperatures for p > 3 torr are below room temperature. This may be due to a contribution to the measured conductivity by negative ions.

  9. Titanium monoxide spectroscopy following laser-induced optical breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Keszler, Anna; Nemes, László; Hornkohl, James O.

    2012-07-01

    This work investigates Titanium Monoxide (TiO) in ablation-plasma by employing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with 1 to 10 TW/cm2 irradiance, pulsed, 13 nanosecond, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The analysis of TiO is based on our first accurate determination of transition line strengths for selected TiO A-X, B-X, and E-X transitions, particularly TiO A-X γ and B-X γ' bands. Electric dipole line strengths for the A3Φ-X3δ and B3Π-X3δ bands of TiO are computed. The molecular TiO spectra are observed subsequent to laser-induced breakdown (LIB). We discuss analysis of diatomic molecular spectra that may occur simultaneously with spectra originating from atomic species. Gated detection is applied to investigate the development in time of the emission spectra following LIB. Collected emission spectra allow one to infer micro-plasma parameters such as temperature and electron density. Insight into the state of the micro-plasma is gained by comparing measurements with predictions of atomic and molecular spectra. Nonlinear fitting of recorded and computed diatomic spectra provides the basis for molecular diagnostics, while atomic species may overlap and are simultaneously identified. Molecular diagnostic approaches similar to TiO have been performed for diatomic molecules such as AlO, C2, CN, CH, N2, NH, NO and OH.

  10. Review of recent theories and experiments for improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Liu Guozhi; Tang Chuanxiang; Chen Changhua; Fang Jinyong

    2011-05-15

    Dielectric window breakdown is a serious challenge in high-power microwave (HPM) transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric. Methods of improving breakdown thresholds are key challenges in HPM systems. First, the main theoretical and experimental progress is reviewed. Next, the mechanisms of multipactor suppression for periodic rectangular and triangular surface profiles by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations are surveyed. Improved HPM breakdown thresholds are demonstrated by proof-of-principle and multigigawatt experiments. The current theories and experiments of using dc magnetic field to resonantly accelerate electrons to suppress multipactor are also synthesized. These methods of periodic profiles and magnetic field may solve the key issues of HPM vacuum dielectric breakdown.

  11. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  12. Variables associated with family breakdown in healthy and obese/ overweigh adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Carla Cristina J. N.; Mora, Paula de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Valmir Aparecido; João, Camila Aparecida; João, Carolina Regina; Riccio, Ana Carolina; de Almeida, Carlos Alberto N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the presence of family breakdown factors among eutrophic and overweight/obese adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 242 students aged between 14 and 19 years old, from a public school. Each student was weighed, measured and answered a questionnaire with closed questions addressing the presence of family breakdown factors. The adolescents were divided in two groups: euthophic and overweight/obese. The answers of both groups were compared by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of the studied factors between the two groups. Comparing the number of positive answers (presence of family breakdown factors) and negative ones (absence of family breakdown factors), no difference was observed between the groups. Conclusions: The inclusion of a control group showed that factors of family breakdown, usually identified as associated with obesity in adolescents, may also be present in eutrophic adolescents. PMID:24676193

  13. Electromechanical Breakdown of Barrier-Type Anodized Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Under High Electric Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Yao, Xi

    2016-02-01

    Barrier-type anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were formed on a polished aluminum substrate via electrochemical anodization in 0.1 mol/L aqueous solution of ammonium pentaborate. Electromechanical breakdown occurred under high electric field conditions as a result of the accumulation of mechanical stress in the film-substrate system by subjecting it to rapid thermal treatment. Before the breakdown event, the electricity of the films was transported in a highly nonlinear way. Immediately after the breakdown event, dramatic cracking of the films occurred, and the cracks expanded quickly to form a mesh-like dendrite network. The breakdown strength was significantly reduced because of the electromechanical coupling effect, and was only 34% of the self-healing breakdown strength of the AAO film.

  14. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  15. DC breakdown characteristics of silicone polymer composites for HVDC insulator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byung-Jo; Seo, In-Jin; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Hwang, Young-Ho; Yang, Hai-Won

    2015-11-01

    Critical components for HVDC transmission systems are polymer insulators, which have stricter requirements that are more difficult to achieve compared to those of HVAC insulators. In this study, we investigated the optimal design of HVDC polymer insulators by using a DC electric field analysis and experiments. The physical properties of the polymer specimens were analyzed to develop an optimal HVDC polymer material, and four polymer specimens were prepared for DC breakdown experiments. Single and reverse polarity breakdown tests were conducted to analyze the effect of temperature on the breakdown strength of the polymer. In addition, electric fields were analyzed via simulations, in which a small-scale polymer insulator model was applied to prevent dielectric breakdown due to electric field concentration, with four DC operating conditions taken into consideration. The experimental results show that the electrical breakdown strength and the electric field distribution exhibit significant differences in relation to different DC polarity transition procedures.

  16. Effect of Oxidation on Localized Heat Generation and Dielectric Breakdown of Low-Density Polyethylene Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurimoto, Takao; Nagao, Masayuki; Kosaki, Masamitsu

    1995-12-01

    The effect of oxidation on localized heat generation and dielectric breakdown in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film was studied by thermography. In the non-McKeown-type epoxy-free electrode system, localized heat generation of LDPE film leading to dielectric breakdown increased and breakdown strength decreased upon oxidation. In the McKeown-type specimen, however, the breakdown strength of oxidized LDPE film is higher than that of an unoxidized one. It is considered that enhancement of the thermal process is a major factor of breakdown in the epoxy-free electrode system and that homo-space charge and/or electron scattering effect is dominant in the McKeown type specimen.

  17. Backside optimization for improving avalanche breakdown behavior of 4.5 kV IGBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoli, Tian; Jiang, Lu; Yuan, Teng; Wenliang, Zhang; Shuojin, Lu; Yangjun, Zhu

    2015-03-01

    The static avalanche breakdown behavior of 4.5 kV high-voltage IGBT is studied by theory analysis and experiment. The avalanche breakdown behaviors of the 4.5 kV IGBTs with different backside structures are investigated and compared by using the curve tracer. The results show that the snap back behavior of the breakdown waveform is related to the bipolar PNP gain, which leads to the deterioration of the breakdown voltage. There are two ways to optimize the backside structure, one is increasing the implant dose of the N+ buffer layer, the other is decreasing the implant dose of the P+ collector layer. It is found that the optimized structure is effective in suppressing the snap back behavior and improving the breakdown characteristic of high voltage IGBT. Project supported by the National Major Science and Technology Special Project of China (No. 2011ZX02503-003).

  18. Electrical breakdown properties of stainless steel and titanium electrodes in ultra-high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beukema, G. P.

    1981-02-01

    The breakdown voltage in ultra-high vacuum of stainless steel and titanium electrodes is measured as a function of the electrode separation in the range 0.05-0.80 mm. This relationship can be described by the simple equation Vb = Cda. Values for c and a are given for all electrode combinations. For titanium electrodes the current just before breakdown was about three times that for stainless steel electrodes. Comparative measurements with all combinations of stainless steel and titanium show that the cause of this difference must be sought in the anode. The microscopic breakdown field strength was a function of the emitting cathode area, as derived from Fowler-Nordheim plots. This dependence suggests that the breakdown was initiated by thermal instabilities at the anode due to field emission electrons. This is consistent with a theoretical analysis. Measurements of the pre-breakdown current allow an estimate of the number and dimensions of emitting sites.

  19. Fast shut-down protection system for radio frequency breakdown and multipactor testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, T P; Hanson, P; Michaelson, J M; Farkas, A D; Hubble, A A

    2014-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) breakdown such as multipactor or ionization breakdown is a device-limiting phenomenon for on-orbit spacecraft used for communication, navigation, or other RF payloads. Ground testing is therefore part of the qualification process for all high power components used in these space systems. This paper illustrates a shut-down protection system to be incorporated into multipactor/ionization breakdown ground testing for susceptible RF devices. This 8 channel system allows simultaneous use of different diagnostic classes and different noise floors. With initiation of a breakdown event, diagnostic signals increase above a user-specified level, which then opens an RF switch to eliminate RF power from the high power amplifier. Examples of this system in use are shown for a typical setup, illustrating the reproducibility of breakdown threshold voltages and the lack of multipactor conditioning. This system can also be utilized to prevent excessive damage to RF components in tests with sensitive or flight hardware.

  20. Stimulation of high-frequency breakdown of gas in Uragan-3M torsatron by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, I. K.; Tarasov, M. I.; Sitnikov, D. A.; Pashnev, V. K.; Lytova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments on confinement and heating of plasma in the Uragan-3M torsatron, the method of high-frequency breakdown of the working gas is used. In these experiments, in conditions of a relatively stable magnetic field, the rf power supplied to the setup chamber has a frequency close to the ion-cyclotron frequency. Such a method of gas breakdown is not always sufficiently reliable. In our experiments, preliminary ionization of the working gas by the run-away electron beam is used for stabilizing the breakdown. This work contains the results of experiments on enhancement of the runaway electron beam and on the interaction of the runaway electron beam in the Uragan-3M torsatron with the HF electromagnetic pump field. This enables us to formulate a number of recommendations for using spontaneously formed beams of accelerated particles for stimulating the rf breakdown. Our results confirm the possibility of gas breakdown by runaway electrons.

  1. Falling through the Cracks: Information Breakdowns in Critical Care Handoff Communication

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Joanna; Nguyen, Vickie; Almoosa, Khalid F.; Patel, Bela; Patel, Vimla L.

    2011-01-01

    Handoffs have been recognized as a major healthcare challenge primarily due to the breakdowns in communication that occur during transitions in care. Consequently, they are characterized as being “remarkably haphazard”. To investigate the information breakdowns in group handoff communication, we conducted a study at a large academic hospital in Texas. We used multifaceted qualitative methods such as observations, shadowing of care providers and their work activities, audio-recording of handoffs, and care provider interviews to examine the handoff communication workflow, with particular emphasis on investigating the sources of information breakdowns. Using a mixed inductive-deductive analysis approach, we identified two critical sources for information breakdowns - lack of standardization in handoff communication events and unsuccessful completion of pre-turnover coordination activities. We propose strategic solutions that can effectively help mitigate the handoff communication breakdowns. PMID:22195052

  2. A Dioxobilin-Type Fluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolite as a Transient Early Intermediate of the Dioxobilin-Branch of Chlorophyll Breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Süssenbacher, Iris; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-11-09

    Chlorophyll breakdown in higher plants occurs by the so called "PaO/phyllobilin" path. It generates two major types of phyllobilins, the characteristic 1-formyl-19-oxobilins and the more recently discovered 1,19-dioxobilins. The hypothetical branching point at which the original 1-formyl-19-oxobilins are transformed into 1,19-dioxobilins is still elusive. Here, we clarify this hypothetical crucial transition on the basis of the identification of the first natural 1,19-dioxobilin-type fluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (DFCC). This transient chlorophyll breakdown intermediate was isolated from leaf extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana at an early stage of senescence. The fleetingly existent DFCC was then shown to represent the direct precursor of the major nonfluorescent 1,19-dioxobilin that accumulated in fully senescent leaves.

  3. Want change? Call your representative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischhoff, Ilya R.

    2011-07-01

    During my tenure as an AGU Congressional Science Fellow, which began in September 2010 and continues until November 2011, my time has been shared between working with the U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resource Committee Democratic staff and in the office of Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass., ranking Democrat on the committee). I appreciate getting to work with staff, fellows, and interns who inspire me, make me laugh, and know their issues cold. Much of my work on the committee is related to fish, wildlife, oceans, lands, and water issues and is directly related to my background in ecology and evolutionary biology (I studied zebra ecology and behavior in Kenya). My assignments have included asking the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) about why it has not changed the allowed usage of certain pesticides that the National Marine Fisheries Service has found to jeopardize the recovery of endangered Pacific salmon; helping to identify research needs and management options to combat the swiftly spreading and catastrophic white nose syndrome in North American bats; and inquiring as to whether a captive-ape welfare bill, if passed without amendment, could thwart development of a vaccine to stop the Ebola virus from continuing to cause mass mortality in endangered wild apes.

  4. Study of Bulk and Elementary Screw Dislocation Assisted Reverse Breakdown in Low-Voltage (< 250 V) 4H-SiC p(sup +)n Junction Diodes--Part II: Dynamic Breakdown Properties. Part 2; Dynamic Breakdown Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Fazi, Christian

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines the dynamic reverse-breakdown characteristics of low-voltage (<250 V) small-area <5 x 10(exp -4) sq cm 4H-SiC p(sup +)n diodes subjected to nonadiabatic breakdown-bias pulsewidths ranging from 0.1 to 20 microseconds. 4H-SiC diodes with and without elementary screw dislocations exhibited positive temperature coefficient of breakdown voltage and high junction failure power densities approximately five times larger than the average failure power density of reliable silicon pn rectifiers. This result indicates that highly reliable low-voltage SiC rectifiers may be attainable despite the presence of elementary screw dislocations. However, the impact of elementary screw dislocations on other more useful 4H-SiC power device structures, such as high-voltage (>1 kV) pn junction and Schottky rectifiers, and bipolar gain devices (thyristors, IGBT's, etc.) remains to be investigated.

  5. Validation of an Academic Listening Test: Effects of "Breakdown" Tests and Test Takers' Cognitive Awareness of Listening Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Youngshin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the breakdown effect of a listening comprehension test, whether test takers are affected in comprehending lectures by impediments, and collected test takers' cognitive awareness on test tasks which contain listening breakdown factors how they perceived these impediments. In this context of the study, a "Breakdown" is a test…

  6. Did HIV contribute to the breakdown of society in Rwanda? A question worth asking.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Rwanda may represent the first example of an entire society breaking down because of the prevalence of AIDS. It was known that infection rates in Rwanda were among the highest in the world, yet few Rwandans, even those tested, were given a diagnosis. Analysts believe that this situation led to feelings of fear and despair which fueled the recent violence. It has been estimated that as many as 70% of sex workers, 30-40% of pregnant women, and 4-65% of soldiers were infected. The disease decimated the officer corps, leaving an unstable leadership and a lack of discipline. In addition, although 98% of the people in Rwanda were aware of the epidemic, only 5% changed their behavior as a result of this knowledge. Because the government failed to acknowledge AIDS as a problem, public discussion was prohibited. It is instructive that when the atrocities began, HIV/AIDS workers were among the first to be murdered. Although it will be impossible to pinpoint the amount of influence that this epidemic had on the breakdown of civilization in Rwanda, it is important to ask this question. Attention is also being paid to the appropriate strategies for dealing with AIDS in postwar conditions. Is it reasonable to hand out condoms, for example, to a population struggling with cholera? Also, how can AIDS awareness be maintained in a country which must deal with repairing the far-reaching damages of war?

  7. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of uranium and thorium powders and uranium ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E., II; Berg, John M.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Montoya, Velma M.; Le, Loan A.; Lopez, Leon N.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze depleted uranium and thorium oxide powders and uranium ore as a potential rapid in situ analysis technique in nuclear production facilities, environmental sampling, and in-field forensic applications. Material such as pressed pellets and metals, has been extensively studied using LIBS due to the high density of the material and more stable laser-induced plasma formation. Powders, on the other hand, are difficult to analyze using LIBS since ejection and removal of the powder occur in the laser interaction region. The capability of analyzing powders is important in allowing for rapid analysis of suspicious materials, environmental samples, or trace contamination on surfaces since it most closely represents field samples (soil, small particles, debris etc.). The rapid, in situ analysis of samples, including nuclear materials, also reduces costs in sample collection, transportation, sample preparation, and analysis time. Here we demonstrate the detection of actinides in oxide powders and within a uranium ore sample as both pressed pellets and powders on carbon adhesive discs for spectral comparison. The acquired LIBS spectra for both forms of the samples differ in overall intensity but yield a similar distribution of atomic emission spectral lines.

  9. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  10. Detection and classification of live and dead Escherichia coli by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Fernández-Bravo, A; Taleh, L; Biddle, J F; Melikechi, N

    2015-02-01

    A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity.

  11. Understanding the signature of rock coatings in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanza, Nina L.; Ollila, Ann M.; Cousin, Agnes; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Mangold, Nicolas; Bridges, Nathan; Cooper, Daniel; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Tokar, Robert; Hardgrove, Craig; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Jackson, Ryan S.; Clark, Benton C.; Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Nachon, Marion; Anderson, Ryan B.; Blank, Jennifer; Deans, Matthew; Delapp, Dorothea; Léveillé, Richard; McInroy, Rhonda; Martinez, Ronald; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pinet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Surface compositional features on rocks such as coatings and weathering rinds provide important information about past aqueous environments and water–rock interactions. The search for these features represents an important aspect of the Curiosity rover mission. With its unique ability to do fine-scale chemical depth profiling, the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) onboard Curiosity can be used to both identify and analyze rock surface alteration features. In this study we analyze a terrestrial manganese-rich rock varnish coating on a basalt rock in the laboratory with the ChemCam engineering model to determine the LIBS signature of a natural rock coating. Results show that there is a systematic decrease in peak heights for elements such as Mn that are abundant in the coating but not the rock. There is significant spatial variation in the relative abundance of coating elements detected by LIBS depending on where on the rock surface sampled; this is due to the variability in thickness and spatial discontinuities in the coating. Similar trends have been identified in some martian rock targets in ChemCam data, suggesting that these rocks may have coatings or weathering rinds on their surfaces.

  12. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  13. Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of scales from petroleum pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, G. H.; Rocha, A. A.; Damasceno, R. N.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L.; Palleschi, V.

    2013-09-01

    Pipeline scales from the Campos Bay Petroleum Field near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil have been analyzed by both Raman spectroscopy and by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using a double-pulse, calibration-free approach. Elements that are characteristic of petroleum (e.g. C, H, N, O, Mg, Na, Fe and V) were detected, in addition to the Ca, Al, and Si which form the matrix of the scale. The LIBS results were compared with the results of micro-Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed the nature of the incrustations inferred by the LIBS analysis. Results of this preliminary study suggest that diffusion of pipe material into the pipeline intake column plays an important role in the growth of scale. Thanks to the simplicity and relative low cost of equipment and to the fact that no special chemical pre-treatment of the samples is needed, LIBS can offer very fast acquisition of data and the possibility of in situ measurements. LIBS could thus represent an alternative or complementary method for the chemical characterization of the scales by comparison to conventional analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction or X-ray fluorescence.

  14. A review of the development of portable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovský, J.; Čermák, P.; Musset, O.; Veis, P.

    2014-11-01

    In this review, we present person-transportable laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) devices that have previously been developed and reported in the literature as well as their applications. They are compared with X-ray fluorescent (XRF) devices, which represent their strongest competition. Although LIBS devices have advantages over XRF devices, such as sensitivity to the light elements, high spatial resolution and the possibility to distinguish between different layers of the sample, there are also disadvantages and both are discussed here. Furthermore, the essential portable LIBS instrumentation (laser, spectrograph and detector) is presented, and published results related to new laser sources (diode-pumped solid-state, microchip and fiber lasers) used in LIBS are overviewed. Compared to conventional compact flashlamp pumped solid-state lasers, the new laser sources provide higher repetition rates, higher efficiency (less power consumption) and higher beam quality, resulting in higher fluences, even for lower energies, and could potentially increase the figure of merit of portable LIBS instruments. Compact spectrometers used in portable LIBS devices and their parts (spectrograph, detector) are also discussed.

  15. Sample Preparation for Repeated Measurements on a Single Liquid Droplet Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Violeta; Fantoni, Roberta; Palucci, Antonio; Ciaffi, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    We studied changes in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal intensity with the thickness of a liquid layer placed on a solid substrate, where an easily evaporating methanol sample was used. For a certain optimal liquid film thickness we obtained a manifold increase of the LIBS signal from methanol. Progressive liquid film thinning leads to a reduction and a successive disappearance of laser-induced splashes; the latter condition drastically reduces the sample consumption and allows measurements to be repeated many times on a single liquid droplet. In following, we developed two methods for actively controlled deformation, i.e., thinning of a liquid droplet (volume ∼10 µl) prior to its sampling by LIBS. Control of the droplet's height was achieved on a Si-SiO2 wafer substrate by electro-wetting in the case of water solutions or by target rotation in the case of viscous liquids. The chosen substrate also has the advantages of low cost, easy manipulation, and very high purity, thus minimizing interference with analytes. Through the droplet deformation, in a single-pulse excitation at moderate laser energy (70 mJ), we clearly detected Fe and Mn in peanut oil, which represent trace elements in edible oils (∼ 1 part per billion), according to results published in the literature.

  16. Early myelin breakdown following sural nerve crush: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A M; Canavarro, S

    2000-12-01

    In this study we describe the early changes of the myelin sheath following surgical nerve crush. We used the freeze-fracture technique to better evaluate myelin alterations during an early stage of Wallerian degeneration. Rat sural nerves were experimentally crushed and animals were sacrificed by transcardiac perfusion 30 h after surgery. Segments of the nerves were processed for routine transmission electron microscopy and freeze-fracture techniques. Our results show that 30 h after the lesion there was asynchrony in the pattern of Wallerian degeneration, with different nerve fibers exhibiting variable degrees of axon disruption. This was observed by both techniques. Careful examination of several replicas revealed early changes in myelin membranes represented by vacuolization and splitting of consecutive lamellae, rearrangement of intramembranous particles and disappearance of paranodal transverse bands associated or not with retraction of paranodal myelin terminal loops from the axolemma. These alterations are compatible with a direct injury to the myelin sheath following nerve crush. The results are discussed in terms of a similar mechanism underlying both axon and myelin breakdown.

  17. Role of the cysteine protease interpain A of Prevotella intermedia in breakdown and release of haem from haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Dominic P; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Anna; Birss, Andrew J; Potempa, Jan; Smalley, John W

    2009-12-14

    The gram-negative oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia forms an iron(III) protoporphyrin IX pigment from haemoglobin. The bacterium expresses a 90 kDa cysteine protease, InpA (interpain A), a homologue of Streptococcus pyogenes streptopain (SpeB). The role of InpA in haemoglobin breakdown and haem release was investigated. At pH 7.5, InpA mediated oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin to hydroxymethaemoglobin [in which the haem iron is oxidized to the Fe(III) state and which carries OH- as the sixth co-ordinate ligand] by limited proteolysis of globin chains as indicated by SDS/PAGE and MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization)-TOF (time-of-flight) analysis. Prolonged incubation at pH 7.5 did not result in further haemoglobin protein breakdown, but in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome (where the haem Fe atom is co-ordinated by another amino acid ligand in addition to the proximal histidine residue) resistant to degradation by InpA. InpA-mediated haem release from hydroxymethaemoglobin-agarose was minimal compared with trypsin at pH 7.5. At pH 6.0, InpA increased oxidation at a rate greater than auto-oxidation, producing aquomethaemoglobin (with water as sixth co-ordinate ligand), and resulted in its complete breakdown and haem loss. Aquomethaemoglobin proteolysis and haem release was prevented by blocking haem dissociation by ligation with azide, whereas InpA proteolysis of haem-free globin was rapid, even at pH 7.5. Both oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin and breakdown of methaemoglobin by InpA were inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane]. In summary, we conclude that InpA may play a central role in haem acquisition by mediating oxyhaemoglobin oxidation, and by degrading aquomethaemoglobin in which haem-globin affinity is weakened under acidic conditions.

  18. Evolution of specifier proteins in glucosinolate-containing plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The glucosinolate-myrosinase system is an activated chemical defense system found in plants of the Brassicales order. Glucosinolates are stored separately from their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases, in plant tissues. Upon tissue damage, e.g. by herbivory, glucosinolates and myrosinases get mixed and glucosinolates are broken down to an array of biologically active compounds of which isothiocyanates are toxic to a wide range of organisms. Specifier proteins occur in some, but not all glucosinolate-containing plants and promote the formation of biologically active non-isothiocyanate products upon myrosinase-catalyzed glucosinolate breakdown. Results Based on a phytochemical screening among representatives of the Brassicales order, we selected candidate species for identification of specifier protein cDNAs. We identified ten specifier proteins from a range of species of the Brassicaceae and assigned each of them to one of the three specifier protein types (NSP, nitrile-specifier protein, ESP, epithiospecifier protein, TFP, thiocyanate-forming protein) after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Together with nine known specifier proteins and three putative specifier proteins found in databases, we subjected the newly identified specifier proteins to phylogenetic analyses. Specifier proteins formed three major clusters, named AtNSP5-cluster, AtNSP1-cluster, and ESP/TFP cluster. Within the ESP/TFP cluster, specifier proteins grouped according to the Brassicaceae lineage they were identified from. Non-synonymous vs. synonymous substitution rate ratios suggested purifying selection to act on specifier protein genes. Conclusions Among specifier proteins, NSPs represent the ancestral activity. The data support a monophyletic origin of ESPs from NSPs. The split between NSPs and ESPs/TFPs happened before the radiation of the core Brassicaceae. Future analyses have to show if TFP activity evolved from ESPs at least twice independently in different

  19. Effect of distribution of electric field on low-pressure gas breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Yang, Shuo; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2017-02-01

    A low-pressure gas breakdown in a gap of the non-uniform electric field between two plane-parallel electrodes was studied. The experiments were specially designed to neatly separate the effect of a centered dielectric tube in between the electrodes on the breakdown from the effect of the electric field distribution determined by the electrode geometry on the breakdown. For a given electrode radius and an interelectrode distance, when the diameter of the centered dielectric tube in between the electrodes is smaller, the breakdown voltage is lower, which is most possibly as a result of the flashover more easily happening along the surface of the smaller tube on which the more charged particles are accumulated. When the dielectric tube in between the electrodes is removed, the breakdown voltage depends not only on the product of gas pressure and gap length but also on the aspect ratio of the gas gap, i.e., Ub = f(pd, d/r). Furthermore, Ub = f(pd, d/r) was proved to automatically fulfill two necessary conditions for the similar discharges in the non-uniform electric field, which implies that Ub = f(pd, d/r) is an expression of the similarity theorem in the breakdown of a gap between two plane-parallel electrodes and confirms Townsend's prediction that the general similarity theorem can be applied equally to the breakdowns in non-uniform fields.

  20. Positive and negative effects of dielectric breakdown in transformer oil based magnetic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won-Ho; Lee, Se-Hee; Lee, Sangyoup

    2012-10-15

    The transformer oil based magnetic fluids can be considered as the next-generation insulation fluids because they offer exciting new possibilities to enhance dielectric breakdown voltage as well as heat transfer performance compared to pure transformer oils. In this study, we have investigated the dielectric breakdown strength of the fluids with the various volume concentrations of nanoparticles in accordance with IEC 156 standard and have tried to find the reason for changing the dielectric breakdown voltage of the fluids from the magnetic field analysis. It was found that the dielectric breakdown voltage of pure transformer oil is around 12 kV with the gap distance of 1.5 mm. In the case of our transformer oil-based magnetic fluids with 0.08% < Φ < 0.6% (Φ means the volume concentration of magnetic nanoparticles), the dielectric breakdown voltage shows above 40 kV, which is 3.3 times higher positively than that of pure transformer oil. Negatively in the case when the volume concentration of magnetic nanoparticles is above 0.65%, the dielectric breakdown voltage decreases reversely. From the magnetic field analysis, the reason might be considered as two situations: the positive is for the conductive nanoparticles dispersed well near the electrodes, which play an important role in converting fast electrons to slow negatively charged particles, and the negative is for the agglomeration of the particles near the electrodes, which leads to the breakdown initiation.

  1. Radio frequency breakdown between structured parallel plate electrodes with a millimetric gap in low pressure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Legradic, B.; Howling, A. A.; Hollenstein, C.

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents an investigation into radio frequency (rf) breakdown for electrodes with holes or protrusions, approximating the situation in real reactors and providing a benchmark for fluid simulations. rf breakdown curves (voltage versus pressure) generally show a steep left-hand branch at low pressures and a flatter right-hand branch at higher pressures. Introducing protrusions or holes in parallel plate electrodes will lower the breakdown voltage in certain conditions. Yet experiments show that the breakdown curves are not perceptibly influenced by the increased electric field at sharp edges or ridges. Instead, both experiments and simulation show that breakdown at high pressure will occur at the protrusion providing the smallest gap, while breakdown at low pressure will occur in the aperture providing the largest gap. This holds true as long as the feature in question is wide enough. Features that are too narrow will lose too many electrons due to diffusion, either to the walls of the apertures or to the surroundings of the protrusion, which negates the effect on the breakdown voltage. The simulation developed presents a tool to aid the design of complex rf parts for dark-space shielding.

  2. Electric properties and carrier multiplication in breakdown sites in multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneemann, Matthias; Carius, Reinhard; Rau, Uwe; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2015-05-28

    This paper studies the effective electrical size and carrier multiplication of breakdown sites in multi-crystalline silicon solar cells. The local series resistance limits the current of each breakdown site and is thereby linearizing the current-voltage characteristic. This fact allows the estimation of the effective electrical diameters to be as low as 100 nm. Using a laser beam induced current (LBIC) measurement with a high spatial resolution, we find carrier multiplication factors on the order of 30 (Zener-type breakdown) and 100 (avalanche breakdown) as new lower limits. Hence, we prove that also the so-called Zener-type breakdown is followed by avalanche multiplication. We explain that previous measurements of the carrier multiplication using thermography yield results higher than unity, only if the spatial defect density is high enough, and the illumination intensity is lower than what was used for the LBIC method. The individual series resistances of the breakdown sites limit the current through these breakdown sites. Therefore, the measured multiplication factors depend on the applied voltage as well as on the injected photocurrent. Both dependencies are successfully simulated using a series-resistance-limited diode model.

  3. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya

    2009-01-22

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including 1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, 2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, 3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and 4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width.

  4. Breakdown in the organ donation process and its effect on organ availability.

    PubMed

    Razdan, Manik; Degenholtz, Howard B; Kahn, Jeremy M; Driessen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study examines the effect of breakdown in the organ donation process on the availability of transplantable organs. A process breakdown is defined as a deviation from the organ donation protocol that may jeopardize organ recovery. Methods. A retrospective analysis of donation-eligible decedents was conducted using data from an independent organ procurement organization. Adjusted effect of process breakdown on organs transplanted from an eligible decedent was examined using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results. An eligible decedent is four times more likely to become an organ donor when there is no process breakdown (adjusted OR: 4.01; 95% CI: 1.6838, 9.6414; P < 0.01) even after controlling for the decedent's age, gender, race, and whether or not a decedent had joined the state donor registry. However once the eligible decedent becomes a donor, whether or not there was a process breakdown does not affect the number of transplantable organs yielded. Overall, for every process breakdown occurring in the care of an eligible decedent, one less organ is available for transplant. Decedent's age is a strong predictor of likelihood of donation and the number of organs transplanted from a donor. Conclusion. Eliminating breakdowns in the donation process can potentially increase the number of organs available for transplant but some organs will still be lost.

  5. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  6. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGES

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  7. Breakdown Characteristics Study on an 18 Cell X-band Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Faya

    2008-11-12

    A CLIC designed 18 cells, low group velocity (2.4% to 1.0% c), X-band (11.4 GHz) accelerator structure (denoted T18) was designed at CERN, its cells were built at KEK, and it was assembled and tested at SLAC. An interesting feature of this structure is that the gradient in the last cell is about 50% higher than that in the first cell. This structure has been RF conditioned at SLAC NLCTA for about 1400 hours where it incurred about 2200 breakdowns. This paper presents the characteristics of these breakdowns, including (1) the breakdown rate dependence on gradient, pulse width and conditioning time, (2) the breakdown distribution along the structure, (3) relation between breakdown and pulsed heating dependence study and (4) electric field decay time for breakdown changing over the whole conditioning time. Overall, this structure performed very well, having a final breakdown rate of less than 1e-6/pulse/m at 106 MV/m with 230 ns pulse width.

  8. Breakdown and space charge formation in polyimide film under DC high stress at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Miyake, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, T.

    2009-08-01

    Relationship between breakdown strength and space charge formation in polyimide film under dc high stress at various temperatures is investigated using pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. Some typical results of the space charge observations show that hetero space charges are always found before breakdown. The amount of the hetero charges increase with increase of temperature or increase of applied electric field. Since the enhancement of the internal electric field in the sample by the accumulation of the hetero charges is not so large, the accumulation doesn't seem to be an immediate cause of breakdown. However since it is always observed before breakdown, it may be predictive information for breakdown. In a certain case, the breakdown occurs after voltage application for few hours. However, while we give an interval of short circuit condition after observing the hetero space charge under dc stress, the total voltage application time to breakdown is almost the same to the case without the interval. It means that the hetero space charge generation may show a kind of degradation of the material.

  9. The electrical breakdown strength of pre-stretched elastomers, with and without sample volume conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Shamsul; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Yahia Benslimane, Mohamed; Yu, Liyun; Ladegaard Skov, Anne

    2015-05-01

    In practice, the electrical breakdown strength of dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAPs) determines the upper limit for transduction. During DEAP actuation, the thickness of the elastomer decreases, and thus the electrical field increases and the breakdown process is determined by a coupled electro-mechanical failure mechanism. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms behind the electro-mechanical breakdown process is required for developing reliable transducers. In this study, two experimental configurations were used to determine the stretch dependence of the electrical breakdown strength of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers. Breakdown strength was determined for samples with and without volume conservation and was found to depend strongly on the stretch ratio and the thickness of the samples. PDMS elastomers are shown to increase breakdown strength by a factor of ∼3 when sample thickness decreases from 120 to 30 μm, while the biaxial pre-stretching (λ = 2) of samples leads similarly to an increase in breakdown strength by a factor of ∼2.5.

  10. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  11. Physical Mechanism of Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown stage of a lightning flash encompasses its first several to tens of milliseconds and it is characterized by a sequence of pulses typically detected with electric field change sensors on the ground [e.g., Villanueva et al., JGR, 99, D7, 1994]. A typical (referred to as "classical") initial breakdown pulse (IBP) has duration of tens of microseconds and it is one of the largest pulses at the beginning of a lightning flash, but a wide range of pulse durations and amplitudes also occur [e.g., Nag et al., Atmos. Res., 91, 316, 2009]. Recent results by Marshall et al. [JGR, 119, 445, 2014] suggest that IBPs should be observable in all lightning discharges. Complementarily, Stolzenburg et al. [JGR, 118, 2918, 2013] correlated individual IBPs to bursts of light that appear to be illumination of a lightning leader channel and Karunarathne et al. [JGR, 118, 7129, 2013] have determined that as a flash evolves the location of IBP sources inside the cloud coincide with the position of negative leaders as determined by a VHF lightning mapping system. In view of the above listed properties of IBPs, we have developed a new numerical model to investigate the electromagnetic signatures associated with these events and to relate them to the initial lightning leader development. The model is built on a bidirectional (zero-net-charge) lightning leader concept [e.g., Mazur and Ruhnke, JGR, 103, D18, 1998]. We simulate a finite-length finite-conductivity leader elongating in the thunderstorm electric field and we solve a set of integro-differential equations to retrieve the full dynamics of charges and currents induced in it. Our proposed approach is a generalization of the transmission-line [e.g., Nag and Rakov, JGR, 115, D20102, 2010] and electrostatic [e.g., Pasko, GRL, 41, 179, 2014] approximations used for analysis of in-cloud discharge processes. We also allow for different propagation mechanisms at the different polarity leader extremities, i.e., continuous

  12. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  13. Investigation of historical metal objects using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  14. 1D PIC-DSMC simulations of breakdown in microscale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Chris H.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Crozier, Paul S.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Musson, Lawrence C.; Hooper, Russell W.; Bettencourt, Matthew T.

    2012-11-01

    An explicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code with complex boundary conditions and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle collisions is utilized to investigate one dimensional direct current breakdown between two electrodes separated by air at STP. The simulation model includes Auger neutralization and cold field electron emission from the cathode as well as electron-neutral elastic, ionization, and excitation interactions. The simulated breakdown voltages at various electrode gap sizes are compared to experimental data and the Paschen curve. It is found that cold field electron emission can explain the breakdown voltage deviation from the Paschen curve measured for small gaps. Breakdown in large gaps proceeds over multiple ion transit timescales as electrons created via Auger neutralization of ions at the cathode quickly stream across the gap, creating new ions which accelerate towards the cathode and release another "pulse" of electrons. If the resultant pulse of electrons is larger than the initial pulse, then this process can build up a significant quasi-neutral plasma in the gap and the voltage drop across the gap will occur primarily across the (thin) sheath. Breakdown is accelerated if the electric field at the cathode surface is large enough for significant cold field emission flux, which increases the plasma density and decreases the Debye length and thus the sheath size, further increasing the electric field and cold field emission flux from the cathode surface. Breakdown in air pressure gaps was found to be sensitive to the differential scattering cross section for electron-neutral interactions. Isotropic scattering of elastic collisions results in lower breakdown voltages at moderate gaps (several mean free paths) and higher breakdown voltages for large gap sizes compared to when more accurate forward-biased scattering distributions are used. The dependence of breakdown voltage on the scattering distribution is due to a competition

  15. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    SciTech Connect

    Meshchanov, A. V.; Korshunov, A. N.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Dyatko, N. A.

    2015-08-15

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given.

  16. Lipid droplet breakdown requires Dynamin 2 for vesiculation of autolysosomal tubules in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Ryan J.; Weller, Shaun G.; Schroeder, Barbara; Krueger, Eugene W.; Chi, Susan; Casey, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are lipid storage organelles that in hepatocytes may be catabolized by autophagy for use as an energy source, but the membrane-trafficking machinery regulating such a process is poorly characterized. We hypothesized that the large GTPase Dynamin 2 (Dyn2), well known for its involvement in membrane deformation and cellular protein trafficking, could orchestrate autophagy-mediated LD breakdown. Accordingly, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of Dyn2 led to a substantial accumulation of LDs in hepatocytes. Strikingly, the targeted disruption of Dyn2 induced a dramatic four- to fivefold increase in the size of autolysosomes. Chronic or acute Dyn2 inhibition combined with nutrient deprivation stimulated the excessive tubulation of these autolysosomal compartments. Importantly, Dyn2 associated with these tubules along their length, and the tubules vesiculated and fragmented in the presence of functional Dyn2. These findings provide new evidence for the participation of the autolysosome in LD metabolism and demonstrate a novel role for dynamin in the function and maturation of an autophagic compartment. PMID:24145164

  17. Maturation-promoting factor induces nuclear envelope breakdown in cycloheximide-arrested embryos of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the effect of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) on embryonic nuclei during the early cleavage stage of Xenopus laevis development. When protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide during this stage, the embryonic cell cycle arrests in an artificially produced G2 phase-like state, after completion of one additional round of DNA synthesis. Approximately 100 nuclei can be arrested in a common cytoplasm if cytokinesis is first inhibited by cytochalasin B. Within 5 min after injection of MPF into such embryos, the nuclear envelope surrounding each nucleus disperses, as determined histologically or by immunofluorescent staining of the nuclear lamina with antilamin antiserum. The breakdown of the nuclear envelope occurs at levels of MPF comparable to or slightly lower than those required for oocyte maturation. Amplification of MPF activity, however, does not occur in the arrested egg as it does in the oocyte. These results suggest that MPF can act to advance interphase nuclei into the first events of mitosis and show that the nuclear lamina responds rapidly to MPF. PMID:6345556

  18. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  19. Functional metagenomics reveals novel pathways of prebiotic breakdown by human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Davide A; Laville, Elisabeth; Laguerre, Sandrine; Robe, Patrick; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Henrissat, Bernard; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; Monsan, Pierre; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine hosts a complex bacterial community that plays a major role in nutrition and in maintaining human health. A functional metagenomic approach was used to explore the prebiotic breakdown potential of human gut bacteria, including non-cultivated ones. Two metagenomic libraries, constructed from ileum mucosa and fecal microbiota, were screened for hydrolytic activities on the prebiotic carbohydrates inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, xylo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and lactulose. The DNA inserts of 17 clones, selected from the 167 hits that were identified, were pyrosequenced in-depth, yielding in total 407, 420 bp of metagenomic DNA. From these sequences, we discovered novel prebiotic degradation pathways containing carbohydrate transporters and hydrolysing enzymes, for which we provided the first experimental proof of function. Twenty of these proteins are encoded by genes that are also present in the gut metagenome of at least 100 subjects, whatever are their ages or their geographical origin. The sequence taxonomic assignment indicated that still unknown bacteria, for which neither culture conditions nor genome sequence are available, possess the enzymatic machinery to hydrolyse the prebiotic carbohydrates tested. The results expand the vision on how prebiotics are metabolized along the intestine, and open new perspectives for the design of functional foods.

  20. Phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide breakdown induced by ELF-EMF in Peganum harmala calli.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Maria Piera; Piatti, Elena; Fraternale, Daniele; Ricci, Donata; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Accorsi, Augusto

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of examining the response of plant cells to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), we investigated the behaviour of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PtdIns 4,5-P(2)) molecule (the precursor of the phosphoinositide signal transduction cascade) by exposing callus cells from Peganum harmala to 50 Hz, 1 gauss EMF for 10 min and by examining the level and the fatty acid composition of PtdIns 4,5-P(2) after the exposure. Our results evidenced a statistically significant decrease in PtdIns 4,5-P(2) concentrations and a different involvement of the constituting fatty acids in the induced breakdown. The manipulation of the lipid-based signalling pathway by phosphoinositide-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitors (i.e., neomycin, U-73122 and ET-18-OCH(3)) seems to support the hypothesis that, as in animals, also in plants, the cell membrane is the primary impact site of ELF electromagnetic stimulus and that this interaction could probably involve the activation of PI signal transduction pathway including a heterotrimeric G protein.