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Sample records for protein c inhibitor

  1. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  2. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  3. Discovery of Protein Phosphatase 2C Inhibitors by Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jessica P.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Flajolet, Marc; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Olson, Arthur; Greengard, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) is an archetype of the PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases, characterized by dependence on divalent magnesium or manganese cofactors, absence of known regulatory proteins, and resistance to all known Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors. We have used virtual ligand screening with the AutoDock method and the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set to identify small molecule inhibitors of PP2Cα activity at a protein substrate. These inhibitors are active in the micromolar range, and represent the first non-phosphate-based molecules found to inhibit a type 2C phosphatase. The compounds docked to three recurrent binding sites near the PP2Cα active site and displayed novel Ser/Thr phosphatase selectivity profiles. Common chemical features of these compounds may form the basis for development of a PP2C inhibitor pharmacophore and may facilitate investigation of PP2C control and cellular function. PMID:16509582

  4. Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 by Protein Kinase C*s

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Nairn, Angus C.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr35. Moreover, Ser67 of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser65 in vitro. In contrast, Ser67 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser65. Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser65 and Ser67, but not Ser65 alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser67 protects phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser65 and/or Ser67 did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser67 and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:16772299

  5. Properties and distribution of the protein inhibitor (Mr 17,000) of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J R; Gröschel-Stewart, U; Walsh, M P

    1987-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography is a powerful tool for the identification and isolation of a variety of Ca2+-binding proteins which expose a hydrophobic site(s) in the presence of Ca2+ [Gopalakrishna & Anderson (1982) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 104, 830-836; Walsh, Valentine, Ngai, Carruthers & Hollenberg (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 117-127; McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567]. Using this approach, we isolated two potent and specific protein inhibitors of protein kinase C, of 17 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567] and 12 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1986) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 14, 585-586]. Although these inhibitors were purified by Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and exhibit properties similar to those of calmodulin and related Ca2+-binding proteins, we were unable to demonstrate high-affinity Ca2+ binding to these inhibitors, using equilibrium dialysis. Protein kinase C exhibited half-maximal activity at 0.6 microM-Ca2+ in the presence of phospholipid and diacylglycerol, and complete inhibition by both inhibitors was observed over the range of Ca2+ concentrations examined (10 nM-10 microM). These observations suggest that the inhibitory action of these proteins does not require Ca2+. The inclusion of proteinase inhibitors during isolation of the kinase C inhibitors, as well as two-dimensional peptide mapping and amino acid analysis of the isolated proteins, suggested that the 12 kDa inhibitor is a proteolytic fragment of the 17 kDa protein which is generated during purification. Antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine brain 17 kDa inhibitor were shown to be specific by Western immunoblotting and the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and were used to study the tissue and species distribution of this protein. The inhibitor was found to be present in several bovine, murine, avian and human tissues, consistent with a role in the regulation of a variety of physiological

  6. Protein kinase c inhibitor attenuates cyanide toxicity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Nealley, E.W.; Song, H.; Wang, P.C.; Baskin, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    We have examined the effect of pretreatment with a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, l-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), against metabolic alterations induced by sodium cyanide (NaCN), 4.2 mg/kg, in brain of anesthetized male micropigs (6-10 kg). Brain high energy phosphates were analyzed using a 3/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic surface coil in a 4.7 Tesla horizontal bore magnet. H-7, I mg/kg, was given intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before NaCN challenge (H-7 + CN). Prior to NaCN, H-7, or H-7 + CN administration, baseline 31P resonance spectra of 1-min duration were acquired for 5-10 min, and continued for an additional 60 min following i.v. NaCN injection, each animal serving as its own control. Peaks were identified as phosphomonoester (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiester (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), based on their respective chemical shifts. Without H-7 pretreatment, NaCN effects were marked by a rising Pi and a declining PCr peak 2 min after injection, with only 2/5 of the animals surviving the 60 min experiment. Through a pretreatment period of 30 min, H-7 did not affect baseline cell energy profile as reflected by the 31P-NMR spectra, but in its presence, those changes (i.e. diminishing PCr and rising Pi peaks) elicited by NaCN were markedly blunted; 4/5 of the animals in this group survived the NaCN challenge. It is proposed that H-7, a pharmacologic inhibitor of PKC, may be useful in CN antagonism, underscoring the role of PKC in cyanide intoxication.

  7. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  8. Sangivamycin, a nucleoside analogue, is a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Bell, R M

    1988-02-01

    Protein kinase C functions prominently in cell regulation via its pleiotropic role in signal transduction processes. Certain oncogene products resemble elements involved in transmembrane signaling, elevate cellular sn-1,2-diacylglycerol second messenger levels, and activate protein kinase C. Sangivamycin was unique among the nucleoside compounds tested in its ability to potently inhibit protein kinase C activity. Inhibition was competitive with respect to ATP for both protein kinase C and the catalytic fragment of protein kinase C prepared by trypsin digestion. Sangivamycin was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to histone and lipid cofactors (phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol). Sangivamycin inhibited native protein kinase C and the catalytic fragment identically, with apparent Ki values of 11 and 15 microM, respectively. Sangivamycin was an effective an inhibitor of protein kinase C as H-7, an isoquinolinsulfonamide. Sangivamycin did not inhibit [3H]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding to protein kinase C. Sangivamycin did not exert its action through the lipid binding/regulatory domain; inhibition was not affected by the presence of lipid or detergent. Unlike H-7, sangivamycin selectively inhibited protein kinase C compared to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The discovery that protein kinase C is inhibited by sangivamycin and other antitumor agents suggests that protein kinase C may be a target for rational design of antitumor compounds. PMID:3338987

  9. Mechanism of membrane redistribution of protein kinase C by its ATP-competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Namiki, Hideo

    2007-07-15

    ATP-competitive inhibitors of PKC (protein kinase C) such as the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X, which interact with the ATP-binding site in the PKC molecule, have also been shown to affect several redistribution events of PKC. However, the reason why these inhibitors affect the redistribution is still controversial. In the present study, using immunoblot analysis and GFP (green fluorescent protein)-tagged PKC, we showed that, at commonly used concentrations, these ATP-competitive inhibitors alone induced redistribution of DAG (diacylglycerol)-sensitive PKCalpha, PKCbetaII, PKCdelta and PKCepsilon, but not atypical PKCzeta, to the endomembrane or the plasma membrane. Studies with deletion and point mutants showed that the DAG-sensitive C1 domain of PKC was required for membrane redistribution by these inhibitors. Furthermore, membrane redistribution was prevented by the aminosteroid PLC (phospholipase C) inhibitor U-73122, although an ATP-competitive inhibitor had no significant effect on acute DAG generation. Immunoblot analysis showed that an ATP-competitive inhibitor enhanced cell-permeable DAG analogue- or phorbol-ester-induced translocation of endogenous PKC. Furthermore, these inhibitors also enhanced [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding to the cytosolic fractions from PKCalpha-GFP-overexpressing cells. These results clearly demonstrate that ATP-competitive inhibitors cause redistribution of DAG-sensitive PKCs to membranes containing endogenous DAG by altering the DAG sensitivity of PKC and support the idea that the inhibitors destabilize the closed conformation of PKC and make the C1 domain accessible to DAG. Most importantly, our findings provide novel insights for the interpretation of studies using ATP-competitive inhibitors, and, especially, suggest caution about the interpretation of the relationship between the redistribution and kinase activity of PKC.

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  11. Comparison of ability of protein kinase C inhibitors to arrest cell growth and to alter cellular protein kinase C localisation.

    PubMed Central

    Courage, C.; Budworth, J.; Gescher, A.

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as the staurosporine analogues UCN-01 and CGP 41251 possess antineoplastic properties, but the mechanism of their cytostatic action is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that the ability of these compounds to arrest growth is intrinsically linked with their propensity to inhibit PKC. Compounds with varying degrees of potency and specificity for PKC were investigated in A549 and MCF-7 carcinoma cells. When the log values of drug concentration which arrested cell growth by 50% (IC50) were plotted against the logs of the IC50 values for inhibition of cytosolic PKC activity, two groups of compound could be distinguished. The group which comprised the more potent inhibitors of enzyme activity (calphostin C, staurosporine and its analogues UCN-01, RO 31-8220, CGP 41251) were the stronger growth inhibitors, whereas the weaker enzyme inhibitors (trimethylsphingosine, miltefosine, NPC-15437, H-7, H-7I) affected proliferation less potently. GF 109203X was exceptional in that it inhibited PKC with an IC50 in the 10(-8) M range, yet was only weakly cytostatic. To substantiate the role of PKC in the growth inhibition caused by these agents, cells were depleted of PKC by incubation with bryostatin 1 (1 microM). The susceptibility of these enzyme-depleted cells towards growth arrest induced by staurosporine, RO 31-8220, UCN-01 or H-7 was studied. The drug concentrations which inhibited incorporation of [3H]thymidine into PKC-depleted A549 cells by 50% were slightly, but not significantly, lower than significantly, lower than those observed in control cells. These results suggest that PKC is unlikely to play a direct role in the arrest of the growth of A549 and MCF-7 cells mediated by these agents. Staurosporine is not only a strong inhibitor of PKC but also mimics activators of this enzyme in that it elicits the cellular redistribution of certain PKC isoenzymes. The ability of kinase inhibitors other than staurosporine to exert a

  12. [Suppressive effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on tumor cell function via phosphorylation of p53 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shinozuka, K; Kunitomo, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of a p53 protein. Exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7), increased the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein, whereas exposure to a tumor promoter phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased it in vivo after incubation with mouse epidermal JB6 cells for 3 h. Exposure to a cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) activator, forskolin, did not decrease the phosphorylation of p53 protein. In the transient transfection/luciferase reporter transactivation assay, H7 slightly increased the mouse double minute (MDM) 2 reporter transactivation activity of the p53 protein after treatment for 24 h, whereas TPA completely blocked it. Exposure to H7 and a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (bis), dose-dependently reduced the lung-colonizing potential of highly metastatic B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein is inversely related to PKC activation, and also suggest that the phosphorylation of the p53 protein is involved in the function of its transcription factor. The PKC inhibitor may exhibit a potent anti-metastatic effect through the phosphorylation of wild type p53 protein and the activation of its function. PMID:11193387

  13. A Facile Inhibitor Screening of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protein Using Nanoparticle-Based RNA

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Globally, over hundreds of million people are infected with the hepatitis C virus: the global rate of death as a direct result of the hepatitis C virus has increased remarkably. For this reason, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of the hepatitis C virus is highly necessary. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide can recognize the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein specifically and sensitively. In this study, we elucidated that this biochip can analyze inhibitors to the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein using a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein. Both 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs conjugated RNA oligonucleotide. At a concentration of 0.01 μg·mL−1, 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone showed more than a 30% inhibition activity of a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system. PMID:25586033

  14. Elucidating the structural chemistry of glycosaminoglycan recognition by protein C inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, L A; Griffin, J H; Fisher, C L; Greengard, J S; Bouma, B N; España, F; Tainer, J A

    1990-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) including heparin accelerate the inhibition of serine proteases by serine protease inhibitors (serpins), an essential process in regulating blood coagulation. to analyze the molecular basis for GAG recognition by the plasma serpin protein C inhibitor (PCI; also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor 3), we have constructed a complete, energy-minimized, three-dimensional model of PCI by using the structure of homologous alpha 1-antitrypsin as a template. Sequence analysis, hydrogen-bonding environment, and shape complementarity suggested that the N-terminal residues of PCI, which are not homologous to those of alpha 1-antitrypsin, form an amphipathic alpha-helix, here designated A+ since it precedes the alpha 1-antitrypsin A helix. Electrostatic calculations revealed a single, highly positive surface region arising from both the A+ and H helices, suggesting that this two-helix motif is required for GAG binding by PCI. The dominant role of electrostatic interactions in PCI-heparin binding was confirmed by the strong ionic strength dependence of heparin stimulation. The involvement of the A+ helix in heparin binding was verified by demonstrating that an anti-PCI antibody that specifically binds the A+ peptide blocks heparin binding. Images PMID:2172989

  15. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  16. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent HIV protease inhibitor-induced atherosclerosis by ubiquitination and degradation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Emily L; Li, Xiang-An; Guerin, Theresa; Everson, William V; Wilson, Melinda E; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Greenberg, Richard N; Guo, Ling; Ross, Stuart A; Smart, Eric J

    2006-12-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are important pharmacological agents used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. One of the major disadvantages of HIV protease inhibitors is that they increase several cardiovascular risk factors, including the expression of CD36 in macrophages. The expression of CD36 in macrophages promotes the accumulation of cholesterol, the development of foam cells, and ultimately atherosclerosis. Recent studies have suggested that alpha-tocopherol can prevent HIV protease inhibitor-induced increases in macrophage CD36 levels. Because of the potential clinical utility of using alpha-tocopherol to limit some of the side effects of HIV protease inhibitors, we tested the ability of alpha-tocopherol to prevent ritonavir, a common HIV protease inhibitor, from inducing atherosclerosis in the LDL receptor (LDLR) null mouse model. Surprisingly, alpha-tocopherol did not prevent ritonavir-induced atherosclerosis. However, cotreatment with the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), didanosine or D4T, did prevent ritonavir-induced atherosclerosis. Using macrophages isolated from LDLR null mice, we demonstrated that the NRTIs prevented the upregulation of CD36 and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages. Treatment of LDLR null mice with NRTIs promoted the ubiquitination and downregulation of protein kinase Calpha (PKC). Previous studies demonstrated that HIV protease inhibitor activation of PKC was necessary for the upregulation of CD36. Importantly, the in vivo inhibition of PKC with chelerythrine prevented ritonavir-induced upregulation of CD36, accumulation of cholesterol, and the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. These novel mechanistic studies suggest that NRTIs may provide protection from one of the negative side effects associated with HIV protease inhibitors, namely the increase in CD36 levels and subsequent cholesterol accumulation and atherogenesis.

  17. Regulation of protein C inhibitor (PCI) activity by specific oxidized and negatively charged phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Malleier, Julia M; Oskolkova, Olga; Bochkov, Valery; Jerabek, Ingrid; Sokolikova, Barbora; Perkmann, Thomas; Breuss, Johannes; Binder, Bernd R; Geiger, Margarethe

    2007-06-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin with affinity for heparin and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). We analyzed the interaction of PCI with different phospholipids and their oxidized forms. PCI bound to oxidized PE (OxPE), and oxidized and unoxidized phosphatidylserine (PS) immobilized on microtiter plates and in aqueous suspension. Binding to OxPE and PS was competed by heparin, but not by the aminophospholipid-binding protein annexin V or the PCI-binding lipid retinoic acid. PS and OxPE stimulated the inhibition of activated protein C (aPC) by PCI in a Ca(++)-dependent manner, indicating that binding of both, aPC (Ca(++) dependent) and PCI (Ca(++) independent), to phospholipids is necessary. A peptide corresponding to the heparin-binding site of PCI abolished the stimulatory effect of PS on aPC inhibition. No stimulatory effect of phospholipids on aPC inhibition was seen with a PCI mutant lacking the heparin-binding site. A heparin-like effect of phospholipids (OxPE) was not seen with antithrombin III, another heparin-binding serpin, suggesting that it is specific for PCI. PCI and annexin V were found to be endogenously colocalized in atherosclerotic plaques, supporting the hypothesis that exposure of oxidized PE and/or PS may be important for the local regulation of PCI activity in vivo.

  18. Virtual screening of protein kinase C inhibitors from natural product library to modulate general anaesthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhui; Zhou, Chuixian

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and targeting PKC domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. In this study, we described a synthetic pipeline to perform high-throughput virtual screening against a large library of 3D structural natural products released recently in order to discover those potential PKC modulators. A total of 100 natural products with top scores were raised, from which 12 promising candidates were tested to determine their inhibitory potencies against PKC. As might be expected, the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed a high PKC inhibitory activity (IC50 = 64 nM), and other two tested compounds, i.e. fisetin and tetrahydropapaverine, were also highly potent with their activities at nanomolar level (IC50 = 370 and 190, respectively).

  19. N-glycans of Human Protein C Inhibitor: Tissue-Specific Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Åke; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Hreinsson, Julius; Wånggren, Kjell; Clark, Gary F.; Dell, Anne; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin type of serine protease inhibitor that is found in many tissues and fluids in human, including blood plasma, seminal plasma and urine. This inhibitor displays an unusually broad protease specificity compared with other serpins. Previous studies have shown that the N-glycan(s) and the NH2-terminus affect some blood-related functions of PCI. In this study, we have for the first time determined the N-glycan profile of seminal plasma PCI, by mass spectrometry. The N-glycan structures differed markedly compared with those of both blood-derived and urinary PCI, providing evidence that the N-glycans of PCI are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The most abundant structure (m/z 2592.9) had a composition of Fuc3Hex5HexNAc4, consistent with a core fucosylated bi-antennary glycan with terminal Lewisx. A major serine protease in semen, prostate specific antigen (PSA), was used to evaluate the effects of N-glycans and the NH2-terminus on a PCI function related to the reproductive tract. Second-order rate constants for PSA inhibition by PCI were 4.3±0.2 and 4.1±0.5 M−1s−1 for the natural full-length PCI and a form lacking six amino acids at the NH2-terminus, respectively, whereas these constants were 4.8±0.1 and 29±7 M−1s−1 for the corresponding PNGase F-treated forms. The 7–8-fold higher rate constants obtained when both the N-glycans and the NH2-terminus had been removed suggest that these structures jointly affect the rate of PSA inhibition, presumably by together hindering conformational changes of PCI required to bind to the catalytic pocket of PSA. PMID:22205989

  20. Enzastaurin (LY317615), a Protein Kinase C Beta Selective Inhibitor, Enhances Antiangiogenic Effect of Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Xiao Dakai; Tu Tianxiang; Kim, Kwang Woon; Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Tawtawy, Mohammed N.; Quarles, Chad C. Ph.D.; Lu Bo

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Angiogenesis has generated interest in oncology because of its important role in cancer growth and progression, particularly when combined with cytotoxic therapies, such as radiotherapy. Among the numerous pathways influencing vascular growth and stability, inhibition of protein kinase B(Akt) or protein kinase C(PKC) can influence tumor blood vessels within tumor microvasculature. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether PKC inhibition could sensitize lung tumors to radiation. Methods and Materials: The combination of the selective PKC{beta} inhibitor Enzastaurin (ENZ, LY317615) and ionizing radiation were used in cell culture and a mouse model of lung cancer. Lung cancer cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined using immunoblotting, cytotoxic assays including cell proliferation and clonogenic assays, and Matrigel endothelial tubule formation. In vivo, H460 lung cancer xenografts were examined for tumor vasculature and proliferation using immunohistochemistry. Results: ENZ effectively radiosensitizes HUVEC within in vitro models. Furthermore, concurrent ENZ treatment of lung cancer xenografts enhanced radiation-induced destruction of tumor vasculature and proliferation by IHC. However, tumor growth delay was not enhanced with combination treatment compared with either treatment alone. Analysis of downstream effectors revealed that HUVEC and the lung cancer cell lines differed in their response to ENZ and radiation such that only HUVEC demonstrate phosphorylated S6 suppression, which is downstream of mTOR. When ENZ was combined with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in H460 lung cancer cells, radiosensitization was observed. Conclusion: PKC appears to be crucial for angiogenesis, and its inhibition by ENZ has potential to enhance radiotherapy in vivo.

  1. Structure-based lead discovery for protein kinase C zeta inhibitor design by exploiting kinase-inhibitor complex crystal structure data and potential therapeutics for preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Cui-Juan; Li, Jie

    2014-10-14

    The protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases with a broad range of cellular targets. Members of the PKC family participate at the diverse biological events involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. The PKC isoform zeta (PKCζ) is an atypical member that has recently been found to play an essential role in promoting human uterine contractility and thus been raised as a new target for treating preterm labour and other tocolytic diseases. In this study, an integrative protocol was described to graft hundreds of inhibitor ligands from their complex crystal structures with cognate kinases into the active pocket of PKCζ and, based on the modeled structures, to evaluate the binding strength of these inhibitors to the non-cognate PKCζ receptor by using a consensus scoring strategy. A total of 32 inhibitors with top score were compiled, and eight out of them were tested for inhibitory potency against PKCζ. Consequently, five compounds, i.e. CDK6 inhibitor fisetin, PIM1 inhibitor myricetin, CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol and PknB inhibitor mitoxantrone as well as the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed high or moderate inhibitory activity on PKCζ, with IC50 values of 58 ± 9, 1.7 ± 0.4, 108 ± 17, 280 ± 47 and 0.019 ± 0.004 μM, respectively, while other three compounds, including two marketed drugs dasatinib and sunitinib as well as the Rho inhibitor fasudil, have not been detected to possess observable activity. Next, based on the modeled structure data we modified three flavonoid kinase inhibitors, i.e. fisetin, myricetin and flavopiridol, to generate a number of more potential molecular entities, two of which were found to have a moderately improved activity as compared to their parent compounds.

  2. ATPase-promoting dead end inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, M; Prorok, M; Salerno, A; Lawrence, D S

    1993-06-15

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase is a bifunctional enzyme, catalyzing the phosphorylation of the serine and threonine residues in peptides and proteins (kinase activity) as well as the phosphorylation of water (ATPase activity). We have found that several peptides, which serve as inhibitors of the kinase reaction, will either maintain or enhance the ATPase reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Positively charged dipeptides (e.g. Arg-Arg), as well as small guanidino-containing compounds (e.g. guanethidine) block protein kinase activity yet enhance ATPase activity up to 3.5-fold over that exhibited by the enzyme in the absence of these compounds. In contrast, several nonphosphorylatable peptides, whose primary sequences are based on that of a known substrate (i.e. Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly), such as Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly, Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Phe-Leu-Gly, and Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Gly, have little or no effect on the rate of the kinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of ATP. An exception to the latter observation is Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Cys-Leu-Gly, a cysteine-containing peptide that promotes the protein kinase-catalyzed ATPase reaction by 2.2-fold. We have also found that peptides that possess relatively large amino acid side chain moieties immediately following the arginine dyad (i.e. such as Phe, Tyr, Cys, or Asn at Xaa in Leu-Arg-Arg-Xaa-Ala-Leu-Gly) sharply reduce the rate of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that in the presence of peptides containing an -Arg-Arg-Ala- sequence, the enzyme-bound gamma-phosphate of ATP is relatively accessible to water. In contrast, when the latter alanine moiety is replaced by a larger residue, access by water to ATP appears to be hindered. These results indicate that certain structural features associated with the substrate or substrate analog have a profound influence on the manner by which these species interact with the protein kinase. Furthermore, the work described herein demonstrates that it is possible to block the

  3. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Muhammad Usman; Ghori, Noor-Ul-Huda; Ikram, Nazia; Adil, Abdur Rehman; Manzoor, Sadia

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. PMID:25848219

  4. Label Free Inhibitor Screening of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS5B Viral Protein Using RNA Oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun; Kim, Sang Eun; Jo, Sung-Kee

    2011-01-01

    Globally, over 170 million people (ca. 3% of the World’s population) are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which can cause serious liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, evolving into subsequent health problems. Driven by the need to detect the presence of HCV, as an essential factor in diagnostic medicine, the monitoring of viral protein has been of great interest in developing simple and reliable HCV detection methods. Despite considerable advances in viral protein detection as an HCV disease marker, the current enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based detection methods using antibody treatment have several drawbacks. To overcome this bottleneck, an RNA aptamer become to be emerged as an antibody substitute in the application of biosensor for detection of viral protein. In this study, we demonstrated a streptavidin-biotin conjugation method, namely, the RNA aptamer sensor system that can quantify viral protein with detection level of 700 pg mL−1 using a biotinylated RNA oligonucleotide on an Octet optical biosensor. Also, we showed this method can be used to screen inhibitors of viral protein rapidly and simply on a biotinylated RNA oligonucleotide biosensor. Among the inhibitors screened, (−)-Epigallocatechin gallate showed high binding inhibition effect on HCV NS5B viral protein. The proposed method can be considered a real-time monitoring method for inhibitor screening of HCV viral protein and is expected to be applicable to other types of diseases. PMID:22163979

  5. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  6. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  7. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme-inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases.

  8. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme–inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases. PMID:27677239

  9. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C

    PubMed Central

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S. Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J.; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  10. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-05-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  11. Mechanistic and kinetic characterization of hepatitis C virus NS3 protein interactions with NS4A and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Geitmann, Matthis; Dahl, Göran; Danielson, U Helena

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the interactions between ligands and immobilized full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1a NS3 have been characterized by SPR biosensor technology. The NS3 interactions for a series of NS3 protease inhibitors as well as for the NS4A cofactor, represented by a peptide corresponding to the sequence interacting with the enzyme, were found to be heterogeneous. It may represent interactions with two stable conformations of the protein. The NS3-NS4A interaction consisted of a high-affinity (K(D) = 50 nM) and a low-affinity (K(D) = 2 µM) interaction, contributing equally to the overall binding. By immobilizing NS3 alone or together with NS4A it was shown that all inhibitors had a higher affinity for NS3 in the presence of NS4A. NS4A thus has a direct effect on the binding of inhibitors to NS3 and not only on catalysis. As predicted, the mechanism-based inhibitor VX 950 exhibited a time-dependent interaction with a slow formation of a stable complex. BILN 2061 or ITMN-191 showed no signs of time-dependent interactions, but ITMN-191 had the highest affinity of the tested compounds, with both the slowest dissociation (k(off)) and fastest association rate, closely followed by BILN 2061. The k(off) for the inhibitors correlated strongly with their NS3 protease inhibitory effect as well as with their effect on replication of viral proteins in replicon cell cultures, confirming the relevance of the kinetic data. This approach for obtaining kinetic and mechanistic data for NS3 protease inhibitor and cofactor interactions is expected to be of importance for understanding the characteristics of HCV NS3 functionality as well as for anti-HCV lead discovery and optimization. PMID:21194118

  12. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine inhibits replication of human enteroviruses B and D by targeting viral protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; van der Linden, Lonneke; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Lanke, Kjerstin H W; Leyssen, Pieter; Coutard, Bruno; De Palma, Armando M; Canard, Bruno; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2013-04-01

    Although the genus Enterovirus contains many important human pathogens, there is no licensed drug for either the treatment or the prophylaxis of enterovirus infections. We report that fluoxetine (Prozac)--a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor--inhibits the replication of human enterovirus B (HEV-B) and HEV-D but does not affect the replication of HEV-A and HEV-C or human rhinovirus A or B. We show that fluoxetine interferes with viral RNA replication, and we identified viral protein 2C as the target of this compound. PMID:23335743

  14. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  15. A chemical-biological study reveals C9-type iridoids as novel heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Vassallo, Antonio; Temraz, Abeer; Cotugno, Roberta; Belisario, Maria A; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Chini, Maria G; Pisano, Claudio; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra

    2013-02-28

    The potential of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as a therapeutic target for numerous diseases has made the identification and optimization of novel Hsp90 inhibitors an emerging therapeutic strategy. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) approach was adopted to screen some iridoids for their Hsp90 α binding capability. Twenty-four iridoid derivatives, including 13 new natural compounds, were isolated from the leaves of Tabebuia argentea and petioles of Catalpa bignonioides. Their structures were elucidated by NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. By means of a panel of chemical and biological approaches, four iridoids were demonstrated to bind Hsp90 α. In particular, the dimeric iridoid argenteoside A was shown to efficiently inhibit the chaperone in biochemical and cellular assays. Our results disclose C9-type iridoids as a novel class of Hsp90 inhibitors.

  16. Complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein-friend or foe in the innate immune system?

    PubMed

    Blom, Anna M; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2004-04-01

    The complement system constitutes an important component of the defence against foreign organisms, functioning both in innate and adaptive immune systems. It is potentially harmful also to the own organism and is therefore tightly regulated by a number of membrane-bound and soluble factors. C4b-binding protein (C4BP) is a potent circulating soluble inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In recent years, the relationships between the structure of C4BP and its functions have been elucidated using a combination of computer-based molecular analysis and recombinant DNA technologies. Moreover, two novel functions have recently been ascribed to C4BP. One is the ability of C4BP to localize complement regulatory activity to the surface of apoptotic cells via its interaction with the membrane-binding vitamin K-dependent protein S. The other is the ability of C4BP to act as a survival factor for B cells due to an interaction with CD40. The complement regulatory activity of C4BP is not only beneficial because it is also explored by pathogens such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Bordetella pertussis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli K1, and Candida albicans, that bind C4BP to their surfaces. This contributes to the serum resistance and the pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this review, the structural requirements and functional importance of the interactions between C4BP and its various ligands are discussed.

  17. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  18. Structure-based Inhibitor Design for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen; Niu, Xiaogang; Jin, Fan; Liu, Zhirong; Jin, Changwen; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with various diseases and have been proposed as promising drug targets. However, conventional structure-based approaches cannot be applied directly to IDPs, due to their lack of ordered structures. Here, we describe a novel computational approach to virtually screen for compounds that can simultaneously bind to different IDP conformations. The test system used c-Myc, an oncoprotein containing a disordered basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domain that adopts a helical conformation upon binding to Myc-associated factor X (Max). For the virtual screen, we used three binding pockets in representative conformations of c-Myc370–409, which is part of the disordered bHLH-LZ domain. Seven compounds were found to directly bind c-Myc370–409 in vitro, and four inhibited the growth of the c-Myc-overexpressing cells by affecting cell cycle progression. Our approach of IDP conformation sampling, binding site identification, and virtual screening for compounds that can bind to multiple conformations provides a useful strategy for structure-based drug discovery targeting IDPs. PMID:26931396

  19. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    PubMed

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  20. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    PubMed

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer. PMID:27156192

  1. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides. PMID:24391867

  2. A Screen for Genetic Suppressor Elements of Hepatitis C Virus Identifies a Supercharged Protein Inhibitor of Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1’s anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides. PMID:24391867

  3. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides.

  4. Withaferin A is an inhibitor of endothelial protein C receptor shedding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Han, Min-Su; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-06-01

    Withaferin A (WFA), an active compound from Withania somnifera, has been widely researched for its anti-inflammatory and cardioactive properties and effects on the central nervous system. The endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) plays important roles in blood coagulation and inflammation. EPCR activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble EPCR. EPCR is shed from the cell surface, mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). In this study, we investigated the effects of WFA on the EPCR shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice and the associated signaling pathways. WFA was found to induce inhibition of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced EPCR shedding and WFA suppressed the expression and activity of TACE. In addition, treatment with WFA resulted in reduced PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of p38, extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). These results demonstrate a therapeutic potentiality of WFA as an anti-sEPCR shedding reagent against PMA and CLP-mediated EPCR shedding.

  5. Myricitrin, a nitric oxide and protein kinase C inhibitor, exerts antipsychotic-like effects in animal models.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Siba, I P; Chioca, L R; Correia, D; Vital, M A B F; Pizzolatti, M G; Santos, A R S; Andreatini, R

    2011-08-15

    Myricitrin is a nitric oxide (NO) and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor that has central nervous system activity, including anxiolytic-like action. Nitric oxide inhibitors blocked the behavioral effects of apomorphine, suggesting an antipsychotic-like effect. Furthermore, PKC inhibition reduced psychotic symptoms in acute mania patients and blocked amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting a potential antipsychotic-like effect. The present study evaluated the effects of myricitrin in animal models that assess antipsychotic-like effects (apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing and the paw test) and extrapyramidal side effects (catalepsy test and paw test). Olanzapine was used as a positive control. 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), a NOS inhibitor, and l-arginine, a NO precursor, were used to evaluate nitrergic modulation, and tamoxifen was used to test the effect of PKC inhibition. In mice, myricitrin dose-dependently and olanzapine blocked the stereotypy and climbing induced by apomorphine at doses that did not induce catalepsy. 7-Nitroindazole also blocked apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing, which were reversed by l-arginine pretreatment. l-arginine only attenuated the effects of myricitrin on apomorphine's effects. Tamoxifen also blocked apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing. In the paw test in rats, myricitrin and olanzapine increased hindlimb retraction time at doses that did not affect forelimb reaction time, whereas haloperidol affected both parameters at the same dose. Myricitrin did not induce catalepsy in the bar test. Tamoxifen did not affect hindlimb retraction time or forelimb retraction time, whereas 7-NI significantly increased hindlimb reaction time. Thus, myricitrin exhibited an antipsychotic-like profile at doses that did not induce catalepsy, and this effect may be related to nitrergic action.

  6. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  7. Protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin selectively inhibits the growth of CD79 mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tara L; Tang, Huaping; Ratsch, Boris A; Enns, Andreas; Loo, Alice; Chen, Liqing; Lenz, Peter; Waters, Nigel J; Schuler, Walter; Dörken, Bernd; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Lenz, Georg; Stegmeier, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The ABC subtype of DLBCL is associated with constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, and oncogenic lesions have been identified in its regulators, including CARD11/CARMA1 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11), A20/TNFAIP3, and CD79A/B. In this study, we offer evidence of therapeutic potential for the selective PKC (protein kinase C) inhibitor sotrastaurin (STN) in preclinical models of DLBCL. A significant fraction of ABC DLBCL cell lines exhibited strong sensitivity to STN, and we found that the molecular nature of NF-κB pathway lesions predicted responsiveness. CD79A/B mutations correlated with STN sensitivity, whereas CARD11 mutations rendered ABC DLBCL cell lines insensitive. Growth inhibitory effects of PKC inhibition correlated with NF-κB pathway inhibition and were mediated by induction of G₁-phase cell-cycle arrest and/or cell death. We found that STN produced significant antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft model of CD79A/B-mutated DLBCL. Collectively, our findings offer a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of STN in ABC DLBCL patients who harbor CD79 mutations also illustrating the necessity to stratify DLBCL patients according to their genetic abnormalities.

  8. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand protein synthesis inhibitor bindarit prevents cytoskeletal rearrangement and contraction of human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Paccosi, Sara; Giachi, Matelda; Di Gennaro, Paola; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Parenti, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Intraglomerular mesangial cells (MCs) maintain structural and functional integrity of renal glomerular microcirculation and homeostasis of mesangial matrix. Following different types of injury, MCs change their phenotype upregulating the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), changing contractile abilities and increasing the production of matrix proteins, chemokines and cytokines. CCL2 is a chemokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. Its glomerular upregulation correlates with the extent of renal damage. Bindarit is an indazolic derivative endowed with anti-inflammatory activity when tested in experimental diseases. It selectively inhibits the synthesis of inflammatory C-C chemokines including CCL2, CCL7 and CCL8. This work aims to analyse bindarit effects on ET1-, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction. Bindarit significantly reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced α-SMA upregulation. In a collagen contraction assay, bindarit reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced HRMC contraction. Within 3-6h stimulation, vinculin organization and phosphorylation was significantly impaired by bindarit in AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-stimulated cells without any effect on F-actin distribution. Conversely, p38 phosphorylation was not significantly inhibited by bindarit. Our data strengthen the importance of CCL2 on ET-1, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction, adding new insights into the cellular mechanisms responsible of bindarit protective effects in human MC dysfunction. PMID:27309675

  9. Crystal structures and mutagenesis of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases elucidate the selectivity of cantharidin and novel norcantharidin-based inhibitors of PP5C.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debasish; Swingle, Mark R; Salter, Edward A; Wood, Eric; D'Arcy, Brandon; Zivanov, Catherine; Abney, Kevin; Musiyenko, Alla; Rusin, Scott F; Kettenbach, Arminja; Yet, Larry; Schroeder, Chad E; Golden, Jennifer E; Dunham, Wade H; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Banerjee, Surajit; Forbes, David; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Honkanen, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Cantharidin is a natural toxin and an active constituent in a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat tumors. Cantharidin acts as a semi-selective inhibitor of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases. Despite sharing a common catalytic mechanism and marked structural similarity with PP1C, PP2AC and PP5C, human PP4C was found to be insensitive to the inhibitory activity of cantharidin. To explore the molecular basis for this selectivity, we synthesized and tested novel C5/C6-derivatives designed from quantum-based modeling of the interactions revealed in the co-crystal structures of PP5C in complex with cantharidin. Structure-activity relationship studies and analysis of high-resolution (1.25Å) PP5C-inhibitor co-crystal structures reveal close contacts between the inhibitor bridgehead oxygen and both a catalytic metal ion and a non-catalytic phenylalanine residue, the latter of which is substituted by tryptophan in PP4C. Quantum chemistry calculations predicted that steric clashes with the bulkier tryptophan side chain in PP4C would force all cantharidin-based inhibitors into an unfavorable binding mode, disrupting the strong coordination of active site metal ions observed in the PP5C co-crystal structures, thereby rendering PP4C insensitive to the inhibitors. This prediction was confirmed by inhibition studies employing native human PP4C. Mutation of PP5C (F446W) and PP1C (F257W), to mimic the PP4C active site, resulted in markedly suppressed sensitivity to cantharidin. These observations provide insight into the structural basis for the natural selectivity of cantharidin and provide an avenue for PP4C deselection. The novel crystal structures also provide insight into interactions that provide increased selectivity of the C5/C6 modifications for PP5C versus other PPP-family phosphatases.

  10. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  11. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Li, Jun; Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  12. Identification of Highly Potent Protein Kinase C-Related Kinase 1 Inhibitors by Virtual Screening, Binding Free Energy Rescoring, and in vitro Testing.

    PubMed

    Slynko, Inna; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Rumpf, Tobias; Klaeger, Susan; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Najar, Abdulkarim; Metzger, Eric; Kuster, Bernhard; Schüle, Roland; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2016-09-20

    Despite the considerable interest in protein kinase C-related kinase 1 (PRK1) as a target in cancer research, there is still a lack of PRK1 inhibitors with suitable selectivity profiles and physicochemical properties. To identify new PRK1 inhibitors we applied a virtual screening approach, which combines ensemble docking, minimization of the protein-ligand complex, binding free energy calculations, and application of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting in vitro activity. The developed approach was then applied in a prospective manner to screen available libraries of kinase inhibitors from Selleck and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). Compounds that showed favorable prediction were then tested in vitro for PRK1 inhibition. Some of the hits were found to inhibit PRK1 in the low-nanomolar range. Three in vitro hits were additionally tested in a mass-spectrometry-based cellular kinase profiling assay to examine selectivity. Our findings show that nanomolar and drug-like inhibitors can be identified by the virtual screening approach presented herein. The identified inhibitors are valuable tools for gaining a better understanding of PRK1 inhibition, and the identified hits can serve as starting points for further chemical optimization.

  13. Identification of Highly Potent Protein Kinase C-Related Kinase 1 Inhibitors by Virtual Screening, Binding Free Energy Rescoring, and in vitro Testing.

    PubMed

    Slynko, Inna; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Rumpf, Tobias; Klaeger, Susan; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Najar, Abdulkarim; Metzger, Eric; Kuster, Bernhard; Schüle, Roland; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2016-09-20

    Despite the considerable interest in protein kinase C-related kinase 1 (PRK1) as a target in cancer research, there is still a lack of PRK1 inhibitors with suitable selectivity profiles and physicochemical properties. To identify new PRK1 inhibitors we applied a virtual screening approach, which combines ensemble docking, minimization of the protein-ligand complex, binding free energy calculations, and application of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting in vitro activity. The developed approach was then applied in a prospective manner to screen available libraries of kinase inhibitors from Selleck and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). Compounds that showed favorable prediction were then tested in vitro for PRK1 inhibition. Some of the hits were found to inhibit PRK1 in the low-nanomolar range. Three in vitro hits were additionally tested in a mass-spectrometry-based cellular kinase profiling assay to examine selectivity. Our findings show that nanomolar and drug-like inhibitors can be identified by the virtual screening approach presented herein. The identified inhibitors are valuable tools for gaining a better understanding of PRK1 inhibition, and the identified hits can serve as starting points for further chemical optimization. PMID:27472906

  14. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  15. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  16. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species.

  17. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species. PMID:27590422

  18. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  19. PDE5 inhibitors, sildenafil and vardenafil, reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of multidrug resistance protein 7 (ATP-binding Cassette C10) transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Jiang; Sun, Yue-Li; Tiwari, Amit K; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Sodani, Kamlesh; Yang, Dong-Hua; Vispute, Saraubh G; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Chen, Si-Dong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, several groups have evaluated the ability of PDE5 inhibitors for their anticancer activities. Previously, we had shown that sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil could reverse P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1)-mediated MDR. In the present study, we determined whether these PDE5 inhibitors have the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7; ATP-binding cassette C10)-mediated MDR. We found that sildenafil and vardenafil dose-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine, while tadalafil had only a minimal effect. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that sildenafil and vardenafil increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [(3 H]-paclitaxel in HEK/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that no significant alterations of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes were found after treatment with sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These results demonstrate that sildenafil and vardenafil reverse MRP7-mediated a MDR through inhibition of the drug efflux function of MRP7. Our findings indicate a potentially novel use of PDE5 inhibitors as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in clinical practice. PMID:22578167

  20. Intrinsic resistance to selumetinib, a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation in human lung and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Troiani, T; Vecchione, L; Martinelli, E; Capasso, A; Costantino, S; Ciuffreda, L P; Morgillo, F; Vitagliano, D; D'Aiuto, E; De Palma, R; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; De Lorenzi, M; Caraglia, M; Berrino, L; Ciardiello, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: MEK is activated in ∼40% colorectal cancer (CRC) and 20–30% non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Selumetinib is a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, which is currently in clinical development. Methods: We evaluated the effects of selumetinib in vitro and in vivo in CRC and NSCLC cell lines to identify cancer cell characteristics correlating with sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Results: Five NSCLC and six CRC cell lines were treated with selumetinib and classified according to the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values as sensitive (⩽1 μℳ) or resistant (>1 μℳ). In selumetinib-sensitive cancer cell lines, selumetinib treatment induced G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and suppression of tumour growth as xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Evaluation of intracellular effector proteins and analysis of gene mutations showed no correlation with selumetinib sensitivity. Microarray gene expression profiles revealed that the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) was associated with MEK inhibitor resistance. Combined targeting of both MEK and PKA resulted in cancer cell growth inhibition of MEK inhibitor-resistant cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: This study provides molecular insights to explain resistance to an MEK inhibitor in human cancer cell lines. PMID:22569000

  1. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5. PMID:25383722

  2. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5.

  3. C646, a Novel p300/CREB-Binding Protein-Specific Inhibitor of Histone Acetyltransferase, Attenuates Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongming; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Takashita, Emi; Shoemaker, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    New strategies to develop novel broad-spectrum antiviral drugs against influenza virus infections are needed due to the emergence of antigenic variants and drug-resistant viruses. Here, we evaluated C646, a novel p300/CREB-binding protein-specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (HAT), as an anti-influenza virus agent in vitro and in vivo and explored how C646 affects the viral life cycle and host response. Our studies highlight the value of targeting HAT activity for anti-influenza drug development. PMID:26711748

  4. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein Sbi Acts as a Complement Inhibitor and Forms a Tripartite Complex with Host Complement Factor H and C3b

    PubMed Central

    van den Elsen, Jean; Burman, Julia; Hälbich, Steffi; Richter, Julia; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2008-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, similar to other pathogens, binds human complement regulators Factor H and Factor H related protein 1 (FHR-1) from human serum. Here we identify the secreted protein Sbi (Staphylococcus aureus binder of IgG) as a ligand that interacts with Factor H by a—to our knowledge—new type of interaction. Factor H binds to Sbi in combination with C3b or C3d, and forms tripartite Sbi∶C3∶Factor H complexes. Apparently, the type of C3 influences the stability of the complex; surface plasmon resonance studies revealed a higher stability of C3d complexed to Sbi, as compared to C3b or C3. As part of this tripartite complex, Factor H is functionally active and displays complement regulatory activity. Sbi, by recruiting Factor H and C3b, acts as a potent complement inhibitor, and inhibits alternative pathway-mediated lyses of rabbit erythrocytes by human serum and sera of other species. Thus, Sbi is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement components Factor H and C3 as well as IgG and β2-glycoprotein I and interferes with innate immune recognition. PMID:19112495

  5. Budd-Chiari syndrome during nephrotic relapse in a patient with resistance to activated protein C clotting inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, G; Patrassi, G; Pittarello, F; Nardellotto, A; Checchetto, S; D'Angelo, A

    1998-10-01

    It has long been known that patients with nephrotic syndrome have a hypercoagulable state, which explains the association between nephrotic syndrome, renal vein thrombosis, and thromboembolism. However, the Budd-Chiari syndrome has never been reported in nephrotic patients. This is the first report of such an association that, most likely, depended on a primary resistance to activated protein C.

  6. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways.

  7. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways. PMID:23964079

  8. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling.

  9. Mode of Action of cGMP-dependent Protein Kinase-specific Inhibitors Probed by Photoaffinity Cross-linking Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitor peptide DT-2 (YGRKKRRQRRRPPLRKKKKKH) is the most potent and selective inhibitor of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) known today. DT-2 is a construct of a PKG tight binding sequence (W45, LRKKKKKH, KI = 0.8 μm) and a membrane translocating sequence (DT-6, YGRKKRRQRRRPP, KI = 1.1 μm), that combined strongly inhibits PKG catalyzed phosphorylation (KI = 12.5 nm) with ∼1000-fold selectivity toward PKG over protein kinase A, the closest relative of PKG. However, the molecular mechanism behind this inhibition is not entirely understood. Using a combination of photoaffinity labeling, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry, we have located the binding sites of PKG-specific substrate and inhibitor peptides. Covalent linkage of a PKG-specific substrate analogue was localized in the catalytic core on residues 356–372, also known as the glycine-rich loop, essential for ATP binding. By analogy, the individual inhibitor peptides W45 and DT-6 were also found to cross-link near the glycine-rich loop, suggesting these are both substrate competitive inhibitors. A bifunctional photoreactive analogue of DT-2 was found to generate dimers of PKG. This cross-linking induced covalent PKG dimerization was not observed for an N-terminal deletion mutant of PKG, which lacks the dimerization domain. In addition, non-covalent mass spectrometry was used to determine binding stoichiometry and binding order of the inhibitor peptides. Dimeric PKG binds two W45 and DT-6 peptides, whereas only one DT-2 molecule was observed to bind to the dimeric PKG. Taken together, these findings imply that (i) the two individual components making up DT-2 are both targeted against the substrate-binding site and (ii) binding of a single DT-2 molecule inactivates both PKG monomers simultaneously, which is an indication that (iii) in cGMP-activated PKG the catalytic centers of both subunits may be in each other's proximity. PMID:19369251

  10. Effects of an AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor, compound C, on adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye; Zhou, Yi; Xu, Aimin; Wu, Donghai

    2008-09-01

    The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocyte differentiation is not completely understood. Here we reported that an AMPK inhibitor, compound C, significantly inhibited adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells in a dose dependent manner, and this inhibitory effect was primarily effective in the initial stage of differentiation. Compound C prevented the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of preadipocytes, probably by inhibiting expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)beta and delta, and subsequently blocked the expression of C/EBPalpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and transcriptional activation of genes that produce the adipocyte phenotype. AMPK activity was also suppressed by compound C treatment during the early phase of adipogenic differentiation, which indicated that suppressed activation of AMPK by compound C may inhibit the MCE process of preadipocytes. Our results suggest that compound C might serve as a useful molecule in both basic and clinical research on adipogenesis and as a potential lead compound for the treatment of obesity. PMID:18758065

  11. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15–3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  12. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15-3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations.

  13. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15-3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  14. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  15. Identification of inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, members of C-lectin type proteins, in Echis sochureki venom

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, Piotr; Calvete, Juan J.; Eble, Johannes A.; Lazarovici, Philip; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2013-05-15

    Snake venom antagonists of α2β1 integrin have been identified as members of a C-lectin type family of proteins (CLP). In the present study, we characterized three new CLPs isolated from Echis sochureki venom, which interact with this integrin. These proteins were purified using a combination of gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. Sochicetin-A and sochicetin-B potently inhibited adhesion of cells expressing α2β1 integrin and binding of isolated α2β1 ectodomain to collagen I, as well as bound to recombinant GST-α2A domain in ELISA, whereas activity of sochicetin-C in these assays was approximately two orders of magnitude lower. Structurally, sochicetin-B and sochicetin-C are typical heterodimeric αβ CLPs, whereas sochicetin-A exhibits a trimer of its subunits (αβ){sub 3} in the quaternary structure. Immobilized sochicetins supported adhesion of glioma cell lines, LN18 and LBC3, whereas in a soluble form they partially inhibited adhesion of these cells to collagen I. Glioma cells spread very poorly on sochicetin-A, showing no cytoskeleton rearrangement typical for adhesion to collagen I or fibronectin. Adhesion on CLP does not involve focal adhesion elements, such as vinculin. Sochicetin-A also inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, similar to other CLPs' action on the blood coagulation system. - Highlights: • Isolation of three novel snake venom CLPs inhibiting α2β1 integrin • Reporting hexameric CLP, sochicetin-A with anti-collagen receptor activity • CLPs antagonize the interaction of glioma cells with collagen matrix. • Sochicetin-A does not support glioma cell spreading.

  16. Inhibitory effects of C-type natriuretic peptide on the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, and secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Ying-Long; Li, Gang; Li, Bin; Liu, Yang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Ai-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on the function of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of myofibroblast marker proteins: α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), extra domain-A fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Immunofluorescence was used to examine the morphological changes; a transwell assay was used to analyze migration, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA were employed to determine the mRNA expression and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The results demonstrated that CNP significantly reduced the protein expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and suppressed the migratory ability of CFs. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of MCP-1 and PAI-1 was inhibited under the CNP treatment; and this effect was mediated by the inhibition of the ERK1/2 activity. In conclusion, CNP inhibited cardiac fibroblast differentiation and migration, and reduced the secretion of MCP-1 and PAI-1, which demonstrates novel mechanisms to explain the antifibrotic effect of CNP.

  17. Effects on coagulation and fibrinolysis induced by influenza in mice with a reduced capacity to generate activated protein C and a deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Keller, Tymen T; van der Sluijs, Koen F; de Kruif, Martijn D; Gerdes, Victor E A; Meijers, Joost C M; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom; van Gorp, Eric C M; Brandjes, Dees P M; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2006-11-24

    Influenza infections increase the risk of diseases associated with a prothrombotic state, such as venous thrombosis and atherothrombotic diseases. However, it is unclear whether influenza leads to a prothrombotic state in vivo. To determine whether influenza activates coagulation, we measured coagulation and fibrinolysis in influenza-infected C57BL/6 mice. We found that influenza increased thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and fibrinolysis. In addition, we used various anti- and prothrombotic models to study pathways involved in the influenza-induced prothrombotic state. A reduced capacity to generate activated protein C in TM(pro/pro) mice increased thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, whereas treatment with heparin decreased thrombin generation in influenza-infected C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation was not changed in hyperfibrinolytic mice, deficient in plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1(-/-)); however, increased fibrin degradation was seen. Treatment with tranexamic acid reduced fibrinolysis, but thrombin generation was unchanged. We conclude that influenza infection generates thrombin, increased by reduced levels of protein C and decreased by heparin. The fibrinolytic system appears not to be important for thrombin generation. These findings suggest that influenza leads to a prothrombotic state by coagulation activation. Heparin treatment reduces the influenza induced prothrombotic state. PMID:17068293

  18. Protein kinase Cinhibitor, Rottlerin inhibits growth and survival of mycobacteria exclusively through Shikimate kinase.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sapna; Chatterjee, Aditi; Jaiswal, Swati; Kumar, Sanjay; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Srivastava, Kishore K

    2016-09-16

    The molecular bases of disease provide exceptional prospect to translate research findings into new drugs. Nevertheless, to develop new and novel chemical entities takes huge amount of time and efforts, mainly due to the stringent processes. Therefore, drug repurposing is one of such strategies which is being used in recent times to identify new pharmacophores. The essential first step in discovery of the specific inhibitor with low toxicity is the identification and elucidation of pathways exclusive to target pathogen. One such target is the shikimate pathway, which is essential for algae, higher plants, bacteria and fungi. Since, this enzyme system is absent in higher eukaryotes and in mammals, the enzymes involved in the pathway provide an attractive target for the development of potentially selective and non toxic antimicrobial agents. Since, so far there is no specific inhibitor which is able to restrain mycobacterial shikimate pathway; we expanded the use of a known kinase inhibitor; Rottlerin, in order to predict the prototype in discovering the specific molecules against this enzyme. For the first time we have shown that Rottlerin inhibits extracellular mycobacteria by affecting Shikimate Kinase (SK) and this effect is further enhanced during the intracellular infection due to the added effect of PKC- δ down-regulation. The molecular docking of Rottlerin with both the mycobacterial SKs, corroborated the inhibition data, and revealed that the effects of SK, in slow and in fast grower mycobacteria are due to the changes in affinity of binding with the drug. PMID:27498028

  19. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Investigation of Protein Kinase C Inhibitors: Total Syntheses of (+)-Calphostin D, (+)- Phleichrome, Cercosporin and New Photoactive Perylenequinones

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Barbara J.; Dey, Sangeeta; Johnson, Steven W.; Kozlowski, Marisa C.

    2010-01-01

    The total syntheses of the PKC inhibitors (+)-calphostin D, (+)-phleichrome, cercosporin, and 10 novel perylenequinones are detailed. The highly convergent and flexible strategy developed employed an enantioselective oxidative biaryl coupling and a double cuprate epoxide opening, allowing the selective syntheses of all the possible stereoisomers in pure form. In addition, this strategy permitted rapid access to a broad range of analogs, including those not accessible from the natural products. These compounds provided a powerful means for evaluation of the perylenequinones structural features necessary to PKC activity. Simpler analogs were discovered with superior PKC inhibitory properties and superior photopotentiation in cancer cell lines relative to the more complex natural products. PMID:19489582

  5. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells.

  6. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. PMID:23790005

  7. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Inhibitors: Current and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered a serious health-care problem all over the world. A good number of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV infection are in clinical progress including NS3-4A protease inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors as well as host targeted inhibitors. Two NS3-4A protease inhibitors (telaprevir and boceprevir) have been recently approved for the treatment of hepatitis C in combination with standard of care (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin). The new therapy has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR); however, the adverse effects associated with this therapy are still the main concern. In addition to the emergence of viral resistance, other targets must be continually developed. One such underdeveloped target is the helicase portion of the HCV NS3 protein. This review article summarizes our current understanding of HCV treatment, particularly with those of NS3 inhibitors. PMID:24282816

  8. Protein Kinase C Delta (PKCδ) Affects Proliferation of Insulin-Secreting Cells by Promoting Nuclear Extrusion of the Cell Cycle Inhibitor p21Cip1/WAF1

    PubMed Central

    Ranta, Felicia; Leveringhaus, Johannes; Theilig, Dorothea; Schulz-Raffelt, Gabriele; Hennige, Anita M.; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Handrick, René; Jendrossek, Verena; Bosch, Fatima; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Background High fat diet-induced hyperglycemia and palmitate-stimulated apoptosis was prevented by specific inhibition of protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) in β-cells. To understand the role of PKCδ in more detail the impact of changes in PKCδ activity on proliferation and survival of insulin-secreting cells was analyzed under stress-free conditions. Methodology and Principal Findings Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, the effect of reduced and increased PKCδ activity on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation of insulin secreting cells was examined. Proteins were analyzed by Western blotting and by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Increased expression of wild type PKCδ (PKCδWT) significantly stimulated proliferation of INS-1E cells with concomitant reduced expression and cytosolic retraction of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1/WAF1. This nuclear extrusion was mediated by PKCδ-dependent phosphorylation of p21Cip1/WAF1 at Ser146. In kinase dead PKCδ (PKCδKN) overexpressing cells and after inhibition of endogenous PKCδ activity by rottlerin or RNA interference phosphorylation of p21Cip1/WAF1 was reduced, which favored its nuclear accumulation and apoptotic cell death of INS-1E cells. Human and mouse islet cells express p21Cip1/WAF1 with strong nuclear accumulation, while in islet cells of PKCδWT transgenic mice the inhibitor resides cytosolic. Conclusions and Significance These observations disclose PKCδ as negative regulator of p21Cip1/WAF1, which facilitates proliferation of insulin secreting cells under stress-free conditions and suggest that additional stress-induced changes push PKCδ into its known pro-apoptotic role. PMID:22216119

  9. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) Regulation of Cyclin D1 Protein Expression and Cancer Cell Anchorage-independent Growth via Its E3 Ligase-mediated Protein Phosphatase 2A/c-Jun Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruowen; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Jingjie; Gao, Jimin; Chen, Jingyuan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a well known potent inhibitor of apoptosis; however, it is also involved in other cancer cell biological behavior. In the current study, we discovered that XIAP and its E3 ligase played a crucial role in regulation of cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells. We found that deficiency of XIAP expression resulted in a marked reduction in cyclin D1 expression. Consistently, cell cycle transition and anchorage-independent cell growth were also attenuated in XIAP-deficient cancer cells compared with those of the parental wild-type cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that E3 ligase activity within the RING domain of XIAP is crucial for its ability to regulate cyclin D1 transcription, cell cycle transition, and anchorage-independent cell growth by up-regulating transactivation of c-Jun/AP-1. Moreover, we found that E3 ligase within RING domain was required for XIAP inhibition of phosphatase PP2A activity by up-regulation of PP2A phosphorylation at Tyr-307 in its catalytic subunit. Such PP2A phosphorylation and inactivation resulted in phosphorylation and activation of its downstream target c-Jun in turn leading to cyclin D1 expression. Collectively, our studies uncovered a novel function of E3 ligase activity of XIAP in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, providing significant insight into the understanding of the biomedical significance of overexpressed XIAP in cancer development, further offering a new molecular basis for utilizing XIAP E3 ligase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:23720779

  10. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1−/−) or Epac2 (Epac2−/−) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2−/− mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2−/− mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2−/− mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  11. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1(-/-)) or Epac2 (Epac2(-/-)) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2(-/-) mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2(-/-) mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2(-/-) mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  12. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  13. The many faces of protease–protein inhibitor interaction

    PubMed Central

    Otlewski, Jacek; Jelen, Filip; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Oleksy, Arkadiusz

    2005-01-01

    Proteases and their natural protein inhibitors are among the most intensively studied protein–protein complexes. There are about 30 structurally distinct inhibitor families that are able to block serine, cysteine, metallo- and aspartyl proteases. The mechanisms of inhibition can be related to the catalytic mechanism of protease action or include a mechanism-unrelated steric blockage of the active site or its neighborhood. The structural elements that are responsible for the inhibition most often include the N- or the C-terminus or exposed loop(s) either separately or in combination of several such elements. During complex formation, no major conformational changes are usually observed, but sometimes structural transitions of the inhibitor and enzyme occur. In many cases, convergent evolution, with respect to the inhibitors' parts that are responsible for the inhibition, can be inferred from comparisons of their structures or sequences, strongly suggesting that there are only limited ways to inhibit proteases by proteins. PMID:15775973

  14. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting INK4 protein p18INK4C enhance ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yingdai; Yang, Peng; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Xianmin; Zhang, Liyan; Zhang, Peng; Cheng, Haizi; Xie, Zhaojun; Hao, Sha; Dong, Fang; Ma, Shihui; Ji, Qing; Bartlow, Patrick; Ding, Yahui; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Haibin; Li, Yanxin; Cheng, Hui; Miao, Weimin; Yuan, Weiping; Yuan, Youzhong; Cheng, Tao; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Among cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors that control the G1 phase in cell cycle, only p18 and p27 can negatively regulate haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that p18 protein is a more potent inhibitor of HSC self-renewal than p27 in mouse models and its deficiency promoted HSC expansion in long-term culture. Single-cell analysis indicated that deleting p18 gene favoured self-renewing division of HSC in vitro. Based on the structure of p18 protein and in-silico screening, we further identified novel small-molecule inhibitors that can specifically block the activity of p18 protein. Our selected lead compounds were able to expand functional HSCs in a short-term culture. Thus, these putative small-molecule inhibitors for p18 protein are valuable for further dissecting the signalling pathways of stem cell self-renewal and may help develop more effective chemical agents for therapeutic expansion of HSC. PMID:25692908

  15. Expression of functional human C1 inhibitor in COS cells.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Nuijens, J H; Hack, C E

    1988-08-25

    Full length human C1 inhibitor cDNA was cloned into a vector suitable for transient expression in COS-1 cells. Transfected COS cells secreted an immunoreactive protein of Mr approximately 110,000 that appeared to be functionally equivalent to the plasma-derived protein as established by the following criteria: 1) ability to form sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with C1s, factor XIIa, and kallikrein; 2) inhibition of C1s-mediated C4 consumption; and 3) susceptibility to inactivation by the nontarget proteinase elastase. Quantitation of secreted recombinant C1 inhibitor by radioimmunoassay indicated that 72 h after transfection the level was approximately 2.2 micrograms/ml. Treatment of transfected cells with tunicamycin resulted in secretion of a protein of Mr approximately 90,000 that was also capable of complex formation with C1s.

  16. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  17. Solution structure analysis of the conformational changes that occur upon the binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide to the catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.D.; Walsh, D.A.; Olah, G.A.; Sosnick, T.R.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments have been used to examine both the secondary structure content and overall conformation, respectively, of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and to characterize the structural change that occurs upon binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide, PKI(5-22)amide. While the secondary structure of the enzyme is unaltered by the binding of PKI(5-22)amide, a large overall conformational change occurs resulting in a compaction of the enzyme that is characterized by a 2{angstrom} decrease in radius of gyration, Rg, and an 11{angstrom} decrease in the maximum linear dimension, d{sub max}. We have modeled the conformational change as a simple rotation of the upper and lower lobes of the kinase by 39{degrees} about a molecular hinge defined by Glyl25, resulting in a closure of the cleft between the two lobes of the kinase. These data are evaluated with respect to recent x-ray crystallographic studies of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CDK2 protein kinase, and the MAP kinase ERK2. In addition, the implications that these findings have for the remainder of the protein kinase family are discussed.

  18. Upregulation of cAMP-specific PDE-4 activity following ligation of the TCR complex on thymocytes is blocked by selective inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosyl kinases.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Rena, G; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms present in murine thymocytes are the cGMP-stimulated PDE activity (PDE-2) and the cAMP-specific PDE activity (PDE-4), and that these isoforms are differentially regulated following ligation of the TCR (Michie, A.M., Lobban, M. D., Mueller, T., Harnett, M. M., and Houslay, M.D. [1996] Cell. Signalling 8, 97-110). We show here that the anti-CD3-stimulated elevation in PDE-4 activity in murine thymocytes is dependent on protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated signals as the TCR-coupled increase in PDE-4 activity can be abrogated by both the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and the PKC selective inhibitors chelerythrine and staurosporine. Moreover, the PKC-activating phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) caused an increase in PDE-4 activity, similar to that observed in cells challenged with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and which was not additive with cochallenge using anti-CD3 antibodies. Both the PMA- and the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated increases in PDE-4 activity were blocked by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Despite the upregulation of PDE-4 activity consequent to TCR ligation, intracellular cAMP levels increased on challenge of thymocytes with anti-CD3 antibody, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity was also increased by TCR ligation. It is suggested that the anti-CD3-mediated increase in PDE-4 activity was owing to a rapid PKC-dependent induction of PDE-4 activity following crosslinking of the TCR complex. This identifies "crosstalk" occurring between the PKA and PKC signaling pathways initiated by ligation of the antigen receptor in murine thymocytes. That both adenylate cyclase and PDE-4 activities were increased may indicate the presence of compartmentalized cAMP responses present in these cells. PMID:9515165

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Signaling, but Not TWEAK (TNF-like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis)-triggered cIAP1 (Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 1) Degradation, Requires cIAP1 RING Dimerization and E2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Feltham, Rebecca; Moulin, Maryline; Vince, James E.; Mace, Peter D.; Wong, Wendy Wei-Lynn; Anderton, Holly; Day, Catherine L.; Vaux, David L.; Silke, John

    2010-01-01

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) proteins, cIAP1 and cIAP2, are important regulators of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (SF) signaling and are amplified in a number of tumor types. They are targeted by IAP antagonist compounds that are undergoing clinical trials. IAP antagonist compounds trigger cIAP autoubiquitylation and degradation. The TNFSF member TWEAK induces lysosomal degradation of TRAF2 and cIAPs, leading to elevated NIK levels and activation of non-canonical NF-κB. To investigate the role of the ubiquitin ligase RING domain of cIAP1 in these pathways, we used cIAP-deleted cells reconstituted with cIAP1 point mutants designed to interfere with the ability of the RING to dimerize or to interact with E2 enzymes. We show that RING dimerization and E2 binding are required for IAP antagonists to induce cIAP1 degradation and protect cells from TNF-induced cell death. The RING functions of cIAP1 are required for full TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, however, delayed activation of NF-κB still occurs in cIAP1 and -2 double knock-out cells. The RING functions of cIAP1 are also required to prevent constitutive activation of non-canonical NF-κB by targeting NIK for proteasomal degradation. However, in cIAP double knock-out cells TWEAK was still able to increase NIK levels demonstrating that NIK can be regulated by cIAP-independent pathways. Finally we show that, unlike IAP antagonists, TWEAK was able to induce degradation of cIAP1 RING mutants. These results emphasize the critical importance of the RING of cIAP1 in many signaling scenarios, but also demonstrate that in some pathways RING functions are not required. PMID:20356846

  20. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  1. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  2. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  3. A kinase inhibitor screen reveals protein kinase C-dependent endocytic recycling of ErbB2 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Tameka A; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-10-31

    ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20-30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs (α, β1, βII, and γ). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-α and PKC-δ together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-α knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-δ knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-δ but not that of PKC-α. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-α and -δ mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling.

  4. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  5. Cytokines associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease brain stimulate human glial and neuronal cell cultures to secrete early complement proteins, but not C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; De Groot, C J; Van Muiswinkel, F L; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1999-11-01

    Complement activation products C1q, C4c/d, and C3c/d in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease probably result from direct binding and activation of C1 by amyloid beta peptides. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization studies have shown that several complement factors are produced in the brain parenchyma. In the present study, cytokines that can be detected in amyloid plaques (i.e., interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were found to differentially stimulate the expression of C1 subcomponents, C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh), C4, and C3, by astrocyte and microglial cell cultures derived from postmortem adult, human brain specimens and by neuroblastoma cell lines in culture. C1r and C1s were secreted at low levels by astrocytes and neuroblastoma cell lines. Exposure of cells to IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha and to a far lesser extent IL-6, markedly upregulated C1r, C1s, and C3 production. C4 synthesis increased in response to interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-6, whereas that of C1-Inh could be stimulated only by IFN-gamma. Thus, C1-Inh production is refractory to stimulation by plaque-associated cytokines, whereas these cytokines do stimulate C1r, C1s, and also C4 and C3 secretion by astrocytes and neuronal cells in culture. In contrast to the amyloid plaque associated cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-1 alpha, and TNF-alpha, the amyloid peptide A beta 1-42 itself did not stimulate C1r and C1s synthesis by astrocytes, microglial cells, or neuroblastoma cell lines. Microglial cells were the only cell type that constitutively expressed C1q. The ability of C1q to reassociate with newly formed C1r and C1s upon activation of C1 and subsequent inactivation by C1-Inh, may enable ongoing complement activation at sites of amyloid deposition, especially when C1-Inh is consumed and not replaced.

  6. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  7. Pooled screening for antiproliferative inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Nim, Satra; Jeon, Jouhyun; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Ivarsson, Ylva; Moffat, Jason; Tarasova, Nadya; Kim, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are emerging as a promising new class of drug targets. Here, we present a novel high-throughput approach to screen inhibitors of PPIs in cells. We designed a library of 50,000 human peptide-binding motifs and used a pooled lentiviral system to express them intracellularly and screen for their effects on cell proliferation. We thereby identified inhibitors that drastically reduced the viability of a pancreatic cancer line (RWP1) while leaving a control line virtually unaffected. We identified their target interactions computationally, and validated a subset in experiments. We also discovered their potential mechanisms of action, including apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Finally, we confirmed that synthetic lipopeptide versions of our inhibitors have similarly specific and dosage-dependent effects on cancer cell growth. Our screen reveals new drug targets and peptide drug leads, and it provides a rich data set covering phenotypes for the inhibition of thousands of interactions. PMID:26900867

  8. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1) stability contributes to YM155 resistance in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-A; Park, Yong-Man; Hong, Seung-Woo; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ha-Reum; Ha, Seung-Hee; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon

    2015-04-17

    YM155, which blocks the expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, induces cell death in a variety of cancer types, including prostate, bladder, breast, leukemia, and non-small lung cancer. However, the mechanism underlying gastric cancer susceptibility and resistance to YM155 is yet to be specified. Here, we demonstrate that cIAP1 stability dictates resistance to YM155 in human gastric cancer cells. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with YM155 differentially induced cell death dependent on the stability of cIAP1 as well as survivin. Transfection with cIAP1 expression plasmids decreased cell sensitivity to YM155, whereas knockdown of endogenous cIAP1 using RNA interference enhanced sensitivity to YM155. In addition, double knockdown of survivin and cIAP1 significantly induced cell death in the YM155-resistant cell line, MKN45. We also showed that YM155 induced autoubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of cIAP1. Surprisingly, survivin affected the stability of cIAP1 through binding, contributing to cell sensitivity to YM155. Thus, our findings reveal that YM155 sensitizes human gastric cancer cells to apoptotic cell death by degrading cIAP1, and furthermore, cIAP1 in gastric cancer cells may act as a PD marker for YM155 treatment. PMID:25635055

  9. Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 1 (cIAP1) Stability Contributes to YM155 Resistance in Human Gastric Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Soo-A; Park, Yong-Man; Hong, Seung-Woo; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ha-Reum; Ha, Seung-Hee; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon

    2015-01-01

    YM155, which blocks the expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, induces cell death in a variety of cancer types, including prostate, bladder, breast, leukemia, and non-small lung cancer. However, the mechanism underlying gastric cancer susceptibility and resistance to YM155 is yet to be specified. Here, we demonstrate that cIAP1 stability dictates resistance to YM155 in human gastric cancer cells. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with YM155 differentially induced cell death dependent on the stability of cIAP1 as well as survivin. Transfection with cIAP1 expression plasmids decreased cell sensitivity to YM155, whereas knockdown of endogenous cIAP1 using RNA interference enhanced sensitivity to YM155. In addition, double knockdown of survivin and cIAP1 significantly induced cell death in the YM155-resistant cell line, MKN45. We also showed that YM155 induced autoubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of cIAP1. Surprisingly, survivin affected the stability of cIAP1 through binding, contributing to cell sensitivity to YM155. Thus, our findings reveal that YM155 sensitizes human gastric cancer cells to apoptotic cell death by degrading cIAP1, and furthermore, cIAP1 in gastric cancer cells may act as a PD marker for YM155 treatment. PMID:25635055

  10. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  11. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  12. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates.

  13. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  14. Plasma levels of C1- inhibitor complexes and cleaved C1- inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Nuijens, J; Hack, E; Eerenberg, A; Frangi, D; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1990-04-01

    C1- inhibitor (C1(-)-Inh) catabolism in plasma of patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) was assessed by measuring the complexes formed by C1(-)-Inh with its target proteases (C1-s, Factor XIIa, and kallikrein) and a modified (cleaved) inactive form of C1(-)-Inh (iC1(-)-Inh). This study was performed in plasma from 18 healthy subjects and 30 patients with HANE in remission: 20 with low antigen concentration (type I) and 10 (from 5 different kindreds) with dysfunctional protein (type II). Both type-I and type-II patients had increased C1(-)-C1(-)-Inh complexes (P less than 0.0001), which in type I inversely correlated with the levels of C1(-)-Inh (P less than 0.001). iC1(-)-Inh was normal in all type-I patients and in type-II patients from three families with increased C1(-)-Inh antigen, whereas iC1(-)-Inh was higher than 20 times the normal values in patients from the remaining two families with C1(-)-Inh antigen in the normal range. None of the subjects had an increase of either Factor XIIa-C1(-)-Inh or kallikrein-C1(-)-Inh complexes. This study shows that the hypercatabolism of C1(-)-Inh in HANE patients at least in part occurs via the formation of complexes with C1- and that genetically determined differences in catabolism of dysfunctional C1(-)-Inh proteins are present in type-II patients.

  15. Chemoproteomic characterization of protein kinase inhibitors using immobilized ATP.

    PubMed

    Duncan, James S; Haystead, Timothy A J; Litchfield, David W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors have emerged as indispensable tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of specific signal transduction pathways and as promising candidates for molecular-targeted therapy. However, because many protein kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of specific protein kinases, the large number of protein kinases that are encoded within eukaryotic genomes and the existence of many other cellular proteins that bind ATP result in the prospect of off-target effects for many of these compounds. Many of the potential off-target effects remain unrecognized because protein kinase inhibitors are often developed and tested primarily on the basis of in vitro assays using purified components. To overcome this limitation, we describe a systematic approach to characterize ATP-competitive protein kinase inhibitors employing ATP-sepharose to capture the purine-binding proteome from cell extracts. Protein kinase inhibitors can be used in competition experiments to prevent binding of specific cellular proteins to ATP-sepharose or to elute bound proteins from ATP-sepharose. Collectively, these strategies can enable validation of interactions between a specific protein kinase and an inhibitor in complex mixtures and can yield the identification of inhibitor targets.

  16. Distinct Activation Mechanisms of NF-κB Regulator Inhibitor of NF-κB Kinase (IKK) by Isoforms of the Cell Death Regulator Cellular FLICE-like Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP)*

    PubMed Central

    Baratchian, Mehdi; Davis, Christopher A.; Shimizu, Akira; Escors, David; Bagnéris, Claire; Barrett, Tracey; Collins, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    The viral FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) protein from Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus activates the NF-κB pathway by forming a stable complex with a central region (amino acids 150–272) of the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKK) γ subunits, thereby activating IKK. Cellular FLIP (cFLIP) forms are also known to activate the NF-κB pathway via IKK activation. Here we demonstrate that cFLIPL, cFLIPS, and their proteolytic product p22-FLIP all require the C-terminal region of NEMO/IKKγ (amino acids 272–419) and its ubiquitin binding function for activation of the IKK kinase (or kinase complex), but none form a stable complex with IKKγ. Our results further reveal that cFLIPL requires the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex and the kinase TAK1 for activation of the IKK kinase. Similarly, cFLIPS and p22-FLIP also require TAK1 but do not require LUBAC. In contrast, these isoforms are both components of complexes that incorporate Fas-associated death domain and RIP1, which appear essential for kinase activation. This conservation of IKK activation among the cFLIP family using different mechanisms suggests that the mechanism plays a critical role in their function. PMID:26865630

  17. Distinct Activation Mechanisms of NF-κB Regulator Inhibitor of NF-κB Kinase (IKK) by Isoforms of the Cell Death Regulator Cellular FLICE-like Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP).

    PubMed

    Baratchian, Mehdi; Davis, Christopher A; Shimizu, Akira; Escors, David; Bagnéris, Claire; Barrett, Tracey; Collins, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    The viral FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) protein from Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus activates the NF-κB pathway by forming a stable complex with a central region (amino acids 150-272) of the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKK) γ subunits, thereby activating IKK. Cellular FLIP (cFLIP) forms are also known to activate the NF-κB pathway via IKK activation. Here we demonstrate that cFLIPL, cFLIPS, and their proteolytic product p22-FLIP all require the C-terminal region of NEMO/IKKγ (amino acids 272-419) and its ubiquitin binding function for activation of the IKK kinase (or kinase complex), but none form a stable complex with IKKγ. Our results further reveal that cFLIPLrequires the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex and the kinase TAK1 for activation of the IKK kinase. Similarly, cFLIPSand p22-FLIP also require TAK1 but do not require LUBAC. In contrast, these isoforms are both components of complexes that incorporate Fas-associated death domain and RIP1, which appear essential for kinase activation. This conservation of IKK activation among the cFLIP family using different mechanisms suggests that the mechanism plays a critical role in their function.

  18. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor

  19. The thiol proteinase inhibitor E-64-d ameliorates amyloid-β-induced reduction of sAPPα secretion by reversing ceramide-induced protein kinase C down-regulation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Fuminori; Nakajima, Tomoko; Ito, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), enhancing α-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is an important pathway to decrease neurotoxic amyloid β (Aβ) secretion. The α-secretase is reported to be regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and various endogenous proteins or cell surface receptors. In this report, we first examined whether Aβ reduces α-secretase activity, and showed that Aβ peptide 1-40 (0.001 and 0.01 μM) reduced the secretion of soluble amyloid precursor protein α (sAPPα) in carbachol-stimulated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. E-64-d (3 μM), which is a potent calpain inhibitor that prevents PKC degradation, ameliorated the Aβ-induced reduction of sAPPα secretion. In addition, we observed that Aβ significantly enhanced ceramide production by activating neutral sphingomyelinase. The cell-permeable ceramide analog, C2-ceramide (1 μg/mL), also reduced sAPPα secretion, and in addition, E-64-d eliminated the observed decrease of sAPPα secretion. C2-ceramide induced down-regulation of PKC-α, -β1, and -β2 isozymes in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest that ceramide may play an important role in sAPPα processing by modulating PKC activity.

  20. Physical mapping of four serpin genes: [alpha][sub 1]-antitrypsin, [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin, corticosteroid-binding globulin, and protein C inhibitor, within a 280-kb region on chromosome 14q32. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W. Univ. of Toronto, Ontario ); Walter, M.A. ); Hammond, G.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Alpha[sub 1]-antitrypsin ([alpha]1AT; protease inhibitor [PI] locus), [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin ([alpha]1ACT; AACT locus), corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG; CBG locus), and protein C inhibitor (PCI; PCI locus) are members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. A noncoding PI-like (PIL) gene has been located 12 kb 3[prime] of the PI gene. The PI, PIL, and AACT loci have been localized to 14q32.1, the CBG locus has been localized to 14q31-14q32.1, and PCI has been mapped to chromosome 14. Genetic linkage analysis suggests tight linkage between PI and AACT. The authors have used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to generate a physical map linking these five serpin genes. The order of the genetic loci is AACT/PCI-PI-PIL-CBG, with a maximum distance of about 220 kb between the AACT/PCI and PI genes. These genes form a PI cluster at 14q32.1, similar to that of the homologous genes on murine chromosome 12. The close proximity of these genes has implications for disease-association studies. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Further evidence for the interaction of mu- and delta-opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effects of the dual inhibitor of enkephalin catabolism, RB101(S). A spinal c-Fos protein study in the rat under carrageenin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Stéphanie; Catheline, Gwénaëlle; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie Claude; Roques, Bernard Pierre; Besson, Jean Marie; Buritova, Jaroslava

    2003-03-28

    We have previously shown that RB101, a dual inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, decreased carrageenin-evoked c-Fos protein expression at the spinal cord level in awake rats. Moreover, we have also shown that c-Fos expression is a useful marker of the possible direct or indirect interactions between neural pathways, such as opioid and cholecystokinin systems. We now investigated the respective roles of the three main types of opioid receptors (mu, delta, or kappa) and their possible interactions, in the depressive effects of RB101 in inflammatory nociceptive conditions induced by intraplantar carrageenin (6 mg/150 microl of saline). We used beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), naltrindole (NTI), and nor-binaltorphimine (BNI) as specific antagonists for mu, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors, respectively. c-Fos protein-immunoreactivity (c-Fos-IR) was evaluated as the number of c-Fos-IR nuclei in the lumbar spinal cord 90 min after carrageenin. c-Fos-IR nuclei were preferentially located in the superficial (I-II) and deep (V-VI) laminae of segments L4-L5 (areas containing numerous neurons responding exclusively, or not, to nociceptive stimuli). RB101(S) (30 mg/kg, i.v.) significantly reduced the total number of carrageenin-evoked c-Fos-IR nuclei (30% reduction, P<0.01). This effect was completely blocked by beta-FNA (10 mg/kg, i.v.), or NTI (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In contrast, BNI (2.5 mg/kg, i.v.) did not reverse the reducing effects of RB101(S) on carrageenin-evoked c-Fos protein expression. These results suggest that functional interactions occur between mu- and delta-opioid receptors in enkephalin-induced antinociceptive effects.

  2. Differential diagnosis of human ascites: inhibitors of the contact system and total proteins.

    PubMed

    Buø, L; Karlsrud, T S; Dyrhaug, G; Jacobsen, M B; Bell, H; Johansen, H T; Aasen, A O

    1993-09-01

    To assess their accuracies as markers for malignancy, we assayed alpha 2-macroglobulin, C1-inhibitor, alpha 1-protease inhibitor, and total proteins in ascites and plasma from patients with gastrointestinal cancer (n = 15) and non-malignant liver disease (n = 13), using functional and immunologic assays. For all inhibitors and total proteins determined in ascites, the values in the cancer group were significantly higher than the corresponding values in the group with non-malignant liver disease. The diagnostic accuracy for differentiating malignancy-related from non-malignant ascites was 93% for a alpha 1-protease inhibitor value > or = 50% of the pool plasma value and 90% for alpha 2-macroglobulin > or = 16%, C1-inhibitor > or = 40% (all functional assays), and total proteins > or = 20 g/l (biuret). In conclusion, functional assays for alpha 2-macroglobulin, C1-inhibitor, and alpha 1-protease inhibitor and determination of total proteins in ascites appeared to be very informative tests for the differential diagnosis of ascites. The test for alpha 1-protease inhibitor gave higher specificity (92% versus 77%) and likelihood ratio for a positive test (12 versus 4) compared with the other tests.

  3. Protein Kinase C (PKC)ζ Pseudosubstrate Inhibitor Peptide Promiscuously Binds PKC Family Isoforms and Disrupts Conventional PKC Targeting and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bogard, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    PKMζ is generated via an alternative transcriptional start site in the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)ζ isoform, which removes N-terminal regulatory elements, including the inhibitory pseudosubstrate domain, consequently rendering the kinase constitutively active. Persistent PKMζ activity has been proposed as a molecular mechanism for the long-term maintenance of synaptic plasticity underlying some forms of memory. Many studies supporting a role for PKMζ in synaptic plasticity and memory have relied on the PKCζ pseudosubstrate-derived ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP). However, recent studies have demonstrated that ZIP-induced impairments to synaptic plasticity and memory occur even in the absence of PKCζ, suggesting that ZIP exerts its actions via additional cellular targets. In this study, we demonstrated that ZIP interacts with conventional and novel PKC, in addition to atypical PKC isoforms. Moreover, when brain abundance of each PKC isoform and affinity for ZIP are taken into account, the signaling capacity of ZIP-responsive pools of conventional and novel PKCs may match or exceed that for atypical PKCs. Pseudosubstrate-derived peptides, like ZIP, are thought to exert their cellular action primarily by inhibiting PKC catalytic activity; however, the ZIP-sensitive catalytic core of PKC is known to participate in the enzyme’s subcellular targeting, suggesting an additional mode of ZIP action. Indeed, we have demonstrated that ZIP potently disrupts PKCα interaction with the PKC-targeting protein A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79 and interferes with ionomycin-induced translocation of conventional PKC to the plasma membrane. Thus, ZIP exhibits broad-spectrum action toward the PKC family of enzymes, and this action may contribute to its unique ability to impair memory. PMID:26199377

  4. C1 inhibitor hinge region mutations produce dysfunction by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E; Aulak, K; Parad, R B; Stecklein, H P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Kramer, J; Strunk, R C; Bissler, J; Rosen, F S

    1992-08-01

    Heterozygosity for a mutant dysfunctional C1 inhibitor protein, a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily, results in type II hereditary angioneurotic oedema. We identified a "hinge" region mutation in C1 inhibitor with a Val to Glu replacement at P14 Val-432. Recombinant C1 inhibitors P10 Ala-->Thr and P14Val-->Glu did not form stable complexes with fluid phase C1s or kallikrein. The P14 Val-->Glu mutant, however, was cleaved to a 96K form by C1s, while the P10 Ala-->Thr mutant was not. The recombinant P10 mutant also did not complex with C1s, kallikrein or beta-factor Xlla-Sepharose. The two mutations, therefore, result in dysfunction by different mechanisms: in one (P14 Val-->Glu), the inhibitor is converted to a substrate, while in the other (P10 Ala-->Thr), interaction with target protease is blocked.

  5. Characterization of C1 inhibitor binding to neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, N S; Boackle, R J; Leu, R W

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study we have isolated neutrophil membrane proteins that non-covalently bind to native C1-INH (105,000 MW) and a non-functional, degraded C1-INH (88,000 MW; C1-INH-88). To further characterize the binding nature, we have designed a novel kinetic C1 titration assay which enables not only a quantification of the removal of fluid-phase C1-INH by neutrophils, but also a concomitant measure of residual C1-INH function. Native C1-INH, when adsorbed to EDTA-pretreated neutrophils, lost its function in the inhibition of fluid-phase C1. The non-functional C1-INH-88, which is probably devoid of a reactive centre, was found to block the binding of native C1-INH to neutrophils. Pretreatment of neutrophils with serine esterase inhibitors did not abrogate binding capacity of the cells for C1-INH, whereas the binding affinity for C1-INH was lost when the cells were pretreated with trypsin. An array of human peripheral blood leucocytes and several lymphoid cell lines has surface binding sites for C1-INH, but not on human erythrocytes and U937 cells. Binding was further confirmed using (i) C1-INH-microsphere beads to neutrophils, in which the binding was blocked when pretreating neutrophils with excess C1-INH or with trypsin, and (ii) radiolabelled C1-INH to neutrophils, which was competitively blocked by unlabelled non-functional C1-INH-88. Desialylation of C1-INH significantly reduced its binding affinity for neutrophils, indicating that the membrane receptor sites on neutrophils could be specific for the binding of sialic acid residues on C1-INH. Overall, our studies indicate that neutrophils or other leucocytes possess specific surface binding sites for the sialic acid-containing portion of C1-INH. PMID:2045131

  6. A critical role for cellular inhibitor of protein 2 (cIAP2) in colitis-associated colorectal cancer and intestinal homeostasis mediated by the inflammasome and survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, M; Dupaul-Chicoine, J; Champagne, C; Skeldon, A; Morizot, A; Saleh, M

    2016-01-01

    Cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) are critical arbiters of cell death and key mediators of inflammation and innate immunity. cIAP2 is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and in regenerating crypts of ulcerative colitis patients. However, its corresponding functions in intestinal homeostasis and underlying mechanisms in disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. We found that mice deficient in cIAP2 exhibited reduced colitis-associated colorectal cancer tumor burden but, surprisingly, enhanced susceptibility to acute and chronic colitis. The exacerbated colitis phenotype of cIAP2-deficient mice was mediated by increased cell death and impaired activation of the regenerative inflammasome-interleukin-18 (IL-18) pathway required for tissue repair following injury. Accordingly, administration of recombinant IL-18 or pharmacological inhibition of caspases or the kinase RIPK1 protected cIAP2-deficient mice from colitis and restored intestinal epithelial barrier architecture. Thus, cIAP2 orchestrates intestinal homeostasis by exerting a dual function in suppressing cell death and promoting intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and crypt regeneration.

  7. c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor favors transforming growth factor-β to antagonize hepatitis B virus X protein-induced cell growth promotion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, YAN-HUI; AI, XI; LIU, FU-YAO; LIANG, HUI-FANG; ZHANG, BI-XIANG; CHEN, XIAO-PING

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces cell growth arrest in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) minimizes the tumor suppression of TGF-β signaling in early chronic hepatitis B. However, how to reverse the oncogenic effect of HBx and sustain the tumor-suppressive action of TGF-β has yet to be investigated. The present study examined the effect of TGF-β and a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor on cell growth in HCC cells with forced expression of HBx. It was found that HBx promoted cell growth via activation of the JNK/pSMAD3L pathway and inhibition of the transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TβRI)/pSMAD3C pathway. pSMAD3L/SMAD4 and pSMAD3C/SMAD4 complexes antagonized each other to regulate c-Myc expression. In the absence of HBx, TGF-β induced cell growth arrest through activation of the TβRI/pSMAD3C pathway in well-differentiated HCC cells. In the presence of HBx, TGF-β had no effect on cell growth. JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly reversed the oncogenic action of HBx and favored TGF-β to regain the ability to inhibit the cell growth in HBx-expressing well-differentiated HCC cells. In conclusion, targeting JNK signaling favors TGF-β to block HBx-induced cell growth promotion in well-differentiated HCC cells. As an adjunct to anti-viral therapy, the combination of TGF-β and inhibition of JNK signaling is a potential therapy for HBV-infected HCC. PMID:26648552

  8. c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor favors transforming growth factor-β to antagonize hepatitis B virus X protein-induced cell growth promotion in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Hui; Ai, Xi; Liu, Fu-Yao; Liang, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bi-Xiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces cell growth arrest in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) minimizes the tumor suppression of TGF-β signaling in early chronic hepatitis B. However, how to reverse the oncogenic effect of HBx and sustain the tumor-suppressive action of TGF-β has yet to be investigated. The present study examined the effect of TGF-β and a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor on cell growth in HCC cells with forced expression of HBx. It was found that HBx promoted cell growth via activation of the JNK/pSMAD3L pathway and inhibition of the transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TβRI)/pSMAD3C pathway. pSMAD3L/SMAD4 and pSMAD3C/SMAD4 complexes antagonized each other to regulate c-Myc expression. In the absence of HBx, TGF-β induced cell growth arrest through activation of the TβRI/pSMAD3C pathway in well-differentiated HCC cells. In the presence of HBx, TGF-β had no effect on cell growth. JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly reversed the oncogenic action of HBx and favored TGF-β to regain the ability to inhibit the cell growth in HBx-expressing well-differentiated HCC cells. In conclusion, targeting JNK signaling favors TGF-β to block HBx-induced cell growth promotion in well-differentiated HCC cells. As an adjunct to anti-viral therapy, the combination of TGF-β and inhibition of JNK signaling is a potential therapy for HBV-infected HCC.

  9. Complement C1-inhibitor expression in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hoozemans, J J; De Groot, C J; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1998-09-01

    In situ and in vitro studies suggest that activation of locally produced complement factors may act as a mediator between amyloid deposits and neurodegenerative changes seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh), which regulates activation of C1 of the complement classical pathway, can be detected immunohistochemically in its inactivated form in activated astrocytes and dystrophic neurites in AD plaque areas. In this study, designed to investigate the cellular source of C1-Inh, C1-Inh was found to be secreted in a functionally active form by astrocytes cultured from postmortem human brain specimens as well as by neuroblastoma cell lines. Recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which stimulates C1-Inh synthesis in various cell types, several-fold stimulated C1-Inh protein secretion by cultured human astrocytes derived from different regions of the central nervous system and by one (SK-N-SH) of two neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and IMR-32) included in this study. In contrast to IFN-gamma, other cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] that can be found in brain areas affected by AD, did not stimulate C1-Inh secretion by astrocytes or neuroblastomas in vitro. This inability to secrete C1-Inh is probably due to unresponsiveness at the transcriptional level, since C1-Inh secretion paralleled the expression of the 2.1-kb C1-Inh mRNA. In situ hybridization with a C1-Inh RNA antisense probe labeled neurons rather than astrocytes, suggesting a role for neurons as producers of complement regulatory proteins in vivo. Since IFN-gamma is apparently lacking in the brain parenchyma, and amyloid plaque-associated cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) do not stimulate C1-Inh expression in vitro, the nature of the stimulus responsible for neuronal C1-Inh expression in AD brains remains to be investigated.

  10. Structure and function of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Hack, C Erik

    2006-11-01

    C1-INH belongs to the family of serpins. Structural studies have yielded a clear understanding of the biochemical principle underlying the functional activities of these proteins. Although the crystal structure of C1-INH has yet to be revealed, homology modeling has provided a three-dimensional model of the serpin part of C1-INH. This model has helped us understand the biochemical consequences of mutations of the C1-INH gene as they occur in patients who have HAE. The structure of the N-terminal domain of C1-INH remains unknown; however, this part of the molecule is unlikely to be important in the inhibitory activity of C1-INH toward its target proteases. Mutations in this part have not been described in patients who have HAE, except for a deletion containing two cysteine residues involved in the stabilization of the serpin domain. Recent studies suggest some anti-inflammatory functions for this N-terminal part, possibly explaining the effects of C1-INH in diseases other than HAE.

  11. Protein engineering of protein kinase A catalytic subunits results in the acquisition of novel inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Niswender, Colleen M; Ishihara, R Wesley; Judge, Luke M; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M; McKnight, G Stanley

    2002-08-01

    Analysis of the role of specific protein kinases in signal transduction networks has relied heavily on ATP analog inhibitors. Currently used agents, however, often do not distinguish between kinase family members. Genetic approaches can also be used to inactivate a specific kinase, but these techniques do not afford the rapid kinetics possible with pharmacological inhibitors. To circumvent this problem, modification of the structure of a particular protein kinase can be performed to engineer a drug-target interaction of choice. We have used this method to create protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits with modifications that confer sensitivity to novel ATP analog inhibitors. Mutation of methionine 120 to alanine or glycine in either the Calpha or Cbeta subunits of PKA induces sensitivity to a series of C-3 derivatized pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-based inhibitors. Modification of threonine 183 enhances this inhibitor sensitivity. The IC(50) values in cell culture of the most broadly effective agent, 1-NM, ranged from 25 to 200 nm depending upon the combination of modified amino acids and were significantly higher than the potencies observed with H-89. Despite their high sequence conservation, Cbeta enzymes with inhibitor-sensitive amino acids at position 120 showed a substantial loss of overall catalytic activity when used to induce reporter gene transcription in transfected cells. Conversion of position 46 (lysine to isoleucine) rescued the ability of position 120 mutated Cbeta enzymes to induce gene transcription. Application of this combined genetic and pharmacological approach should allow analysis of the specific roles of PKA isoforms in cell culture and in vivo. PMID:12034735

  12. Identification of potent maturation inhibitors against HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Timalsina, Bivek; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.; Freed, Eric O.; Gaur, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to a profound improvement in the clinical care of HIV-infected patients. However, drug tolerability and the evolution of drug resistance have limited treatment options for many patients. Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents for treatment of HIV-1. They act by interfering with the maturation of the virus by blocking the last step in Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA by the viral protease (PR). The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) failed against a subset of HIV-1 isolates in clinical trials due to polymorphisms present in the CA-SP1 region of the Gag protein. Sequence analysis indicated that these polymorphisms are more common in non-clade B strains of HIV-1 such as HIV-1 clade C. Indeed, BVM was found to be ineffective against HIV-1 clade C molecular clones tested in this study. A number of BVM analogs were synthesized by chemical modifications at the C-28 position to improve its activity. The new BVM analogs displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B and C and also reduced infectivity of the virus. This study identifies novel and broadly active BVM analogs that may ultimately demonstrate efficacy in the clinic. PMID:27264714

  13. Converting potent indeno[1,2-b]indole inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 into selective inhibitors of the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Jabor Gozzi, Gustavo; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Aichele, Dagmar; Nacereddine, Abdelhamid; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Zeinyeh, Waël; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Lacoudre, Aline; Pinaud, Noël; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    A series of indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives were synthesized as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors. The most potent inhibitors contained a N(5)-isopropyl substituent on the C-ring. The same series of compounds was found to also inhibit the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 but with totally different structure-activity relationships: a N(5)-phenethyl substituent was critical, and additional hydrophobic substituents at position 7 or 8 of the D-ring or a methoxy at phenethyl position ortho or meta also contributed to inhibition. The best ABCG2 inhibitors, such as 4c, 4h, 4i, 4j, and 4k, behaved as very weak inhibitors of CK2, whereas the most potent CK2 inhibitors, such as 4a, 4p, and 4e, displayed limited interaction with ABCG2. It was therefore possible to convert, through suitable substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione scaffold, potent CK2 inhibitors into selective ABCG2 inhibitors and vice versa. In addition, some of the best ABCG2 inhibitors, which displayed a very low cytotoxicity, thus giving a high therapeutic ratio, and appeared not to be transported, constitute promising candidates for further investigations.

  14. Data in support of a central role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism in recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in the setting of high HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein using Bayesian network modeling.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Salzman, Peter; Ryan, Dan; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech; Sparks, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented that was utilized as the basis for Bayesian network modeling of influence pathways focusing on the central role of a polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) on recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in patients with high levels of HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation, "Influences on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Polymorphism-Associated Recurrent Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients with High HDL Cholesterol and Inflammation" (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]). The data consist of occurrence of recurrent coronary events in 166 post myocardial infarction patients along with 1. clinical data on gender, race, age, and body mass index; 2. blood level data on 17 biomarkers; and 3. genotype data on 53 presumptive CVD-related single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, a flow diagram of the Bayesian modeling procedure is presented along with Bayesian network subgraphs (root nodes to outcome events) utilized as the data from which PAI-2 associated influence pathways were derived (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]).

  15. Inactivation of C-1 inhibitor by proteases: demonstration by a monoclonal antibody of a neodeterminant on inactivated, non-complexed C-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; van Mierlo, G M; Hack, C E

    1987-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor and factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes. One of the monoclonal antibodies (KII) appeared to react predominantly with C-1 inhibitor complexes in an ELISA. However, the apparent binding of KII to C-1 inhibitor complexes was probably due to the presence of proteolytically inactivated C-1 inhibitor in the complex mixture used for the coating:KII did not bind either kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor or factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes generated in plasma by dextran sulphate. SDS-PAGE analysis of C-1 inhibitor incubated with proteases revealed that KII-reactive C-1 inhibitor has a lower molecular weight than native C-1 inhibitor. We propose that the determinant that reacts with KII is exposed after cleavage of C-1 inhibitor in its reactive site. The monoclonal antibody KII will enable us to study the inactivation of C-1 inhibitor in human inflammatory disease.

  16. Targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for new breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaomeng; Bai, Longchuan; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Sun, Haiying

    2012-12-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of human cancer. Research in the last two decades has identified key regulators of apoptosis, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). These critical apoptosis regulators have been targeted for the development of new cancer therapeutics. In this article, we will discuss three members of IAP proteins, namely XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, as cancer therapeutic targets and the progress made in developing new cancer therapeutic agents to target these IAP proteins.

  17. Dissection of signals controlling T cell function and activation: H7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks induction of primary T cell proliferation by suppressing interleukin (IL)2 receptor expression without affecting IL2 production.

    PubMed

    Hengel, H; Allig, B; Wagner, H; Heeg, K

    1991-07-01

    T cell activation induced via cross-linking of the T cell receptor (TcR) stimulates hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol to the second messengers diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). DAG is necessary for the activation and function of protein kinase C (PKC) which is suggested to play a key role in the cascade of signal transduction when translocated from the cytosol to the cell membrane. In this report, we investigated responses of resting vs. activated Ly-2+ and L3T4+ T lymphocytes in the presence of the PKC inhibitor H7 [1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine]. H7 inhibited the induction of primary T cell proliferation, while interleukin 2 (IL 2) production was fully retained. The effect of the PKC inhibitor on primary T cells depended on the type of ligand interacting with the TcR: increasing doses of concanavalin A or of immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not of anti-V beta 8 or of anti-TcR alpha/beta mAb, partly overcame the blockade, indicating a differential signaling compared to the former stimuli. The blockade of T cell proliferation by H7 was not due to an inhibition of PKC translocation, but occurred even 4-8 h after T cell induction and correlated with a significant reduction of IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) expression. In contrast, the mRNA levels of IL 2R and the cellular proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were not affected. On activated T cells, H7 neither blocked proliferation nor IL2R expression. Consequently, H7 dissects the signal resulting in T cell proliferation from those governing the triggering of other T cell functions, i.e. IL 2 production, during primary responses of Ly-2+ or L3T4+ murine T lymphocytes.

  18. HPLC-DAD protein kinase inhibitor analysis in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Marek; Lessig, Rüdiger; Bartels, Heidemarie

    2012-04-15

    We here describe an HPLC-DAD method to analyse different protein kinase inhibitors. Potential applications of this method are pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. Optimised chromatography conditions resulted in a very good separation of seven inhibitors (vatalanib, bosutinib, canertinib, tandutinib, pazopanib, dasatinib - internal standard and erlotinib). The good sensitivity makes this method competitive with LC/MS/MS. The separation was performed with a Lichrospher 100-5 RP8, 250 mm × 4 mm column maintained at 30 ± 1 °C, and with a mobile phase of 0.05 M H(3)PO(4)/KH(2)PO(4) (pH=2.3)-acetonitrile (7:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. A simple and fast sample preparation sequence with liquid-liquid extraction led to good recoveries (73-90%) of all analytes. The recovery hardly reached 50% only for pazopanib. This method can also be used for targeted protein kinase inhibitor quantification. A perfect linearity in the validated range (20-10,000 ng/mL) and an LOQ of 20 ng/mL were achieved. The relative standard deviations and accuracies of all examined drug concentrations gave values much lower than 15% both for between- and within-batch calculations. All analysed PKIs were stable for 6 months in a 1mg/mL dimethyl sulfoxide stock solution. Vatalanib, bosutinib and erlotinib were also stable in human serum in the whole examined concentration range. PMID:22425385

  19. Towards a Green Hydrate Inhibitor: Imaging Antifreeze Proteins on Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K.; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors. PMID:20161789

  20. Regulation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chan; Nishi, Akinori; Kansy, Janice W; Fernandez, Joseph; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Gillardon, Frank; Hemmings, Hugh C; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2007-06-01

    Inhibitor-1, the first identified endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1), was previously reported to be a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Ser67. Further investigation has revealed the presence of an additional Cdk5 site identified by mass spectrometry and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis as Ser6. Basal levels of phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, as detected by a phosphorylation state-specific antibody against the site, existed in specific regions of the brain and varied with age. In the striatum, basal in vivo phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Ser6 were mediated by Cdk5, PP-2A, and PP-1, respectively. Additionally, calcineurin contributed to dephosphorylation under conditions of high Ca2+. In biochemical assays the function of Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser6 and Ser67 was demonstrated to be an intramolecular impairment of the ability of inhibitor-1 to be dephosphorylated at Thr35; this effect was recapitulated in two systems in vivo. Dephosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Thr35 is equivalent to inactivation of the protein, as inhibitor-1 only serves as an inhibitor of PP-1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) at Thr35. Thus, inhibitor-1 serves as a critical junction between kinase- and phosphatase-signaling pathways, linking PP-1 to not only PKA and calcineurin but also Cdk5.

  1. Diarylthiophenes as inhibitors of the pore-forming protein perforin

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christian K.; Huttunen, Kristiina M.; Denny, William A.; Jaiswal, Jagdish K.; Ciccone, Annette; Browne, Kylie A.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Spicer, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution from a furan-containing high-throughput screen (HTS) hit (1) resulted in isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2) as a potent inhibitor of the function of both isolated perforin protein and perforin delivered in situ by intact KHYG-1 NK cells. In the current study, structure–activity relationship (SAR) development towards a novel series of diarylthiophene analogues has continued through the use of substituted-benzene and -pyridyl moieties as bioisosteres for 2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one (A) on a thiophene (B) -isobenzofuranone (C) scaffold. The resulting compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit perforin lytic activity in vitro. Carboxamide (23) shows a 4-fold increase over (2) in lytic activity against isolated perforin and provides good rationale for continued development within this class. PMID:26711151

  2. Developing irreversible inhibitors of the protein kinase cysteinome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Sabnis, Yogesh; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Tinghu; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Jones, Lyn H.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of approximately 530 highly conserved enzymes that transfer a γ-phosphate group from ATP to a variety of amino acid residues such as tyrosine, serine and threonine which serves as a ubiquitous mechanism for cellular signal transduction. The clinical success of a number of kinase-directed drugs and the frequent observation of disease causing mutations in protein kinases suggest that a large number of kinases may represent therapeutically relevant targets. To-date the majority of clinical and preclinical kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive, non-covalent inhibitors that achieve selectivity through recognition of unique features of particular protein kinases. Recently there has been renewed interest in the development of irreversible inhibitors that form covalent bonds with cysteine or other nucleophilic residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Irreversible kinase inhibitors have a number of potential advantages including prolonged pharmacodynamics, suitability for rational design, high potency and ability to validate pharmacological specificity through mutation of the reactive cysteine residue. Here we review recent efforts to develop cysteine-targeted irreversible protein kinase inhibitors and discuss their modes of recognizing the ATP-binding pocket and their biological activity profiles. In addition, we provided an informatics assessment of the potential ‘kinase-cysteinome’ and discuss strategies for the efficient development of new covalent inhibitors. PMID:23438744

  3. Protein kinase–inhibitor database: Structural variability of and inhibitor interactions with the protein kinase P-loop

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Doerksen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Structure based drug design of protein-kinase inhibitors has been facilitated by availability of an enormous number of structures in the Protein Databank (PDB), systematic analyses of which can provide insight into the factors which govern ligand–protein kinase interactions and into the conformational variability of the protein kinases. In this study, a non-redundant database containing 755 unique, curated and annotated PDB protein kinase–inhibitor complexes (each consisting of a single protein kinase chain, a ligand and water molecules around the ligand) was created. With this dataset, analyses were performed of protein conformational variability and interactions of ligands with 11 P-loop residues. Analysis of ligand–protein interactions included ligand atom preference, ligand–protein hydrogen bonds and the number and position of crystallographic water molecules around important P-loop residues. Analysis of variability in the conformation of the P-loop considered backbone and side-chain dihedral angles, and solvent accessible surface area (SASA). A distorted conformation of the P-loop was observed for some of the protein kinase structures. Lower SASA was observed for the hydrophobic residue in β1 of several members of the AGC family of protein kinases. Our systematic studies were performed amino-acid by amino-acid, which is unusual for analyses of protein kinase–inhibitor complexes. PMID:20681595

  4. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  5. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53.

  6. Proteasome inhibitors suppress the protein expression of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, Marianna; Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer, with almost 50% of all types of cancer expressing a mutant form of p53. p53 transactivates the expression of its primary negative regulator, HDM2. HDM2 is a ubiquitin ligase, which initiates the proteasomal degradation of p53 following ubiquitination. Proteasome inhibitors, by targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway inhibit the degradation of the majority of cellular proteins including wild-type p53. In contrast, in this study we found that the protein expression of mutant p53 was suppressed following treatment with established or novel proteasome inhibitors. Furthermore, for the first time we demonstrated that Arsenic trioxide, which was previously shown to suppress mutant p53 protein level, exhibits proteasome inhibitory activity. Proteasome inhibitor-mediated suppression of mutant p53 was partially rescued by the knockdown of HDM2, suggesting that the stabilization of HDM2 by proteasome inhibitors might be responsible for mutant p53 suppression to some extent. This study suggests that suppression of mutant p53 is a general property of proteasome inhibitors and it provides additional rationale to use proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of tumors with mutant p53. PMID:25485499

  7. Potential Roles for C1 Inhibitor in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Mel; Baldwin, William M; Jordan, Stanley C

    2016-07-01

    Complement is a major contributor to inflammation and graft injury. This system is especially important in ischemia-reperfusion injury/delayed graft function as well as in acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). The latter is increasingly recognized as a major cause of late graft loss, for which we have few effective therapies. C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) regulates several pathways which contribute to both acute and chronic graft injuries. However, C1-INH spares the alternative pathway and the membrane attack complex (C5-9) so innate antibacterial defenses remain intact. Plasma-derived C1-INH has been used to treat hereditary angioedema for more than 30 years with excellent safety. Studies with C1-INH in transplant recipients are limited, but have not revealed any unique toxicity or serious adverse events attributed to the protein. Extensive data from animal and ex vivo models suggest that C1-INH ameliorates ischemia-reperfusion injury. Initial clinical studies suggest this effect may allow transplantation of donor organs which are now discarded because the risk of primary graft dysfunction is considered too great. Although the incidence of severe early AMR is declining, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that complement is an important mediator of chronic AMR, a major cause of late graft loss. Thus, C1-INH may also be helpful in preserving function of established grafts. Early clinical studies in transplantation suggest significant beneficial effects of C1-INH with minimal toxicity. Recent results encourage continued investigation of this already-available therapeutic agent.

  8. Three new pigment protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors from the insect parasite fungus Cordyceps gracilioides: terreusinone A, pinophilin C and cryptosporioptide A.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pei-Yao; Liu, Lin-Xia; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Luo, Du-Qiang; Shi, Bao-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Three new pigment compounds--terreusinone A (1), pinophilin C (2) and cryptosporioptide A (3)-were isolated from a solid culture of Cordyceps gracilioides. The structures of these compounds were determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis including HRESIMS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. The structure of terreusinone A (1) was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallographic diffraction analysis. In an in vitro activity assay, 1, 2 and 3 exhibited high inhibitory activity against PTP1B, SHP2, CDC25B, LAR and SHP1. Terreusinone A (1) inhibited PTP1B, SHP2, CDC25B, LAR and SHP1 enzyme with IC50 values 12.5, >50, 4.1, 10.6, 5.6 µg/mL, respectively; pinophilin C (2) with IC50 values 6.8, 8.0, 4.5, 4.7, 3.4 µg/mL, respectively; and cryptosporioptide A (3) with IC50 values 7.3, 5.7, 7.6, >50, 4.9 µg/mL, respectively. PMID:25849805

  9. C-reactive protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. This article discusses the blood test done to measure the amount of CRP in your blood.

  10. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Levi, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled generation of bradykinin (BK) due to insufficient levels of protease inhibitors controlling contact phase (CP) activation, increased activity of CP proteins, and/or inadequate degradation of BK into inactive peptides increases vascular permeability via BK-receptor 2 (BKR2) and results in subcutaneous and submucosal edema formation. Hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE and -AAE) are diseases characterized by serious and potentially fatal attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of upper airways, facial structures, abdomen, and extremities, due to inadequate control of BK generation. A decreased activity of C1-inhibitor is the hallmark of C1-INH-HAE (types 1 and 2) due to a mutation in the C1-inhibitor gene, whereas the deficiency in C1-inhibitor in C1-INH-AAE is the result of autoimmune phenomena. In HAE with normal C1-inhibitor, a significant percentage of patients have an increased activity of factor XIIa due to a FXII mutation (FXII-HAE). Treatment of C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focuses on restoring control of BK generation by inhibition of CP proteases by correcting the balance between CP inhibitors and BK breakdown or by inhibition of BK-mediated effects at the BKR2 on endothelial cells. This review will address the pathophysiology, clinical picture, diagnosis and available treatment in C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focusing on BK-release and its regulation. Key Messages Inadequate control of bradykinin formation results in the formation of characteristic subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of the skin, upper airways, facial structures, abdomen and extremities as seen in hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema. Diagnosis of hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema may be troublesome as illustrated by the fact that there is a significant delay in diagnosis; a certain grade of suspicion is therefore crucial for quick diagnosis. Submucosal edema formation in

  11. Comparing protein VEGF inhibitors: In vitro biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lanlan; Liang, Xiao Huan; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF is a mediator of angiogenesis. {yields} VEGF inhibitors have clinical applications in cancer and eye disorders. {yields} Five protein VEGF inhibitors were compared for their ability to inhibit. {yields} VEGF-induced activities in cultured endothelial cells. -- Abstract: VEGF inhibitors are widely used as a therapy for tumors and intravascular neovascular disorders, but limited and conflicting data regarding their relative biological potencies are available. The purpose of the study is to compare different protein VEGF inhibitors for their ability to inhibit VEGF-stimulated activities. We tested ranibizumab, the full-length variant of ranibizumab (Mab Y0317), bevacizumab, the VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG in bioassays measuring VEGF-stimulated proliferation of bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells or chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The inhibitors were also compared for their ability to inhibit MAP kinase activation in HUVECs following VEGF addition. Ranibizumab, VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG had very similar potencies in the bioassays tested. Bevacizumab was over 10-fold less potent than these molecules. Mab Y0317 was over 30-fold more potent than bevacizumab. The findings reported in this manuscript describe important intrinsic characteristics of several VEGF inhibitors that may be useful to design and interpret preclinical or clinical studies.

  12. Recent developments of protein kinase inhibitors as potential AD therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tell, Volkmar; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Present Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3) β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit. PMID:24312003

  13. Recent developments of protein kinase inhibitors as potential AD therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tell, Volkmar; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Present Alzheimer’s disease (AD) therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3) β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit. PMID:24312003

  14. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  15. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  16. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  17. Inhibitors of Protein Translocation Across the ER Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Römisch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) constitutes the first step of protein secretion. ER protein import is essential in all eukaryotic cells and is particularly critical in fast-growing tumour cells. Thus, the process can serve as target both for potential cancer drugs and for bacterial virulence factors. Inhibitors of protein transport across the ER membrane range from broad-spectrum to highly substrate-specific and can interfere with virtually any stage of this multistep process, and even with transport of endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for cross-presentation. PMID:26122014

  18. Eliminating Anti-Nutritional Plant Food Proteins: The Case of Seed Protease Inhibitors in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C.; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G.; Lawson, David M.; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  19. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G; Lawson, David M; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  20. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G; Lawson, David M; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  1. Effects of protein phosphatase and kinase inhibitors on the cardiac L- type Ca current suggest two sites are phosphorylated by protein kinase A and another protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously showed (Frace, A.M. and H.C. Hartzell. 1993. Journal of Physiology. 472:305-326) that internal perfusion of frog atrial myocytes with the nonselective protein phosphatase inhibitors microcystin or okadaic acid produced an increase in the L-type Ca current (ICa) and a decrease in the delayed rectifier K current (IK). We hypothesized that microcystin revealed the activity of a protein kinase (PKX) that was basally active in the cardiac myocyte that could phosphorylate the Ca and K channels or regulators of the channels. The present studies were aimed at determining the nature of PKX and its phosphorylation target. The effect of internal perfusion with microcystin on ICa or IK was not attenuated by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the effect of microcystin on ICa was largely blocked by the nonselective protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (10- 30 nM), K252a (250 nM), and H-7 (10 microM). Staurosporine and H-7 also decreased the stimulation of ICa by isoproterenol, but K252a was more selective and blocked the ability of microcystin to stimulate ICa without significantly reducing isoproterenol-stimulated current. Internal perfusion with selective inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), including the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate PKC peptide (PKC(19-31)) and a myristoylated derivative of this peptide had no effect. External application of several PKC inhibitors had negative side effects that prevented their use as selective PKC inhibitors. Nevertheless, we conclude that PKX is not PKC. PKA and PKX phosphorylate sites with different sensitivities to the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and microcystin. In contrast to the results with ICa, the effect of microcystin on IK was not blocked by any of the kinase inhibitors tested, suggesting that the effect of microcystin on IK may not be mediated by a protein kinase but may be due to a direct effect of microcystin on the IK channel. PMID:8786340

  2. Stabilization of mutant BRCA1 protein confers PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Johnson, Shawn F.; Yao, Wei; Li, Yu-Chen; Choi, Young-Eun; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Wang, Yifan; Capelletti, Marzia; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; Moreau, Lisa A.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Wickramanayake, Anneka; Harrell, Maria I.; Liu, Joyce F.; D’Andrea, Alan D.; Miron, Alexander; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer Type 1 Susceptibility Protein (BRCA1)-deficient cells have compromised DNA repair and are sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Despite initial responses, the development of resistance limits clinical efficacy. Mutations in the BRCA C-terminal (BRCT) domain of BRCA1 frequently create protein products unable to fold that are subject to protease-mediated degradation. Here, we show HSP90-mediated stabilization of a BRCT domain mutant BRCA1 protein under PARP inhibitor selection pressure. The stabilized mutant BRCA1 protein interacted with PALB2-BRCA2-RAD51, was essential for RAD51 focus formation, and conferred PARP inhibitor as well as cisplatin resistance. Treatment of resistant cells with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin reduced mutant BRCA1 protein levels and restored their sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Resistant cells also acquired a TP53BP1 mutation that facilitated DNA end resection in the absence of a BRCA1 protein capable of binding CtIP. Finally, concomitant increased mutant BRCA1 and decreased 53BP1 protein expression occur in clinical samples of BRCA1-mutated recurrent ovarian carcinomas that have developed resistance to platinum. These results provide evidence for a two-event mechanism by which BRCA1-mutant tumors acquire anticancer therapy resistance. PMID:24085845

  3. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  4. A Microplate-Based Nonradioactive Protein Synthesis Assay: Application to TRAIL Sensitization by Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-radioactive assays based on incorporation of puromycin into newly synthesized proteins and subsequent detection using anti-puromycin antibodies have been previously reported and well-validated. To develop a moderate- to high-throughput assay, an adaptation is here described wherein cells are puromycin-labeled followed by simultaneously probing puromycin-labeled proteins and a reference protein in situ. Detection using a pair of near IR-labeled secondary antibodies (InCell western, ICW format) allows quantitative analysis of protein synthesis in 384-well plates. After optimization, ICW results were compared to western blot analysis using cycloheximide as a model protein synthesis inhibitor and showed comparable results. The method was then applied to several protein synthesis inhibitors and revealed good correlation between potency as protein synthesis inhibitors to their ability to sensitize TRAIL-resistant renal carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. PMID:27768779

  5. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  6. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  7. A C1-inhibitor-complex assay (INCA): a method to detect C1 activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Hannema, A J; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Out, T A; Aalberse, R C

    1981-10-01

    A radioimmunoassay (the C1-inhibitor-complex assay, INCA) is described for the detection of complexes that are composed of at least C1s and C1-inhibitor. This INCA is based on demonstrating that C1s and C1-inhibitor (C1-In) are linked: after an incubation with anti-C1s-Sepharose, bound C1sC1-In complexes are detected by 125I-anti-C1-In. C1sC1-In complexes were prepared by the addition of a slight excess of C1s to normal human serum (NHS). As little as 2 ng C1-In bound to C1s was detected. Additional free C1s in serum hardly influenced the detection of C1sC1-In complexes. Complexes presumably composed of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 were generated by the addition of aggregated IgG to NHS. This generation was inhibited by lowering the temperature to 0 degrees C, and by EDTA, and depended on the concentration of aggregated IgG. These complexes had a sedimentation value of approximately 9S. Complexes of C1s and C1-In were also generated in NHS by the addition of DNP-albumin and protein A, but not by zymosan. The INCA was applied to blood samples from normal donors and patients. Sixteen out of 19 samples from patients with acute glomerulonephritis contained increased amounts of C1rC1s(C1-In)2 complexes as compared with the amounts in blood samples from normal donors. The INCA provides a useful tool to assess the activation of C1 in the presence of C1-In, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors repurposed against Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Debnath, Anjan; Benedict, Christan; McKerrow, James H.; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp90 is an essential chaperone responsible for trafficking a vast array of client proteins, which are substrates that Hsp90 regulates in eukaryotic cells under stress conditions. The ATP-binding N-terminal domain of Hsp90 (also known as a GHKL type ATPase domain) can serve as a specific drug target, because sufficient structural diversity in the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 allows for ortholog selectivity of Hsp90 inhibitors. The primary objective of this study is to identify inhibitors specific for the ATP-binding domain of Entamoeba histolytica Hsp90 (EhHsp90). An additional aim, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a protein in vitro assay, is to show that the antiparasitic activity of Hsp90 inhibitors is dependent on specific residues within the ATP-binding domain. Here, we tested the activity of 43 inhibitors of Hsp90 that we previously identified using a high-throughput screen. Of the 43 compounds tested, 19 competed for binding of the EhHsp90 ATP-binding domain. Five out of the 19 EhHsp90 protein hits demonstrated activity against E. histolytica in vitro culture: rifabutin, rutilantin, cetylpyridinium chloride, pararosaniline pamoate and gentian violet. These five top E. histolytica Hsp90 inhibitors showed 30–100% inhibition of E. histolytica in culture in the micromolar range. These data suggest that E. histolytica-specific Hsp90 inhibitors are possible to identify and provide important lead compounds for the development of novel antiamebic drugs. PMID:26029171

  9. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and hereditary protein C deficiency].

    PubMed

    Massons, J; Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; Besses, C; Muñoz, C; Titus, F

    1992-01-01

    Protein C together with its plasmatic cofactor protein S and antithrombin III probably represent the most important plasmatic inhibitor in coagulation. Protein C deficiency constitutes a high risk factor for venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous thrombosis is a manifestation which is scarcely referred to in protein C deficiency. The case of a 32 year old patient with protein C deficiency is presented. The patient was admitted for an endocraneal hypertension syndrome. CT and MR demonstrated multiple hemorrhagic cerebral infarctions. Arteriography confirmed vertebral venous thrombosis. Only six cases sufficiently documenting cerebral venous thrombosis due to protein C deficiency were found in the literature. In most cases coadjuvant factors exist predisposing thromboembolic disease. The present clinical case demonstrates the importance of considering protein C deficiency in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in young adults.

  10. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  11. Blocking c-Met-mediated PARP1 phosphorylation enhances anti-tumor effects of PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Wei, Yongkun; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Wang, Hung-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Chi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Leonard, Paul G.; Lee, Gilbert R.; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Nakai, Katsuya; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Te; Sun, Ye; Wu, Yun; Chang, Wei-Chao; Huang, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Park, Morag; Jones, Philip; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutics for many diseases, including cancer, in clinical trials1. One PARP inhibitor, olaparib (Lynparza™, AstraZeneca), was recently approved by the FDA to treat ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. BRCA1 and BRCA2 play essential roles in repairing DNA double strand breaks, and a deficiency of BRCA proteins sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibition2,3. Here we show that receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met associates with and phosphorylates PARP1 at Tyr907. Phosphorylation of PARP1 Tyr907 increases PARP1 enzymatic activity and reduces binding to a PARP inhibitor, thereby rendering cancer cells resistant to PARP inhibition. Combining c-Met and PARP1 inhibitors synergized to suppress growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and xenograft tumor models. Similar synergistic effects were observed in a lung cancer xenograft tumor model. These results suggest that PARP1 pTyr907 abundance may predict tumor resistance to PARP inhibitors, and that treatment with a combination of c-Met and PARP inhibitors may benefit patients bearing tumors with high c-Met expression who do not respond to PARP inhibition alone. PMID:26779812

  12. Anchor-based classification and type-C inhibitors for tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Chih-Ta; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hung, Hui-Chen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Barve, Indrajeet; Chen, Wen-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chien; Huang, Chin-Ting; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases regulate various biological processes and are drug targets for cancers. At present, the design of selective and anti-resistant inhibitors of kinases is an emergent task. Here, we inferred specific site-moiety maps containing two specific anchors to uncover a new binding pocket in the C-terminal hinge region by docking 4,680 kinase inhibitors into 51 protein kinases, and this finding provides an opportunity for the development of kinase inhibitors with high selectivity and anti-drug resistance. We present an anchor-based classification for tyrosine kinases and discover two type-C inhibitors, namely rosmarinic acid (RA) and EGCG, which occupy two and one specific anchors, respectively, by screening 118,759 natural compounds. Our profiling reveals that RA and EGCG selectively inhibit 3% (EGFR and SYK) and 14% of 64 kinases, respectively. According to the guide of our anchor model, we synthesized three RA derivatives with better potency. These type-C inhibitors are able to maintain activities for drug-resistant EGFR and decrease the invasion ability of breast cancer cells. Our results show that the type-C inhibitors occupying a new pocket are promising for cancer treatments due to their kinase selectivity and anti-drug resistance. PMID:26077136

  13. The Pepper Extracellular Xyloglucan-Specific Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Inhibitor Protein Gene, CaXEGIP1, Is Required for Plant Cell Death and Defense Responses1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Yeon Kyeong; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce various proteinaceous inhibitors to protect themselves against microbial pathogen attack. A xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase inhibitor1 gene, CaXEGIP1, was isolated and functionally characterized in pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. CaXEGIP1 was rapidly and strongly induced in pepper leaves infected with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, and purified CaXEGIP1 protein significantly inhibited the hydrolytic activity of the glycoside hydrolase74 family xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase from Clostridium thermocellum. Soluble-modified green fluorescent protein-tagged CaXEGIP1 proteins were mainly localized to the apoplast of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated overexpression of CaXEGIP1 triggered pathogen-independent, spontaneous cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CaXEGIP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to virulent and avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria, accompanied by a compromised hypersensitive response and lowered expression of defense-related genes. Overexpression of dexamethasone:CaXEGIP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enhanced resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Comparative histochemical and proteomic analyses revealed that CaXEGIP1 overexpression induced a spontaneous cell death response and also increased the expression of some defense-related proteins in transgenic Arabidopsis leaves. This response was also accompanied by cell wall thickening and darkening. Together, these results suggest that pathogen-inducible CaXEGIP1 positively regulates cell death-mediated defense responses in plants. PMID:23093361

  14. Characterization of recombinant C1 inhibitor P1 variants.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Lubbers, Y T; Longstaff, C; Hack, C E

    1992-04-01

    Twelve human C1 inhibitor P1 variants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the codon for arginine 444 and were expressed in COS-1 cells to analyze the functional properties. The ability to bind to target proteases, as well as potential substrate-like behavior, was investigated with radioimmunoassays. The P1-Lys variant retained binding capacity toward C1s, plasmin, and kallikrein. In addition, complex formation with C1s was detected for P1-Asn and P1-His. All other P1 substitutions resulted in C1 inhibitor variants that neither complexed with nor were inactivated by C1s, kallikrein, beta-factor XIIa, or plasmin. Electrophoretic studies confirmed that P1-Lys and P1-His can form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant complexes with C1s. In contrast, the C1s-P1-Asn complex dissociated upon addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Kinetic experiments by the method of progress curves generated association rate constants (kon) with C1s of 4.2 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for recombinant wild-type C1 inhibitor and 1.7 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for P1-Lys. For P1-Asn and P1-His, kon was decreased approximately 100-fold. The results from inhibition experiments were compatible with a model of reversible inhibition, although the observed dissociation rate for wild-type C1 inhibitor is too low (1-2 x 10(-6) s-1) to be physiologically relevant. The overall inhibition constant (Ki) was estimated to be 0.03 nM. With P1-Asn, reversible inhibition could be demonstrated directly upon dilution of preformed complexes; the observed dissociation rate constant was 3.2 x 10(-4) s-1; and Ki increased to approximately 380 nM. These findings are discussed in relation to inhibitor specificity and inhibition mechanism.

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  16. A Novel Inhibitor of the Obesity-Related Protein FTO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Meizi; Liu, Weijia; Han, Zhifu; Song, Chuanjun; Yu, Wenquan; Yang, Qinghua; Wang, Ruiyong; Wang, Shaomin; Shi, Shuai; Zhao, Renbin; Chai, Jijie; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-03-15

    Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate-dependent fat mass and obesity associated protein (FTO)-dependent demethylation of m⁶A is important for regulation of mRNA splicing and adipogenesis. Developing FTO-specific inhibitors can help probe the biology of FTO and unravel novel therapeutic targets for treatment of obesity or obesity-associated diseases. In the present paper, we have identified that 4-chloro-6-(6'-chloro-7'-hydroxy-2',4',4'-trimethyl-chroman-2'-yl)benzene-1,3-diol (CHTB) is an inhibitor of FTO. The crystal structure of CHTB complexed with human FTO reveals that the novel small molecule binds to FTO in a specific manner. The identification of the novel small molecule offers opportunities for further development of more selective and potent FTO inhibitors.

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors.

  18. Novel ATP-competitive kinesin spindle protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Cynthia A; Adams, Nicholas D; Auger, Kurt R; Burgess, Joelle L; Carson, Jeffrey D; Chaudhari, Amita M; Copeland, Robert A; Diamond, Melody A; Donatelli, Carla A; Duffy, Kevin J; Faucette, Leo F; Finer, Jeffrey T; Huffman, William F; Hugger, Erin D; Jackson, Jeffrey R; Knight, Steven D; Luo, Lusong; Moore, Michael L; Newlander, Ken A; Ridgers, Lance H; Sakowicz, Roman; Shaw, Antony N; Sung, Chiu-Mei M; Sutton, David; Wood, Kenneth W; Zhang, Shu-Yun; Zimmerman, Michael N; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2007-10-01

    Kinesin spindle protein (KSP), an ATPase responsible for spindle pole separation during mitosis that is present only in proliferating cells, has become a novel and attractive anticancer target with potential for reduced side effects compared to currently available therapies. We report herein the discovery of the first known ATP-competitive inhibitors of KSP, which display a unique activity profile as compared to the known loop 5 (L5) allosteric KSP inhibitors that are currently under clinical evaluation. Optimization of this series led to the identification of biphenyl sulfamide 20, a potent KSP inhibitor with in vitro antiproliferative activity against human cells with either wild-type KSP (HCT116) or mutant KSP (HCT116 D130V). In a murine xenograft model with HCT116 D130V tumors, 20 showed significant antitumor activity following intraperitoneal dosing, providing in vivo proof-of-principle of the efficacy of an ATP-competitive KSP inhibitor versus tumors that are resistant to the other known KSP inhibitors. PMID:17725339

  19. Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors of Biotin Protein Ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Geders, Todd W.; Tiwari, Divya; Boshoff, Helena I.; Sibbald, Paul A.; Barry, Clifton E.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Finzel, Barry C.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The mycobacterial biotin protein ligase (MtBPL) globally regulates lipid metabolism in Mtb through the posttranslational biotinylation of acyl coenzyme A carboxylases involved in lipid biosynthesis that catalyze the first step in fatty acid biosynthesis and pyruvate coenzyme A carboxylase, a gluconeogenic enzyme vital for lipid catabolism. Here we describe the design, development and evaluation of a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of MtBPL. This inhibitor displays potent sub-nanomolar enzyme inhibition and antitubercular activity against multi- and extensively drug resistant Mtb strains. We show that the inhibitor decreases in vivo protein biotinylation of key enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and that the anti-bacterial activity is MtBPL-dependent. Additionally, the gene encoding BPL was found to be essential in M. smegmatis. Finally, the X-ray co-crystal structure of inhibitor bound MtBPL was solved providing detailed insight for further structure-activity analysis. Collectively, these data suggest that MtBPL is a promising target for further antitubercular therapeutic development. PMID:22118677

  20. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  1. Development of Inhibitors of Protein-protein Interactions through REPLACE: Application to the Design and Development Non-ATP Competitive CDK Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nandha Premnath, Padmavathy; Craig, Sandra; McInnes, Campbell

    2015-10-26

    REPLACE is a unique strategy developed to more effectively target protein-protein interactions (PPIs). It aims to expand available drug target space by providing improved methodology for the identification of inhibitors for such binding sites and which represent the majority of potential drug targets. The main goal of this paper is to provide a methodological overview of the use and application of the REPLACE strategy which involves computational and synthetic chemistry approaches. REPLACE is exemplified through its application to the development of non-ATP competitive cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) inhibitors as anti-tumor therapeutics. CDKs are frequently deregulated in cancer and hence are considered as important targets for drug development. Inhibition of CDK2/cyclin A in S phase has been reported to promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells in a p53 independent manner through the E2F1 pathway. Targeting the protein-protein interaction at the cyclin binding groove (CBG) is an approach which will allow the specific inhibition of cell cycle over transcriptional CDKs. The CBG is recognized by a consensus sequence derived from CDK substrates and tumor suppressor proteins termed the cyclin binding motif (CBM). The CBM has previously been optimized to an octapeptide from p21Waf (HAKRRIF) and then further truncated to a pentapeptide retaining sufficient activity (RRLIF). Peptides in general are not cell permeable, are metabolically unstable and therefore the REPLACE (REplacement with Partial Ligand Alternatives through Computational Enrichment) strategy has been applied in order to generate more drug-like inhibitors. The strategy begins with the design of Fragment ligated inhibitory peptides (FLIPs) that selectively inhibit cell cycle CDK/cyclin complexes. FLIPs were generated by iteratively replacing residues of HAKRRLIF/RRLIF with fragment like small molecules (capping groups), starting from the N-terminus (Ncaps), followed by replacement on the C-terminus. These

  2. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.; Sillito, Rowland R.; Zich, Judith; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Paranthaman, Karthika; Larsen, Anders Peter; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Porteous, David J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance the repositioning of MEK inhibitors as behavior stabilizers in the context of increased cAMP. PMID:26388333

  3. Structural dynamics and inhibitor searching for Wnt-4 protein using comparative computational studies

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Mirza A; Azam, Syed Sikander

    2015-01-01

    Wnt-4 (wingless mouse mammary tumor virus integration site-4) protein is involved in many crucial embryonic pathways regulating essential processes. Aberrant Wnt-4 activity causes various anomalies leading to gastric, colon, or breast cancer. Wnt-4 is a conserved protein in structure and sequence. All Wnt proteins contain an unusual fold comprising of a thumb (or N-terminal domain) and index finger (or C-terminal domain) bifurcated by a palm domain. The aim of this study was to identify the best inhibitors of Wnt-4 that not only interact with Wnt-4 protein but also with the covalently bound acyl group to inhibit aberrant Wnt-4 activity. A systematic computational approach was used to analyze inhibition of Wnt-4. Palmitoleic acid was docked into Wnt-4 protein, followed by ligand-based virtual screening of nearly 209,847 compounds; conformer generation of 271 compounds resulted from extensive virtual screening and comparative docking of 10,531 conformers of 271 unique compounds through GOLD (Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking), AutoDock-Vina, and FRED (Fast Rigid Exhaustive Docking) was subsequently performed. Linux scripts was used to handle the libraries of compounds. The best compounds were selected on the basis of having maximum interactions to protein with bound palmitoleic acid. These represented lead inhibitors in further experiments. Palmitoleic acid is important for efficient Wnt activity, but aberrant Wnt-4 expression can be inhibited by designing inhibitors interacting with both protein and palmitoleic acid. PMID:25995617

  4. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  5. Inactivation of factor XIa in human plasma assessed by measuring factor XIa-protease inhibitor complexes: major role for C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Minnema, M; Meijers, J C; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Nuijens, J H; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1995-03-15

    From experiments with purified proteins, it has been concluded that factor XIa (FXIa) is inhibited in plasma mainly by alpha 1-antitrypsin (a1AT), followed by antithrombin III (ATIII), C1-inhibitor (C1Inh), and alpha 2-antiplasmin (a2AP). However, the validity of this concept has never been studied in plasma. We established the relative contribution of different inhibitors to the inactivation of FXIa in human plasma, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the quantification of complexes of FXIa with a1AT, C1Inh, a2AP, and ATIII. We found that 47% of FXIa added to plasma formed complexes with C1Inh, 24.5% with a2AP, 23.5% with a1AT, and 5% with ATIII. The distribution of FXIa between these inhibitors in plasma was independent of whether FXIa was added to plasma, or was activated endogenously by kaolin, celite, or glass. However, in the presence of heparin (1 or 50 U/mL), C1Inh appeared to be the major inhibitor of FXIa, followed by ATIII. Furthermore, at lower temperatures, less FXIa-C1Inh and FXIa-a1AT complexes but more FXIa-a2AP complexes were formed. These data demonstrate that the contribution of the different inhibitors to inactivation of FXIa in plasma may vary, but C1Inh is the principal inhibitor under most conditions.

  6. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  7. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  8. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  9. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  10. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein C deficiency protein C deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the ...

  11. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  12. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-07-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein-protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a 'hot segment', a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  13. BET protein inhibitor JQ1 attenuates Myc-amplified MCC tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qiang; Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Stack, Brendan C; Suen, James Y; Gao, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin currently with no cure. In this study, we have first demonstrated that c-Myc overexpression is common in MCC. By targeting c-Myc, bromodomain inhibitors have demonstrated antitumor efficacy in several preclinical human cancer models. Thus, we interrogated the role of c-Myc inhibition in MCC with c-Myc amplification by using the BET inhibitor JQ1. We have uncovered that c-Myc can be regulated by JQ1 in MCC cells with pathologic c-Myc activation. Moreover, JQ1 potently abrogates c-Myc expression in MCC cells and causes marked G1 cell-cycle arrest. Mechanistically, JQ1-induced cell-cycle arrest coincides with downregulation of cyclin D1 and upregulation of p21, p27, and p57, whereas JQ1 exerts no effect on apoptosis in MCC cells. Further knockdown of p21, p27, or p57 by shRNA partially protects cells from JQ1-induced cell-cycle arrest. In addition, c-Myc knockdown by shRNA generates significant cell-cycle arrest, suggesting that c-Myc overexpression plays a role in MCC pathogenesis. Most importantly, JQ1 significantly attenuates tumor growth in xenograft MCC mouse models. Our results provide initial evidence, indicating the potential clinical utility of BET protein inhibitors in the treatment of MCC with pathologic activation of c-Myc.

  14. Structural basis of the promiscuous inhibitor susceptibility of Escherichia coli LpxC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Najeeb, Javaria; Ark, Eugene D; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2014-01-17

    The LpxC enzyme in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway is one of the most promising and clinically unexploited antibiotic targets for treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Progress in medicinal chemistry has led to the discovery of potent LpxC inhibitors with a variety of chemical scaffolds and distinct antibiotic profiles. The vast majority of these compounds, including the nanomolar inhibitors L-161,240 and BB-78485, are highly effective in suppressing the activity of Escherichia coli LpxC (EcLpxC) but not divergent orthologs such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa LpxC (PaLpxC) in vitro. The molecular basis for such promiscuous inhibition of EcLpxC has remained poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcLpxC bound to L-161,240, providing the first molecular insight into L-161,240 inhibition. Additionally, structural analysis of the EcLpxC/L-161,240 complex together with the EcLpxC/BB-78485 complex reveals an unexpected backbone flipping of the Insert I βa-βb loop in EcLpxC in comparison with previously reported crystal structures of EcLpxC complexes with l-threonyl-hydroxamate-based broad-spectrum inhibitors. Such a conformational switch, which has only been observed in EcLpxC but not in divergent orthologs such as PaLpxC, results in expansion of the active site of EcLpxC, enabling it to accommodate LpxC inhibitors with a variety of head groups, including compounds containing single (R- or S-enantiomers) or double substitutions at the neighboring Cα atom of the hydroxamate warhead group. These results highlight the importance of understanding inherent conformational plasticity of target proteins in lead optimization. PMID:24117400

  15. Molecular Dynamics simulations of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins and identification of potential small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Jayanthi; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2014-05-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance due to over expression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) XIAP, survivin and livin has been observed in various cancers. In the current study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for all three IAPs and a common ligand binding scaffold was identified. Further, a novel sequence based motif specific to these IAPs was designed. SMAC is an endogenous inhibitor of IAPs. Screening of ChemBank for compounds similar to lead SMAC-non-peptidomimetics yielded a cemadotin related compound NCIMech_000654. Cemadotin is a derivative of natural anti-tumor peptide dolastatin-15; hence these compounds were docked against all three IAPs. Based on our analysis, we propose that NCIMech_000654/dolastatin-15/cemadotin derivatives may be investigated for their potential in inhibiting XIAP, survivin and livin.

  16. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  17. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  18. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  19. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  1. Effects of a new microbial α-amylase inhibitor protein on Helicoverpa armigera larvae.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Xiaojing; Cui, Jinjie; Ma, Yan; Li, Qiannan

    2013-03-01

    A new microbial α-amylase inhibitor gene was cloned and characterized. The encoded, recombinant, α-amylase inhibitor protein was induced and expressed by isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in Escherichia coli M15 cells. The effects of the α-amylase inhibitor protein on Helicoverpa armigera larvae were studied. Compared to the control, the weight of H. armigera larvae fed the diet with recombinant α-amylase inhibitor protein added at a concentration of 20 μg/g was reduced by 49.8%. The total soluble protein of H. armigera larvae fed the diet with the α-amylase inhibitor protein added was also reduced by 36.8% compared to the control. The recombinant α-amylase inhibitor protein showed inhibition activity against α-amylase of H. armigera. These results suggested that this α-amylase inhibitor protein may be a promising bioinsecticide candidate for controlling H. armigera.

  2. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2008-06-01

    Since cell death by apoptosis plays a key role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis, dysregulation of the cell's intrinsic death program may foster tumor formation and progression. "Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins" (IAPs) block apoptosis at the core of the apoptotic machinery by inhibiting effector caspases. Aberrant expression and/or function of IAPs are found in many human cancers and have been implied in resistance to current treatment approaches. Recent insights into the role of IAPs have provided the basis for various exciting discoveries that aim at modulating expression or function of IAPs. Thus, targeting IAPs, e.g. by antisense approaches or small molecule inhibitors, presents a promising novel approach for future drug development and may proof to be a successful strategy to overcome apoptosis resistance of human cancers.

  3. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor produced in Pichia pastoris has the same inhibitory capacity as plasma C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; de Bruin, Eric C; Karuntu, Yani A; Modderman, Piet W; Eldering, Eric; Hack, C Erik

    2003-05-30

    Therapeutic application of the serpin C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) in inflammatory diseases like sepsis, acute myocardial infarction and vascular leakage syndrome seems promising, but large doses may be required. Therefore, a high-yield recombinant expression system for C1-Inh is very interesting. Earlier attempts to produce high levels of C1-Inh resulted in predominantly inactive C1-Inh. We describe the high yield expression of rhC1-Inh in Pichia pastoris, with 180 mg/l active C1-Inh at maximum. On average, 30 mg/l of 80-100% active C1-Inh was obtained. Progress curves were used to study the interaction with C1s, kallikrein, coagulation factor XIIa and XIa, and demonstrated that rhC1-Inh had the same inhibitory capacity as plasma C1-Inh. Structural integrity, as monitored via heat stability, was comparable despite differences in extent and nature of glycosylation. We conclude that the P. pastoris system is capable of high-level production of functionally and structurally intact human C1 inhibitor.

  4. Isolation, cDNA Cloning, and Structure-based Functional Characterization of Oryctin, a Hemolymph Protein from the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, as a Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Shoichiro; Ishibashi, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Miyakawa, Takuya; Yamakawa, Minoru; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    We isolated oryctin, a 66-residue peptide, from the hemolymph of the coconut rhinoceros beetle Oryctes rhinoceros and cloned its cDNA. Oryctin is dissimilar to any other known peptides in amino acid sequence, and its function has been unknown. To reveal that function, we determined the solution structure of recombinant 13C,15N-labeled oryctin by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Oryctin exhibits a fold similar to that of Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors but has a unique additional C-terminal α-helix. We performed protease inhibition assays of oryctin against several bacterial and eukaryotic proteases. Oryctin does inhibit the following serine proteases: α-chymotrypsin, endopeptidase K, subtilisin Carlsberg, and leukocyte elastase, with Ki values of 3.9 × 10−10 m, 6.2 × 10−10 m, 1.4 × 10−9 m, and 1.2 × 10−8 m, respectively. Although the target molecule of oryctin in the beetle hemolymph remains obscure, our results showed that oryctin is a novel single domain Kazal-type inhibitor and could play a key role in protecting against bacterial infections. PMID:20630859

  5. Nanomolar Inhibitors of AmpC [beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, Federica; Caselli, Emilia; Morandi, Stefania; Focia, Pamela J.; Blazquez, Jesus; Shoichet, Brian K.; Prati, Fabio

    2010-03-08

    {beta}-lactamases are the most widespread resistance mechanism to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, such as the penicillins and the cephalosporins. In an effort to combat these enzymes, a combination of stereoselective organic synthesis, enzymology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography was used to design and evaluate new carboxyphenyl-glycylboronic acid transition-state analogue inhibitors of the class C {beta}-lactamase AmpC. The new compounds improve inhibition by over 2 orders of magnitude compared to analogous glycylboronic acids, with K{sub i} values as low as 1 nM. On the basis of the differential binding of different analogues, the introduced carboxylate alone contributes about 2.1 kcal/mol in affinity. This carboxylate corresponds to the ubiquitous C3(4)' carboxylate of {beta}-lactams, and this energy represents the first thermodynamic measurement of the importance of this group in molecular recognition by class C {beta}-lactamases. The structures of AmpC in complex with two of these inhibitors were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.72 and 1.83 {angstrom} resolution. These structures suggest a structural basis for the high affinity of the new compounds and provide templates for further design. The highest affinity inhibitor was 5 orders of magnitude more selective for AmpC than for characteristic serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin. This inhibitor reversed the resistance of clinical pathogens to the third generation cephalosporin ceftazidime; it may serve as a lead compound for drug discovery to combat bacterial resistance to {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  6. Bromodomain inhibitors regulate the C9ORF72 locus in ALS.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Zane; Esanov, Rustam; Belle, Kinsley C; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Johnstone, Andrea L; Halley, Paul; DeRosa, Brooke A; Khoury, Nathalie; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Rademakers, Rosa; Albert, Jeffrey; Brothers, Shaun P; Wuu, Joanne; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Benatar, Michael; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-09-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion residing within the C9ORF72 gene represents the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and places the disease among a growing family of repeat expansion disorders. The presence of RNA foci, repeat-associated translation products, and sequestration of RNA binding proteins suggests that toxic RNA gain-of-function contributes to pathology while C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency may be an additional pathological factor. One viable therapeutic strategy for treating expansion diseases is the use of small molecule inhibitors of epigenetic modifier proteins to reactivate expanded genetic loci. Indeed, previous studies have established proof of this principle by increasing the drug-induced expression of expanded (and abnormally heterochromatinized) FMR1, FXN and C9ORF72 genes in respective patient cells. While epigenetic modifier proteins are increasingly recognized as druggable targets, there have been few screening strategies to address this avenue of drug discovery in the context of expansion diseases. Here we utilize a semi-high-throughput gene expression based screen to identify siRNAs and small molecule inhibitors of epigenetic modifier proteins that regulate C9ORF72 RNA in patient fibroblasts, lymphocytes and reprogrammed motor neurons. We found that several bromodomain small molecule inhibitors increase the expression of C9ORF72 mRNA and pre-mRNA without affecting repressive epigenetic signatures of expanded C9ORF72 alleles. These data suggest that bromodomain inhibition increases the expression of unexpanded C9ORF72 alleles and may therefore compensate for haploinsufficiency without increasing the production of toxic RNA and protein products, thereby conferring therapeutic value. PMID:26099177

  7. Bromodomain inhibitors regulate the C9ORF72 locus in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Zane; Esanov, Rustam; Belle, Kinsley C.; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Johnstone, Andrea L.; Halley, Paul; DeRosa, Brooke A.; Khoury, Nathalie; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Rademakers, Rosa; Albert, Jeffrey; Brothers, Shaun P.; Wuu, Joanne; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Benatar, Michael; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion residing within the C9ORF72 gene represents the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and places the disease among a growing family of repeat expansion disorders. The presence of RNA foci, repeat-associated translation products, and sequestration of RNA binding proteins suggests that toxic RNA gain-of-function contributes to pathology while C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency may be an additional pathological factor. One viable therapeutic strategy for treating expansion diseases is the use of small molecule inhibitors of epigenetic modifier proteins to reactivate expanded genetic loci. Indeed, previous studies have established proof of this principle by increasing the drug-induced expression of expanded (and abnormally heterochromatinized) FMR1, FXN and C9ORF72 genes in respective patient cells. While epigenetic modifier proteins are increasingly recognized as druggable targets, there have been few screening strategies to address this avenue of drug discovery in the context of expansion diseases. Here we utilize a semi-high-throughput gene expression based screen to identify siRNAs and small molecule inhibitors of epigenetic modifier proteins that regulate C9ORF72 RNA in patient fibroblasts, lymphocytes and reprogrammed motor neurons. We found that several bromodomain small molecule inhibitors increase the expression of C9ORF72 mRNA and pre-mRNA without affecting repressive epigenetic signatures of expanded C9ORF72 alleles. These data suggest that bromodomain inhibition increases the expression of unexpanded C9ORF72 alleles and may therefore compensate for haploinsufficiency without increasing the production of toxic RNA and protein products, thereby conferring therapeutic value. PMID:26099177

  8. Study of protein complexes via homology modeling, applied to cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tastan Bishop, Ozlem; Kroon, Matthys

    2011-12-01

    This paper develops and evaluates large-scale calculation of 3D structures of protein complexes by homology modeling as a promising new approach for protein docking. The complexes investigated were papain-like cysteine proteases and their protein inhibitors, which play numerous roles in human and parasitic metabolisms. The structural modeling was performed in two parts. For the first part (evaluation set), nine crystal structure complexes were selected, 1325 homology models of known complexes were rebuilt by various templates including hybrids, allowing an analysis of the factors influencing the accuracy of the models. The important considerations for modeling the interface were protease coverage and inhibitor sequence identity. In the second part (study set), the findings of the evaluation set were used to select appropriate templates to model novel cysteine protease-inhibitor complexes from human and malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The energy scores, considering the evaluation set, indicate that the models are of high accuracy. PMID:21365221

  9. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, Rachel A.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Revill, Charlotte H.; Foster, Richard J.; Smith, D. Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small molecule therapeutic has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of IAPP aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  10. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Janet C; Young, Lydia M; Mahood, Rachel A; Jackson, Matthew P; Revill, Charlotte H; Foster, Richard J; Smith, D Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E; Brockwell, David J; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small-molecule therapeutic targeting this process has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, that is capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  11. The structural basis for neutrophil inactivation of C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, P A; Harrison, R A; Lachmann, P J; Carrell, R W

    1989-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) by neutrophil elastase, Pseudomonas elastase and snake venoms resulted in initial cleavage within the molecule's N-terminus followed by further cleavage within the molecule's C-terminally placed reactive centre. N-Terminal proteolysis occurred at peptide bonds 14-15, 36-37 and 40-41. This had no effect on either the inhibitory activity or the heat-stability of C1-INH. Proteolysis within the reactive centre occurred at peptide bonds 439-440, 440-441, 441-442 and 442-443. Cleavage at any one of these sites inactivated C1-INH and conferred enhanced heat-stability upon a previously heat-labile molecule. Released neutrophil proteinases also cleaved and inactivated C1-INH, suggesting that they may physiologically regulate C1-INH during inflammatory episodes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2930506

  12. Clearance of human native, proteinase-complexed, and proteolytically inactivated C1-inhibitor in rats.

    PubMed

    de Smet, B J; de Boer, J P; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; Bleeker, W K; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    C1-inhibitor is the only known inhibitor of the classical pathway of complement and the major inhibitor of the contact pathway of coagulation. Like other serine proteinase inhibitors, C1-inhibitor can exist in three conformations, ie, the native, the proteinase-complexed, and the proteolytically inactivated form. Here we studied the plasma elimination kinetics of these three forms of human C1-inhibitor in rats. The clearance of the complexed form of C1-inhibitor appeared to be the most rapid and depended in part on the proteinase involved (observed plasma t1/2 was 20 minutes for C1s-C1-inhibitor, 32 minutes for kallikrein-C1-inhibitor, and 47 minutes for beta XIIa-C1-inhibitor), whereas that of native C1-inhibitor was the slowest (observed plasma t1/2 4.5 hours). Inactivated C1-inhibitor was cleared with an apparent plasma t1/2 of 1.6 hours. Thus, the short plasma t1/2 of complexed relative to native C1-inhibitor explains why in patients only low concentrations of C1-inhibitor complexes may be observed despite activation of the contact and/or complement systems.

  13. Protein flexibility oriented virtual screening strategy for JAK2 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiao; Yuan, Haoliang; Zhang, Yanmin; Xu, Jinxing; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Li, Hongmei; Jiang, Yulei; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-10-01

    JAK2 has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-cancer agents. In this study, considering the flexibility of its binding site, an integrated strategy combining Bayesian categorization modeling and ensemble docking was established. Four representative crystal structures were selected for ensemble docking by the hierarchical clustering of 34 crystal structures according to the volume overlaps of each structure. A retrospective virtual screening was performed to validate this integrated strategy. As the preliminary filtration, the Bayesian model enhanced the ratio of actives by reducing the large amount of decoys. After docking the remaining compounds, the comparison between the ensemble and individual results showed that the enrichment of ensemble docking improved significantly. The results of analysis on conformational changes of two top ranked active inhibitors when docking into different proteins indicated that compounds with flexible conformations well fitted the different binding site shapes were more likely to be potential JAK2 inhibitors. This high efficient strategy will facilitate virtual screening for novel JAK2 inhibitors and could be even applied in drug discovery against other targets.

  14. Design and synthesis of procollagen C-proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Eric; Chow, Nicholas; Yang, Charles; Sosa, Sergio; Bauer, Udo; Brenner, Mitch; Solow-Cordero, David; Ho, Wen-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) were designed from substrate leads. Compounds were optimized for potency and selectivity, with N-substituted aryl sulfonamide hydroxamates having the best combination of these properties. Compounds 89 and 60 have IC(50) values of 10 and 80 nM, respectively, against PCP; excellent selectivity over MMP's 1, 2, and 9; and activity in cell-based collagen deposition assays.

  15. Plant Protein Inhibitors of Enzymes: Their Role in Animal Nutrition and Plant Defence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Current information and research related to plant protein inhibitors of enzymes are reviewed, including potential uses of the inhibitors for medical treatment and for breeding plant varieties with greater resistance to insects. (DC)

  16. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  17. Recent Developments of C-Aryl Glucoside SGLT2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is almost exclusively expressed in the proximal renal tubules. It is responsible for about 90% of the glucose reabsorption from tubular fluid. Selective inhibition of SGLT2 is expected to favor in the normalization of plasma glucose levels in T2DM patients through the prevention of renal glucose reabsorption and the promotion of glucose excretion from urine. Selective SGLT2 inhibitors have the merits to minimize the gastrointestinal side effects associated with SGLT1 inhibition, and selective SGLT2 inhibition may have a low risk of hypoglycemia. Since the C-aryl glucosides are metabolically more stable than the O-glucosides, numerous efforts have been made in the development of potent and selective C-aryl glucoside SGLT2 inhibitors, and a number of them are now used as anti-diabetes drugs in clinic or at various stages of clinical developments. Based on their structural features, in this review, these SGLT2 inhibitors are classified as three types: the phenyl/arylmethylphenyl C-glucosides, with an emphasis on the modifications on the proximal and/or the distal phenyl ring, and the spacer; the heteroarylmethylphenyl Cglucosides, with a replacement of the distal phenyl ring by a heterocycle like pyridazine, pyrimidine, thiophene and benzothiophene, thiazole, 1,3,4-thiadiazole, and triazolopyridinone; and the glucose-modified Caryl glucosides, including the glucose C-1 derived O-spiroketals, C-4 gem-difluoro analogues, C-5 and C-6 modified derivatives, dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octane bridged ketals, the thioglucosides, and carbasugars. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of each type along with their inhibitory potency against human SGLT2 and selectivity over human SGLT1 are discussed. PMID:26861002

  18. Recent Developments of C-Aryl Glucoside SGLT2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is almost exclusively expressed in the proximal renal tubules. It is responsible for about 90% of the glucose reabsorption from tubular fluid. Selective inhibition of SGLT2 is expected to favor in the normalization of plasma glucose levels in T2DM patients through the prevention of renal glucose reabsorption and the promotion of glucose excretion from urine. Selective SGLT2 inhibitors have the merits to minimize the gastrointestinal side effects associated with SGLT1 inhibition, and selective SGLT2 inhibition may have a low risk of hypoglycemia. Since the C-aryl glucosides are metabolically more stable than the O-glucosides, numerous efforts have been made in the development of potent and selective C-aryl glucoside SGLT2 inhibitors, and a number of them are now used as anti-diabetes drugs in clinic or at various stages of clinical developments. Based on their structural features, in this review, these SGLT2 inhibitors are classified as three types: the phenyl/arylmethylphenyl C-glucosides, with an emphasis on the modifications on the proximal and/or the distal phenyl ring, and the spacer; the heteroarylmethylphenyl Cglucosides, with a replacement of the distal phenyl ring by a heterocycle like pyridazine, pyrimidine, thiophene and benzothiophene, thiazole, 1,3,4-thiadiazole, and triazolopyridinone; and the glucose-modified Caryl glucosides, including the glucose C-1 derived O-spiroketals, C-4 gem-difluoro analogues, C-5 and C-6 modified derivatives, dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octane bridged ketals, the thioglucosides, and carbasugars. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of each type along with their inhibitory potency against human SGLT2 and selectivity over human SGLT1 are discussed.

  19. Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interaction with Capillary Electrophoresis Frontal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao; Kang, Jingwu

    2016-08-16

    A simple and effective method for identifying inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) was developed by using capillary electrophoresis frontal analysis (CE-FA). Antiapoptotic B-cell-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-XL protein, a 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled peptide truncated from the BH3 domain of Bid (F-Bid) as the ligand, and a known Bcl-XL-Bid interaction inhibitor ABT-263 were employed as an experimental model for the proof of concept. In CE-FA, the free ligand is separated from the protein and protein-ligand complex to permit the measurement of the equilibrium concentration of the ligand, hence the dissociation constant of the protein-ligand complex. In the presence of inhibitors, formation of the protein-ligand complex is hindered, thereby the inhibition can be easily identified by the raised plateau height of the ligand and the decayed plateau of the complex. Further, we proposed an equation used to convert the IC50 value into the inhibition constant Ki value, which is more useful than the former for comparison. In addition, the sample pooling strategy was employed to improve the screening throughput more than 10 times. A small chemical library composed of synthetic compounds and natural extracts were screened with the method, two natural products, namely, demethylzeylasteral and celastrol, were identified as new inhibitors to block the Bcl-XL-Bid interaction. Cell-based assay was performed to validate the activity of the identified compounds. The result demonstrated that CE-FA represents a straightforward and robust technique for screening of PPI inhibitors. PMID:27425825

  20. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism. PMID:27698713

  1. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  2. In vitro interaction of C1-inhibitor with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Bos, I; Lubbers, Y; Hack, C E; Agostoni, A

    2001-06-01

    Previous observations of increased generation of thrombin during acute attacks of angioedema in plasma of patients with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency prompted us to evaluate the interaction of C1-INH with thrombin in both purified systems and human plasma. For this purpose, we used several methods: (1) sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis; (2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure complexes between C1-INH and thrombin and inactivated C1-INH; and (3) kinetic studies using a chromogenic assay. We found that the interaction of purified C1-INH with thrombin is associated with the formation of bimolecular complexes of molecular weight (Mr) 130 000 and 120 000 as well as with the appearance of a cleaved form of C1-INH of Mr 97 000. The kinetic studies of inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH showed an average second-order rate constant of 19/s per mol/l, which was significantly increased in the presence of heparin. The addition of thrombin to human plasma was not associated with detectable C1-INH-thrombin complex formation or with cleavage of C1-INH. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that C1-INH upon interaction with thrombin, in part, forms enzyme-inhibitor complexes and, in part, is cleaved. The low second-order rate constant and the lack of a significant interaction in plasma suggest that the inhibition of thrombin by C1-INH has a minor role in circulating blood; however, its role might be important at the endothelial surface, where high concentrations of glycosaminoglycans occur.

  3. Complex actions of protein kinase A inhibitors on mitogenesis of bovine coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Osinski, M T; Weber, A; Schrör, K

    2000-05-01

    This study investigates the possible modulation of platelet-derived growth factor-(PDGF, 20 ng/ml)-induced DNA synthesis in bovine coronary artery smooth muscle cells by the protein kinase A inhibitors Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic phosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPS, 0. 03-10 microM) and ¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, HCl¿ (H-89, 0.01-1 microM). Rp-cAMPS concentration dependently enhanced PDGF-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast, no potentiation of PDGF-induced DNA synthesis was seen with H-89. However, H-89 but not Rp-cAMPS, inhibited p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Thus, Rp-cAMPS, but not H-89, unmasks inhibitory actions of protein kinase A on PDGF-induced mitogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells. Low specificity may limit the use of H-89 as protein kinase A inhibitor. PMID:10812046

  4. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  5. Anticytolytic screen identifies inhibitors of mycobacterial virulence protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Rybniker, Jan; Chen, Jeffrey M; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Vocat, Anthony; Benjak, Andrej; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Zhang, Ming; Székely, Rita; Greff, Zoltán; Orfi, László; Szabadkai, István; Pató, János; Kéri, György; Cole, Stewart T

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires protein secretion systems like ESX-1 for intracellular survival and virulence. The major virulence determinant and ESX-1 substrate, EsxA, arrests phagosome maturation and lyses cell membranes, resulting in tissue damage and necrosis that promotes pathogen spread. To identify inhibitors of Mtb protein secretion, we developed a fibroblast survival assay exploiting this phenotype and selected molecules that protect host cells from Mtb-induced lysis without being bactericidal in vitro. Hit compounds blocked EsxA secretion and promoted phagosome maturation in macrophages, thus reducing bacterial loads. Target identification studies led to the discovery of BTP15, a benzothiophene inhibitor of the histidine kinase MprB that indirectly regulates ESX-1, and BBH7, a benzyloxybenzylidene-hydrazine compound. BBH7 affects Mtb metal-ion homeostasis and revealed zinc stress as an activating signal for EsxA secretion. This screening approach extends the target spectrum of small molecule libraries and will help tackle the mounting problem of antibiotic-resistant mycobacteria.

  6. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs. PMID:26091166

  7. Extracellular proteins needed for C. elegans mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Du, H; Gu, G; William, C M; Chalfie, M

    1996-01-01

    The mec-5 and mec-9 genes encode putative extracellular proteins that allow a set of six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans to respond to gentle touch. MEC-5 is a collagen made by the epidermal cells that surround the touch cells. Mutations causing touch insensitivity affect the Gly-X-Y repeats of this collagen. mec-9 produces two transcripts, the larger of which is expressed in the touch cells and two PVD neurons. This transcript encodes a protein with 5 Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domains, 6 EGF-like repeats (2 of the Ca(2+)-binding type), and a glutamic acid-rich region. Missense mutations causing touch insensitivity affect both the EGF-like and Kunitz domains. Since mec-9 loss of function mutations dominantly enhance the touch insensitive phenotype of several mec-5 mutations, MEC-5 and MEC-9 may interact. We propose that these proteins provide an extracellular attachment point for the mechanosensory channels of the touch cells.

  8. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  9. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Pompeu, Dávia G; Smolka, Marcus B; Gozzo, Fabio C; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N; Granjeiro, Paulo A; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge.

  10. Recombinant replacement therapy for hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Dumitru; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cicardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare genetic condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized most commonly by the production of either inadequate or nonfunctioning C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), a blood protein that regulates proteases in the complement, fibrinolytic and contact systems. Patients with hereditary angioedema suffer from episodic, unpredictable manifestations of edema affecting multiple anatomical locations, including the GI tract, facial tissue, the upper airway, oropharynx, urogenital region and/or the arms and legs. A rational approach to treatment is replacement of C1-INH protein, to normalize the levels of C1-INH activity and halt the progression of the biochemical activation processes underlying the edema formation. Ruconest is a highly purified recombinant human C1-INH. This article will focus on the results of ten clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of Ruconest(®) (Pharming Group NV, Leiden, the Netherlands), which is now approved for use in Europe, Israel and the USA.

  11. Recombinant replacement therapy for hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Dumitru; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cicardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare genetic condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized most commonly by the production of either inadequate or nonfunctioning C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), a blood protein that regulates proteases in the complement, fibrinolytic and contact systems. Patients with hereditary angioedema suffer from episodic, unpredictable manifestations of edema affecting multiple anatomical locations, including the GI tract, facial tissue, the upper airway, oropharynx, urogenital region and/or the arms and legs. A rational approach to treatment is replacement of C1-INH protein, to normalize the levels of C1-INH activity and halt the progression of the biochemical activation processes underlying the edema formation. Ruconest is a highly purified recombinant human C1-INH. This article will focus on the results of ten clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of Ruconest(®) (Pharming Group NV, Leiden, the Netherlands), which is now approved for use in Europe, Israel and the USA. PMID:26250409

  12. An allosteric inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 3.

    PubMed

    Siarheyeva, Alena; Senisterra, Guillermo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Wasney, Gregory A; Chau, Irene; Marcellus, Richard; Hajian, Taraneh; Liu, Feng; Korboukh, Ilia; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Min, Jinrong; Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Loppnau, Peter; Poda, Gennadiy; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Brown, Peter J; Jin, Jian; Al-Awar, Rima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Schapira, Matthieu; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-08-01

    PRMT3, a protein arginine methyltransferase, has been shown to influence ribosomal biosynthesis by catalyzing the dimethylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S2. Although PRMT3 has been reported to be a cytosolic protein, it has been shown to methylate histone H4 peptide (H4 1-24) in vitro. Here, we report the identification of a PRMT3 inhibitor (1-(benzo[d][1,2,3]thiadiazol-6-yl)-3-(2-cyclohexenylethyl)urea; compound 1) with IC50 value of 2.5 μM by screening a library of 16,000 compounds using H4 (1-24) peptide as a substrate. The crystal structure of PRMT3 in complex with compound 1 as well as kinetic analysis reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Mutating PRMT3 residues within the allosteric site or using compound 1 analogs that disrupt interactions with allosteric site residues both abrogated binding and inhibitory activity. These data demonstrate an allosteric mechanism for inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases, an emerging class of therapeutic targets.

  13. IAPs: more than just inhibitors of apoptosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Dubrez-Daloz, Laurence; Dupoux, Alban; Cartier, Jessy

    2008-04-15

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a conserved family of proteins identified in species ranging from virus, yeasts, nematodes, fishes, flies and mammals. The common structural feature is the presence of at least one Baculovirus IAP Repeat (BIR) domain. Hence, IAPs are also known as BIR-containing proteins (BIRCs). Most of them display anti-apoptotic properties when overexpressed. In drosophila, IAPs are sufficient and necessary to promote cell survival through a direct regulation of apoptotic proteases called caspases. In mammals, BIRC4/XIAP, the most studied IAP member can directly inhibit the activity of caspase-3, 7 and 9. However, this activity is not conserved in other IAPs and physiological relevancies of such anti-caspase activities are still discussed. A detailed analysis of IAP-deficient mice or derived cells, deletion experiments performed in drosophila and zebrafish, or research of protein partners have revealed the importance of IAPs in adaptive response to cellular stress, in cell proliferation, differentiation, signaling, motility and in immune response. This review discusses recent data that help understanding of cellular functions of IAPs.

  14. Protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate water flow in vasopressin-stimulated toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, B.S.; Ast, M.B.; Fusco, M.J.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. )

    1988-01-01

    Vasopressin stimulates the introduction of aggregated particles, which may represent pathways for water flow, into the luminal membrane of toad urinary bladder. It is not known whether water transport pathways are degraded on removal from membrane or whether they are recycled. The authors examined the effect of the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin using repeated 30-min cycles of vasopressin followed by washout of vasopressin, all in the presence of an osmotic gradient, a protocol that maximizes aggregate turnover. High dose cycloheximide inhibited flow immediately. Low dose cycloheximide did not affect initial flow. In the absence of vasopressin, inhibition did not develop. Despite the inhibition of flow in vasopressin-treated tissues, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase ratio was elevated in cycloheximide-treated tissues, suggesting modulation at a distal site in the stimulatory cascade. ({sup 14}C)urea permeability was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin also inhibited water flow by the fourth challenge with vasopressin. The data suggest that protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate flow at a site that is distal to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, the reversal of inhibition in MIX-treated tissues suggests that the water pathway can be fully manifested given suitable stimulation. They conclude that either large stores of the transport system are available or that the transport system is extensively recycled on retrieval from the membrane.

  15. Proteolytic inactivation of plasma C1- inhibitor in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Huijbregts, C C; Schreuder, W O; Felt-Bersma, R J; Abbink, J J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1989-08-01

    Activation of both the complement system and the contact system of intrinsic coagulation is implicated in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Because C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh) regulates the activation of both cascade systems, we studied the characteristics of plasma C1-Inh in 48 patients with severe sepsis on admission to the Intensive Care Unit at the Free University of Amsterdam. The ratio between the level of functional and antigenic C1-Inh (functional index) was significantly reduced in the patients with sepsis compared with healthy volunteers (P = 0.004). The assessment of modified (cleaved), inactive C1-Inh (iC1-Inh), and complexed forms of C1-Inh (nonfunctional C1-Inh species) revealed that the reduced functional index was mainly due to the presence of iC1-Inh. On SDS-PAGE, iC1-Inh species migrated with a lower apparent molecular weight (Mr 98,000, 91,000, and 86,000) than native C1-Inh (Mr 110,000). Elevated iC1-Inh levels (greater than or equal to 0.13 microM) were found in 81% of all patients, sometimes up to 1.6 microM. Levels of iC1-Inh on admission appeared to be of prognostic value: iC1-Inh was higher in 27 patients who died than in 21 patients who survived (P = 0.003). The mortality in 15 patients with iC1-Inh levels up to 0.2 microM was 27%, but in 12 patients with plasma iC1-Inh exceeding 0.44 microM, the mortality was 83%. The overall mortality in the patients with sepsis was 56%. We propose that the cleavage of C1-Inh in patients with sepsis reflects processes that play a major role in the development of fatal complications during sepsis.

  16. Bisubstrate Inhibitors of Biotin Protein Ligase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistant to Cyclonucleoside Formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is the leading cause of bacterial infectious disease mortality. Biotin protein ligase (BirA) globally regulates lipid metabolism in Mtb through the posttranslational biotinylation of acyl coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) involved in lipid biosynthesis and is essential for Mtb survival. We previously developed a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of BirA that displays potent enzyme inhibition and whole-cell activity against multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant Mtb strains. Here we present the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a focused series of inhibitors, which are resistant to cyclonucleoside formation, a key decomposition pathway of our initial analogue. Improved chemical stability is realized through replacement of the adenosyl N-3 nitrogen and C-5′ oxygen atom with carbon as well as incorporation of a bulky group on the nucleobase to prevent the required syn-conformation necessary for proper alignment of N-3 with C-5′. PMID:24363833

  17. Discovery and optimization of antibacterial AccC inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Cliff C.; Shipps, Jr., Gerald W.; Yang, Zhiwei; Sun, Binyuan; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Soucy, Kyle A.; Soriano, Aileen; Orth, Peter; Xiao, Li; Mann, Paul; Black, Todd

    2010-09-17

    The biotin carboxylase (AccC) is part of the multi-component bacterial acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (ACCase) and is essential for pathogen survival. We describe herein the affinity optimization of an initial hit to give 2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxamide (1), which was identified using our proprietary Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS). The X-ray co-crystal structure of 1 was solved and revealed several key interactions and opportunities for further optimization in the ATP site of AccC. Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD) and parallel synthetic approaches resulted in a novel series of AccC inhibitors, exemplified by (R)-2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-5-carboxamide (40). This compound is a potent and selective inhibitor of bacterial AccC with an IC{sub 50} of 20 nM and a MIC of 0.8 {micro}g/mL against a sensitized strain of Escherichia coli (HS294 E. coli).

  18. Geminivirus C3 Protein: Replication Enhancement and Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Settlage, Sharon B.; See, Renee G.; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Most dicot-infecting geminiviruses encode a replication enhancer protein (C3, AL3, or REn) that is required for optimal replication of their small, single-stranded DNA genomes. C3 interacts with C1, the essential viral replication protein that initiates rolling circle replication. C3 also homo-oligomerizes and interacts with at least two host-encoded proteins, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the retinoblastoma-related protein (pRBR). It has been proposed that protein interactions contribute to C3 function. Using the C3 protein of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, we examined the impact of mutations to amino acids that are conserved across the C3 protein family on replication enhancement and protein interactions. Surprisingly, many of the mutations did not affect replication enhancement activity of C3 in tobacco protoplasts. Other mutations either enhanced or were detrimental to C3 replication activity. Analysis of mutated proteins in yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that mutations that inactivate C3 replication enhancement activity also reduce or inactivate C3 oligomerization and interaction with C1 and PCNA. In contrast, mutated C3 proteins impaired for pRBR binding are fully functional in replication assays. Hydrophobic residues in the middle of the C3 protein were implicated in C3 interaction with itself, C1, and PCNA, while polar resides at both the N and C termini of the protein are important for C3-pRBR interaction. These experiments established the importance of C3-C3, C3-C1, and C3-PCNA interactions in geminivirus replication. While C3-pRBR interaction is not required for viral replication in cycling cells, it may play a role during infection of differentiated cells in intact plants. PMID:16014949

  19. A new simplified procedure for C1 inhibitor purification. A novel use for jacalin-agarose.

    PubMed

    Pilatte, Y; Hammer, C H; Frank, M M; Fries, L F

    1989-06-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the major regulatory protein of the classical pathway of complement activation, is also involved in the regulation of several other plasma proteolytic systems including the coagulation, fibrinolytic and contact systems. All the previously published methods for the purification of C1-INH are time-consuming and some do not yield highly pure protein. Recently, it was reported that Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin, also called jacalin, binds C1-INH. Since jacalin binds only a small number of human serum proteins it appeared that jacalin-agarose affinity chromatography would constitute a very selective early step for the purification of C1-INH. Consequently we have designed a new, simplified three-step procedure for the purification of C1-INH which includes PEG fractionation, jacalin-agarose chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose which takes advantage of the marked hydrophilicity of the inhibitor. This procedure has three major advantages over those which have been the most frequently used. Firstly, it includes only two fast chromatographic steps. Secondly, because the C1-INH pool is cleanly and predictably separated from the unwanted proteins by differential elution conditions in both chromatographic steps, no antigenic or functional assays are required to define the desired peaks. Thirdly, only the final product is dialyzed while all other methods required several buffer changes. For these reasons this procedure is much faster and simpler than the previously published methods. About 10-12 mg of highly purified and fully active C1-INH can be obtained within 1 day from 120 ml of plasma giving an average yield of 40-45%. This method may thus be highly adaptable to bulk purification for clinical use or for preparation of genetically or pathologically altered C1-INH from clinical specimens.

  20. The Ubiquitin-associated Domain of Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Facilitates Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Budhidarmo, Rhesa; Day, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) proteins are essential RING E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate apoptosis and inflammatory responses. cIAPs contain a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain that binds ubiquitin and is implicated in the regulation of cell survival and proteasomal degradation. Here we show that mutation of the MGF and LL motifs in the UBA domain of cIAP1 caused unfolding and increased cIAP1 multimonoubiquitylation. By developing a UBA mutant that disrupted ubiquitin binding but not the structure of the UBA domain, we found that the UBA domain enhances cIAP1 and cIAP2 ubiquitylation. We demonstrate that the UBA domain binds to the UbcH5b∼Ub conjugate, and this promotes RING domain-dependent monoubiquitylation. This study establishes ubiquitin-binding modules, such as the UBA domain, as important regulatory modules that can fine tune the activity of E3 ligases. PMID:25065467

  1. An Intriguing Correlation Based on the Superimposition of Residue Pairs with Inhibitors that Target Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakadai, Masakazu; Tomida, Shuta; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Druggable sites on protein-protein interfaces are difficult to predict. To survey inhibitor-binding sites onto which residues are superimposed at protein-protein interfaces, we analyzed publicly available information for 39 inhibitors that target the protein-protein interfaces of 8 drug targets. By focusing on the differences between residues that were superimposed with inhibitors and non-superimposed residues, we observed clear differences in the distances and changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas (∆SASA). Based on the observation that two or more residues were superimposed onto inhibitors in 37 (95%) of 39 protein-inhibitor complexes, we focused on the two-residue relationships. Application of a cross-validation procedure confirmed a linear negative correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASAs of the residues. Finally, we applied the regression equation of this correlation to four inhibitors that bind to new sites not bound by the 39 inhibitors as well as additional inhibitors of different targets. Our results shed light on the two-residue correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASA, which may be a useful relationship for identifying the key two-residues as potential targets of protein-protein interfaces. PMID:26730437

  2. Potentiation of C1 inhibitor by glycosaminoglycans: dextran sulfate species are effective inhibitors of in vitro complement activation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; te Velthuis, H; Lubbers, Y T; de Ruig, C P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E

    1997-08-15

    Activation of the complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Hence, an effective inhibitor of complement might be useful to reduce tissue damage. Some glycosaminoglycans (GAG), such as heparin, are known to inhibit the interaction of C1q with activators and the assembly of the classical and the alternative pathway C3 convertases. Furthermore, they may potentiate C1 inhibitor-mediated inactivation of C1s. To search for potential complement inhibitors, we systematically investigated the complement inhibitory properties of various synthetic and naturally occurring GAG (dextran sulfates 500,000 and 5,000, heparin, N-acetylheparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates A and C). First, we assessed the effect of GAG on the second-order rate constant of the inactivation of C1s by C1 inhibitor. This rate constant increased 6- to 130-fold in the presence of the GAG, dextran sulfate being the most effective. Second, all tested GAG were found to reduce deposition of C4 and C3 on immobilized aggregated human IgG (AHG) and to reduce fluid phase formation of C4b/c and C3b/c in recalcified plasma upon incubation with AHG. Dextran sulfate again was found to be most effective. We conclude that GAG modulate complement activation in vitro and that the low molecular weight dextran sulfate (m.w. 5000) may be a candidate for pharmacologic manipulation of complement activation via potentiation of C1 inhibitor.

  3. Role of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Pakaski, M; Kasa, P

    2003-06-01

    Potentiation of central cholinergic activity has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for improving the cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing the acetylcholine concentration in the brain by modulating acetylcholine-sterase (AChE) activity is among the most promising therapeutic strategies. Efforts to treat the underlying pathology based on the modulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing in order to decrease the accumulation of beta-amyloid are also very important. Alterations in APP metabolism have recently been proposed to play a key role in the long-lasting effects of AChE inhibitors. This review surveys recent data from in vivo and in vitro studies that have contributed to our understanding of the role of AChE inhibitors in APP processing. The regulatory mechanisms relating to the muscarinic agonist effect, protein kinase C activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, involving the alpha-secretase or the 5 -UTR region of the APP gene, are also discussed. Further work is warranted to elucidate the exact roles in APP metabolism of the AChE inhibitors used in AD therapy at present. PMID:12769797

  4. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  5. Identification of Protein Palmitoylation Inhibitors from a Scaffold Ranking Library

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Laura D.; Lenhart, Brian J.; Mitchell, David A.; Santos, Radleigh G.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Deschenes, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The addition of palmitoyl moieties to proteins regulates their membrane targeting, subcellular localization, and stability. Dysregulation of the enzymes which catalyzed the palmitoyl addition and/or the substrates of these enzymes have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders, implying these enzymes and substrates are valid targets for pharmaceutical intervention. However, current chemical modulators of zDHHC PAT enzymes lack specificity and affinity, underscoring the need for screening campaigns to identify new specific, high affinity modulators. This report describes a mixture based screening approach to identify inhibitors of Erf2 activity. Erf2 is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PAT responsible for catalyzing the palmitoylation of Ras2, an ortholog of the human Ras oncogene proteins. A chemical library developed by the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies consists of more than 30 million compounds designed around 68 molecular scaffolds that are systematically arranged into positional scanning and scaffold ranking formats. We have used this approach to identify and characterize several scaffold backbones and R-groups that reduce or eliminate the activity of Erf2 in vitro. Here, we present the analysis of one of the scaffold backbones, bis-cyclic piperazine. We identified compounds that inhibited Erf2 auto-palmitoylation activity using a fluorescence-based, coupled assay in a high throughput screening (HTS) format and validated the hits utilizing an orthogonal gel-based assay. Finally, we examined the effects of the compounds on cell growth in a yeast cell-based assay. Based on our results, we have identified specific, high affinity palmitoyl transferase inhibitors that will serve as a foundation for future compound design. PMID:27009891

  6. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  7. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? C-Reactive Protein Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: CRP Formal name: C-Reactive Protein Related tests: ESR , Complement , Procalcitonin , ANA , Rheumatoid Factor ...

  8. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying (Annie); Baron, Lauren A.; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosomareceptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  9. Protein-Directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Guide to Protein Ligand and Inhibitor Discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjie; Leung, Ivanhoe K H

    2016-07-16

    Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry is an emerging technique for efficient discovery of novel chemical structures for binding to a target protein. Typically, this method relies on a library of small molecules that react reversibly with each other to generate a combinatorial library. The components in the combinatorial library are at equilibrium with each other under thermodynamic control. When a protein is added to the equilibrium mixture, and if the protein interacts with any components of the combinatorial library, the position of the equilibrium will shift and those components that interact with the protein will be amplified, which can then be identified by a suitable biophysical technique. Such information is useful as a starting point to guide further organic synthesis of novel protein ligands and enzyme inhibitors. This review uses literature examples to discuss the practicalities of applying this method to inhibitor discovery, in particular, the set-up of the combinatorial library, the reversible reactions that may be employed, and the choice of detection methods to screen protein ligands from a mixture of reversibly forming molecules.

  10. Synergistic Blockade of Mitotic Exit by Two Chemical Inhibitors of the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Sackton, Katharine L.; Dimova, Nevena; Zeng, Xing; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Sackton, Timothy B.; Meaders, Johnathan; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Sigoillot, Frederic; Yu, Hongtao; Luo, Xuelian; King, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein machines are multi-subunit protein complexes that orchestrate highly regulated biochemical tasks. An example is the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a thirteen-subunit ubiquitin ligase that initiates the metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit by targeting proteins such as securin and cyclin B1 for ubiquitin-dependent destruction by the proteasome1,2. Because blocking mitotic exit is an effective approach for inducing tumor cell death3,4, the APC/C represents a potential novel target for cancer therapy. APC/C activation in mitosis requires binding of Cdc205, which forms a co-receptor with the APC/C to recognize substrates containing a Destruction box (D-box)6-14. Here we demonstrate that we can synergistically inhibit APC/C-dependent proteolysis and mitotic exit by simultaneously disrupting two protein-protein interactions within the APC/C-Cdc20-substrate ternary complex. We identified a small molecule, called apcin (APC inhibitor), which binds to Cdc20 and competitively inhibits the ubiquitylation of D-box-containing substrates. Analysis of the crystal structure of the apcin-Cdc20 complex suggests that apcin occupies the D-box-binding pocket on the side face of the WD40-domain. The ability of apcin to block mitotic exit is synergistically amplified by co-addition of tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), a small molecule that blocks the APC/C-Cdc20 interaction15,16. This work suggests that simultaneous disruption of multiple, weak protein-protein interactions is an effective approach for inactivating a protein machine. PMID:25156254

  11. Zinc can play chaperone-like and inhibitor roles during import of mitochondrial small Tim proteins.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bruce; Ang, Swee Kim; Yan, Guanhua; Lu, Hui

    2009-03-13

    Zinc is an essential cofactor required for the function of approximately 8% of the yeast and 10% of the human proteome. All of the "small Tim" proteins of the mitochondrial intermembrane space contain a strictly conserved "twin CX(3)C" zinc finger motif, which can bind zinc ions in the Cys-reduced form. We have shown previously that although disulfide bond formation is essential for the function of these proteins in mitochondria, only reduced proteins can be imported into mitochondria (Lu, H., Allen, S., Wardleworth, L., Savory, P., and Tokatlidis, K. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 18952-18958 and Morgan, B., and Lu, H. (2008) Biochem. J. 411, 115-122). However, the role of zinc during the import of these proteins is unclear. This study shows that the function of zinc is complex. It can play a thiol stabilizer role preventing oxidative folding of the small Tim proteins and maintaining the proteins in an import-competent form. On the other hand, zinc-bound forms cannot be imported into mitochondria efficiently. Furthermore, our results show that zinc is a powerful inhibitor of Erv1, an essential component of the import pathway used by the small Tim proteins. We propose that zinc plays a chaperone-like role in the cytosol during biogenesis of the small Tim proteins and that the proteins are imported into mitochondria through the apo-forms.

  12. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens. PMID:25757622

  13. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  14. Protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate water flow in vasopressin-stimulated toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Hoch, B S; Ast, M B; Fusco, M J; Jacoby, M; Levine, S D

    1988-01-01

    Vasopressin stimulates the introduction of aggregated particles, which may represent pathways for water flow, into the luminal membrane of toad urinary bladder. It is not known whether water transport pathways are degraded on removal from membrane or whether they are recycled. We examined the effect of the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin using repeated 30-min cycles of vasopressin followed by washout of vasopressin, all in the presence of an osmotic gradient, a protocol that maximizes aggregate turnover. "High dose" cycloheximide (200 micrograms/ml) inhibited flow immediately. "Low dose" cycloheximide (1 microgram/ml) did not affect initial flow; however, flow was inhibited by the fourth restimulation. On further rechallenge, inhibition persisted but did not increase. In the absence of vasopressin, inhibition did not develop. Despite the inhibition of flow in vasopressin-treated tissues, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase ratio (-cAMP/+cAMP), an index of in vivo cAMP effect, was elevated in cycloheximide-treated tissues, suggesting modulation at a distal site in the stimulatory cascade. Cycloheximide inhibited flow when 10 microM forskolin or 0.2 mM 8-BrcAMP was substituted for vasopressin in the fourth period; however, MIX (4 mM)-stimulated flow was enhanced by 1 microgram/ml cycloheximide but inhibited by 200 micrograms/ml cycloheximide. [14C]urea permeability was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin (0.5 mM) also inhibited water flow by the fourth challenge with vasopressin. The data suggest that protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate flow at a site that is distal to cAMP-dependent protein kinase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins prevent clearance of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Gregor; Preston, Simon; Allison, Cody; Cooney, James; Toe, Jesse G.; Stutz, Michael D.; Ojaimi, Samar; Scott, Hamish W.; Baschuk, Nikola; Nachbur, Ueli; Torresi, Joseph; Chin, Ruth; Colledge, Danielle; Li, Xin; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter; Bowden, Scott; Silke, John; Begley, C. Glenn; Pellegrini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can result in a spectrum of outcomes from immune-mediated control to disease progression, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The host molecular pathways that influence and contribute to these outcomes need to be defined. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection, we identified some of the host cellular and molecular factors that impact on infection outcomes. Here, we show that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) attenuate TNF signaling during hepatitis B infection, and they restrict the death of infected hepatocytes, thus allowing viral persistence. Animals with a liver-specific cIAP1 and total cIAP2 deficiency efficiently control HBV infection compared with WT mice. This phenotype was partly recapitulated in mice that were deficient in cIAP2 alone. These results indicate that antagonizing the function of cIAPs may promote the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:25902529

  16. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-06-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel FAK scaffold inhibitors targeting the FAK-VEGFR3 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Priyanka N; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Kurenova, Elena V; Magis, Andrew T; Pandey, Ravindra K; Cance, William G

    2014-06-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) are tyrosine kinases, which function as key modulators of survival and metastasis signals in cancer cells. Previously, we reported that small molecule chlorpyramine hydrochloride (C4) specifically targets the interaction between FAK and VEGFR3 and exhibits anti-tumor efficacy. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of 1 (C4) analogs on the basis of structure activity relationship and molecular modeling. The resulting new compounds were evaluated for their binding to the FAT domain of FAK and anti-cancer activity. Amongst all tested analogs, compound 29 augmented anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines with stronger binding to the FAT domain of FAK and disrupted the FAK-VEGFR3 interaction. In conclusion, we hope that this work will contribute to further studies of more potent and selective FAK-VEGFR3 protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

  18. A Molecular Insight into Complement Evasion by the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor Protein Family1

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Tzekou, Apostolia; Garcia, Brandon L.; Hammel, Michal; McWhorter, William J.; Sfyroera, Georgia; Wu, You-Qiang; Holers, V. Michael; Herbert, Andrew P.; Barlow, Paul N.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Lambris, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses an impressive arsenal of complement evasion proteins that help the bacterium escape attack of the immune system. The staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN) protein exhibits a particularly high potency and was previously shown to block complement by acting at the level of the C3 convertases. However, many details about the exact binding and inhibitory mechanism remained unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that SCIN directly binds with nanomolar affinity to a functionally important area of C3b that lies near the C terminus of its β-chain. Direct competition of SCIN with factor B for C3b slightly decreased the formation of surface-bound convertase. However, the main inhibitory effect can be attributed to an entrapment of the assembled convertase in an inactive state. Whereas native C3 is still able to bind to the blocked convertase, no generation and deposition of C3b could be detected in the presence of SCIN. Furthermore, SCIN strongly competes with the binding of factor H to C3b and influences its regulatory activities: the SCIN-stabilized convertase was essentially insensitive to decay acceleration by factor H and the factor I- and H-mediated conversion of surface-bound C3b to iC3b was significantly reduced. By targeting a key area on C3b, SCIN is able to block several essential functions within the alternative pathway, which explains the high potency of the inhibitor. Our findings provide an important insight into complement evasion strategies by S. aureus and may act as a base for further functional studies. PMID:19625656

  19. Brainstorming: weighted voting prediction of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    The "Brainstorming" approach presented in this paper is a weighted voting method that can improve the quality of predictions generated by several machine learning (ML) methods. First, an ensemble of heterogeneous ML algorithms is trained on available experimental data, then all solutions are gathered and a consensus is built between them. The final prediction is performed using a voting procedure, whereby the vote of each method is weighted according to a quality coefficient calculated using multivariable linear regression (MLR). The MLR optimization procedure is very fast, therefore no additional computational cost is introduced by using this jury approach. Here, brainstorming is applied to selecting actives from large collections of compounds relating to five diverse biological targets of medicinal interest, namely HIV-reverse transcriptase, cyclooxygenase-2, dihydrofolate reductase, estrogen receptor, and thrombin. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) database was used for selecting known inhibitors for these protein targets, and experimental data was then used to train a set of machine learning methods. The benchmark dataset (available at http://bio.icm.edu.pl/∼darman/chemoinfo/benchmark.tar.gz ) can be used for further testing of various clustering and machine learning methods when predicting the biological activity of compounds. Depending on the protein target, the overall recall value is raised by at least 20% in comparison to any single machine learning method (including ensemble methods like random forest) and unweighted simple majority voting procedures.

  20. Small-Molecule Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor of Oncogenic Rho Signaling.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Cosmo D; Dreyer, Elisa; Reggi, Erica; Osman, Halima; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gonano, Cynthia; Cavin, Sabrina; Box, Clare L; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Bellucci, Luca; Seeber, Michele; Fanelli, Francesca

    2016-09-22

    Uncontrolled activation of Rho signaling by RhoGEFs, in particular AKAP13 (Lbc) and its close homologs, is implicated in a number of human tumors with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Structure predictions and alanine scanning mutagenesis of Lbc identified a circumscribed hot region for RhoA recognition and activation. Virtual screening targeting that region led to the discovery of an inhibitor of Lbc-RhoA interaction inside cells. By interacting with the DH domain, the compound inhibits the catalytic activity of Lbc, halts cellular responses to activation of oncogenic Lbc pathways, and reverses a number of prostate cancer cell phenotypes such as proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. This study provides insights into the structural determinants of Lbc-RhoA recognition. This is a successful example of structure-based discovery of a small protein-protein interaction inhibitor able to halt oncogenic Rho signaling in cancer cells with therapeutic implications.

  1. Bivalent inhibitors for disrupting protein surface-substrate interactions and for dual inhibition of protein prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shinnosuke; Kato, Nobuo; Harada, Kazuo; Ohkanda, Junko

    2011-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight compounds that disrupt protein−protein interactions (PPIs) have tremendous potential applications as clinical agents and as chemical probes for investigating intracellular PPI networks. However, disrupting PPIs is extremely difficult due to the large, flat interfaces of many proteins, which often lack structurally defined cavities to which drug-like molecules could bind in a thermodynamically favorable manner. Here, we describe a series of bivalent compounds that anchor to the enzyme active site to deliver a minimally sized surface-binding module to the targeted surface involved in transient PPI with a substrate. These compounds are capable of significantly inhibiting enzymatic reactions involving protein surface−substrate interaction in the single-digit nanomole range. Inhibitors of farnesyltransferase (FTase), which possesses a negatively charged local area on its α-subunit, were designed by attaching a module derived from a branched monoamine-containing gallate to a conventional active-site-directed CVIM tetrapeptide using an alkyl spacer. A significant improvement in inhibitory activity (>200-fold) against farnesylation of the K-Ras4B peptide was observed when the gallate module was attached to the CVIM tetrapeptide. Furthermore, the bivalent compounds had submicromolar inhibitory activity against geranylgeranylation of the K-Ras4B peptide catalyzed by GGTase I, which has an α-subunit identical to that of FTase. The anchoring strategy we describe would be useful for designing a new class of PPI inhibitors as well as dual enzyme inhibitors targeting common surface structures.

  2. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates. PMID:17405861

  3. Characterization of Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Morgan, Brandie R; Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Sharma, Ajay; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Rieger, Frank G

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are DNA-binding transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation, migration, inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis. However, their expression and role in the cornea is unknown. The present study was undertaken to characterize the expression of Id proteins and their interactions with the pro-fibrotic cytokine Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) and anti-fibrotic cytokine, bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in human cornea. Human donor corneas procured from Eye Bank were used. Id proteins were localized in human corneal sections using immunofluorescence. Primary cultures of human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) were established and treated with either TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) or BMP7 (10 ng/ml) for 24 h in serum free medium. Expression of Id's in response to TGFβ1, BMP7 and TGFβ1 + BMP7 was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Id1 and Id2 proteins were ubiquitously expressed in the epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes in human cornea. The Id1 was localized to the basal epithelial cells as seen by immunohistochemistry. HCF expressed all known mammalian Id genes (Id1-Id4). In addition, Id1 and Id2 are selectively expressed in HCF. Treatment of human recombinant TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) to serum-starved HCF showed a significant increase in Id genes (Id1, Id2 and Id4) at 2 h time point compared to BMP7 treatment, which showed time dependent increase in the expression of Id1-Id3 at 24-48 h. Combined treatment with TGFβ1 + BMP7 to HCF showed a significant increase in Id1 transcript and an increasing trend in Id3 and Id4 expression. The results of this study suggest that Id family of genes (Id1-Id4) are localized in the human cornea and expressed in the corneal fibroblasts. Also, Id's were differentially regulated with TGFβ1 and/or BMP7 in a time dependent manner and might serve as a therapeutic target in corneal fibrosis.

  4. Proteasome inhibitors attenuated cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoo, Young Sook; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-05-01

    The Ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in protein degradation, cell cycle control, and growth and inflammatory cell signaling. Dysfunction of UPS in cardiac diseases has been seen in many studies. Cholesterol acts as an inducer of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the cholesterol-induced hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cells is examined in order to observe whether UPS is involved in cardiac hypertrophy. The treatment of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib markedly reduced cellular surface area and mRNA expression of β-MHC in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, activated AKT and ERK were significantly attenuated by MG132 and Bortezomib in cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrated that cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed by proteasome inhibitors. Thus, regulatory mechanism of cholesterol- induced cardiac hypertrophy by proteasome inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of heart failure. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 270-275]. PMID:26592933

  5. Proteasome inhibitors attenuated cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in H9c2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoo, Young Sook; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-01-01

    The Ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in protein degradation, cell cycle control, and growth and inflammatory cell signaling. Dysfunction of UPS in cardiac diseases has been seen in many studies. Cholesterol acts as an inducer of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the cholesterol-induced hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cells is examined in order to observe whether UPS is involved in cardiac hypertrophy. The treatment of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib markedly reduced cellular surface area and mRNA expression of β-MHC in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, activated AKT and ERK were significantly attenuated by MG132 and Bortezomib in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrated that cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed by proteasome inhibitors. Thus, regulatory mechanism of cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy by proteasome inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of heart failure. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 270-275] PMID:26592933

  6. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) as potential molecular targets for therapy of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Smolewski, P; Robak, T

    2011-11-01

    Apoptosis, a programmed cell death, plays a key role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. However, impairment of its regulation may promote formation and progression of malignancy. An important part of the apoptotic machinery are the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, regulating caspase activity, cell division or cell survival pathways through binding to their baculovirus AIP repeat (BIR) domains and/or by their ubiquitin-ligase RING zinc finger (RZF) activity. The following IAPs have been described so far: NAIP (neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein; BIRC1), cIAP1 and cIAP2 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 and 2; BIRC2 and BIRC3, respectively), XIAP (X-chromosome binding IAP; BIRC4), survivin (BIRC5), BRUCE (Apollon; BIRC6), livin (BIRC7) and Ts-IAP (testis-specific IAP; BIRC8). Several studies suggested a potential contribution of IAPs to oncogenesis and resistance to anti-tumor treatment. Increased IAP expression was found in variety of human cancers, including hematological malignancies, such as leukemias and B-cell lymphomas. A correlation between the progression of those diseases and high levels of survivin or XIAP has been reported. Overexpression of XIAP in acute myeloid leukemia or survivin in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been indicated as an unfavorable prognostic factors. Elevated cellular levels of cIAP1, cIAP2, XIAP and survivin correlated with a progressive course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Thus, targeting IAPs with small-molecule inhibitors by their antisense approaches or natural IAP antagonist mimetics, may be an attractive strategy of anti-cancer treatment. Such agents can either directly induce apoptosis of tumor cells or sensitize them to other cytotoxic agents, hence overcoming drug-resistance. This review demonstrates the current knowledge on IAP molecular biology, as well as the mechanisms of action and the development of IAP-targeting agents for treatment of hematological

  7. Biochemical comparison of four commercially available C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for treatment of hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Annette; Kalina, Uwe; Hofmann, Peter; Machnig, Thomas; Henkel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background For safe and efficacious treatment of hereditary angioedema, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrates should have high purity and high amounts of functional protein. As no pharmacopoeia requirements exist for C1-INH concentrate lot release, biochemical characteristics as declared by the manufacturers may not be compared directly. This study compared the characteristics and purity profiles of four commercially available C1-INH concentrates. Study Design and Methods The analysis included one transgenic (Ruconest) and three plasma-derived (Berinert, Cetor, Cinryze) C1-INH concentrates. C1-INH antigen concentration was determined by nephelometry, total protein (specific activity) with a Bradford assay, purity by size-exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed. Results Functionality (inversely proportional to antigen-to-activity ratio) was lowest for Ruconest (1.67), followed by Cetor (1.42), Berinert (1.24), and Cinryze (1.22). Specific activity (U/mg) and purity (%) were highest in Ruconest (12.13; 98.6) and Berinert (11.57; 97.0), followed by Cinryze (10.41; 89.5) and Cetor (9.01; 88.6). Main protein bands were found for all plasma-derived products at approximately 105 kDa, and for Ruconest, at approximately 98 kDa. Additional bands in the plasma-derived products were α1-antichymotrypsin, ceruloplasmin, Factor C3 (Cinryze/Cetor), and immunoglobulin heavy constant mu (Berinert). Conclusion Ruconest has a very high purity profile but is not identical to the human C1-INH protein. Of the plasma-derived products, Berinert has the highest purity profile. The impact of the nontherapeutic proteins identified has not yet been evaluated. For harmonization of the analysis for drug release, we recommend the establishment of regulatory requirements for purity determination and the implementation of threshold levels in C1-INH concentrates. PMID:24805006

  8. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  9. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  10. Characterization of the biological effects of a novel protein kinase D inhibitor in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ian M; Bagherzadeh, Azadeh; Charles, Mark; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Chris; Boakes, Alexandra; Kelland, Lloyd; Zachary, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) plays an essential role in angiogenesis during development and in disease largely mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of VEGF to its receptor, VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2)/KDR (kinase insert domain receptor). Recent studies indicate that VEGF activates PKD (protein kinase D) in endothelial cells to regulate a variety of cellular functions, including signalling events, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. To better understand the role of PKD in VEGF-mediated endothelial function, we characterized the effects of a novel pyrazine benzamide PKD inhibitor CRT5 in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). The activity of the isoforms PKD1 and PKD2 were blocked by this inhibitor as indicated by reduced phosphorylation, at Ser916 and Ser876 respectively, after VEGF stimulation. The VEGF-induced phosphorylation of three PKD substrates, histone deacetylase 5, CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein) and HSP27 (heat-shock protein 27) at Ser82, was also inhibited by CRT5. In contrast, CRT6, an inactive analogue of CRT5, had no effect on PKD or HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation. Furthermore, phosphorylation of HSP27 at Ser78, which occurs solely via the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, was also unaffected by CRT5. In vitro kinase assays show that CRT5 did not significantly inhibit several PKC isoforms expressed in endothelial cells. CRT5 also decreased VEGF-induced endothelial migration, proliferation and tubulogenesis, similar to effects seen when the cells were transfected with PKD siRNA (small interfering RNA). CRT5, a novel specific PKD inhibitor, will greatly facilitate the study of the role of PKD signalling mechanisms in angiogenesis. PMID:20497126

  11. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) as therapeutic targets in Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Vijay; Painuly, Utkarsh; Kimlinger, Teresa; Haug, Jessica; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Kumar, Shaji

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins plays a critical role in the control of apoptotic machinery, and has been explored as a therapeutic target. Here, we have examined the functional importance of IAPs in multiple myeloma (MM) by using a Smac-mimetic LCL161. We observed that LCL161 was able to potently induce apoptosis in some MM cell lines but not in others. Examining the levels of XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2 post LCL161 treatment indicated clear down regulation of both XIAP activity and cIAP1 levels in both the sensitive and less sensitive (resistant) cell lines. cIAP2, however, was not down regulated in the cell line resistant to the drug. siRNA mediated silencing of cIAP2 significantly enhanced the effect of LCL161 indicating the importance of down regulating all IAPs simultaneously for induction of apopotsis in MM cells. LCL161 induced marked up regulation of the Jak2/Stat3 pathway in the resistant MM cell lines. Combining LCL161 with a Jak2 specific inhibitor resulted in synergistic cell death in MM cell lines and patient cells. In addition, combining LCL161 with death inducing ligands clearly showed that LCL161 sensitized MM cells to both FAS-L and TRAIL. PMID:24402161

  12. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  13. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  14. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and ovarian dysfunction in galactosemic rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, K W; Cheng, L Y L; Cheung, A L M; O, W S

    2003-03-01

    Galactosemia is a genetic disease with deficiency of galactose-1-uridyltransferase, resulting in the accumulation of galactose or galactose-1-phosphate in the blood and tissues. Rats were fed with normal rat chow and with a high-galactose diet for 4 weeks to give control and galactosemic groups, and their ovarian function was studied. The two groups of rats were injected with pregnant mare's serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and were killed at different time points after human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) injection. The number of oocytes ovulated in the controls was significantly higher than in the galactosemic group. Morphometric studies of the ovaries also showed a higher number of corpora lutea in the controls. Western blot analysis of granulosa cells showed that the overall expressions of Fas and FasL were lower in the control group and their expressions of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) were higher than in the galactosemic group, especially at 8 h post hCG injection. TDT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemical staining of ovarian sections with Ki-67 and IAPs showed more apoptotic granulosa cells in the galactosemic group and the expressions of IAPs in granulosa cells also confirmed the result of the Western blot. These findings support our hypothesis that ovarian dysfunction in galactosemic rats is due to increased apoptosis in granulosa cells of maturing follicles. PMID:12658449

  15. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  16. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of C(5)-substituted derivatives of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BRP-7.

    PubMed

    Levent, Serkan; Gerstmeier, Jana; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Nikels, Felix; Garscha, Ulrike; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver; Banoglu, Erden; Çalışkan, Burcu

    2016-10-21

    Pharmacological intervention with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway leading to suppression of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis is a clinically validated strategy for treatment of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as asthma and atherosclerosis. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of C(5)-substituted analogues of the previously described 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor BRP-7 (IC50 = 0.31 μM) to explore the effects of substitution at the C(5)-benzimidazole (BI) ring as a strategy to increase the potency against FLAP-mediated 5-LO product formation. Incorporation of polar substituents on the C(5) position of the BI core, exemplified by compound 11 with a C(5)-nitrile substituent, significantly enhances the potency for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.07 μM) and monocytes (IC50 = 0.026 μM). PMID:27423639

  18. Polar Recognition Group Study of Keap1-Nrf2 Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Chen; Tan, Shi-Jie; Ji, Jian-Ai; Chen, Zhi-Yun; Yuan, Zhen-Wei; You, Qi-Dong; Jiang, Zheng-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Directly disrupting the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI) has emerged as an attractive way to activate Nrf2, and Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitors have been proposed as potential agents to relieve inflammatory and oxidative stress diseases. In this work, we investigated the diacetic moiety around the potent Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitor DDO1018 (2), which was reported by our group previously. Exploration of bioisosteric replacements afforded the ditetrazole analog 7, which maintains the potent PPI inhibition activity (IC50 = 15.8 nM) in an in vitro fluorescence polarization assay. Physicochemical property determination demonstrated that ditetrazole replacement can improve the drug-like property, including elevation of pK a, log D, and transcellular permeability. Additionally, 7 is more efficacious than 2 on inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent gene products in cells. This study provides an alternative way to replace the diacetic moiety and occupy the polar subpockets in Keap1, which can benefit the subsequent development of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitor. PMID:27660687

  19. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of the putative breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor [11C]methyl 4-((4-(2-(6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl)phenyl)amino-carbonyl)-2-(quinoline-2-carbonylamino)benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Langer, Oliver; Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Bankstahl, Marion; Stanek, Johann; Dörner, Bernd; Bauer, Florian; Baumgartner, Christoph; Löscher, Wolfgang; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multidrug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where it limits brain entry of a broad range of endogenous and exogenous substrates. Methyl 4-((4-(2-(6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl)phenyl)amino-carbonyl)-2-(quinoline-2-carbonylamino)benzoate (1) is a recently discovered BCRP-selective inhibitor, which is structurally derived from the potent P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor tariquidar. The aim of this study was to develop a new PET tracer based on 1 to map BCRP expression levels in vivo. Methods 1 was labelled with 11C in its methyl ester function by reaction of the corresponding carboxylic acid 2 with [11C]methyl triflate. PET imaging of [11C]-1 was performed in wild-type, Mdr1a/b(−/−), Bcrp1(−/−) and Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) mice (n=3 per mouse type) and radiotracer metabolism was assessed in plasma and brain. Results Brain-to-plasma ratios of unchanged [11C]-1 were 4.8- and 10.3-fold higher in Mdr1a/b(−/−) and in Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) mice, respectively, as compared to wild-type animals, but only modestly increased in Bcrp1(−/−) mice. [11C]-1 was rapidly metabolized in vivo giving rise to a polar radiometabolite which was taken up into brain tissue. Conclusion Our data suggest that [11C]-1 preferably interacts with P-gp rather than BCRP at the murine BBB which questions its reported in vitro BCRP selectivity. Consequently, [11C]-1 appears to be unsuitable as a PET tracer to map cerebral BCRP expression. PMID:20610168

  20. Sodium glucose transporter protein 2 inhibitors: focusing on the kidney to treat type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Peene, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide. Treatment of T2DM continues to present challenges, with a significant proportion of patients failing to achieve and maintain glycemic targets. Despite the availability of many oral antidiabetic agents, therapeutic efficacy is also offset by side effects such as weight gain and hypoglycemia. Therefore, the search for novel therapeutic agents with an improved benefit–risk profile continues. In the following review we focus on a novel class of oral antidiabetic drugs, the sodium glucose transporter protein 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, which have unique characteristics. SGLT2 inhibitors focus on the kidney as a therapeutic target, where they inhibit the reabsorption of glucose in the proximal tubule, causing an increase in urinary glucose excretion. Doing this, they reduce plasma glucose independently of the β-cell function of the pancreas. SGLT2 inhibitors are effective at lowering hemoglobin A1c, but also induce weight loss and reduce blood pressure, with a low risk of hypoglycemia. In general, the SGLT2 inhibitors are well tolerated, with the most frequent adverse events being mild urinal and genital infections. Since their primary site of effect is the kidney, these drugs are less effective in patients with impaired kidney function but evidence is emerging that these drugs may also have a protective effect against diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on the most extensively studied SGLT2 inhibitors dapagliflozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin. Dapagliflozin and canagliflozin have already been approved for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration. The European Medicines Agency has accepted all three drugs for marketing. PMID:25419452

  1. Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor in the management of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, is caused by a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This potentially life-threatening condition manifests as recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal swelling of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and larynx. The management of HAE includes treatment of acute episodes, short-term prophylaxis in preparation for exposure to known triggers and long-term prophylaxis to decrease the incidence and severity of HAE attacks. Four products are approved in the USA for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE, including one human plasma-derived C1-INH therapy, a recombinant human C1-INH product (rhC1-INH), a plasma kallikrein inhibitor and a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist. In addition, one human plasma-derived C1-INH therapy and danazol are approved for prophylaxis of HAE attacks. rhC1-INH, extracted from the milk of transgenic rabbits, is a glycoprotein of 478 amino acids with an identical amino acid sequence to the endogenous human C1-INH protein. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of rhC1-INH supports an intravenous dosing strategy of 50 U/kg (maximum 4200 U). The safety and efficacy of rhC1-INH in the treatment of acute attacks in patients with HAE were demonstrated in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies and two open-label extension studies. In a pilot prophylaxis study, weekly administration of rhC1-INH 50 U/kg for 8 weeks reduced the incidence of HAE attacks and was well tolerated. Administration of rhC1-INH has not been associated with the development of anti-drug antibodies or antibodies to anti-host-related impurities.

  2. C1q protein binds to the apoptotic nucleolus and causes C1 protease degradation of nucleolar proteins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yitian; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Yeo, Joo Guan; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-09-11

    In infection, complement C1q recognizes pathogen-congregated antibodies and elicits complement activation. Among endogenous ligands, C1q binds to DNA and apoptotic cells, but whether C1q binds to nuclear DNA in apoptotic cells remains to be investigated. With UV irradiation-induced apoptosis, C1q initially bound to peripheral cellular regions in early apoptotic cells. By 6 h, binding concentrated in the nuclei to the nucleolus but not the chromatins. When nucleoli were isolated from non-apoptotic cells, C1q also bound to these structures. In vivo, C1q exists as the C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2), and C1q binding to ligands activates the C1r/C1s proteases. Incubation of nucleoli with C1 caused degradation of the nucleolar proteins nucleolin and nucleophosmin 1. This was inhibited by the C1 inhibitor. The nucleoli are abundant with autoantigens. C1q binding and C1r/C1s degradation of nucleolar antigens during cell apoptosis potentially reduces autoimmunity. These findings help us to understand why genetic C1q and C1r/C1s deficiencies cause systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  4. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  5. Regulation of cAMP-dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Diskar, Mandy; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Kaupisch, Alexandra; Kaufholz, Melanie; Brockmeyer, Stefanie; Sohmen, Daniel; Berrera, Marco; Zaccolo, Manuela; Boshart, Michael; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Prinz, Anke

    2010-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinases are reversibly complexed with any of the four isoforms of regulatory (R) subunits, which contain either a substrate or a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitory domain. The human protein kinase X (PrKX) is an exemption as it is inhibited only by pseudosubstrate inhibitors, i.e. RIα or RIβ but not by substrate inhibitors RIIα or RIIβ. Detailed examination of the capacity of five PrKX-like kinases ranging from human to protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei) to form holoenzymes with human R subunits in living cells shows that this preference for pseudosubstrate inhibitors is evolutionarily conserved. To elucidate the molecular basis of this inhibitory pattern, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance in combination with site-directed mutagenesis. We observed that the conserved αH-αI loop residue Arg-283 in PrKX is crucial for its RI over RII preference, as a R283L mutant was able to form a holoenzyme complex with wild type RII subunits. Changing the corresponding αH-αI loop residue in PKA Cα (L277R), significantly destabilized holoenzyme complexes in vitro, as cAMP-mediated holoenzyme activation was facilitated by a factor of 2–4, and lead to a decreased affinity of the mutant C subunit for R subunits, significantly affecting RII containing holoenzymes. PMID:20819953

  6. Peptide analogs of the beef heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase inhibitor protein.

    PubMed

    Stout, J S; Partridge, B E; Dibbern, D A; Schuster, S M

    1993-07-27

    Peptide analogs which correspond to the conserved region of the natural ATPase inhibitor protein from beef heart, Candida utilis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria were synthesized by solid-phase methodologies and tested for ATPase inhibitory activity. These peptides were found to be potent inhibitors of F1-ATPase-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in acidic reaction media, having I50 values of 1.1 +/- 0.4 microM, 10 +/- 5 microM, and 48 +/- 19 microM, respectively. These results closely match those obtained for the naturally occurring inhibitor proteins. Additional peptides that correspond to the beef heart beta-subunit near the binding site of the beef heart inhibitor protein and that possess a substantial homology with the conserved region of the inhibitor protein were synthesized. Several of these peptides were found to be inhibitors of the ATPase activity. The best inhibitor, with an I50 value of 20 +/- 3 microM, was the peptide resembling the beef heart beta-subunit comprising amino acids 394-413. This peptide most closely resembles the peptides derived from the conserved region of the inhibitor protein. The insertion of five glycine residues between the charge clusters in the beta-394-413 peptide resulted in a peptide which was able to stimulate the hydrolysis of ATP.

  7. Ca2+-binding properties of a unique ATPase inhibitor protein isolated from mitochondria of bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamada, E W; Huzel, N J

    1985-12-01

    Previous studies showed that Ca2+ induced monomer to active dimer interconversion of a mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor protein from bovine heart or rat skeletal muscle (Yamada, E.W., Huzel, N.J. and Dickison, J.C. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 10203-10207). Initial equilibrium dialysis measurements of Ca2+ binding showed that this unique protein possesses three binding sites of high affinity with a maximum of one mol of Ca2+ bound/mol of protein monomer. Magnesium (1 mM) did not affect the first association constant but increased the second and third by about 1.2 and 1.5 fold, respectively. That the apparent association constants varied with concentration of protein monomer was in agreement with the self-associating nature of the protein. Scatchard plots at three concentrations of protein intersected at a molar ratio of about 0.5 (Ca2+/monomer). Ka1 and Ka2 values of 4.2 microM and 12.1 microM, respectively, were estimated by extra-polation of apparent constants to infinite dilution of protein. Ka3 (51.3 microM) was estimated by extrapolation of double reciprocal plots of apparent constants versus protein concentration to infinite levels of protein. A model for Ca2+ binding by this self-associating protein is described. Trifluoperazine had no effect on the activity of the inhibitor protein from either tissue.

  8. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease is activated by low concentrations of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Göran; Arenas, Omar Gutiérrez; Danielson, U Helena

    2009-12-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a bifunctional enzyme with a protease and a helicase functionality located in each of the two domains of the single peptide chain. There is little experimental evidence for a functional role of this unexpected arrangement since artificial single domain forms of both enzymes are catalytically competent. We have observed that low concentrations of certain protease inhibitors activate the protease of full-length NS3 from HCV genotype 1a with up to 100%, depending on the preincubation time and the inhibitor used. The activation was reduced, but not eliminated, by increased ionic strength, lowered glycerol concentration, or lowered pH. In all cases, it was at the expense of a significant loss of activity. Activation was not seen with the artificial protease domain of genotype 1b NS3 fused with a fragment of the NS4A cofactor. This truncated and covalently modified enzyme form was much less active and exhibited fundamentally different catalytic properties to the full-length NS3 protease without the fused cofactor. The most plausible explanation for the activation was found to involve a slow transition between two enzyme conformations, which differed in their catalytic ability and affinity for inhibitors. Equations derived based on this assumption resulted in better fits to the experimental data than the equation for simple competitive inhibition. The mechanism may involve an inhibitor-induced stabilization of the helicase domain in a conformation that enhances the protease activity, or an improved alignment of the catalytic triad in the protease. The proposed mnemonic mechanism and derived equations are viable for both these explanations and can serve as a basic framework for future studies of enzymes activated by inhibitors or other ligands.

  9. Constrained Cyclic Peptides as Immunomodulatory Inhibitors of the CD2:CD58 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Durek, Thomas; Taneja, Veena; Craik, David J; Pallerla, Sandeep; Gauthier, Ted; Jois, Seetharama

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between the cell-cell adhesion proteins CD2 and CD58 plays a crucial role in lymphocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, and inhibitors of this interaction have potential as immunomodulatory drugs in autoimmune diseases. Peptides from the CD2 adhesion domain were designed to inhibit CD2:CD58 interactions. To improve the stability of the peptides, β-sheet epitopes from the CD2 region implicated in CD58 recognition were grafted into the cyclic peptide frameworks of sunflower trypsin inhibitor and rhesus theta defensin. The designed multicyclic peptides were evaluated for their ability to modulate cell-cell interactions in three different cell adhesion assays, with one candidate, SFTI-a, showing potent activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 51 nM). This peptide also suppresses the immune responses in T cells obtained from mice that exhibit the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. SFTI-a was resistant to thermal denaturation, as judged by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and had a half-life of ∼24 h in human serum. Binding of this peptide to CD58 was predicted by molecular docking studies and experimentally confirmed by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Our results suggest that cyclic peptides from natural sources are promising scaffolds for modulating protein-protein interactions that are typically difficult to target with small-molecule compounds. PMID:27337048

  10. Small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions: progressing towards the reality

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, Michelle R.; Tang, Yinyan; Wells, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The past twenty years have seen many advances in our understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and how to target them with small-molecule therapeutics. In 2004, we reviewed some early successes; since then, potent inhibitors have been developed for diverse protein complexes, and compounds are now in clinical trials for six targets. Surprisingly, many of these PPI clinical candidates have efficiency metrics typical of ‘lead-like’ or ‘drug-like’ molecules and are orally available. Successful discovery efforts have integrated multiple disciplines and make use of all the modern tools of target-based discovery - structure, computation, screening, and biomarkers. PPI become progressively more challenging as the interfaces become more complex, i.e., as binding epitopes are displayed on primary, secondary, or tertiary structures. Here, we review the last ten years of progress, focusing on the properties of PPI inhibitors that have advanced to clinical trials and prospects for the future of PPI drug discovery. PMID:25237857

  11. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  12. Rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivatives as inhibitors of fungal protein mannosyl transferase 1 (PMT1).

    PubMed

    Orchard, Michael G; Neuss, Judi C; Galley, Carl M S; Carr, Andrew; Porter, David W; Smith, Phillip; Scopes, David I C; Haydon, David; Vousden, Katherine; Stubberfield, Colin R; Young, Kate; Page, Martin

    2004-08-01

    The first inhibitors of fungal protein: mannosyl transferase 1 (PMT1) are described. They are based upon rhodanine-3-acetic acid and several compounds have been identified, for example, 5-[[3-(1-phenylethoxy)-4-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]methylene]-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-thiazolidineacetic acid (5a), which inhibit Candida albicans PMT1 with IC(50)s in the range 0.2-0.5 microM. Members of the series are effective in inducing changes in morphology of C. albicans in vitro that have previously been associated with loss of the transferase activity. These compounds could serve as useful tools for studying the effects of protein O-mannosylation and its relevance in the search for novel antifungal agents. PMID:15225710

  13. IAPs on the move: role of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Oberoi-Khanuja, T K; Murali, A; Rajalingam, K

    2013-09-05

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are a class of highly conserved proteins predominantly known for the regulation of caspases and immune signaling. However, recent evidence suggests a crucial role for these molecules in the regulation of tumor cell shape and migration by controlling MAPK, NF-κB and Rho GTPases. IAPs directly control Rho GTPases, thus regulating cell shape and migration. For instance, XIAP and cIAP1 function as the direct E3 ubiquitin ligases of Rac1 and target it for proteasomal degradation. IAPs are differentially expressed in tumor cells and have been targeted by several cancer therapeutic drugs that are currently in clinical trials. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of IAPs in the regulation of cell migration and discuss the possible implications of these observations in regulating tumor cell metastases.

  14. Identification of peptidic inhibitors of the alternative complement pathway based on Staphylococcus aureus SCIN proteins.

    PubMed

    Summers, Brady J; Garcia, Brandon L; Woehl, Jordan L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Yao, Xiaolan; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2015-10-01

    The complement system plays a central role in a number of human inflammatory diseases, and there is a significant need for development of complement-directed therapies. The discovery of an arsenal of anti-complement proteins secreted by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus brought with it the potential for harnessing the powerful inhibitory properties of these molecules. One such family of inhibitors, the SCINs, interact with a functional "hot-spot" on the surface of C3b. SCINs not only stabilize an inactive form of the alternative pathway (AP) C3 convertase (C3bBb), but also overlap the C3b binding site of complement factors B and H. Here we determined that a conserved Arg residue in SCINs is critical for function of full-length SCIN proteins. Despite this, we also found SCIN-specific differences in the contributions of other residues found at the C3b contact site, which suggested that a more diverse repertoire of residues might be able to recognize this region of C3b. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a phage display screen aimed at identifying SCIN-competitive 12-mer peptides. In total, seven unique sequences were identified and all exhibited direct C3b binding. A subset of these specifically inhibited the AP in assays of complement function. The mechanism of AP inhibition by these peptides was probed through surface plasmon resonance approaches, which revealed that six of the seven peptides disrupted C3bBb formation by interfering with factor B/C3b binding. To our knowledge this study has identified the first small molecules that retain inhibitory properties of larger staphylococcal immune evasion proteins.

  15. Rational Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Coumarin Derivatives as Protein-protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferro, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a new series of coumarin derivatives searching for novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) allosteric inhibitors. All new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 IN enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75. A combined approach of docking and molecular dynamic simulations has been applied to clarify the activity of the new compounds. Specifically, the binding free energies by using the method of molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) was calculated, whereas hydrogen bond occupancies were monitored throughout simulations methods.

  16. Rational Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Coumarin Derivatives as Protein-protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferro, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a new series of coumarin derivatives searching for novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) allosteric inhibitors. All new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 IN enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75. A combined approach of docking and molecular dynamic simulations has been applied to clarify the activity of the new compounds. Specifically, the binding free energies by using the method of molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) was calculated, whereas hydrogen bond occupancies were monitored throughout simulations methods. PMID:27546050

  17. Comparison of newly developed anti-bone morphogenetic protein 4 llama-derived antibodies with commercially available BMP4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Calpe, Silvia; Correia, Ana C. P.; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to improved understanding of the role of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in an increasing number of diseases, the development of selective inhibitors of BMP4 is an attractive therapeutic option. The currently available BMP4 inhibitors are not suitable as therapeutics because of their low specificity and low effectiveness. Here, we compared newly generated anti-BMP4 llama-derived antibodies (VHHs) with 3 different types of commercially available BMP4 inhibitors, natural antagonists, small molecule BMPR inhibitors and conventional anti-BMP4 monoclonal antibodies. We found that the anti-BMP4 VHHs were as effective as the natural antagonist or small molecule inhibitors, but had higher specificity. We also showed that commercial anti-BMP4 antibodies were inferior in terms of both specificity and effectiveness. These findings might result from the fact that the VHHs C4C4 and C8C8 target a small region within the BMPR1 epitope of BMP4, whereas the commercial antibodies target other areas of the BMP4 molecule. Our results show that the newly developed anti-BMP4 VHHs are promising antibodies with better specificity and effectivity for inhibition of BMP4, making them an attractive tool for research and for therapeutic applications. PMID:26967714

  18. Protein synthesis inhibitors reveal differential regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and stress-activated protein kinase pathways that converge on Elk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zinck, R; Cahill, M A; Kracht, M; Sachsenmaier, C; Hipskind, R A; Nordheim, A

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as anisomycin and cycloheximide, lead to superinduction of immediate-early genes. We demonstrate that these two drugs activate intracellular signaling pathways involving both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascades. The activation of either pathway correlates with phosphorylation of the c-fos regulatory transcription factor Elk-1. In HeLa cells, anisomycin stabilizes c-fos mRNA when protein synthesis is inhibited to only 50%. Under these conditions, anisomycin, in contrast to cycloheximide, rapidly induces kinase activation and efficient Elk-1 phosphorylation. However, full inhibition of translation by either drug leads to prolonged activation of SAPK activity, while MAPK induction is transient. This correlates with prolonged Elk-1 phosphorylation and c-fos transcription. Elk-1 induction and c-fos activation are also observed in KB cells, in which anisomycin strongly induces SAPKs but not MAPKs. Purified p54 SAPK alpha efficiently phosphorylates the Elk-1 C-terminal domain in vitro and comigrates with anisomycin-activated kinases in in-gel kinase assays. Thus, Elk-1 provides a potential convergence point for the MAPK and SAPK signaling pathways. The activation of signal cascades and control of transcription factor function therefore represent prominent processes in immediate-early gene superinduction. PMID:7651411

  19. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  20. Surfing the Protein-Protein Interaction Surface Using Docking Methods: Application to the Design of PPI Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Jois, Seetharama

    2015-01-01

    Blocking protein-protein interactions (PPI) using small molecules or peptides modulates biochemical pathways and has therapeutic significance. PPI inhibition for designing drug-like molecules is a new area that has been explored extensively during the last decade. Considering the number of available PPI inhibitor databases and the limited number of 3D structures available for proteins, docking and scoring methods play a major role in designing PPI inhibitors as well as stabilizers. Docking methods are used in the design of PPI inhibitors at several stages of finding a lead compound, including modeling the protein complex, screening for hot spots on the protein-protein interaction interface and screening small molecules or peptides that bind to the PPI interface. There are three major challenges to the use of docking on the relatively flat surfaces of PPI. In this review we will provide some examples of the use of docking in PPI inhibitor design as well as its limitations. The combination of experimental and docking methods with improved scoring function has thus far resulted in few success stories of PPI inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. Docking algorithms used for PPI are in the early stages, however, and as more data are available docking will become a highly promising area in the design of PPI inhibitors or stabilizers.

  1. The protein C pathway in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Spek, C Arnold; Arruda, Valder R

    2012-04-01

    Cancer is frequently associated with activation of blood coagulation, which in turn has been suggested to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Indeed, low molecular weight heparin treatment significantly prolongs the survival of a wide variety of patients with cancer. Based on this notion that anticoagulant treatment seems to benefit cancer patients, recent experiments aimed to elucidate the importance of the natural anticoagulant protein C pathways in cancer progression. Interestingly, these experiments showed that the repeated administration of exogenous activated protein C limits cancer cell extravasation in experimental animal models. In line, reducing endogenous activated protein C activity dramatically increased the number of experimental metastasis. These data thus strongly suggest that exogenous activated protein C administration may be a novel therapeutic avenue to limit cancer metastasis thereby prolonging overall survival of cancer patients. The current review provides an overview of recent data on the role of the protein C pathway in cancer metastasis. It discusses the potential of activated protein C as a novel target to reduce cancer progression, it points to several limitations of activated protein C administration in the setting of cancer cell metastasis and it suggest zymogen protein C as an attractive alternative. PMID:22682140

  2. Development of selective inhibitors for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins from BHI-1

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Chengguo; Wang, Liangyou; Tang, XiaoHu; Sham, Yuk Y

    2007-01-01

    A series of inhibitors for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins based on BHI-1 were synthesized and their binding interactions with Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w were evaluated. It was found that modification of BHI-1 resulted in varied binding profiles among Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w and a set of inhibitors with varied selectivity to Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w protein have been identified. Molecular modeling of the interaction of the BHI-1 based analogs with the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins suggested that the binding site for the BHI-1 based inhibitor was the least conserved section among Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w: targeting the non-conserved section may account for the observed selectivity of the BHI-1 based inhibitors among the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The validity of the model was supported by a strong correlation between the model-calculated binding energy and the experimental binding affinity. In summary, our studies suggest that most of the reported inhibitors for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins are nonselective and BHI-1 is a promising template to distinguish among Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w by targeting the nonconserved domain among the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Molecular-modeling aided rational development of BHI-1 based selective inhibitor for anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins is underway. PMID:17227711

  3. A novel inhibitor of dengue virus replication that targets the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Dai, Dongcheng; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Berhanu, Aklile; Jones, Kevin F; Cardwell, Kara B; Schneider, Christine; Wineinger, Kristin A; Page, Jessica M; Harver, Chris; Stavale, Eric; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Stone, Melialani A; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Scaturro, Pietro; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) infect 50 to 100 million people worldwide per year, of which 500,000 develop severe life-threatening disease. This mosquito-borne illness is endemic in most tropical and subtropical countries and has spread significantly over the last decade. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, there are currently no approved vaccines or therapeutics available for treatment of dengue infection. Here, we describe a novel small-molecule compound, ST-148, that is a potent inhibitor of all four serotypes of DENV in vitro. ST-148 significantly reduced viremia and viral load in vital organs and tended to lower cytokine levels in the plasma in a nonlethal model of DENV infection in AG129 mice. Compound resistance mapped to the DENV capsid (C) gene, and a direct interaction of ST-148 with C protein is suggested by alterations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein in the presence of compound. Thus, ST-148 appears to interact with the DENV C protein and inhibits a distinct step(s) of the viral replication cycle.

  4. A novel inhibitor of dengue virus replication that targets the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Dai, Dongcheng; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Berhanu, Aklile; Jones, Kevin F; Cardwell, Kara B; Schneider, Christine; Wineinger, Kristin A; Page, Jessica M; Harver, Chris; Stavale, Eric; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Stone, Melialani A; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Scaturro, Pietro; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) infect 50 to 100 million people worldwide per year, of which 500,000 develop severe life-threatening disease. This mosquito-borne illness is endemic in most tropical and subtropical countries and has spread significantly over the last decade. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, there are currently no approved vaccines or therapeutics available for treatment of dengue infection. Here, we describe a novel small-molecule compound, ST-148, that is a potent inhibitor of all four serotypes of DENV in vitro. ST-148 significantly reduced viremia and viral load in vital organs and tended to lower cytokine levels in the plasma in a nonlethal model of DENV infection in AG129 mice. Compound resistance mapped to the DENV capsid (C) gene, and a direct interaction of ST-148 with C protein is suggested by alterations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein in the presence of compound. Thus, ST-148 appears to interact with the DENV C protein and inhibits a distinct step(s) of the viral replication cycle. PMID:23070172

  5. Evaluation of six proton pump inhibitors as inhibitors of various human cytochromes P450: focus on cytochrome P450 2C19.

    PubMed

    Zvyaga, Tatyana; Chang, Shu-Ying; Chen, Cliff; Yang, Zheng; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Hurley, Jeremy; Thorndike, Denise; Wagner, Andrew; Chimalakonda, Anjaneya; Rodrigues, A David

    2012-09-01

    Six proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), omeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, dexlansoprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole, were shown to be weak inhibitors of cytochromes P450 (CYP3A4, -2B6, -2D6, -2C9, -2C8, and -1A2) in human liver microsomes. In most cases, IC₅₀ values were greater than 40 μM, except for dexlansoprazole and lansoprazole with CYP1A2 (IC₅₀ = ∼8 μM) and esomeprazole with CYP2C8 (IC₅₀ = 31 μM). With the exception of CYP2C19 inhibition by omeprazole and esomeprazole (IC₅₀ ratio, 2.5 to 5.9), there was no evidence for a marked time-dependent shift in IC₅₀ (IC₅₀ ratio, ≤ 2) after a 30-min preincubation with NADPH. In the absence of preincubation, lansoprazole (IC₅₀ = 0.73 μM) and esomeprazole (IC₅₀ = 3.7 μM) were the most potent CYP2C19 inhibitors, followed by dexlansoprazole and omeprazole (IC₅₀ = ∼7.0 μM). Rabeprazole and pantoprazole (IC₅₀ = ≥ 25 μM) were the weakest. A similar ranking was obtained with recombinant CYP2C19. Despite the IC₅₀ ranking, after consideration of plasma levels (static and dynamic), protein binding, and metabolism-dependent inhibition, it is concluded that omeprazole and esomeprazole are the most potent CYP2C19 inhibitors. This was confirmed after the incubation of the individual PPIs with human primary hepatocytes (in the presence of human serum) and by monitoring their impact on diazepam N-demethylase activity at a low concentration of diazepam (2 μM). Data described herein are consistent with reports that PPIs are mostly weak inhibitors of cytochromes P450 in vivo. However, two members of the PPI class (esomeprazole and omeprazole) are more likely to serve as clinically relevant inhibitors of CYP2C19.

  6. Structural and Inhibitor Studies of Norovirus 3C-like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kim, Yunjeong; Lovell, Scott; Prakash, Om; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses have a single-stranded, positive sense 7–8 kb RNA genome, which encodes a polyprotein precursor processed by a virus-encoded 3C-like cysteine protease (3CLpro) to generate mature non-structural proteins. Because processing of the polyprotein is essential for virus replication, norovirus 3CLpro has been targeted for the discovery of anti-norovirus small molecule therapeutics. Thus, we performed functional, structural and inhibition studies of norovirus 3CLpro with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, X-ray crystallography, and NMR spectroscopy with a synthetic protease inhibitor. Three 3CLpro from Norwalk virus (NV, genogroup I), MD145 (genogroup II) and murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1, genogroup V) were optimized for a FRET assay, and compared for the inhibitory activities of a synthetic protease inhibitor (GC376). The apo 3D structures of NV 3CLpro determined with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy were further analyzed. In addition, the binding mode of NV 3CLpro-GC376 was compared with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The results of this report provide insight into the interaction of NV 3CLpro with substrate/inhibitor for better understanding of the enzyme and antiviral drug development. PMID:24055466

  7. A unified approach to the important protein kinase inhibitor balanol and a proposed analogue

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tapan; Maitra, Ratnava

    2013-01-01

    Summary A common approach to the important protein kinase inhibitor (−)-balanol and an azepine-ring-modified balanol derivative has been developed using an efficient fragment coupling protocol which proceeded in good overall yield. PMID:24454570

  8. A cell-permeable inhibitor to trap Gαq proteins in the empty pocket conformation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2014-07-17

    In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be "frozen" pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors.

  9. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  10. Characterization of a metalloprotease inhibitor protein (SmaPI) of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Kim, T U; Kim, I J; Byun, S M; Shin, Y C

    1995-08-01

    As suggested by Y. Suh and M.J. Benedik (J. Bacteriol. 174: 2361-2366, 1992), Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 produced very small amounts (0.8 U ml-1) of an inhibitor protein (SmaPI) that shows an inhibitory activity against extracellular 50-kDa metalloprotease (SMP) of S. marcescens and that is localized in the periplasm of cells at the optimal growth temperature of 25 degrees C. A recombinant S. marcescens harboring plasmid pSP2 encoding SMP and SmaPI genes produced 20 U of SmaPI ml-1 that is also localized in the periplasm of cells at 25 degrees C. However, a large amount of SmaPI (86 Uml-1) was extracellularly produced at the supraoptimal growth temperature 37 degrees C from the recombinant S. marcescens (pSP2). We purified SmaPI from the culture supernatant of S. marcescens (pSP2) grown at 37 degrees C, and some biochemical properties were characterized. SmaPI had a pI value of about 10.0 and was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 10,000. SmaPI was produced from a precursor SmaPI by cleavage of a signal peptide (26 amino acid residues). The inhibitor was stable in boiling water for up to 30 min. The thermostability of SmaPI can be attributed to its reversible denaturation. SmaPI inhibited SMP by formation of a noncovalent complex with a molar ratio of 1:1 and showed a high protease specificity, which inhibited only SMP among the various proteases we examined.

  11. Synthesis, in Vitro Covalent Binding Evaluation, and Metabolism of 14C-Labeled Inhibitors of 11β-HSD1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, we reported the design and synthesis of three potent, selective, and orally bioavailable 11β-HSD1 inhibitors labeled with 14C: AMG 456 (1), AM-6949 (2), and AM-7715 (3). We evaluated the covalent protein binding of the labeled inhibitors in human liver microsomes in vitro and assessed their potential bioactivation risk in humans. We then studied the in vitro mechanism of 2 in human hepatocytes and the formation of reactive intermediates. Our study results suggest that 1 and 3 have low potential for metabolic bioactivation in humans, while 2 has relatively high risk. PMID:25408839

  12. A structurally dynamic N-terminal helix is a key functional determinant in staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN) proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Summers, Brady J; Ramyar, Kasra X; Tzekou, Apostolia; Lin, Zhuoer; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Laity, John H; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2013-01-25

    Complement is a network of interacting circulatory and cell surface proteins that recognizes, marks, and facilitates clearance of microbial invaders. To evade complement attack, the pathogenic organism Staphylococcus aureus expresses a number of secreted proteins that interfere with activation and regulation of the complement cascade. Staphylococcal complement inhibitors (SCINs) are one important class of these immunomodulators and consist of three active members (SCIN-A/-B/-C). SCINs inhibit a critical enzymatic complex, the alternative pathway C3 convertase, by targeting a functional "hot spot" on the central opsonin of complement, C3b. Although N-terminal truncation mutants of SCINs retain complement inhibitory properties, they are significantly weaker binders of C3b. To provide a structural basis for this observation, we undertook a series of crystallographic and NMR dynamics studies on full-length SCINs. This work reveals that N-terminal SCIN domains are characterized by a conformationally dynamic helical motif. C3b binding and functional experiments further demonstrate that this sequence-divergent N-terminal region of SCINs is both functionally important and context-dependent. Finally, surface plasmon resonance data provide evidence for the formation of inhibitor·enzyme·substrate complexes ((SCIN·C3bBb)·C3). Similar to the (SCIN·C3bBb)(2) pseudodimeric complexes, ((SCIN·C3bBb)·C3) interferes with the interaction of complement receptors and C3b. This activity provides an additional mechanism by which SCIN couples convertase inhibition to direct blocking of phagocytosis. Together, these data suggest that tethering multi-host protein complexes by small modular bacterial inhibitors may be a global strategy of immune evasion used by S. aureus. The work presented here provides detailed structure-activity relationships and improves our understanding of how S. aureus circumvents human innate immunity.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection protein network

    PubMed Central

    de Chassey, B; Navratil, V; Tafforeau, L; Hiet, M S; Aublin-Gex, A; Agaugué, S; Meiffren, G; Pradezynski, F; Faria, B F; Chantier, T; Le Breton, M; Pellet, J; Davoust, N; Mangeot, P E; Chaboud, A; Penin, F; Jacob, Y; Vidalain, P O; Vidal, M; André, P; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Lotteau, V

    2008-01-01

    A proteome-wide mapping of interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human proteins was performed to provide a comprehensive view of the cellular infection. A total of 314 protein–protein interactions between HCV and human proteins was identified by yeast two-hybrid and 170 by literature mining. Integration of this data set into a reconstructed human interactome showed that cellular proteins interacting with HCV are enriched in highly central and interconnected proteins. A global analysis on the basis of functional annotation highlighted the enrichment of cellular pathways targeted by HCV. A network of proteins associated with frequent clinical disorders of chronically infected patients was constructed by connecting the insulin, Jak/STAT and TGFβ pathways with cellular proteins targeted by HCV. CORE protein appeared as a major perturbator of this network. Focal adhesion was identified as a new function affected by HCV, mainly by NS3 and NS5A proteins. PMID:18985028

  14. A neoepitope-based enzyme immunoassay for quantification of C1-inhibitor in complex with C1r and C1s.

    PubMed

    Fure, H; Nielsen, E W; Hack, C E; Mollnes, T E

    1997-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) recognizing neoepitopes exposed on activation products of complement proteins but hidden in the native components have been used for quantification of activated complement. A previously produced and characterized mouse MoAb, recognizing a neoepitope on the human plasma protein C1-inhibitor complexed with its substrates, was used to design an enzyme immunoassay for detection of C1-inhibitor complexed with C1r and C1s. These complexes are indicators of early classical complement pathway activation. The standard was serum activated with heat aggregated IgG defined to contain 1000 arbitrary units (AU)/ml. The lower detection limit was approximately 0.05 AU/ml corresponding to 0.005% of fully activated serum. The reliability of the assay, including day-to-day variation, was tested. Intra-assay variation coefficients were 12% for low plasma control and 13% for high plasma control (n = 12 for both). Inter-assay variation coefficients were 12% for low control (n = 6), 19% for high control (n = 6) and 15% for the normal plasma control (n = 9). A 2.5-97.5 percentile reference range (normal blood donors) was 16-33 AU/ml. Two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus had considerably elevated plasma levels of the activation product (56 and 62 AU/ml), and six patients with hereditary angioedema had normal plasma levels despite considerably reduced C1-inhibitor concentration. We conclude that the present method is sensitive and reliable for detection of early classical pathway activation and superior to previously published methods by utilizing neoepitope specificity and non-radiolabelled reagents.

  15. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  16. Characterization of recombinant human C1 inhibitor secreted in milk of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Koiter, Jaco; Vogelezang, Carla J M; van Wessel, Noucha; van Dam, Tijtje; Velterop, Ingeborg; van Houdt, Kristina; Kupers, Luc; Horbach, Danielle; Salaheddine, Mourad; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M

    2012-12-31

    C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is a single-chain glycoprotein that inhibits activation of the contact system of coagulation and the complement system. C1INH isolated from human blood plasma (pd-hC1INH) is used for the management of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a disease caused by heterozygous deficiency of C1INH, and is a promise for treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injuries like acute myocardial or cerebral infarction. To obtain large quantities of C1INH, recombinant human C1INH (rhC1INH) was expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits (12 g/l) harboring genomic human C1INH sequences fused to 5' bovine αS(1) casein promoter sequences. Recombinant hC1INH was isolated from milk to a specific activity of 6.1 U/mg and a purity of 99%; by size-exclusion chromatography the 1% impurities consisted of multimers and N-terminal cleaved C1INH species. Mass spectrometric analysis of purified rhC1INH revealed a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 67,200. Differences in M(r) on SDS PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis between rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH are explained by differential glycosylation (calculated carbohydrate contents of 21% and 28%, respectively), since protein sequencing analysis of rhC1INH revealed intact N- and C-termini. Host-related impurity analysis by ELISA revealed trace amounts of rabbit protein (approximately 10 ppm) in purified batches, but not endogenous rabbit C1INH. The kinetics of inhibition of the target proteases C1s, Factor XIIa, kallikrein and Factor XIa by rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH, indicated comparable inhibitory potency and specificity. Recently, rhC1INH (Ruconest(®)) has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. PMID:22995741

  17. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  18. Extended ubiquitin species are protein-based DUB inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Krutauz, Daria; Reis, Noa; Nakasone, Mark A.; Siman, Peter; Zhang, Daoning; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Gygi, Steven P.; Brik, Ashraf; Fushman, David; Glickman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    A frame-shift mutation in the transcript of the ubiquitin-B gene leads to a C-terminally extended ubiquitin, UBB+1. UBB+1 has been considered to inhibit proteasomes, and as such to be the underlying cause for toxic protein buildup correlated with certain neuropathological conditions. We demonstrated that expression of extended ubiquitin variants led to accumulation of heterogeneously-linked polyubiquitin conjugates indicating a pervasive effect on ubiquitin-dependent turnover. 20S proteasomes selectively proteolysed ubiquitin extensions, yet no evidence for inhibition of 26S holoenzymes was found. However, among susceptible targets for inhibition was Ubp6, the primary enzyme responsible for disassembly of lysine-48 linkages at 26S proteasomes. Processing of lysine-48 and lysine-63 linkages by other deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) was also inhibited. Disruption of ubiquitin-dependent degradation by extended ubiquitin variants may therefore be attributed to their inhibitory effect on select DUBs, thus shifting research efforts related to protein accumulation in neurodegenerative processes from proteasomes to DUBs. PMID:24997605

  19. Circular proteins in plants: solution structure of a novel macrocyclic trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Felizmenio-Quimio, M E; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2001-06-22

    Much interest has been generated by recent reports on the discovery of circular (i.e. head-to-tail cyclized) proteins in plants. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of one of the newest such circular proteins, MCoTI-II, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis, a member of the Cucurbitaceae plant family. The structure consists of a small beta-sheet, several turns, and a cystine knot arrangement of the three disulfide bonds. Interestingly, the molecular topology is similar to that of the plant cyclotides (Craik, D. J., Daly, N. L., Bond, T., and Waine, C. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 294, 1327-1336), which derive from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families, have antimicrobial activities, and exemplify the cyclic cystine knot structural motif as part of their circular backbone. The sequence, biological activity, and plant family of MCoTI-II are all different from known cyclotides. However, given the structural similarity, cyclic backbone, and plant origin of MCoTI-II, we propose that MCoTI-II can be classified as a new member of the cyclotide class of proteins. The expansion of the cyclotides to include trypsin inhibitory activity and a new plant family highlights the importance and functional variability of circular proteins and the fact that they are more common than has previously been believed. Insights into the possible roles of backbone cyclization have been gained by a comparison of the structure of MCoTI-II with the homologous acyclic trypsin inhibitors CMTI-I and EETI-II from the Cucurbitaceae plant family. PMID:11292835

  20. Circular proteins in plants: solution structure of a novel macrocyclic trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Felizmenio-Quimio, M E; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2001-06-22

    Much interest has been generated by recent reports on the discovery of circular (i.e. head-to-tail cyclized) proteins in plants. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of one of the newest such circular proteins, MCoTI-II, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis, a member of the Cucurbitaceae plant family. The structure consists of a small beta-sheet, several turns, and a cystine knot arrangement of the three disulfide bonds. Interestingly, the molecular topology is similar to that of the plant cyclotides (Craik, D. J., Daly, N. L., Bond, T., and Waine, C. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 294, 1327-1336), which derive from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families, have antimicrobial activities, and exemplify the cyclic cystine knot structural motif as part of their circular backbone. The sequence, biological activity, and plant family of MCoTI-II are all different from known cyclotides. However, given the structural similarity, cyclic backbone, and plant origin of MCoTI-II, we propose that MCoTI-II can be classified as a new member of the cyclotide class of proteins. The expansion of the cyclotides to include trypsin inhibitory activity and a new plant family highlights the importance and functional variability of circular proteins and the fact that they are more common than has previously been believed. Insights into the possible roles of backbone cyclization have been gained by a comparison of the structure of MCoTI-II with the homologous acyclic trypsin inhibitors CMTI-I and EETI-II from the Cucurbitaceae plant family.

  1. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase NS5B

    PubMed Central

    Powdrill, Megan H.; Bernatchez, Jean A.; Götte, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 years after the identification of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a novel human pathogen, the only approved treatment remains a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This rather non-specific therapy is associated with severe side effects and by far not everyone benefits from treatment. Recently, progress has been made in the development of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C). A major target for such direct acting antivirals (DAAs) is the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or non-structural protein 5B (NS5B), which is essential for viral replication. This review will examine the current state of development of inhibitors targeting the polymerase and issues such as the emergence of antiviral resistance during treatment, as well as strategies to address this problem. PMID:21994615

  2. Analysis of protein kinase C requirement for exocytosis in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-2H3 cells: a GTP-binding protein(s) as a potential target for protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Buccione, R; Di Tullio, G; Caretta, M; Marinetti, M R; Bizzarri, C; Francavilla, S; Luini, A; De Matteis, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of protein kinase C in calcium-dependent exocytosis was investigated in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia cells. When protein kinase C was down-regulated by phorbol myristate acetate (1 microM for 3-6 h) or inhibited by pharmacological agents such as calphostin C (1 microM) or a protein kinase C-specific pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor (100-200 microM), cells lost the ability to secrete in response to 10 microM free Ca2+. In contrast, a short treatment (15 min) with phorbol myristate acetate, which maximally activates protein kinase C, potentiated the effects of calcium. Biochemical analysis of protein kinase C-deprived cells indicated that loss of the Ca(2+)-induced secretory response correlated with disappearance of protein kinase C-alpha. In addition, at the concentrations effective for exocytosis, calcium caused translocation of protein kinase C-alpha to the membrane fraction and stimulated phospholipase C, suggesting that, in permeabilized cells, protein kinase C can be activated by calcium through generation of the phospholipase C metabolite diacylglycerol. The delta, epsilon and zeta Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase C isoenzymes were insensitive to phorbol myristate acetate-induced down-regulation and did not, as expected, translocate to the particulate fraction in response to calcium. Interestingly, secretory competence was restored in cells depleted of protein kinase C or in which protein kinase C itself was inhibited by non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, but not by GTP, suggesting that protein kinase C might regulate the ability of a G protein(s) directly controlling the exocytotic machinery to be activated by endogenous GTP. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8129713

  3. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  4. Novel pyridazinone inhibitors for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1): old target-new inhibition mode.

    PubMed

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A

    2013-12-27

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific, and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity, and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Although they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors, and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors.

  5. Preclinical Characterization of BMS-791325, an Allosteric Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengping; Gentles, Robert G.; Ding, Min; Voss, Stacey; Pelosi, Lenore A.; Wang, Ying-Kai; Rigat, Karen L.; Mosure, Kathleen W.; Bender, John A.; Knipe, Jay O.; Colonno, Richard; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Kadow, John F.; Santone, Kenneth S.; Roberts, Susan B.; Gao, Min

    2014-01-01

    BMS-791325 is an allosteric inhibitor that binds to thumb site 1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. BMS-791325 inhibits recombinant NS5B proteins from HCV genotypes 1, 3, 4, and 5 at 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) below 28 nM. In cell culture, BMS-791325 inhibited replication of HCV subgenomic replicons representing genotypes 1a and 1b at 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3 nM and 6 nM, respectively, with similar (3 to 18 nM) values for genotypes 3a, 4a, and 5a. Potency against genotype 6a showed more variability (9 to 125 nM), and activity was weaker against genotype 2 (EC50, 87 to 925 nM). Specificity was demonstrated by the absence of activity (EC50s of >4 μM) against a panel of mammalian viruses, and cytotoxic concentrations (50%) were >3,000-fold above the HCV EC50. Resistance substitutions selected by BMS-791325 in genotype 1 replicons mostly mapped to a single site, NS5B amino acid 495 (P495A/S/L/T). Additive or synergistic activity was observed in combination studies using BMS-791325 with alfa interferon plus ribavirin, inhibitors of NS3 protease or NS5A, and other classes of NS5B inhibitor (palm site 2-binding or nucleoside analogs). Plasma and liver exposures in vivo in several animal species indicated that BMS-791325 has a hepatotropic disposition (liver-to-plasma ratios ranging from 1.6- to 60-fold across species). Twenty-four hours postdose, liver exposures across all species tested were ≥10-fold above the inhibitor EC50s observed with HCV genotype 1 replicons. These findings support the evaluation of BMS-791325 in combination regimens for the treatment of HCV. Phase 3 studies are ongoing. PMID:24733465

  6. Examining Ligand-Based Stabilization of Proteins in Cells with MEK1 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Davis, Christopher A; Jimenez, Marta; Knight, Sinead; Orme, Jonathon P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we describe the evaluation of a cell-based protein stability assay using β-galactosidase fragment complementation technology performed in two independent laboratories. The assay is based on the ability of certain ligands to bind to a protein leading to a ligand-protein complex that has a different stability than the free protein. The assay employed a prolabeled-tagged MEK1 kinase stably expressed in A549 cells and this was used to evaluate focused sets of compounds containing known MEK1inhibitors as well as a random set of compounds. An assay using a prolabeled-tagged lysine methyltransferase known as G9a expressed in A549 cells was used as a counterscreen. In one study, it was found that the majority of MEK1 inhibitors were either found as inactive (52%) or showed a selective inhibitory response (18%) in the cell-based MEK1 assay; however, eight compounds showed a specific activation response consistent with stabilization of MEK1 in cells. Examination of these stabilizing compounds showed that three of these were analogs of hypothemycin, a known covalent allosteric MEK1 inhibitor, while the remaining compounds covered one structural class. Both laboratories were able to confirm activity in the cell-based MEK1 assay for known MEK1 inhibitors and found that this activity was highly selective over the G9a counterscreen assay. Screening of a mechanism of action library containing compounds with bioactivity annotations against the cell-based MEK1 assay did not reveal any mechanisms leading to an increase in signal other than inhibitors of MEK1. This study supports that the MEK1 cellular protein stability assay is sensitive to certain MEK1 inhibitors, often noncompetitive inhibitors with respect to ATP. The cellular stability assay format could be useful to rapidly filter kinase inhibitor hit lists for allosteric kinase inhibitors and support target engagement in cells.

  7. Tuning cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes as activated protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heffern, Marie C; Reichova, Viktorie; Coomes, Joseph L; Harney, Allison S; Bajema, Elizabeth A; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-09-21

    Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes ([Co(acacen)(L)2](+), where L = NH3) inhibit histidine-containing proteins through dissociative exchange of the labile axial ligands (L). This work investigates axial ligand exchange dynamics of [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) complexes toward the development of protein inhibitors that are activated by external triggers such as light irradiation. We sought to investigate ligand exchange dynamics to design a Co(III) complex that is substitutionally inert under normal physiological conditions for selective activation. Fluorescent imidazoles (C3Im) were prepared as axial ligands in [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) to produce complexes (CoC3Im) that could report on ligand exchange and, thus, complex stability. These fluorescent imidazole reporters guided the design of a new dinuclear Co(III) Schiff base complex containing bridging diimidazole ligands, which exhibits enhanced stability to ligand exchange with competing imidazoles and to hydrolysis within a biologically relevant pH range. These studies inform the design of biocompatible Co(III) Schiff base complexes that can be selectively activated for protein inhibition with spatial and temporal specificity.

  8. Induction of apoptosis by c-Fos protein.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, G A; Lyon, T T; Yin, Y; Lang, J E; Solomon, G; Annab, L; Srinivasan, D G; Alcorta, D A; Barrett, J C

    1996-01-01

    The role of c-Fos in apoptosis was examined in two Syrian hamster embryo cell lines (sup+I and sup-II) and a human colorectal carcinoma cell line (RKO), using the chimeric Fos-estrogen receptor fusion protein c-FosER. As previously reported, contrasting responses were observed when these two cell lines were placed under growth factor deprivation conditions; sup+I cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis, whereas sup-II cells were resistant. In this report, we show that the activated c-FosER protein induces apoptosis in sup-II preneoplastic cells in serum-free medium, indicating that c-Fos protein can induce apoptotic cell death in these cells. c-Fos-induced apoptosis was not blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, suggesting that the c-Fos transcriptional activation activity is not involved. This conclusion was further supported by the observation that overexpression of v-Fos, which is highly proficient in transcriptional activation but deficient in the transcriptional repression activity associated with c-Fos, did not induce apoptosis. Constitutively expressed Bcl-2 delayed the onset of low-serum-induced apoptosis in sup+I cells and enhanced survival in sup-II cells. Further, coexpression of Bcl-2 and c-FosER in sup+I or sup-II cells protected the cells from c-FosER-induced apoptosis. The possibility that c-FosER-induced apoptosis requires a p53 function was examined. Colorectal carcinoma RKOp53+/+ cells, which do not normally undergo apoptosis in serum-free medium, showed apoptotic DNA fragmentation upon expression and activation of c-FosER. Further, when the wild-type p53 protein was diminished in the RKO cells by infection with the papillomavirus E6 gene, subsequent c-FosER-induced apoptosis was blocked. The data suggest that c-Fos protein plays a causal role in the activation of apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. This activity does not require new protein synthesis and is blocked by overexpression of Bcl-2 protein. PMID:8524298

  9. Discovery of a Potent Inhibitor of Replication Protein A Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Fragment Linking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Andreas O.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Waterson, Alex G.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, DeMarco V.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is involved in nearly all cellular DNA transactions. The RPA N-terminal domain (RPA70N) is a recruitment site for proteins involved in DNA damage response and repair. Selective inhibition of these protein-protein interactions has the potential to inhibit the DNA damage response and sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents without affecting other functions of RPA. To discover a potent, selective inhibitor of the RPA70N protein-protein interactions to test this hypothesis, we used NMR spectroscopy to identify fragment hits that bind to two adjacent sites in the basic cleft of RPA70N. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of RPA70N-ligand complexes revealed how these fragments bind to RPA and guided the design of linked compounds that simultaneously occupy both sites. We have synthesized linked molecules that bind to RPA70N with submicromolar affinity and minimal disruption of RPA’s interaction with ssDNA. PMID:24147804

  10. Structural basis for the inhibition of mammalian and insect alpha-amylases by plant protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Payan, Françoise

    2004-02-12

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitous proteins which play an important role in the carbohydrate metabolism of microorganisms, animals and plants. Living organisms use protein inhibitors as a major tool to regulate the glycolytic activity of alpha-amylases. Most of the inhibitors for which three-dimensional (3-D) structures are available are directed against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases, interacting with the active sites in a substrate-like manner. In this review, we discuss the detailed inhibitory mechanism of these enzymes in light of the recent determination of the 3-D structures of pig pancreatic, human pancreatic, and yellow mealworm alpha-amylases in complex with plant protein inhibitors. In most cases, the mechanism of inhibition occurs through the direct blockage of the active center at several subsites of the enzyme. Inhibitors exhibiting "dual" activity against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases establish contacts of the same type in alternative ways.

  11. Discovery of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction as potential therapeutic and preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Abed, Dhulfiqar Ali; Goldstein, Melanie; Albanyan, Haifa; Jin, Huijuan; Hu, Longqin

    2015-07-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important antioxidant defense mechanism that protects cells from oxidative stress and the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI) has become an important drug target to upregulate the expression of ARE-controlled cytoprotective oxidative stress response enzymes in the development of therapeutic and preventive agents for a number of diseases and conditions. However, most known Nrf2 activators/ARE inducers are indirect inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI and they are electrophilic species that act by modifying the sulfhydryl groups of Keap1׳s cysteine residues. The electrophilicity of these indirect inhibitors may cause "off-target" side effects by reacting with cysteine residues of other important cellular proteins. Efforts have recently been focused on the development of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI. This article reviews these recent research efforts including the development of high throughput screening assays, the discovery of peptide and small molecule direct inhibitors, and the biophysical characterization of the binding of these inhibitors to the target Keap1 Kelch domain protein. These non-covalent direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI could potentially be developed into effective therapeutic or preventive agents for a variety of diseases and conditions.

  12. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  13. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  14. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of activated protein C in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H. Jr.; Kirstein, C.G.; Orthner, C.L. )

    1991-05-15

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent zymogen of the serine protease, activated protein C (APC), an important regulatory enzyme in hemostasis. In view of the potential of human APC as an anticoagulant and profibrinolytic agent, the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of APC were studied in guinea pigs. The plasma elimination of a trace dose of {sup 125}I-APC was biphasic following an initial rapid elimination of approximately 15% of the injected dose within 1 to 2 minutes. This rapid removal of {sup 125}I-APC from the circulation was found to be a result of an association with the liver regardless of the route of injection. Essentially identical results were obtained with active site-blocked forms of APC generated with either diisopropylfluorophosphate or D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone, which indicates that the active site was not essential for the liver association. Accumulation of all three forms of APC in the liver peaked at 30 minutes and then declined as increasing amounts of degraded radiolabeled material appeared in the gastrointestinal tract and urine. Removal of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (gla) domain of diisopropylphosphoryl-APC resulted in a 50% reduction in the association with liver and an accumulation in the kidneys. Protein C and protein S were cleared from the circulation at rates approximately one-half and one-fourth, respectively, that of APC. Both in vitro and in vivo, APC was found to form complexes with protease inhibitors present in guinea pig plasma. Complex formation resulted in a more rapid disappearance of the enzymatic activity of APC than elimination of the protein moiety. These findings indicate two distinct mechanisms for the elimination of APC. One mechanism involves reaction with plasma protease inhibitors and subsequent elimination by specific hepatic receptors. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. PIF-pocket as a target for C. albicans Pkh selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Schulze, Jörg O; Bahí, Anna; Giacometti, Romina; Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; Passeron, Susana; Engel, Matthias; Süss, Evelyn; Casamayor, Antonio; Biondi, Ricardo M

    2013-10-18

    The phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, PDK1, is a master kinase that phosphorylates the activation loop of up to 23 AGC kinases. S. cerevisiae has three PDK1 orthologues, Pkh1-3, which also phosphorylate AGC kinases (e.g., Ypk, Tpk, Pkc1, and Sch9). Pkh1 and 2 are redundant proteins involved in multiple essential cellular functions, including endocytosis and cell wall integrity. Based on similarities with the budding yeast, the Pkh of fungal infectious species was postulated as a novel target for antifungals. Here, we found that depletion of Pkh eventually induces oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks, leading to programmed cell death. This finding supports Pkh as an antifungal target since pharmacological inhibition of Pkh would lead to the death of yeast cells, the ultimate goal of antifungals. It was therefore of interest to further investigate the possibility to develop Pkh inhibitors with selectivity for Candida Pkh that would not inhibit the human ortholog. Here, we describe C. albicans Pkh2 biochemically, structurally and by using chemical probes in comparison to human PDK1. We found that a regulatory site on the C. albicans Pkh2 catalytic domain, the PIF-pocket, diverges from human PDK1. Indeed, we identified and characterized PS77, a new small allosteric inhibitor directed to the PIF-pocket, which has increased selectivity for C. albicans Pkh2. Together, our results describe novel features of the biology of Pkh and chemical biology approaches that support the validation of Pkh as a drug target for selective antifungals. PMID:23911092

  17. The heat shock protein-90 inhibitor XL888 overcomes BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated through diverse mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Haarberg, H. Eirik; Wood, Elizabeth; Rebecca, Vito W.; Chen, Y. Ann; Xiang, Yun; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; John, Jobin K.; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The clinical use of BRAF inhibitors is being hampered by the acquisition of drug resistance. This study demonstrates the potential therapeutic utility of the HSP90 inhibitor (XL888) in 6 different models of vemurafenib resistance. Experimental design The ability of XL888 to inhibit growth and to induce apoptosis and tumor regression of vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cell lines was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. A novel mass spectrometry-based pharmacodynamic assay was developed to measure intratumoral HSP70 levels following HSP90 inhibition in melanoma cell lines, xenografts and melanoma biopsies. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the mechanism of XL888-induced apoptosis. Results XL888 potently inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and prevented the growth of vemurafenib resistant melanoma cell lines in 3D cell culture, long-term colony formation assays and human melanoma mouse xenografts. The reversal of the resistance phenotype was associated with the degradation of PDGFRβ, COT, IGFR1, CRAF, ARAF, S6, cyclin D1 and AKT, which in turn led to the nuclear accumulation of FOXO3a, an increase in BIM expression and the downregulation of Mcl-1. In most resistance models, XL888 treatment increased BIM expression, decreased Mcl-1 expression, and induced apoptosis more effectively than dual MEK/PI3K inhibition. Conclusions HSP90 inhibition may be a highly effective strategy at managing the diverse array of resistance mechanisms being reported to BRAF inhibitors and appears to be more effective at restoring BIM expression and downregulating Mcl-1 expression than combined MEK/PI3K inhibitor therapy. PMID:22351686

  18. Structural Insight into Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Recognition by a Potent Divalent Smac-Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Vachette, Patrice; Malvezzi, Francesca; Grassi, Serena; Lecis, Daniele; Delia, Domenico; Drago, Carmelo; Seneci, Pierfausto; Bolognesi, Martino; Mastrangelo, Eloise

    2012-01-01

    Genetic alterations enhancing cell survival and suppressing apoptosis are hallmarks of cancer that significantly reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP) family hosts conserved proteins in the apoptotic pathway whose over-expression, frequently found in tumours, potentiates survival and resistance to anticancer agents. In humans, IAPs comprise eight members hosting one or more structural Baculoviral IAP Repeat (BIR) domains. Cellular IAPs (cIAP1 and 2) indirectly inhibit caspase-8 activation, and regulate both the canonical and the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathways. In contrast to cIAPs, XIAP (X chromosome-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein) inhibits directly the effector caspases-3 and -7 through its BIR2 domain, and initiator caspase-9 through its BIR3 domain; molecular docking studies suggested that Smac/DIABLO antagonizes XIAP by simultaneously targeting both BIR2 and BIR3 domains. Here we report analytical gel filtration, crystallographic and SAXS experiments on cIAP1-BIR3, XIAP-BIR3 and XIAP-BIR2BIR3 domains, alone and in the presence of compound 9a, a divalent homodimeric Smac mimetic. 9a is shown to bind two BIR domains inter- (in the case of two BIR3) and intra-molecularly (in the case of XIAP-BIR2BIR3), with higher affinity for cIAP1-BIR3, relative to XIAP-BIR3. Despite the different crystal lattice packing, 9a maintains a right handed helical conformation in both cIAP1-BIR3 and XIAP-BIR3 crystals, that is likely conserved in solution as shown by SAXS data. Our structural results demonstrate that the 9a linker length, its conformational degrees of freedom and its hydrophobicity, warrant an overall compact structure with optimal solvent exposure of its two active moieties for IAPs binding. Our results show that 9a is a good candidate for pre-clinical and clinical studies, worth of further investigations in the field of cancer therapy. PMID:23166698

  19. Tandem overproduction and characterisation of the nuclease domain of colicin E9 and its cognate inhibitor protein Im9.

    PubMed

    Wallis, R; Reilly, A; Barnes, K; Abell, C; Campbell, D G; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    1994-03-01

    We report the overproduction of the non-specific endonuclease domain of the bacterial toxin colicin E9 and its preliminary characterisation in vitro. The enzymatic colicins (61 kDa) are normally released from producing cells in a complex with their cognate inhibitors, known as the immunity proteins (9.5 kDa). Tryptic digestion of the purified ColE9 complex was found to generate two major components, a monomer derived from the N-terminal and central regions of the toxin and a heterodimer comprising the catalytically active C-terminal domain of the colicin bound to its intact immunity protein, Im9. N-terminal amino acid sequencing, in conjunction with electrospray mass spectrometry, shows that preparations of the DNase domain isolated by this method are heterogeneous, thus making subsequent mechanistic and structural analysis difficult. This problem was circumvented by selectively overexpressing the C-terminal 15-kDa nuclease domain of colicin E9 in tandem with its cognate inhibitor in Escherichia coli. This tandem overexpression strategy allowed high-level production of a 25-kDa protein complex comprising the C-terminal DNase domain of colicin E9 tightly bound to its specific inhibitor Im9, thus masking the anticipated toxicity of the nuclease. The DNase domain was then separated from Im9 under denaturing conditions, refolded by removal of the denaturant and the renatured protein shown to possess both endonuclease and Im9 binding activity. These results describe a novel method for the overproduction of a nuclease in bacteria by co-expressing its specific inhibitor and lay the foundations for a full mechanistic, biophysical and structural characterization of the isolated DNase domain of the colicin E9 toxin. PMID:8125102

  20. (-)-Oleocanthal as a c-Met inhibitor for the control of metastatic breast and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Elnagar, Ahmed Y; Sylvester, Paul W; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2011-07-01

    The proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met encodes the high-affinity receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Dysregulation of the HGF-c-Met pathway plays a significant oncogenic role in many tumors. Overexpression of c-Met is a prognostic indicator for some transitional cell carcinomas. Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) provides a variety of minor phenolic compounds with beneficial properties. (-)-Oleocanthal (1) is a naturally occurring minor secoiridoid isolated from EVOO, which showed potent anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to inhibit COX-1 and COX-2. It altered the structure of neurotoxic proteins believed to contribute to the debilitating effects of Alzheimer's disease. Computer-Assisted Molecular Design (CAMD) identified 1 as a potential virtual c-Met inhibitor hit. Oleocanthal inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of the epithelial human breast and prostate cancer cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and PC-3, respectively, with an IC (50) range of 10-20 µM, and demonstrated anti-angiogenic activity via downregulating the expression of the microvessel density marker CD31 in endothelial colony forming cells with an IC (50) of 4.4 µM. It inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Met kinase IN VITRO in the Z'-LYTE™ assay, with an IC (50) value of 4.8 µM. (-)-Oleocanthal and EVOO can have potential therapeutic use for the control of c-Met-dependent malignancies. PMID:21328179

  1. Oxamic acid analogues as LDH-C4-specific competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Páez, Lorena; Chena-Taboada, Miguel Angel; Cabrera-Hernández, Arturo; Cordero-Martínez, Joaquín; Wong, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    We performed kinetic studies to determine whether oxamate analogues are selective inhibitors of LDH-C4, owing to their potential usefulness in fertility control and treatment of some cancers. These substances were shown to be competitive inhibitors of LDH isozymes and are able to discriminate among subtle differences that differentiate the active sites of LDH-A4, LDH-B4 and LDH-C4. N-Ethyl oxamate was the most potent inhibitor showing the highest affinity for LDH-C4. However, N-propyl oxamate was the most selective inhibitor showing a high degree of selectivity towards LDH-C4. Non-polar four carbon atoms chains, linear or branched, dramatically diminished the affinity and selectivity towards LDH-C4. N-Propyl oxamate significantly reduced ATP levels, capacitation and mouse sperm motility, in line with results shown by others, suggesting that LDH-C4 plays an essential role in mouse fertility.

  2. Exploiting Protein Conformational Change to Optimize Adenosine-Derived Inhibitors of HSP70.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Matthew D; Westwood, Isaac M; Barbeau, Olivier; Rowlands, Martin; Dobson, Sarah; Jones, Alan M; Jeganathan, Fiona; Burke, Rosemary; Kadi, Nadia; Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian; van Montfort, Rob L M; Jones, Keith

    2016-05-26

    HSP70 is a molecular chaperone and a key component of the heat-shock response. Because of its proposed importance in oncology, this protein has become a popular target for drug discovery, efforts which have as yet brought little success. This study demonstrates that adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors potentially bind to the protein with a novel mechanism of action, the stabilization by desolvation of an intramolecular salt-bridge which induces a conformational change in the protein, leading to high affinity ligands. We also demonstrate that through the application of this mechanism, adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors can be optimized in a rational manner. PMID:27119979

  3. Structural analysis of xylanase inhibitor protein I (XIP-I), a proteinaceous xylanase inhibitor from wheat (Triticum aestivum, var. Soisson).

    PubMed Central

    Payan, Françoise; Flatman, Ruth; Porciero, Sophie; Williamson, Gary; Juge, Nathalie; Roussel, Alain

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of proteinaceous inhibitors exhibiting specificity towards microbial xylanases has recently been discovered in cereals. The three-dimensional structure of xylanase inhibitor protein I (XIP-I) from wheat (Triticum aestivum, var. Soisson) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.8 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The inhibitor possesses a (beta/alpha)(8) barrel fold and has structural features typical of glycoside hydrolase family 18, namely two consensus regions, approximately corresponding to the third and fourth barrel strands, and two non-proline cis -peptide bonds, Ser(36)-Phe and Trp(256)-Asp (in XIP-I numbering). However, detailed structural analysis of XIP-I revealed several differences in the region homologous with the active site of chitinases. The catalytic glutamic acid residue of family 18 chitinases [Glu(127) in hevamine, a chitinase/lysozyme from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)] is conserved in the structure of the inhibitor (Glu(128)), but its side chain is fully engaged in salt bridges with two neighbouring arginine residues. Gly(81), located in subsite -1 of hevamine, where the reaction intermediate is formed, is replaced by Tyr(80) in XIP-I. The tyrosine side chain fills the subsite area and makes a strong hydrogen bond with the side chain of Glu(190) located at the opposite side of the cleft, preventing access of the substrate to the catalytic glutamic acid. The structural differences in the inhibitor cleft structure probably account for the lack of activity of XIP-I towards chitin. PMID:12617724

  4. Human complement protein C99 is a calcium binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Thielens, N.M.; Lohner, K.; Esser, A.F.

    1988-05-15

    Human complement protein C9 is shown to be a metalloprotein that binds 1 mol of Ca/sup 2 +//mol of C9 with a dissociation constant of 3 ..mu..m as measured by equilibrium dialysis. Incubation with EDTA removes the bound calcium, resulting in a apoprotein with decreased thermal stability. This loss in stability leads to aggregation and, therefore, to loss of hemolytic activity upon heating to a few degrees above the physiological temperature. Heat-induced aggregation of apoC9 can be prevented by salts that stabilize proteins according to the Hofmeister series of lyotropic ions, suggesting that the ion in native C9 may ligand with more than one structural element of domain of the protein. Ligand blotting indicates that the calcium binding site is located in the amino-terminal half of the protein. Removal of calcium by inclusion of EDTA in assay mixtures has no effect on the hemolytic activity of C9, and its capacity to bind to C8 in solution, or to small unilamellar lipid vesicles at temperatures at or below the physiological range. Although the precise structural and functional role of the bound calcium is not know, it is clear that it provides thermal stability to C9 and it may have a function in regulation of membrane insertion.

  5. Structural Basis for Binding and Selectivity of Antimalarial and Anticancer Ethylenediamine Inhibitors to Protein Farnesyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Fletcher, Steven; Cummings, Christopher G.; Pusateri, Erin E.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Rivas, Kasey; Gelb, Michael H.; Voorhis, Wesley C.Van; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Beese, Lorena S. ); ); ); )

    2009-03-20

    Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes an essential posttranslational lipid modification of more than 60 proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction networks. FTase inhibitors have emerged as a significant target for development of anticancer therapeutics and, more recently, for the treatment of parasitic diseases caused by protozoan pathogens, including malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). We present the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of mammalian FTase with five inhibitors based on an ethylenediamine scaffold, two of which exhibit over 1000-fold selective inhibition of P. falciparum FTase. These structures reveal the dominant determinants in both the inhibitor and enzyme that control binding and selectivity. Comparison to a homology model constructed for the P. falciparum FTase suggests opportunities for further improving selectivity of a new generation of antimalarial inhibitors.

  6. Discovery of a Potent Class I Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Fragment Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Freitas, Renato; Eram, Mohammad S; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Steuber, Holger; Smil, David; Wu, Hong; Li, Fengling; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dong, Aiping; Brown, Peter J; Hitchcock, Marion; Moosmayer, Dieter; Stegmann, Christian M; Egner, Ursula; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-02-11

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a promising target class in oncology and other disease areas. They are composed of SET domain methyltransferases and structurally unrelated Rossman-fold enzymes that include protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). In the absence of a well-defined medicinal chemistry tool-kit focused on PMTs, most current inhibitors were identified by screening large and diverse libraries of leadlike molecules. So far, no successful fragment-based approach was reported against this target class. Here, by deconstructing potent PRMT inhibitors, we find that chemical moieties occupying the substrate arginine-binding site can act as efficient fragment inhibitors. Screening a fragment library against PRMT6 produced numerous hits, including a 300 nM inhibitor (ligand efficiency of 0.56) that decreased global histone 3 arginine 2 methylation in cells, and can serve as a warhead for the development of PRMT chemical probes.

  7. De novo design of caseinolytic protein proteases inhibitors based on pharmacophore and 2D molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanzhong; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hong; Lin, Kejiang

    2015-06-01

    Caseinolytic protein proteases (ClpP) are large oligomeric protein complexes that contribute to cell homeostasis as well as virulence regulation in bacteria. Inhibitors of ClpP can significantly attenuate the capability to produce virulence factors of the bacteria. In this work, we developed a workflow to expand the chemical space of potential ClpP inhibitors based on a set of β-lactones. In our workflow, an artificial pharmacophore model was generated based on HipHop and HYPOGEN method. A de novo compound library based on molecular fingerprints was constructed and virtually screened by the pharmacophore model. The results were further investigated by molecular docking study. The workflow successfully achieved potential ClpP inhibitors. It could be applied to design more novel potential ClpP inhibitors and provide theoretical basis for the further optimization of the hit compounds. PMID:25937012

  8. De novo design of caseinolytic protein proteases inhibitors based on pharmacophore and 2D molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanzhong; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hong; Lin, Kejiang

    2015-06-01

    Caseinolytic protein proteases (ClpP) are large oligomeric protein complexes that contribute to cell homeostasis as well as virulence regulation in bacteria. Inhibitors of ClpP can significantly attenuate the capability to produce virulence factors of the bacteria. In this work, we developed a workflow to expand the chemical space of potential ClpP inhibitors based on a set of β-lactones. In our workflow, an artificial pharmacophore model was generated based on HipHop and HYPOGEN method. A de novo compound library based on molecular fingerprints was constructed and virtually screened by the pharmacophore model. The results were further investigated by molecular docking study. The workflow successfully achieved potential ClpP inhibitors. It could be applied to design more novel potential ClpP inhibitors and provide theoretical basis for the further optimization of the hit compounds.

  9. CD4-Specific Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins Are Novel Potent HIV Entry Inhibitors with Unique Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Andreas; Rusert, Peter; Berlinger, Livia; Ruprecht, Claudia R.; Mann, Axel; Corthésy, Stéphanie; Turville, Stuart G.; Aravantinou, Meropi; Fischer, Marek; Robbiani, Melissa; Amstutz, Patrick; Trkola, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation of a novel type of HIV entry inhibitor using the recently developed Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology. DARPin proteins specific for human CD4 were selected from a DARPin DNA library using ribosome display. Selected pool members interacted specifically with CD4 and competed with gp120 for binding to CD4. DARPin proteins derived in the initial selection series inhibited HIV in a dose-dependent manner, but showed a relatively high variability in their capacity to block replication of patient isolates on primary CD4 T cells. In consequence, a second series of CD4-specific DARPins with improved affinity for CD4 was generated. These 2nd series DARPins potently inhibit infection of genetically divergent (subtype B and C) HIV isolates in the low nanomolar range, independent of coreceptor usage. Importantly, the actions of the CD4 binding DARPins were highly specific: no effect on cell viability or activation, CD4 memory cell function, or interference with CD4-independent virus entry was observed. These novel CD4 targeting molecules described here combine the unique characteristics of DARPins—high physical stability, specificity and low production costs—with the capacity to potently block HIV entry, rendering them promising candidates for microbicide development. PMID:18654624

  10. Discovery of a Potent Inhibitor of Replication Protein A Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Fragment-Linking Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Andreas O.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Waterson, Alex G.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, DeMarco V.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-10-22

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, is involved in nearly all cellular DNA transactions. The RPA N-terminal domain (RPA70N) is a recruitment site for proteins involved in DNA-damage response and repair. Selective inhibition of these protein–protein interactions has the potential to inhibit the DNA-damage response and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents without affecting other functions of RPA. To discover a potent, selective inhibitor of the RPA70N protein–protein interactions to test this hypothesis, we used NMR spectroscopy to identify fragment hits that bind to two adjacent sites in the basic cleft of RPA70N. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of RPA70N–ligand complexes revealed how these fragments bind to RPA and guided the design of linked compounds that simultaneously occupy both sites. We have synthesized linked molecules that bind to RPA70N with submicromolar affinity and minimal disruption of RPA’s interaction with ssDNA.

  11. Computational design of a protein-based enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Procko, Erik; Hedman, Rickard; Hamilton, Keith; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Fleishman, Sarel J.; Su, Min; Aramini, James; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F.; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable progress in designing protein-protein interactions, the design of proteins that bind polar surfaces is an unmet challenge. We describe the computational design of a protein that binds the acidic active site of hen egg lysozyme and inhibits the enzyme. The design process starts with two polar amino acids that fit deep into the enzyme active site, identifies a protein scaffold that supports these residues and is complementary in shape to the lysozyme active site region, and finally optimizes the surrounding contact surface for high affinity binding. Following affinity maturation, a protein designed using this method bound lysozyme with low nanomolar affinity, and a combination of NMR studies, crystallography and knockout mutagenesis confirmed the designed binding surface and orientation. Saturation mutagenesis with selection and deep sequencing demonstrated that specific designed interactions extending well beyond the centrally grafted polar residues are critical for high affinity binding. PMID:23827138

  12. Role of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase in the Toxicity of Nucleotide Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yili; Barauskas, Ona; Perry, Jason K.; Ahmadyar, Shekeba; Stepan, George; Yu, Helen; Babusis, Darius; Park, Yeojin; McCutcheon, Krista; Perron, Michel; Schultz, Brian E.; Sakowicz, Roman; Ray, Adrian S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity has emerged during the clinical development of many but not all nucleotide inhibitors (NI) of hepatitis C virus (HCV). To better understand the mechanism for adverse events, clinically relevant HCV NI were characterized in biochemical and cellular assays, including assays of decreased viability in multiple cell lines and primary cells, interaction with human DNA and RNA polymerases, and inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis and respiration. NI that were incorporated by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (PolRMT) inhibited mitochondrial protein synthesis and showed a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in cells. The nucleoside released by the prodrug balapiravir (R1626), 4′-azido cytidine, was a highly selective inhibitor of mitochondrial RNA transcription. The nucleotide prodrug of 2′-C-methyl guanosine, BMS-986094, showed a primary effect on mitochondrial function at submicromolar concentrations, followed by general cytotoxicity. In contrast, NI containing multiple ribose modifications, including the active forms of mericitabine and sofosbuvir, were poor substrates for PolRMT and did not show mitochondrial toxicity in cells. In general, these studies identified the prostate cell line PC-3 as more than an order of magnitude more sensitive to mitochondrial toxicity than the commonly used HepG2 cells. In conclusion, analogous to the role of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma in toxicity caused by some 2′-deoxynucleotide analogs, there is an association between HCV NI that interact with PolRMT and the observation of adverse events. More broadly applied, the sensitive methods for detecting mitochondrial toxicity described here may help in the identification of mitochondrial toxicity prior to clinical testing. PMID:26596942

  13. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Human Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) Protein from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Moy, Allison; Sohal, Kirti; Dam, Carolyn; Kuo, Peter; Ulrich, Beau; Whittaker, James; Whittaker, Mei; Düzgünes, Nejat; Konopka, Kryatyna; Franz, Andreas H.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.

    2009-01-01

    The human secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) has been shown to possess anti-protease, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Its presence in saliva is believed to be a major deterrent to oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The 11.7 kD peptide is a secreted, nonglycosylated protein rich in disulfide bonds. Currently, recombinant SLPI is only available as an expensive bacterial expression product. We have investigated the utility of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris to produce and secrete SLPI with C-terminal c-myc and polyhistidine tags. The posttransformational vector amplification protocol was used to isolate strains with increased copy number, and culturing parameters were varied to optimize SLPI expression. Modification of the purification procedure allowed the secreted, recombinant protein to be isolated from the cell-free fermentation medium with cobalt affinity chromatography. This yeast-derived SLPI was shown to have an anti-protease activity comparable to the commercially available bacterial product. Thus, P. pastoris provides an efficient, cost-effective system for producing SLPI for structure function analysis studies as well as a wide array of potential therapeutic applications. PMID:19505578

  14. Selective Inhibition of the Synthesis of Sindbis Virion Proteins by an Inhibitor of Chymotrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E. R.; Boyle, Mary K.

    1972-01-01

    Treatment of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus with TPCK, the choloromethyl ketone derivative of tosyl-phenylalanine and an inhibitor of chymotrypsin, resulted in reduced synthesis of viral structural proteins and the accumulation of a high-molecular-weight polypeptide, thought to be a precursor. The analogous inhibitor of trypsin, TLCK, the chloromethyl ketone derivative of tosyllysine, had no such effect. PMID:5061988

  15. Imbalance in chemical space: How to facilitate the identification of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kuenemann, Mélaine A; Labbé, Céline M; Cerdan, Adrien H; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play vital roles in life and provide new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. In this large data analysis, 3,300 inhibitors of PPIs (iPPIs) were compared to 17 reference datasets of collectively ~566,000 compounds (including natural compounds, existing drugs, active compounds on conventional targets, etc.) using a chemoinformatics approach. Using this procedure, we showed that comparable classes of PPI targets can be formed using either the similarity of their ligands or the shared properties of their binding cavities, constituting a proof-of-concept that not only can binding pockets be used to group PPI targets, but that these pockets certainly condition the properties of their corresponding ligands. These results demonstrate that matching regions in both chemical space and target space can be found. Such identified classes of targets could lead to the design of PPI-class-specific chemical libraries and therefore facilitate the development of iPPIs to the stage of drug candidates. PMID:27034268

  16. Imbalance in chemical space: How to facilitate the identification of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenemann, Mélaine A.; Labbé, Céline M.; Cerdan, Adrien H.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play vital roles in life and provide new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. In this large data analysis, 3,300 inhibitors of PPIs (iPPIs) were compared to 17 reference datasets of collectively ~566,000 compounds (including natural compounds, existing drugs, active compounds on conventional targets, etc.) using a chemoinformatics approach. Using this procedure, we showed that comparable classes of PPI targets can be formed using either the similarity of their ligands or the shared properties of their binding cavities, constituting a proof-of-concept that not only can binding pockets be used to group PPI targets, but that these pockets certainly condition the properties of their corresponding ligands. These results demonstrate that matching regions in both chemical space and target space can be found. Such identified classes of targets could lead to the design of PPI-class-specific chemical libraries and therefore facilitate the development of iPPIs to the stage of drug candidates.

  17. Imbalance in chemical space: How to facilitate the identification of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuenemann, Mélaine A.; Labbé, Céline M.; Cerdan, Adrien H.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play vital roles in life and provide new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. In this large data analysis, 3,300 inhibitors of PPIs (iPPIs) were compared to 17 reference datasets of collectively ~566,000 compounds (including natural compounds, existing drugs, active compounds on conventional targets, etc.) using a chemoinformatics approach. Using this procedure, we showed that comparable classes of PPI targets can be formed using either the similarity of their ligands or the shared properties of their binding cavities, constituting a proof-of-concept that not only can binding pockets be used to group PPI targets, but that these pockets certainly condition the properties of their corresponding ligands. These results demonstrate that matching regions in both chemical space and target space can be found. Such identified classes of targets could lead to the design of PPI-class-specific chemical libraries and therefore facilitate the development of iPPIs to the stage of drug candidates. PMID:27034268

  18. Targeting the RAS pathway by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic driver mutations with small-molecule inhibitors resulted in powerful treatment options for cancer patients in recent years. The RAS (rat sarcoma) pathway is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Whereas targeting mutant Kirsten RAS (KRAS) remains difficult, mutant B rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (BRAF) kinase is an established drug target in cancer. Now data show that neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) and even Harvey RAS (HRAS) mutations could be predictive markers for treatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitors. This review discusses recent preclinical and clinical studies of MEK inhibitors in BRAF and RAS mutant cancer. PMID:26691679

  19. In Silico Designing and Analysis of Inhibitors against Target Protein Identified through Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Monika; Chadha, Nidhi; Tiwari, Anjani K.; Hasija, Yasha

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, a life-threatening blood disease, has been a major concern in the field of healthcare. One of the severe forms of malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum which is initiated through protein interactions of pathogen with the host proteins. It is essential to analyse the protein-protein interactions among the host and pathogen for better understanding of the process and characterizing specific molecular mechanisms involved in pathogen persistence and survival. In this study, a complete protein-protein interaction network of human host and Plasmodium falciparum has been generated by integration of the experimental data and computationally predicting interactions using the interolog method. The interacting proteins were filtered according to their biological significance and functional roles. α-tubulin was identified as a potential protein target and inhibitors were designed against it by modification of amiprophos methyl. Docking and binding affinity analysis showed two modified inhibitors exhibiting better docking scores of −10.5 kcal/mol and −10.43 kcal/mol and an improved binding affinity of −83.80 kJ/mol and −98.16 kJ/mol with the target. These inhibitors can further be tested and validated in vivo for their properties as an antimalarial drug. PMID:27057354

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Madwed, Jeffrey; Bos, Carina L; Gupta, Abhya; Yong, Chan-Loi; Polmar, Stephen H; Olszyna, Dariusz P; Hack, C Erik; van Deventer, Sander J H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-04-15

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participates in intracellular signaling cascades resulting in inflammatory responses. Therefore, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway may form the basis of a new strategy for treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, p38 MAPK activation during systemic inflammation in humans has not yet been shown, and its functional significance in vivo remains unclear. Hence, we exposed 24 healthy male subjects to an i.v. dose of LPS (4 ng/kg), preceded 3 h earlier by orally administered 600 or 50 mg BIRB 796 BS (an in vitro p38 MAPK inhibitor) or placebo. Both doses of BIRB 796 BS significantly inhibited LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation in the leukocyte fraction of the volunteers. Cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1R antagonist) was strongly inhibited by both low and high dose p38 MAPK inhibitor. In addition, p38 MAPK inhibition diminished leukocyte responses, including neutrophilia, release of elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, and up-regulation of CD11b with down-regulation of L-selectin. Finally, blocking p38 MAPK decreased C-reactive protein release. These data identify p38 MAPK as a principal mediator of the inflammatory response to LPS in humans. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory potential of an oral p38 MAPK inhibitor in humans in vivo suggests that p38 MAPK inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  1. Identification of a new dengue virus inhibitor that targets the viral NS4B protein and restricts genomic RNA replication.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Kaptein, Suzanne J F; Davidson, Andrew D; Jacobs, Michael; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2013-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human arthropod-borne virus with a major impact on public health. Nevertheless, a licensed vaccine or specific treatment is still lacking. We therefore screened the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC), a library of drug-like small molecules, for inhibitors of DENV replication using a cell line that contains a stably replicating DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) subgenomic replicon. The most potent DENV inhibitor in the NCC was δ opioid receptor antagonist SDM25N. This compound showed antiviral activity against wild-type DENV2 in both Hela and BHK-21 cells, but not in the C6/36 cell line derived from the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The structurally related compound naltrindole also inhibited DENV replication, albeit less potently. Using a transient subgenomic replicon, we demonstrate that SDM25N restricts genomic RNA replication rather than translation of the viral genome. We identified a single amino acid substitution (F164L) in the NS4B protein that confers resistance to SDM25N. Remarkably, an NS4B amino acid substitution (P104L), which was previously shown to confer resistance to the DENV inhibitor NITD-618, also provided resistance to SDM25N. In conclusion, we have identified a new DENV inhibitor, SDM25N, which restricts genomic RNA replication by - directly or indirectly - targeting the viral NS4B protein. PMID:23735301

  2. Protein kinase C is involved in regulation of Ca2+ channels in plasmalemma of Nitella syncarpa.

    PubMed

    Zherelova, O M

    1989-01-01

    Ca2+ current recordings have been made on Nitella syncarpa cells using the intracellular perfusion and the voltage-clamp technique. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), a substance capable of activating protein kinase C from plasmalemma of Nitella cells, modulates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Polymixin B, inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks the Nitella plasmalemma Ca2+ channels; the rate of channel blockage depends on the concentration and exposure time of the substance. PMID:2536617

  3. rhC1INH: a new drug for the treatment of attacks in hereditary angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (rhC1INH) (Ruconest(®), Pharming) is a new drug developed for the relief of symptoms occurring in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Pertinent results have already been published elsewhere; this article summarizes the progress made since then. Similar to the purified C1-inhibitor derived from human plasma, the therapeutic efficacy of rhC1INH results from its ability to block the actions of enzymes belonging to the overactivated bradykinin-forming pathway, at multiple locations. During clinical trials into the management of acute edema, a total of 190 subjects received recombinant C1-inhibitor by intravenous infusion on 714 occasions altogether. Dose-ranging efficacy studies established 50 U/kg as the recommended dose, and demonstrated the effectiveness of this agent in all localizations of hereditary angioedema attacks. Studies into the safety of rhC1INH based on 300 administrations to healthy subjects or hereditary angioedema patients followed-up for 90 days have not detected the formation of autoantibodies against rhC1INH or IgE antibodies directed against rabbit proteins, even after repeated administration on multiple occasions. These findings met favorable appraisal by the EMA, which granted European marketing authorization for rhC1INH. Pharming is expected to file a biological licence with the US FDA by the end of 2010 to obtain marketing approval in the USA. The launch of rhC1INH onto the pharmaceutical market may represent an important progress in the management of hereditary angioedema patients.

  4. rhC1INH: a new drug for the treatment of attacks in hereditary angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (rhC1INH) (Ruconest(®), Pharming) is a new drug developed for the relief of symptoms occurring in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Pertinent results have already been published elsewhere; this article summarizes the progress made since then. Similar to the purified C1-inhibitor derived from human plasma, the therapeutic efficacy of rhC1INH results from its ability to block the actions of enzymes belonging to the overactivated bradykinin-forming pathway, at multiple locations. During clinical trials into the management of acute edema, a total of 190 subjects received recombinant C1-inhibitor by intravenous infusion on 714 occasions altogether. Dose-ranging efficacy studies established 50 U/kg as the recommended dose, and demonstrated the effectiveness of this agent in all localizations of hereditary angioedema attacks. Studies into the safety of rhC1INH based on 300 administrations to healthy subjects or hereditary angioedema patients followed-up for 90 days have not detected the formation of autoantibodies against rhC1INH or IgE antibodies directed against rabbit proteins, even after repeated administration on multiple occasions. These findings met favorable appraisal by the EMA, which granted European marketing authorization for rhC1INH. Pharming is expected to file a biological licence with the US FDA by the end of 2010 to obtain marketing approval in the USA. The launch of rhC1INH onto the pharmaceutical market may represent an important progress in the management of hereditary angioedema patients. PMID:21426252

  5. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  6. K-Ras(G12C) inhibitors allosterically control GTP affinity and effector interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrem, Jonathan M.; Peters, Ulf; Sos, Martin L.; Wells, James A.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2013-11-01

    Somatic mutations in the small GTPase K-Ras are the most common activating lesions found in human cancer, and are generally associated with poor response to standard therapies. Efforts to target this oncogene directly have faced difficulties owing to its picomolar affinity for GTP/GDP and the absence of known allosteric regulatory sites. Oncogenic mutations result in functional activation of Ras family proteins by impairing GTP hydrolysis. With diminished regulation by GTPase activity, the nucleotide state of Ras becomes more dependent on relative nucleotide affinity and concentration. This gives GTP an advantage over GDP and increases the proportion of active GTP-bound Ras. Here we report the development of small molecules that irreversibly bind to a common oncogenic mutant, K-Ras(G12C). These compounds rely on the mutant cysteine for binding and therefore do not affect the wild-type protein. Crystallographic studies reveal the formation of a new pocket that is not apparent in previous structures of Ras, beneath the effector binding switch-II region. Binding of these inhibitors to K-Ras(G12C) disrupts both switch-I and switch-II, subverting the native nucleotide preference to favour GDP over GTP and impairing binding to Raf. Our data provide structure-based validation of a new allosteric regulatory site on Ras that is targetable in a mutant-specific manner.

  7. Characterization of. alpha. -amylase-inhibitor, a lectin-like protein in the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect {alpha}-amylases but not of plant {alpha}-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it. The primary translation product of {alpha}Al is a polypeptide of M{sub r} 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of M{sub r} 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (M{sub r} 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that {alpha}Al is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles.

  8. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Transport N-Acylethanolamines to Nuclear Receptors and Are Targets of Endocannabinoid Transport Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin; Vivieca, Stephanie; Sun, Jing; Glaser, Sherrye T.; Deutsch, Dale G.

    2012-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are bioactive lipids that engage diverse receptor systems. Recently, we identified fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) as intracellular NAE carriers. Here, we provide two new functions for FABPs in NAE signaling. We demonstrate that FABPs mediate the nuclear translocation of the NAE oleoylethanolamide, an agonist of nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Antagonism of FABP function through chemical inhibition, dominant-negative approaches, or shRNA-mediated knockdown reduced PPARα activation, confirming a requisite role for FABPs in this process. In addition, we show that NAE analogs, traditionally employed as inhibitors of the putative endocannabinoid transmembrane transporter, target FABPs. Support for the existence of the putative membrane transporter stems primarily from pharmacological inhibition of endocannabinoid uptake by such transport inhibitors, which are widely employed in endocannabinoid research despite lacking a known cellular target(s). Our approach adapted FABP-mediated PPARα signaling and employed in vitro binding, arachidonoyl-[1-14C]ethanolamide ([14C]AEA) uptake, and FABP knockdown to demonstrate that transport inhibitors exert their effects through inhibition of FABPs, thereby providing a molecular rationale for the underlying physiological effects of these compounds. Identification of FABPs as targets of transport inhibitors undermines the central pharmacological support for the existence of an endocannabinoid transmembrane transporter. PMID:22170058

  9. Interaction of C1 inhibitor with thrombin on the endothelial surface.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Sonia; Castelli, Roberto; Maiocchi, Diana; Bergamaschini, Luigi; Cugno, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    Thrombin, the central bioregulatory enzyme of haemostasis, also has a potent vasopermeability effect on the surface of endothelial cells, and has therefore been considered a major link between the activation of the coagulation pathway and inflammation. C1 inhibitor inhibits thrombin with a low second-order rate constant that can be increased by heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the C1 inhibitor-induced inhibition of thrombin is potentiated on the endothelial surface. The interaction of C1 inhibitor and thrombin was evaluated in an in-vitro system of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to which purified C1 inhibitor and thrombin have been added. The role of heparins and selectins has been tested by adding heparinase and Mab to selectins. Kinetic analysis under pseudo-first-order conditions showed that the inhibitory effect of C1 inhibitor on thrombin is greater on the surface of endothelial cells. After incubating nanomolar concentrations of thrombin and micromolar concentrations of C1 inhibitor in a purified system, thrombin activity remained significant, but was almost totally suppressed in the presence of HUVECs. The abolition of such suppression by heparinase and Mab to selectins supports the involvement of heparin and selectins in C1 inhibitor-thrombin interaction. Furthermore, the second-order rate constant was 25 ± 3 /s per mol/l in our purified system, but increased to 100 ± 9 /s per mol/l in the presence of HUVECs. Our results indicate that C1 inhibitor can inhibit thrombin activity on vascular endothelium via binding to selectins and potentiation by heparins. This may contribute to the modulation of thrombin activity on vasopermeability and on coagulation especially when the major natural anticoagulant pathways are impaired. PMID:21959589

  10. Luteoloside Acts as 3C Protease Inhibitor of Enterovirus 71 In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Ke, Zhipeng; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luteoloside is a member of the flavonoids family that exhibits several bioactivities including anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. However, the antiviral activity of luteoloside against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for this effect remain unknown. In this study, the antiviral potency of luteoloside against EV71 and its inhibitory effects on 3C protease activity were evaluated. First, we investigated the cytotoxicity of luteoloside against rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which was the cell line selected for an in vitro infection model. In a subsequent antiviral assay, the cytopathic effect of EV71 was significantly and dose-dependently relieved by the administration of luteoloside (EC50 = 0.43 mM, selection index = 5.3). Using a plaque reduction assay, we administered luteoloside at various time points and found that the compound reduced EV71 viability in RD cells rather than increasing defensive mobilization or viral absorption. Moreover, biochemical studies focused on VP1 (a key structural protein of EV71) mRNA transcript and protein levels also revealed the inhibitory effects of luteoloside on the EV71 viral yield. Finally, we performed inhibition assays using luteoloside to evaluate its effect on recombinant 3C protease activity. Our results demonstrated that luteoloside blocked 3C protease enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 mM) that was similar to the effect of rutin, which is a well-known C3 protease inhibitor. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that luteoloside can block 3C protease activity and subsequently inhibit EV71 production in vitro.

  11. Luteoloside Acts as 3C Protease Inhibitor of Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Ke, Zhipeng; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luteoloside is a member of the flavonoids family that exhibits several bioactivities including anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. However, the antiviral activity of luteoloside against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for this effect remain unknown. In this study, the antiviral potency of luteoloside against EV71 and its inhibitory effects on 3C protease activity were evaluated. First, we investigated the cytotoxicity of luteoloside against rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which was the cell line selected for an in vitro infection model. In a subsequent antiviral assay, the cytopathic effect of EV71 was significantly and dose-dependently relieved by the administration of luteoloside (EC50 = 0.43 mM, selection index = 5.3). Using a plaque reduction assay, we administered luteoloside at various time points and found that the compound reduced EV71 viability in RD cells rather than increasing defensive mobilization or viral absorption. Moreover, biochemical studies focused on VP1 (a key structural protein of EV71) mRNA transcript and protein levels also revealed the inhibitory effects of luteoloside on the EV71 viral yield. Finally, we performed inhibition assays using luteoloside to evaluate its effect on recombinant 3C protease activity. Our results demonstrated that luteoloside blocked 3C protease enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 mM) that was similar to the effect of rutin, which is a well-known C3 protease inhibitor. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that luteoloside can block 3C protease activity and subsequently inhibit EV71 production in vitro. PMID:26870944

  12. Luteoloside Acts as 3C Protease Inhibitor of Enterovirus 71 In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zeyu; Ding, Yue; Ke, Zhipeng; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Luteoloside is a member of the flavonoids family that exhibits several bioactivities including anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. However, the antiviral activity of luteoloside against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for this effect remain unknown. In this study, the antiviral potency of luteoloside against EV71 and its inhibitory effects on 3C protease activity were evaluated. First, we investigated the cytotoxicity of luteoloside against rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which was the cell line selected for an in vitro infection model. In a subsequent antiviral assay, the cytopathic effect of EV71 was significantly and dose-dependently relieved by the administration of luteoloside (EC50 = 0.43 mM, selection index = 5.3). Using a plaque reduction assay, we administered luteoloside at various time points and found that the compound reduced EV71 viability in RD cells rather than increasing defensive mobilization or viral absorption. Moreover, biochemical studies focused on VP1 (a key structural protein of EV71) mRNA transcript and protein levels also revealed the inhibitory effects of luteoloside on the EV71 viral yield. Finally, we performed inhibition assays using luteoloside to evaluate its effect on recombinant 3C protease activity. Our results demonstrated that luteoloside blocked 3C protease enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 mM) that was similar to the effect of rutin, which is a well-known C3 protease inhibitor. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that luteoloside can block 3C protease activity and subsequently inhibit EV71 production in vitro. PMID:26870944

  13. NMR investigation of the interaction of the inhibitor protein Im9 with its partner DNase.

    PubMed Central

    Boetzel, R.; Czisch, M.; Kaptein, R.; Hemmings, A. M.; James, R.; Kleanthous, C.; Moore, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the 24 kDa complex of uniformly 13C and 15N labeled Im9 bound to the unlabeled DNase domain have provided sufficient constraints for the solution structure of the bound Im9 to be determined. For the final ensemble of 20 structures, pairwise RMSDs for residues 3-84 were 0.76 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone atoms and 1.36 +/- 0.15 A for the heavy atoms. Representative solution structures of the free and bound Im9 are highly similar, with backbone and heavy atom RMSDs of 1.63 and 2.44 A, respectively, for residues 4-83, suggesting that binding does not cause a major conformational change in Im9. The NMR studies have also allowed the DNase contact surface on Im9 to be investigated through changes in backbone chemical shifts and NOEs between the two proteins determined from comparisons of 1H-1H-13C NOESY-HSQC spectra with and without 13C decoupling. The NMR-defined interface agrees well with that determined in a recent X-ray structure analysis with the major difference being that a surface loop of Im9, which is at the interface, has a different conformation in the solution and crystal structures. Tyr54, a key residue on the interface, is shown to exhibit NMR characteristics indicative of slow rotational flipping. A mechanistic description of the influence binding of Im9 has on the dynamic behavior of E9 DNase, which is known to exist in two slowly interchanging conformers in solution, is proposed. PMID:11045617

  14. Effect of reactive site loop elongation on the inhibitory activity of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Eldering, Eric; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik

    2004-06-01

    The serine protease inhibitor C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh) inhibits several complement- and contact-system proteases, which play an important role in inflammation. C1-Inh has a short reactive site loop (RSL) compared to other serpins. RSL length determines the inhibitory activity of serpins. We investigated the effect of RSL elongation on inhibitory activity of C1-Inh by insertion of one or two alanine residues in the RSL. One of five mutants had an increased association rate with kallikrein, but was nevertheless a poor inhibitor because of a simultaneous high stoichiometry of inhibition (>10). The association rate of the other variants was lower than that of wild-type C1-Inh. These data suggest that the relatively weak inhibitory activity of C1-Inh is not the result of its short RSL. The short RSL of C1-Inh has, surprisingly, the optimal length for inhibition.

  15. Whey proteins as source of dipeptidyl dipeptidase IV (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, Giovanni; Sibilia, Valeria; Caroli, Anna Maria; Cocchi, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that whey proteins can reduce postprandial glucose levels and stimulate insulin release in healthy subjects and in subjects with type 2 diabetes by reducing dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity in the proximal bowel and hence increasing intact incretin levels. Our aim was to identify DPP-4 inhibitors among short peptides occurring in hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin, the major whey protein found in the milk of ruminants. We proved that the bioactive peptide Ile-Pro-Ala can be regarded as a moderate DPP-4 inhibitor.

  16. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  17. Isolation, characterization and cDNA sequencing of a Kazal family proteinase inhibitor from seminal plasma of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Olczak, Mariusz; Wojtczak, Mariola; Glogowski, Jan; Jankowski, Jan; Watorek, Wiesław; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2008-06-01

    The turkey reproductive tract and seminal plasma contain a serine proteinase inhibitor that seems to be unique for the reproductive tract. Our experimental objective was to isolate, characterize and cDNA sequence the Kazal family proteinase inhibitor from turkey seminal plasma and testis. Seminal plasma contains two forms of a Kazal family inhibitor: virgin (Ia) represented by an inhibitor of moderate electrophoretic migration rate (present also in the testis) and modified (Ib, a split peptide bond) represented by an inhibitor with a fast migration rate. The inhibitor from the seminal plasma was purified by affinity, ion-exchange and reverse phase chromatography. The testis inhibitor was purified by affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. N-terminal Edman sequencing of the two seminal plasma inhibitors and testis inhibitor were identical. This sequence was used to construct primers and obtain a cDNA sequence from the testis. Analysis of a cDNA sequence indicated that turkey proteinase inhibitor belongs to Kazal family inhibitors (pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors, mammalian acrosin inhibitors) and caltrin. The turkey seminal plasma Kazal inhibitor belongs to low molecular mass inhibitors and is characterized by a high value of the equilibrium association constant for inhibitor/trypsin complexes.

  18. Intranasal delivery of FSD-C10, a novel Rho kinase inhibitor, exhibits therapeutic potential in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hua; Yu, Jie-Zhong; Liu, Chun-Yun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Hai-Fei; Yang, Wan-Fang; Li, Jun-Lian; Feng, Qian-Jin; Feng, Ling; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Xiao, Bao-Guo; Ma, Cun-Gen

    2014-01-01

    Viewing multiple sclerosis (MS) as both neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration has major implications for therapy, with neuroprotection and neurorepair needed in addition to controlling neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). While Fasudil, an inhibitor of Rho kinase (ROCK), is known to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, it relies on multiple, short-term injections, with a narrow safety window. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effect of a novel ROCK inhibitor FSD-C10, a Fasudil derivative, on EAE. An important advantage of this derivative is that it can be used via non-injection routes; intranasal delivery is the preferred route because of its efficient CNS delivery and the much lower dose compared with oral delivery. Our results showed that intranasal delivery of FSD-C10 effectively ameliorated the clinical severity of EAE and CNS inflammatory infiltration and promoted neuroprotection. FSD-C10 effectively induced CNS production of the immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 and boosted expression of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor proteins, while inhibiting activation of p-nuclear factor-κB/p65 on astrocytes and production of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, FSD-C10 treatment effectively induced CD4+ CD25+, CD4+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that intranasal delivery of the novel ROCK inhibitor FSD-C10 has therapeutic potential in EAE, through mechanisms that possibly involve both inhibiting CNS inflammation and promoting neuroprotection. PMID:24749492

  19. Streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) inhibits the membrane attack complex by preventing uptake of C567 onto cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Fernie-King, B A; Seilly, D J; Willers, C; Würzner, R; Davies, A; Lachmann, P J

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcal inhibitor of complement (SIC) was first described in 1996 as a putative inhibitor of the membrane attack complex of complement (MAC). SIC is a 31 000 MW protein secreted in large quantities by the virulent Streptococcus pyogenes strains M1 and M57, and is encoded by a gene which is extremely variable. In order to study further the interactions of SIC with the MAC, we have made a recombinant form of SIC (rSIC) in Escherichia coli and purified native M1 SIC which was used to raise a polyclonal antibody. SIC prevented reactive lysis of guinea pig erythrocytes by the MAC at a stage prior to C5b67 complexes binding to cell membranes, presumably by blocking the transiently expressed membrane insertion site on C7. The ability of SIC and clusterin (another putative fluid phase complement inhibitor) to inhibit complement lysis was compared, and found to be equally efficient. In parallel, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay both SIC and rSIC bound strongly to C5b67 and C5b678 complexes and to a lesser extent C5b-9, but only weakly to individual complement components. The implications of these data for virulence of SIC-positive streptococci are discussed, in light of the fact that Gram-positive organisms are already protected against complement lysis by the presence of their peptidoglycan cell walls. We speculate that MAC inhibition may not be the sole function of SIC.

  20. Regulation of complement activation by C-reactive protein: targeting of the inhibitory activity of C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Andreas P; Trouw, Leendert A; McGrath, Fabian D G; Hack, C Erik; Blom, Anna M

    2006-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the major acute phase protein in humans. It has been shown that CRP interacts with factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, and now we demonstrate binding of CRP to the fluid-phase inhibitor of the classical pathway, C4b-binding protein (C4BP). C4BP bound to directly immobilized recombinant CRP as well as CRP attached to phosphorylcholine. The binding was sensitive to ionic strength and was enhanced in the presence of calcium. C4BP lacking beta-chain and protein S, which is a form of C4BP increasing upon inflammation, bound CRP with higher affinity than the C4BP-protein S complex. The binding could not be blocked with mAbs directed against peripheral parts of the alpha-chains of C4BP while the isolated central core of C4BP obtained by partial proteolytic digestion bound CRP, indicating that the binding site for CRP is localized in the central core of the C4BP molecule. Furthermore, we found complexes in serum from a patient with an elevated CRP level and trace amounts of CRP were also identified in a plasma-derived C4BP preparation. We were also able to detect C4BP-CRP complexes in solution and established that C4BP retains full complement regulatory activity in the presence of CRP. In addition, we found that C4BP can compete with C1q for binding to immobilized CRP and that it inhibits complement activation locally. We hypothesize that CRP limits excessive complement activation on targets via its interactions with both factor H and C4BP.

  1. Hemin as a generic and potent protein misfolding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanqin; Carver, John A.; Ho, Lam H.; Elias, Abigail K.; Musgrave, Ian F.; Pukala, Tara L.

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Hemin prevents Aβ42, α-synuclein and RCM-κ-casein forming amyloid fibrils. • Hemin inhibits the β-sheet structure formation of Aβ42. • Hemin reduces the cell toxicity caused by fibrillar Aβ42. • Hemin dissociates partially formed Aβ42 fibrils. • Hemin prevents amorphous aggregation by ADH, catalase and γs-crystallin. - Abstract: Protein misfolding causes serious biological malfunction, resulting in diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and cataract. Molecules which inhibit protein misfolding are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated that hemin prevents amyloid fibril formation of kappa-casein, amyloid beta peptide and α-synuclein by blocking β-sheet structure assembly which is essential in fibril aggregation. Further, inhibition of fibril formation by hemin significantly reduces the cytotoxicity caused by fibrillar amyloid beta peptide in vitro. Interestingly, hemin degrades partially formed amyloid fibrils and prevents further aggregation to mature fibrils. Light scattering assay results revealed that hemin also prevents protein amorphous aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase and γs-crystallin. In summary, hemin is a potent agent which generically stabilises proteins against aggregation, and has potential as a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases.

  2. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  3. Structural comparison of p38 inhibitor-protein complexes: a review of recent p38 inhibitors having unique binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Wrobleski, Stephen T; Doweyko, Arthur M

    2005-01-01

    Small molecule inhibition of protein kinases in the treatment of significant diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis has attracted significant attention over the past two decades and has clearly become one of the most significant challenges for drug discovery in the 21st century. While the recent identification of 518 different kinases in the human genome has offered a wealth of opportunities for drug intervention in the treatment of these diseases, it has also created a daunting challenge with respect to selective kinase inhibition as a viable strategy in target-based drug design. Over the past decade, the design and development of a small molecule that selectively inhibits the p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase has clearly emerged as one of these challenges within the industry. This review will focus on the comparison of the x-ray crystal structures and binding models of the most recent p38 inhibitor-enzyme complexes and the identification of the structural elements and interactions that may be important in providing inhibitor potency and selectivity toward the p38 MAP kinase. PMID:16178743

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) acts as a BMP and Wnt inhibitor during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, Elisa; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2009-09-18

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) belongs to an unusual subgroup of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily of signaling ligands as it lacks a key cysteine residue in the mature region required for proper intermolecular dimerization. Naturally occurring BMP15 mutation leads to early ovarian failure in humans, and BMP15 has been shown to activate the Smad1/5/8 pathway in that context. Despite its important role in germ cell specification, the embryological function of BMP15 remains unknown. Surprisingly, we find that during early Xenopus embryogenesis BMP15 acts solely as an inhibitor of the Smad1/5/8 pathway and the Wnt pathway. BMP15 gain-of-function leads to embryos with secondary ectopic heads and to direct neural induction in intact explants. BMP15 inhibits BMP4-mediated epidermal induction in dissociated explants. BMP15 strongly inhibits BRE response induced by BMP4 and blocks phosphorylation and activation of Smad1/5/8 MH2-domain. Mechanistically, BMP15 protein specifically interacts with BMP4 protein, suggesting inhibition upstream of receptor binding. Loss-of-function experiments using morpholinos or a naturally occurring human BMP15 dominant-negative mutant (BMP15-Y235C) leads to embryos lacking head. BMP15-Y235C also eliminates the inhibitory activity of BMP15 on BRE (BMP-responsive element). Finally, we show that BMP15 inhibits the canonical branch of the Wnt pathway, upstream of beta-catenin. We, thus, demonstrate that BMP15 is necessary and sufficient for the specification of dorso-anterior structures and highlight novel mechanisms of BMP15 function that strongly suggest a reinterpretation of its function in ovaries specially for ovarian failure.

  5. Structural and functional aspects of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Hack, C Erik; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2002-09-01

    C1-Inh is a serpin that inhibits serine proteases from the complement and the coagulation pathway. C1-Inh consists of a serpin domain and a unique N-terminal domain and is heavily glycosylated. Non-functional mutants of C1-Inh can give insight into the inhibitory mechanism of C1-Inh. This review describes a novel 3D model of C1-Inh, based on a newly developed homology modelling method. This model gives insight into a possible potentiation mechanism of C1-Inh and based on this model the essential residues for efficient inhibition by C1-Inh are discussed.

  6. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the MDM2–p53 Protein–Protein Interaction (MDM2 Inhibitors) in Clinical Trials for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Design of small-molecule inhibitors (MDM2 inhibitors) to block the MDM2–p53 protein–protein interaction has been pursued as a new cancer therapeutic strategy. In recent years, potent, selective, and efficacious MDM2 inhibitors have been successfully obtained and seven such compounds have been advanced into early phase clinical trials for the treatment of human cancers. Here, we review the design, synthesis, properties, preclinical, and clinical studies of these clinical-stage MDM2 inhibitors. PMID:25396320

  8. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  9. Effect of protease inhibitors on pulmonary bioavailability of therapeutic proteins and peptides in the rat.

    PubMed

    Amancha, Kiran Prakash; Hussain, Alamdar

    2015-02-20

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of protease inhibitors on the pulmonary absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins with varying molecular weights. Dry powder formulations of leuprolide (1.2 kD), salmon calcitonin (3.4 kD), human insulin (5.8 kD), human leptin (16.0 kD), and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (36.5 kD) were prepared with or without protease inhibitors; aprotinin and bestatin. The formulations were administered intrapulmonary to anesthetized rats. The pharmacokinetics of these proteins were assessed by measuring serum drug concentrations. In addition, in vitro stability of these proteins in rat lung homogenate was assessed using the trifluoroacetic acid method. Bioavailability of leuprolide following pulmonary administration was 75% higher compared to subcutaneously administered leuprolide. Protease inhibitors had little or no effect on the pulmonary bioavailability of leuprolide. However, protease inhibitors (1 mg/kg) increased the bioavailability of calcitonin by more than 50%. Similarly, the bioavailabilities of leptin and HCG in the presence of bestatin were increased by 1.9 and 2.1-fold, respectively. Leuprolide was stable both in the lung cytosol and subcellular pellets with about 10% degradation at the end of the study period (4h). In contrast, calcitonin, insulin, leptin and HCG were significantly degraded in the lung cytosol and subcellular pellets. Presence of protease inhibitors in formulation could improve the stability of protein drugs. The results of this study demonstrate that the pulmonary absorption of proteins may be enhanced by the selection of optimal concentration and type of protease inhibitor.

  10. Amino acid residues in the laminin G domains of protein S involved in tissue factor pathway inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed

    Somajo, Sofia; Ahnström, Josefin; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Gierula, Magdalena; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Protein S functions as a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and activated protein C (APC). The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like region of protein S, consisting of two laminin G-like domains (LG1 and LG2), contains the binding site for C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and TFPI. Furthermore, the LG-domains are essential for the TFPI-cofactor function and for expression of full APC-cofactor function. The aim of the current study was to localise functionally important interaction sites in the protein S LG-domains using amino acid substitutions. Four protein S variants were created in which clusters of surface-exposed amino acid residues within the LG-domains were substituted. All variants bound normally to C4BP and were fully functional as cofactors for APC in plasma and in pure component assays. Two variants, SHBG2 (E612A, I614A, F265A, V393A, H453A), involving residues from both LG-domains, and SHBG3 (K317A, I330A, V336A, D365A) where residues in LG1 were substituted, showed 50-60 % reduction in enhancement of TFPI in FXa inhibition assays. For SHBG3 the decreased TFPI cofactor function was confirmed in plasma based thrombin generation assays. Both SHBG variants bound to TFPI with decreased affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. The TFPI Kunitz 3 domain is known to contain the interaction site for protein S. Using in silico analysis and protein docking exercises, preliminary models of the protein S SHBG/TFPI Kunitz domain 3 complex were created. Based on a combination of experimental and in silico data we propose a binding site for TFPI on protein S, involving both LG-domains.

  11. Purification and identification of lactoperoxidase in milk basic proteins as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Y; Ono, A; Serizawa, A; Yogo, K; Ishida-Kitagawa, N; Takeya, T; Ogawa, T

    2011-05-01

    A milk protein fraction with alkaline isoelectric points (milk basic protein, MBP) inhibits both bone resorption and osteoclastogenesis for in vitro models. We previously identified bovine angiogenin as a component of MBP that inhibits bone resorption. However, purified angiogenin had no effect on osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that MBP contains unidentified component(s) that inhibit osteoclast formation. In this study, we purified lactoperoxidase (LPO) as the predominant inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis in MBP. The LPO treatment downregulated levels of reactive oxygen species in osteoclasts. Signaling by receptor activator of NF-kappa-B ligand/receptor activator of NF-kappa-B (RANKL/RANK) was downregulated in LPO-treated cells, and, in particular, the ubiquitination of tumor necrosis factor receptor associate factor 6 (TRAF6) and activation of downstream signaling cascades (JNK, p38, ERK, and NFκB) were suppressed. Ultimately, LPO treatment led to decreased expression of c-Fos and NFAT2. These results suggest that MBP contains at least 2 components that independently suppress bone resorption through a unique mechanism: angiogenin inhibits bone resorption and LPO inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. These data explain many of the positive aspects of milk consumption on bone health.

  12. Quassinoids: Viral protein R inhibitors from Picrasma javanica bark collected in Myanmar for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Win, Nwet Nwet; Ito, Takuya; Win, Yi Yi; Ngwe, Hla; Kodama, Takeshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) is an accessory protein that plays important roles in the viral pathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). An assay for anti-Vpr activity, using TREx-HeLa-Vpr cells, is a promising strategy to discover Vpr inhibitors. The anti-Vpr assay revealed that the CHCl3-soluble extract of Picrasma javanica bark possesses potent anti-Vpr activity. Furthermore, studies of quassinoids (1-15) previously isolated from the extract demonstrated that all of the tested quassinoids exhibit anti-Vpr activity. Among the tested compounds, javanicin I (15) exhibited the most potent anti-Vpr activity ((***)p <0.001) in comparing with that of the positive control, damnacanthal. The structure-activity relationships of the active quassinoids suggested that the presence of a methyl group at C-13 in the 2,12,14-triene-1,11,16-trione-2,12-dimethoxy-18-norpicrasane quassinoids is the important factor for the potent inhibitory effect in TREx-HeLa-Vpr cells. PMID:27575477

  13. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein functions as a cofactor in transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Birkey Reffey, S; Wurthner, J U; Parks, W T; Roberts, A B; Duckett, C S

    2001-07-13

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a potent suppressor of apoptotic cell death, which functions by directly inhibiting caspases, the principal effectors of apoptosis. Here we report that XIAP can also function as a cofactor in the regulation of gene expression by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). XIAP, but not the related proteins c-IAP1 or c-IAP2, associated with several members of the type I class of the TGF-beta receptor superfamily and potentiated TGF-beta-induced signaling. Although XIAP-mediated activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor kappa B was found to require the TGF-beta signaling intermediate Smad4, the ability of XIAP to suppress apoptosis was found to be Smad4-independent. These data implicate a role for XIAP in TGF-beta-mediated signaling that is distinct from its anti-apoptotic functions.

  14. A novel PI3K inhibitor PIK-C98 displays potent preclinical activity against multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Qi, Huixin; Han, Kunkun; Tang, Juan; Zhang, Zubin; Zeng, Yuanying; Cao, Biyin; Qiao, Chunhua; Zhang, Hongjian; Hou, Tingjun; Mao, Xinliang

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated targeting PI3K pathway is a promising strategy for the treatment of blood cancers. To identify novel PI3K inhibitors, we performed a high throughput virtual screen and identified several novel small molecule compounds, including PIK-C98 (C98). The cell-free enzymatic studies showed that C98 inhibited all class I PI3Ks at nano- or low micromolar concentrations but had no effects on AKT or mTOR activity. Molecular docking analysis revealed that C98 interfered with the ATP-binding pockets of PI3Ks by forming H-bonds and arene-H interactions with specific amino acid residues. The cellular assays demonstrated that C98 specifically inhibited PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, but had no effects on other kinases and proteins including IGF-1R, ERK, p38, c-Src, PTEN, and STAT3. Inhibition of PI3K by C98 led to myeloma cell apoptosis. Furthermore, oral administration of C98 delayed tumor growth in two independent human myeloma xenograft models in nude mice but did not show overt toxicity. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed that C98 was well penetrated into myeloma tumors. Therefore, through a high throughput virtual screen we identified a novel PI3K inhibitor that is orally active against multiple myeloma with great potential for further development. PMID:25474140

  15. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics of ligands binding into protein: The case of HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Kehchih; Huang, Yonggang

    2009-06-01

    Binding dynamics and pathways of ligands or inhibitors to target proteins are challenging both experimental and theoretical biologists. A dynamics understanding of inhibitors interacting with protein is essential for the design of novel potent drugs. In this work we applied a coarse-grained molecular dynamics method for simulating inhibitors entering the binding cavity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (PR). It shows that the coarse-grained dynamics, consistent with the experimental results, can capture the essential molecular dynamics of various inhibitors binding into PR. The primary driving force for the binding processes is the nonbond interaction between inhibitors and PR. The size and topology of inhibitors and the interacting strength between inhibitors and PR have great influence on the binding mode and processes. The interaction strength between the PR and various inhibitors is also analyzed by atomistic molecular mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann solvation area method.

  16. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of Protein–Protein Interactions: Mimicking Peptide Binding Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Pelay-Gimeno, Marta; Glas, Adrian; Koch, Oliver; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) are involved at all levels of cellular organization, thus making the development of PPI inhibitors extremely valuable. The identification of selective inhibitors is challenging because of the shallow and extended nature of PPI interfaces. Inhibitors can be obtained by mimicking peptide binding epitopes in their bioactive conformation. For this purpose, several strategies have been evolved to enable a projection of side chain functionalities in analogy to peptide secondary structures, thereby yielding molecules that are generally referred to as peptidomimetics. Herein, we introduce a new classification of peptidomimetics (classes A–D) that enables a clear assignment of available approaches. Based on this classification, the Review summarizes strategies that have been applied for the structure-based design of PPI inhibitors through stabilizing or mimicking turns, β-sheets, and helices. PMID:26119925

  17. Molecular dynamics of protein kinase-inhibitor complexes: a valid structural information.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases (PKs) are key components of protein phosphorylation based signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. They have been identified as being implicated in many diseases. High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data exist for many PKs and, in many cases, these structures are co-complexed with inhibitors. Although this valuable information confirms the precise structure of PKs and their complexes, it ignores the dynamic movements of the structures which are relevant to explain the affinities and selectivity of the ligands, to characterize the thermodynamics of the solvated complexes, and to derive predictive models. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations present a convenient way to study PK-inhibitor complexes and have been increasingly used in recent years in structure-based drug design. MD is a very useful computational method and a great counterpart for experimentalists, which helps them to derive important additional molecular information. That enables them to follow and understand structure and dynamics of protein-ligand systems with extreme molecular detail on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. MD can be used to sample dynamic molecular processes, and can be complemented with more advanced computational methods (e.g., free energy calculations, structure-activity relationship analysis). This review focuses on the most commonly applications to study PK-inhibitor complexes using MD simulations. Our aim is that researchers working in the design of PK inhibitors be aware of the benefits of this powerful tool in the design of potent and selective PK inhibitors. PMID:22571663

  18. The intracellular Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid induce stress proteins in mammalian chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T C; Benton, H P

    1994-07-15

    Primary cultures of mammalian articular chondrocytes respond to treatment with the intracellular Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors thapsigargin (TG) and cyclopiazonic acid by specific changes in protein synthesis consistent with a stress response. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of newly synthesized proteins confirmed that the response was consistent with the induction of glucose-regulated proteins. The effects of low-dose TG (10 nM), measured by changes in [35S]methionine labelling of newly synthesized proteins, can first be observed by 10 h and are maximal by 24 h. The pattern of changes induced by TG is shared with cyclopiazonic acid, but effects of both perturbants differ significantly from changes induced by heat shock. Upon removal of TG, normal protein synthesis is restored by 48 h. Immunoblots showed increased concentrations of the stress proteins HSP90, HSP72/73 and HSP60 in chondrocytes treated with TG, but induction of newly synthesized heat-shock proteins by TG was not apparent on [35S]methionine-labelled gels. The alterations in protein synthesis induced by Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors were unaffected by BAPTA-AM loading, which clamped cytosolic Ca2+ at resting levels. We conclude that inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+)-pump activity can elicit a stress response, which has important implications for the interpretation of chronic use of Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors. In particular, the activation of the cellular shock response should be considered in interpreting the regulation of protein synthesis and cell survival by Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors such as TG. PMID:8043004

  19. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Physically Interact with and Block Apoptosis Induced by Drosophila Proteins HID and GRIM

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Domagoj; Kaiser, William J.; Miller, Lois K.

    1998-01-01

    Reaper (RPR), HID, and GRIM activate apoptosis in cells programmed to die during Drosophila development. We have previously shown that transient overexpression of RPR in the lepidopteran SF-21 cell line induces apoptosis and that members of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of antiapoptotic proteins can inhibit RPR-induced apoptosis and physically interact with RPR through their BIR motifs (D. Vucic, W. J. Kaiser, A. J. Harvey, and L. K. Miller, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:10183–10188, 1997). In this study, we found that transient overexpression of HID and GRIM also induced apoptosis in the SF-21 cell line. Baculovirus and Drosophila IAPs blocked HID- and GRIM-induced apoptosis and also physically interacted with them through the BIR motifs of the IAPs. The region of sequence similarity shared by RPR, HID, and GRIM, the N-terminal 14 amino acids of each protein, was required for the induction of apoptosis by HID and its binding to IAPs. When stably overexpressed by fusion to an unrelated, nonapoptotic polypeptide, the N-terminal 37 amino acids of HID and GRIM were sufficient to induce apoptosis and confer IAP binding activity. However, GRIM was more complex than HID since the C-terminal 124 amino acids of GRIM retained apoptosis-inducing and IAP binding activity, suggesting the presence of two independent apoptotic motifs within GRIM. Coexpression of IAPs with HID stabilized HID levels and resulted in the accumulation of HID in punctate perinuclear locations which coincided with IAP localization. The physical interaction of IAPs with RPR, HID, and GRIM provides a common molecular mechanism for IAP inhibition of these Drosophila proapoptotic proteins. PMID:9584170

  20. HIV-1 Tat protein directly induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and inactivates cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lecoeur, H; Borgne-Sanchez, A; Chaloin, O; El-Khoury, R; Brabant, M; Langonné, A; Porceddu, M; Brière, J-J; Buron, N; Rebouillat, D; Péchoux, C; Deniaud, A; Brenner, C; Briand, J-P; Muller, S; Rustin, P; Jacotot, E

    2012-01-01

    The Trans-activator protein (Tat) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a pleiotropic protein involved in different aspects of AIDS pathogenesis. As a number of viral proteins Tat is suspected to disturb mitochondrial function. We prepared pure synthetic full-length Tat by native chemical ligation (NCL), and Tat peptides, to evaluate their direct effects on isolated mitochondria. Submicromolar doses of synthetic Tat cause a rapid dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as well as cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, heart, and brain. Accordingly, Tat decreases substrate oxidation by mitochondria isolated from these tissues, with oxygen uptake being initially restored by adding cytochrome c. The anion-channel inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS) protects isolated mitochondria against Tat-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), whereas ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor blocker, does not. Pharmacologic inhibitors of the permeability transition pore, Bax/Bak inhibitors, and recombinant Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins do not reduce Tat-induced MMP. We finally observed that Tat inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in disrupted mitochondria isolated from liver, heart, and brain of both mouse and human samples, making it the first described viral protein to be a potential COX inhibitor. PMID:22419111

  1. Comparative QSAR analyses of competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors using three-dimensional molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Lather, Viney; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2011-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges in QSAR studies using three-dimensional descriptors is to generate the bioactive conformation of the molecules. Comparative QSAR analyses have been performed on a dataset of 34 structurally diverse and competitive CYP2C9 inhibitors by generating their lowest energy conformers as well as additional multiple conformers for the calculation of molecular descriptors. Three-dimensional descriptors accounting for the spatial characteristics of the molecules calculated using E-Dragon were used as the independent variables. The robustness and the predictive performance of the developed models were verified using both the internal [leave-one-out (LOO)] and external statistical validation (test set of 12 inhibitors). The best models (MLR using GETAWAY descriptors and partial least squares using 3D-MoRSE) were obtained by using the multiple conformers for the calculation of descriptors and were selected based upon the higher external prediction ( values of 0.65 and 0.63, respectively) and lower root mean square error of prediction (0.48 and 0.48, respectively). The predictive ability of the best model, i.e., MLR using GETAWAY descriptors was additionally verified on an external test set of quinoline-4-carboxamide analogs and resulted in an value of 0.6. These simple and alignment-independent QSAR models offer the possibility to predict CYP2C9 inhibitory activity of chemically diverse ligands in the absence of X-ray crystallographic information of target protein structure and can provide useful insights about the ADMET properties of candidate molecules in the early phases of drug discovery.

  2. A high throughput screening strategy to identify protein-protein interaction inhibitors that block the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voter, Andrew F.; Manthei, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for re-sensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  3. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  4. Identification and structure-function analysis of subfamily selective G protein-coupled receptor kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristoff T; Larimore, Kelly M; Elkins, Jonathan M; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J G

    2015-01-16

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson's disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  5. Selection and characterization of hepatitis C virus replicons dually resistant to the polymerase and protease inhibitors HCV-796 and boceprevir (SCH 503034).

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Mullen, Stanley; Deatly, Anne M; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z; Ralston, Robert; Broom, Colin; Emini, Emilio A; Howe, Anita Y M

    2009-02-01

    HCV-796 is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) polymerase, and boceprevir is an inhibitor of the NS3 serine protease. The emergence of replicon variants resistant to the combination of HCV-796 and boceprevir was evaluated. Combining the inhibitors greatly reduced the frequency with which resistant colonies arose; however, some resistant replicon cells could be isolated by the use of low inhibitor concentrations. These replicons were approximately 1,000-fold less susceptible to HCV-796 and 9-fold less susceptible to boceprevir. They also exhibited resistance to anthranilate nonnucleoside inhibitors of NS5B but were fully sensitive to inhibitors of different mechanisms: a pyranoindole, Hsp90 inhibitors, an NS5B nucleoside inhibitor, and pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). The replicon was cleared from the combination-resistant cells by extended treatment with Peg-IFN. Mutations known to confer resistance to HCV-796 (NS5B C316Y) and boceprevir (NS3 V170A) were present in the combination-resistant replicons. These changes could be selected together and coexist in the same genome. The replicon bearing both changes exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by HCV-796 and boceprevir but had a reduced replicative capacity.

  6. ATP-competitive inhibitors block protein kinase recruitment to the Hsp90-Cdc37 system.

    PubMed

    Polier, Sigrun; Samant, Rahul S; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H

    2013-05-01

    Protein kinase clients are recruited to the Hsp90 molecular chaperone system via Cdc37, which simultaneously binds Hsp90 and kinases and regulates the Hsp90 chaperone cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 in vivo results in degradation of kinase clients, with a therapeutic effect in dependent tumors. We show here that Cdc37 directly antagonizes ATP binding to client kinases, suggesting a role for the Hsp90-Cdc37 complex in controlling kinase activity. Unexpectedly, we find that Cdc37 binding to protein kinases is itself antagonized by ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors, including vemurafenib and lapatinib. In cancer cells, these inhibitors deprive oncogenic kinases such as B-Raf and ErbB2 of access to the Hsp90-Cdc37 complex, leading to their degradation. Our results suggest that at least part of the efficacy of ATP-competitive inhibitors of Hsp90-dependent kinases in tumor cells may be due to targeted chaperone deprivation.

  7. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts. PMID:24582986

  8. Structure-Based Design of 1,4-Dibenzoylpiperazines as β-Catenin/B-Cell Lymphoma 9 Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, John A; Yin, Jinya; Teuscher, Kevin B; Zhang, Min; Ji, Haitao

    2016-05-12

    A small-molecule inhibitor with a 1,4-dibenzoylpiperazine scaffold was designed to match the critical binding elements in the β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 (BCL9) protein-protein interaction interface. Inhibitor optimization led to a potent inhibitor that can disrupt the β-catenin/BCL9 interaction and exhibit 98-fold selectivity over the β-catenin/cadherin interaction. The binding mode of new inhibitors was characterized by structure-activity relationships and site-directed mutagenesis studies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that this series of inhibitors can selectively suppress canonical Wnt signaling and inhibit growth of Wnt/β-catenin-dependent cancer cells.

  9. Overexpression of Inhibitor of DNA-Binding 2 Attenuates Pulmonary Fibrosis through Regulation of c-Abl and Twist

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Agarwal, Manisha; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Wolters, Paul J.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a multicellular process leading to excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Factors that affect lung epithelial cell proliferation and activation may be important regulators of the extent of fibrosis after injury. We and others have shown that activated alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) directly contribute to fibrogenesis by secreting mesenchymal proteins, such as type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial cell acquisition of mesenchymal features during carcinogenesis and fibrogenesis is regulated by several mesenchymal transcription factors. Induced expression of direct inhibitors to these mesenchymal transcription factors offers a potentially novel therapeutic strategy. Inhibitor of DNA-binding 2 (Id2) is an inhibitory helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is highly expressed by lung epithelial cells during development and has been shown to coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells. We found that overexpression of Id2 in primary AECs promotes proliferation by inhibiting a retinoblastoma protein/c-Abl interaction leading to greater c-Abl activity. Id2 also blocks transforming growth factor β1–mediated expression of type I collagen by inhibiting Twist, a prominent mesenchymal basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. In vivo, Id2 induced AEC proliferation and protected mice from lung fibrosis. By using a high-throughput screen, we found that histone deacetylase inhibitors induce Id2 expression by adult AECs. Collectively, these findings suggest that Id2 expression by AECs can be induced, and overexpression of Id2 affects AEC phenotype, leading to protection from fibrosis. PMID:25661109

  10. Optogenetically controlled RAF to characterize BRAF and CRAF protein kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chatelle, Claire V.; Hövermann, Désirée; Müller, Anne; Wagner, Hanna J.; Weber, Wilfried; Radziwill, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Here, we applied optoRAF, an optogenetic tool for light-controlled clustering and activation of RAF proteins that mimics the natural occurring RAS-mediated dimerization. This versatile tool allows studying the effect on BRAF and CRAF homodimer- as well as heterodimer-induced RAF signaling. Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are two clinically approved inhibitors for BRAF that efficiently suppress the kinase activity of oncogenic BRAF (V600E). However in wild-type BRAF expressing cells, BRAF inhibitors can exert paradoxical activation of wild-type CRAF. Using optoRAF, vemurafenib was identified as paradoxical activator of BRAF and CRAF homo- and heterodimers. Dabrafenib enhanced activity of light-stimulated CRAF at low dose and inhibited CRAF signaling at high dose. Moreover, dabrafenib increased the protein level of CRAF proteins but not of BRAF proteins. Increased CRAF levels correlate with elevated RAF signaling in a dabrafenib-dependent manner, independent of light activation. PMID:27025703

  11. Efficacy and Safety of a Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Inhibitor in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Cuchel, M; Meagher, EA; du Toit, Theron H.; Blom, DJ; Marais, AD; Hegele, RA; Averna, M; Sirtori, C; Shah, PK; Gaudet, D; Stefanutti, C; Vigna, GB; Du Plessis, AME; Propert, Kathleen J.; Sasiela, WJ; Bloedon, LT; Rader, DJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) respond inadequately to existing drugs. We conducted a phase 3 study to assess the efficacy and safety of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide in adults with HoFH. Methods Twenty-nine subjects enrolled into a single-arm, open-label study and maintained current lipid lowering therapy from six weeks before baseline through at least week 26. Lomitapide dose was escalated based on safety and tolerability from 5 mg to a maximum of 60 mg/day. The primary endpoint was mean percent change from baseline in LDL-C at week 26, after which patients remained on lomitapide through week 78 for safety assessment. Findings Twenty-three subjects completed weeks 26 and 78. The median dose of lomitapide was 40 mg/day. LDL-C was reduced by 50% from baseline at week 26 (4·3 ± 2·5 mmol/L vs. 8·7 ± 2·9 mmol/L, p<0.0001). Eight subjects achieved LDL-C <2·6 mmol/L at this time point. LDL-C was reduced by 44% at week 56 and 38% at week 78 (p<0.0001 for both). Gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common adverse event. Four patients had aminotransaminase > 5× ULN that resolved after dose reduction or temporary interruption of lomitapide. No subject permanently discontinued treatment due to liver abnormalities. Liver fat content assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS; n=20) was 1·0 ± 1·3 % at baseline, 8·6 ± 8·1% at week 26 and remained stable up to week 78 (8·3± 5·3%). Interpretation These data demonstrate that lomitapide had a robust and durable efficacy in lowering LDL-C in patients with HoFH with an acceptable safety and tolerability profile. PMID:23122768

  12. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset. PMID:24588117

  13. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset.

  14. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system.

    PubMed

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M M; Van Mierlo, Gerard J; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2003-08-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the capability of rCRP to activate complement. The activation of complement by hCRP and rCRP was investigated in solid- and fluid-phase systems. In the solid-phase system, purified CRP was fixed to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates and incubated with human or rat recalcified plasma. Dose-dependent binding of human and rat C3 and C4 was observed to human and rat CRP, respectively. In the fluid-phase system, recalcified rat plasma, which contains about 500 mg/l of CRP, or human plasma supplemented with hCRP, were incubated with lyso-phosphatidylcholine. A dose-dependent activation of complement was observed upon incubation with this ligand, as reflected by the generation of activated C4 as well as of CRP-complement complexes. This activation was, in both cases, inhibited by preincubation of plasma with p-aminophosphorylcholine, a specific inhibitor of the interaction of CRP with its ligands, or by chelation of calcium ions. We conclude that rat CRP, similarly to human CRP, can activate autologous complement. These results support the notion that opsonization of ligands with complement is an important biological function of CRP.

  15. Interaction proteins of invertase and invertase inhibitor in cold-stored potato tubers suggested a protein complex underlying post-translational regulation of invertase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xun; Ou, Yongbin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Huiling; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2013-12-01

    The activity of vacuolar invertase (VI) is vital to potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS). A post-translational regulation of VI activity has been proposed which involves invertase inhibitor (VIH), but the mechanism for the interaction between VI and VIH has not been fully understood. To identify the potential partners of VI and VIH, two cDNA libraries were respectively constructed from CIS-resistant wild potato species Solanum berthaultii and CIS-sensitive potato cultivar AC035-01 for the yeast two-hybrid analysis. The StvacINV1 (one of the potato VIs) and StInvInh2B (one of the potato VIHs), previously identified to be associated with potato CIS, were used as baits to screen the two libraries. Through positive selection and sequencing, 27 potential target proteins of StvacINV1 and eight of StInvInh2B were clarified. The Kunitz-type protein inhibitors were captured by StvacINV1 in both libraries and the interaction between them was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco cells, reinforcing a fundamental interaction between VI and VIH. Notably, a sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 1 was captured by both the baits, suggesting that a protein complex could be necessary for fine turning of the invertase activity. The target proteins clarified in present research provide a route to elucidate the mechanism by which the VI activity can be subtly modulated.

  16. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein Ligase (MtBPL) with Nucleoside-Based Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Petrelli, Riccardo; De la Mora-Rey, Teresa; Tiwari, Divya; Liu, Feng; Dawadi, Surrendra; Nandakumar, Madhumitha; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Finzel, Barry C.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) responsible for both latent and symptomatic tuberculosis (TB) remains the second leading cause of mortality among infectious diseases worldwide. Mycobacterial biotin protein ligase (MtBPL) is an essential enzyme in Mtb and regulates lipid metabolism through the post-translational biotinylation of acyl coenzyme A carboxylases. We report the synthesis and evaluation of a systematic series of potent nucleoside-based inhibitors of MtBPL that contain modifications to the ribofuranosyl ring of the nucleoside. All compounds were characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and shown to bind potently with KD's below 2 nM. Additionally, we obtained high-resolution co-crystal structures for a majority of the compounds. Despite fairly uniform biochemical potency, the whole-cell Mtb activity varied greatly with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.78 to >100 μM. Cellular accumulation studies showed a nearly 10-fold enhanced accumulation of a C-2′-α analog over the corresponding C-2′-β analog, consistent with their differential whole-cell activity. PMID:26299766

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors bearing a cycloalkene scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunchi; Luo, Changqun; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Honglei; Zhao, Shizhen; Hao, Chenzhou; Zhao, Dongmei; Cheng, Maosheng

    2016-11-10

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a potential target for cardiovascular disease therapy as inhibition of CETP leads to increased HDL-C in humans. Based on the structure of Merck's biphenyl CETP inhibitor, we designed novel N,N-substituted-cycloalkenyl-methylamine scaffold derivatives by utilizing core replacement and conformational restriction strategies. Consequently, twenty-eight compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against CETP. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) studies indicate that polar substituents were tolerated in moiety A and hydrophobic alkyl groups at the 5-position of cyclohexene were critical for potency. Among them, compound 17a, bearing an N-(5-pyrazolyl-pyrimidin-2-yl)-cycloalkenyl- methylamine scaffold, exhibited excellent CETP inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.07 μM) in vitro. Furthermore, it showed an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile in S-D rats and efficient HDL-C increase in high-fat fed hamsters. PMID:27490022

  18. Crystal structures of two aminoglycoside kinases bound with a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fong, Desiree H; Xiong, Bing; Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3')-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3')-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eukaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides.

  19. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel substituted pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives as inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Jean; Le Borgne, Marc; Rimbault, Charlotte; Moreau, Stéphane; Savrimoutou, Solène; Pinaud, Noël; Baratin, Sophie; Marchivie, Mathieu; Roche, Séverine; Bollacke, Andre; Pecci, Adali; Alvarez, Lautaro; Desplat, Vanessa; Jose, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis and properties of substituted phenylaminopyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-carboxylic acid derivatives as a novel class of potent inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2. A set of 15 compounds was designed and synthesized using convenient and straightforward synthesis protocols. The compounds were tested for inhibition of human protein kinase CK2, which is a potential drug target for many diseases including inflammatory disorders and cancer. New inhibitors with IC50 in the micro- and sub-micromolar range were identified. The most promising compound, the 4-[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-3-carboxylic acid 1c inhibited human CK2 with an IC50 of 49 nM. Our findings indicate that pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines are a promising starting scaffold for further development and optimization of human protein kinase CK2 inhibitors.

  1. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  2. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  3. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  4. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G T T; Erlenkamp, G; Jäck, O; Küberl, A; Bott, M; Fiorani, F; Gohlke, H; Groth, G

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world's most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2',3',4',3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2',3',4'-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15-45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  5. Turnover of mitochondrial steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein by Lon protease: the unexpected effect of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Granot, Zvi; Kobiler, Oren; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Bahat, Assaf; Lu, Bin; Braun, Sergei; Maurizi, Michael R; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Oppenheim, Amos B; Orly, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a vital mitochondrial protein promoting transfer of cholesterol into steroid making mitochondria in specialized cells of the adrenal cortex and gonads. Our previous work has demonstrated that StAR is rapidly degraded upon import into the mitochondrial matrix. To identify the protease(s) responsible for this rapid turnover, murine StAR was expressed in wild-type Escherichia coli or in mutant strains lacking one of the four ATP-dependent proteolytic systems, three of which are conserved in mammalian mitochondria-ClpP, FtsH, and Lon. StAR was rapidly degraded in wild-type bacteria and stabilized only in lon (-)mutants; in such cells, StAR turnover was fully restored upon coexpression of human mitochondrial Lon. In mammalian cells, the rate of StAR turnover was proportional to the cell content of Lon protease after expression of a Lon-targeted small interfering RNA, or overexpression of the protein. In vitro assays using purified proteins showed that Lon-mediated degradation of StAR was ATP-dependent and blocked by the proteasome inhibitors MG132 (IC(50) = 20 microm) and clasto-lactacystin beta-lactone (cLbetaL, IC(50) = 3 microm); by contrast, epoxomicin, representing a different class of proteasome inhibitors, had no effect. Such inhibition is consistent with results in cultured rat ovarian granulosa cells demonstrating that degradation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix is blocked by MG132 and cLbetaL but not by epoxomicin. Both inhibitors also blocked Lon-mediated cleavage of the model substrate fluorescein isothiocyanate-casein. Taken together, our former studies and the present results suggest that Lon is the primary ATP-dependent protease responsible for StAR turnover in mitochondria of steroidogenic cells.

  6. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  7. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  8. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins in combination with ErbB antagonists in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Fiona M; Owens, Thomas W; Tanianis-Hughes, Jolanta; Clarke, Robert B; Brennan, Keith; Bundred, Nigel J; Streuli, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins are a family of proteins that can block apoptosis in normal cells and have been suggested to cause resistance to apoptosis in cancer. Overexpression of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases is common in breast cancer; in particular 20% of all cases show elevated Her2. Despite clinical success with the use of targeted therapies, such as Trastuzumab, only up to 35% of Her2-positive patients initially respond. We reasoned that IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance might contribute to this insensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase therapy, in particular ErbB antagonists. Here we examine the levels of IAPs in breast cancer and evaluate whether targeting IAPs can enhance apoptosis in response to growth factor receptor antagonists and TRAIL. Methods IAP levels were examined in a breast cancer cell line panel and in patient samples. IAPs were inhibited using siRNA or cell permeable mimetics of endogenous inhibitors. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib, or Gefitinib for 48 hours. Examining nuclear morphology and staining for cleaved caspase 3 was used to score apoptosis. Proliferation was examined by Ki67 staining. Results Four members of the IAP family, Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, were all expressed to varying extents in breast cancer cell lines or tumours. MDAMB468, BT474 and BT20 cells all expressed XIAP to varying extents. Depleting the cells of XIAP overcame the intrinsic resistance of BT20 and MDAMB468 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, siRNA-based depletion of XIAP or use of a Smac mimetic to target multiple IAPs increased apoptosis in response to the ErbB antagonists, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib or Gefitinib in Her2-overexpressing BT474 cells, or Gefitinib in EGFR-overexpressing MDAMB468 cells. Conclusions The novel findings of this study are that multiple IAPs are concomitantly expressed in breast cancers, and that, in combination with clinically relevant Her2 treatments, IAP antagonists promote apoptosis

  9. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  10. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance.

  11. Novel Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitor with Anticancer Activity in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Phillips, James G; Jha, Babal K; Govindgari, Shravya; Hu, Jennifer; Grabowski, Dale; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W; Smith, Mitchell R; Cotta, Claudiu; Xu, Yan; Chilakala, Sujatha; Kuang, Rebecca R; Tall, Samantha; Reu, Frederic J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma cells secrete more disulfide bond-rich proteins than any other mammalian cell. Thus, inhibition of protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) should increase ER stress beyond repair in this incurable cancer. Here, we report the mechanistically unbiased discovery of a novel PDI-inhibiting compound with antimyeloma activity. We screened a 30,355 small-molecule library using a multilayered multiple myeloma cell-based cytotoxicity assay that modeled disease niche, normal liver, kidney, and bone marrow. CCF642, a bone marrow-sparing compound, exhibited a submicromolar IC50 in 10 of 10 multiple myeloma cell lines. An active biotinylated analog of CCF642 defined binding to the PDI isoenzymes A1, A3, and A4 in MM cells. In vitro, CCF642 inhibited PDI reductase activity about 100-fold more potently than the structurally distinct established inhibitors PACMA 31 and LOC14. Computational modeling suggested a novel covalent binding mode in active-site CGHCK motifs. Remarkably, without any further chemistry optimization, CCF642 displayed potent efficacy in an aggressive syngeneic mouse model of multiple myeloma and prolonged the lifespan of C57BL/KaLwRij mice engrafted with 5TGM1-luc myeloma, an effect comparable to the first-line multiple myeloma therapeutic bortezomib. Consistent with PDI inhibition, CCF642 caused acute ER stress in multiple myeloma cells accompanied by apoptosis-inducing calcium release. Overall, our results provide an illustration of the utility of simple in vivo simulations as part of a drug discovery effort, along with a sound preclinical rationale to develop a new small-molecule therapeutic to treat multiple myeloma. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3340-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197150

  12. Discovery and optimization of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Keith R; Berger, Dan M; Crew, Andrew P; Dong, Hanqing; Kleinberg, Andrew; Li, An-Hu; Medeiros, Matthew R; Mulvihill, Mark J; Siu, Kam; Tarrant, James; Wang, Jing; Weng, Felix; Wilde, Victoria L; Albertella, Mark; Bittner, Mark; Cooke, Andrew; Gray, Michael J; Maresca, Paul; May, Earl; Meyn, Peter; Peick, William; Romashko, Darlene; Tanowitz, Michael; Tokar, Brianna

    2013-08-15

    The discovery and potency optimization of a series of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1 is described. Micromolar hits taken from high-throughput screening were optimized for biochemical and cellular mechanistic potency to ~10nM, as exemplified by compound 12az. Application of structure-based drug design aided by co-crystal structures of TAK1 with inhibitors significantly shortened the number of iterations required for the optimization. PMID:23850198

  13. Proline-Based Macrocyclic Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus: Stereoselective Synthesis and Biological Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Prongay, Andrew; Pichardo, John; Madison, Vincent; Buevich, Alexei; Chan, Tze-Ming

    2008-06-30

    Macrocyclization through a Mitsunobu reaction was used to synthesize a 17-membered macrocycle. The bicyclic acetal core was prepared completely diastereoselectively. The macrocyclic peptidomimetic surrogate of the P2-P3 dipeptide moiety was designed to function as a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 serine protease inhibitor, and the pentapeptide {alpha}-ketoamides derived from the macrocycle were shown to be potent HCV inhibitors.

  14. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-06-25

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  15. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with plasma-derived C1 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Prematta, Michael J; Prematta, Tracy; Craig, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Plasma-derived C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate is a treatment option for acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and is considered the standard-of-care in many countries, although it is not yet available in the United States. Studies are still being conducted to establish its safety and efficacy as required by the FDA. Objective: To review the medical literature to determine if C1-INH concentrate is a safe and effective treatment for acute HAE attacks. Methods: The following keywords were searched in PubMed and OVID: C1 esterase inhibitor, C1-inhibitor, C1 inhibitor, and hereditary angioedema treatment. English-language articles were searched from 1966 to the present to look for studies demonstrating the efficacy and the safety of C1-INH concentrate. Results: The English-language literature search revealed several studies showing significantly improved relief of HAE symptoms with the administration of C1-INH concentrate – many studies demonstrated some improvement of symptoms within 30 minutes. Side effects have been similar to placebo, and no proven cases of viral transmission have occurred in over 20 years. Conclusion: C1-INH concentrate appears to be a very safe and effective treatment option for HAE. PMID:19209279

  16. ENaC inhibitors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rebecca; Hunt, Thomas; Smith, Nichola J

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel, ENaC, is a key regulator of the volume of airway surface liquid in the human airway epithelium. In cystic fibrosis (CF), Na(+) hyperabsorption through ENaC in the absence of CFTR-mediated anion secretion results in the dehydration of respiratory secretions and the impairment of mucociliary clearance. The hypothesis of utilizing an ENaC-blocking molecule to facilitate restoration of the airway surface liquid volume sufficiently to allow normal mucociliary clearance is of interest in the management of lung disease in CF patients. This article summarizes the published patent applications from 2010 that claim approaches to inhibit the function of ENaC for utility in the treatment of CF. Patents were located though SciFinder(®), using "ENaC" as the keyword from 2010 onwards; documents not relevant to CF were then manually removed. PMID:25565157

  17. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors: a review on pharmacophore mapping and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are the serine/threonine protein kinases, which play a vital role in cellular responses to external stress signals. p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory effects in the preclinical disease models, primarily through inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators. A number of structurally diverse p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have been developed as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Most of the inhibitors have failed in the clinical trials either due to poor pharmacokinetic profile or selectivity issue, which makes p38 MAP kinase a promising target for molecular modelling studies. Several quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and pharmacophore models have been developed to identify the structural requirements essential for p38 MAP kinase inhibitory activity. In this review, we provide an overview of the presently known p38 MAP kinase inhibitors and how QSAR analyses among series of compounds have led to the development of molecular models and pharmacophores, allowing the design of novel inhibitors.

  18. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitors: discovery of clinically active inhibitors using high-throughput screening and parallel synthesis paradigms.

    PubMed

    Chang, George; Ruggeri, Roger B; Harwood, H James

    2002-07-01

    The inhibition of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) blocks the hepatic secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and the intestinal secretion of chylomicrons. Consequently, this mechanism provides a highly efficacious pharmacological target for the lowering of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduction of postprandial lipemia. The combination of these effects could afford unprecedented benefit in the treatment of atherosclerosis and consequent cardiovascular disease. The promise of this therapeutic target has attracted widespread interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Independent efforts have yielded strikingly similar series of lipophilic amide inhibitors. The way in which the evolutionary paths of distinct inhibitor series have tended to converge through the course of robotics-assisted synthesis efforts is illustrated with candidates from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer. Hanging in the balance with the exceptional potency of the compounds presented are the potential adverse effects due to blockage of intestinal fat absorption and hepatic lipid secretion. Finding a degree of efficacy that can be safely tolerated defines the dilemma surrounding the advancement of these compounds to clinical practice.

  19. Is caseinomacropeptide from milk proteins, an inhibitor of gastric secretion?

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Paul; Romé, Véronique; Delaby, Luc; Mendy, François; Roger, Loic; Chayvialle, Jean Alain

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study, in vivo, the effect of the ingestion of not glycosylated caseinomacropeptide (CMP) on gastric secretion. In Experiments #1 and #2, 7 calves fitted with a gastric pouch received either a diet without CMP (C diet) or C diet in which CMP was introduced (equal to and 5 folds that of CMP quantity contained in cow milk, diets CMP1 and CMP5, respectively). In Experiment #3, 2 calves (with gastric pouch) were fed C diet followed by an "iv perfusion" of CMP. In Experiment #4, 25 calves fed either C, CMP1 or CMP5 diets were fitted with a blood catheter for sample collections. The quantities of daily gastric secretions seemed few modified by CMP ingestion but the profile of these secretions was changed along the day. The most important result is that CMP can inhibit gastric secretions (mainly hydrochloric acid) stimulated by the meal, but there was no dose-dependent response. No similar observations were obtained after perfusion of CMP in jugular vein. CMP was not detected in blood. Results obtained in our experiments are not in favor of its significant intestinal absorption. Gastrin, somatostatin and VIP could be implicated in the mechanisms of regulation.

  20. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  1. Advances in the clinical development of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Komal; Taldone, Tony; Modi, Shanu; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP dependent molecular chaperone protein which integrates multiple oncogenic pathways. As such, Hsp90 inhibition is a promising anti-cancer strategy. Several inhibitors that act on Hsp90 by binding to its N-terminal ATP pocket have entered clinical evaluation. Robust pre-clinical data suggested anti-tumor activity in multiple cancer types. Clinically, encouraging results have been demonstrated in melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, castrate refractory prostate cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma and multiple myeloma. In breast cancer, proof-of-concept was demonstrated by first generation Hsp90 inhibitors in combination with trastuzumab mainly in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) + metastatic breast cancer. There are a multitude of second generation Hsp90 inhibitors currently under investigation. To date, however, there is no FDA approved Hsp90 inhibitor nor standardized assay to ascertain Hsp90 inhibition. This review summarizes the current status of both first and second generation Hsp90 inhibitors based on their chemical classification and stage of clinical development. It also discusses the pharmacodynamic assays currently implemented in clinic as well as other novel strategies aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors. Ultimately, these efforts will aid in maximizing the full potential of this class of agents. PMID:22062686

  2. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia: effects of serenoa repens, selenium and lycopene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The apoptosis machinery is a promising target against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) modulate apoptosis by direct inhibition of caspases. Serenoa Repens (SeR) may be combined with other natural compounds such as Lycopene (Ly) and Selenium (Se) to maximize its therapeutic activity in BPH. We investigated the effects of SeR, Se and Ly, alone or in association, on the expression of four IAPs, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, NAIP and survivin in rats with experimental testosterone-dependent BPH. Moreover, caspase-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been evaluated. Rats were administered, daily, with testosterone propionate (3 mg/kg/sc) or its vehicle for 14 days. Testosterone injected animals (BPH) were randomized to receive vehicle, SeR (25 mg/kg/sc), Se (3 mg/kg/sc), Ly (1 mg/kg/sc) or the SeR-Se-Ly association for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed and prostate removed for analysis. Results BPH animals treated with vehicle showed unchanged expression of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 and increased expression of NAIP, survivin, caspase-3, IL-6 and PSMA levels when compared with sham animals. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the enhanced expression of NAIP and survivin with a characteristic pattern of cellular localization. SeR-Se-Ly association showed the highest efficacy in reawakening apoptosis; additionally, this therapeutic cocktail significantly reduced IL-6 and PSMA levels. The administration of SeR, Se and Ly significantly blunted prostate overweight and growth; moreover, the SeR-Se-Ly association was most effective in reducing prostate enlargement and growth by 43.3% in treated animals. Conclusions The results indicate that IAPs may represent interesting targets for drug therapy of BPH. PMID:24606563

  3. Post-session injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide do not alter saccharin self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewski, Pawel; Korkosz, Agnieszka; Rogowski, Artur; Korkosz, Izabela; Kostowski, Wojciech; Scinska, Anna

    2009-03-17

    A large body of evidence indicates that reactivation of aversive memories leads to protein synthesis-dependent memory reconsolidation which can be disrupted by cycloheximide (CHX) and other protein synthesis inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether CHX would alter maintenance of well-trained instrumental responding for 0.1% saccharin. Male Wistar rats were trained to lever press for saccharin. When lever pressing stabilized, experimental self-administration sessions with CHX (3 mg/kg, s.c.) started. The animals received four experimental sessions, with each session separated by 5 days. The protein synthesis inhibitor was injected immediately after the experimental sessions 1-3. Repeated post-session injections of CHX did not alter saccharin self-administration. A two-bottle choice test conducted after the last experimental session revealed that CHX had not induced any conditioned taste aversion to 0.1% saccharin. The present results suggest that well-consolidated long-term memory of an appetitive instrumental task does not depend on de novo protein synthesis.

  4. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Biphenylamide Derivatives as Hsp90 C-terminal Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Garg, Gaurav; Zhao, Jinbo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Girgis, Antwan; Franco, Lucas S.; Singh, Swapnil; Colombo, Giorgio; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Hsp90 C-terminal function represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Current drug discovery efforts toward Hsp90 C-terminal inhibition focus on novobiocin, an antibiotic that was transformed into an Hsp90 inhibitor. Based on structural information obtained during the development of novobiocin derivatives and molecular docking studies, scaffolds containing a biphenyl moiety in lieu of the coumarin ring present in novobiocin were identified as new Hsp90 C-terminal inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship studies produced new derivatives that inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines at nanomolar concentrations, which corresponded directly with Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:25462258

  5. Analysing the Effect of Mutation on Protein Function and Discovering Potential Inhibitors of CDK4: Molecular Modelling and Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    N, Nagasundaram; Zhu, Hailong; Liu, Jiming; V, Karthick; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)-cyclin D1 complex plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to S phase of the cell cycle. Among the CDKs, CDK4 is one of the genes most frequently affected by somatic genetic variations that are associated with various forms of cancer. Thus, because the abnormal function of the CDK4-cyclin D1 protein complex might play a vital role in causing cancer, CDK4 can be considered a genetically validated therapeutic target. In this study, we used a systematic, integrated computational approach to identify deleterious nsSNPs and predict their effects on protein-protein (CDK4-cyclin D1) and protein-ligand (CDK4-flavopiridol) interactions. This analysis resulted in the identification of possible inhibitors of mutant CDK4 proteins that bind the conformations induced by deleterious nsSNPs. Using computational prediction methods, we identified five nsSNPs as highly deleterious: R24C, Y180H, A205T, R210P, and R246C. From molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we observed that these deleterious nsSNPs affected CDK4-cyclin D1 and CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. Furthermore, in a virtual screening approach, the drug 5_7_DIHYDROXY_ 2_ (3_4_5_TRI HYDROXYPHENYL) _4H_CHROMEN_ 4_ONE displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations R24C or R246C, the drug diosmin displayed good binding affinity for the protein with the mutation Y180H, and the drug rutin displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations A205T and R210P. Overall, this computational investigation of the CDK4 gene highlights the link between genetic variation and biological phenomena in human cancer and aids in the discovery of molecularly targeted therapies for personalized treatment. PMID:26252490

  6. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  7. Patient considerations and clinical impact of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the management of dyslipidemia: focus on anacetrapib.

    PubMed

    Miyares, Marta A; Davis, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality within the United States and worldwide. Although targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in the prevention of CVD has been shown to be effective, evidence exists to indicate that significant cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in patients receiving 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) - a risk that may be correlated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Among the various tactics under investigation to increase HDL-C, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) appears the most adept to raise these levels. Although torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, demonstrated significant beneficial changes in HDL-C and LDL-C after 12 months of therapy when coadministered with atorvastatin, patients in the torcetrapib arm experienced a rise in mortality, including increased risk of death from CV and non-CV causes as well as a significant rise in major CV events. Later studies established that the adverse effects of torcetrapib were produced from molecule-specific off-target effects and not to the mechanism of CETP inhibition. These untoward outcomes have not been detected with anacetrapib, the third of the CETP inhibitors to enter Phase III trials. Furthermore, treatment with anacetrapib revealed both a statistically significant decrease in LDL-C and increase in HDL-C over placebo. While the place in therapy of niacin and fibrates to reduce CV events is currently in question secondary to the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL Cholesterol/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes and the Action to Control CV Risk in Diabetes trials, the ongoing large-scale, randomized-placebo, controlled-outcomes study with anacetrapib coadministered with statin treatment will not only test the hypothesis if CETP inhibition lowers residual CV risk but will also provide insight as to which patient

  8. Potential transition state analogue inhibitors for the penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pechenov, Aleksandr; Stefanova, Miglena E; Nicholas, Robert A; Peddi, Sridhar; Gutheil, William G

    2003-01-21

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are ubiquitous bacterial enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. The development of new PBP inhibitors is a potentially viable strategy for developing new antibacterial agents. Several potential transition state analogue inhibitors for the PBPs were synthesized, including peptide chloromethyl ketones, trifluoromethyl ketones, aldehydes, and boronic acids. These agents were characterized chemically, stereochemically, and as inhibitors of a set of low molecular mass PBPs: Escherichia coli (EC) PBP 5, Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) PBP 3, and NG PBP 4. A peptide boronic acid was the most effective PBP inhibitor in the series, with a preference observed for a d-boroAla-based over an l-boroAla-based inhibitor, as expected given that physiological PBP substrates are based on d-Ala at the cleavage site. The lowest K(I) of 370 nM was obtained for NG PBP 3 inhibition by Boc-l-Lys(Cbz)-d-boroAla (10b). Competitive inhibition was observed for this enzyme-inhibitor pair, as expected for an active site-directed inhibitor. For the three PBPs included in this study, an inverse correlation was observed between the values for log K(I) with 10b and the values for log(k(cat)/K(m)) for activity against the analogous substrate, and K(m)/K(I) ratios were 90, 1900, and 9600 for NG PBP 4, EC PBP 5, and NG PBP 3, respectively. These results demonstrate that peptide boronic acids can be effective transition state analogue inhibitors for the PBPs and provide a basis for the use of these agents as probes of PBP structure, function, and mechanism, as well as a possible basis for the development of new PBP-targeted antibacterial agents. PMID:12525187

  9. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  10. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  11. Influence of plasma protein on the potencies of inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy D; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Mitchell, Jane A

    2006-03-01

    It is widely believed that the potencies of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) are influenced by protein binding in the extracellular fluid, since NSAIDs are bound to circulating albumin by well over 95%. This is an important point because the protein concentrations in synovial fluid and the central nervous system, which are sites of NSAID action, are markedly different from those in plasma. Here we have used a modified whole-blood assay to compare the potencies of aspirin, celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, lumiracoxib, meloxicam, naproxen, rofecoxib, sodium salicylate, and SC560 as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2 in the presence of differing concentrations of protein. The potencies of diclofenac, naproxen, rofecoxib, and salicylate, but not aspirin, celecoxib, indomethacin, lumiracoxib, meloxicam, or SC560, against COX-1 (human platelets) increased as protein concentrations were reduced. Varying protein concentrations did not affect the potencies of any of the drugs against COX-2, with the exception of sodium salicylate (A549 cells). Clearly, our findings show that the selectivity of inhibitors for COX-1 and COX-2, which are taken to be linked to their efficacy and side effects, may change in different extracellular fluid conditions. In particular, selectivity in one body compartment does not demonstrate selectivity in another. Thus, whole-body safety or toxicity cannot be linked to one definitive measure of COX selectivity.

  12. Structure guided design of biotin protein ligase inhibitors for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Ashleigh S; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Yap, Min Y; Tieu, William; Wilce, Matthew C J; Booker, Grant W; Abell, Andrew D; Polyak, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) represents a promising target for the discovery of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. Here we review the central role of BPL for the survival and virulence of clinically important Staphylococcus aureus in support of this claim. X-ray crystallography structures of BPLs in complex with ligands and small molecule inhibitors provide new insights into the mechanism of protein biotinylation, and a template for structure guided approaches to the design of inhibitors for antibacterial discovery. Most BPLs employ an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5´-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Recent studies reporting chemical analogs of biotin and biotinyl-5´-AMP as BPL inhibitors that represent new classes of anti-S. aureus agents are reviewed. We highlight strategies to selectively inhibit bacterial BPL over the mammalian equivalent using a 1,2,3-triazole isostere to replace the labile p