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Sample records for protein c-terminal labeling

  1. Fast and catalyst-free hydrazone ligation via ortho-halo-substituted benzaldehydes for protein C-terminal labeling at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Xu, Ling; Xia, Yuan; Guan, Chao-Jian; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao; Wang, Chen; Li, Yi-Ming

    2015-08-28

    Rapid and catalyst-free hydrazone ligation reaction between ortho-halobenzaldehyde derivatives and peptide/protein hydrazides was observed at neutral pH and room temperature. 2-Chlorobenzaldehyde exhibited the fastest reaction and highest conversion rates among the series of ortho-halobenzaldehydes. The resulting hydrazone-containing bioconjugation products were also found to be fairly stable under experimental conditions. The new ligation strategy was successfully used for protein C-terminal labeling and should provide a practical approach for the modification of proteins.

  2. Establishment of intein-mediated protein ligation under denaturing conditions: C-terminal labeling of a single-chain antibody for biochip screening.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Jens R; Mariano, Maria; Sideris, Steve; Nock, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    Intein-mediated protein ligation is a recently developed method that enables the C-terminal labeling of proteins. This technique requires a correctly folded intein mutant that is fused to the C-terminus of a target protein to create a thioester, which allows the ligation of a peptide with an N-terminal cysteine (1, 2). Here we describe the establishment of this method for the labeling, under denaturing conditions, of target proteins that are expressed insolubly as intein fusion proteins. A GFPuv fusion protein with the Mycobacterium xenopi gyrA intein was expressed in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and initially used as a model protein to verify intein cleavage activity under different refolding conditions. The intein showed activity after refolding in nondenaturing and slightly denaturing conditions. A construct of the same intein with an anti-neutravidin single-chain antibody was also expressed in an insoluble form. The intein-mediated ligation was established for this single chain antibody-intein fusion protein under denaturing conditions in 4 M urea to prevent significant precipitation of the fusion protein during the first refolding step. Under optimized conditions, the single-chain antibody was labeled with a fluorescent peptide and used for antigen screening on a biochip after final refolding. This screening procedure allowed the determination of binding characteristics of the scFv for avidin proteins in a miniaturized format.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of photoaffinity labelling reagents towards the Hsp90 C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Simon, Binto; Huang, Xuexia; Ju, Huangxian; Sun, Guoxuan; Yang, Min

    2017-02-21

    Glucosyl-novobiocin-based diazirine photoaffinity labelling reagents (PALs) were designed and synthesized to probe the Hsp90 C-terminal domain unknown binding pocket and the structure-activity relationship. Five PALs were successfully synthesized from novobiocin in six consecutive steps employing phase transfer catalytic glycosylation. Reactions were monitored and guided by analytical LC/MS which led to different strategies of adding either a PAL precursor or a sugar moiety first. The structures and bonding linkages of these compounds were characterised by various 2D-NMR spectroscopy and MS techniques. Synthetic techniques provide powerful probes for unknown protein binding pockets.

  4. C-Terminal Protein Characterization by Mass Spectrometry: Isolation of C-Terminal Fragments from Cyanogen Bromide-Cleaved Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2014-01-01

    A sample preparation method for protein C-terminal peptide isolation from cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digests has been developed. In this strategy, the analyte was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated, followed by CNBr cleavage in a one-pot reaction scheme. The digest was then adsorbed on ZipTipC18 pipette tips for conjugation of the homoserine lactone-terminated peptides with 2,2′-dithiobis (ethylamine) dihydrochloride, followed by reductive release of 2-aminoethanethiol from the derivatives. The thiol-functionalized internal and N-terminal peptides were scavenged on activated thiol sepharose, leaving the C-terminal peptide in the flow-through fraction. The use of reversed-phase supports as a venue for peptide derivatization enabled facile optimization of the individual reaction steps for throughput and completeness of reaction. Reagents were replaced directly on the support, allowing the reactions to proceed at minimal sample loss. By this sequence of solid-phase reactions, the C-terminal peptide could be recognized uniquely in mass spectra of unfractionated digests by its unaltered mass signature. The use of the sample preparation method was demonstrated with low-level amounts of a whole, intact model protein. The C-terminal fragments were retrieved selectively and efficiently from the affinity support. The use of covalent chromatography for C-terminal peptide purification enabled recovery of the depleted material for further chemical and/or enzymatic manipulation. The sample preparation method provides for robustness and simplicity of operation and is anticipated to be expanded to gel-separated proteins and in a scaled-up format to high-throughput protein profiling in complex biological mixtures. PMID:24688319

  5. Protein splicing of inteins with atypical glutamine and aspartate C-terminal residues.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Gil; Dassa, Bareket; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2004-01-30

    Inteins are protein-splicing domains present in many proteins. They self-catalyze their excision from the host protein, ligating their former flanks by a peptide bond. The C-terminal residue of inteins is typically an asparagine (Asn). Cyclization of this residue to succinimide causes the final detachment of inteins from their hosts. We studied protein-splicing activity of two inteins with atypical C-terminal residues. One having a C-terminal glutamine (Gln), isolated from Chilo iridescent virus (CIV), and another unique intein, first reported here, with a C-terminal aspartate, isolated from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (Chy). Protein-splicing activity was examined in the wild-type inteins and in several mutants with N- and C-terminal amino acid substitutions. We demonstrate that both wild-type inteins can protein splice, probably by new variations of the typical protein-splicing mechanism. Substituting the atypical C-terminal residue to the typical Asn retained protein-splicing only in the CIV intein. All diverse C-terminal substitutions in the Chy intein (Asp(345) to Asn, Gln, Glu, and Ala) abolished protein-splicing and generated N- and C-terminal cleavage. The observed C-terminal cleavage in the Chy intein ending with Ala cannot be explained by cyclization of this residue. We present and discuss several new models for reactions in the protein-splicing pathway.

  6. Cholesterol dependent conformational exchange of the C-terminal domain of the influenza A M2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo S.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Saotome, Kei; Sahu, Indra D.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Feix, Jimmy B.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Howard, Kathleen P.

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal amphipathic helix of the influenza A M2 protein plays a critical cholesterol dependent role in viral budding. To provide atomic-level detail on the impact cholesterol has on the conformation of M2 protein, we spin-labeled sites right before and within the C-terminal amphipathic helix of the M2 protein. We studied the spin-labeled M2 proteins in membranes both with and without cholesterol. We used a multipronged site-directed spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) approach and collected data on line shapes, relaxation rates, accessibility of sites to the membrane, and distances between symmetry related sites within the tetrameric protein. We demonstrate that the C-terminal amphipathic helix of M2 populates at least two conformations in POPC/POPG 4:1 bilayers. Furthermore, we show that the conformational state that becomes more populated in the presence of cholesterol is less dynamic, less membrane buried, and more tightly packed than the other state. Cholesterol dependent changes in M2 could be attributed to the changes cholesterol induces in bilayer properties and/or direct binding of cholesterol to the protein. We propose a model consistent with all our experimental data that suggests that the predominant conformation we observe in the presence of cholesterol is relevant for the understanding of viral budding. PMID:26569023

  7. Affinity labelling of proteinases with tryptic specificity by peptides with C-terminal lysine chloromethyl ketone

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, John R.; Kray, William; Shaw, Elliott

    1974-01-01

    Methods are described for the synthesis of peptides terminating in Lys-CH2Cl. The products were examined as affinity labels for several enzymes of trypsin-like specificity which are resistant to Tos-Lys-CH2Cl. In part, the inertness of the latter may be due to the sulphonamide group, since Z-Lys-CH2Cl was more effective. However, a number of tripeptides with C-terminal Lys-CH2Cl were superior in their ability to inactivate subtilisin, thrombin and plasma kallikrein. The possibility of developing enzyme-specific reagents selective for members within the trypsin-like group is demonstrated by Ala-Phe-Lys-CH2Cl, which readily inactivates plasma kallikrein but not thrombin. PMID:4422496

  8. Specific inhibition of AGC protein kinases by antibodies against C-terminal epitopes.

    PubMed

    Traincard, François; Giacomoni, Véronique; Veron, Michel

    2004-08-13

    The sequences contributing to the catalytic site of protein kinases are not all comprised within the highly conserved catalytic core. Thus, in mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), the C-terminal sequence participates in substrate binding. Using synthetic peptides mimicking the FxxF motif present at most C-termini of AGC kinases, we have raised highly specific antibodies which are potent and specific inhibitors of the catalytic activity of the cognate protein kinase. Taking into account the structure of PKA, these results point to the potential of the C-terminal region of protein kinases as a target for designing specific protein kinase inhibitors.

  9. C-terminally mutated tubby protein accumulates in aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunshin; Sung, Ho Jin; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Yun Hee; Oh, Yong-Seok; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Heo, Kyun; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2017-01-01

    The tubby protein (Tub), a putative transcription factor, plays important roles in the maintenance and function of neuronal cells. A splicing defect-causing mutation in the 3′-end of the tubby gene, which is predicted to disrupt the carboxy-terminal region of the Tub protein, causes maturity-onset obesity, blindness, and deafness in mice. Although this pathological Tub mutation leads to a loss of function, the precise mechanism has not yet been investigated. Here, we found that the mutant Tub proteins were mostly localized to puncta found in the perinuclear region and that the C-terminus was important for its solubility. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that puncta of mutant Tub co-localized with the aggresome. Moreover, whereas wild-type Tub was translocated to the nucleus by extracellular signaling, the mutant forms failed to undergo such translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that the malfunctions of the Tub mutant are caused by its misfolding and subsequent localization to aggresomes. PMID:27697107

  10. Evolutionary bridges to new protein folds: design of C-terminal Cro protein chameleon sequences.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William J; Van Dorn, Laura O; Ingram, Wendy M; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2011-09-01

    Regions of amino-acid sequence that are compatible with multiple folds may facilitate evolutionary transitions in protein structure. In a previous study, we described a heuristically designed chameleon sequence (SASF1, structurally ambivalent sequence fragment 1) that could adopt either of two naturally occurring conformations (α-helical or β-sheet) when incorporated as part of the C-terminal dimerization subdomain of two structurally divergent transcription factors, P22 Cro and λ Cro. Here we describe longer chameleon designs (SASF2 and SASF3) that in the case of SASF3 correspond to the full C-terminal half of the ordered region of a P22 Cro/λ Cro sequence alignment (residues 34-57). P22-SASF2 and λ(WDD)-SASF2 show moderate thermal stability in denaturation curves monitored by circular dichroism (T(m) values of 46 and 55°C, respectively), while P22-SASF3 and λ(WDD)-SASF3 have somewhat reduced stability (T(m) values of 33 and 49°C, respectively). (13)C and (1)H NMR secondary chemical shift analysis confirms two C-terminal α-helices for P22-SASF2 (residues 36-45 and 54-57) and two C-terminal β-strands for λ(WDD)-SASF2 (residues 40-45 and 50-52), corresponding to secondary structure locations in the two parent sequences. Backbone relaxation data show that both chameleon sequences have a relatively well-ordered structure. Comparisons of (15)N-(1)H correlation spectra for SASF2 and SASF3-containing proteins strongly suggest that SASF3 retains the chameleonism of SASF2. Both Cro C-terminal conformations can be encoded in a single sequence, showing the plausibility of linking different Cro folds by smooth evolutionary transitions. The N-terminal subdomain, though largely conserved in structure, also exerts an important contextual influence on the structure of the C-terminal region.

  11. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  12. Study on the C-terminal beta-hairpin of protein G in AB heteropolymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    The off-lattice AB heteropolymer model, consisting of the hydrophobic (A) and hydrophilic (B) polymers, is one of popular protein models. Its energy function includes the bending energy and the van der Waals interaction energy. The properties and the energy landscape of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of protein G are studied in the off-lattice AB heteropolymer model with conformational space annealing, a powerful global optimization method.

  13. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  14. Structural and functional comparisons of retroviral envelope protein C-terminal domains: still much to learn.

    PubMed

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Kuhlmann, Anne-Sophie; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2014-01-16

    Retroviruses are a family of viruses that cause a broad range of pathologies in animals and humans, from the apparently harmless, long-term genomic insertion of endogenous retroviruses, to tumors induced by the oncogenic retroviruses and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) resulting from human immunodeficiency virus infection. Disease can be the result of diverse mechanisms, including tumorigenesis induced by viral oncogenes or immune destruction, leading to the gradual loss of CD4 T-cells. Of the virally encoded proteins common to all retroviruses, the envelope (Env) displays perhaps the most diverse functionality. Env is primarily responsible for binding the cellular receptor and for effecting the fusion process, with these functions mediated by protein domains localized to the exterior of the virus. The remaining C-terminal domain may have the most variable functionality of all retroviral proteins. The C-terminal domains from three prototypical retroviruses are discussed, focusing on the different structures and functions, which include fusion activation, tumorigenesis and viral assembly and lifecycle influences. Despite these genetic and functional differences, however, the C-terminal domains of these viruses share a common feature in the modulation of Env ectodomain conformation. Despite their differences, perhaps each system still has information to share with the others.

  15. Assessing induced folding within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the Henipavirus nucleoproteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Marlène; Habchi, Johnny; El Habre, Zeina; Nesme, Léo; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at characterizing structural transitions within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein (NTAIL) from the Nipah and Hendra viruses, two recently emerged pathogens gathered within the Henipavirus genus. To this end, we used site-directed spin labeling combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the α-helical-induced folding that Henipavirus NTAIL domains undergo in the presence of the C-terminal X domain of the phosphoprotein (PXD). For each NTAIL protein, six positions located within four previously proposed molecular recognition elements (MoREs) were targeted for spin labeling, with three of these positions (475, 481, and 487) falling within the MoRE responsible for binding to PXD (Box3). A detailed analysis of the impact of the partner protein on the labeled NTAIL variants revealed a dramatic modification in the environment of the spin labels grafted within Box3, with the observed modifications supporting the formation of an induced α-helix within this region. In the free state, the slightly lower mobility of the spin labels grafted within Box3 as compared to the other positions suggests the existence of a transiently populated α-helix, as already reported for measles virus (MeV) NTAIL. Comparison with the well-characterized MeV NTAIL-PXD system, allowed us to validate the structural models of Henipavirus NTAIL-PXD complexes that we previously proposed. In addition, this study highlighted a few notable differences between the Nipah and Hendra viruses. In particular, the observation of composite spectra for the free form of the Nipah virus NTAIL variants spin labeled in Box3 supports conformational heterogeneity of this partly pre-configured α-helix, with the pre-existence of stable α-helical segments. Altogether these results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the Henipavirus NTAIL-PXD binding reaction.

  16. C-terminal dimerization of apo-cyclic AMP receptor protein validated in solution.

    PubMed

    Sim, Dae-Won; Choi, Jae Wan; Kim, Ji-Hun; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Myeongkyu; Yu, Hee-Wan; Jo, Ku-Sung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Seo, Min-Duk; Jeon, Young Ho; Lee, Bong-Jin; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2017-04-01

    Although cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) has long served as a typical example of effector-mediated protein allostery, mechanistic details into its regulation have been controversial due to discrepancy between the known crystal structure and NMR structure of apo-CRP. Here, we report that the recombinant protein corresponding to its C-terminal DNA-binding domain (CDD) forms a dimer. This result, together with structural information obtained in the present NMR study, is consistent with the previous crystal structure and validates its relevance also in solution. Therefore, our findings suggest that dissociation of the CDD may be critically involved in cAMP-induced allosteric activation of CRP.

  17. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. PMID:22297990

  18. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371-553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C222(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress.

  19. Involvement of C-Terminal Histidines in Soybean PM1 Protein Oligomerization and Cu2+ Binding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guobao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Yang; Zheng, Yizhi

    2017-04-06

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are widely distributed among plant species, where they contribute to abiotic stress tolerance. LEA proteins can be classified into seven groups according to conserved sequence motifs. The PM1 protein from soybean, which belongs to the Pfam LEA_1 group, has been shown previously to be at least partially natively unfolded, to bind metal ions and potentially to stabilize proteins and membranes. Here, we investigated the role of the PM1 C-terminal domain and in particular the multiple histidine residues in this half of the protein. We constructed recombinant plasmids expressing full-length PM1 and two truncated forms, PM1-N and PM1-C, which represent the N- and C-terminal halves of the protein, respectively. Immunoblotting and cross-linking experiments showed that full-length PM1 forms oligomers and high molecular weight (HMW) complexes in vitro and in vivo, while PM1-C, but not PM1-N, also formed oligomers and HMW complexes in vitro. When the histidine residues in PM1 and PM1-C were chemically modified, oligomerization was abolished, suggesting that histidines play a key role in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high Cu2+ concentrations promote oligomerization and induce PM1 and PM1-C to form HMW complexes. Therefore, we speculate that PM1 proteins not only maintain ion homeostasis in the cytoplasm, but also potentially stabilize and protect other proteins during abiotic stress by forming a large, oligomeric molecular shield around biological targets.

  20. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kolonko, Marta; Ożga, Katarzyna; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Taube, Michał; Kozak, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Greb-Markiewicz, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Methoprene tolerant protein (Met) has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC) is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects. PMID:27657508

  1. Structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Hakoshima, Toshio; Kitano, Ken

    2013-11-21

    Bloom syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. The disease is caused by mutations of the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM). Here we report the crystal structure of a RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain from human BLM. The structure reveals three novel features of BLM RQC which distinguish it from the previous structures of the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and RECQ1. First, BLM RQC lacks an aromatic residue at the tip of the β-wing, a key element of the RecQ-family helicases used for DNA-strand separation. Second, a BLM-specific insertion between the N-terminal helices exhibits a looping-out structure that extends at right angles to the β-wing. Deletion mutagenesis of this insertion interfered with binding to Holliday junction. Third, the C-terminal region of BLM RQC adopts an extended structure running along the domain surface, which may facilitate the spatial positioning of an HRDC domain in the full-length protein.

  2. Diverse C-terminal sequences involved in Flavobacterium johnsoniae protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Surashree S; Zhu, Yongtao; Brendel, Colton J; McBride, Mark J

    2017-04-10

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae and many related bacteria secrete proteins across the outer membrane using the type IX secretion system (T9SS). Proteins secreted by T9SSs have amino-terminal signal peptides for export across the cytoplasmic membrane by the Sec system and carboxy-terminal domains (CTDs) targeting them for secretion across the outer membrane by the T9SS. Most but not all T9SS CTDs belong to family TIGR04183 (type-A CTDs). We functionally characterized diverse CTDs for secretion by the F. johnsoniae T9SS. Attachment of the CTDs from F. johnsoniae RemA, AmyB, and ChiA to the foreign protein sfGFP that had a signal peptide at the amino terminus resulted in secretion across the outer membrane. In each case approximately 80 to 100 amino acids from the extreme carboxy-termini was needed for efficient secretion. Several type-A CTDs from distantly related members of the phylum Bacteroidetes functioned in F. johnsoniae, supporting secretion of sfGFP by the F. johnsoniae T9SS. F. johnsoniae SprB requires the T9SS for secretion but lacks a type-A CTD. It has a conserved C-terminal domain belonging to family TIGR04131, which we refer to as a type-B CTD. The CTD of SprB was required for its secretion, but attachment of C-terminal regions of SprB of up to 1182 amino acids to sfGFP failed to result in secretion. Additional features outside of the C-terminal region of SprB may be required for its secretion.Importance Type IX protein secretion systems (T9SSs) are common in but limited to members of the phylum Bacteroidetes Most proteins that are secreted by T9SSs have conserved carboxy-terminal domains that belong to either protein domain family TIGR04183 (type-A CTDs) or TIGR04131 (type-B CTDs). Here we identify features of T9SS CTDs of F. johnsoniae that are required for protein secretion and demonstrate that type-A CTDs from distantly related members of the phylum function with the F. johnsoniae T9SS to secrete the foreign protein sfGFP. In contrast, type-B CTDs failed

  3. Protein identification with N and C-terminal sequence tags in proteome projects.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, M R; Gasteiger, E; Tonella, L; Ou, K; Tyler, M; Sanchez, J C; Gooley, A A; Walsh, B J; Bairoch, A; Appel, R D; Williams, K L; Hochstrasser, D F

    1998-05-08

    Genome sequences are available for increasing numbers of organisms. The proteomes (protein complement expressed by the genome) of many such organisms are being studied with two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Here we have investigated the application of short N-terminal and C-terminal sequence tags to the identification of proteins separated on 2D gels. The theoretical N and C termini of 15, 519 proteins, representing all SWISS-PROT entries for the organisms Mycoplasma genitalium, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human, were analysed. Sequence tags were found to be surprisingly specific, with N-terminal tags of four amino acid residues found to be unique for between 43% and 83% of proteins, and C-terminal tags of four amino acid residues unique for between 74% and 97% of proteins, depending on the species studied. Sequence tags of five amino acid residues were found to be even more specific. To utilise this specificity of sequence tags for protein identification, we created a world-wide web-accessible protein identification program, TagIdent (http://www.expasy.ch/www/tools.html), which matches sequence tags of up to six amino acid residues as well as estimated protein pI and mass against proteins in the SWISS-PROT database. We demonstrate the utility of this identification approach with sequence tags generated from 91 different E. coli proteins purified by 2D gel electrophoresis. Fifty-one proteins were unambiguously identified by virtue of their sequence tags and estimated pI and mass, and a further 11 proteins identified when sequence tags were combined with protein amino acid composition data. We conlcude that the TagIdent identification approach is best suited to the identification of proteins from prokaryotes whose complete genome sequences are available. The approach is less well suited to proteins from eukaryotes, as many eukaryotic proteins are not amenable to sequencing via Edman degradation, and tag protein

  4. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  5. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  6. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g., night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors' C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  7. Solution structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Chin-Ju; Ko, Junsang; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2014-02-01

    RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain is known as the main DNA binding module of RecQ helicases such as Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and Werner syndrome protein (WRN) that recognizes various DNA structures. Even though BLM is able to resolve various DNA structures similarly to WRN, BLM has different binding preferences for DNA substrates from WRN. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the RQC domain of human BLM. The structure shares the common winged-helix motif with other RQC domains. However, half of the N-terminal has unstructured regions (α1-α2 loop and α3 region), and the aromatic side chain on the top of the β-hairpin, which is important for DNA duplex strand separation in other RQC domains, is substituted with a negatively charged residue (D1165) followed by the polar residue (Q1166). The structurally distinctive features of the RQC domain of human BLM suggest that the DNA binding modes of the BLM RQC domain may be different from those of other RQC domains.

  8. Amyloid β-Protein C-Terminal Fragments: Formation of Cylindrins and β-Barrels.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh D; LaPointe, Nichole E; Nelson, Rebecca; Krotee, Pascal; Hayden, Eric Y; Ulrich, Brittany; Quan, Sarah; Feinstein, Stuart C; Teplow, David B; Eisenberg, David; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2016-01-20

    In order to evaluate potential therapeutic targets for treatment of amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is essential to determine the structures of toxic amyloid oligomers. However, for the amyloid β-protein peptide (Aβ), thought to be the seminal neuropathogenetic agent in AD, its fast aggregation kinetics and the rapid equilibrium dynamics among oligomers of different size pose significant experimental challenges. Here we use ion-mobility mass spectrometry, in combination with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and computational modeling, to test the hypothesis that Aβ peptides can form oligomeric structures resembling cylindrins and β-barrels. These structures are hypothesized to cause neuronal injury and death through perturbation of plasma membrane integrity. We show that hexamers of C-terminal Aβ fragments, including Aβ(24-34), Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(26-36), have collision cross sections similar to those of cylindrins. We also show that linking two identical fragments head-to-tail using diglycine increases the proportion of cylindrin-sized oligomers. In addition, we find that larger oligomers of these fragments may adopt β-barrel structures and that β-barrels can be formed by folding an out-of-register β-sheet, a common type of structure found in amyloid proteins.

  9. Amyloid β-Protein C-terminal Fragments: Formation of Cylindrins and β-barrels

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; LaPointe, Nichole E.; Nelson, Rebecca; Krotee, Pascal; Hayden, Eric Y.; Ulrich, Brittany; Quan, Sarah; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Teplow, David B.; Eisenberg, David; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate potential therapeutic targets for treatment of amyloidoses such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is essential to determine the structures of toxic amyloid oligomers. However, for the amyloid β-protein peptide (Aβ), thought to be the seminal neuropathogenetic agent in AD, its fast aggregation kinetics and the rapid equilibrium dynamics among oligomers of different size pose significant experimental challenges. Here we use ion-mobility mass spectrometry, in combination with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and computational modeling, to test the hypothesis that Aβ peptides can form oligomeric structures resembling cylindrins and β-barrels. These structures are hypothesized to cause neuronal injury and death through perturbation of plasma membrane integrity. We show that hexamers of C-terminal Aβ fragments, including Aβ(24-34), Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(26-36), have collision cross-sections similar to those of cylindrins. We also show that linking two identical fragments head-to-tail using di-glycine increases the proportion of cylindrin-sized oligomers. In addition, we find that larger oligomers of these fragments may adopt β-barrel structures and that β-barrels can be formed by folding an out-of-register β-sheet, a common type of structure found in amyloid proteins. PMID:26700445

  10. The C-terminal 42 residues of the Tula virus Gn protein regulate interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Valery; Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Pepini, Timothy; Mackow, Erich R

    2011-05-01

    Hantaviruses primarily infect the endothelial cell lining of capillaries and cause two vascular permeability-based diseases. The ability of pathogenic hantaviruses to regulate the early induction of interferon determines whether hantaviruses replicate in endothelial cells. Tula virus (TULV) and Prospect Hill virus (PHV) are hantaviruses which infect human endothelial cells but fail to cause human disease. PHV is unable to inhibit early interferon (IFN) responses and fails to replicate within human endothelial cells. However, TULV replicates successfully in human endothelial cells, suggesting that TULV is capable of regulating cellular IFN responses. We observed a >300-fold reduction in the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) MxA and ISG56 following TULV versus PHV infection of endothelial cells 1 day postinfection. Similar to results with pathogenic hantaviruses, expressing the TULV Gn protein cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T) blocked RIG-I- and TBK1-directed transcription from IFN-stimulated response elements (ISREs) and IFN-β promoters (>90%) but not transcription directed by constitutively active IFN regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). In contrast, expressing the PHV Gn-T had no effect on TBK1-induced transcriptional responses. Analysis of Gn-T truncations demonstrated that the C-terminal 42 residues of the Gn-T (Gn-T-C42) from TULV, but not PHV, inhibited IFN induction >70%. These findings demonstrate that the TULV Gn-T inhibits IFN- and ISRE-directed responses upstream of IRF3 at the level of the TBK1 complex and further define a 42-residue domain of the TULV Gn-T that inhibits IFN induction. In contrast to pathogenic hantavirus Gn-Ts, the TULV Gn-T lacks a C-terminal degron domain and failed to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), a TBK1 complex component required for IRF3 activation. These findings indicate that the nonpathogenic TULV Gn-T regulates IFN induction but accomplishes this via unique interactions with cellular TBK1 complexes. These

  11. Binding of a C-terminal fragment (residues 369 to 435) of vitamin D-binding protein to actin.

    PubMed

    Buch, Stefan; Gremm, Dagmar; Wegner, Albrecht; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2002-10-01

    The vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) binds to monomeric actin with high affinity. The variation in DBP isoforms is due to genetic polymorphism and varying glycosylation. To obtain a homogeneous preparation, the cDNA for human DBP and truncations thereof were cloned and various systems were applied for heterologous bacterial and yeast expression. The full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal halves of DBP remained insoluble probably because the protein did not fold to its native three-dimensional structure due to formation of accidental intra- and inter-molecular disulfide bonds during expression in bacteria or yeast. This problem was overcome by cloning of a C-terminal fragment comprising residues 369 to 435 that did not contain disulfide bonds and was completely soluble. Binding of the C-terminal fragment to monomeric actin was demonstrated by comigration with actin during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance, however, at considerably lower affinity than full-length DBP. This suggests that in addition to the C-terminal amino acid sequence other parts (amino acid residues or sugar moieties) of DBP participate in actin binding. The C-terminal fragment was found to inhibit denaturation of actin and to decrease the rate of actin polymerisation both at the barbed and at the pointed end in a concentration-dependent manner. According to a quantitative analysis of the polymerisation kinetics, association of actin monomers to nucleate filaments was not prevented by binding of the C-terminal fragment to actin. These data suggest that the sites on the surface of actin that are involved in actin nucleation and elongation are different.

  12. The C- terminal region of the Major Outer Sheath Protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan M; Vanyo, Stephen T; Visser, Michelle B

    2017-03-13

    Treponema denticola is an oral spirochete strongly associated with severe periodontal disease. A prominent virulence factor, the major outer sheath protein (Msp), disorients neutrophil chemotaxis by altering the cellular phosphoinositide balance, leading to impairment of downstream chemotactic events including actin rearrangement, Rac1 activation and Akt activation in response to chemoattractant stimulation. The specific regions of Msp responsible for interactions with neutrophils remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of truncated Msp regions on neutrophil chemotaxis and associated signaling pathways. Murine neutrophils were treated with recombinant protein truncations followed by assessment of chemotaxis and associated signal pathway activation. Chemotaxis assays indicate sequences within the C-terminal region; particularly the first 130 amino acids, have the strongest inhibitory effect on neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils incubated with the C-terminal region protein also demonstrated the greatest inhibition of Rac1 activation, increased phosphoinositide phosphatase activity, and decreased Akt activation; orchestrating impairment of chemotaxis. Furthermore, incubation with antibodies specific to only the C-terminal region blocked the Msp induced inhibition of chemotaxis and denaturing the protein restored Rac1 activation. Msp from the strain OTK, with numerous amino acid substitutions throughout the polypeptide, including the C-terminal region compared to strain 35405, showed increased ability to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. Collectively, these results indicate the C-terminal region of Msp is the most potent region to modulate neutrophil chemotactic signaling and that specific sequences and structure is likely required. Knowledge of how spirochetes dampen neutrophil response is limited and Msp may represent a novel therapeutic target for periodontal disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Generating recombinant C-terminal prion protein fragments of exact native sequence.

    PubMed

    Johanssen, V A; Barnham, K J; Masters, C L; Hill, A F; Collins, S J

    2012-02-01

    Transmissibility and distinctive neuropathology are hallmark features of prion diseases differentiating them from other neurodegenerative disorders, with pathogenesis and transmission appearing closely linked to misfolded conformers (PrP(Sc)) of the ubiquitously expressed cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)). Given the apparent pathogenic primacy of misfolded PrP, the utilisation of peptides based on the prion protein has formed an integral approach for providing insights into misfolding pathways and pathogenic mechanisms. In parallel with studies employing prion peptides, similar approaches in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer Disease, have demonstrated that differential processing of parent proteins and quite minor variations in the primary sequence of cognate peptides generated from the same constitutive processing (such as Aβ1-40 versus Aβ1-42 produced from γ-secretase activity) can be associated with very different pathogenic consequences. PrP(C) also undergoes constitutive α- or β-cleavage yielding C1 (residues 112-231 human sequence) or C2 (residues 90-231), respectively, with the full cell biological significance of such processing unresolved; however, it is noteworthy that in prion diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and murine models, the moderately extended C2 fragment predominates in the brain suggesting that the two cleavage events and the consequent C-terminal fragments may differ in their pathogenic significance. Accordingly, studies characterising biologically relevant peptides like C1 and C2, would be most valid if undertaken using peptides completely free of any inherent non-native sequence that arises as a by-product of commonly employed recombinant production techniques. To achieve this aim and thereby facilitate more representative biophysical and neurotoxicity studies, we adapted the combination of high fidelity Taq TA cloning with a SUMO-Hexa-His tag-type approach, incorporating the SUMO protease

  14. The C-terminal half of UvrC protein is sufficient to reconstitute (A)BC excinuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.J.; Sancar, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The UvrC protein is one of three subunits of the Escherichia coli repair enzyme (A)BC excinuclease. This subunit is thought to have at least one of the active sites for nucleophilic attack on the phosphodiester bonds of damaged DNA. To localize the active site, mutant UvrC proteins were constructed by linker-scanning and deletion mutagenesis. In vivo studies revealed that the C-terminal 314 amino acids of the 610-amino acid UvrC protein were sufficient to confer UV resistance to cells lacking the uvrC gene. The portion of the uvrC gene encoding the C-terminal half of the protein was fused to the 3{prime} end of the E. coli malE gene (which encodes maltose binding protein), and the fusion protein MBP-C314C was purified and characterized. The fusion protein, in combination with UvrA and UvrB subunits, reconstituted the excinuclease activity that incised the eighth phosphodiester bond 5{prime} and the fourth phosphodiester bond 3{prime} to a psoralen-thymine adduct. These results suggest that the C-terminal 314 amino acids of UvrC constitute a functional domain capable of interacting with the UvrB-damaged DNA complex and of inducing the two phosphodiester bond incisions characteristic of (A)BC excinuclease.

  15. Fertilization in C. elegans requires an intact C-terminal RING finger in sperm protein SPE-42

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The C. elegans sperm protein SPE-42, a membrane protein of unknown structure and molecular function, is required for fertilization. Sperm from worms with spe-42 mutations appear normal but are unable to fertilize eggs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 8 conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of this protein suggesting these residues form a zinc-coordinating RING finger structure. Results We made an in silico structural model of the SPE-42 RING finger domain based on primary sequence analysis and previously reported RING structures. To test the model, we created spe-42 transgenes coding for mutations in each of the 8 cysteine residues predicted to coordinate Zn++ ions in the RING finger motif. Transgenes were crossed into a spe-42 null background and protein function was measured by counting progeny. We found that all 8 cysteines are required for protein function. We also showed that sequence differences between the C-terminal 29 and 30 amino acids in C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 following the RING finger domain are not responsible for the failure of the C. briggsae SPE-42 homolog to rescue C. elegans spe-42 mutants. Conclusions The results suggest that a bona fide RING domain is present at the C-terminus of the SPE-42 protein and that this motif is required for sperm-egg interactions during C. elegans fertilization. Our structural model of the RING domain provides a starting point for further structure-function analysis of this critical region of the protein. The C-terminal domain swap experiment suggests that the incompatibility between the C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 proteins is caused by small amino acid differences outside the C-terminal domain. PMID:21345212

  16. Functions of the C-terminal domains of apoptosis-related proteins of the Bcl-2 family.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2014-10-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are involved in cell homeostasis, where they regulate cell death. Some of these proteins are pro-apoptotic and others pro-survival. Moreover, many of them share a similar domain composition with several of the so-called BH domains, although some only have a BH3 domain. A C-terminal domain is present in all the multi-BH domain proteins and in some of the BH3-only ones. This C-terminal domain is hydrophobic or amphipathic, for which reason it was thought when they were discovered that they were membrane anchors. Although this is indeed one of their functions, it has since been observed that they may also serve as regulators of the function of some members of this family, such as Bax. They may also serve to recognize the target membrane of some of these proteins, which only after an apoptotic signal, are incorporated into a membrane. It has been shown that peptides that imitate the sequence of C-terminal domains can form pores and may serve as a model to design cytotoxic molecules.

  17. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  18. The paramyxovirus fusion protein C-terminal region: mutagenesis indicates an indivisible protein unit.

    PubMed

    Zokarkar, Aarohi; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Fusion is mediated by the viral fusion (F) protein, and it undergoes large irreversible conformational changes to cause membrane merger. The C terminus of PIV5 F contains a membrane-proximal 7-residue external region (MPER), followed by the transmembrane (TM) domain and a 20-residue cytoplasmic tail. To study the sequence requirements of the F protein C terminus for fusion, we constructed chimeras containing the ectodomain of parainfluenza virus 5 F (PIV5 F) and either the MPER, the TM domain, or the cytoplasmic tail of the F proteins of the paramyxoviruses measles virus, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus, human parainfluenza virus 3, and Nipah virus. The chimeras were expressed, and their ability to cause cell fusion was analyzed. The chimeric proteins were variably expressed at the cell surface. We found that chimeras containing the ectodomain of PIV5 F with the C terminus of other paramyxoviruses were unable to cause cell fusion. Fusion could be restored by decreasing the activation energy of refolding through introduction of a destabilizing mutation (S443P). Replacing individual regions, singly or doubly, in the chimeras with native PIV5 F sequences restored fusion to various degrees, but it did not have an additive effect in restoring activity. Thus, the F protein C terminus may be a specific structure that only functions with its cognate ectodomain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of MPER indicates that it has a regulatory role in fusion since both hyperfusogenic and hypofusogenic mutations were found.

  19. Synthesis of histone proteins by CPE ligation using a recombinant peptide as the C-terminal building block.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Yoshikawa, Ryo; Fujiyoshi, Yuki; Mishima, Yuichi; Hojo, Hironobu; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-11-01

    The post-translational modification of histones plays an important role in gene expression. We report herein on a method for synthesizing such modified histones by ligating chemically prepared N-terminal peptides and C-terminal recombinant peptide building blocks. Based on their chemical synthesis, core histones can be categorized as two types; histones H2A, H2B and H4 which contain no Cys residues, and histone H3 which contains a Cys residue(s) in the C-terminal region. A combination of native chemical ligation and desulphurization can be simply used to prepare histones without Cys residues. For the synthesis of histone H3, the endogenous Cys residue(s) must be selectively protected, while keeping the N-terminal Cys residue of the C-terminal building block that is introduced for purposes of chemical ligation unprotected. To this end, a phenacyl group was successfully utilized to protect endogenous Cys residue(s), and the recombinant peptide was ligated with a peptide containing a Cys-Pro ester (CPE) sequence as a thioester precursor. Using this approach it was possible to prepare all of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 with any modifications. The resulting proteins could then be used to prepare a core histone library of proteins that have been post-translationally modified.

  20. Synapse associated protein 102 (SAP102) binds the C-terminal part of the scaffolding protein neurobeachin.

    PubMed

    Lauks, Juliane; Klemmer, Patricia; Farzana, Fatima; Karupothula, Ramesh; Zalm, Robbert; Cooke, Nancy E; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Toonen, Ruud; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Neurobeachin (Nbea) is a multidomain scaffold protein abundant in the brain, where it is highly expressed during development. Nbea-null mice have severe defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission resulting in lethal paralysis of the newborns. Recently, it became clear that Nbea is important also for the functioning of central synapses, where it is suggested to play a role in trafficking membrane proteins to both, the pre- and post-synaptic sites. So far, only few binding partners of Nbea have been found and the precise mechanism of their trafficking remains unclear. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify SAP102, a MAGUK protein implicated in trafficking of the ionotropic glutamate AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors during synaptogenesis, as a novel Nbea interacting protein in mouse brain. Experiments in heterologous cells confirmed this interaction and revealed that SAP102 binds to the C-terminal part of Nbea that contains the DUF, PH, BEACH and WD40 domains. Furthermore, we discovered that introducing a mutation in Nbea's PH domain, which disrupts its interaction with the BEACH domain, abolishes this binding, thereby creating an excellent starting point to further investigate Nbea-SAP102 function in the central nervous system.

  1. Synapse Associated Protein 102 (SAP102) Binds the C-Terminal Part of the Scaffolding Protein Neurobeachin

    PubMed Central

    Farzana, Fatima; Karupothula, Ramesh; Zalm, Robbert; Cooke, Nancy E.; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B.; Toonen, Ruud; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Neurobeachin (Nbea) is a multidomain scaffold protein abundant in the brain, where it is highly expressed during development. Nbea-null mice have severe defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission resulting in lethal paralysis of the newborns. Recently, it became clear that Nbea is important also for the functioning of central synapses, where it is suggested to play a role in trafficking membrane proteins to both, the pre- and post-synaptic sites. So far, only few binding partners of Nbea have been found and the precise mechanism of their trafficking remains unclear. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify SAP102, a MAGUK protein implicated in trafficking of the ionotropic glutamate AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors during synaptogenesis, as a novel Nbea interacting protein in mouse brain. Experiments in heterologous cells confirmed this interaction and revealed that SAP102 binds to the C-terminal part of Nbea that contains the DUF, PH, BEACH and WD40 domains. Furthermore, we discovered that introducing a mutation in Nbea’s PH domain, which disrupts its interaction with the BEACH domain, abolishes this binding, thereby creating an excellent starting point to further investigate Nbea-SAP102 function in the central nervous system. PMID:22745750

  2. C-Terminal Charge-Reversal Derivatization and Parallel Use of Multiple Proteases Facilitates Identification of Protein C-Termini by C-Terminomics.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Prasath; Koudelka, Tomas; Linke, Dennis; Tholey, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The identification of protein C-termini in complex proteomes is challenging due to the poor ionization efficiency of the carboxyl group. Amidating the negatively charged C-termini with ethanolamine (EA) has been suggested to improve the detection of C-terminal peptides and allows for a directed depletion of internal peptides after proteolysis using carboxyl reactive polymers. In the present study, the derivatization with N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (DMEDA) and (4-aminobutyl)guanidine (AG) leading to a positively charged C-terminus was investigated. C-terminal charge-reversed peptides showed improved coverage of b- and y-ion series in the MS/MS spectra compared to their noncharged counterparts. DMEDA-derivatized peptides resulted in many peptides with charge states of 3+, which benefited from ETD fragmentation. This makes the charge-reversal strategy particularly useful for the analysis of protein C-termini, which may also be post-translationally modified. The labeling strategy and the indirect enrichment of C-termini worked with similar efficiency for both DMEDA and EA, and their applicability was demonstrated on an E. coli proteome. Utilizing two proteases and different MS/MS activation mechanisms allowed for the identification of >400 C-termini, encompassing both canonical and truncated C-termini.

  3. Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Takashi; Mine, Shouhei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce various extracellular signals, such as neurotransmitters, hormones, light, and odorous chemicals, into intracellular signals via G protein activation during neurological, cardiovascular, sensory and reproductive signaling. Common and unique features of interactions between GPCRs and specific G proteins are important for structure-based design of drugs in order to treat GPCR-related diseases. Atomic resolution structures of GPCR complexes with G proteins have revealed shared and extensive interactions between the conserved DRY motif and other residues in transmembrane domains 3 (TM3), 5 and 6, and the target G protein C-terminal region. However, the initial interactions formed between GPCRs and their specific G proteins remain unclear. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the murine olfactory receptor S6 (mOR-S6) indicated that the N-terminal acidic residue of helix 8 of mOR-S6 is responsible for initial transient and specific interactions with chimeric Gα15_olf, resulting in a response that is 2.2-fold more rapid and 1.7-fold more robust than the interaction with Gα15. Our mutagenesis analysis indicates that the hydrophobic core buried between helix 8 and TM1–2 of mOR-S6 is important for the activation of both Gα15_olf and Gα15. This review focuses on the functional role of the C-terminal amphipathic helix 8 based on several recent GPCR studies. PMID:27869740

  4. Mobility and Core-Protein Binding Patterns of Disordered C-Terminal Tails in β-Tubulin Isotypes.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Yoann; Eyer, Joel; Robert, Charles H; Prevost, Chantal; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2017-03-28

    Although they play a significant part in the regulation of microtubule structure, dynamics, and function, the disordered C-terminal tails of tubulin remain invisible to experimental structural methods and do not appear in the crystallographic structures that are currently available in the Protein Data Bank. Interestingly, these tails concentrate most of the sequence variability between tubulin isotypes and are the sites of the principal post-translational modifications undergone by this protein. Using homology modeling, we developed two complete models for the human αI/βI- and αI/βIII-tubulin isotypes that include their C-terminal tails. We then investigated the conformational variability of the two β-tails using long time-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations that revealed similar features, notably the unexpected presence of common anchoring regions on the surface of the tuulin dimer, but also distinctive mobility or interaction patterns, some of which could be related to the tail lengths and charge distributions. We also observed in our simulations that the C-terminal tail from the βI isotype, but not the βIII isotype, formed contacts in the putative binding site of a recently discovered peptide that disrupts microtubule formation in glioma cells. Hindering the binding site in the βI isotype would be consistent with this peptide's preferential disruption of microtubule formation in glioma, whose cells overexpress βIII, compared to normal glial cells. While these observations need to be confirmed with more intensive sampling, our study opens new perspectives for the development of isotype-specific chemotherapy drugs.

  5. High-level expression and in vitro mutagenesis of a fibrillogenic 109-amino-acid C-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gardella, J E; Gorgone, G A; Candela, L; Ghiso, J; Castaño, E M; Frangione, B; Gorevic, P D

    1993-01-01

    We amplified DNA encoding the 3' 109 codons of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) inclusive of the beta protein (A beta) and cytoplasmic domains from cDNA using oligonucleotide primers designed to facilitate cloning into the T7 expression vector pT7Ad23K13. We also modified this construct to generate recombinant molecules incorporating two recently described APP mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. Both native C109 (deletion construct inclusive of the C-terminal 109 residues of APP) and constructs with a single mutation at codon 642 (T-->G, resulting in a substitution of glycine for valine) or a double mutation at codons 595 (G-->T, substituting asparagine for lysine) and 596 (A-->C, substituting leucine for methionine) were expressed in Escherichia coli to levels of 5-20% of total bacterial protein after induction. The major constituent of expressed C109 protein had an apparent molecular mass of 16-18 kDa by SDS/PAGE and appeared to be the full-length construct by size and N-terminal microsequencing. Also present was a 4-5 kDa species that co-purified with C109, constituting only approximately 1% of expressed protein, which was revealed by Western-blot analysis with antibodies specific for A beta epitopes and after biotinylation of purified recombinant C109. This fragment shared N-terminal sequence with, and appeared to arise by proteolysis of, full-length C109 in biosynthetic labelling experiments. C109 spontaneously precipitated after dialysis against NaCl or water, and with prolonged (> 20 weeks) standing was found by electron microscopy to contain a minor (< 5%) fibrillar component that was reactive with antibodies to a C-terminal epitope of APP. Recombinant C109 appears to duplicate some of the biochemical and physicochemical properties of C-terminal A beta-inclusive fragments of APP that have been found in transfected cells, brain cortex and cerebral microvessels. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID

  6. α-Helical to β-Helical Conformation Change in the C-Terminal of the Mammalian Prion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jesse; Whitford, Paul; Hayre, Natha; Cox, Daniel; Onuchic, José.

    2011-03-01

    We employ all-atom structure-based models with mixed basis contact maps to explore whether there are any significant geometric or energetic constraints limiting conjectured conformational transitions between the alpha-helical (α H) and the left handed beta helical (LHBH) conformations for the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. The LHBH structure has been proposed to describe infectious oligomers and one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self- templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Our results confirm that the kinetics of the conformation change are not strongely limited by large scale geometry modification and there exists an overall preference for the LHBH conformation.

  7. Dual-tagged amyloid-β precursor protein reveals distinct transport pathways of its N- and C-terminal fragments.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Christine; Muresan, Virgil; Ladescu Muresan, Zoia

    2014-03-15

    The amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a type I transmembrane protein genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease, has a complex biology that includes proteolytic processing into potentially toxic fragments, extensive trafficking and multiple, yet poorly-defined functions. We recently proposed that a significant fraction of APP is proteolytically cleaved in the neuronal soma into N- and C-terminal fragments (NTFs and CTFs), which then target independently of each other to separate destinations in the cell. Here, we prove this concept with live imaging and immunolocalization of two dual, N- and C-termini-tagged APP constructs: CFP-APP-YFP [containing the fluorescent tags, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)] and FLAG-APP-Myc. When expressed at low levels in neuronal cells, these constructs are processed into differently tagged NTFs and CTFs that reveal distinct distributions and characteristics of transport. Like the endogenous N- and C-terminal epitopes of APP, the FLAG-tagged NTFs are present in trains of vesicles and tubules that localize to short filaments, which often immunostain for acetylated tubulin, whereas the Myc-tagged CTFs are detected on randomly distributed vesicle-like structures. The experimental treatments that selectively destabilize the acetylated microtubules abrogate the distribution of NTFs along filaments, without altering the random distribution of CTFs. These results indicate that the NTFs and CTFs are recruited to distinct transport pathways and reach separate destinations in neurons, where they likely accomplish functions independent of the parental, full-length APP. They also point to a compartment associated with acetylated microtubules in the neuronal soma--not the neurite terminals--as a major site of APP cleavage, and segregation of NTFs from CTFs.

  8. The nine C-terminal residues of the grapevine fanleaf nepovirus movement protein are critical for systemic virus spread.

    PubMed

    Belin, C; Schmitt, C; Gaire, F; Walter, B; Demangeat, G; Pinck, L

    1999-06-01

    The grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) RNA2-encoded polyprotein P2 is proteolytically cleaved by the RNA1-encoded proteinase to yield protein 2A, 2B(MP) movement protein and 2C(CP) coat protein. To further investigate the role of the 2B(MP) and 2C(CP) proteins in virus movement, RNA2 was engineered by alternatively replacing the GFLV 2B(MP) and 2C(CP) genes with their counterparts from the closely related Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV). Transcripts of all chimeric RNA2s were able to replicate in Chenopodium quinoa protoplasts and form tubules in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts in the presence of the infectious transcript of GFLV RNA1. Virus particles were produced when the GFLV 2C(CP) gene was replaced with its ArMV counterpart, but systemic virus spread did not occur in C. quinoa plants. In addition, chimeric RNA2 containing the complete ArMV 2B(MP) gene was neither encapsidated nor infectious on plants, probably because polyprotein P2 was incompletely processed. However, chimeric RNA2 encoding ArMV 2B(MP), in which the nine C-terminal residues were those of GFLV 2B(MP), formed virus particles and were infectious in the presence of GFLV but not ArMV 2C(CP). These results suggest that the nine C-terminal residues of 2B(MP) must be of the same virus origin as the proteinase for efficient proteolytic processing of polyprotein P2 and from the same virus origin as the 2C(CP) for systemic virus spread.

  9. Simultaneous Site-Specific Dual Protein Labeling Using Protein Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Blanden, Melanie J; Sudheer, Ch; Gangopadhyay, Soumyashree A; Rashidian, Mohammad; Hougland, James L; Distefano, Mark D

    2015-12-16

    Site-specific protein labeling is an important technique in protein chemistry and is used for diverse applications ranging from creating protein conjugates to protein immobilization. Enzymatic reactions, including protein prenylation, have been widely exploited as methods to accomplish site-specific labeling. Enzymatic prenylation is catalyzed by prenyltransferases, including protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) and geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I), both of which recognize C-terminal CaaX motifs with different specificities and transfer prenyl groups from isoprenoid diphosphates to their respective target proteins. A number of isoprenoid analogues containing bioorthogonal functional groups have been used to label proteins of interest via PFTase-catalyzed reaction. In this study, we sought to expand the scope of prenyltransferase-mediated protein labeling by exploring the utility of rat GGTase-I (rGGTase-I). First, the isoprenoid specificity of rGGTase-I was evaluated by screening eight different analogues and it was found that those with bulky moieties and longer backbone length were recognized by rGGTase-I more efficiently. Taking advantage of the different substrate specificities of rat PFTase (rPFTase) and rGGTase-I, we then developed a simultaneous dual labeling method to selectively label two different proteins by using isoprenoid analogue and CaaX substrate pairs that were specific to only one of the prenyltransferases. Using two model proteins, green fluorescent protein with a C-terminal CVLL sequence (GFP-CVLL) and red fluorescent protein with a C-terminal CVIA sequence (RFP-CVIA), we demonstrated that when incubated together with both prenyltransferases and the selected isoprenoid analogues, GFP-CVLL was specifically modified with a ketone-functionalized analogue by rGGTase-I and RFP-CVIA was selectively labeled with an alkyne-containing analogue by rPFTase. By switching the ketone-containing analogue to an azide-containing analogue, it was

  10. Intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal domain of the Shaker voltage-activated K+ channel modulates its interaction with scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magidovich, Elhanan; Orr, Irit; Fass, Deborah; Abdu, Uri; Yifrach, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) with intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) protein, is mediated by the channel C-terminal segment. This interaction underlies Kv channel clustering at unique membrane sites and is important for the proper assembly and functioning of the synapse. In the current study, we address the molecular mechanism underlying Kv/PSD-95 interaction. We provide experimental evidence, based on hydrodynamic and spectroscopic analyses, indicating that the isolated C-terminal segment of the archetypical Shaker Kv channel (ShB-C) is a random coil, suggesting that ShB-C belongs to the recently defined class of intrinsically disordered proteins. We show that isolated ShB-C is still able to bind its scaffold protein partner and support protein clustering in vivo, indicating that unfoldedness is compatible with ShB-C activity. Pulldown experiments involving C-terminal chains differing in flexibility or length further demonstrate that intrinsic disorder in the C-terminal segment of the Shaker channel modulates its interaction with the PSD-95 protein. Our results thus suggest that the C-terminal domain of the Shaker Kv channel behaves as an entropic chain and support a “fishing rod” molecular mechanism for Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins. The importance of intrinsically disordered protein segments to the complex processes of synapse assembly, maintenance, and function is discussed. PMID:17666528

  11. NMR Determines Transient Structure and Dynamics in the Disordered C-Terminal Domain of WASp Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Haba, Noam Y.; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H.

    2013-01-01

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIPC, a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407–503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIPC and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR13C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, 15N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446–456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468–478. The 13C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIPC polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIPC. Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIPC fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function. PMID:23870269

  12. Citrate-capped gold nanoparticles for the label-free detection of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-1.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Srishti; Mishra, Priyanka; Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Moros, María; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Anindya, Roy

    2015-02-21

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-1 (UCH-L1) is a specific neuronal endoprotease that cleaves the specific peptide bond between ubiquitin molecules. UCH-L1 is released in serum and cerebrospinal fluid after severe brain injury and is considered to be an important biomarker of brain injury. A common polymorphism of UCH-L1 (S18Y) is also linked to a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease. In addition to its function in neuronal tissues, UCH-L1 may also play a part in the progression of certain non-neuronal cancers. UCH-L1 is highly expressed in primary lung tumors and colo-rectal cancers, suggesting a role in tumorigenesis. We report here the development of a sensitive and accurate UCH-L1 assay based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorbance of gold nanoparticles. We created a unique UCH-L1 substrate containing a ubiquitin molecule with two terminal thiol groups. This UCH-L1 substrate interacted with gold nanoparticles via the terminal thiol groups and induced clustering of the nanoparticles, which was detected by SPR absorbance at 650 nm. UCH-L1 proteolytically cleaved the substrate and the clustered gold nanoparticles were dispersed and could be detected by a shift in the SPR absorbance to 530 nm. This change in absorbance was proportional to the concentration of UCH-L1 and can be used for the quantification of functional UCH-L1. The currently available fluorescence-based UCH-L1 assay is affected by a high background signal and a poor detection limit, especially in the presence of serum. The assay reported here can detect concentrations of UCH-L1 as low as 20 ng ml(-1) (0.8 nM) and the presence of serum had no effect on the detection limit. This assay could be adapted for the rapid determination of the severity of brain injury and could also be applied to high-throughput screening of inhibitors of UCH-L1 enzymatic activity in Parkinson's disease and cancer.

  13. Solution structure of the c-terminal dimerization domain of SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein solved by the SAIL-NMR method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Chang, Chung-ke; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Chang, Yuan-hsiang; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-07-18

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid protein (NP) contains a potential RNA-binding region in its N-terminal portion and also serves as a dimerization domain by forming a homodimer with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. So far, the structure determination of the SARS-CoV NP CTD in solution has been impeded by the poor quality of NMR spectra, especially for aromatic resonances. We have recently developed the stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) method to overcome the size problem of NMR structure determination by utilizing a protein exclusively composed of stereo- and regio-specifically isotope-labeled amino acids. Here, we employed the SAIL method to determine the high-quality solution structure of the SARS-CoV NP CTD by NMR. The SAIL protein yielded less crowded and better resolved spectra than uniform (13)C and (15)N labeling, and enabled the homodimeric solution structure of this protein to be determined. The NMR structure is almost identical with the previously solved crystal structure, except for a disordered putative RNA-binding domain at the N-terminus. Studies of the chemical shift perturbations caused by the binding of single-stranded DNA and mutational analyses have identified the disordered region at the N-termini as the prime site for nucleic acid binding. In addition, residues in the beta-sheet region also showed significant perturbations. Mapping of the locations of these residues onto the helical model observed in the crystal revealed that these two regions are parts of the interior lining of the positively charged helical groove, supporting the hypothesis that the helical oligomer may form in solution.

  14. C-Terminal DxD-Containing Sequences within Paramyxovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins Determine Matrix Protein Compatibility and Can Direct Foreign Proteins into Budding Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxovirus particles are formed by a budding process coordinated by viral matrix (M) proteins. M proteins coalesce at sites underlying infected cell membranes and induce other viral components, including viral glycoproteins and viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), to assemble at these locations from which particles bud. M proteins interact with the nucleocapsid (NP or N) components of vRNPs, and these interactions enable production of infectious, genome-containing virions. For the paramyxoviruses parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and mumps virus, M-NP interaction also contributes to efficient production of virus-like particles (VLPs) in transfected cells. A DLD sequence near the C-terminal end of PIV5 NP protein was previously found to be necessary for M-NP interaction and efficient VLP production. Here, we demonstrate that 15-residue-long, DLD-containing sequences derived from either the PIV5 or Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein C-terminal ends are sufficient to direct packaging of a foreign protein, Renilla luciferase, into budding VLPs. Mumps virus NP protein harbors DWD in place of the DLD sequence found in PIV5 NP protein, and consequently, PIV5 NP protein is incompatible with mumps virus M protein. A single amino acid change converting DLD to DWD within PIV5 NP protein induced compatibility between these proteins and allowed efficient production of mumps VLPs. Our data suggest a model in which paramyxoviruses share an overall common strategy for directing M-NP interactions but with important variations contained within DLD-like sequences that play key roles in defining M/NP protein compatibilities. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are responsible for a wide range of diseases that affect both humans and animals. Paramyxovirus pathogens include measles virus, mumps virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, and the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Infectivity of paramyxovirus particles depends on matrix-nucleocapsid protein

  15. Expression vectors for C-terminal fusions with fluorescent proteins and epitope tags in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Candida glabrata is a haploid yeast considered the second most common of the Candida species found in nosocomial infections, accounting for approximately 18% of candidemias worldwide. Even though molecular biology methods are easily adapted to study this organism, there are not enough vectors that will allow probing the transcriptional and translational activity of any gene of interest in C. glabrata. In this work we have generated a set of expression vectors to systematically tag any gene of interest at the carboxy-terminus with three different fluorophores (CFP, YFP and mCherry) or three epitopes (HA, FLAG or cMyc) independently. This system offers the possibility to generate translational fusions in three versions: under the gene's own promoter integrated in its native locus in genome, on a replicative plasmid under its own promoter, or on a replicative plasmid under a strong promoter to overexpress the fusions. The expression of these translational fusions will allow determining the transcriptional and translational activity of the gene of interest as well as the intracellular localization of the protein. We have tested these expression vectors with two biosynthetic genes, HIS3 and TRP1. We detected fluorescence under the microscope and we were able to immunodetect the fusions using the three different versions of the system. These vectors permit coexpression of several different fusions simultaneously in the same cell, which will allow determining protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. This set of vectors adds a new toolbox to study expression and protein interactions in the fungal pathogen C. glabrata.

  16. CK2-dependent C-terminal phosphorylation at T{sup 30} directs the nuclear transport of TSPY protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, Roswitha; Aschrafi, Amaz; Hasguen, Dilek; Arnemann, Joachim |. E-mail: Joachim_Arnemann@web.de

    2006-03-10

    TSPY (testis-specific protein, Y-encoded) is a member of the greater SET/NAP family of molecules with various functions, e.g., in chromatin remodeling, regulation of gene expression, and has been implicated to play a role in the malignant development of gonadoblastoma, testicular and prostate cancer. Here we demonstrate that the C-terminus has a functional role for the nucleo-cytoplasmatic shuttling of the TSPY protein. Using various combinations of in vitro mutagenesis and enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene-expression experiments we were able to show that while the deletion of C-terminus leads to a decreased stability and enhanced degradation of the protein, the selective mutation of a C-terminal CK2 phosphorylation site (T{sup 30}) prevents the TSPY protein from entering the nucleus. We conclude that phosphorylation of the (T{sup 30}) residue is a necessary and functional prerequisite for TSPY's transport into the nucleus reminding of comparable data from a related Drosophila molecule, NAP1.

  17. XCTK1: A Xenopus C-terminal Kinesin-like Protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, Seth; Wilhelm, Heike; Sawyer, Alan; Karsenti, Eric; Mitchison, Tim; Walczak, Claire; Reinsch, Sigrid; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    XCTK1 is 97kDa kinesin-like protein homologous to FKIF2 and KIFC3. XCTK1 is present at picomolar levels in eggs, embryos and cultured cells in a soluble high-molecular weight complex that is not associated with membranes. XCKT1 localizes to centrosomes in Xenopus A6 cells. Anti-XCTK1 antibodies also localize to spindle poles when injected into A6 cells or when added to extracts during in vitro spindle assembly reactions. XCTK1 is associated with the center of taxol-induced microtubule asters in extracts. Therefore its localization to poles is dependent on microtubule minus-ends and not on centrosomes per se. Overexpression of XCTK1 leads to centrosome destruction in cultured cells. XCTK1 was tagged at either the N- or C-terminus and transfected into Xenopus A6 cells At low expression levels, XCTK1 associated with centrosomes. At higher levels, the protein localized to insoluble cytoplasmic structures. Gamma-tubulin staining was dramatically decreased from centrosomes or altogether absent. The centrosomal SPJ antigen colocalized with XCTK1-containing structures. Upon nocodozole treatment, microtubules failed to regrow from the centrosomes indicating that overexpression of XCTK1 severely compromises centrosomal function. Current studies are aimed at determining whether XCTK1 interacts directly with centrosomal proteins and to determine the effects of XCTK1 depletion on oocyte maturation and embryogenesis.

  18. PAAR-Rhs proteins harbor various C-terminal toxins to diversify the antibacterial pathways of type VI secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiale; Sun, Min; Dong, Wenyang; Pan, Zihao; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun

    2017-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) of bacteria plays a key role in competing for specific niches by the contact-dependent killing of competitors. Recently, Rhs proteins with polymorphic C-terminal toxin-domains that inhibit or kill neighboring cells were identified. In this report, we identified a novel Rhs with an MPTase4 (Metallopeptidase-4) domain (designated as Rhs-CT1) that showed an antibacterial effect via T6SS in Escherichia coli. We managed to develop a specific strategy by matching the diagnostic domain-architecture of Rhs-CT1 (Rhs with an N-terminal PAAR-motif and a C-terminal toxin domain) for effector retrieval and discovered a series of Rhs-CTs in E. coli. Indeed, the screened Rhs-CT3 with a REase-3 (Restriction endonuclease-3) domain also mediated interbacterial antagonism. Further analysis revealed that vgrGO1 and eagR/DUF1795 (upstream of rhs-ct) were required for the delivery of Rhs-CTs, suggesting eagR as a potential T6SS chaperone. In addition to chaperoned Rhs-CTs, neighborless Rhs-CTs could be classified into a distinct family (Rhs-Nb) sharing close evolutionary relationship with T6SS2-Rhs (encoded in the T6SS2 cluster of E. coli). Notably, the Rhs-Nb-CT5 was confirmed bioinformatically and experimentally to mediate interbacterial antagonism via Hcp2B-VgrG2 module. In a further retrieval analysis, we discovered various toxin/immunity pairs in extensive bacterial species that could be systematically classified into eight referential clans, suggesting that Rhs-CTs greatly diversify the antibacterial pathways of T6SS.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle.

  20. Role of the C-terminal extension peptide of plastid located glutamine synthetase from Medicago truncatula: Crucial for enzyme activity and needless for protein import into the plastids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria João; Vale, Diogo; Cunha, Luis; Melo, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in plant nitrogen metabolism, is encoded by a small family of highly homologous nuclear genes that produce cytosolic (GS1) and plastidic (GS2) isoforms. Compared to GS1, GS2 proteins have two extension peptides, one at the N- and the other at the C-terminus, which show a high degree of conservation among plant species. It has long been known that the N-terminal peptide acts as a transit peptide, targeting the protein to the plastids however, the function of the C-terminal extension is still unknown. To investigate whether the C-terminal extension influences the activity of the enzyme, we produced a C-terminal truncated version of Medicago truncatula GS2a in Escherechia coli and studied its catalytic properties. The activity of the truncated protein was found to be lower than that of MtGS2a and with less affinity for glutamate. The importance of the C-terminal extension for the protein import into the chloroplast was also assessed by transient expression of fluorescently-tagged MtGS2a truncated at the C-terminus, which was correctly detected in the chloroplast. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the C-terminal extension of M. truncatula GS2a is important for the activity of the enzyme and does not contain crucial information for the import process.

  1. The C-terminal Domain Supports a Novel Function for CETPI as a New Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Victor; Gutiérrez-Quintanar, Nadia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Described by our group a few years ago, the cholesteryl-ester transfer protein isoform (CETPI), exclusively expressed in the small intestine and present in human plasma, lacked a functional identification for a role of physiological relevance. Now, this study introduces CETPI as a new protein with the potential capability to recognise, bind and neutralise lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of CETPI showed that CETPI not only might interact with several LPS serotypes but also might displace LPS bound to the surface of cells. Peptide VSAK, derived from the last 18 residues of CETPI, protected against the cytotoxic effect of LPS on macrophages. At high concentrations, when different cell types were tested in culture, it did not exhibit cytotoxicity by itself and it did prevent the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the generation of oxidative stress conditions. In a rabbit model of septic shock, the infusion of peptide VSAK exerted a protective effect against the effects of LPS and reduced the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) in plasma. Therefore, CETPI is proposed as a new protein with the capability to advance the possibilities for better understanding and treatment of the dangerous effects of LPS in vivo. PMID:26537318

  2. Targeting of C-Terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) by ARF Results in p53-Independent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Seema; Pande, Sandhya; Kovi, Ramesh C.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Grossman, Steven R.

    2006-01-01

    ARF encodes a potent tumor suppressor that antagonizes MDM2, a negative regulator of p53. ARF also suppresses the proliferation of cells lacking p53, and loss of ARF in p53-null mice, compared with ARF or p53 singly null mice, results in a broadened tumor spectrum and decreased tumor latency. To investigate the mechanism of p53-independent tumor suppression by ARF, potential interacting proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid screen. The antiapoptotic transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) was identified, and ARF interactions with both CtBP1 and CtBP2 were confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Interaction with ARF resulted in proteasome-dependent CtBP degradation. Both ARF-induced CtBP degradation and CtBP small interfering RNA led to p53-independent apoptosis in colon cancer cells. ARF induction of apoptosis was dependent on its ability to interact with CtBP, and reversal of ARF-induced CtBP depletion by CtBP overexpression abrogated ARF-induced apoptosis. CtBP proteins represent putative targets for p53-independent tumor suppression by ARF. PMID:16508011

  3. P13, an Integral Membrane Protein of Borrelia burgdorferi, Is C-Terminally Processed and Contains Surface-Exposed Domains

    PubMed Central

    Noppa, Laila; Östberg, Yngve; Lavrinovicha, Marija; Bergström, Sven

    2001-01-01

    To elucidate antigens present on the bacterial surface of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato that may be involved in pathogenesis, we characterized a protein, P13, with an apparent molecular mass of 13 kDa. The protein was immunogenic and was expressed in large amounts during in vitro cultivation compared to other known antigens. An immunofluorescence assay, immunoelectron microscopy, and protease sensitivity assays indicated that P13 is surface exposed. The deduced sequence of the P13 peptide revealed a possible signal peptidase type I cleavage site, and computer analysis predicted that P13 is an integral membrane protein with three transmembrane-spanning domains. Mass spectrometry, in vitro translation, and N- and C-terminal amino acid sequencing analyses indicated that P13 was posttranslationally processed at both ends and modified by an unknown mechanism. Furthermore, p13 belongs to a gene family with five additional members in B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. The p13 gene is located on the linear chromosome of the bacterium, in contrast to five paralogous genes, which are located on extrachromosomal plasmids. The size of the p13 transcript was consistent with a monocistronic transcript. This new gene family may be involved in functions that are specific for this spirochete and its pathogenesis. PMID:11292755

  4. An antibody against a conserved C-terminal consensus motif from plant alternative oxidase (AOX) isoforms 1 and 2 label plastids in the explosive dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum, Santalaceae) fruit exocarp.

    PubMed

    Ross Friedman, Cynthia; Ross, Bradford N; Martens, Garnet D

    2013-02-01

    Dwarf mistletoes, genus Arceuthobium (Santalaceae), are parasitic angiosperms that spread their seeds by an explosive process. As gentle heating triggers discharge in the lab, we wondered if thermogenesis (endogenous heat production) is associated with dispersal. Thermogenesis occurs in many plants and is enabled by mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. The purpose of this study was to probe Arceuthobium americanum fruit (including seed tissues) collected over a 10-week period with an anti-AOX antibody/gold-labeled secondary antibody to determine if AOX could be localized in situ, and if so, quantitatively assess whether label distribution changed during development; immunochemical results were evaluated with Western blotting. No label could be detected in the mitochondria of any fruit or seed tissue, but was observed in fruit exocarp plastids of samples collected in the last 2 weeks of study; plastids collected in week 10 had significantly more label than week 9 (p = 0.002). Western blotting of whole fruit and mitochondrial proteins revealed a signal at 30-36 kD, suggestive of AOX, while blots of whole fruit (but not mitochondrial fraction) proteins showed a second band at 40-45 kD, in agreement with plastid terminal oxidases (PTOXs). AOX enzymes are likely present in the A. americanum fruit, even though they were not labeled in mitochondria. The results strongly indicate that the anti-AOX antibody was labeling PTOX in plastids, probably at a C-terminal region conserved in both enzymes. PTOX in plastids may be involved in fruit ripening, although a role for PTOX in thermogenesis cannot be eliminated.

  5. C-terminal, endoplasmic reticulum-lumenal domain of prosurfactant protein C - structural features and membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Casals, Cristina; Johansson, Hanna; Saenz, Alejandra; Gustafsson, Magnus; Alfonso, Carlos; Nordling, Kerstin; Johansson, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) constitutes the transmembrane part of prosurfactant protein C (proSP-C) and is alpha-helical in its native state. The C-terminal part of proSP-C (CTC) is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and binds to misfolded (beta-strand) SP-C, thereby preventing its aggregation and amyloid fibril formation. In this study, we investigated the structure of recombinant human CTC and the effects of CTC-membrane interaction on protein structure. CTC forms noncovalent trimers and supratrimeric oligomers. It contains two intrachain disulfide bridges, and its secondary structure is significantly affected by urea or heat only after disulfide reduction. The postulated Brichos domain of CTC, with homologs found in proteins associated with amyloid and proliferative disease, is up to 1000-fold more protected from limited proteolysis than the rest of CTC. The protein exposes hydrophobic surfaces, as determined by CTC binding to the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate). Fluorescence energy transfer experiments further reveal close proximity between bound 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate) and tyrosine residues in CTC, some of which are conserved in all Brichos domains. CTC binds to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with low micromolar dissociation constants, and differential scanning calorimetry and CD analyses indicate that membrane-bound CTC is less structurally ordered than the unbound protein. The exposed hydrophobic surfaces and the structural disordering that result from interactions with phospholipid membranes suggest a mechanism whereby CTC binds to misfolded SP-C in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  6. The C-terminal helices of heat shock protein 70 are essential for J-domain binding and ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Chao; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Wu, Meng; Cao, Chun-Yang; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-02-17

    The J-domain co-chaperones work together with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) chaperone to regulate many cellular events, but the mechanism underlying the J-domain-mediated HSP70 function remains elusive. We studied the interaction between human-inducible HSP70 and Homo sapiens J-domain protein (HSJ1a), a J domain and UIM motif-containing co-chaperone. The J domain of HSJ1a shares a conserved structure with other J domains from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, and it mediates the interaction with and the ATPase cycle of HSP70. Our in vitro study corroborates that the N terminus of HSP70 including the ATPase domain and the substrate-binding β-subdomain is not sufficient to bind with the J domain of HSJ1a. The C-terminal helical α-subdomain of HSP70, which was considered to function as a lid of the substrate-binding domain, is crucial for binding with the J domain of HSJ1a and stimulating the ATPase activity of HSP70. These fluctuating helices are likely to contribute to a proper conformation of HSP70 for J-domain binding other than directly bind with the J domain. Our findings provide an alternative mechanism of allosteric activation for functional regulation of HSP70 by its J-domain co-chaperones.

  7. Haemophilus influenzae protein E recognizes the C-terminal domain of vitronectin and modulates the membrane attack complex.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Jalalvand, Farshid; Mörgelin, Matthias; Zipfel, Peter; Blom, Anna M; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2011-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae protein E (PE) is a 16 kDa adhesin that induces a pro-inflammatory immune response in lung epithelial cells. The active epithelial binding region comprising amino acids PE 84-108 also interferes with complement-mediated bacterial killing by capturing vitronectin (Vn) that prevents complement deposition and formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Here, the interaction between PE and Vn was characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Protein E variants were produced both in soluble forms and in surface-expressed molecules on Escherichia coli. Mutations within PE(84-108) in the full-length molecule revealed that K85 and R86 residues were important for the Vn binding. Bactericidal activity against H. influenzae was higher in human serum pre-treated with full-length PE as compared with serum incubated with PE(K85E, R86D) , suggesting that PE quenched Vn. A series of truncated Vn molecules revealed that the C-terminal domain comprising Vn(353-363) harboured the major binding region for PE. Interestingly, MAC deposition was significantly higher on mutants devoid of PE due to a decreased Vn-binding capacity when compared with wild-type H. influenzae. Our results define a fine-tuned interaction between H. influenzae and the innate immune system, and identify the mode of control of the MAC that is important for pathogen complement evasion.

  8. Plasmids for C-terminal tagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain improved GFP proteins, Envy and Ivy.

    PubMed

    Slubowski, Christian J; Funk, Alyssa D; Roesner, Joseph M; Paulissen, Scott M; Huang, Linda S

    2015-04-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has become an invaluable tool in biological research. Many GFP variants have been created that differ in brightness, photostability, and folding robustness. We have created two hybrid GFP variants, Envy and Ivy, which we placed in a vector for the C-terminal tagging of yeast proteins by PCR-mediated recombination. The Envy GFP variant combines mutations found in the robustly folding SuperfolderGFP and GFPγ, while the Ivy GFP variant is a hybrid of GFPγ and the yellow-green GFP variant, Clover. We compared Envy and Ivy to EGFP, SuperfolderGFP and GFPγ and found that Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants at both 30°C and 37°C, while Ivy is the most photostable. Envy and Ivy are recognized by a commonly used anti-GFP antibody, and both variants can be immunoprecipitated using the GFP TRAP Camelidae antibody nanotrap technology. Because Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants and is as photostable as GFPγ, we suggest that Envy should be the preferred GFP variant, while Ivy may be used in cases where photostability is of the utmost importance.

  9. The ∼16 kDa C-Terminal Sequence of Clathrin Assembly Protein AP180 Is Essential for Efficient Clathrin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ling-Shan; Moshkanbaryans, Lia; Xue, Jing; Graham, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-specific AP180 is present in clathrin coats at equal concentration to the adapter complex, AP2, and assembles clathrin faster than any other protein in vitro. Both AP180 and its ubiquitously expressed homolog clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein (CALM) control vesicle size and shape in clathrin mediated endocytosis. The clathrin assembly role of AP180 is mediated by a long disordered C-terminal assembly domain. Within this assembly domain, a central acidic clathrin and adapter binding (CLAP) sub-domain contains all of the known short binding motifs for clathrin and AP2. The role of the remaining ∼16 kDa C-terminal sequence has not been clear. We show that this sequence has a separate function in ensuring efficient binding of clathrin, based on in vitro binding and ex vivo transferrin uptake assays. Sequence alignment suggests the C-terminal sub-domain is conserved in CALM. PMID:25329427

  10. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  11. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    PubMed

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  12. Alleles of the maize P gene with distinct tissue specificities encode Myb-homologous proteins with C-terminal replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1996-01-01

    The maize P gene is a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis in the pathway leading to the production of a red phlobaphene pigment. Multiple alleles of the P gene confer distinct patterns of pigmentation to specific floral organs, such as the kernel pericarp and cob tissues. To determine the basis of allele-specific pigmentation, we have characterized the gene products and transcript accumulation patterns of the P-wr allele, which specifies colorless pericarps and red cob tissues. RNA transcripts of P-wr are present in colorless pericarps as well as in the colored cob tissues; however, the expression of P-wr in pericarp does not induce the accumulation of transcripts from the C2 and A1 genes, which encode enzymes for flavonoid pigment biosynthesis. The coding sequences of P-wr were compared with the P-rr allele, which specifies red pericarp and red cob. The P-wr and P-rr cDNA sequences are very similar in their 5' regions. There are only two nucleotide changes that result in amino acid differences; both are outside of the Myb-homologous DNA binding domain. In contrast, the 3' coding region of P-rr is replaced by a unique 210-bp sequence in P-wr. The predicted P-wr protein has a C-terminal sequence resembling a cysteine-containing metal binding domain that is not present in the P-rr protein. These results indicate that the differential pericarp pigmentation specified by the P-rr and P-wr alleles does not result from an absence of P-wr transcripts in pericarps. Rather, the allele-specific patterns of P-rr and P-wr pigmentation may be associated with structural differences in the proteins encoded by each allele. PMID:8768374

  13. Multimodal Recognition of Diverse Peptides by the C-Terminal SH2 Domain of Phospholipase C-γ1 Protein.

    PubMed

    McKercher, Marissa A; Guan, Xiaoyang; Tan, Zhongping; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2017-04-11

    SH2 domains recognize phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptide ligands and play key roles in the regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase pathways. Each SH2 domain has individualized specificity, encoded in the amino acids neighboring the pY, for defined targets that convey their distinct functions. The C-terminal SH2 domain (PLCC) of the phospholipase C-γ1 full-length protein (PLCγ1) typically binds peptides containing small and hydrophobic amino acids adjacent to the pY, including a peptide derived from platelet-derived growth factor receptor B (PDGFRB) and an intraprotein recognition site (Y783 of PLCγ1) involved in the regulation of the protein's lipase activity. Remarkably, PLCC also recognizes unexpected peptides containing amino acids with polar or bulky side chains that deviate from this pattern. This versatility in recognition specificity may allow PLCγ1 to participate in diverse, previously unrecognized, signaling pathways in response to binding chemically dissimilar partners. We have used structural approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography, to elucidate the mechanisms of noncognate peptide binding to PLCC by ligands derived from receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB2 and from the insulin receptor. The high-resolution peptide-bound structures reveal that PLCC has a relatively static backbone but contains a chemically rich protein surface comprised of a combination of hydrophobic pockets and amino acids with charged side chains. We demonstrate that this expansive and chemically diverse PLCC interface, in addition to peptide conformational plasticity, permits PLCC to recognize specific noncognate peptide ligands with multimodal specificity.

  14. Extrusion of the C-terminal Helix in Navel Orangeworm Moth Pheromone-Binding Protein (AtraPBP1) Controls Pheromone Binding†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Xianzhong; Leal, Walter S.; Ames, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is an agricultural insect pest that can be controlled by disrupting male-female communication with sex pheromones, a technique known as mating disruption. Insect pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) provide fast transport of hydrophobic pheromones through aqueous sensillar lymph and promote sensitive delivery of pheromones to receptors. Here we present a mutational analysis on a PBP from Amyelois transitella (AtraPBP1) to evaluate how the C-terminal helix in this protein controls pheromone binding as a function of pH. Pheromone binds tightly to AtraPBP1 at neutral pH, but the binding is much weaker at pH below 5. Deletion of the entire C-terminal helix (residues 129–142) causes more than 100-fold increase in pheromone binding affinity at pH 5 and only a 1.5-fold increase at pH 7. A similar pH-dependent increase in pheromone binding is also seen for the H80A/H95A double mutant that promotes extrusion of the C-terminal helix by disabling salt bridges at each end of the helix. The single mutants (H80A and H95A) also exhibit pheromone binding at pH below 5, but with ~2-fold weaker affinity. NMR and circular dichroism data demonstrate a large overall structural change in each of these mutants at pH 4.5, indicating an extrusion of the C-terminal helix that profoundly affects the overall structure of the low pH form. Our results confirm that sequestration of the C-terminal helix at low pH as seen in the recent NMR structure may serve to block pheromone binding. We propose that extrusion of these C-terminal residues at neutral pH (or by the mutations in this study) exposes a hydrophobic cleft that promotes high affinity pheromone binding. PMID:21130734

  15. Extrusion of the C-terminal helix in navel orangeworm moth pheromone-binding protein (AtraPBP1) controls pheromone binding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Xianzhong; Leal, Walter S; Ames, James B

    2011-01-07

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is an agricultural insect pest that can be controlled by disrupting male-female communication with sex pheromones, a technique known as mating disruption. Insect pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) provide fast transport of hydrophobic pheromones through aqueous sensillar lymph and promote sensitive delivery of pheromones to receptors. Here we present a mutational analysis on a PBP from A. transitella (AtraPBP1) to evaluate how the C-terminal helix in this protein controls pheromone binding as a function of pH. Pheromone binds tightly to AtraPBP1 at neutral pH, but the binding is much weaker at pH below 5. Deletion of the entire C-terminal helix (residues 129-142) causes more than 100-fold increase in pheromone-binding affinity at pH 5 and only a 1.5-fold increase at pH 7. A similar pH-dependent increase in pheromone binding is also seen for the H80A/H95A double mutant that promotes extrusion of the C-terminal helix by disabling salt bridges at each end of the helix. The single mutants (H80A and H95A) also exhibit pheromone binding at pH below 5, but with ∼2-fold weaker affinity. NMR and circular dichroism data demonstrate a large overall structural change in each of these mutants at pH 4.5, indicating an extrusion of the C-terminal helix that profoundly affects the overall structure of the low pH form. Our results confirm that sequestration of the C-terminal helix at low pH as seen in the recent NMR structure may serve to block pheromone binding. We propose that extrusion of these C-terminal residues at neutral pH (or by the mutations in this study) exposes a hydrophobic cleft that promotes high affinity pheromone binding.

  16. Affinity labeling of lysine-149 in the anion-binding exosite of human. alpha. -thrombin with an N sup. alpha. -(dinitrofluorobenzyl)hirudin C-terminal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, P.; Maraganore, J.M. ); Fenton, J.W. II )

    1990-07-10

    In order to define structural regions in thrombin that interact with hirudin, the N{sup {alpha}}-dinitrofluorobenzyl analogue of an undecapeptide was synthesized corresponding to residues 54-64 of hirudin (GDFEEIPEEY(O{sup 35}SO{sub 3})L (DNFB-({sup 35}S)Hir{sub 54-64})). DNFB-({sup 35}S)Hir{sub 54-64} was reacted at a 10-fold molar excess with human {alpha}-thrombin in phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.4 and 23{degree}C for 18 h. Autoradiographs of the product in reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gels revealed a single {sup 35}S-labeled band of M{sub r} {approximately}32,500. The labeled product was coincident with a band on Coomassie Blue stained gels migrating slightly above an unlabeled thrombin band at M{sub r} {approximately}31,000. Incorporation of the {sup 35}S affinity reagent peptide was found markedly reduced when reaction with thrombin was performed in the presence of 5- and 20-fold molar excesses of unlabeled hirudin peptide, showing that a specific site was involved in complex formation. The human {alpha}-thrombin-DNFB-Hir{sub 54-64} complex was reduced, S-carboxymethylated, and treated with pepsin. Peptic fragments were separated by reverse-phase HPLC revealing two major peaks containing absorbance at 310 nm. Automated Edman degradation of the peptide fragments allowed identification of Lys-149 of human thrombin as the major site of DNFB-Hir{sub 54-64} derivatization. These data suggest that the anionic C-terminal tail of hirudin interacts with an anion-binding exosite in human thrombin removed 18-20 {angstrom} from the catalytic apparatus.

  17. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  18. The activity of protein phosphatase 5 towards native clients is modulated by the middle- and C-terminal domains of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Eckl, Julia M.; Drazic, Adrian; Rutz, Daniel A.; Lorenz, Oliver R.; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Kriehuber, Thomas; Lindemann, Claudia; Madl, Tobias; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 is involved in the regulation of kinases and transcription factors. The dephosphorylation activity is modulated by the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which binds to the TPR-domain of protein phosphatase 5. This interaction is dependent on the C-terminal MEEVD motif of Hsp90. We show that C-terminal Hsp90 fragments differ in their regulation of the phosphatase activity hinting to a more complex interaction. Also hydrodynamic parameters from analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest a compact structure for the Hsp90-protein phosphatase 5 complexes. Using crosslinking experiments coupled with mass spectrometric analysis and structural modelling we identify sites, which link the middle/C-terminal domain interface of C. elegans Hsp90 to the phosphatase domain of the corresponding kinase. Studying the relevance of the domains of Hsp90 for turnover of native substrates we find that ternary complexes with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are cooperatively formed by full-length Hsp90 and PPH-5. Our data suggest that the direct stimulation of the phosphatase activity by C-terminal Hsp90 fragments leads to increased dephosphorylation rates. These are further modulated by the binding of clients to the N-terminal and middle domain of Hsp90 and their presentation to the phosphatase within the phosphatase-Hsp90 complex. PMID:26593036

  19. Posttranslational processing of a new class of hydroxyproline-containing proteins. Prolyl hydroxylation and C-terminal cleavage of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) vacuolar chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sticher, L; Hofsteenge, J; Neuhaus, J M; Boller, T; Meins, F

    1993-04-01

    The fungicidal class I chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) are believed to be important in defending plants against microbial pathogens. The vacuolar isoforms of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), chitinases A and B, are the first examples of a new type of hydroxyproline-containing protein with intracellular location, enzymic activity, and a small number of hydroxyprolyl residues restricted to a single, short peptide sequence. We have investigated the posttranslational processing and intracellular transport of transgene-encoded chitinase A in callus cultures of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Havana 425 and leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris Spegazzini and Comes. Pulse-chase experiments and cell fractionation show that chitinase A is processed in two distinct steps. In the first step, the nascent protein undergoes an increase in apparent M(r) of approximately 1500 detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Experiments with the inhibitor of prolyl hydroxylation, alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl, and pulse-chase labeling of cells expressing recombinant forms of chitinase A indicate that the anomalous increase in M(r) is due to hydroxylation of prolyl residues. This step occurs in the endomembrane system before sorting for secretion and vacuolar transport and does not appear to be required for correct targeting of chitinase A to the vacuole. The second step is a proteolytic cleavage. Sequencing of tryptic peptides of the mature proteins indicates that during processing essentially all molecules of chitinase A and B lose a C-terminal heptapeptide, which has been shown to be a vacuolar targeting signal. This appears to occur primarily in the endomembrane system late in intracellular transport. A model for the posttranslational modification of chitinase A is proposed.

  20. Annexin A2 is a C-terminal PCSK9-binding protein that regulates endogenous low density lipoprotein receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Gaétan; Poirier, Steve; Seidah, Nabil G

    2008-11-14

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9 (PCSK9), which promotes degradation of the hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), is now recognized as a major player in plasma cholesterol metabolism. Several gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 cause hypercholesterolemia and premature atherosclerosis, and thus, inhibition of PCSK9-induced degradation of the LDLR may be used to treat this deadly disease. Herein, we discovered an endogenous PCSK9 binding partner by Far Western blotting, co-immunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. Following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrated that PCSK9 binds to a approximately 33-kDa protein identified as annexin A2 (AnxA2) but not to the closely related annexin A1. Furthermore, our functional LDLR assays and small hairpin RNA studies show that AnxA2 and the AnxA2.p11 complex could prevent PCSK9-directed LDLR degradation in HuH7, HepG2, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that PCSK9 and AnxA2 co-localize at the cell surface, indicating a possible competition with the LDLR. Structure-function analyses demonstrated that the C-terminal cysteine-histidine-rich domain of PCSK9 interacts specifically with the N-terminal repeat R1 of AnxA2. Mutational analysis of this 70-amino acid-long repeat indicated that the RRTKK81 sequence of AnxA2 is implicated in this binding because its mutation to AATAA81 prevents its interaction with PCSK9. To our knowledge, this work constitutes the first to show that PCSK9 activity on LDLR can be regulated by an endogenous inhibitor. The identification of the minimal inhibitory sequence of AnxA2 should pave the way toward the development of PCSK9 inhibitory lead molecules for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    SciTech Connect

    Pazehoski, Kristina O.; Cobine, Paul A.; Winzor, Donald J.; Dameron, Charles T.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate that the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.

  2. Crystal Structure of Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Ricin A Chain in Complex with the C-Terminal Peptide of the Ribosomal Stalk Protein P2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Wei; Tang, Yun-Sang; Sze, See-Yuen; Zhu, Zhen-Ning; Wong, Kam-Bo; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), containing a catalytic A chain and a lectin-like B chain. It inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the N-glycosidic bond at α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA, which thereby prevents the binding of elongation factors to the GTPase activation center of the ribosome. Here, we present the 1.6 Å crystal structure of Ricin A chain (RTA) complexed to the C-terminal peptide of the ribosomal stalk protein P2, which plays a crucial role in specific recognition of elongation factors and recruitment of eukaryote-specific RIPs to the ribosomes. Our structure reveals that the C-terminal GFGLFD motif of P2 peptide is inserted into a hydrophobic pocket of RTA, while the interaction assays demonstrate the structurally untraced SDDDM motif of P2 peptide contributes to the interaction with RTA. This interaction mode of RTA and P protein is in contrast to that with trichosanthin (TCS), Shiga-toxin (Stx) and the active form of maize RIP (MOD), implying the flexibility of the P2 peptide-RIP interaction, for the latter to gain access to ribosome. PMID:27754366

  3. Chimeras between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal that their C-terminal domains interact with uracil DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Handa, P; Acharya, N; Varshney, U

    2001-05-18

    Uracil, a promutagenic base in DNA can arise by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or incorporation of dUMP by DNA polymerase. Uracil is removed from DNA by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), the first enzyme in the uracil excision repair pathway. We recently reported that the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) facilitated uracil excision from certain structured substrates by E. coli UDG (EcoUDG) and suggested the existence of interaction between SSB and UDG. In this study, we have made use of the chimeric proteins obtained by fusion of N- and C-terminal domains of SSBs from E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis to investigate interactions between SSBs and UDGs. The EcoSSB or a chimera containing its C-terminal domain interacts with EcoUDG in a binary (SSB-UDG) or a ternary (DNA-SSB-UDG) complex. However, the chimera containing the N-terminal domain from EcoSSB showed no interactions with EcoUDG. Thus, the C-terminal domain (48 amino acids) of EcoSSB is necessary and sufficient for interaction with EcoUDG. The data also suggest that the C-terminal domain (34 amino acids) of MtuSSB is a predominant determinant for mediating its interaction with MtuUDG. The mechanism of how the interactions between SSB and UDG could be important in uracil excision repair pathway has been discussed.

  4. Biophysical Characterization of Essential Phosphorylation at the Flexible C-Terminal Region of C-Raf with 14-3-3ζ Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Nilanjan; Mroue, Kamal H.; Kar, Rajiv K.; Mandal, Atin K.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation at the C-terminal flexible region of the C-Raf protein plays an important role in regulating its biological activity. Auto-phosphorylation at serine 621 (S621) in this region maintains C-Raf stability and activity. This phosphorylation mediates the interaction between C-Raf and scaffold protein 14-3-3ζ to activate the downstream MEK kinase pathway. In this study, we have defined the interaction of C-terminal peptide sequence of C-Raf with 14-3-3ζ protein and determined the possible structural adaptation of this region. Biophysical elucidation of the interaction was carried out using phosphopeptide (residue number 615–630) in the presence of 14-3-3ζ protein. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a high binding affinity with micro-molar range was found to exist between the peptide and 14-3-3ζ protein, whereas the non-phosphorylated peptide did not show any appreciable binding affinity. Further interaction details were investigated using several biophysical techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in addition to molecular modeling. This study provides the molecular basis for C-Raf C-terminal-derived phosphopeptide interaction with 14-3-3ζ protein as well as structural insights responsible for phosphorylated S621-mediated 14-3-3ζ binding at an atomic resolution. PMID:26295714

  5. Roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of mammalian mitochondrial initiation factor 3 in protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Emdadul; Spremulli, Linda L

    2008-12-26

    Bacterial initiation factor 3 (IF3) is organized into N- and C-domains separated by a linker. Mitochondrial IF3 (IF3(mt)) has a similar domain organization, although both domains have extensions not found in the bacterial factors. Constructs of the N- and C-domains of IF3(mt) with and without the connecting linker were prepared. The K(d) values for the binding of full-length IF3(mt) and its C-domain with and without the linker to mitochondrial 28S subunits are 30, 60, and 95 nM, respectively, indicating that much of the ribosome binding interactions are mediated by the C-domain. However, the N-domain binds to 28S subunits with only a 10-fold lower affinity than full-length IF3(mt). This observation indicates that the N-domain of IF3(mt) has significant contacts with the protein-rich small subunit of mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes. The linker also plays a role in modulating the interactions between the 28S subunit and the factor; it is not just a physical connector between the two domains. The presence of the two domains and the linker may optimize the overall affinity of IF3(mt) for the ribosome. These results are in sharp contrast to observations with Escherichia coli IF3. Removal of the N-domain drastically reduces the activity of IF3(mt) in the dissociation of mitochondrial 55S ribosomes, although the C-domain itself retains some activity. This residual activity depends significantly on the linker region. The N-domain alone has no effect on the dissociation of ribosomes. Full-length IF3(mt) reduces the binding of fMet-tRNA to the 28S subunit in the absence of mRNA. Both the C-terminal extension and the linker are required for this effect. IF3(mt) promotes the formation of a binary complex between IF2(mt) and fMet-tRNA that may play an important role in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Both domains play a role promoting the formation of this complex.

  6. C-terminal processing of reaction center protein D1 is essential for the function and assembly of photosystem II in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yufen; Fu, Aigen; Hou, Xin; McDonald, Kent; Buchanan, Bob B.; Huang, Weidong; Luan, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein D1 is synthesized as a precursor (pD1) with a short C-terminal extension. The pD1 is processed to mature D1 by carboxyl-terminal peptidase A to remove the C-terminal extension and form active protein. Here we report functional characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding D1 C-terminal processing enzyme (AtCtpA) in the chloroplast thylakoid lumen. Recombinant AtCtpA converted pD1 to mature D1 and a mutant lacking AtCtpA retained all D1 in precursor form, confirming that AtCtpA is solely responsible for processing. As with cyanobacterial ctpa, a knockout Arabidopsis atctpa mutant was lethal under normal growth conditions but was viable with sucrose under low-light conditions. Viable plants, however, showed deficiencies in PSII and thylakoid stacking. Surprisingly, unlike its cyanobacterial counterpart, the Arabidopsis mutant retained both monomer and dimer forms of the PSII complexes that, although nonfunctional, contained both the core and extrinsic subunits. This mutant was also essentially devoid of PSII supercomplexes, providing an unexpected link between D1 maturation and supercomplex assembly. A knock-down mutant expressing about 2% wild-type level of AtCtpA showed normal growth under low light but was stunted and accumulated pD1 under high light, indicative of delayed C-terminal processing. Although demonstrating the functional significance of C-terminal D1 processing in PSII biogenesis, our study reveals an unsuspected link between D1 maturation and PSII supercomplex assembly in land plants, opening an avenue for exploring the mechanism for the association of light-harvesting complexes with the PSII core complexes. PMID:24043802

  7. IN VITRO EVOLUTION OF AN HIV INTEGRASE BINDING PROTEIN FROM A LIBRARY OF C-TERMINAL DOMAIN γS-CRYSTALLIN VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Issa S.; Verde, Shawn C.; Overstreet, Cathie M.; Robinson, W. Edward; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    A protein without natural binding functions was engineered to bind HIV-1 integrase. Phage display selections applied a library of variants based on the C-terminal domain of the eye lens protein human γS-crystallin. Multiple loop regions were altered to encode libraries with ≈3.6×1011 different variants. A crystallin variant, termed Integrase-Binding Protein-10 (IBP-10), inhibits integrase catalysis with nanomolar Ki values. IBP-10 interacts with the integrase C-terminal domain and inhibits integrase substrate affinity. This allosteric mechanism allows IBP-10 to inhibit drug resistant integrase variants. The results demonstrate the applicability of the crystallin scaffold for the discovery of binding partners and enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22858140

  8. Both the P and V proteins of the porcine rubulavirus LPMV interact with the NP protein via their respective C-terminal unique parts.

    PubMed

    Svenda, Martin; Hjertner, Bernt; Linné, Tommy; Berg, Mikael

    2002-02-26

    In this paper we show that the porcine rubulavirus LPMV phosphoprotein (P) and V protein (V) both interact with the nucleoprotein (NP). There are also indications for an interaction between P and V with L protein. Further analysis of the domains of the P and V which are necessary for interaction with the NP protein demonstrates that the interaction is not mediated from their common part but instead from their unique C-terminal parts, respectively. The common N-terminus of P and V appear to mediate the interaction with L. We also map the regions of NP that are necessary for interaction with P and V, respectively. Both P and V interact with regions of NP, which reside in the N-terminal part but appear not to overlap.

  9. Expression, Purification And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of An Arginine Repressor Protein From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.J.; Garen, C.R.; Cherney, M.M.; Cherney, L.T.; Lee, C.; James, M.N.J.

    2009-06-03

    The gene product of an open reading frame Rv1657 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a putative arginine repressor protein (ArgR), a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of arginine-biosynthetic enzymes. Rv1657 was expressed and purified and a C-terminal domain was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed to a resolution of 2.15 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group P1 and the Matthews coefficient suggests that the crystals contain six C-terminal domain molecules per unit cell. Previous structural and biochemical studies on the arginine repressor proteins from other organisms have likewise shown the presence of six molecules per unit cell.

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus ZEBRA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Morand, Patrice; Budayova-Spano, Monika; Perrissin, Monique; Müller, Christoph W. Petosa, Carlo

    2006-03-01

    A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus lytic switch protein ZEBRA has been crystallized in complex with DNA. A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus immediate-early transcription factor ZEBRA has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The fragment behaves as a dimer in solution, consistent with the presence of a basic region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain. Crystals of the fragment in complex with a DNA duplex were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 4000 and magnesium acetate as crystallization agents. Crystals diffract to better than 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.976 Å). Crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.2, b = 26.5, c = 98.1 Å, β = 103.9°.

  11. Structures of the nucleoid occlusion protein SlmA bound to DNA and the C-terminal domain of the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by FtsZ, which polymerizes to create the cytokinetic Z ring. Multiple FtsZ-binding proteins regulate FtsZ polymerization to ensure the proper spatiotemporal formation of the Z ring at the division site. The DNA-binding protein SlmA binds to FtsZ and prevents Z-ring formation through the nucleoid in a process called “nucleoid occlusion” (NO). As do most FtsZ-accessory proteins, SlmA interacts with the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) that is connected to the FtsZ core by a long, flexible linker. However, SlmA is distinct from other regulatory factors in that it must be DNA-bound to interact with the FtsZ CTD. Few structures of FtsZ regulator–CTD complexes are available, but all reveal the CTD bound as a helix. To deduce the molecular basis for the unique SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD regulatory interaction and provide insight into FtsZ–regulator protein complex formation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, and Klebsiella pneumonia SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD ternary complexes. Strikingly, the FtsZ CTD does not interact with SlmA as a helix but binds as an extended conformation in a narrow, surface-exposed pocket formed only in the DNA-bound state of SlmA and located at the junction between the DNA-binding and C-terminal dimer domains. Binding studies are consistent with the structure and underscore key interactions in complex formation. Combined, these data reveal the molecular basis for the SlmA–DNA–FtsZ interaction with implications for SlmA’s NO function and underscore the ability of the FtsZ CTD to adopt a wide range of conformations, explaining its ability to bind diverse regulatory proteins. PMID:27091999

  12. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  13. Role of the C-terminal basic amino acids and the lipid anchor of the Gγ2 protein in membrane interactions and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Salvà, Maria A; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martin, M Laura; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Bergo, Martin O; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-02-21

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are peripheral membrane proteins that frequently localize to the plasma membrane where their presence in molar excess over G protein coupled receptors permits signal amplification. Their distribution is regulated by protein-lipid interactions, which has a clear influence on their activity. Gβγ dimer drives the interaction between G protein heterotrimers with cell membranes. We focused our study on the role of the C-terminal region of the Gγ2 protein in G protein interactions with cell membranes. The Gγ2 subunit is modified at cysteine (Cys) 68 by the addition of an isoprenyl lipid, which is followed by the proteolytic removal of the last three residues that leaves an isoprenylated and carboxyl methylated Cys-68 as the terminal amino acid. The role of Cys isoprenylation of the CAAX box has been defined for other proteins, yet the importance of proteolysis and carboxyl methylation of isoprenylated proteins is less clear. Here, we showed that not only geranylgeranylation but also proteolysis and carboxyl methylation are essential for the correct localization of Gγ2 in the plasma membrane. Moreover, we showed the importance of electrostatic interactions between the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane and the positively charged C-terminal domain of the Gγ2 subunit (amino acids Arg-62, Lys-64 and Lys-65) as a second signal to reach the plasma membrane. Indeed, single or multiple point mutations at Gγ2 C-terminal amino acids have a significant effect on Gγ2 protein-plasma membrane interactions and its localization to charged Ld (liquid disordered) membrane microdomains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo Escríba-Ruíz.

  14. Amyloidogenic properties of a D/N mutated 12 amino acid fragment of the C-terminal domain of the Cholesteryl-Ester Transfer Protein (CETP).

    PubMed

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) facilitates the transfer of cholesterol esters and triglycerides between lipoproteins in plasma where the critical site for its function is situated in the C-terminal domain. Our group has previously shown that this domain presents conformational changes in a non-lipid environment when the mutation D(470)N is introduced. Using a series of peptides derived from this C-terminal domain, the present study shows that these changes favor the induction of a secondary β-structure as characterized by spectroscopic analysis and fluorescence techniques. From this type of secondary structure, the formation of peptide aggregates and fibrillar structures with amyloid characteristics induced cytotoxicity in microglial cells in culture. These supramolecular structures promote cell cytotoxicity through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and change the balance of a series of proteins that control the process of endocytosis, similar to that observed when β-amyloid fibrils are employed. Therefore, a fine balance between the highly dynamic secondary structure of the C-terminal domain of CETP, the net charge, and the physicochemical characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment define the type of secondary structure acquired. Changes in this balance might favor misfolding in this region, which would alter the lipid transfer capacity conducted by CETP, favoring its propensity to substitute its physiological function.

  15. A C-terminal translocation signal required for Dot/Icm-dependent delivery of the Legionella RalF protein to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hiroki; Cambronne, Eric D.; Kagan, Jonathan C.; Amor, Juan Carlos; Kahn, Richard A.; Roy, Craig R.

    2005-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm system is a type IV secretion apparatus that transfers bacterial proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The RalF protein is a substrate engaged and translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. In this study, the mechanism of Dot/Icm-mediated translocation of RalF has been investigated. It was determined that RalF translocation into host cells occurs before bacterial internalization. Sequences essential for RalF translocation were located at the C terminus of the RalF protein. A fusion protein consisting of a 20-aa C-terminal RalF peptide appended to the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase protein was translocated into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. A leucine (L372) residue at the -3 position in relation to the RalF C terminus was critical for translocation. Consistent with RalF L372 playing an important role in substrate recognition by the Dot/Icm system, most other Dot/Icm substrates were found to have amino acid residues with similar physical properties at their -3 or -4 C-terminal positions. These data demonstrate that the Dot/Icm system can transfer bacterial proteins that modulate host cellular functions before uptake and indicate that substrate recognition involves a C-terminal translocation signal. Thus, Legionella has the ability to engage synthesized substrate proteins and transfer them into host cells on contact, enabling Legionella to rapidly alter transport of the vacuole in which it resides. PMID:15613486

  16. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  17. Deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of cucumber mosaic virus movement protein enables a chimeric brome mosaic virus to move from cell to cell.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Okuno, T; Mise, K; Furusawa, I

    1997-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) gene of brome mosaic virus (BMV) was precisely replaced with that of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infectivity tests of the chimeric BMV on Chenopodium quinoa, a permissive host for cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV, showed that the chimeric BMV failed to move from cell to cell even though it replicated in protoplasts. A spontaneous mutant of the chimeric BMV that displayed cell-to-cell movement was subsequently obtained from a local lesion during one of the experiments. A cloned cDNA representing the genomic RNA encoding the MP of the chimeric BMV mutant was analyzed and found to contain a mutation in the CMV MP gene resulting in deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the MP. Directed mutagenesis of the CMV MP gene showed that the C-terminal deletion was responsible for the movement capability of the mutant. When the mutation was introduced into CMV, the CMV mutant moved from cell to cell in C. quinoa, though the movement was less efficient than that of the wild-type CMV. These results indicate that the CMV MP, except the C-terminal 33 amino acids, potentiates cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV in C. quinoa. In addition, since C. quinoa is a common host for both BMV and CMV, these results suggest that the CMV MP has specificity for the viral genomes during cell-to-cell movement of the virus and that the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the CMV MP are involved in that specificity. PMID:9032362

  18. The 60-kilodalton protein encoded by orf2 in the cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan functions like a C-terminal crystallization domain.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar; Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K; Federici, Brian A

    2012-03-01

    The cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan encodes two proteins, mosquitocidal Cry19A (ORF1; 75 kDa) and an ORF2 (60 kDa) of unknown function. Expression of the cry19A operon in an acrystalliferous strain of B. thuringiensis (4Q7) yielded one small crystal per cell, whereas no crystals were produced when cry19A or orf2 was expressed alone. To determine the function of the ORF2 protein, different combinations of Cry19A, ORF2, and the N- or C-terminal half of Cry1C were synthesized in strain 4Q7. Stable crystalline inclusions of these fusion proteins similar in shape to those in the strain harboring the wild-type operon were observed in sporulating cells. Comparative analysis showed that ORF2 shares considerable amino acid sequence identity with the C-terminal region of large Cry proteins. Together, these results suggest that ORF2 assists in synthesis and crystallization of Cry19A by functioning like the C-terminal domain characteristic of Cry protein in the 130-kDa mass range. In addition, to determine whether overexpression of the cry19A operon stabilized its shape and increased Cry19A yield, it was expressed under the control of the strong chimeric cyt1A-p/STAB-SD promoter. Interestingly, in contrast to the expression seen with the native promoter, overexpression of the operon yielded uniform bipyramidal crystals that were 4-fold larger on average than the wild-type crystal. In bioassays using the 4th instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, the strain producing the larger Cry19A crystal showed moderate larvicidal activity that was 4-fold (95% lethal concentration [LC(95)] = 1.9 μg/ml) more toxic than the activity produced in the strain harboring the wild-type operon (LC(95) = 8.2 μg/ml).

  19. Human Gpn1 purified from bacteria binds guanine nucleotides and hydrolyzes GTP as a protein dimer stabilized by its C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Romero, Violeta; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A; Calera, Mónica R; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The essential GTPase Gpn1 mediates RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting and controls microtubule dynamics in yeast and human cells by molecular mechanisms still under investigation. Here, we purified human HisGpn1 expressed as a recombinant protein in bacteria E. coli BL-21 (DE3). Affinity purified HisGpn1 eluted from a size exclusion column as a protein dimer, a state conserved after removing the hexa-histidine tail and confirmed by separating HisGpn1 in native gels, and in dynamic light scattering experiments. Human HisGpn1 purity was higher than 95%, molecularly monodisperse and could be concentrated to more than 10 mg/mL without aggregating. Circular dichroism spectra showed that human HisGpn1 was properly folded and displayed a secondary structure rich in alpha helices. HisGpn1 effectively bound GDP and the non-hydrolyzable GTP analogue GMPPCP, and hydrolyzed GTP. We next tested the importance of the C-terminal tail, present in eukaryotic Gpn1 but not in the ancestral archaeal Gpn protein, on HisGpn1 dimer formation. C-terminal deleted human HisGpn1 (HisGpn1ΔC) was also purified as a protein dimer, indicating that the N-terminal GTPase domain contains the interaction surface needed for dimer formation. In contrast to HisGpn1, however, HisGpn1ΔC dimer spontaneously dissociated into monomers. In conclusion, we have developed a method to purify properly folded and functionally active human HisGpn1 from bacteria, and showed that the C-terminal tail, universally conserved in all eukaryotic Gpn1 orthologues, stabilizes the GTPase domain-mediated Gpn1 protein dimer. The availability of recombinant human Gpn1 will open new research avenues to unveil the molecular and pharmacological properties of this essential GTPase.

  20. The 60-Kilodalton Protein Encoded by orf2 in the cry19A Operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan Functions Like a C-Terminal Crystallization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barboza-Corona, J. Eleazar; Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    The cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan encodes two proteins, mosquitocidal Cry19A (ORF1; 75 kDa) and an ORF2 (60 kDa) of unknown function. Expression of the cry19A operon in an acrystalliferous strain of B. thuringiensis (4Q7) yielded one small crystal per cell, whereas no crystals were produced when cry19A or orf2 was expressed alone. To determine the function of the ORF2 protein, different combinations of Cry19A, ORF2, and the N- or C-terminal half of Cry1C were synthesized in strain 4Q7. Stable crystalline inclusions of these fusion proteins similar in shape to those in the strain harboring the wild-type operon were observed in sporulating cells. Comparative analysis showed that ORF2 shares considerable amino acid sequence identity with the C-terminal region of large Cry proteins. Together, these results suggest that ORF2 assists in synthesis and crystallization of Cry19A by functioning like the C-terminal domain characteristic of Cry protein in the 130-kDa mass range. In addition, to determine whether overexpression of the cry19A operon stabilized its shape and increased Cry19A yield, it was expressed under the control of the strong chimeric cyt1A-p/STAB-SD promoter. Interestingly, in contrast to the expression seen with the native promoter, overexpression of the operon yielded uniform bipyramidal crystals that were 4-fold larger on average than the wild-type crystal. In bioassays using the 4th instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, the strain producing the larger Cry19A crystal showed moderate larvicidal activity that was 4-fold (95% lethal concentration [LC95] = 1.9 μg/ml) more toxic than the activity produced in the strain harboring the wild-type operon (LC95 = 8.2 μg/ml). PMID:22247140

  1. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  2. GlyGly-CTERM and Rhombosortase: A C-Terminal Protein Processing Signal in a Many-to-One Pairing with a Rhomboid Family Intramembrane Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Varghese, Neha

    2011-01-01

    The rhomboid family of serine proteases occurs in all domains of life. Its members contain at least six hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices, with an active site serine located deep within the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane. The model member GlpG from Escherichia coli is heavily studied through engineered mutant forms, varied model substrates, and multiple X-ray crystal studies, yet its relationship to endogenous substrates is not well understood. Here we describe an apparent membrane anchoring C-terminal homology domain that appears in numerous genera including Shewanella, Vibrio, Acinetobacter, and Ralstonia, but excluding Escherichia and Haemophilus. Individual genomes encode up to thirteen members, usually homologous to each other only in this C-terminal region. The domain's tripartite architecture consists of motif, transmembrane helix, and cluster of basic residues at the protein C-terminus, as also seen with the LPXTG recognition sequence for sortase A and the PEP-CTERM recognition sequence for exosortase. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling identifies a distinctive rhomboid-like protease subfamily almost perfectly co-distributed with this recognition sequence. This protease subfamily and its putative target domain are hereby renamed rhombosortase and GlyGly-CTERM, respectively. The protease and target are encoded by consecutive genes in most genomes with just a single target, but far apart otherwise. The signature motif of the Rhombo-CTERM domain, often SGGS, only partially resembles known cleavage sites of rhomboid protease family model substrates. Some protein families that have several members with C-terminal GlyGly-CTERM domains also have additional members with LPXTG or PEP-CTERM domains instead, suggesting there may be common themes to the post-translational processing of these proteins by three different membrane protein superfamilies. PMID:22194940

  3. Screening of hepatocyte proteins binding with C-terminally truncated surface antigen middle protein of hepatitis B virus (MHBst167) by a yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHI QUN; LINGHU, ENQIANG; JUN, WAN; CHENG, JUN

    2014-01-01

    The function of middle hepatitis B surface protein C-terminally truncated at amino acid position 167 (MHBst167) is not currently clear. This study aimed to screen and identify the proteins that interact with MHBst167 in hepatocytes using a yeast two-hybrid system, and to explore the effects of MHBst167 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and precancerous diseases of the liver. The MHBst167 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a pGEM-T vector. The target region was sequenced and the constructed bait plasmid, pGBKT7-MHBst167, was transformed into AH109 yeast cells. The transformed AH109 cells were then mated with Y187 yeast cells containing the fetal liver cDNA library plasmid using a yeast two-hybrid system. The false positives were eliminated and the true positive clones were selected by PCR and sequencing analysis. The pGBKT7-MHBst167 bait plasmid was successfully constructed and 66 clones grew in the selective synthetic defined media lacking leucine, tryptophan, histidine and adenine. Fifty-two clones were identified following X-α-Gal selection and segregation analysis. Seven proteins were found to be expressed that could interact with MHBst167 in hepatocytes by the yeast two-hybrid system. These results have provided novel insights into the biological functions of MHBst167. PMID:24968805

  4. The Crystal Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of the Salmonella enterica PduO Protein: An Old Fold with a New Heme-Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Hickey, Neal; Hensel, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Geremia, Silvano; Tiufiakova, Tatiana; Torda, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    The two-domain protein PduO, involved in 1,2-propanediol utilization in the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica is an ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, but this is a function of the N-terminal domain alone. The role of its C-terminal domain (PduOC) is, however, unknown. In this study, comparative growth assays with a set of Salmonella mutant strains showed that this domain is necessary for effective in vivo catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. It was also shown that isolated, recombinantly-expressed PduOC binds heme in vivo. The structure of PduOC co-crystallized with heme was solved (1.9 Å resolution) showing an octameric assembly with four heme moieities. The four heme groups are highly solvent-exposed and the heme iron is hexa-coordinated with bis-His ligation by histidines from different monomers. Static light scattering confirmed the octameric assembly in solution, but a mutation of the heme-coordinating histidine caused dissociation into dimers. Isothermal titration calorimetry using the PduOC apoprotein showed strong heme binding (Kd = 1.6 × 10−7 M). Biochemical experiments showed that the absence of the C-terminal domain in PduO did not affect adenosyltransferase activity in vitro. The evidence suggests that PduOC:heme plays an important role in the set of cobalamin transformations required for effective catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. Salmonella PduO is one of the rare proteins which binds the redox-active metabolites heme and cobalamin, and the heme-binding mode of the C-terminal domain differs from that in other members of this protein family. PMID:27446048

  5. Cooperation of the N-terminal Helicase and C-terminal endonuclease activities of Archaeal Hef protein in processing stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kayoko; Hidaka, Masumi; Horiuchi, Takashi; Fujikane, Ryosuke; Shinagawa, Hideo; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2004-12-17

    Blockage of replication fork progression often occurs during DNA replication, and repairing and restarting stalled replication forks are essential events in all organisms for the maintenance of genome integrity. The repair system employs processing enzymes to restore the stalled fork. In Archaea Hef is a well conserved protein that specifically cleaves nicked, flapped, and fork-structured DNAs. This enzyme contains two distinct domains that are similar to the DEAH helicase family and XPF nuclease superfamily proteins. Analyses of truncated mutant proteins consisting of each domain revealed that the C-terminal nuclease domain independently recognized and incised fork-structured DNA. The N-terminal helicase domain also specifically unwound fork-structured DNA and Holliday junction DNA in the presence of ATP. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of the whole Hef protein was clearly stimulated by ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the N-terminal domain. These enzymatic properties suggest that Hef efficiently resolves stalled replication forks by two steps, which are branch point transfer to the 5'-end of the nascent lagging strand by the N-terminal helicase followed by template strand incision for leading strand synthesis by the C-terminal endonuclease.

  6. Cloning, mapping, and characterization of the Escherichia coli prc gene, which is involved in C-terminal processing of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, H; Yamamoto, Y; Higashitani, A; Suzuki, H; Nishimura, Y

    1991-01-01

    The prc gene, which is involved in cleavage of the C-terminal peptide from the precursor form of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP 3) of Escherichia coli, was cloned and mapped at 40.4 min on the chromosome. The gene product was identified as a protein of about 80 kDa in maxicell and in vitro systems. Fractionation of the maxicells producing the product suggested that the product was associated with the periplasmic side of the cytoplasmic membrane. This was consistent with the notion that the C-terminal processing of PBP 3 probably occurs outside the cytoplasmic membrane: the processing was found to be dependent on the secY and secA functions, indicating that the prc product or PBP 3 or both share the translocation machinery with other extracytoplasmic proteins. DNA sequencing analysis of the prc gene region identified an open reading frame, with two possible translational starts 6 bp apart from each other, that could code for a product with a calculated molecular weight of 76,667 or 76,432. The prc mutant was sensitive to thermal and osmotic stresses. Southern analysis of the chromosomal DNA of the mutant unexpectedly revealed that the mutation was a deletion of the entire prc gene and thus that the prc gene is conditionally dispensable. The mutation resulted in greatly reduced heat shock response at low osmolarity and in leakage of periplasmic proteins. Images PMID:1856173

  7. Three-dimensional studies of pathogenic peptides from the c-terminal of Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins and their interaction with a monoclonal antibody structural model.

    PubMed

    Martín, Osvaldo A; Villegas, Myriam E; Aguilar, Carlos F

    2009-05-27

    The acidic C-terminal peptides from Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins are the major target of the antibody response in patients suffering Chagas chronic heart disease. It has been proposed that the disease is triggered by the cross-reaction of these antibodies with the second extra cellular loop of the beta1-adrenoreceptor, brought about by the molecular mimicry between the acidic C-terminal peptides and the receptor's loop. To improve the understanding of the structural basis of the autoimmune response against heart receptors, the 3-dimensional structure of the C-terminal peptides of Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal proteins P0 (EDDDDDFGMGALF) and P2beta (EEEDDDMGFGLFD) were solved using the Electrostaticaly Driven MonteCarlo method. Their structures were compared with the second extra-cellular loop of our homology model of human rhodopsin and the existing experimental NMR structures of the C-terminal peptides from human P0 (EESDDDMGFGLFD) and from Leishmania braziliensis P0 (EEADDDMGFGLFD). Docking of Trypanosoma cruzi peptides P0, P2beta and human rhodopsin loop into our anti-P2beta monoclonal antibody homology model allowed to explore their interactions.The solution structure of peptides P0 and P2beta can be briefly described as a bend. Although the global conformations of the peptides are not identical they shared a common region of four residues (3 to 6) that have a similar structure. The structural alignment of the five peptides also showed a surprising conformational similarity for the same residues. The antibody model and docking studies revealed a most remarkable feature in the active site, a positively charged, narrow and deep cavity where the acidic residues 3 to 6 were accommodated. These results suggest that the most important elements in the molecular peptide recognition by the antibody may be the shape of the loop and the presence of negative charges in positions 3-5 (P0, P2beta) or a negative charge in position 4 (rhodopsin loop). This work

  8. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium. PMID:27310312

  9. Effect of pH on the structure of the recombinant C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes dragline silk protein.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Martin; Leclerc, Jérémie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Gagné, Stéphane M; Auger, Michèle

    2014-12-08

    Spider silk proteins undergo a complex series of molecular events before being converted into an outstanding hierarchically organized fiber. Recent literature has underlined the crucial role of the C-terminal domain in silk protein stability and fiber formation. However, the effect of pH remains to be clarified. We have thus developed an efficient purification protocol to obtain stable native-like recombinant MaSp1 C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes (NCCTD). Its structure was investigated as a function of pH using circular dichroism, fluorescence and solution NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the NCCTD structure is very sensitive to pH and suggest that a molten globule state occurs at pH 5.0 and below. Electronic microscopy images also indicate fiber formation at low pH and coarser globular particles at more basic pH. The results are consistent with a spinning process model where the NCCTD acts as an aggregation nucleus favoring the β-aggregation of the hydrophobic polyalanine repeats upon spinning.

  10. Contributions of the S100A9 C-terminal tail to high-affinity Mn(II) chelation by the host-defense protein human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Nakashige, Toshiki G; Gaillard, Aleth; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-27

    Human calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein that coordinates Mn(II) with high affinity in a Ca(II)-dependent manner at an unusual histidine-rich site (site 2) formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface. We present a 16-member CP mutant family where mutations in the S100A9 C-terminal tail (residues 96-114) are employed to evaluate the contributions of this region, which houses three histidines and four acidic residues, to Mn(II) coordination at site 2. The results from analytical size-exclusion chromatography, Mn(II) competition titrations, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy establish that the C-terminal tail is essential for high-affinity Mn(II) coordination by CP in solution. The studies indicate that His103 and His105 (HXH motif) of the tail complete the Mn(II) coordination sphere in solution, affording an unprecedented biological His6 site. These solution studies are in agreement with a Mn(II)-CP crystal structure reported recently (Damo, S. M.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2013, 110, 3841). Remarkably high-affinity Mn(II) binding is retained when either H103 or H105 are mutated to Ala, when the HXH motif is shifted from positions 103-105 to 104-106, and when the human tail is substituted by the C-terminal tail of murine S100A9. Nevertheless, antibacterial activity assays employing human CP mutants reveal that the native disposition of His residues is important for conferring growth inhibition against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Within the S100 family, the S100A8/S100A9 heterooligomer is essential for providing high-affinity Mn(II) binding; the S100A7, S100A9(C3S), S100A12, and S100B homodimers do not exhibit such Mn(II)-binding capacity.

  11. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  12. The C-Terminal Domains of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Protein IX Assemble into an Antiparallel Structure on the Facets of the Capsid▿

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, Céline M. S.; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Moriscot, Christine; Ruigrok, Rob W. H.; Boulanger, Pierre; Schoehn, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 protein IX (pIX) has two domains connected by a flexible linker. Three N-terminal domains form triskelions on the capsid facets that cement hexons together, and the C-terminal domains of four monomers form complexes toward the facet periphery. Here we present a cryoelectron microscopy structure of recombinant adenovirus with a peptide tag added to the C terminus of pIX. The structure, made up by several C termini of pIX, is longer at both ends than the wild-type protein, and Fabs directed against the tag bind to both ends of the oligomer, demonstrating that the pIX C termini associate in an antiparallel manner. PMID:19004948

  13. Molecular and functional characterization of proteins interacting with the C-terminal domains of 5-HT2 receptors: emergence of 5-HT2 "receptosomes".

    PubMed

    Gavarini, Sophie; Bécamel, Carine; Chanrion, Benjamin; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    Many cellular functions are carried out by multiprotein complexes. The last five years of research have revealed that many G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) functions that are not mediated by G proteins involve protein networks, which interact with their intracellular domains. This review focuses on one family of GPCRs activated by serotonin, the 5-HT(2) receptor family, which comprises three closely related subtypes, the 5-HT(2A), the 5-HT(2B) and the 5-HT(2c) receptors. These receptors still raise particular interest, because a large number of psychoactive drugs including hallucinogens, anti-psychotics, anxiolytics and anti-depressants, mediate their action, at least in part, through activation of 5-HT(2) receptors. Recent studies based on two-hybrid screens, proteomic, biochemical and cell biology approaches, have shown that the C-terminal domains of 5-HT(2) receptors interact with intracellular proteins. To date, the protein network associated with the C-terminus of the 5-HT(2C) receptor has been the most extensively characterized, using a proteomic approach combining affinity chromatography, mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. It includes scaffolding proteins containing one or several PDZ domains, signalling proteins and proteins of the cytoskeleton. Data indicating that the protein complexes interacting with 5-HT(2) receptor C-termini tightly control receptor trafficking and receptor-mediated signalling will also be reviewed.

  14. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Vanessa L. de Azevedo; Peabody, David S.; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Gomes, Andre Marco de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124) is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12), indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles. PMID:27867765

  15. The C-Terminal Portion of the Hrs Protein Interacts with Tsg101 and Interferes with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Particle Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Bouamr, Fadila; Houck-Loomis, Brian R.; De Los Santos, Martha; Casaday, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Marc C.; Goff, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein recruits Tsg101 to facilitate HIV-1 particle budding and release. In uninfected cells, the Hrs protein recruits the ESCRT-I complex to the endosome, also through an interaction with Tsg101, to promote the sorting of host proteins into endosomal vesicles and multivesicular bodies. Here, we show that the overexpression of the C-terminal fragment of Hrs (residues 391 to 777) or Hrs mutants lacking either the N-terminal FYVE domain (mutant dFYVE) or the PSAP (residues 348 to 351) motif (mutant ASAA) all efficiently inhibit HIV-1 Gag particle production. Expression of the dFYVE or ASAA mutants of Hrs had no effect on the release of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that the expression of Hrs mutant dFYVE or ASAA significantly reduced or abolished the HIV-1 Gag-Tsg101 interaction. Yeast-two hybrid assays were used to identify two new and independent Tsg101 binding sites, one in the Hrs coiled-coil domain and one in the proline/glutamic acid-rich domain. Scanning electron microscopy of HeLa cells expressing HIV-1 Gag and the Hrs ASAA mutant showed viral particles arrested in “lump-like” structures that remained attached to the cell surface. Together, these data indicate that fragments of Hrs containing the C-terminal portion of the protein can potently inhibit HIV-1 particle release by efficiently sequestering Tsg101 away from the Gag polyprotein. PMID:17182674

  16. Autophagosomes cooperate in the degradation of intracellular C-terminal fragments of the amyloid precursor protein via the MVB/lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    González, Alexis E; Muñoz, Vanessa C; Cavieres, Viviana A; Bustamante, Hianara A; Cornejo, Víctor-Hugo; Januário, Yunan C; González, Ibeth; Hetz, Claudio; daSilva, Luis L; Rojas-Fernández, Alejandro; Hay, Ronald T; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Burgos, Patricia V

    2017-03-02

    Brain regions affected by Alzheimer disease (AD) display well-recognized early neuropathologic features in the endolysosomal and autophagy systems of neurons, including enlargement of endosomal compartments, progressive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and lysosomal dysfunction. Although the primary causes of these disturbances are still under investigation, a growing body of evidence suggests that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular C-terminal fragment β (C99), generated by cleavage of APP by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE-1), is the primary cause of the endosome enlargement in AD and the earliest initiator of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible relationship between the endolysosomal degradation pathway and autophagy on the proteolytic processing and turnover of C99. We found that pharmacologic treatments that either inhibit autophagosome formation or block the fusion of autophagosomes to endolysosomal compartments caused an increase in C99 levels. We also found that inhibition of autophagosome formation by depletion of Atg5 led to higher levels of C99 and to its massive accumulation in the lumen of enlarged perinuclear, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1)-positive organelles. In contrast, activation of autophagosome formation, either by starvation or by inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin, enhanced lysosomal clearance of C99. Altogether, our results indicate that autophagosomes are key organelles to help avoid C99 accumulation preventing its deleterious effects.-González, A. E., Muñoz, V. C., Cavieres, V. A., Bustamante, H. A., Cornejo, V.-H., Januário, Y. C., González, I., Hetz, C., daSilva, L. L., Rojas-Fernández, A., Hay, R. T., Mardones, G. A., Burgos, P. V. Autophagosomes cooperate in the degradation of intracellular C-terminal fragments of the amyloid precursor protein via the MVB/lysosomal pathway.

  17. Structure of C-terminal Tandem BRCT Repeats of Rtt107 Protein Reveals Critical Role in Interaction with Phosphorylated Histone H2A during DNA Damage Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Liu, Kaixian; Li, Fudong; Wang, Juncheng; Huang, Hongda; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2012-01-01

    Rtt107 (regulator of Ty1 transposition 107; Esc4) is a DNA repair protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that can restore stalled replication forks following DNA damage. There are six BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminal) domains in Rtt107 that act as binding sites for other recruited proteins during DNA repair. Several Rtt107 binding partners have been identified, including Slx4, Rtt101, Rad55, and the Smc5/6 (structural maintenance of chromosome) protein complex. Rtt107 can reportedly be recruited to chromatin in the presence of Rtt101 and Rtt109 upon DNA damage, but the chromatin-binding site of Rtt107 has not been identified. Here, we report our investigation of the interaction between phosphorylated histone H2A (γH2A) and the C-terminal tandem BRCT repeats (BRCT5-BRCT6) of Rtt107. The crystal structures of BRCT5-BRCT6 alone and in a complex with γH2A reveal the molecular basis of the Rtt107-γH2A interaction. We used in vitro mutagenesis and a fluorescence polarization assay to confirm the location of the Rtt107 motif that is crucial for this interaction. In addition, these assays indicated that this interaction requires the phosphorylation of H2A. An in vivo phenotypic analysis in yeast demonstrated the critical role of BRCT5-BRCT6 and its interaction with γH2A during the DNA damage response. Our results shed new light on the molecular mechanism by which Rtt107 is recruited to chromatin in response to stalled DNA replication forks. PMID:22262834

  18. C-terminal truncated cannabinoid receptor 1 coexpressed with G protein trimer in Sf9 cells exists in a precoupled state and shows constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Chillakuri, Chandramouli Reddy; Reinhart, Christoph; Michel, Hartmut

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated the existence of a precoupled form of the distal C-terminal truncated cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1-417) and heterotrimeric G proteins in a heterologous insect cell expression system. CB1-417 showed higher production levels than the full-length receptor. The production levels obtained in our expression system were double the values reported in the literature. We also observed that at least the distal C-terminus of the receptor was not involved in receptor dimerization, as was predicted in the literature. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that CB1-417 and Galpha(i1)beta(1)gamma(2) proteins were colocalized in the cells. GTPgammaS binding assays with the Sf9 cell membranes containing CB1-417 and the G protein trimer showed that the receptor could constitutively activate the Galpha(i1) protein in the absence of agonists. A CB1-specific antagonist (SR 141716A) inhibited this constitutive activity of the truncated receptor. We found that the CB1-417/Galpha(i1)beta(1)gamma(2) complex could be solubilized from Sf9 cell membranes and coimmunoprecipitated. In this study, we have proven that the receptor and G proteins can be coexpressed in higher yields using Sf9 cells, and that the protein complex is stable in detergent solution. Thus, our system can be used to produce sufficient quantities of the protein complex to start structural studies.

  19. Accelerating the clinical development of protein-based vaccines for malaria by efficient purification using a four amino acid C-terminal 'C-tag'.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Silk, Sarah E; Brown, Rebecca E; Labbé, Geneviève M; Marshall, Jennifer M; Wright, Katherine E; Bezemer, Sandra; Clemmensen, Stine B; Biswas, Sumi; Li, Yuanyuan; El-Turabi, Aadil; Douglas, Alexander D; Hermans, Pim; Detmers, Frank J; de Jongh, Willem A; Higgins, Matthew K; Ashfield, Rebecca; Draper, Simon J

    2017-01-30

    Development of bespoke biomanufacturing processes remains a critical bottleneck for translational studies, in particular when modest quantities of a novel product are required for proof-of-concept Phase I/II clinical trials. In these instances the ability to develop a biomanufacturing process quickly and relatively cheaply, without risk to product quality or safety, provides a great advantage by allowing new antigens or concepts in immunogen design to more rapidly enter human testing. These challenges with production and purification are particularly apparent when developing recombinant protein-based vaccines for difficult parasitic diseases, with Plasmodium falciparum malaria being a prime example. To that end, we have previously reported the expression of a novel protein vaccine for malaria using the ExpreS(2)Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system, however, a very low overall process yield (typically <5% recovery of hexa-histidine-tagged protein) meant the initial purification strategy was not suitable for scale-up and clinical biomanufacture of such a vaccine. Here we describe a newly available affinity purification method that was ideally suited to purification of the same protein which encodes the P. falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 - currently the leading antigen for assessment in next generation vaccines aiming to prevent red blood cell invasion by the blood-stage parasite. This purification system makes use of a C-terminal tag known as 'C-tag', composed of the four amino acids, glutamic acid - proline - glutamic acid - alanine (E-P-E-A), which is selectively purified on a CaptureSelect™ affinity resin coupled to a camelid single chain antibody, called NbSyn2. The C-terminal fusion of this short C-tag to P. falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 achieved >85% recovery and >70% purity in a single step purification directly from clarified, concentrated Schneider 2 cell supernatant under mild conditions

  20. Sequence conservation in the C-terminal region of spider silk proteins (Spidroin) from Nephila clavipes (Tetragnathidae) and Araneus bicentenarius (Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Beckwitt, R; Arcidiacono, S

    1994-03-04

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used to amplify the portion of the Spidroin 1 gene that codes for the C-terminal part of the silk protein of the spider Nephila clavipes. Along with some substitution mutations of minor consequence, the PCR-derived sequence reveals an additional base missing from the previously published Nephila Spidroin 1 sequence. Comparison of the PCR-derived sequence with the equivalent region of Spidroin 2 indicates that the insertion of this single base results in greatly increased similarity in the resulting amino acid sequences of Spidroin 1 and Spidroin 2 (75% over 97 amino acids). The same PCR primers also amplified a fragment of the same length from Araneus bicentenarius. This sequence is also very similar to Spidroin 1 of Nephila (71% over 238 bases excluding the PCR primers, which translates into 76% over 79 amino acids).

  1. The functional roles of the unstructured N- and C-terminal regions in αB-crystallin and other mammalian small heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Carver, John A; Grosas, Aidan B; Ecroyd, Heath; Quinlan, Roy A

    2017-04-08

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps), such as αB-crystallin, are one of the major classes of molecular chaperone proteins. In vivo, under conditions of cellular stress, sHsps are the principal defence proteins that prevent large-scale protein aggregation. Progress in determining the structure of sHsps has been significant recently, particularly in relation to the conserved, central and β-sheet structured α-crystallin domain (ACD). However, an understanding of the structure and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal flanking regions has proved elusive mainly because of their unstructured and dynamic nature. In this paper, we propose functional roles for both flanking regions, based around three properties: (i) they act in a localised crowding manner to regulate interactions with target proteins during chaperone action, (ii) they protect the ACD from deleterious amyloid fibril formation and (iii) the flexibility of these regions, particularly at the extreme C-terminus in mammalian sHsps, provides solubility for sHsps under chaperone and non-chaperone conditions. In the eye lens, these properties are highly relevant as the crystallin proteins, in particular the two sHsps αA- and αB-crystallin, are present at very high concentrations.

  2. Proteasome-mediated degradation of the C-terminus of the Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid protein precursor: effect of C-terminal truncation on production of beta-amyloid protein.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Janelle; Williamson, Nicholas A; Hill, Andrew F; Sernee, M Fleur; Masters, Colin L; Small, David H

    2003-11-01

    The beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is derived by proteolytic processing of the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Cleavage of APP by beta-secretase generates a C-terminal fragment (APP-CTFbeta), which is subsequently cleaved by gamma-secretase to produce Abeta. Our previous studies have shown that the proteasome can cleave the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of APP. To identify proteasome cleavage sites in APP, two peptides homologous to the C-terminus of APP were incubated with recombinant 20S proteasome. Cleavage of the peptides was monitored by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Proteasome cleaved the APP C-terminal peptides at several sites, including a region around the sequence YENPTY that interacts with several APP-binding proteins. To examine the effect of this cleavage on Abeta production, APP-CTFbeta and mutant forms of APP-CTFbeta terminating on either side of the YENPTY sequence were expressed in CHO cells. Truncation of APP-CTFbeta on the N-terminal side of the YENPTY sequence at residue 677 significantly decreased the amount of Abeta produced, whereas truncation on the C-terminal side of residue 690 had little effect. The results suggest that proteasomal cleavage of the cytosolic domain of APP at the YENPTY sequence decreases gamma-secretase processing, and consequently inhibits Abeta production. Therefore, the proteasome-dependent trafficking pathway of APP may be a valid therapeutic target for altering Abeta production in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

  3. Direct recognition of the C-terminal polylysine residues of nonstop protein by Ltn1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kwang Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2014-10-24

    When mRNAs lack stop codons, errors in gene expression and coding of aberrant proteins that are harmful in cells can result. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 180-kDa E3-ubiquitin ligase, Ltn1 has been known to associate with ribosomes and marks translationally-arrested aberrant nascent polypeptides for proteasomal degradation. Here, we demonstrate the Ltn1 E3-ubiquitin ligase directly binds to the nonstop proteins and efficiently ubiquitylates them. The middle domain of Ltn1 is responsible for recognizing the polylysine residues of the nonstop protein with an affinity of 2-3μM. This biochemical characterization of Ltn1 expands our knowledge regarding the fundamental process that removes aberrant nascent polypeptides in eukaryotes.

  4. Solid-Phase Synthesis of C-Terminal Peptide Libraries for Studying the Specificity of Enzymatic Protein Prenylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Prenylation is an essential post-translational modification in all eukaryotes. Here we describe the synthesis of a 340-member library of peptides containing free C-termini on cellulose membranes. The resulting library was then used to probe the specificity of protein farnesyltransferase from S. cerevisiae. PMID:22783549

  5. Solid-phase synthesis of C-terminal peptide libraries for studying the specificity of enzymatic protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-08-25

    Prenylation is an essential post-translational modification in all eukaryotes. Here we describe the synthesis of a 340-member library of peptides containing free C-termini on cellulose membranes. The resulting library was then used to probe the specificity of protein farnesyltransferase from S. cerevisiae.

  6. The trappin gene family: proteins defined by an N-terminal transglutaminase substrate domain and a C-terminal four-disulphide core.

    PubMed Central

    Schalkwijk, J; Wiedow, O; Hirose, S

    1999-01-01

    Recently, several new genes have been discovered in various species which are homologous to the well-characterized human epithelial proteinase inhibitor elafin/SKALP (skin-derived anti-leukoproteinase). Because of the high degree of conservation and the similarities in genomic organization, we propose that these genes belong to a novel gene family. At the protein level, the family members are defined by: (1) an N-terminal domain consisting of a variable number of repeats with the consensus sequence Gly-Gln-Asp-Pro-Val-Lys that can act as an anchoring motif by transglutaminase cross-linking, and (2) a C-terminal four-disulphide core or whey acidic protein (WAP) domain, which harbours a functional motif involved in binding of proteinases and possibly other proteins. We have proposed the name trappin gene family as a unifying nomenclature for this group of proteins (trappin is an acronym for TRansglutaminase substrate and wAP domain containing ProteIN, and refers to its functional property of 'getting trapped' in tissues by covalent cross-linking). Analysis of the trappin family members shows extensive diversification in bovidae and suidae, whereas the number of primate trappins is probably limited. Recent biochemical and cell biological data on the human trappin family member elafin/SKALP suggest that this molecule is induced in epidermis by cellular stress. We hypothesize that trappins play an important role in the regulation of inflammation and in protection against tissue damage in stratified epithelia. PMID:10359639

  7. The Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of the Protein Kinase AtSOS2 Bound to the Calcium Sensor AtSOS3

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Barrena, María José; Fujii, Hiroaki; Angulo, Ivan; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Albert, Armando

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The plant SOS2 family of protein kinases and their interacting activators, the SOS3 family of calcium-binding proteins, function together in decoding calcium signals elicited by different environmental stimuli. SOS2 is activated by Ca-SOS3 and subsequently phosphorylates the ion transporter SOS1 to bring about cellular ion homeostasis under salt stress. In addition to possessing the kinase activity, members of the SOS2 family of protein kinases can bind to protein phosphatase 2Cs. The crystal structure of the binary complex of Ca-SOS3 with the C-terminal regulatory moiety of SOS2 resolves central questions regarding the dual function of SOS2 as a kinase and a phosphatase-binding protein. A comparison with the structure of unbound SOS3 reveals the basis of the molecular function of this family of kinases and their interacting calcium sensors. Furthermore, our study suggests that the structure of the phosphatase-interaction domain of SOS2 defines a scaffold module conserved from yeast to human. PMID:17499048

  8. Development of the C-Terminal Inhibitors of Heat Shock Protein 90 in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    has applications for other disease states such as Alzheimers but toxicity through inhibition is something desirable for cancer studies. Therefore...remains limited2, 3. Prostate cancer remains a heterogeneous disease with multiple contributing pathways, and future treatment strategies...protein expression (Figure 2B) while Hsp90 expression was moderately increased following 72 hours F-4 treament . HIF-1α appeared to be more sensitive

  9. Cell-Free Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly Dependent on the Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Regulated by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Liu, Kuancheng; Luckenbaugh, Laurie; Streck, Nicholas; Eng, Stacey; Voitenleitner, Christian; Delaney, William E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple subunits of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) assemble into an icosahedral capsid that packages the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). The N-terminal domain (NTD) of HBc is sufficient for capsid assembly, in the absence of pgRNA or any other viral or host factors, under conditions of high HBc and/or salt concentrations. The C-terminal domain (CTD) is deemed dispensable for capsid assembly although it is essential for pgRNA packaging. We report here that HBc expressed in a mammalian cell lysate, rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL), was able to assemble into capsids when (low-nanomolar) HBc concentrations mimicked those achieved under conditions of viral replication in vivo and were far below those used previously for capsid assembly in vitro. Furthermore, at physiologically low HBc concentrations in RRL, the NTD was insufficient for capsid assembly and the CTD was also required. The CTD likely facilitated assembly under these conditions via RNA binding and protein-protein interactions. Moreover, the CTD underwent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in RRL similar to those seen in vivo which regulated capsid assembly. Importantly, the NTD alone also failed to accumulate in mammalian cells, likely resulting from its failure to assemble efficiently. Coexpression of the full-length HBc rescued NTD assembly in RRL as well as NTD expression and assembly in mammalian cells, resulting in the formation of mosaic capsids containing both full-length HBc and the NTD. These results have important implications for HBV assembly during replication and provide a facile cell-free system to study capsid assembly under physiologically relevant conditions, including its modulation by host factors. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important global human pathogen and the main cause of liver cancer worldwide. An essential component of HBV is the spherical capsid composed of multiple copies of a single protein, the core protein (HBc). We have

  10. C-terminal truncated hepatitis B virus X protein regulates tumorigenicity, self-renewal and drug resistance via STAT3/Nanog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ching, Rachel Hiu Ha; Sze, Karen Man Fong; Lau, Eunice Yuen Ting; Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Lee, Joyce Man Fong; Ng, Irene Oi Lin; Lee, Terence Kin Wah

    2017-02-08

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major risk factor of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Random integration of HBV DNA into the host genome is frequent in HCC leading to truncation of the HBV DNA, particularly at the C-terminal end of the HBV X protein (HBx). C-terminally truncated HBx (HBx-ΔC) has been implicated in playing a pro-oncogenic role in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the mechanism whereby HBx-ΔC1 contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the functional role of HBx-ΔC1 in regulating liver cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. Using Tet-on inducible system, we found that HBx-ΔC1 enhanced CSC properties including self-renewal, tumorigenicity, chemoresistance, migration and expression of liver CSC markers, when compared with the full-length HBx counterpart and vector control. Interestingly, HBx-ΔC1 conferred resistance in HCC cells towards sorafenib treatment through suppression of apoptotic cascade. In addition, HBx-ΔC1 upregulated a panel of stemness genes, in which Nanog was found to be among the most significant one in both trasnfected cell lines. Consistently, Nanog was upregulated in human HCC samples which had HBx-ΔC1 expression. Furthermore, the induction of CSC properties by HBx-ΔC1 was via the Stat3/Nanog pathway, as administration of Stat3 inhibitor abolished the HBx-ΔC1-induced self-renewing capacity. In conclusion, our data suggest that HBx-ΔC1 enhances liver CSCs properties through Stat3/Nanog cascade, and provide a new insight for the therapeutic intervention for HBV-related HCC.

  11. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and its interaction with model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Senac, María del Mar; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2002-01-01

    Bak is a pro-apoptotic protein widely distributed in different cell types that is associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane, apparently through a C-terminal hydrophobic domain. We used infrared spectroscopy to study the secondary structure of a synthetic peptide ((+)(3)HN-(188)ILNVLVVLGVVLLGQFVVRRFFKS(211)-COO(-)) with the same sequence as the C-terminal domain of Bak. The spectrum of this peptide in D(2)O buffer shows an amide I' band with a maximum at 1636 cm(-1), which clearly indicates the predominance of an extended beta-structure in aqueous solvent. However, the peptide incorporated in multilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes shows a different amide I' band spectrum, with a maximum at 1658 cm(-1), indicating a predominantly alpha-helical structure induced by its interaction with the membrane. It was observed that through differential scanning calorimetry the transition of the phospholipid model membrane was broadened in the presence of the peptide. Fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in fluid DMPC vesicles showed that increasing concentrations of the peptide produced increased polarization values, which is compatible with the peptide being inserted into the membrane. High concentrations of the peptide considerably broaden the phase transition of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and DPH polarization increased, especially at temperatures above the T(c) transition temperature of the pure phospholipid. The addition of peptide destabilized unilamellar vesicles and released encapsulated carboxyfluorescein. These results indicate that this domain is able to insert itself into membranes, where it adopts an alpha-helical structure and considerably perturbs the physical properties of the membrane. PMID:11751312

  12. Penicillin-binding protein 2x of Streptococcus pneumoniae: the mutation Ala707Asp within the C-terminal PASTA2 domain leads to destabilization.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Inga; Peters, Katharina; Stahlmann, Christoph; Hakenbeck, Regine; Denapaite, Dalia

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) is an enzyme involved in the last stages of peptidoglycan assembly and essential for bacterial growth and survival. PBP2x localizes to the division site, a process that depends on its Penicillin-Binding Protein And Serine-Threonine-kinase Associated (PASTA) domains, which was previously demonstrated via GFP-PBP2x in living cells. During this study a mutant strain was isolated in which the GFP-PBP2x fusion protein did not localize at division sites and it contained reduced amounts of the full-length GFP-PBP2x. We now show that this defect is due to a point mutation within the C-terminal PASTA2 domain of PBP2x. The mutant protein was analyzed in detail in terms of beta-lactam binding, functionality, and localization in live cells. We demonstrate that the mutation affects the GFP-tagged PBP2x variant severely and renders it susceptible to the protease/chaperone HtrA.

  13. Identification and characterization of the antimicrobial peptide corresponding to C-terminal beta-sheet domain of tenecin 1, an antibacterial protein of larvae of Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, K H; Hong, S Y; Oh, J E; Kwon, M; Yoon, J H; Lee, J; Lee, B L; Moon, H M

    1998-08-15

    An active fragment was identified from tenecin 1, an antibacterial protein belonging to the insect defensin family, by synthesizing the peptides corresponding to the three regions of tenecin 1. Only the fragment corresponding to the C-terminal beta-sheet domain showed activity against fungi as well as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, whereas tenecin 1, the native protein, showed activity only against Gram-positive bacteria. CD spectra indicated that each fragment in a membrane-mimetic environment might adopt a secondary structure corresponding to its region in the protein. The leakage of dye from liposomes induced by this fragment suggested that this fragment acts on the membrane of pathogens as a primary mode of action. A comparison between the structure and the activity of each fragment indicated that a net positive charge was a prerequisite factor for activity. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report in which the fragment corresponding to the beta-sheet region in antibacterial proteins, which consists of alpha-helical and beta-sheet regions, has been identified as a primary active fragment.

  14. The C-terminal region of the non-structural protein 2B from Hepatitis A Virus demonstrates lipid-specific viroporin-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ashutosh; Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Kamalika; Nain, Anshu; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-10-01

    Viroporins are virally encoded, membrane-active proteins, which enhance viral replication and assist in egress of viruses from host cells. The 2B proteins in the picornaviridae family are known to have viroporin-like properties, and play critical roles during virus replication. The 2B protein of Hepatitis A Virus (2B), an unusual picornavirus, is somewhat dissimilar from its analogues in several respects. HAV 2B is approximately 2.5 times the length of other 2B proteins, and does not disrupt calcium homeostasis or glycoprotein trafficking. Additionally, its membrane penetrating properties are not yet clearly established. Here we show that the membrane interacting activity of HAV 2B is localized in its C-terminal region, which contains an alpha-helical hairpin motif. We show that this region is capable of forming small pores in membranes and demonstrates lipid specific activity, which partially rationalizes the intracellular localization of full-length 2B. Using a combination of biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulation studies, we also show that HAV 2B demonstrates a marked propensity to dimerize in a crowded environment, and probably interacts with membranes in a multimeric form, a hallmark of other picornavirus viroporins. In sum, our study clearly establishes HAV 2B as a bona fide viroporin in the picornaviridae family.

  15. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  16. The cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin regulates acid-sensing ion channel 1a through a C-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, Mikael K; Schnizler, Katrin; Zha, Xiang-Ming; Hall, Duane D; Wemmie, John A; Hell, Johannes W; Welsh, Michael J

    2009-01-30

    The acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons where it generates transient cation currents when extracellular pH falls. ASIC1a confers pH-dependent modulation on postsynaptic dendritic spines and has critical effects in neurological diseases associated with a reduced pH. However, knowledge of the proteins that interact with ASIC1a and influence its function is limited. Here, we show that alpha-actinin, which links membrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, associates with ASIC1a in brain and in cultured cells. The interaction depended on an alpha-actinin-binding site in the ASIC1a C terminus that was specific for ASIC1a versus other ASICs and for alpha-actinin-1 and -4. Co-expressing alpha-actinin-4 altered ASIC1a current density, pH sensitivity, desensitization rate, and recovery from desensitization. Moreover, reducing alpha-actinin expression altered acid-activated currents in hippocampal neurons. These findings suggest that alpha-actinins may link ASIC1a to a macromolecular complex in the postsynaptic membrane where it regulates ASIC1a activity.

  17. C-terminal region of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type I (HTLV) p19 core protein is immunogenic in humans and contains an HTLV/sub I/-specific epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Palker, T.J.; Scearce, R.M.; Copeland, T.D.; Oroszlan, S.; Haynes, B.F.

    1986-04-01

    To study the human host response to viral structural proteins during HTLV type I infection, five synthetic peptides matching the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of HTLV/sub I/ p19 core protein were used to identify antigenic sites on p19 that were immunogenic in man. In radioimmunoassay and immunoprecipitation experiments, antibodies in 16 of 18 HTLV/sub I//sup +/ patient sera reacted with a synthetic peptide matching the C-terminal 11-amino acid sequence of p19, whereas only two sera contained antibodies that reacted with other N- or C-terminal region p19 synthetic peptides. Polyclonal rabbit antisera to N- and C-terminal peptides reacted with a native viral protein of 19,000 daltons and with gagencoded precursors of p19. Six monoclonal antibodies against native viral p19 were screened for reactivity to the five synthetic peptides. One of six antibodies (13B12) reacted with the C-terminal synthetic peptide of p19. Antibody 13B12 did not react with HTLV/sub II/ or HTLV/sub III/ proteins or with HTLV/sub III/-infected cells, nor did it cross-react with a wide variety of HTLV-uninfected normal host tissues. Thus, the C-terminus of p19 contains an antigen that is highly immunogenic in most HTLV/sub 1/-infected patients and is HTLV/sub I/ specific.

  18. A C-terminal segment of the V{sub 1}R vasopressin receptor is unstructured in the crystal structure of its chimera with the maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Adikesavan, Nallini Vijayarangan; Mahmood, Syed Saad; Stanley, Nithianantham; Xu, Zhen; Wu, Nan; Thibonnier, Marc; Shoham, Menachem

    2005-04-01

    The 1.8 Å crystal structure of an MBP-fusion protein with the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment of the V1 vasopressin receptor reveals that the receptor segment is unstructured. The V{sub 1} vascular vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1}R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of body-fluid osmolality, blood volume and blood pressure. Signal transduction is mediated by the third intracellular loop of this seven-transmembrane protein as well as by the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment. A chimera of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) and the C-terminal segment of V{sub 1}R has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.10, b = 66.56, c = 115.72 Å, β = 95.99°. The 1.8 Å crystal structure reveals the conformation of MBP and part of the linker region of this chimera, with the C-terminal segment being unstructured. This may reflect a conformational plasticity in the C-terminal segment that may be necessary for proper function of V{sub 1}R.

  19. The C-terminal region of the motor protein MCAK controls its structure and activity through a conformational switch.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, Sandeep K; Harker, Bethany; Welburn, Julie P I

    2015-04-27

    The precise regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential during cell division. The kinesin-13 motor protein MCAK is a potent microtubule depolymerase. The divergent non-motor regions flanking the ATPase domain are critical in regulating its targeting and activity. However, the molecular basis for the function of the non-motor regions within the context of full-length MCAK is unknown. Here, we determine the structure of MCAK motor domain bound to its regulatory C-terminus. Our analysis reveals that the MCAK C-terminus binds to two motor domains in solution and is displaced allosterically upon microtubule binding, which allows its robust accumulation at microtubule ends. These results demonstrate that MCAK undergoes long-range conformational changes involving its C-terminus during the soluble to microtubule-bound transition and that the C-terminus-motor interaction represents a structural intermediate in the MCAK catalytic cycle. Together, our work reveals intrinsic molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of kinesin-13 activity.

  20. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  1. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  2. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R.; Muto, Michael G.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Sugrue, Stephen P.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  3. C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) activates the expression of E-box clock genes with CLOCK/CYCLE in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Taichi Q; Matsumoto, Akira; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, CLOCK/CYCLE heterodimer (CLK/CYC) is the primary activator of circadian clock genes that contain the E-box sequence in their promoter regions (hereafter referred to as "E-box clock genes"). Although extensive studies have investigated the feedback regulation of clock genes, little is known regarding other factors acting with CLK/CYC. Here we show that Drosophila C-terminal binding protein (dCtBP), a transcriptional co-factor, is involved in the regulation of the E-box clock genes. In vivo overexpression of dCtBP in clock cells lengthened or abolished circadian locomotor rhythm with up-regulation of a subset of the E-box clock genes, period (per), vrille (vri), and PAR domain protein 1ε (Pdp1ε). Co-expression of dCtBP with CLK in vitro also increased the promoter activity of per, vri, Pdp1ε and cwo depending on the amount of dCtBP expression, whereas no effect was observed without CLK. The activation of these clock genes in vitro was not observed when we used mutated dCtBP which carries amino acid substitutions in NAD+ domain. These results suggest that dCtBP generally acts as a putative co-activator of CLK/CYC through the E-box sequence.

  4. Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation of a γ-Protocadherin C-terminal Lipid Binding Domain Regulates Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition and Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Austin B; Schreiner, Dietmar; Weiner, Joshua A

    2015-08-21

    The γ-protocadherins (γ-Pcdhs) are a family of 22 adhesion molecules with multiple critical developmental functions, including the proper formation of dendritic arbors by forebrain neurons. The γ-Pcdhs bind to and inhibit focal adhesion kinase (FAK) via a constant C-terminal cytoplasmic domain shared by all 22 proteins. In cortical neurons lacking the γ-Pcdhs, aberrantly high activity of FAK and of PKC disrupts dendrite arborization. Little is known, however, about how γ-Pcdh function is regulated by other factors. Here we show that PKC phosphorylates a serine residue situated within a phospholipid binding motif at the shared γ-Pcdh C terminus. Western blots using a novel phospho-specific antibody against this site suggest that a portion of γ-Pcdh proteins is phosphorylated in the cortex in vivo. We find that PKC phosphorylation disrupts both phospholipid binding and the γ-Pcdh inhibition of (but not binding to) FAK. Introduction of a non-phosphorylatable (S922A) γ-Pcdh construct into wild-type cortical neurons significantly increases dendrite arborization. This same S922A construct can also rescue dendrite arborization defects in γ-Pcdh null neurons cell autonomously. Consistent with these data, introduction of a phosphomimetic (S/D) γ-Pcdh construct or treatment with a PKC activator reduces dendrite arborization in wild-type cortical neurons. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism through which γ-Pcdh control of a signaling pathway important for dendrite arborization is regulated.

  5. Ovine plasma prion protein levels show genotypic variation detected by C-terminal epitopes not exposed in cell-surface PrPC.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Fitzmaurice, Tim J; Hopkins, Lee; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2006-12-01

    Ovine PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) express PrP(C) [cellular PrP (prion-related protein)] and have the potential to harbour and release disease-associated forms of PrP during scrapie in sheep. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression by PBMCs, together with plasma PrP(C) levels, may contribute to the regulatory mechanisms that determine susceptibility and resistance to natural scrapie in sheep. Here, we have correlated cell-surface PrP(C) expression on normal ovine PBMCs by FACS with the presence of PrP(C) in plasma measured by capture-detector immunoassay. FACS showed similar levels of cell-surface PrP(C) on homozygous ARR (Ala136-Arg154-Arg171), ARQ (Ala136-Arg154-Gln171) and VRQ (Val136-Arg154-Gln171) PBMCs. Cell-surface ovine PrP(C) showed modulation of N-terminal epitopes, which was more evident on homozygous ARR cells. Ovine plasma PrP(C) levels showed genotypic variation and the protein displayed C-terminal epitopes not available in cell-surface PrP(C). Homozygous VRQ sheep showed the highest plasma PrP(C) level and homozygous ARR animals the lowest. For comparison, similar analyses were performed on normal bovine PBMCs and plasma. PrP(C) levels in bovine plasma were approx. 4-fold higher than ovine homozygous ARQ plasma despite similar levels of PBMC cell-surface PrP(C) expression. Immunoassays using C-terminal-specific anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies as capture and detector reagents revealed the highest level of PrP(C) in both ovine and bovine plasma, whilst lower levels were detected using N-terminal-specific monoclonal antibody FH11 as the capture reagent. This suggested that a proportion of plasma PrP(C) was N-terminally truncated. Our results indicate that the increased susceptibility to natural scrapie displayed by homozygous VRQ sheep correlates with a higher level of plasma PrP(C).

  6. The zinc finger and C-terminal domains of MTA proteins are required for FOG-2-mediated transcriptional repression via the NuRD complex.

    PubMed

    Roche, Andrea E; Bassett, Brett J; Samant, Sadhana A; Hong, Wei; Blobel, Gerd A; Svensson, Eric C

    2008-02-01

    FOG-2 is a transcriptional co-regulator that is required for cardiac morphogenesis as mice deficient in this factor die during mid-gestation of cardiac malformations. FOG-2 interacts with GATA4 to attenuate GATA4-dependent gene expression. The first 12 amino acids of FOG-2 (the FOG Repression Motif) are necessary to mediate this repression. To determine the mechanism by which the FOG Repression Motif functions, we identified 7 polypeptides from rat cardiac nuclear extracts that co-purified with a GST-FOG-2 fusion protein. All proteins identified are members of the NuRD nucleosome remodeling complex. Using in vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that Metastasis-Associated proteins (MTA)-1, 2 and 3 and Retinoblastoma binding proteins RbAp46 and RbAp48 interact with FOG-2, but not with a mutant form of FOG-2 that is unable to repress transcription. Furthermore, we define a novel domain located in the C-terminal portion of MTA-1 that mediates the FOG-2/MTA-1 interaction. We also demonstrate that knockdown of MTA protein expression dramatically impairs the ability of FOG-2 to repress GATA4 activity. Finally, we show that the zinc finger domain of MTA-1 is required for FOG-2-mediated transcriptional repression and that this domain interacts with RbAp46 and RbAp48 subunits of the NuRD complex. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/MTA/RbAp interactions for FOG-2-mediated transcriptional repression and further define the molecular interactions between the FOG Repression Motif and the NuRD complex.

  7. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases cleave isopeptide- and peptide-linked ubiquitin from structured proteins but do not edit ubiquitin homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bett, John S; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Jaffray, Ellis G; Virdee, Satpal; Chin, Jason W; Knebel, Axel; Kurz, Thimo; Trost, Matthias; Tatham, Michael H; Hay, Ronald T

    2015-03-15

    Modification of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) occurs through a variety of topologically distinct Ub linkages, including Ube2W-mediated monoubiquitylation of N-terminal alpha amines to generate peptide-linked linear mono-Ub fusions. Protein ubiquitylation can be reversed by the action of deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), many of which show striking preference for particular Ub linkage types. Here, we have screened for DUBs that preferentially cleave N-terminal Ub from protein substrates but do not act on Ub homopolymers. We show that members of the Ub C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family of DUBs demonstrate this preference for N-terminal deubiquitylating activity as they are capable of cleaving N-terminal Ub from SUMO2 and Ube2W, while displaying no activity against any of the eight Ub linkage types. Surprisingly, this ability to cleave Ub from SUMO2 was 100 times more efficient for UCH-L3 when we deleted the unstructured N-terminus of SUMO2, demonstrating that UCH enzymes can cleave Ub from structured proteins. However, UCH-L3 could also cleave chemically synthesized isopeptide-linked Ub from lysine 11 (K11) of SUMO2 with similar efficiency, demonstrating that UCH DUB activity is not limited to peptide-linked Ub. These findings advance our understanding of the specificity of the UCH family of DUBs, which are strongly implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration but whose substrate preference has remained unclear. In addition, our findings suggest that the reversal of Ube2W-mediated N-terminal ubiquitylation may be one physiological role of UCH DUBs in vivo.

  8. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  9. Serum Concentrations of Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Stefania; Kobeissy, Firas; Vestri, Annarita; Hayes, Ronald L.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Berger, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective reliable markers to assess traumatic brain injury (TBI) and predict outcome soon after injury are a highly needed tool for optimizing management of pediatric TBI. We assessed serum concentrations of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) in a cohort of 45 children with clinical diagnosis of TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] 3–15) and 40 healthy subjects, evaluated their associations with clinical characteristics and outcomes, and compared their performance to previously published data on two well-studied blood biomarkers, S100B and MBP. We observed higher serum levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 in brain-injured children compared with controls and also demonstrated a step-wise increase of biomarker concentrations over the continuum of severity from mild to severe TBI. Furthermore, while we found that only the neuronal biomarker UCH-L1 holds potential to detect acute intracranial lesions as assessed by computed tomography (CT), both markers were substantially increased in TBI patients even with a normal CT suggesting the presence of undetected microstructural injuries. Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP concentrations also strongly predicted poor outcome and performed better than S100B and MBP. Our results point to a role of GFAP and UCH-L1 as candidate biomarkers for pediatric TBI. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27319802

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM-3) of human ELAV-type RNA-binding protein 3 (ETR-3)

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Sharma, Ashwani; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonically lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-type RNA-binding protein 3 (ETR-3) has been implicated in many aspects of RNA-processing events including alternative splicing, stability, editing and translation. RNA recognition motif 3 (RRM-3) is an independent C-terminal RNA-binding domain of ETR-3 that preferentially binds to UG-rich repeats of the nuclear or cytoplasmic pre-mRNA, and along with the other domains mediates the inclusion of cardiac troponin T (c-TNT) exon 5 in embryonic muscle, which is otherwise excluded in the adult. In the present study, RRM-3 was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 3 Å resolution at the home source and belonged to space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 118.5 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. There were two molecules of RRM-3 in the asymmetric unit and the calculated Matthews coefficient (V M) was 6.35 Å3 Da−1, with a solvent content of 80.62%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. PMID:24100559

  11. Dephosphorylation of the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 by small C-terminal domain phosphatases has distinct outcomes for bone morphogenetic protein and transforming growth factor-beta pathways.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Gopal; Knockaert, Marie; Alarcón, Claudio; Montalvo, Ermelinda; Brivanlou, Ali H; Massagué, Joan

    2006-12-29

    Smad proteins transduce bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signals upon phosphorylation of their C-terminal SXS motif by receptor kinases. The activity of Smad1 in the BMP pathway and Smad2/3 in the TGFbeta pathway is restricted by pathway cross-talk and feedback through protein kinases, including MAPK, CDK2/4, p38MAPK, JNK, and others. These kinases phosphorylate Smads 1-3 at the region that links the N-terminal DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal transcriptional domain. Phosphatases that dephosphorylate the linker region are therefore likely to play an integral part in the regulation of Smad activity. We reported previously that small C-terminal domain phosphatases 1, 2, and 3 (SCP1-3) dephosphorylate Smad1 C-terminal tail, thereby attenuating BMP signaling. Here we provide evidence that SCP1-3 also dephosphorylate the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 in vitro, in mammalian cells and in Xenopus embryos. Overexpression of SCP 1, 2, or 3 decreased linker phosphorylation of Smads 1, 2 and 3. Moreover, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SCP1/2 increased the BMP-dependent phosphorylation of the Smad1 linker region as well as the C terminus. In contrast, SCP1/2 knockdown increased the TGFbeta-dependent linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3 but not the C-terminal phosphorylation. Consequently, SCP1/2 knockdown inhibited TGFbeta transcriptional responses, but it enhanced BMP transcriptional responses. Thus, by dephosphorylating Smad2/3 at the linker (inhibitory) but not the C-terminal (activating) site, the SCPs enhance TGFbeta signaling, and by dephosphorylating Smad1 at both sites, the SCPs reset Smad1 to the basal unphosphorylated state.

  12. The Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 1 Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Dephosphorylating Ser(P)68-Twist1 to Accelerate Twist1 Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Fu, Junjiang; Shen, Tao; Lin, Xia; Liao, Lan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Jianming

    2016-05-27

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that strongly promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. The MAPK-phosphorylated Twist1 on its serine 68 (Ser(P)(68)-Twist1) has a significantly enhanced stability and function to drive cancer cell invasion and metastasis. However, the phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and destabilizes Twist1 has not been identified and characterized. In this study, we screened a serine/threonine phosphatase cDNA expression library in HEK293T cells with ectopically coexpressed Twist1. We found that the small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) specifically dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 in both cell-free reactions and living cells. SCP1 uses its amino acid residues 43-63 to interact with the N terminus of Twist1. Increased SCP1 expression in cells decreased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins, whereas knockdown of SCP1 increased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins. Furthermore, the levels of SCP1 are negatively correlated with Twist1 protein levels in several cancer cell lines. SCP1-dephosphorylated Twist1 undergoes fast degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Importantly, an increase in SCP1 expression in breast cancer cells with either endogenous or ectopically expressed Twist1 largely inhibits the Twist1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and the migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. These results indicate that SCP1 is the phosphatase that counterregulates the MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of Ser(68)-Twist1. Thus, an increase in SCP1 expression and activity may be a useful strategy for eliminating the detrimental roles of Twist1 in cancer cells.

  13. KU135, a Novel Novobiocin-Derived C-Terminal Inhibitor of the 90-kDa Heat Shock Protein, Exerts Potent Antiproliferative Effects in Human Leukemic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Shary N.; Shawgo, Mary E.; Matthews, Shawna B.; Lu, Yuanming; Donnelly, Alison C.; Szabla, Kristen; Tanol, Mehmet; Vielhauer, George A.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Matts, Robert L.; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) assists in the proper folding of numerous mutated or overexpressed signal transduction proteins that are involved in cancer. Consequently, there is considerable interest in developing chemotherapeutic drugs that specifically disrupt the function of Hsp90. Here, we investigated the extent to which a novel novobiocin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated KU135, induced antiproliferative effects in Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The results indicated that KU135 bound directly to Hsp90, caused the degradation of known Hsp90 client proteins, and induced more potent antiproliferative effects than the established N-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). Closer examination of the cellular response to KU135 and 17-AAG revealed that only 17-AAG induced a strong up-regulation of Hsp70 and Hsp90. In addition, KU135 caused wild-type cells to undergo G2/M arrest, whereas cells treated with 17-AAG accumulated in G1. Furthermore, KU135 but not 17-AAG was found to be a potent inducer of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as evidenced, in part, by the fact that cell death was inhibited to a similar extent by Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpression or the depletion of apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (Apaf-1). Together, these data suggest that KU135 inhibits cell proliferation by regulating signaling pathways that are mechanistically different from those targeted by 17-AAG and as such represents a novel opportunity for Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:19741006

  14. The Cold Denatured State of the C-terminal Domain of Protein L9 Is Compact and Contains Both Native and Non-native Structure

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Bing; McClendon, Sebastian; Rospigliosi, Carla; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    Cold denaturation is a general property of globular proteins, and the process provides insight into the origins of the cooperativity of protein folding and the nature of partially folded states. Unfortunately, studies of protein cold denaturation have been hindered by the fact that the cold denatured state is normally difficult to access experimentally. Special conditions such as addition of high concentrations of denaturant, encapsulation into reverse micelles, the formation of emulsified solutions, high pressure or extremes of pHs, have been applied, but these can perturb the unfolded state of proteins. The cold denatured state of the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 can be populated under native like conditions by taking advantage of a destabilizing point mutation which leads to cold denaturation at temperatures above zero °C. This state is in slow exchange with the native state on the NMR time scale. Virtually complete backbone 15N, 13C and 1H as well as side-chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ chemical shift assignments were obtained for the cold denatured state at pH 5.7, 12 °C. Chemical shift analysis, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings, amide proton NOEs and R2 relaxation rates all indicate that the cold denatured state of CTL9 contains significant native like secondary structure, but also contains non-native structure. The regions corresponding to the two native α-helices show a strong tendency to populate helical Φ and Ψ angles. The segment which connects α-helix 2 and β-strand 2 (residues 107–124) in the native state exhibits a significant preference to form non-native helical structure in the cold denatured state. The structure observed in the cold denatured state of the I98A mutant is similar to that observed in the pH 3.8 unfolded state of wild type CTL9 at 25 °C, suggesting that it is a robust feature of the denatured state ensemble of this protein. The implications for protein folding and for studies of cold denatured states are

  15. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 Are Not Specific Biomarkers for Mild CT-Negative Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Posti, Jussi P; Hossain, Iftakher; Takala, Riikka S K; Liedes, Hilkka; Newcombe, Virginia; Outtrim, Joanne; Katila, Ari J; Frantzén, Janek; Ala-Seppälä, Henna; Coles, Jonathan P; Kyllönen, Anna; Maanpää, Henna-Riikka; Tallus, Jussi; Hutchinson, Peter J; van Gils, Mark; Menon, David K; Tenovuo, Olli

    2017-01-27

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) have been studied as potential biomarkers of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). We report the levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 in patients with acute orthopedic injuries without central nervous system involvement, and relate them to the type of extracranial injury, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 in patients with CT-negative mTBI. Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP were longitudinally measured from 73 patients with acute orthopedic injury on arrival and on days 1, 2, 3, 7 after admission, and on the follow-up visit 3-10 months after the injury. The injury types were recorded, and 71% patients underwent also head MRI. The results were compared with those found in patients with CT-negative mTBI (n = 93). The levels of GFAP were higher in patients with acute orthopedic trauma than in patients with CT-negative mTBI (p = 0.026) on arrival; however, no differences were found on the following days. The levels of UCH-L1 were not significantly different between these two groups at any measured point of time. Levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 were not able to distinguish patients with CT-negative mTBI from patients with orthopedic trauma. Patients with orthopedic trauma and high levels of UCH-L1 or GFAP values may be falsely diagnosed as having a concomitant mTBI, predisposing them to unwarranted diagnostics and unnecessary brain imaging. This casts a significant doubt on the diagnostic value of GFAP and UCH-L1 in cases with mTBI.

  16. Unveiling the Membrane-Binding Properties of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Regions of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 by Combined Optical Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) is thought to associate with membranes in part via N- and C-terminal segments that are typically disordered in available high-resolution crystal structures. Herein we investigate the interactions of these regions with model cell membrane using combined sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that both regions associate with POPC lipid bilayers but adopt different structures when doing so: GRK5 residues 2–31 (GRK52–31) was in random coil whereas GRK5546–565 was partially helical. When the subphase for the GRK52–31 peptide was changed to 40% TFE/60% 10 mM phosphate pH 7.4 buffer, a large change in the SFG amide I signal indicated that GRK52–31 became partially helical. By inspecting the membrane behavior of two different segments of GRK52–31, namely, GRK52–24 and GRK525–31, we found that residues 25–31 are responsible for membrane binding, whereas the helical character is imparted by residues 2–24. With SFG, we deduced that the orientation angle of the helical segment of GRK52–31 is 46 ± 1° relative to the surface normal in 40% TFE/60% 10 mM phosphate pH = 7.4 buffer but increases to 78 ± 11° with higher ionic strength. We also investigated the effect of PIP2 in the model membrane and concluded that the POPC:PIP2 (9:1) lipid bilayer did not change the behavior of either peptide compared to a pure POPC lipid bilayer. With ATR-FTIR, we also found that Ca2+·calmodulin is able to extract both peptides from the POPC lipid bilayer, consistent with the role of this protein in disrupting GRK5 interactions with the plasma membrane in cells. PMID:24401145

  17. Conformational changes accompany phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Y.; Koland, John G.

    2005-01-01

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is crucial to its function in cellular growth control. Various studies have suggested that the C-terminal phosphorylation domain, itself a substrate for the EGFR kinase activity, exerts a regulatory influence upon it, although the molecular mechanism for this regulation is unknown. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique was employed to examine how C-terminal domain conformational changes in the context of receptor activation and autophosphorylation might regulate EGFR enzymatic activity. A novel FRET reporter system was devised in which recombinant purified EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) proteins of varying C-terminal lengths were site-specifically labeled at their extreme C termini with blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and a fluorescent nucleotide analog, 2′(3′)-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine 5′-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), binding at their active sites. This novel BFP/TNP-ATP FRET pair demonstrated efficient energy transfer as evidenced by appreciable BFP-donor quenching by bound TNP-ATP. In particular, a marked reduction in energy transfer was observed for the full-length BFP-labeled EGFR-ICD protein upon phosphorylation, likely reflecting its movement away from the active site. The estimated distances from the BFP module to the TNP-ATP-occupied active site for the full-length and C-terminally truncated proteins also reveal the possible folding geometry of this domain with respect to the kinase core. The present studies demonstrate the first use of BFP/TNP-ATP as a FRET reporter system. Furthermore, the results described here provide biophysical evidence for phosphorylation-dependent conformational changes in the C-terminal phosphorylation domain and its likely interaction with the kinase core. PMID:16199664

  18. Conformational changes accompany phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Y; Koland, John G

    2005-11-01

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is crucial to its function in cellular growth control. Various studies have suggested that the C-terminal phosphorylation domain, itself a substrate for the EGFR kinase activity, exerts a regulatory influence upon it, although the molecular mechanism for this regulation is unknown. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique was employed to examine how C-terminal domain conformational changes in the context of receptor activation and autophosphorylation might regulate EGFR enzymatic activity. A novel FRET reporter system was devised in which recombinant purified EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) proteins of varying C-terminal lengths were site-specifically labeled at their extreme C termini with blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and a fluorescent nucleotide analog, 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), binding at their active sites. This novel BFP/TNP-ATP FRET pair demonstrated efficient energy transfer as evidenced by appreciable BFP-donor quenching by bound TNP-ATP. In particular, a marked reduction in energy transfer was observed for the full-length BFP-labeled EGFR-ICD protein upon phosphorylation, likely reflecting its movement away from the active site. The estimated distances from the BFP module to the TNP-ATP-occupied active site for the full-length and C-terminally truncated proteins also reveal the possible folding geometry of this domain with respect to the kinase core. The present studies demonstrate the first use of BFP/TNP-ATP as a FRET reporter system. Furthermore, the results described here provide biophysical evidence for phosphorylation-dependent conformational changes in the C-terminal phosphorylation domain and its likely interaction with the kinase core.

  19. Synthesis of the blood circulating C-terminal fragment of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-4 in its native conformation. Crystallization, heparin and IGF binding, and osteogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Lozano, Rosa M; Rivas, Germán; Jiménez, M Angeles; Ständker, Ludger; Díaz-Gonzalez, Diana; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Cuevas, Pedro; Romero, Antonio; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2005-05-13

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins play a critical role in a wide variety of important physiological processes. It has been demonstrated that both an N-terminal and a C-terminal fragment of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-4 exist and accumulate in the circulatory system, these fragments accounting for virtually the whole amino acid sequence of the protein. The circulating C-terminal fragment establishes three disulfide bridges, and the binding pattern of these has recently been defined. Here we show that the monodimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the C-terminal fragment is typical of a protein with a relatively close packed tertiary structure. This fragment can be produced in its native conformation in Escherichia coli, without the requirement of further refolding procedures, when synthesis is coupled to its secretion from the cell. The recombinant protein crystallizes with the unit cell parameters of a hexagonal system. Furthermore, it binds strongly to heparin, acquiring a well defined oligomeric structure that interacts with insulin-like growth factors, and promotes bone formation in cultures of murine calvariae.

  20. Structure and dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal phosphorylation domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Y; Hazlett, Theodore L; Koland, John G

    2006-05-01

    The C-terminal phosphorylation domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor is believed to regulate protein kinase activity as well as mediate the assembly of signal transduction complexes. The structure and dynamics of this proposed autoregulatory domain were examined by labeling the extreme C terminus of the EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) with an extrinsic fluorophore. Fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the nonphosphorylated EGFR-ICD yielded two rotational correlation times: a longer time, consistent with the global rotational motion of a 60- to 70-kDa protein with an elongated globular conformation, and a shorter time, presumably contributed by segmental motion near the fluorophore. A C-terminally truncated form of EGFR-ICD yielded a slow component consistent with the rotational motion of the 38-kDa kinase core. These findings suggested a structural arrangement of the EGFR-ICD in which the C-terminal phosphorylation domain interacts with the kinase core to move as an extended structure. A marked reduction in the larger correlation time of EGFR-ICD was observed upon its autophosphorylation. This dynamic component was faster than predicted for the globular motion of the 62-kDa EGFR-ICD, suggesting an increase in the mobility of the C-terminal domain and a likely displacement of this domain from the kinase core. The interaction between the SH2 domain of c-Src and the phosphorylated EGFR C-terminal domain was shown to impede its mobility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the EGFR C-terminal domain possessed a significant level of secondary structure in the form of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, with a marginal change in beta-sheet content occurring upon phosphorylation.

  1. Structure and dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal phosphorylation domain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Y.; Hazlett, Theodore L.; Koland, John G.

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal phosphorylation domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor is believed to regulate protein kinase activity as well as mediate the assembly of signal transduction complexes. The structure and dynamics of this proposed autoregulatory domain were examined by labeling the extreme C terminus of the EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) with an extrinsic fluorophore. Fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the nonphosphorylated EGFR-ICD yielded two rotational correlation times: a longer time, consistent with the global rotational motion of a 60- to 70-kDa protein with an elongated globular conformation, and a shorter time, presumably contributed by segmental motion near the fluorophore. A C-terminally truncated form of EGFR-ICD yielded a slow component consistent with the rotational motion of the 38-kDa kinase core. These findings suggested a structural arrangement of the EGFR-ICD in which the C-terminal phosphorylation domain interacts with the kinase core to move as an extended structure. A marked reduction in the larger correlation time of EGFR-ICD was observed upon its autophosphorylation. This dynamic component was faster than predicted for the globular motion of the 62-kDa EGFR-ICD, suggesting an increase in the mobility of the C-terminal domain and a likely displacement of this domain from the kinase core. The interaction between the SH2 domain of c-Src and the phosphorylated EGFR C-terminal domain was shown to impede its mobility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the EGFR C-terminal domain possessed a significant level of secondary structure in the form of α-helices and β-sheets, with a marginal change in β-sheet content occurring upon phosphorylation. PMID:16597832

  2. Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x: importance of the C-terminal penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains for beta-lactam binding.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Todorova, Katya; Sauerbier, Julia; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2012-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) mutations that occur during the selection with beta-lactams are located within the central penicillin-binding/transpeptidase (TP) domain, and are believed to mediate resistance by interfering with the formation of a covalent complex of the active site serine with the antibiotic. We now investigated the effect of two point mutations found in two independently obtained laboratory mutants that are located at the surface of the TP domain with their side chains facing outside (G422D respectively R426C). They have no significant effect on resistance to cefotaxime in vivo or on binding to Bocillin™FL to the active site in vitro using purified PBP2x derivatives, thus apparently do not affect the active site directly. In contrast, in silico modeling revealed that they affect van der Waal's interactions with the PASTA1 (PBP and serine/threonine kinase associated) domain of the C-terminal extension and a noncovalent cefuroxime molecule found in the X-ray structure of an acylated PBP2x, suggesting some effect of the mutations on the interaction of the TP domain with PASTA1 and/or with the antibiotic associated with PASTA1. The effect of the PASTA domains on covalent binding of PBP2x to Bocillin FL was then investigated using a series of soluble truncated PBP2x derivatives. Deletion of 127 C-terminal residues, that is, of both PASTA domains, decreased binding dramatically by ∼90%. Surprisingly, deletion of only 40 amino acids resulted in the same phenotype, whereas the absence of 30 amino acids affected binding marginally by 10%, documenting a crucial role of the C-terminal domain for beta-lactam binding.

  3. Human heart cell proteins interacting with a C-terminally truncated 2A protein of coxsackie B3 virus: identification by the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiansheng; Huang, Xiaotian; Xia, Yanhua

    2016-04-01

    Protein 2A is a non-structural protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), an important human pathogen that can cause a variety of human diseases. Protein 2A not only participates in viral life cycle, but also regulates host cell functions; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of CVB3 2A's function, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system was adopted to screen for CVB3 2A interactive proteins in the human heart cDNA library. Full-length 2A shows strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells, which interferes with the application of Y2H system; therefore, a series of 2A deletion mutants were constructed. Analysis of transcriptional self-activation revealed that 2A lost its transcriptional activity after truncation of 60 amino acids (aa) at the N-terminus or deletion of 17 aa at the C-terminus. Choosing the 2A mutant with 17 aa deletion at the C-terminus as the bait protein, four interactive cellular proteins were identified, including TIMP4, MYL2, COX7C, and ENO1. These proteins are mostly related to protein degradation and metabolism. Although the interactions detected by the Y2H system should be considered as preliminary results, the finding of proteins translated from a human heart cDNA library that interacts with the CVB3 2A will stimulate experiments testing the reactivity of a translational mixture derived from that library with full-length 2A protein, followed by co-immunoprecipitation studies.

  4. Luminogenic "clickable" lanthanide complexes for protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Candelon, Nicolas; Hădade, Niculina D; Matache, Mihaela; Canet, Jean-Louis; Cisnetti, Federico; Funeriu, Daniel P; Nauton, Lionel; Gautier, Arnaud

    2013-10-14

    Development of lanthanide-based luminescent "switch-on" systems via azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition is described. We used these for non-specific protein labeling and as tags for specific and selective activity-based protein labeling.

  5. A conserved C-terminal sequence of high-risk cutaneous beta-human papillomavirus E6 proteins alters localization and signalling of β1-integrin to promote cell migration.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Amy; Storey, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Beta-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV) infect cutaneous epithelia, and accumulating evidence suggests that the virus may act as a co-factor with UV-induced DNA damage in the development and progression of non-melanoma skin cancer, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The E6 protein of cutaneous β-HPV types encodes functions consistent with a role in tumorigenesis, and E6 expression can result in papilloma formation in transgenic animals. The E6 proteins of high-risk α-HPV types, which are associated with the development of anogenital cancers, have a conserved 4 aa motif at their extreme C terminus that binds to specific PDZ domain-containing proteins to promote cell invasion. Likewise, the high-risk β-HPVs HPV5 and HPV8 E6 proteins also share a conserved C-terminal motif, but this is markedly different from that of α-HPV types, implying functional differences. Using binding and functional studies, we have shown that β-HPV E6 proteins target β1-integrin using this C-terminal motif. E6 expression reduced membrane localization of β1-integrin, but increased overall levels of β1-integrin protein and its downstream effector focal adhesion kinase in human keratinocytes. Altered β1-integrin localization due to E6 expression was associated with actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and increased cell migration that was abolished by point mutations in the C-terminal motif of E6. We concluded that modulation of β1-integrin signalling by E6 proteins may contribute towards the pathogenicity of these β-HPV types.

  6. Evaluation of the use of C-terminal part of the Schistosoma mansoni 200kDa tegumental protein in schistosomiasis diagnosis and vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gardênia Braz Figueiredo de; Pacífico, Lucila Gonçalves Grossi; Pimenta, Deborah Laranjeira Ferreira; Siqueira, Liliane Maria Vidal; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Pinheiro, Carina da Silva; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Oliveira, Sergio Costa; Fonseca, Cristina Toscano

    2014-04-01

    Schistosoma mansoni tegument is involved in essential functions for parasite survival and represents a target for screening candidates for vaccine and diagnosis. Our group using reverse vaccinology selected six candidates, previously demonstrated by proteomics studies to be expressed in the parasite tegument, among them was Sm200. In this work we have cloned and expressed a recombinant form of Sm200 C-terminal (1069-1520) region. The efficacy of rSm200 (1069-1520) in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and in the formulation of a vaccine against S. mansoni was assessed respectively in an ELISA based diagnostic assay and immunization protocols in mice. Significant differences between non-infected and acutely infected or chronically infected animals were observed and no cross-recognition was observed with sera from Ascaris suum or Ancylostoma ceylanicum infected mice. rSm200-ELISA test could also discriminate infected individuals from healthy donors not living in endemic area for schistosomiasis but failed to discriminate between individuals from a low endemic area for schistosomiasis known to have positive or negative stools after examination. Recombinant Sm200 also failed to induce protection against schistosomiasis, demonstrating that the C-terminal part of Sm200 is unable to induce protective immune response in mice. Therefore rSm200 (1069-1520)-ELISA represents an important tool to be used in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis.

  7. Neonatal Fc receptor stimulation induces ubiquitin c-terminal hydrolase-1 overexpression in podocytes through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Gan, Hualei; Feng, Songtao; Wu, Huijuan; Sun, Yu; Hu, Ruimin; Zhao, Zhonghua; Zhang, Zhigang

    2012-09-01

    Ubiquitin c-terminal hydrolase-1 is overexpressed in renal podocytes in some immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritides, an effect closely related to extensive podocyte injury. Neonatal Fc receptor is newly recognized to be present on human renal podocytes. It is presumed that neonatal Fc receptor serves as a sensor for immune stimulation transduction and is involved in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury. In our current study, we found that neonatal Fc receptor was constitutively expressed in normal podocytes and up-regulated by immune stimulation induced by antithymocyte serum. An increase in neonatal Fc receptor expression was observed in human podocytes within diseased glomeruli in 97 cases of various glomerulonephritides. The expression percentage was significantly higher in immune-mediated disease, including membranous nephropathy (46.7%), immunoglobin A nephropathy (66.7%), lupus nephritis (87.5%), and acute proliferative glomerulonephritis (100%), than in normal kidney samples (16.7%) (P < .05), whereas there was no significant difference between minimal-change disease and normal kidney. Further study showed that neonatal Fc receptor up-regulated the expression of ubiquitin c-terminal hydrolase-1 via activation of p38 in podocytes subjected to immune stimulation in vitro. These data suggest that neonatal Fc receptor acts as an immune sensor that evokes an inflammatory response, which may lead to functional and morphological changes in podocytes in glomerulonephritides.

  8. Elucidating the role of C-terminal post-translational modifications using protein semisynthesis strategies: α-synuclein phosphorylation at tyrosine 125

    PubMed Central

    Hejjaoui, Mirva; Butterfield, Sara; Fauvet, Bruno; Vercruysse, Filip; Cui, Jia; Dikiy, Igor; Prudent, Michel; Olschewski, Diana; Zhang, Yan; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that supports the role of different post-translational modifications (PTMs) in modulating α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation and toxicity, relatively little is known about the functional consequences of each modification and whether or not these modifications are regulated by each other. This lack of knowledge arises primarily from the current lack of tools and methodologies for the site-specific introduction of PTMs in α-syn. More specifically, the kinases that mediate selective and efficient phosphorylation of C-terminal tyrosine residues of α-syn remain to be identified. Unlike phospho-serine and phospho-threonine residues, which in some cases can be mimicked by serine/threonine → glutamate or aspartate substitutions, there are no natural amino acids that can mimic phosphor-tyrosine. To address these challenges, we developed a general and efficient semisynthetic strategy that enables the site-specific introduction of single or multiple PTMs and the preparation of homogeneously C-terminal modified forms of α-syn in milligram quantities. These advances have allowed us to investigate, for the first time, the effects of selective phosphorylation at Y125 on the structure, aggregation, membrane binding and subcellular localization of α-syn. The development of semisynthetic methods for the site-specific introduction of single or PTMs represents an important advance toward determining the roles of such modifications in α-syn structure, aggregation and functions in heath and disease. PMID:22339654

  9. Modification of glutathione S-transferase 3-3 mutants with 2-(S-glutathionyl)-3,5,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone. Identification of the C-terminal tryptic fragment as part of the H-site and evidence that 2-(S-glutathionyl)-3,5,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone is not specific for cysteine labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J L; Liu, L F; Wang, L Y; Tsai, S P; Hsieh, C H; Hsiao, C D; Tam, M F

    1994-01-01

    A triple mutant of rat liver glutathione S-transferase 3-3 that has all three cysteine residues replaced with serine (CallS) and a quadruple mutant with a Tyr-115 to phenylalanine substitution on CallS (CallSY115F) were reacted with 2-(S-glutathionyl)-3,5,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (GS-1,4-TCBQ). The modified proteins were analysed on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. At an enzyme: GS-1,4-TCBQ ratio of 1:10, the enzymes were modified at multiple sites. Covalent attachment of a single inhibitor on to the protein was achieved by lowering the enzyme: GS-1,4-TCBQ ratio to 1:1. Results from m.s. analyses suggest that the inhibitor on the CallSY115F mutant exists as a glutathionyl dichlorobenzoquinone derivative. The modifiers of the CallS mutants are glutathionyl monochlorobenzoquinone derivatives. Therefore, GS-1,4-TCBQ reacts at a single site on CallSY115F, but probably cross-links two regions on wild-type and CallS mutant. To confirm our observation, CallS was modified with 1-chloro2,4-dinitrobenzene, which specifically labels Tyr-115, before reacting with GS-1,4-TCBQ. The inhibitor formed a glutathionyl dichlorobenzoquinone adduct on the dinitrophenyl-CallS mutant. In addition, the benzoquinone derivative on the protein can be partially removed by 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Peptide mapping and sequencing analysis of the GS-1,4-TCBQ-modified CallS mutant revealed that the C-terminal 16-amino-acid fragment is labelled. Molecular modelling suggests the C(5) and C(6) on the benzoquinone ring of the inhibitor interact with the oxygen atoms of Tyr-115 and Ser-209 respectively. PMID:7818487

  10. The catalytic subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase -- role of the N-terminal domain and of the C-terminal residues in catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Etchebehere, L C; Van Bemmelen, M X; Anjard, C; Traincard, F; Assemat, K; Reymond, C; Véron, M

    1997-09-15

    The C subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is unusually large (73 kDa) due to the presence of 330 amino acids N-terminal to the conserved catalytic core. The sequence following the core, including a C-terminal -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe-COOH motif, is highly conserved. We have characterized the catalytic activity and stability of C subunits mutated in sequences outside the catalytic core and we have analyzed their ability to interact with the R subunit and with the heat-stable protein-kinase inhibitor PKI. Mutants carrying deletions in the N-terminal domain displayed little difference in their kinetic properties and retained their capacity to be inhibited by R subunit and by PKI. In contrast, the mutation of one or both of the phenylalanine residues in the C-terminal motif resulted in a decrease of catalytic activity and stability of the proteins. Inhibition by the R subunit or by PKI were however unaffected. Sequence-comparison analysis of other protein kinases revealed that a -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe- motif is present in many Ser/Thr protein kinases, although its location at the very end of the polypeptide is a particular feature of the PKA family. We propose that the presence of this motif may serve to identify isoforms of protein kinases.

  11. N-terminal chemical protein labeling using the naturally split GOS-TerL intein.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Mootz, Henning D

    2017-03-23

    Chemoselective and regioselective chemical protein labeling is of great importance, yet no current technique is sufficiently general and simple to perform. Protein trans-splicing by split inteins can be used to ligate short tags with chemical labels to either the N or the C terminus of a protein. The CysTag approach exploits split intein fragments without a cysteine fused with such a short tag containing a single cysteine that is easily amenable to selective modification using classical cysteine bioconjugation. Labeling of the protein of interest is achieved through transfer of the pre-labeled tag by protein trans-splicing. This protocol keeps other cysteines unmodified. While split inteins for C-terminal CysTag labeling were previously reported, no high-yielding and naturally split intein for N-terminal labeling has been available. In this work, the recently discovered GOS-TerL intein was explored as the only known naturally split intein that both lacks a cysteine in its N-terminal fragment and is active under ambient conditions. Thioredoxin as a model protein and a camelid nanobody were labeled with a synthetic fluorophore by transferring the pre-labeling CysTag in the protein trans-splicing reaction with yields of about 50 to 90%. The short N-terminal intein fragment was also chemically synthesized with a tag to enable protein labeling by semi-synthetic protein trans-splicing. Our results expand the scope of the CysTag labeling strategy, which achieves selective chemical modification without the requirement for sophisticated biorthogonal functional groups and rather builds on the plethora of commercially available reagents directed at the thiol side chain of cysteine. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Novel antiplatelet role for a protein disulfide isomerase-targeted peptide: Evidence of covalent binding to C-terminal CGHC redox motif.

    PubMed

    Sousa, H R; Gaspar, R S; Sena, E M L; da Silva, S A; de L Fontelles, J L; Araújo, T L S; Mastrogiovanni, M; Fries, D M; Azevedo-Santos, A P S; Laurindo, F R M; Trostchansky, A; Paes, A M

    2017-01-21

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) plays a major role in platelet aggregation and its inhibitors have emerged as novel antithrombotic drugs. In previous work, we designed a peptide based on PDI redox motif (CGHC) that inhibited both PDI reductase activity and PDI-modulated superoxide generation by neutrophil Nox2. Thus, we hypothesized this peptide would also inhibit platelet aggregation by association to surface PDI. Three peptides were used: CxxC, containing the PDI redox motif; Scr, presenting a scrambled sequence of the same residues and AxxA, with cysteines replaced by alanine. We showed that CxxC decreased platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, being more potent at lower agonist concentrations, whereas neither AxxA nor Scr peptides exerted any effect. In thrombin-activated platelets, surface expression of activated αIIbβ3 integrin, P-selectin and granulophysin were analyzed by flow cytometry. CxxC decreased αIIbβ3 activation, but had no effect on the other markers. Upon membrane free thiol labeling in resting platelets, CxxC decreased cell-surface PDI pull down without interfering in total thiol protein content. Finally, the capacity of CxxC to covalently bind to PDI active site was analyzed by ESI LC-MS/MS. We detected the addition of one CxxC molecule to reduced PDI through binding to Cys400 , an important site for PDI prothrombotic activity. Interestingly, CxxC did not react with oxidized PDI. In summary, our data support an antiplatelet activity for CxxC through binding to Cys400 in PDI a' domain, which can be further exploited as a model for site-driven antithrombotic agents development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20.

  14. Structure of the Z Ring-associated Protein, ZapD, Bound to the C-terminal Domain of the Tubulin-like Protein, FtsZ, Suggests Mechanism of Z Ring Stabilization through FtsZ Cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Huang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zeng, Wenjie; Janakiraman, Anuradha

    2017-03-03

    Cell division in most bacteria is mediated by the tubulin-like FtsZ protein, which polymerizes in a GTP-dependent manner to form the cytokinetic Z ring. A diverse repertoire of FtsZ-binding proteins affects FtsZ localization and polymerization to ensure correct Z ring formation. Many of these proteins bind the C-terminal domain (CTD) of FtsZ, which serves as a hub for FtsZ regulation. FtsZ ring-associated proteins, ZapA-D (Zaps), are important FtsZ regulatory proteins that stabilize FtsZ assembly and enhance Z ring formation by increasing lateral assembly of FtsZ protofilaments, which then form the Z ring. There are no structures of a Zap protein bound to FtsZ; therefore, how these proteins affect FtsZ polymerization has been unclear. Recent data showed ZapD binds specifically to the FtsZ CTD. Thus, to obtain insight into the ZapD-CTD interaction and how it may mediate FtsZ protofilament assembly, we determined the Escherichia coli ZapD-FtsZ CTD structure to 2.67 Å resolution. The structure shows that the CTD docks within a hydrophobic cleft in the ZapD helical domain and adopts an unusual structure composed of two turns of helix separated by a proline kink. FtsZ CTD residue Phe-377 inserts into the ZapD pocket, anchoring the CTD in place and permitting hydrophobic contacts between FtsZ residues Ile-374, Pro-375, and Leu-378 with ZapD residues Leu-74, Trp-77, Leu-91, and Leu-174. The structural findings were supported by mutagenesis coupled with biochemical and in vivo studies. The combined data suggest that ZapD acts as a molecular cross-linking reagent between FtsZ protofilaments to enhance FtsZ assembly.

  15. C-terminal interactions of apolipoprotein E4 respond to the postprandial state.

    PubMed

    Tetali, Sarada D; Budamagunta, Madhu S; Voss, John C; Rutledge, John C

    2006-07-01

    Increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) in the postprandial state are associated with atherosclerosis. We investigated whether the postprandial state induced structural changes at the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) C terminus, its principal lipid binding domain, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of a site-directed spin label attached to the cysteine of apoE4-W264C. Spin coupling between labels located in the C termini was followed after mixing with preprandial and postprandial human plasma samples. Our results indicate that postprandial plasma triggers a reorganization of the protein such that the dipolar broadening is diminished, indicating a reduction in C-terminal interaction. The loss of spectral broadening was directly correlated with an increase in postprandial plasma triglycerides and was reduced with delipidated plasma. The spin-labeled apoE4 displayed a lipid preference of VLDL > LDL > HDL in the preprandial and postprandial states. The apoE4 shift to VLDL during the postprandial state was accompanied by a loss in spectral broadening of the protein. These findings suggest that apoE4 associated with LDL maintains self-association via its C terminus and that this association is diminished in VLDL-associated protein. Lipolyzed TGRL reflected a depletion of the C-terminal interaction of apoE4. Addition of palmitate to VLDL gave a similar response as lipolyzed TGRL, suggesting that lipolysis products play a major role in reorganizing apoE4 during the postprandial state.

  16. The ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) C terminus plays a key role in protein stability, but its farnesylation is not required for membrane association in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Paul; Rubin, Philip; Thomson, Andrew R; Rocca, Dan; Henley, Jeremy M

    2014-12-26

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that is highly expressed in neurons. A possible role for UCH-L1 in neurodegeneration has been highlighted because of its presence in Lewy bodies associated with Parkinson disease and neurofibrillary tangles observed in Alzheimer disease. UCH-L1 exists in two forms in neurons, a soluble cytoplasmic form (UCH-L1(C)) and a membrane-associated form (UCH-L1(M)). Alzheimer brains show reduced levels of soluble UCH-L1(C) correlating with the formation of UCH-L1-immunoreactive tau tangles, whereas UCH-L1(M) has been implicated in α-synuclein dysfunction. Given these reports of divergent roles, we investigated the properties of UCH-L1 membrane association. Surprisingly, our results indicate that UCH-L1 does not partition to the membrane in the cultured cell lines we tested. Furthermore, in primary cultured neurons, a proportion of UCH-L1(M) does partition to the membrane, but, contrary to a previous report, this does not require farnesylation. Deletion of the four C-terminal residues caused the loss of protein solubility, abrogation of substrate binding, increased cell death, and an abnormal intracellular distribution, consistent with protein dysfunction and aggregation. These data indicate that UCH-L1 is differently processed in neurons compared with clonal cell lines and that farnesylation does not account for the membrane association in neurons.

  17. Solution Structure of the Ubp-M BUZ Domain, a Highly Specific Protein Module That Recognizes the C-terminal Tail of Free Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ming-Tao; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Kovacs, Jeffrey J.; Keaton, Mignon A.; Li, Shawn S.-C.; Yao, Tso-Pang; Zhou, Pei

    2010-01-01

    Summary The BUZ/Znf-UBP domain is a distinct ubiquitin-binding module found in the cytoplasmic deacetylase HDAC6, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BRAP2/IMP, and a subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Here we report the solution structure of the BUZ domain of Ubp-M, a ubiquitin-specific protease, and its interaction with ubiquitin. Unlike the BUZ domain from isopeptidase T (isoT) that contains a single zinc finger, the Ubp-M BUZ domain features three zinc-binding sites consisted of twelve residues. These zinc ligands form a pair of cross-braced ring fingers encapsulated within a third zinc finger in the primary structure. In contrast to isoT, which can form an N-terminal loop swapped dimer in the crystal state, the formation of additional zinc fingers in the Ubp-M BUZ domain restricts its N-terminal loop to intra-domain interactions. The ubiquitin-binding site of the Ubp-M BUZ domain is mapped to the highly conserved, concave surface formed by the α3 helix and the central β-sheet. We further show that this site binds to the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin, and corresponding peptides display essentially the same binding affinities as full-length ubiquitin does for the Ubp-M BUZ domain. However, modification of the G76Ub carboxylate group either by a peptide- or isopeptide-bond abolishes BUZ-domain interaction. The unique ubiquitin-recognition mode of the BUZ domain family suggests that they may function as “sensors” of free ubiquitin in cells to achieve regulatory roles in many aspects of ubiquitin-dependent processes. PMID:17512543

  18. Solution structure of the Ubp-M BUZ domain, a highly specific protein module that recognizes the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ming-Tao; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Kovacs, Jeffrey J; Keaton, Mignon A; Li, Shawn S-C; Yao, Tso-Pang; Zhou, Pei

    2007-07-06

    The BUZ/Znf-UBP domain is a distinct ubiquitin-binding module found in the cytoplasmic deacetylase HDAC6, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BRAP2/IMP, and a subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Here, we report the solution structure of the BUZ domain of Ubp-M, a ubiquitin-specific protease, and its interaction with ubiquitin. Unlike the BUZ domain from isopeptidase T (isoT) that contains a single zinc finger, the Ubp-M BUZ domain features three zinc-binding sites consisting of 12 residues. These zinc ligands form a pair of cross-braced ring fingers encapsulated within a third zinc finger in the primary structure. In contrast to isoT, which can form an N-terminal loop swapped dimer in the crystal state, the formation of additional zinc fingers in the Ubp-M BUZ domain restricts its N-terminal loop to intra-domain interactions. The ubiquitin-binding site of the Ubp-M BUZ domain is mapped to the highly conserved, concave surface formed by the alpha 3 helix and the central beta-sheet. We further show that this site binds to the C-terminal tail of free ubiquitin, and corresponding peptides display essentially the same binding affinities as full-length ubiquitin does for the Ubp-M BUZ domain. However, modification of the G76(Ub) carboxylate group either by a peptide or isopeptide bond abolishes BUZ-domain interaction. The unique ubiquitin-recognition mode of the BUZ domain family suggests that they may function as "sensors" of free ubiquitin in cells to achieve regulatory roles in many aspects of ubiquitin-dependent processes.

  19. Phosphorylation of Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF) and C-terminal Binding Protein 2 (CtBP2) by Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2) Modulates KLF3 DNA Binding and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Vitri; Kwok, Alister; Lee, Stella; Lee, Ming Min; Tan, Yee Mun; Nicholas, Hannah R.; Isono, Kyo-ichi; Wienert, Beeke; Mak, Ka Sin; Knights, Alexander J.; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Funnell, Alister P. W.; Pearson, Richard C. M; Crossley, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF), a member of the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors, is a widely expressed transcriptional repressor with diverse biological roles. Although there is considerable understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow KLF3 to silence the activity of its target genes, less is known about the signal transduction pathways and post-translational modifications that modulate KLF3 activity in response to physiological stimuli. We observed that KLF3 is modified in a range of different tissues and found that the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) can both bind and phosphorylate KLF3. Mass spectrometry identified serine 249 as the primary phosphorylation site. Mutation of this site reduces the ability of KLF3 to bind DNA and repress transcription. Furthermore, we also determined that HIPK2 can phosphorylate the KLF3 co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) at serine 428. Finally, we found that phosphorylation of KLF3 and CtBP2 by HIPK2 strengthens the interaction between these two factors and increases transcriptional repression by KLF3. Taken together, our results indicate that HIPK2 potentiates the activity of KLF3. PMID:25659434

  20. C-terminal splice variants of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel CaV2.1 α1 subunits are differentially regulated by Rab3-interacting molecule proteins.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mitsuru; Takada, Yoshinori; Wong, Chee Fah; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Kotani, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Mori, Masayuki X; Snutch, Terrance P; Ronjat, Michel; Waard, Michel De; Mori, Yasuo

    2017-04-04

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) mediate neurotransmitter release controlled by presynaptic proteins such as the scaffolding proteins Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs). RIMs confer sustained activity and anchoring of synaptic vesicles to the VDCCs. Multiple sites on the VDCC α1 and β subunits have been reported to mediate the RIMs-VDCC interaction, but their significance is unclear. Because alternative splicing of exons 44 and 47 in the P/Q-type VDCC α1 subunit CaV2.1 gene generates major variants of the CaV2.1 C-terminal region, known for associating with presynaptic proteins, we focused here on the protein regions encoded by these two exons. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the C-terminal domain (CTD) encoded by CaV2.1 exons 40-47 interacts with the α-RIMs, RIM1α and RIM2α, and this interaction was abolished by alternative splicing that deletes the protein regions encoded by exons 44 and 47. Electrophysiological characterization of VDCC currents revealed that the suppressive effect of RIM2α on voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) was stronger than that of RIM1α for the CaV2.1 variant containing the region encoded by exons 44 and 47. Importantly, in the CaV2.1 variant in which exons 44 and 47 were deleted, strong RIM2α-mediated VDI suppression was attenuated to a level comparable to that of RIM1α-mediated VDI suppression, which was unaffected by the exclusion of exons 44 and 47. Studies of deletion mutants of the exon 47 region identified 17 amino acid residues on the C-terminal side of a polyglutamine stretch as being essential for the potentiated VDI-suppression characteristic of RIM2α. These results suggest that the interactions of the CaV2.1 CTD with RIMs enable CaV2.1 proteins to distinguish α-RIM isoforms in VDI suppression of P/Q-type VDCC currents.

  1. New acute transforming feline retovirus with fms homology specifies a C-terminally truncated version of the c-fms protein that is different from SM-feline sarcoma virus v-fms protein

    SciTech Connect

    Besmer, P.; Lader, E.; George, P.C.; Bergold, P.J.; Qui, F.; Zuckerman, E.E.; Hardy, W.D.

    1986-10-01

    The HZ5-feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) is a new acute transforming feline retrovirus which was isolated from a multicentric fibrosarcoma of a domestic cat. The HZ5-FeSV transforms fibroblasts in vitro and is replication defective. A biologically active integrated HZ5-FeSV provirus was molecularly cloned from cellular DNA of HZ5-FeSV-infected FRE-3A rat cells. The HZ5-FeSV has oncogene homology with the fms sequences of the SM-FeSV. The genome organization of the 8.6-kilobase HZ5-FeSV provirus is 5' ..delta..gag-fms-..delta..pol-..delta..env 3'. The HZ5- and SM-FeSVs display indistinguishable in vitro transformation characteristics, and the structures of the gag-fms transforming genes in the two viruses are very similar. In the HZ5-FeSV and the SM-FeSV, identical c-fms and feline leukemia virus p10 sequences form the 5' gag-fms junction. With regard to v-fms the two viruses are homologous up to 11 amino acids before the C terminus of the SM-FeSV v-fms protein. In HZ5-FeSV a segment of 362 nucleotides then follows before the 3' recombination site with feline leukemia virus pol. The new 3' v-fms sequence encodes 27 amino acids before reaching a TGA termination signal. The relationship of this sequence with the recently characterized human c-fms sequence has been examined. The 3' HZ5-FeSV v-fms sequence is homologous with 3' c-fms sequences. A frameshift mutation (11-base-pair deletion) was found in the C-terminal fms coding sequence of the HZ5-FeSV. As a result, the HZ5-FeSV v-fms protein is predicted to be a C-terminally truncated version of c-fms. This frameshift mutation may determine the oncogenic properties of v-fms in the HZ5-FeSV.

  2. Structure of the S100A6 complex with a fragment from the C-terminal domain of Siah-1 interacting protein: A novel mode for S100 protein target recognition†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Tae; Dimitrova, Yoana N.; Schneider, Gabriela; Ridenour, Whitney B.; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Soss, Sarah E.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Filipek, Anna; Chazin, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    S100A6 is a member of the S100 subfamily of Ca2+ binding EF-hand proteins that has been shown to interact with calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP; SIP), a subunit of an SCF-like E3 ligase complex (SCF-TBL1) formed under genotoxic stress. SIP serves as a scaffold in this complex, linking the E2-recruiting module Siah-1 to the substrate-recruiting module Skp1-TBL1. A cell-based functional assay suggests that S100A6 modulates the activity of SCF-TBL1. The results from the cell-based experiments could be enhanced if it were possible to selectively inhibit S100A6-SIP interactions without perturbing any other functions of the two proteins. To this end, the structure of the S100A6-SIP complex was determined in solution by NMR and the strength of the interaction was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. In an initial step, the minimal binding region in SIP for S100A6 was mapped to a 31 residue fragment (Ser189-Arg219) in the C-terminal domain. The structure of the S100A6-SIP(189–219) complex revealed that SIP(189–219) forms two helices, the first of which (Met193-Tyr200) interacts with S100A6 in a canonical binding mode. The second helix (Met207-Val216) lies over the S100A6 dimer interface, a mode of binding to S100A6 that has not previously been observed for any target bound to an S100 protein. A series of structure-based SIP mutations showed reduced S100A6 binding affinity, setting the stage for direct functional analysis of S100A6-SIP interactions. PMID:18803400

  3. Immunogenic properties of a recombinant fusion protein containing the C-terminal 19 kDa of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 and the innate immunity agonist FliC flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bargieri, Daniel Y; Leite, Juliana A; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria Elisabete; Braga, Catarina J M; Ferreira, Luis C S; Soares, Irene S; Costa, Fabio T M; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2010-04-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated the immunogenic properties of a new malaria vaccine polypeptide based on a 19 kDa C-terminal fragment of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1(19)) from Plasmodium vivax and an innate immunity agonist, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin (FliC). Herein, we tested whether the same strategy, based on the MSP1(19) component of the deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, could also generate a fusion polypeptide with enhanced immunogenicity. The His(6)FliC-MSP1(19) fusion protein was expressed from a recombinant Escherichia coli and showed preserved in vitro TLR5-binding activity. In contrast to animals injected with His(6)MSP1(19), mice subcutaneously immunised with the recombinant His(6)FliC-MSP1(19) developed strong MSP1(19)-specific systemic antibody responses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass. Incorporation of other adjuvants, such as CpG ODN 1826, complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants or Quil-A, improved the IgG responses after the second, but not the third, immunising dose. It also resulted in a more balanced IgG subclass response, as evaluated by the IgG1/IgG2c ratio, and higher cell-mediated immune response, as determined by the detection of antigen-specific interferon-gamma secretion by immune spleen cells. MSP1(19)-specific antibodies recognised not only the recombinant protein, but also the native protein expressed on the surface of P. falciparum parasites. Finally, sera from rabbits immunised with the fusion protein alone inhibited the in vitro growth of three different P. falciparum strains. In summary, these results extend our previous observations and further demonstrate that fusion of the innate immunity agonist FliC to Plasmodium antigens is a promising alternative to improve their immunogenicity.

  4. Affinity labeling of protein synthesis factors

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, D.D.; Dever, T.E.; Abramson, R.D.; Lobur, M.; Merrick, W.C.

    1986-05-01

    The authors laboratory is interested in determining those eukaryotic protein synthesis factors which interact with nucleotides and mRNA. To study the binding the authors have used the nucleotides, their analogs, and mRNA analogs as listed below: (1) UV cross-linking with normal (/sup 32/P)XTP; (2) Oxidized GTP; (3) 3'p-azido benzoyl GDP (GTP); (4) 5'p-fluoro sulfonyl benzoyl guanosine; (5) 5'p-fluoro sulfonyl benzoyl adenosine; (6) oxidized mRNA. Currently, they are continuing their efforts to specifically label the proteins, and they are also trying to isolate a single labeled tryptic peptide from the proteins.

  5. The C-terminal RG dipeptide repeats of the spliceosomal Sm proteins D1 and D3 contain symmetrical dimethylarginines, which form a major B-cell epitope for anti-Sm autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Brahms, H; Raymackers, J; Union, A; de Keyser, F; Meheus, L; Lührmann, R

    2000-06-02

    The Sm proteins B/B', D1, D2, D3, E, F, and G are components of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 that are essential for the splicing of pre-mRNAs in eukaryotes. D1 and D3 are among the most common antigens recognized by anti-Sm autoantibodies, an autoantibody population found exclusively in patients afflicted with systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we demonstrate by protein sequencing and mass spectrometry that all arginines in the C-terminal arginine-glycine (RG) dipeptide repeats of the human Sm proteins D1 and D3, isolated from HeLa small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, contain symmetrical dimethylarginines (sDMAs), a posttranslational modification thus far only identified in the myelin basic protein. The further finding that human D1 individually overexpressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells contains asymmetrical dimethylarginines suggests that the symmetrical dimethylation of the RG repeats in D1 and D3 is dependent on the assembly status of D1 and D3. In antibody binding studies, 10 of 11 anti-Sm patient sera tested, as well as the monoclonal antibody Y12, reacted with a chemically synthesized C-terminal peptide of D1 containing sDMA, but not with peptides containing asymmetrically modified or nonmodified arginines. These results thus demonstrate that the sDMA-modified C terminus of D1 forms a major linear epitope for anti-Sm autoantibodies and Y12 and further suggest that posttranslational modifications of Sm proteins play a role in the etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  6. Regulatory effect of the glial Golli-BG21 protein on the full-length murine small C-terminal domain phosphatase (SCP1, or Golli-interacting protein).

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Tatis, Sergio; Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2014-05-16

    The gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (golli) encodes a number of proteins essential for myelination, comprising Golli and classic isoforms that are expressed in a developmentally-regulated manner. The Golli-interacting-protein (GIP) was previously discovered in a search for potential interacting partners of the Golli-isoform BG21, and was realised to be an acidic phosphatase belonging to the family of RNA-polymerase-2, small-subunit, C-terminal phosphatases (viz., SCP1). Here, we refer to this protein as mSCP1/GIP. In subsequent in vitro studies of recombinant murine SCP1/GIP, the inability to produce an active full-length version of the protein under native conditions necessitated the study of a truncated form ΔN-rmSCP1/GIP, but with inconclusive results regarding its interaction with BG21 [13]. We have since developed a new SUMO-expression and purification protocol for the preparation of a functional, full-length mGIP/SCP1, with no additional purification tags. Here, the interaction between mSCP1/GIP (with intact N-terminus) and BG21 is shown to be different than for the truncation mutant studied previously. Specifically, this interaction shows a dual effect on the enzymatic activity of mSCP1/GIP by BG21: BG21 enhanced mSCP1/GIP phosphatase activity (Ka = 30 μM), whereas PKCα-phosphorylated BG21 inhibited its activity (Ki = 2.9 μM), suggesting a potential role of BG21 as a molecular switch ("quick-brake mechanism") on mSCP1/GIP. The successful production of an active, full-length mSCP1/GIP thus demonstrates a role for its N-terminus in regulation of phosphatase activity, in events such as the regulation of transcription in oligodendrocytes.

  7. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  8. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 and Protein Kinase C Phosphorylate the Distal C-Terminal Tail of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 and Mediate Recruitment of Beta-Arrestin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiansong; Busillo, John M; Stumm, Ralf; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-22

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a key event for cell signaling and regulation of receptor function. Previously, using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified two phosphorylation sites at the distal C-terminal tail of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, but were unable to determine which specific residues were phosphorylated. Here, we demonstrate that serines 346 and/or 347 (Ser-346/7) of CXCR4 are phosphorylated upon stimulation with the agonist CXCL12 as well as a CXCR4 pepducin, ATI-2341. ATI-2341, a Gi-biased CXCR4 agonist, induced more robust phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 compared to CXCL12. Knockdown of GRK2, GRK3 or GRK6 reduced CXCL12-induced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 with GRK3 knockdown having the strongest effect, while inhibition of the conventional PKC isoforms reduced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 induced by either CXCL12 or ATI-2341. The loss of GRK3- or PKC-mediated phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 impaired the recruitment of β-arrestin to CXCR4. We also found that a pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor for PKCζ effectively inhibited CXCR4 phosphorylation and signaling, most likely by functioning as a non-specific CXCR4 antagonist. Together, these studies demonstrate the role Ser-346/7 plays in arrestin recruitment and initiation of the process of receptor desensitization and provide insight into the dysregulation of CXCR4 observed in patients with various forms of WHIM syndrome.

  9. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  10. Spatially addressable chemoselective C-terminal ligation of an intein fusion protein from a complex mixture to a hydrazine-terminated surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Marinakos, Stella M; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-02-15

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is useful in many areas of research, including biological characterization, antibody purification, and clinical diagnostics. A critical limitation in the development of protein microarrays and heterogeneous protein-based assays is the enormous amount of work and associated costs in the purification of proteins prior to their immobilization onto a surface. Methods to address this problem would simplify the development of interfacial diagnostics that use a protein as the recognition element. Herein, we describe an approach for the facile, site-specific immobilization of proteins on a surface without any preprocessing or sample purification steps that ligates an intein fusion protein at its C-terminus by reaction with a hydrazine group presented by a surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology can directly immobilize a protein directly from cell lysate onto a protein-resistant surface. This methodology is also compatible with soft lithography and inkjet printing so that one or more proteins can be patterned on a surface without the need for purification.

  11. Structural Model of Dodecameric Heat-shock Protein Hsp21 - Flexible N-terminal Arms Interact with Client Proteins while C-terminal Tails Maintain the Dodecamer and Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Rutsdottir, Gudrun; Härmark, Johan; Weide, Yoran; Hebert, Hans; Rasmussen, Morten Ib; Wernersson, Sven; Respondek, Michal; Akke, Mikael; Højrup, Peter; Koeck, Philip J B; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2017-03-21

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) prevent aggregation of thermosensitive client proteins in a first line of defense against cellular stress. The mechanisms by which they perform this function have been hard to define due to limited structural information; currently there is only one high-resolution structure of a plant sHsp published, of the cytosolic Hsp16.9. We took interest in Hsp21, a chloroplast-localized sHsp crucial for plant stress resistance, which has even longer N-terminals arms than Hsp16.9, with a functionally important and conserved methionine-rich motif. To provide a framework for investigating structure-function relationships of Hsp21 and understanding these sequence variations, we developed a structural model of Hsp21 based on homology modeling, cryo-EM, crosslinking mass spectrometry, NMR and small angle X-ray scattering. Our data suggest a dodecameric arrangement of two trimer-of-dimer discs stabilized by the C-terminal tails, possibly through tail-to-tail interactions between the discs, mediated through extended IXVXI-motifs. Our model further suggests that six N-terminal arms are located on the outside of the dodecamer, accessible for interaction with client proteins, and distinct from previous undefined or inwardly-facing arms. To test the importance of the IXVXI motif, we created the point mutant V181A, which as expected disrupts the Hsp21 dodecamer and decreases chaperone activity. Finally, our data emphasize that sHsp chaperone efficiency depends on oligomerization and that client interactions can occur both with and without oligomer dissociation. These results provide a generalizable workflow to explore sHsps, expand our understanding of sHsp structural motifs, and provide a testable Hsp21 structure model to inform future investigations.

  12. Display of both N- and C-terminal target fusion proteins on the Aspergillus oryzae cell surface using a chitin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Soichiro; Ito, Junji; Adachi, Takashi; Ishida, Hiroki; Hata, Yoji; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-08-01

    A novel cell surface display system in Aspergillus oryzae was established by using a chitin-binding module (CBM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an anchor protein. CBM was fused to the N or C terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the fusion proteins (GFP-CBM and CBM-GFP) were expressed using A. oryzae as a host. Western blotting and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that both GFP-CBM and CBM-GFP were successfully expressed on the cell surface. In addition, cell surface display of triacylglycerol lipase from A. oryzae (tglA), while retaining its activity, was also successfully demonstrated using CBM as an anchor protein. The activity of tglA was significantly higher when tglA was fused to the C terminus than N terminus of CBM. Together, these results show that CBM used as a first anchor protein enables the fusion of both the N and/or C terminus of a target protein.

  13. The β1 adrenergic effects of antibodies against the C-terminal end of the ribosomal P2β protein of Trypanosoma cruzi associate with a specific pattern of epitope recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bergami, P Lopez; Gómez, KA; Levy, GV; Grippo, V; Baldi, A; Levin, MJ

    2005-01-01

    BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P2β protein (TcP2β) develop a strong and specific antibody response against its 13 residue-long C-terminal epitope (peptide R13: EEEDDDMGFGLFD) that has a concomitant β1-adrenergic stimulating activity. However, other animals that undergo similar immunizations seem tolerant to this epitope. To evaluate further the antibody response against the ribosomal P proteins, 25 BALB/c and 25 Swiss mice were immunized with TcP2β. From the 50 animals, 31 developed a positive anti-R13 response, whereas 19 were non-responsive. From the 31 anti-R13 positive mice, 25 had anti-R13 antibodies that recognized the discontinuous motif ExDDxGF, and their presence correlated with the recording of supraventricular tachycardia. The other six had anti-R13 antibodies but with a normal electrocardiographic recording. These anti-R13 antibodies recognized the motif DDxGF shared by mammals and T. cruzi and proved to be a true anti-P autoantibody because they were similar to those elicited in Swiss, but not in BALB/c mice, by immunization with the C-terminal portion of the mouse ribosomal P protein. Our results show that the recognition of the glutamic acid in position 3 of peptide R13 defines the ability of anti-R13 antibodies to react with the motif AESDE of the second extracellular loop of the β1-adrenergic receptor, setting the molecular basis for their pathogenic β1 adrenoceptor stimulating activity. PMID:16178868

  14. Clustering of C-terminal stromal domains of Tha4 homo-oligomers during translocation by the Tat protein transport system.

    PubMed

    Dabney-Smith, Carole; Cline, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    The chloroplast Twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway uses three membrane proteins and the proton gradient to transport folded proteins across sealed membranes. Precursor proteins bind to the cpTatC-Hcf106 receptor complex, triggering Tha4 assembly and protein translocation. Tha4 is required only for the translocation step and is thought to be the protein-conducting component. The organization of Tha4 oligomers was examined by substituting pairs of cysteine residues into Tha4 and inducing disulfide cross-links under varying stages of protein translocation. Tha4 formed tetramers via its transmembrane domain in unstimulated membranes and octamers in membranes stimulated by precursor and the proton gradient. Tha4 formed larger oligomers of at least 16 protomers via its carboxy tail, but such C-tail clustering only occurred in stimulated membranes. Mutational studies showed that transmembrane domain directed octamers as well as C-tail clusters require Tha4's transmembrane glutamate residue and its amphipathic helix, both of which are necessary for Tha4 function. A novel double cross-linking strategy demonstrated that both transmembrane domain directed- and C-tail directed oligomerization occur in the translocase. These results support a model in which Tha4 oligomers dock with a precursor-receptor complex and undergo a conformational switch that results in activation for protein transport. This possibly involves accretion of additional Tha4 into a larger transport-active homo-oligomer.

  15. [Expression levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 and serum glial fibrillary acidic protein and its clinical significance in patients with acute cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chongling; Yang, Xinling; Mao, Deqiang; Lou, Silong; Dai, Qinbi; Chen, Jie; Cheng, Xing; Wang, Shiqiang

    2017-03-28

    目的:观察急性脑梗死患者血清泛素羧基末端水解酶-1(ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1,UCH-L1)和血清胶质纤维酸性蛋白(serum glial fibrillary acidic protein,GFAP)的临床表达水平,并探讨二者对脑梗死患者的临床意义。
方法:选取重庆市肿瘤医院在2014年1月至2016年2月期间收治的80例急性脑梗死患者作为观察组,另选取同时段来院做体格检查的80例健康者作为对照组。分别检测两组研究对象的血清UCH-L1和GFAP的表达水平。结果:UCH-L1诊断脑梗死的敏感度为75.0%,特异度为87.5%;GFAP诊断脑梗死的敏感度为81.3%,特异度为 90.0%。UCH-L1和GFAP的受试者工作特征(receiver operating characteristic,ROC)曲线下面积分别为0.670及0.757。两组研究对象在年龄、性别、饮酒、吸烟、糖尿病、高脂血症等一般情况中比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);观察组患者患高血压的比例明显高于对照组(P<0.05);经Spearson/Pearson分析显示血清UCH-L1与GFAP水平与高血压呈正比,与性别、年龄、糖尿病、高血脂、饮酒、吸烟等因素无相关性;观察组患者不同发病时间一般资料的比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平明显高于对照组(P<0.05);在不同发病时间两组患者血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);轻、中、重型3组患者的血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平高于对照组(P<0.05);中、重型患者血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平高于轻型(P<0.05);观察组患者在不同发病时间里血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平与梗死灶大小差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);Pearson相关性分析结果示血清UCH-L1和GFAP表达水平呈正相关(r=0.634,P=0.001)。结论:在急性脑梗死患者中早期血清UCH-L1和GFAP的表达水平明显升高,与脑梗死的病情严重程度有一定的相关性,可为临床上早期诊断及治疗提供依据。.

  16. Structural studies of the Hrp secretion system: expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal domain of the HrcQB protein from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Fadouloglou, V E; Tampakaki, A P; Panopoulos, N J; Kokkinidis, M

    2001-11-01

    The C-terminal domain of the HrcQ(B) protein from the Hrp secretion system of the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola has been crystallized from MPD using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 51.6, b = 27.3, c = 97.2 A and beta = 99.8 degrees. A complete native data set extending to 3.0 A resolution was collected from a single cryoprotected crystal. The crystal solvent content and calculation of self-rotation functions showing non-crystallographic twofold symmetry axes are consistent with the presence of an oligomeric assembly in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Effect of C-Terminal Protein Tags on Pentitol and l-Arabinose Transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-3H]arabinose, l-[14C]arabitol, and [14C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter. PMID:24561586

  18. Effect of C-terminal protein tags on pentitol and L-arabinose transport by Ambrosiozyma monospora Lat1 and Lat2 transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Londesborough, John; Richard, Peter; Valkonen, Mari; Viljanen, Kaarina

    2014-05-01

    Functional expression in heterologous hosts is often less successful for integral membrane proteins than for soluble proteins. Here, two Ambrosiozyma monospora transporters were successfully expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tagged proteins. Growth of A. monospora on l-arabinose instead of glucose caused transport activities of l-arabinose, l-arabitol, and ribitol, measured using l-[1-(3)H]arabinose, l-[(14)C]arabitol, and [(14)C]ribitol of demonstrated purity. A. monospora LAT1 and LAT2 genes were cloned earlier by using their ability to improve the growth of genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae on l-arabinose. However, the l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of S. cerevisiae carrying LAT1 or LAT2 are only slightly greater than those of control strains. S. cerevisiae carrying the LAT1 or LAT2 gene fused in frame to the genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or adenylate kinase (AK) exhibited large (>3-fold for LAT1; >20-fold for LAT2) increases in transport activities. Lat1-mCherry transported l-arabinose with high affinity (Km ≈ 0.03 mM) and l-arabitol and ribitol with very low affinity (Km ≥ 75 mM). The Lat2-GFP, Lat2-mCherry, and Lat2-AK fusion proteins could not transport l-arabinose but were high-affinity pentitol transporters (Kms ≈ 0.2 mM). The l-arabinose and pentitol transport activities of A. monospora could not be completely explained by any combination of the observed properties of tagged Lat1 and Lat2, suggesting either that tagging and expression in a foreign membrane alters the transport kinetics of Lat1 and/or Lat2 or that A. monospora contains at least one more l-arabinose transporter.

  19. LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL1) binds to the C-terminal domain of ATM-interacting protein (ATMIN/ASCIZ) and regulates its subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Rapali, Peter; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor; Martinez-Moreno, Monica; Tarnok, Krisztian; Schlett, Katalin; Albar, Juan Pablo; Bruix, Marta; Nyitray, Laszlo; Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have screened a human library with dynein light chain DYNLL1 (DLC8) as bait. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynein light chain DYNLL1 binds to ATM-kinase interacting protein (ATMIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATMIN has 17 SQ/TQ motifs, a motif frequently found in DYNLL1-binding partners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two proteins interact in vitro, with ATMIN displaying at least five binding sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of ATMIN and DYNNL1 in transfected cells can also be observed. -- Abstract: LC8 dynein light chain (now termed DYNLL1 and DYNLL2 in mammals), a dimeric 89 amino acid protein, is a component of the dynein multi-protein complex. However a substantial amount of DYNLL1 is not associated to microtubules and it can thus interact with dozens of cellular and viral proteins that display well-defined, short linear motifs. Using DYNLL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart library we identified ATMIN, an ATM kinase-interacting protein, as a DYNLL1-binding partner. Interestingly, ATMIN displays at least 18 SQ/TQ motifs in its sequence and DYNLL1 is known to bind to proteins with KXTQT motifs. Using pepscan and yeast two-hybrid techniques we show that DYNLL1 binds to multiple SQ/TQ motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of ATMIN. Recombinant expression and purification of the DYNLL1-binding region of ATMIN allowed us to obtain a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass in gel filtration close to 400 kDa that could bind to DYNLL1 in vitro. The NMR data-driven modelled complexes of DYNLL1 with two selected ATMIN peptides revealed a similar mode of binding to that observed between DYNLL1 and other peptide targets. Remarkably, co-expression of mCherry-DYNLL1 and GFP-ATMIN mutually affected intracellular protein localization. In GFP-ATMIN expressing-cells DNA damage induced efficiently nuclear foci formation, which was partly impeded by the presence of mCherry-DYNLL1

  20. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  1. A VLP Library of C-Terminally Truncated Hepatitis B Core Proteins: Correlation of RNA Encapsidation with a Th1/Th2 Switch in the Immune Responses of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sominskaya, Irina; Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Dishlers, Andris; Berza, Ieva; Mihailova, Maria; Jansons, Juris; Akopjana, Inara; Stahovska, Irina; Dreilina, Dzidra; Ose, Velta; Pumpens, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient pBR327- and Ptrp-based E. coli expression system was used to generate a large-scale library of virus like particles (VLP) formed by recombinant hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) protein derivatives. To construct the library, the gene of HBc protein of the genotype D/subtype ayw2 virus was gradually truncated from the 3`-end and twenty-two HBc variants (with truncation up to 139 aa) were expressed at high levels. The proteins were purified by salt precipitation and gel filtration. Background RNA binding was observed for VLPs formed by HBc1-149, which lacked all C-terminal Arg blocks, and the addition of three Arg residues (HBc1-152) only slightly increased RNA binding. The presence of two Arg blocks (proteins HBc1-162 and HBc1-163) resulted in approximately half of the typical level of RNA binding, and the presence of three blocks (protein HBc1-171) led to approximately 85% of the typical level of binding. Only a small increase in the level of RNA binding was found for the HBc1-175 VLPs, which contained all four Arg blocks but lacked the last 8 aa of the full-length HBc protein. VLPs containing high levels of RNA had higher antigenicity according to an ELISA with anti-HBc mAbs than the VLPs formed by HBc variants without C-terminal Arg blocks and lacking RNA. The results indicate that the VLPs were stabilised by nucleic acids. The immunogenicity in BALB/c mice was comparable for VLPs formed by different HBc proteins, but a clear switch from a Th1 response to a Th2 response occurred after the loss of encapsidated RNA. We did not observe significant differences in lymphocyte proliferation in vitro for the tested VLP variants; however, the loss of RNA encapsidation correlated with a decreased level of IFN-γ induction, which is a measure of the potential CTL activity of immunogens. PMID:24086668

  2. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 - ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species.

  3. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 – ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species. PMID:27073893

  4. Overproduction of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli and expression of the engineered C-terminal DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1986-01-01

    Overproduction of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli, up to 25% of the soluble cell protein, has been achieved in an inducible host-vector system under transcriptional control of the lambda promoter PL. This system is ideally suited for large scale production and purification of CRP. In addition, a structural gene for the DNA-binding domain of CRP has been constructed. To this end the nucleotide sequence coding for the C-terminus was fused to the sequence coding for the first 10 N-terminal amino acids and cloned into suitable vectors. Good expression was achieved using the lambda PL promoter. The gene product, beta CRP, is recognized by anti-CRP antibodies. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3539103

  5. Aquareovirus NS80 recruits viral proteins to its inclusions, and its C-terminal domain is the primary driving force for viral inclusion formation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Guo, Hong; Yan, Li-Ming; Liu, Huan; Fang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed in reovirus-infected cells are the sites of viral replication and assembly. Previous studies have suggested that the NS80 protein of aquareovirus may be involved in the formation of viral inclusion bodies. However, it remains unknown whether other viral proteins are involved in the process, and what regions of NS80 may act coordinately in mediating inclusion formation. Here, we observed that globular cytoplasmic inclusions were formed in virus-infected cells and viral proteins NS80 and NS38 colocalized in the inclusions. During transfection, singly expressed NS80 could form cytoplasmic inclusions and recruit NS38 and GFP-tagged VP4 to these structures. Further treatment of cells with nocodazole, a microtubule inhibitor, did not disrupt the inclusion, suggesting that inclusion formation does not rely on microtubule network. Besides, we identified that the region 530-742 of NS80 was likely the minimal region required for inclusion formation, and the C-tail, coiled-coil region as well as the conserved linker region were essential for inclusion phenotype. Moreover, with series deletions from the N-terminus, a stepwise conversion occurred from large condensed cytoplasmic to small nuclear inclusions, then to a diffused intracellular distribution. Notablely, we found that the nuclear inclusions, formed by NS80 truncations (471 to 513-742), colocalized with cellular protein β-catenin. These data indicated that NS80 could be a major mediator in recruiting NS38 and VP4 into inclusion structures, and the C-terminus of NS80 is responsible for inclusion formation.

  6. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  7. A gene truncation strategy generating N- and C-terminal deletion variants of proteins for functional studies: mapping of the Sec1p binding domain in yeast Mso1p by a Mu in vitro transposition-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Poussu, Eini; Jäntti, Jussi; Savilahti, Harri

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophage Mu in vitro transposition constitutes a versatile tool in molecular biology, with applications ranging from engineering of single genes or proteins to modification of genome segments or entire genomes. A new strategy was devised on the basis of Mu transposition that via a few manipulation steps simultaneously generates a nested set of gene constructions encoding deletion variants of proteins. C-terminal deletions are produced using a mini-Mu transposon that carries translation stop signals close to each transposon end. Similarly, N-terminal deletions are generated using a transposon with appropriate restriction sites, which allows deletion of the 5′-distal part of the gene. As a proof of principle, we produced a set of plasmid constructions encoding both C- and N-terminally truncated variants of yeast Mso1p and mapped its Sec1p-interacting region. The most important amino acids for the interaction in Mso1p are located between residues T46 and N78, with some weaker interactions possibly within the region E79–N105. This general-purpose gene truncation strategy is highly efficient and produces, in a single reaction series, a comprehensive repertoire of gene constructions encoding protein deletion variants, valuable in many types of functional studies. Importantly, the methodology is applicable to any protein-encoding gene cloned in an appropriate vector. PMID:16006618

  8. Patient-derived C-terminal mutation of FANCI causes protein mislocalization and reveals putative EDGE motif function in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi, Luca; Jones, Mathew J K; Cotto-Rios, Xiomaris M; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Huang, Tony T

    2011-02-17

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare familial genome instability syndrome caused by mutations in FA genes that results in defective DNA crosslink repair. Activation of the FA pathway requires the FA core ubiquitin ligase complex-dependent monoubiquitination of 2 interacting FA proteins, FANCI and FANCD2. Although loss of either FANCI or FANCD2 is known to prevent monoubiquitination of its respective partner, it is unclear whether FANCI has any additional domains that may be important in promoting DNA repair, independent of its monoubiquitination. Here, we focus on an FA-I patient-derived FANCI mutant protein, R1299X (deletion of 30 residues from its C-terminus), to characterize important structural region(s) in FANCI that is required to activate the FA pathway. We show that, within this short 30 amino acid stretch contains 2 separable functional signatures, a nuclear localization signal and a putative EDGE motif, that is critical for the ability of FANCI to properly monoubiquitinate FANCD2 and promote DNA crosslink resistance. Our study enable us to conclude that, although proper nuclear localization of FANCI is crucial for robust FANCD2 monoubiquitination, the putative FANCI EDGE motif is important for DNA crosslink repair.

  9. Abrogation of TLR3 inhibition by discrete amino acid changes in the C-terminal half of the West Nile virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clayton R; Scholle, Frank

    2014-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted pathogen, which causes significant disease in humans. The innate immune system is a first-line defense against invading microorganism and many flaviviruses, including WNV, have evolved multifunctional proteins, which actively suppress its activation and antiviral actions. The WNV non-structural protein 1 (NS1) inhibits signal transduction originating from Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and also critically contributes to virus genome replication. In this study we developed a novel FACS-based screen to attempt to separate these two functions. The individual amino acid changes P320S and M333V in NS1 restored TLR3 signaling in virus-infected HeLa cells. However, virus replication was also attenuated, suggesting that the two functions are not easily separated and may be contained within overlapping domains. The residues we identified are completely conserved among several mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses, indicating that they are of biological importance to the virus.

  10. A Novel C-Terminal CIB2 (Calcium and Integrin Binding Protein 2) Mutation Associated with Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss in a Hispanic Family.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunjan; Giese, Arnaud P; Grossheim, J M; Hegde, Rashmi S; Hegde, Rashima S; Delio, Maria; Samanich, Joy; Riazuddin, Saima; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Cai, Jinlu; Ahmed, Zubair M; Morrow, Bernice E

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a complex disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Previously, mutations in CIB2 have been identified as a common cause of genetic hearing loss in Pakistani and Turkish populations. Here we report a novel (c.556C>T; p.(Arg186Trp)) transition mutation in the CIB2 gene identified through whole exome sequencing (WES) in a Caribbean Hispanic family with non-syndromic hearing loss. CIB2 belongs to the family of calcium-and integrin-binding (CIB) proteins. The carboxy-termini of CIB proteins are associated with calcium binding and intracellular signaling. The p.(Arg186Trp) mutation is localized within predicted type II PDZ binding ligand at the carboxy terminus. Our ex vivo studies revealed that the mutation did not alter the interactions of CIB2 with Whirlin, nor its targeting to the tips of hair cell stereocilia. However, we found that the mutation disrupts inhibition of ATP-induced Ca2+ responses by CIB2 in a heterologous expression system. Our findings support p.(Arg186Trp) mutation as a cause for hearing loss in this Hispanic family. In addition, it further highlights the necessity of the calcium binding property of CIB2 for normal hearing.

  11. A Novel C-Terminal CIB2 (Calcium and Integrin Binding Protein 2) Mutation Associated with Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss in a Hispanic Family

    PubMed Central

    Grossheim, J. M.; Hegde, Rashima S.; Delio, Maria; Samanich, Joy; Riazuddin, Saima; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Cai, Jinlu; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a complex disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Previously, mutations in CIB2 have been identified as a common cause of genetic hearing loss in Pakistani and Turkish populations. Here we report a novel (c.556C>T; p.(Arg186Trp)) transition mutation in the CIB2 gene identified through whole exome sequencing (WES) in a Caribbean Hispanic family with non-syndromic hearing loss. CIB2 belongs to the family of calcium-and integrin-binding (CIB) proteins. The carboxy-termini of CIB proteins are associated with calcium binding and intracellular signaling. The p.(Arg186Trp) mutation is localized within predicted type II PDZ binding ligand at the carboxy terminus. Our ex vivo studies revealed that the mutation did not alter the interactions of CIB2 with Whirlin, nor its targeting to the tips of hair cell stereocilia. However, we found that the mutation disrupts inhibition of ATP-induced Ca2+ responses by CIB2 in a heterologous expression system. Our findings support p.(Arg186Trp) mutation as a cause for hearing loss in this Hispanic family. In addition, it further highlights the necessity of the calcium binding property of CIB2 for normal hearing. PMID:26426422

  12. Indirect DNA Readout by an H-NS Related Protein: Structure of the DNA Complex of the C-Terminal Domain of Ler

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Tiago N.; Schmidt, Holger; Madrid, Cristina; Juárez, Antonio; Bernadó, Pau; Griesinger, Christian; García, Jesús; Pons, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Ler, a member of the H-NS protein family, is the master regulator of the LEE pathogenicity island in virulent Escherichia coli strains. Here, we determined the structure of a complex between the DNA-binding domain of Ler (CT-Ler) and a 15-mer DNA duplex. CT-Ler recognizes a preexisting structural pattern in the DNA minor groove formed by two consecutive regions which are narrower and wider, respectively, compared with standard B-DNA. The compressed region, associated with an AT-tract, is sensed by the side chain of Arg90, whose mutation abolishes the capacity of Ler to bind DNA. The expanded groove allows the approach of the loop in which Arg90 is located. This is the first report of an experimental structure of a DNA complex that includes a protein belonging to the H-NS family. The indirect readout mechanism not only explains the capacity of H-NS and other H-NS family members to modulate the expression of a large number of genes but also the origin of the specificity displayed by Ler. Our results point to a general mechanism by which horizontally acquired genes may be specifically recognized by members of the H-NS family. PMID:22114557

  13. Drosophila C-terminal binding protein, dCtBP is required for sensory organ prepattern and sharpens proneural transcriptional activity of the GATA factor Pnr.

    PubMed

    Biryukova, Inna; Heitzler, Pascal

    2008-11-01

    The peripheral nervous system is required for animals to detect and to relay environmental stimuli to central nervous system for the information processing. In Drosophila, the precise spatial and temporal expression of two proneural genes achaete (ac) and scute (sc), is necessary for development of the sensory organs. Here we present an evidence that the transcription co-repressor, dCtBP acts as a negative regulator of sensory organ prepattern. Loss of dCtBP function mutant exhibits ectopic sensory organs, while overexpression of dCtBP results in a dramatic loss of sensory organs. These phenotypes are correlated with mis-emerging of sensory organ precursors and perturbated expression of proneural transcription activator Ac. Mammalian CtBP-1 was identified via interaction with the consensus motif PXDLSX(K/R) of adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. We demonstrated that dCtBP binds directly to PLDLS motif of Drosophila Friend of GATA-1 protein, U-shaped and sharpens the adult sensory organ development. Moreover, we found that dCtBP mediates multivalent interaction with the GATA transcriptional activator Pannier and acts as a direct co-repressor of the Pannier-mediated activation of proneural genes. We demonstrated that Pannier genetically interacts with dCtBP-interacting protein HDAC1, suggesting that the dCtBP-dependent regulation of Pannier activity could utilize a repressive mechanism involving alteration of local chromatine structure.

  14. The C-terminal 50 Amino Acid Residues of Dengue NS3 Protein Are Important for NS3-NS5 Interaction and Viral Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Moon Y. F.; Saw, Wuan Geok; Zhao, Yongqian; Chan, Kitti W. K.; Singh, Daljit; Chong, Yuwen; Forwood, Jade K.; Ooi, Eng Eong; Grüber, Gerhard; Lescar, Julien; Luo, Dahai; Vasudevan, Subhash G.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus multifunctional proteins NS3 protease/helicase and NS5 methyltransferase/RNA-dependent RNA polymerase form part of the viral replication complex and are involved in viral RNA genome synthesis, methylation of the 5′-cap of viral genome, and polyprotein processing among other activities. Previous studies have shown that NS5 residue Lys-330 is required for interaction between NS3 and NS5. Here, we show by competitive NS3-NS5 interaction ELISA that the NS3 peptide spanning residues 566–585 disrupts NS3-NS5 interaction but not the null-peptide bearing the N570A mutation. Small angle x-ray scattering study on NS3(172–618) helicase and covalently linked NS3(172–618)-NS5(320–341) reveals a rigid and compact formation of the latter, indicating that peptide NS5(320–341) engages in specific and discrete interaction with NS3. Significantly, NS3:Asn-570 to alanine mutation introduced into an infectious DENV2 cDNA clone did not yield detectable virus by plaque assay even though intracellular double-stranded RNA was detected by immunofluorescence. Detection of increased negative-strand RNA synthesis by real time RT-PCR for the NS3:N570A mutant suggests that NS3-NS5 interaction plays an important role in the balanced synthesis of positive- and negative-strand RNA for robust viral replication. Dengue virus infection has become a global concern, and the lack of safe vaccines or antiviral treatments urgently needs to be addressed. NS3 and NS5 are highly conserved among the four serotypes, and the protein sequence around the pinpointed amino acids from the NS3 and NS5 regions are also conserved. The identification of the functionally essential interaction between the two proteins by biochemical and reverse genetics methods paves the way for rational drug design efforts to inhibit viral RNA synthesis. PMID:25488659

  15. NMR structure of the HIV-1 regulatory protein Vpr in H2O/trifluoroethanol. Comparison with the Vpr N-terminal (1-51) and C-terminal (52-96) domains.

    PubMed

    Wecker, K; Morellet, N; Bouaziz, S; Roques, B P

    2002-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1, genome encodes a highly conserved regulatory gene product, Vpr (96 amino acids), which is incorporated into virions in quantities equivalent to those of the viral Gag protein. In infected cells, Vpr is believed to function during the early stages of HIV-1 replication (such as transcription of the proviral genome and migration of preintegration nuclear complex), blocks cells in G2 phase and triggers apoptosis. Vpr also plays a critical role in long-term AIDS disease by inducing viral infection in nondividing cells such as monocytes and macrophages. To gain deeper insight of the structure-function relationship of Vpr, the intact protein (residues 1-96) was synthesized. Its three-dimensional structure was analysed using circular dichroism and two-dimensional 1H- and 15N-NMR and refined by restrained molecular dynamics. In addition, 15N relaxation parameters (T1, T2) and heteronuclear 1H-15N NOEs were measured. The structure of the protein is characterized by a well-defined gamma turn(14-16)-alpha helix(17-33)-turn(34-36), followed by a alpha helix(40-48)-loop(49-54)-alpha helix(55-83) domain and ends with a very flexible C-terminal sequence. This structural determination of the whole intact Vpr molecule provide insights into the biological role played by this protein during the virus life cycle, as such amphipathic helices are believed to be involved in protein-lipid bilayers, protein-protein and/or protein-nucleic acid interactions.

  16. Identification of C-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein as a mediator of tumour necrosis factor action in osteoblast differentiation by targeting osterix for degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianmin; Gu, Jieruo

    2015-08-01

    In patients with inflammatory arthritis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α are overproduced in inflamed joints. This leads to local erosion of cartilage and bone, periarticular osteopenia, as well as osteoporosis. But less is known regarding the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effect of TNF-α on osteoblast function. The purpose of this study was to test that C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) has a specific role in suppressing the osteogenic activity of osteoblasts under inflammatory conditions. C2C12, MC3T3-E1 and HEK293T cell lines were cultured and cotransfected with related plasmids. After transfection, the cells were cultured further in the presence or absence of murine TNF-α and subjected to real time RT-PCR, Western blot, Ubiquitination assay, Co-immunoprecipitation, Luciferase reporter assay, Small interfering RNAs and Mineralization assay. The expression levels of TNF-α-induced CHIP and Osx were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation and ubiquitination assays revealed ubiquitinated Osx, confirmed that CHIP indeed interacted with Osx and identified K55 and K386 residues as the ubiquitination sites in Osx, Luciferase reporter assay and Small interfering RNAs examined whether TNF-α target the bone morphogenetic protein signalling through CHIP. We established stable cell lines with the overexpression of HA-CHIP, Mineralization assay and CHIP siRNA demonstrated the important roles of CHIP on osteoblast function in conditions in which TNF-α is overexpressed. We found that the K55 and K386 residues are ubiquitination site(s) in Osx, and that TNF-α inhibits osteoblast differentiation by promoting Osx degradation through up-regulation of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP in osteoblast. Thus, CHIP targets Osx for ubiquitination and degradation in osteoblasts after chronic exposure to TNF-α, and inhibition of CHIP expression in osteoblasts may be a new mechanism to limit inflammation-mediated osteoporosis by promoting their

  17. C-terminal Domain (CTD) Small Phosphatase-like 2 Modulates the Canonical Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Signaling and Mesenchymal Differentiation via Smad Dephosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yulan; Xiao, Mu; Sun, Baoguo; Zhang, Zhengmao; Shen, Tao; Duan, Xueyan; Yu, Paul Borchyung; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2014-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway regulates a wide range of cellular responses in metazoans. A key step in the canonical BMP signaling is the phosphorylation and activation of transcription factors Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 (collectively Smad1/5/8) by the type I BMP receptors. We previously identified PPM1A as a phosphatase toward dephosphorylation of all receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), including Smad1/5/8. Here we report another nuclear phosphatase named SCP4/CTDSPL2, belonging to the FCP/SCP family, as a novel Smad phosphatase in the nucleus. SCP4 physically interacts with and specifically dephosphorylates Smad1/5/8, and as a result attenuates BMP-induced transcriptional responses. Knockdown of SCP4 in multipotent mesenchymal C2C12 cells leads to increased expression of BMP target genes and consequently promotes BMP-induced osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SCP4, as a Smad phosphatase, plays a critical role in BMP-induced signaling and cellular functions. PMID:25100727

  18. A novel C-terminal homologue of Aha1 co-chaperone binds to heat shock protein 90 and stimulates its ATPase activity in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meetali; Shah, Varun; Tatu, Utpal

    2014-04-17

    Cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to be essential for many infectious pathogens and is considered a potential target for drug development. In this study, we have carried out biochemical characterization of Hsp90 from a poorly studied protozoan parasite of clinical importance, Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that Entamoeba Hsp90 can bind to both ATP and its pharmacological inhibitor, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin), with Kd values of 365.2 and 10.77 μM, respectively, and it has a weak ATPase activity with a catalytic efficiency of 4.12×10(-4) min(-1) μM(-1). Using inhibitor 17-AAG, we have shown dependence of Entamoeba on Hsp90 for its growth and survival. Hsp90 function is regulated by various co-chaperones. Previous studies suggest a lack of several important co-chaperones in E. histolytica. In this study, we describe the presence of a novel homologue of co-chaperone Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase), EhAha1c, lacking a canonical Aha1 N-terminal domain. We also show that EhAha1c is capable of binding and stimulating ATPase activity of EhHsp90. In addition to highlighting the potential of Hsp90 inhibitors as drugs against amoebiasis, our study highlights the importance of E. histolytica in understanding the evolution of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone repertoire.

  19. The compact conformation of the Plasmodium knowlesi myosin tail interacting protein MTIP in complex with the C-terminal helix of myosin A.

    PubMed

    Turley, Stewart; Khamrui, Susmita; Bergman, Lawrence W; Hol, Wim G J

    2013-08-01

    The myosin motor of the malaria parasite's invasion machinery moves over actin fibers while it is making critical contacts with the myosin-tail interacting protein (MTIP). Previously, in a "compact" Plasmodium falciparum MTIP•MyoA complex, MTIP domains 2 (D2) and 3 (D3) make contacts with the MyoA helix, and the central helix is kinked, but in an "extended" Plasmodium knowlesi MTIP•MyoA complex only D3 interacts with the MyoA helix, and the central helix is fully extended. Here we report the crystal structure of the compact P. knowlesi MTIP•MyoA complex. It appears that, depending on the pH, P. knowlesi MTIP can adopt either the compact or the extended conformation to interact with MyoA. Only at pH values above ~7.0, can key hydrogen bonds can be formed by the imidazole group of MyoA His810 with an aspartate carboxylate from the hinge of MTIP and a lysine amino group of MyoA simultaneously.

  20. Enzymatic labeling of proteins: techniques and approaches.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Dozier, Jonathan K; Distefano, Mark D

    2013-08-21

    Site-specific modification of proteins is a major challenge in modern chemical biology due to the large number of reactive functional groups typically present in polypeptides. Because of its importance in biology and medicine, the development of methods for site-specific modification of proteins is an area of intense research. Selective protein modification procedures have been useful for oriented protein immobilization, for studies of naturally occurring post-translational modifications, for creating antibody–drug conjugates, for the introduction of fluorophores and other small molecules on to proteins, for examining protein structure, folding, dynamics, and protein–protein interactions, and for the preparation of protein–polymer conjugates. One of the most important approaches for protein labeling is to incorporate bioorthogonal functionalities into proteins at specific sites via enzymatic reactions. The incorporated tags then enable reactions that are chemoselective, whose functional groups not only are inert in biological media, but also do not occur natively in proteins or other macromolecules. This review article summarizes the enzymatic strategies, which enable site-specific functionalization of proteins with a variety of different functional groups. The enzymes covered in this review include formylglycine generating enzyme, sialyltransferases, phosphopantetheinyltransferases, O-GlcNAc post-translational modification, sortagging, transglutaminase, farnesyltransferase, biotin ligase, lipoic acid ligase, and N-myristoyltransferase.

  1. Treatment with N- and C-Terminal Peptides of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Partly Compensate the Skeletal Abnormalities in IGF-I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1–36) and PTHrP (107–111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a, cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone. PMID:24503961

  2. Rqc1 and Ltn1 Prevent C-terminal Alanine-Threonine Tail (CAT-tail)-induced Protein Aggregation by Efficient Recruitment of Cdc48 on Stalled 60S Subunits.

    PubMed

    Defenouillère, Quentin; Zhang, Elodie; Namane, Abdelkader; Mouaikel, John; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline

    2016-06-03

    Protein homeostasis is maintained by quality control mechanisms that detect and eliminate deficient translation products. Cytosolic defective proteins can arise from translation of aberrant mRNAs lacking a termination codon (NonStop) or containing a sequence that blocks translation elongation (No-Go), which results in translational arrest. Stalled ribosomes are dissociated, aberrant mRNAs are degraded by the cytoplasmic exosome, and the nascent peptides remaining in stalled 60S exit tunnels are detected by the ribosome-bound quality control complex (RQC) composed of Ltn1, Rqc1, Rqc2, and Cdc48. Whereas Ltn1 polyubiquitylates these nascent peptides, Rqc2 directs the addition of C-terminal alanine-threonine tails (CAT-tails), and a Cdc48 hexamer is recruited to extract the nascent peptides, which are addressed to the proteasome for degradation. Although the functions of most RQC components have been described, the role of Rqc1 in this quality control process remains undetermined. In this article we show that the absence of Rqc1 or Ltn1 results in the aggregation of aberrant proteins, a phenomenon that requires CAT-tail addition to the nascent peptides by Rqc2. Our results suggest that aberrant CAT-tailed protein aggregation results from a defect in Cdc48 recruitment to stalled 60S particles, a process that requires both Rqc1 and Ltn1. These protein aggregates contain Ltn1-dependent polyubiquitin chains and are degraded by the proteasome. Finally, aggregate characterization by proteomics revealed that they contain specific chaperones including Sis1, Sgt2, Ssa1/2, and Hsp82, suggesting that these protein aggregates may be addressed to aggresome-like structures when the RQC complex fails to deliver aberrant nascent peptides to the proteasome for degradation.

  3. C-terminal domains of bacterial proteases: structure, function and the biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Wu, C; Liu, D; Yang, X; Wu, R; Zhang, J; Ma, C; He, H

    2017-01-01

    C-terminal domains widely exist in the C-terminal region of multidomain proteases. As a β-sandwich domain in multidomain protease, the C-terminal domain plays an important role in proteolysis including regulation of the secretory process, anchoring and swelling the substrate molecule, presenting as an inhibitor for the preprotease and adapting the protein structural flexibility and stability. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics and biological function of C-terminal protease domains are described. Furthermore, the application prospects of C-terminal domains, including polycystic kidney disease, prepeptidase C-terminal and collagen-binding domain, in the area of medicine and biological artificial materials are also discussed.

  4. The arabidopsis RNA binding protein with K homology motifs, SHINY1, interacts with the C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) to repress stress-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Bangshing; Shen, Yun; Wang, Hui; Feng, Qing; Shi, Huazhong

    2013-01-01

    The phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II plays crucial roles in transcription and mRNA processing. Previous studies showed that the plant CTD phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) dephosphorylates Ser-5-specific CTD and regulates abiotic stress response in Arabidopsis. Here, we report the identification of a K-homology domain-containing protein named SHINY1 (SHI1) that interacts with CPL1 to modulate gene expression. The shi1 mutant was isolated from a forward genetic screening for mutants showing elevated expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by a salt-inducible promoter. The shi1 mutant is more sensitive to cold treatment during vegetative growth and insensitive to abscisic acid in seed germination, resembling the phenotypes of shi4 that is allelic to the cpl1 mutant. Both SHI1 and SHI4/CPL1 are nuclear-localized proteins. SHI1 interacts with SHI4/CPL1 in vitro and in vivo. Loss-of-function mutations in shi1 and shi4 resulted in similar changes in the expression of some stress-inducible genes. Moreover, both shi1 and shi4 mutants display higher mRNA capping efficiency and altered polyadenylation site selection for some of the stress-inducible genes, when compared with wild type. We propose that the SHI1-SHI4/CPL1 complex inhibits transcription by preventing mRNA capping and transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  5. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  6. Microwave-assisted 18O-labeling of proteins catalyzed by formic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Hanzhi; Liu, Hongxia; Chen, Guonan; Cai, Zongwei

    2010-11-01

    Oxygen exchange may occur at carboxyl groups catalyzed by acid. The reaction, however, takes at least several days at room temperature. The long-time exchanging reaction often prevents its application from protein analysis. In this study, an (18)O-labeling method utilizing microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was developed. After being dissolved in (16)O/(18)O (1:1) water containing 2.5% formic acid, protein samples were exposed to microwave irradiation. LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulted peptide mixtures indicated that oxygen in the carboxyl groups from glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and the C-terminal residues could be efficiently exchanged with (18)O within less than 15 min. The rate of back exchange was so slow that no detectable back exchange could be found during the HPLC run.

  7. Novel aggregate formation of a frame-shift mutant protein of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase is ascribed to three cysteine residues in the C-terminal extension. Retarded secretion and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoko; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Goseki-Sone, Masae; Orimo, Hideo; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2005-04-01

    In the majority of hypophosphatasia patients, reductions in the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase activity are caused by various missense mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) gene. A unique frame-shift mutation due to a deletion of T at cDNA number 1559 [TNSALP (1559delT)] has been reported only in Japanese patients with high allele frequency. In this study, we examined the molecular phenotype of TNSALP (1559delT) using in vitro translation/translocation system and COS-1 cells transiently expressing this mutant protein. We showed that the mutant protein not only has a larger molecular size than the wild type enzyme by approximately 12 kDa, reflecting an 80 amino acid-long extension at its C-terminus, but that it also lacks a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. In support of this, alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells expressing TNSALP (1559delT) was localized at the juxtanucleus position, but not on the cell surface. However, only a limited amount of the newly synthesized protein was released into the medium and the rest was polyubiquitinated, followed by degradation in the proteasome. SDS/PAGE and analysis by sucrose-density-gradient analysis indicated that TNSALP (1559delT) forms a disulfide-bonded high-molecular-mass aggregate. Interestingly, the aggregate form of TNSALP (1559delT) exhibited a significant enzyme activity. When all three cysteines at positions of 506, 521 and 577 of TNSALP (1559delT) were replaced with serines, the aggregation disappeared and instead this modified mutant protein formed a noncovalently associated dimer, strongly indicating that these cysteine residues in the C-terminal region are solely responsible for aggregate formation by cross-linking the catalytically active dimers. Thus, complete absence of TNSALP on cell surfaces provides a plausible explanation for a severe lethal phenotype of a homozygote hypophosphatasia patient carrying TNSALP (1559delT).

  8. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of beta-hairpin structure.

    PubMed

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-06-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain (residues 46-61), [IG(46-61)] of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG (46-61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from both the C- and the N-terminus. To determine the structure and stability of two resulting 12- and 14-amino acid-residue peptides, IG(48-59) and IG(47-60), respectively, we carried out circular dichroism, NMR, and calorimetric studies of these peptides in pure water. Our results show that IG(48-59) possesses organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50-Phe57 and Trp48-Val59) at T = 283 and 305 K. At T = 313 K, the structure breaks down because of increased chain entropy, but the turn region is preserved in the same position observed for the structure of the whole protein. The breakdown of structure occurs near the melting temperature of this peptide (T(m) = 310 K) measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The melting temperature of IG(47-60) determined by DSC is T(m) = 330 K and its structure is similar to that of the native beta-hairpin at all (lower) temperatures examined (283-313 K). Both of these truncated sequences are conserved in all known amino acid sequences of the B domains of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from bacteria. Thus, this study contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of folding of this whole family of proteins, and provides information about the mechanism of formation and stabilization of a beta-hairpin structural element.

  9. Ten tandem repeats of {beta}-hCG 109-118 enhance immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of {beta}-hCG C-terminal peptide carried by mycobacterial heat-shock protein HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yankai; Yan Rong; He Yi; Liu Wentao; Cao Rongyue; Yan Ming; Li Taiming; Liu Jingjing; Wu Jie . E-mail: wu_jie97@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-07-14

    The {beta}-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}-hCG) is secreted by many kinds of tumors and it has been used as an ideal target antigen to develop vaccines against tumors. In view of the low immunogenicity of this self-peptide,we designed a method based on isocaudamer technique to repeat tandemly the 10-residue sequence X of {beta}-hCG (109-118), then 10 tandemly repeated copies of the 10-residue sequence combined with {beta}-hCG C-terminal 37 peptides were fused to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 to construct a fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 as an immunogen. In this study, we examined the effect of the tandem repeats of this 10-residue sequence in eliciting an immune by comparing the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the two immunogens, HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 and HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37 (without the 10 tandem repeats). Immunization of mice with the fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 elicited much higher levels of specific anti-{beta}-hCG antibodies and more effectively inhibited the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in vivo than with HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37, which should suggest that HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 may be an effective protein vaccine for the treatment of {beta}-hCG-dependent tumors and multiple tandem repeats of a certain epitope are an efficient method to overcome the low immunogenicity of self-peptide antigens.

  10. The Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Contains Linear B Cell Epitopes in the N- and C-Terminal Regions that are Dependent on an Intact C-Terminus for Antibody Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Prow, Natalie A.; Baker, Kelly; Piyasena, Thisun B. H.; Taylor, Carmel T.; Rana, Ashok; Hastie, Marcus L.; Gorman, Jeff J.; Hall, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne agent that causes severe arthritic disease in humans and is considered a serious health threat in areas where competent mosquito vectors are prevalent. CHIKV has recently been responsible for several millions of cases of disease, involving over 40 countries. The recent re-emergence of CHIKV and its potential threat to human health has stimulated interest in better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of the virus, and requirement for improved treatment, prevention and control measures. In this study, we mapped the binding sites of a panel of eleven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) previously generated towards the capsid protein (CP) of CHIKV. Using N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant forms of the CHIKV CP, two putative binding regions, between residues 1–35 and 140–210, were identified. Competitive binding also revealed that five of the CP-specific mAbs recognized a series of overlapping epitopes in the latter domain. We also identified a smaller, N-terminally truncated product of native CP that may represent an alternative translation product of the CHIKV 26S RNA and have potential functional significance during CHIKV replication. Our data also provides evidence that the C-terminus of CP is required for authentic antigenic structure of CP. This study shows that these anti-CP mAbs will be valuable research tools for further investigating the structure and function of the CHIKV CP. PMID:26061335

  11. A pair of adjacent genes, cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad, encode the typical N- and C-terminal regions of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin as two separate proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366.

    PubMed

    Lenane, Ian J; Bagnall, Neil H; Josh, Peter F; Pearson, Roger D; Akhurst, Ray J; Kotze, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA sequence cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad (GenBank accession number EF219060) was isolated from Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366. This DNA sequence contains two ORFs: cry5Ad (a previously unreported member of the cry5A gene family) and orf2-5Ad. cry5Ad is unique among cry5A genes in that it encodes only the N-terminal region of a typical Cry5Adelta-endotoxin. The cry5Ad sequence includes homology blocks 1-5, which are present in most B. thuringiensisdelta-endotoxins. The usual C-terminal region of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin (including homology blocks 6-8) is encoded by orf2-5Ad. Both proteins encoded by cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad were found in IPTG-induced Escherichia coli, after a copy of cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad was cloned into the pQE32 expression vector and transformed into pREP4 E. coli cells. Both proteins were also found in parasporal crystal inclusions of B. thuringiensis L366. Sequencing of cDNA derived from transformed E. coli cells showed that the two ORFs are transcribed as a single mRNA. Extracts prepared from the recombinant E. coli expressing Cry5Ad and Orf2-5Ad were not toxic to nematode larvae (Haemonchus contortus), indicating that these two proteins are most likely not responsible for the nematocidal activity seen previously in the B. thuringiensis strain L366.

  12. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  13. Isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-01-01

    Protein targets of contemporary research are often membrane proteins, multiprotein complexes, secreted proteins, or other proteins of human origin. These are difficult to express in the standard expression host used for most nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, Escherichia coli. Insect cells represent an attractive alternative, since they have become a well-established expression system and simple solutions have been developed for generation of viruses to efficiently introduce the target protein DNA into cells. Insect cells enable production of a larger fraction of the human proteome in a properly folded way than bacteria, as insect cells have a very similar set of cytosolic chaperones and a closely related secretory pathway. Here, the limited and defined glycosylation pattern that insect cells produce is an advantage for structural biology studies. For these reasons, insect cells have been established as the most widely used eukaryotic expression host for crystallographic studies. In the past decade, significant advancements have enabled amino acid type-specific as well as uniform isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells, turning them into an attractive expression host for NMR studies.

  14. A New Mutation, hap1-2, Reveals a C Terminal Domain Function in AtMago Protein and Its Biological Effects in Male Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Cilano, Kevin; Mazanek, Zachary; Khan, Mahmuda; Metcalfe, Sarah; Zhang, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The exon-exon junction complex (EJC) is a conserved eukaryotic multiprotein complex that examines the quality of and determines the availability of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) posttranscriptionally. Four proteins, MAGO, Y14, eIF4AIII and BTZ, function as core components of the EJC. The mechanisms of their interactions and the biological indications of these interactions are still poorly understood in plants. A new mutation, hap1-2. leads to premature pollen death and a reduced seed production in Arabidopsis. This mutation introduces a viable truncated transcript AtMagoΔC. This truncation abolishes the interaction between AtMago and AtY14 in vitro, but not the interaction between AtMago and AteIF4AIII. In addition to a strong nuclear presence of AtMago, both AtMago and AtMagoΔC exhibit processing-body (P-body) localization. This indicates that AtMagoΔC may replace AtMago in the EJC when aberrant transcripts are to be degraded. When introducing an NMD mutation, upf3-1, into the existing HAP1/hap1-2 mutant, plants showed a severely reduced fertility. However, the change of splicing pattern of a subset of SR protein transcripts is mostly correlated with the sr45-1 and upf3-1 mutations, not the hap1-2 mutation. These results imply that the C terminal domain (CTD) of AtMago is required for the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization during EJC assembly, UPF3-mediated NMD pathway and the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization work synergistically to regulate male gametophyte development in plants. PMID:26867216

  15. Site specific protein labeling by enzymatic posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, Murat; Yin, Jun

    2009-09-07

    Site specific protein labeling plays a key role in elucidating the function of the proteins at the molecular level by revealing their locations in the cell, their interaction networks with other cellular components and the dynamic mechanisms of their bio-generation, trafficking and degradation in response to regulatory signals in a biological system. Site specific protein labeling is, in essence, artificial modification of proteins with new chemical entities at the posttranslational stage. Based on the analogy between protein labeling and protein posttranslational modification, enzymatic tools have been developed for site specific and efficient labeling of target proteins with chemical probes of diverse structures and functionalities. This perspective surveys a number of protein labeling methods based on the application of protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  16. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Welch, Robert D; Ayaz, Syed I; Lewis, Lawrence M; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y; Mika, Valerie H; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T; Bazarian, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-15

    Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70-0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71-0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65-0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice.

  17. Full-contact domain labeling: identification of a novel phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin that requires the complete protein.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Mejillano, M; Yin, H L; Chen, J; Prestwich, G D

    2001-01-30

    Gelsolin, an actin and phosphoinositide binding protein, was photoaffinity labeled using a variety of benzophenone-containing phosphoinositide polyphosphate analogues. The N-terminal half and the C-terminal half of gelsolin showed synergy in the binding of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. Competitive displacement experiments with dibutyryl, dioctanoyl, or dipalmitoyl derivatives of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) suggested that, in addition to the inositol headgroup, a diacylglyceryl moiety was important for binding; these analogues also inhibited the gelsolin-severing activity of F-actin. In addition to the previously identified PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding site in the N-terminal half of gelsolin, a new binding site was identified in the C-terminal half by mapping the photocovalently modified peptide fragments. Moreover, increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) decreased the binding of the photolabile analogues to the C-terminal phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin. A molecular model of the binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 within two folded repeats of gelsolin has been calculated using these data.

  18. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  19. Role of the C-terminal domain of PCSK9 in degradation of the LDL receptors.

    PubMed

    Holla, Øystein L; Cameron, Jamie; Tveten, Kristian; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Berge, Knut Erik; Laerdahl, Jon K; Leren, Trond P

    2011-10-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and disrupts the normal recycling of the LDLR. In this study, we investigated the role of the C-terminal domain for the activity of PCSK9. Experiments in which conserved residues and histidines on the surface of the C-terminal domain were mutated indicated that no specific residues of the C-terminal domain, apart from those responsible for maintaining the overall structure, are required for the activity of PCSK9. Rather, the net charge of the C-terminal domain is important. The more positively charged the C-terminal domain, the higher the activity toward the LDLR. Moreover, replacement of the C-terminal domain with an unrelated protein of comparable size led to significant activity of the chimeric protein. We conclude that the role of the evolutionary, poorly conserved C-terminal domain for the activity of PCSK9 reflects its overall positive charge and size and not the presence of specific residues involved in protein-protein interactions.

  20. Improved protein labeling by stannous tartrate reduction of pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, W.A.; DeLand, F.H.; Bennett, S.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure has been developed whereby small amounts of protein - specifically human serum albumin and immunoglobulin G - can be labeled with Tc-99m. Artifactual problems associated with electrolytic and stannous chloride labeling procedures are virtually eliminated. The procedure is satisfactory for labeling human serum albumin, normal goat immunoglobulin G, and goat anti-carcinoembryonic antigen immunoglobulin G.

  1. Cytokinin Response Factor 5 has transcriptional activity governed by its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Melton, Anthony E; Schwacke, Rainer; Krause, Kirsten; Fischer, Karsten; Goertzen, Leslie R; Rashotte, Aaron M

    2017-02-01

    Cytokinin Response Factors (CRFs) are AP2/ERF transcription factors involved in cytokinin signal transduction. CRF proteins consist of a N-terminal dimerization domain (CRF domain), an AP2 DNA-binding domain, and a clade-specific C-terminal region of unknown function. Using a series of sequential deletions in yeast-2-hybrid assays, we provide evidence that the C-terminal region of Arabidopsis CRF5 can confer transactivation activity. Although comparative analyses identified evolutionarily conserved protein sequence within the C-terminal region, deletion experiments suggest that this transactivation domain has a partially redundant modular structure required for activation of target gene transcription.

  2. Strategies for labeling proteins with PARACEST agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Zhao, Piyu; Woods, Mark; Marconescu, Andrei; Castillo-Muzquiz, Aminta; Thorpe, Philip; Kiefer, Garry E.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    Reactive surface lysine groups on the chimeric monoclonal antibody (3G4) and on human serum albumin (HSA) were labeled with two different PARACEST chelates. Between 7.4 – 10.1 chelates were added per 3G4 molecule and between 5.6 – 5.9 chelates per molecule of HSA, depending upon which conjugation chemistry was used. The immunoreactivity of 3G4 as measured by ELISA assays was highly dependent upon the number of attached chelates: 88% immunoreactivity with 7.4 chelates per antibody versus only 17% immunoreactivity with 10.1 chelates per antibody. Upon conjugation to 3G4, the bound water lifetime of Eu-1 increased only marginally, up from 53 μs for the non-conjugated chelate to 65–77 μs for conjugated chelates. Conjugation of a chelate Eu-2 to HSA via a single side-chain group also resulted in little or no change in bound water lifetime (73–75 μs for both the conjugated and non-conjugated forms). These data indicate that exchange of water molecules protons between the inner-sphere site on covalently attached PARACEST agent and bulk water is largely unaffected by the mode of attachment of the agent to the protein and likely its chemical surroundings on the surface of the protein. PMID:20621494

  3. C-Terminal Modification of Fully Unprotected Peptide Hydrazides via in Situ Generation of Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Simon, Mark D; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A method for chemo- and regioselective conjugation of nucleophiles to fully unprotected peptides and proteins via in situ generation of C-terminal isocyanates is reported. Oxidation of C-terminal peptide hydrazides in aqueous media followed by Curtius rearrangement of acyl azides reliably generates isocyanates, which react with a variety of external nucleophiles, such as hydrazines, hydrazides, aromatic thiols, and hydroxylamines. Multiple peptides and a 53 kDa protein hydrazide were conjugated to different nucleophiles using this reaction.

  4. Simultaneous dual protein labeling using a triorthogonal reagent.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Kumarapperuma, Sidath C; Gabrielse, Kari; Fegan, Adrian; Wagner, Carston R; Distefano, Mark D

    2013-11-06

    Construction of heterofunctional proteins is a rapidly emerging area of biotherapeutics. Combining a protein with other moieties, such as a targeting element, a toxic protein or small molecule, and a fluorophore or polyethylene glycol (PEG) group, can improve the specificity, functionality, potency, and pharmacokinetic profile of a protein. Protein farnesyl transferase (PFTase) is able to site-specifically and quantitatively prenylate proteins containing a C-terminal CaaX-box amino acid sequence with various modified isoprenoids. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and application of a triorthogonal reagent, 1, that can be used to site-specifically incorporate an alkyne and aldehyde group simultaneously into a protein. To illustrate the capabilities of this approach, a protein was enzymatically modified with compound 1 followed by oxime ligation and click reaction to simultaneously incorporate an azido-tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) fluorophore and an aminooxy-PEG moiety. This was performed with both a model protein [green fluorescent protein (GFP)] as well as a therapeutically useful protein [ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)]. Next, a protein was enzymatically modified with compound 1 followed by coupling to an azido-bis-methotrexate dimerizer and aminooxy-TAMRA. Incubation of that construct with a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)-DHFR-anti-CD3 fusion protein resulted in the self-assembly of nanoring structures that were endocytosed into T-leukemia cells and visualized therein. These results highlight how complex multifunctional protein assemblies can be prepared using this facile triorthogonal approach.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  6. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Syed I.; Lewis, Lawrence M.; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y.; Mika, Valerie H.; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A.; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C.; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L.; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70–0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71–0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65–0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice. PMID:26467555

  7. Characterization of the denatured structure of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile under nondenaturing conditions: role of the C-terminal alpha-helix of the protein in folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Satoshi; Umezaki, Taro; Takeuchi, Makoto; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Yagi, Hiromasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Akutsu, Hideo; Noda, Yasuo; Segawa, Shin-ichi; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2007-03-27

    The cysteine-free pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase (PCP-0SH) from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, can be trapped in the denatured state under nondenaturing conditions, corresponding to the denatured structure that exists in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions. The denatured state is the initial state (D1 state) in the refolding process but differs from the completely denatured state (D2 state) in the concentrated denaturant. Also, it has been found that the D1 state corresponds to the heat-denatured state. To elucidate the structural basis of the D1 state, H/D exchange experiments with PCP-0SH were performed at pD 3.4 and 4 degrees C. The results indicated that amide protons in the C-terminal alpha6-helix region hardly exchanged in the D1 state with deuterium even after 7 days, suggesting that the alpha6-helix (from Ser188 to Glu205) of PCP-0SH was stably formed in the D1 state. In order to examine the role of the alpha6-helix in folding and stability, H/D exchange experiments with a mutant, A199P, at position 199 in the alpha6-helix region were performed. The alpha6-helix region of A199P in the D1 state was partially unprotected, while some hydrophobic residues were protected against the H/D exchange, although these hydrophobic residues were unprotected in the wild-type protein. These results suggest that the structure of A199P in the D1 state formed a temporary stable denatured structure with a non-native hydrophobic cluster and the unstructured alpha6-helix. Both the stability and the refolding rate decreased by the substitution of Pro for Ala199. We can conclude that the native-like helix (alpha6-helix) of PCP-0SH is already constructed in the D1 state and is necessary for efficient refolding into the native structure and stabilization of PCP-0SH.

  8. XRCC1 interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain suggests a role in post replication repair.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Scott A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    The function of X-ray cross complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1), a scaffold that binds to DNA repair enzymes involved in single-strand break and base excision repair, requires that it be recruited to sites of damaged DNA. However, structural insights into this recruitment are currently limited. Sequence analysis of the first unstructured linker domain of XRCC1 identifies a segment consistent with a possible REV1 interacting region (X1RIR) motif. The X1RIR motif is present in translesion polymerases that can be recruited to the pol /REV1 DNA repair complex via a specific interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain. NMR and fluorescence titration studies were performed on XRCC1-derived peptides containing this putative RIR motif in order to evaluate the binding affinity for the REV1 C-terminal domain. These studies demonstrate an interaction of the XRCC1-derived peptide with the human REV1 C-terminal domain characterized by dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. Ligand competition studies comparing the XRCC1 RIR peptide with previously studied RIR peptides were found to be inconsistent with the NMR based Kd values. These discrepancies were resolved using a fluorescence assay for which the RIR–REV1 system is particularly well suited. The structure of a REV1-XRCC1 peptide complex was determined by using NOE restraints to dock the unlabeled XRCC1 peptide with a labeled REV1 C-terminal domain. The structure is generally homologous with previously determined complexes with the pol κ and pol η RIR peptides, although the helical segment in XRCC1 is shorter than was observed in these cases. These studies suggest the possible involvement of XRCC1 and its associated repair factors in post replication repair.

  9. Engineering protein farnesyltransferase for enzymatic protein labeling applications.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Jonathan K; Khatwani, Santoshkumar L; Wollack, James W; Wang, Yen-Chih; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-07-16

    Creating covalent protein conjugates is an active area of research due to the wide range of uses for protein conjugates spanning everything from biological studies to protein therapeutics. Protein Farnesyltransferase (PFTase) has been used for the creation of site-specific protein conjugates, and a number of PFTase substrates have been developed to facilitate that work. PFTase is an effective catalyst for protein modification because it transfers Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) analogues to protein substrates on a cysteine four residues from the C-terminus. While much work has been done to synthesize various FPP analogues, there are few reports investigating how mutations in PFTase alter the kinetics with these unnatural analogues. Herein we examined how different mutations within the PFTase active site alter the kinetics of the PFTase reaction with a series of large FPP analogues. We found that mutating either a single tryptophan or tyrosine residue to alanine results in greatly improved catalytic parameters, particularly in kcat. Mutation of tryptophan 102β to alanine caused a 4-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a benzaldehyde-containing FPP analogue resulting in an overall 40-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Similarly, mutation of tyrosine 205β to alanine caused a 25-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a coumarin-containing analogue leading to a 300-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Smaller but significant changes in catalytic parameters were also obtained for cyclo-octene- and NBD-containing FPP analogues. The latter compound was used to create a fluorescently labeled form of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), a protein of therapeutic importance. Additionally, computational modeling was performed to study how the large non-natural isoprenoid analogues can fit into the active sites enlarged via mutagenesis. Overall, these results demonstrate that PFTase can be improved via mutagenesis in ways that will be useful

  10. Development of Noviomimetics as C-Terminal Hsp90 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    KU-32 and KU-596 are novobiocin-derived, C-terminal heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) modulators that induce Hsp70 levels and manifest neuroprotective activity. However, the synthetically complex noviose sugar requires 10 steps to prepare, which makes translational development difficult. In this study, we developed a series of “noviomimetic” analogues of KU-596, which contain noviose surrogates that can be easily prepared, while maintaining the ability to induce Hsp70 levels. Both sugar and sugar analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated in a luciferase reporter assay, which identified compound 37, a benzyl containing noviomimetic, as the most potent inducer of Hsp70. PMID:26819668

  11. Genetic Incorporation of the Unnatural Amino Acid p-Acetyl Phenylalanine into Proteins for Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eric G.B.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful tool for the characterization of protein structure and dynamics; however, its application in many systems is hampered by the reliance on unique and benign cysteine substitutions for the site-specific attachment of the spin label. An elegant solution to this problem involves the use of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing reactive functional groups that are chemically orthogonal to those of the 20 amino acids found naturally in proteins. These unique functional groups can then be selectively reacted with an appropriately functionalized spin probe. In this chapter, we detail the genetic incorporation of the ketone-bearing amino acid p-acetyl phenylalanine (pAcPhe) into recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Incorporation of pAcPhe is followed by chemoselective reaction of the ketone side chain with a hydroxylamine-functionalized nitroxide to afford the spin-labeled side chain “K1,” and we present two protocols for successful K1 labeling of proteins bearing site-specific pAcPhe. We outline the basic requirements for pAcPhe incorporation and labeling, with an emphasis on practical aspects that must be considered by the researcher if high yields of UAA incorporation and efficient labeling reactions are to be achieved. To this end, we highlight recent advances that have led to increased yields of pAcPhe incorporation, and discuss the use of aniline-based catalysts allowing for facile conjugation of the hydroxylamine spin label under mild reaction conditions. To illustrate the utility of K1 labeling in proteins where traditional cysteine-based SDSL methods are problematic, we site-specifically K1 label the cellular prion protein at two positions in the C-terminal domain and determine the interspin distance using double electron–electron resonance EPR. Recent advances in UAA incorporation and ketone-based bioconjugation, in combination with the commercial availability of all requisite

  12. Site-specific labeling of proteins for electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M.; Lander, Gabriel C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is commonly employed to determine the subunit organization of large macromolecular assemblies. However, the field lacks a robust molecular labeling methodology for unambiguous identification of constituent subunits. We present a strategy that exploits the unique properties of an unnatural amino acid in order to enable site-specific attachment of a single, readily identifiable protein label at any solvent-exposed position on the macromolecular surface. Using this method, we show clear labeling of a subunit within the 19S proteasome lid subcomplex that has not been amenable to labeling by traditional approaches. PMID:26409249

  13. The vaccinia virus 14-kilodalton (A27L) fusion protein forms a triple coiled-coil structure and interacts with the 21-kilodalton (A17L) virus membrane protein through a C-terminal alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M I; Rivas, G; Cregut, D; Serrano, L; Esteban, M

    1998-12-01

    The vaccinia virus 14-kDa protein (encoded by the A27L gene) plays an important role in the biology of the virus, acting in virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell fusions. The protein is located on the surface of the intracellular mature virus form and is essential for both the release of extracellular enveloped virus from the cells and virus spread. Sequence analysis predicts the existence of four regions in this protein: a structureless region from amino acids 1 to 28, a helical region from residues 29 to 37, a triple coiled-coil helical region from residues 44 to 72, and a Leu zipper motif at the C terminus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking studies of the purified wild-type protein and several mutant forms, lacking one or more of the above regions or with point mutations, support the above-described structural division of the 14-kDa protein. The two contiguous cysteine residues at positions 71 and 72 are not responsible for the formation of 14-kDa protein trimers. The location of hydrophobic residues at the a and d positions on a helical wheel and of charged amino acids in adjacent positions, e and g, suggests that the hydrophobic and ionic interactions in the triple coiled-coil helical region are involved in oligomer formation. This conjecture was supported by the construction of a three-helix bundle model and molecular dynamics. Binding assays with purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and cytoplasmic extracts from cells infected with a virus that does not produce the 14-kDa protein during infection (VVindA27L) show that the 21-kDa protein (encoded by the A17L gene) is the specific viral binding partner and identify the putative Leu zipper, the predicted third alpha-helix on the C terminus of the 14-kDa protein, as the region involved in protein binding. These findings were confirmed in vivo, following transfection of animal cells with plasmid vectors expressing mutant forms of the 14-kDa protein and

  14. Differential protein labeling based on electrochemically generated reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Faber, Helene; Wigger, Tina; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2015-10-06

    A specific labeling method for cysteine moieties in proteins was developed. Electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds such as phenol or acetaminophen leads to the generation of the reactive intermediates benzoquinone and N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which can subsequently react with nucleophilic thiol functions in peptides or proteins. Differential labeling of cysteine residues was successfully demonstrated with native as well as heavy-isotope labeled forms of the corresponding labeling compounds. The specific mass differences on the peptide level were successfully analyzed by mass spectrometry for the tripeptide glutathione. Free cysteines in various proteins such as β-lactoglobulin A, human serum albumin, hemoglobin, and human carbonic anhydrase I were successfully labeled. Tryptic digestion of differentially labeled carbonic anhydrase I and hemoglobin allowed the identification of the binding site in the proteins. The obtained mass difference allowed an easy identification of the cysteine containing peptides. With these experiments, it was successfully demonstrated that the developed method can serve as a tool for counting cysteine moieties in proteins and, thus, be used as an additional technique in protein identification experiments.

  15. PRMT5 C-terminal Phosphorylation Modulates a 14-3-3/PDZ Interaction Switch.

    PubMed

    Espejo, Alexsandra B; Gao, Guozhen; Black, Karynne; Gayatri, Sitaram; Veland, Nicolas; Kim, Jeesun; Chen, Taiping; Sudol, Marius; Walker, Cheryl; Bedford, Mark T

    2017-02-10

    PRMT5 is the primary enzyme responsible for the deposition of the symmetric dimethylarginine in mammalian cells. In an effort to understand how PRMT5 is regulated, we identified a threonine phosphorylation site within a C-terminal tail motif, which is targeted by the Akt/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinases. While investigating the function of this posttranslational modification, we serendipitously discovered that its free C-terminal tail binds PDZ domains (when unphosphorylated) and 14-3-3 proteins (when phosphorylated). In essence, a phosphorylation event within the last few residues of the C-terminal tail generates a posttranslational modification-dependent PDZ/14-3-3 interaction "switch." The C-terminal motif of PRMT5 is required for plasma membrane association, and loss of this switching capacity is not compatible with life. This signaling phenomenon was recently reported for the HPV E6 oncoprotein but has not yet been observed for mammalian proteins. To investigate the prevalence of PDZ/14-3-3 switching in signal transduction, we built a protein domain microarray that harbors PDZ domains and 14-3-3 proteins. We have used this microarray to interrogate the C-terminal tails of a small group of candidate proteins and identified ERBB4, PGHS2, and IRK1 (as well as E6 and PRMT5) as conforming to this signaling mode, suggesting that PDZ/14-3-3 switching may be a broad biological paradigm.

  16. Evolution of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Hall, Benjamin D.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years a great deal of biochemical and genetic research has focused on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (RPB1) of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. This strongly conserved domain of tandemly repeated heptapeptides has been linked functionally to important steps in the initiation and processing of mRNA transcripts in both animals and fungi. Although they are absolutely required for viability in these organisms, C-terminal tandem repeats do not occur in RPB1 sequences from diverse eukaryotic taxa. Here we present phylogenetic analyses of RPB1 sequences showing that canonical CTD heptads are strongly conserved in only a subset of eukaryotic groups, all apparently descended from a single common ancestor. Moreover, eukaryotic groups in which the most complex patterns of ontogenetic development occur are descended from this CTD-containing ancestor. Consistent with the results of genetic and biochemical investigations of CTD function, these analyses suggest that the enhanced control over RNA polymerase II transcription conveyed by acquired CTD/protein interactions was an important step in the evolution of intricate patterns of gene expression that are a hallmark of large, developmentally complex eukaryotic organisms. PMID:11972039

  17. Chemoenzymatic Reversible Immobilization and Labeling of Proteins without Prior Purification

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Song, James M.; Pricer, Rachel E.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Site-specific chemical modification of proteins is important for many applications in biology and biotechnology. Recently, our laboratory and others have exploited the high specificity of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) to site-specifically modify proteins through the use of alternative substrates that incorporate bioorthogonal functionality including azides and alkynes. In this study, we evaluate two aldehyde-containing molecules as substrates for PFTase and as reactants in both oxime and hydrazone formation. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model system, we demonstrate that the purified protein can be enzymatically modified with either analogue to yield aldehyde-functionalized proteins. Oxime or hydrazone formation was then employed to immobilize, fluorescently label or PEGylate the resulting aldehyde-containing proteins. Immobilization via hydrazone formation was also shown to be reversible via transoximization with a fluorescent alkoxyamine. After characterizing this labeling strategy using pure protein, the specificity of the enzymatic process was used to selectively label GFP present in crude E. coli extract followed by capture of the aldehyde-modified protein using hydrazide-agarose. Subsequent incubation of the immobilized protein using a fluorescently labeled or PEGylated alkoxyamine resulted in the release of pure GFP containing the desired site-specific covalent modifications. This procedure was also employed to produce PEGylated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a protein with potential therapeutic activity for diabetes. Given the specificity of the PFTase-catalyzed reaction coupled with the ability to introduce a CAAX-box recognition sequence onto almost any protein, this method shows great potential as a general approach for the selective immobilization and labeling of recombinant proteins present in crude cellular extract without prior purification. Beyond generating site-specifically modified proteins

  18. Chemoenzymatic reversible immobilization and labeling of proteins without prior purification.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Song, James M; Pricer, Rachel E; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-23

    Site-specific chemical modification of proteins is important for many applications in biology and biotechnology. Recently, our laboratory and others have exploited the high specificity of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) to site-specifically modify proteins through the use of alternative substrates that incorporate bioorthogonal functionality including azides and alkynes. In this study, we evaluate two aldehyde-containing molecules as substrates for PFTase and as reactants in both oxime and hydrazone formation. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model system, we demonstrate that the purified protein can be enzymatically modified with either analogue to yield aldehyde-functionalized proteins. Oxime or hydrazone formation was then employed to immobilize, fluorescently label, or PEGylate the resulting aldehyde-containing proteins. Immobilization via hydrazone formation was also shown to be reversible via transoximization with a fluorescent alkoxyamine. After characterizing this labeling strategy using pure protein, the specificity of the enzymatic process was used to selectively label GFP present in crude E. coli extract followed by capture of the aldehyde-modified protein using hydrazide-agarose. Subsequent incubation of the immobilized protein using a fluorescently labeled or PEGylated alkoxyamine resulted in the release of pure GFP containing the desired site-specific covalent modifications. This procedure was also employed to produce PEGylated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a protein with potential therapeutic activity for diabetes. Given the specificity of the PFTase-catalyzed reaction coupled with the ability to introduce a CAAX-box recognition sequence onto almost any protein, this method shows great potential as a general approach for selective immobilization and labeling of recombinant proteins present in crude cellular extract without prior purification. Beyond generating site-specifically modified proteins, this

  19. The VSG C-terminal domain is inaccessible to antibodies on live trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Angela; Jones, Nicola; Engstler, Markus; Carrington, Mark

    2011-02-01

    In the mammalian host, the Trypanosoma brucei cell surface is covered with a densely packed protein coat of a single protein, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The VSG is believed to shield invariant surface proteins from host antibodies but there is limited information on how far antibodies can penetrate into the VSG monolayer. Here, the VSG surface coat was probed to determine whether it acts as a barrier to binding of antibodies to the membrane proximal VSG C-terminal domain. The binding of C-terminal domain antibodies to VSG221 or VSG118 was compared with antibodies recognising the cognate whole VSGs. The C-terminal VSG domain was inaccessible to antibodies on live cells but not on fixed cells. This provides further evidence that the VSG coat acts as a barrier and protects the cell from antibodies that would otherwise bind to some of the other externally disposed proteins.

  20. Effect of C-Terminal S-Palmitoylation on D2 Dopamine Receptor Trafficking and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Brittany; Petko, Jessica; Woll, Matthew; Murakami, Shoko; Sokolina, Kate; Wong, Victoria; Stagljar, Igor; Lüscher, Bernhard; Levenson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We have used bioorthogonal click chemistry (BCC), a sensitive non-isotopic labeling method, to analyze the palmitoylation status of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crucial for regulation of processes such as mood, reward, and motor control. By analyzing a series of D2R constructs containing mutations in cysteine residues, we found that palmitoylation of the D2R most likely occurs on the C-terminal cysteine residue (C443) of the polypeptide. D2Rs in which C443 was deleted showed significantly reduced palmitoylation levels, plasma membrane expression, and protein stability compared to wild-type D2Rs. Rather, the C443 deletion mutant appeared to accumulate in the Golgi, indicating that palmitoylation of the D2R is important for cell surface expression of the receptor. Using the full-length D2R as bait in a membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) screen, we identified the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) zDHHC4 as a D2R interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that several other PATs, including zDHHC3 and zDHHC8, also interacted with the D2R and that each of the three PATs was capable of affecting the palmitoylation status of the D2R. Finally, biochemical analyses using D2R mutants and the palmitoylation blocker, 2-bromopalmitate indicate that palmitoylation of the receptor plays a role in stability of the D2R. PMID:26535572

  1. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  2. Structural and functional characterization of the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-11-26

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO(3)(-) transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala(800)-Lys(967). Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met(858) accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr(926)-Ala(929) only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met(813)-Gly(828)) region and a cryptic (Met(887)-Arg(904)) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp(960). Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro(868)-Leu(967) (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1.

  3. An Overview of Label-free Electrochemical Protein Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Kerman, Kagan; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical-based protein sensors offer sensitivity, selectivity and reliability at a low cost, making them very attractive tools for protein detection. Although the sensors use a broad range of different chemistries, they all depend on the solid electrode surface, interactions with the target protein and the molecular recognition layer. Traditionally, redox enzymes have provided the molecular recognition elements from which target proteins have interacted with. This necessitates that the redox-active enzymes couple with electrode surfaces and usually requires the participation of added diffusional components, or assembly of the enzymes in functional chemical matrices. These complications, among many others, have seen a trend towards non-enzymatic-based electrochemical protein sensors. Several electrochemical detection approaches have been exploited. Basically, these have fallen into two categories: labeled and label-free detection systems. The former rely on a redox-active signal from a reporter molecule or a label, which changes upon the interaction of the target protein. In this review, we discuss the label-free electrochemical detection of proteins, paying particular emphasis to those that exploit intrinsic redox-active amino acids.

  4. The Impact of the Human DNA Topoisomerase II C-Terminal Domain on Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meczes, Emma L.; Gilroy, Kathryn L.; West, Katherine L.; Austin, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) are essential enzymes needed for the resolution of topological problems that occur during DNA metabolic processes. Topos carry out an ATP-dependent strand passage reaction whereby one double helix is passed through a transient break in another. Humans have two topoII isoforms, α and β, which while enzymatically similar are differentially expressed and regulated, and are thought to have different cellular roles. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the enzyme has the most diversity, and has been implicated in regulation. We sought to investigate the impact of the CTD domain on activity. Methodology/Principle Findings We have investigated the role of the human topoII C-terminal domain by creating constructs encoding C-terminally truncated recombinant topoIIα and β and topoIIα+β-tail and topoIIβ+α-tail chimeric proteins. We then investigated function in vivo in a yeast system, and in vitro in activity assays. We find that the C-terminal domain of human topoII isoforms is needed for in vivo function of the enzyme, but not needed for cleavage activity. C-terminally truncated enzymes had similar strand passage activity to full length enzymes, but the presence of the opposite C-terminal domain had a large effect, with the topoIIα-CTD increasing activity, and the topoIIβ-CTD decreasing activity. Conclusions/Significance In vivo complementation data show that the topoIIα C-terminal domain is needed for growth, but the topoIIβ isoform is able to support low levels of growth without a C-terminal domain. This may indicate that topoIIβ has an additional localisation signal. In vitro data suggest that, while the lack of any C-terminal domain has little effect on activity, the presence of either the topoIIα or β C-terminal domain can affect strand passage activity. Data indicates that the topoIIβ-CTD may be a negative regulator. This is the first report of in vitro data with chimeric human topoIIs. PMID:18335031

  5. New de-ubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 8, in chick skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Baek, S H; Woo, S K; Lee, J I; Yoo, Y J; Cho, C M; Kang, M S; Tanaka, K; Chung, C H

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that chick muscle extracts contained at least 10 different ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs). Here we report the purification and characterization of one of the UCHs, called UCH-8, with 125I-labelled ubiquitin-alpha-NH-MHISPPEPESEEEEEHYC as a substrate. The purified UCH-8 behaved as a 240 kDa protein on a Superdex-200 column under non-denaturing conditions but as a 130 kDa polypeptide on analysis by PAGE under denaturing conditions, suggesting that the enzyme consists of two identical subunits. Thus this enzyme seems to be distinct in its dimeric nature from other purified UCHs that consist of a single polypeptide, except that UCH-6 is also a homodimer of 27 kDa subunits. UCH-8 was maximally active between pH 7.5 and 8, but showed little or no activity below pH 7 and above pH 9. Like other UCHs it was sensitive to inhibition by thiol-blocking agents such as N-ethylmaleimide, and by ubiquitin aldehyde. The purified UCH-8 hydrolysed not only ubiquitin-alpha-NH-protein extensions, including ubiquitin-alpha-NH-carboxy extension protein of 80 amino acid residues and ubiquitin-alpha-NH-dihydrofolate reductase, but also branched poly-ubiquitin that are ligated to proteins through epsilon-NH-isopeptide bonds. However, it showed little or no activity against poly-His-tagged di-ubiquitin, suggesting that UCH-8 is not involved in the generation of free ubiquitin from the linear poly-ubiquitin precursors. These results suggest that UCH-8 might have an important role in the production of free ubiquitin and ribosomal proteins from their conjugates as well as in the recycling of ubiquitin molecules after the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated protein conjugates by the 26 S proteasome. PMID:9230110

  6. Characterization of bromine-77-labeled proteins prepared using bromoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    McElvany, K.D.; Welch, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The halogenating enzyme bromoperoxidase, isolated from the red algae Bonnemaisonia hamifera and Penicillus capitatus, was used to catalyze the radiohalogenation of proteins at neutral pH. Human serum albumin and canine fibrinogen were halogenated as model compounds; the proteins were labeled with Br-77, produced by the /sup 75/As(..cap alpha..,2n)/sup 77/Br reaction. For each enzyme, the essential reaction parameters (including the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide or of protein, the amount of enzyme used to catalyze the reaction, the pH of the reaction mixture, and the reaction time) were varied to obtain conditions that resulted in the highest yield of radiolabeled protein. The labeled proteins prepared with bromoperoxidase are stable with respect to loss of the radiolabel by hydrolysis and retain their biologic activity. The extension of this method to radiobromination of other types of compounds for imaging and receptor studies seems promising.

  7. Characterization of mammalian glucose transport proteins using photoaffinity labeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wadzinski, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A carrier-free radioiodinated phenylazide derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyl-deacetyl-forskolin (({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin), has been shown to be a highly selective photoaffinity probe for the human erythrocyte glucose transported and the glucose transport proteins found in several mammalian tissues and cultured cells where the glucose transport protein is present at a low concentration. The photoincorporation of ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin into these glucose transporters was blocked by D- (but not L-) glucose, cytochalasin B, and forskolin. In addition to labeling the mammalian glucose transport proteins, ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin also labeled the L-arabinose transporter from E. coli. In muscle and adipose tissues, glucose transport is markedly increased in response to insulin. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin was shown to selectivity tag the glucose transporter in membranes derived from these cells. In addition, the covalent derivatization of the transport protein in subcellular fractions of the adipocyte has provided a means to study the hormonal regulation of glucose transport. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin has also been used to label the purified human erythrocyte glucose transporter. The site of insertion has therefore been localized by analysis of the radiolabeled peptides which were produced following chemical and proteolytic digestion of the labeled transport protein.

  8. Imaging of conformational changes of proteins with a new environment-sensitive fluorescent probe designed for site-specific labeling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, J; Nakajima, T; Sato, M; Ozawa, T; Tohda, K; Umezawa, Y

    2001-07-01

    We demonstrate herein a new method for imaging conformational changes of proteins in live cells using a new synthetic environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, 9-amino-6,8-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)-5H-benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-one. This fluorescent probe can be attached to recombinant proteins containing four cysteine residues at the i, i + 1, i + 4, and i + 5 positions of an alpha-helix. The specific binding of the fluorescent probe to this 4Cys motif enables fluorescent labeling inside cells by its extracellular administration. The high sensitivity of the fluorophore to its environment enables monitoring of the conformational changes of the proteins in live cells as changes in its fluorescence intensity. The present method was applied to calmodulin (CaM), a Ca2+-binding protein that was well-known to expose hydrophobic domains, depending on the Ca2+ concentration. A recombinant CaM fused at its C-terminal with a helical peptide containing a 4Cys motif was labeled with the fluorescent probe inside live cells. The fluorescence intensity changed reversibly depending on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which reflected the conformational change of the recombinant CaM in the live cells.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H; McDermott, Ann E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces.

  10. Protein specific fluorescent microspheres for labelling a protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, stable and biocompatible microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing an acrylic monomer containing a covalent bonding group such as hydroxyl, amine or carboxyl, for example, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, with an addition polymerizable fluorescent comonomer such as dansyl allyl amine. A lectin or antibody is bound to the covalent site to provide cell specificity. When the microspheres are added to a cell suspension the marked microspheres will specifically label a cell membrane by binding to a specific receptor site thereon. The labeled membrane can then be detected by fluorescence of the fluorescent monomer.

  11. TRAMPLE: the transmembrane protein labelling environment.

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Rossi, Ivan; Amico, Mauro; Zauli, Andrea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2005-07-01

    TRAMPLE (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/biodec/) is a web application server dedicated to the detection and the annotation of transmembrane protein sequences. TRAMPLE includes different state-of-the-art algorithms for the prediction of signal peptides, transmembrane segments (both beta-strands and alpha-helices), secondary structure and fast fold recognition. TRAMPLE also includes a complete content management system to manage the results of the predictions. Each user of the server has his/her own workplace, where the data can be stored, organized, accessed and annotated with documents through a simple web-based interface. In this manner, TRAMPLE significantly improves usability with respect to other more traditional web servers.

  12. A summary of staphylococcal C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, propert...

  13. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  14. The C-terminal domain of the long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) death domain and regulates caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Iyo; Matsuo, Kentaro; Matsushita, Yuka; Haruna, Yasushi; Niwa, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Takao

    2014-02-14

    Caspase 8 plays an essential role in the regulation of apoptotic and non-apoptotic signaling pathways. The long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) has been shown previously to regulate caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2). In this study, the molecular mechanism by which c-FLIPL regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation was further explored in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK 293 and variant cells barely expressing caspase 8. The caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone greatly diminished caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation induced by Fas ligand (FasL) when c-FLIPL, but not its N-terminal fragment c-FLIP(p43), was expressed. The prodomain of caspase 8 was found to interact with the RIP1 death domain and to be sufficient to mediate NF-κB activation induced by FasL or c-FLIP(p43). The interaction of the RIP1 death domain with caspase 8 was inhibited by c-FLIPL but not c-FLIP(p43). Thus, these results reveal that the C-terminal domain of c-FLIPL specifically inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the RIP1 death domain and, thereby, regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation.

  15. The C-terminal Domain of the Long Form of Cellular FLICE-inhibitory Protein (c-FLIPL) Inhibits the Interaction of the Caspase 8 Prodomain with the Receptor-interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) Death Domain and Regulates Caspase 8-dependent Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Iyo; Matsuo, Kentaro; Matsushita, Yuka; Haruna, Yasushi; Niwa, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Caspase 8 plays an essential role in the regulation of apoptotic and non-apoptotic signaling pathways. The long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) has been shown previously to regulate caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2). In this study, the molecular mechanism by which c-FLIPL regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation was further explored in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK 293 and variant cells barely expressing caspase 8. The caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone greatly diminished caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation induced by Fas ligand (FasL) when c-FLIPL, but not its N-terminal fragment c-FLIP(p43), was expressed. The prodomain of caspase 8 was found to interact with the RIP1 death domain and to be sufficient to mediate NF-κB activation induced by FasL or c-FLIP(p43). The interaction of the RIP1 death domain with caspase 8 was inhibited by c-FLIPL but not c-FLIP(p43). Thus, these results reveal that the C-terminal domain of c-FLIPL specifically inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the RIP1 death domain and, thereby, regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation. PMID:24398693

  16. Efficient, chemoselective synthesis of immunomicelles using single-domain antibodies with a C-terminal thioester

    PubMed Central

    Reulen, Sanne WA; van Baal, Ingrid; Raats, Jos MH; Merkx, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    Background Classical bioconjugation strategies for generating antibody-functionalized nanoparticles are non-specific and typically result in heterogeneous compounds that can be compromised in activity. Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester, providing a unique handle for site-specific conjugation using native chemical ligation (NCL). However, current methods to generate antibody fragments with C-terminal thioesters require cumbersome refolding procedures, effectively preventing application of NCL for antibody-mediated targeting and molecular imaging. Results Targeting to the periplasm of E. coli allowed efficient production of correctly-folded single-domain antibody (sdAb)-intein fusions proteins. On column purification and 2-mercapthoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA)-induced cleavage yielded single-domain antibodies with a reactive C-terminal MESNA thioester in good yields. These thioester-functionalized single-domain antibodies allowed synthesis of immunomicelles via native chemical ligation in a single step. Conclusion A novel procedure was developed to obtain soluble, well-folded single-domain antibodies with reactive C-terminal thioesters in good yields. These proteins are promising building blocks for the chemoselective functionalization via NCL of a broad range of nanoparticle scaffolds, including micelles, liposomes and dendrimers. PMID:19619333

  17. Cloning of a C-terminally truncated NK-1 receptor from guinea-pig nervous system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah J; Morris, Judy L; Gibbins, Ian L

    2003-03-17

    In order to examine the possibility that some actions of substance P may be mediated by a variant of the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA encoding a truncated NK-1 receptor from guinea-pig celiac ganglion and brain mRNA by two-step RT-PCR based on the 3'RACE method. The truncated NK-1 receptor sequence corresponded to a splice variant missing the final exon 5, and encoded a 311-amino acid protein that was truncated just after transmembrane domain 7, in an identical position to a truncated variant of the human NK-1 receptor. Thus, the truncated NK-1 receptor lacked the intracellular C-terminus sequence required for the phosphorylation and internalisation of the full-length NK-1 receptor. Using a sensitive one-step semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, we detected mRNA for both the full length and truncated NK-1 receptors throughout the brain, spinal cord, sensory and autonomic ganglia, and viscera. Truncated NK-1 receptor mRNA was present in lower quantities than mRNA for the full-length NK-1R in all tissues. Highest levels of mRNA for the truncated NK-1 receptor were detected in coeliac ganglion, spinal cord, basal ganglia and hypothalamus. An antiserum to the N-terminus of the NK-1 receptor labelled dendrites of coeliac ganglion neurons that were not labelled with antisera to the C-terminus of the full length NK-1 receptor. These results show that a C-terminally truncated variant of the NK-1 receptor is likely to be widespread in central and peripheral nervous tissue. We predict that this receptor will mediate actions of substance P on neurons where immunohistochemical evidence for a full-length NK-1 receptor is lacking.

  18. A novel family of ubiquitin-specific proteases in chick skeletal muscle with distinct N- and C-terminal extensions.

    PubMed Central

    Baek, S H; Park, K C; Lee, J I; Kim, K I; Yoo, Y J; Tanaka, K; Baker, R T; Chung, C H

    1998-01-01

    We have recently identified a cDNA for a ubiquitin-specific protease (UBP), UBP41, that encodes the smallest functional UBP identified to date, using an Escherichia coli-based in vivo screening method. In the present study we isolated highly related cDNAs encoding a new family of UBP enzymes, named UBP46, UBP52 and UBP66. These UBPs have virtually identical catalytic domains spanning the sequence of UBP41 between the active-site Cys and the His box (95% identity). However, they possess distinct N- and/or C-terminal extensions. Moreover, they are more closely related to each other than to any other members of the UBP family. Thus these chick UBPs must define a novel family of de-ubiquitinating enzymes and should represent the first example among the UBP family enzymes, whose multiplicity is achieved by variation in their N- and C-terminal extensions. The chick UBPs were expressed in E. coli, and purified from the cells to apparent homogeneity using 125I-labelled ubiquitin-alphaNH-MHISPPEPESEEEEEHYC as a substrate. Each of the purified UBP46, UBP52 and UBP66 enzymes behaved as proteins of similar sizes under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions, suggesting that all of them consist of a single polypeptide chain. The UBP enzymes cleaved the C-terminus of the ubiquitin moiety in natural and engineered fusions irrespective of their sizes and thus are active against ubiquitin-beta-galactosidase as well as a ubiquitin C-terminal extension protein of 80 amino acids. All UBPs except UBP66 released free ubiquitin from poly-His-tagged di-ubiquitin. However, the isopeptidase activity for hydrolysing polyubiquitinated lysozyme conjugates was not detected from these UBPs, which makes these UBPs distinct from UBP41. These results suggest that the chick UBPs may play an important role in production of free ubiquitin from linear polyubiquitin chains and of certain ribosomal proteins from ubiquitin fusion proteins. PMID:9729477

  19. Fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Churchich, J E

    1993-09-01

    Isatoic anhydride reacts with nucleophile groups of proteins to yield o-aminobenzoyl protein conjugates. The fluorescence emitted by the chromophore decays in a multiexponential manner with average fluorescence lifetimes ranging from 9.9 to 10.7 ns. The steady emission anisotropy, measured upon excitation at 330 nm, is influenced by the molecular mass of the protein to which o-aminobenzoyl is attached. The fluorescence properties of o-aminobenzoyl are suitable for rotational correlation time measurements of proteins smaller than 65 kDa. The technique of emission anisotropy can be used to detect interactions between proteins in solution, provided one of the proteins is labeled with o-aminobenzoyl.

  20. EPR Studies of Functionally Active, Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Peptide Analogs of the C-terminus of a G-Protein Alpha Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Van Eps, Ned; Anderson, Lori L.; Kisselev, Oleg G.; Baranski, Thomas J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail of the transducin alpha subunit, Gtα(340–350), is known to bind and stabilize the active conformation of rhodopsin upon photoactivation (R*). Five spin-labeled analogs of Gtα(340–350) demonstrated native-like activity in their ability to bind and stabilize R*. The spin label 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was employed at interior sites within the peptide, whereas a Proxyl (3-carboxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidinyloxy) spin label was employed at the amino terminus of the peptide. Upon binding to R*, the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of TOAC343-Gtα(340–350) revealed greater immobilization of the nitroxide when compared to that of the N-terminal modified Proxyl-Gtα(340–350) analog. A double-labeled Proxyl/TOAC348-Gtα(340–350) was examined by DEER spectroscopy to determine the distribution of distances between the two nitroxides in the peptides when in solution and when bound to R*. TOAC and Proxyl spin labels in this GPCR-G-protein α-peptide system provide unique biophysical probes that can be used to explore the structure and conformational changes at the rhodopsin-G-protein interface. PMID:20695526

  1. Alpha-A crystallin: quantitation of C-terminal modification during lens aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is susceptible to age-dependent, posttranslational modification. To quantitate the amount of modification, alpha-A crystallin was purified from total proteins of the aging bovine lens, then digested with lys-C endoproteinase. Reverse phase, high pressure liquid chromatography was used to resolve and quantitate the resulting peptides, to determine the amount of C-terminal peptide relative to peptides from other regions of the protein that have not been reported to undergo modification. The results indicate that relative to alpha-A crystallin from newborn lens, posttranslational modification has occurred in approximately 45-55% of the C-terminal region from mature lens. These results demonstrate extensive modification of the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin from the mature lens, indicating that during the aging process, posttranslational modifications in this region may make significant contributions to the aggregated state and/or molecular chaperone properties of the molecule.

  2. A combination of metabolic labeling and 2D-DIGE analysis in response to a farnesyltransferase inhibitor facilitates the discovery of new prenylated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Palsuledesai, Charuta C.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Markowski, Todd W.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification required for proper cellular localization and activity of many important eukaryotic proteins. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) have been explored extensively for their antitumor activity. To assist in identifying potentially new and more useful markers for therapeutic applications, we developed a strategy that uses a combination of metabolic labeling and 2D DIGE (differential gel electrophoresis) to discover new prenylated proteins whose cellular levels are influenced by FTIs. In this approach, metabolic labeling of prenylated proteins was first carried out with an alkyne-modified isoprenoid analog, C15Alk, in the presence or absence of the FTI L-744,832. The resulting alkyne-tagged proteins were then labeled with Cy3-N3 and Cy5-N3 and subjected to 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Multiple spots having altered levels of labeling in presence of the FTI were observed. Mass spectrometric analysis of some of the differentially labeled spots identified several known prenylated proteins, along with HisRS, PACN-3, GNAI-1 and GNAI-2, which are not known to be prenylated. In vitro farnesylation of a C-terminal peptide sequence derived from GNAI-1 and GNAI-2 produced a farnesylated product, suggesting GNAI-1 and GNAI-2 are potential novel farnesylated proteins. These results suggest that this new strategy could be useful for the identification of prenylated proteins whose level of post-translational modification has been modulated by the presence of an FTI. Additionally, this approach, which decreases sample complexity and thereby facilitates analysis, should be applicable to studies of other post-translational modifications as well. PMID:24577581

  3. A combination of metabolic labeling and 2D-DIGE analysis in response to a farnesyltransferase inhibitor facilitates the discovery of new prenylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Palsuledesai, Charuta C; Ochocki, Joshua D; Markowski, Todd W; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification required for proper cellular localization and activity of many important eukaryotic proteins. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) have been explored extensively for their antitumor activity. To assist in identifying potentially new and more useful markers for therapeutic applications, we developed a strategy that uses a combination of metabolic labeling and 2D DIGE (differential gel electrophoresis) to discover new prenylated proteins whose cellular levels are influenced by FTIs. In this approach, metabolic labeling of prenylated proteins was first carried out with an alkyne-modified isoprenoid analog, C15Alk, in the presence or absence of the FTI L-744,832. The resulting alkyne-tagged proteins were then labeled with Cy3-N3 and Cy5-N3 and subjected to 2D-DIGE. Multiple spots having altered levels of labeling in presence of the FTI were observed. Mass spectrometric analysis of some of the differentially labeled spots identified several known prenylated proteins, along with HisRS, PACN-3, GNAI-1 and GNAI-2, which are not known to be prenylated. In vitro farnesylation of a C-terminal peptide sequence derived from GNAI-1 and GNAI-2 produced a farnesylated product, suggesting GNAI-1 and GNAI-2 are potential novel farnesylated proteins. These results suggest that this new strategy could be useful for the identification of prenylated proteins whose level of post-translational modification has been modulated by the presence of an FTI. Additionally, this approach, which decreases sample complexity and thereby facilitates analysis, should be applicable to studies of other post-translational modifications as well.

  4. Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Tubuliform Spidroin 1 Contributes to Extensibility in Synthetic Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig

    2012-05-24

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins.

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of the C-terminal Transmembrane Region of NBCe1-A*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO3− transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala800–Lys967. Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met858 accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr926–Ala929 only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met813–Gly828) region and a cryptic (Met887–Arg904) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp960. Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro868–Leu967 (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1. PMID:20837482

  6. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  7. Electrostatic interactions at the C-terminal domain of nucleoplasmin modulate its chromatin decondensation activity.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Bañuelos, Sonia; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2002-05-21

    The chromatin decondensation activity, thermal stability, and secondary structure of recombinant nucleoplasmin, of two deletion mutants, and of the protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes have been characterized. As previously reported, the chromatin decondensation activity of recombinant, unphosphorylated nucleoplasmin is almost negligible. Our data show that deletion of 50 residues at the C-terminal domain of the protein, containing the positively charged nuclear localization sequence, activates its chromatin decondensation ability and decreases its stability. Interestingly, both the decondensation activity and thermal stability of this deletion mutant resemble those of the phosphorylated protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes. Deletion of 80 residues at the C-terminal domain, containing the above-mentioned positively charged region and a poly(Glu) tract, inactivates the protein and increases its thermal stability. These findings, along with the effect of salt on the thermal stability of these proteins, suggest that electrostatic interactions between the positive nuclear localization sequence and the poly(Glu) tract, at the C-terminal domain, modulate protein activity and stability.

  8. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescence microscopy. Mass spectometry of F-SP-C indicated that the protein is partially deacylated and labeled with 1 mol fluorescein/1 mol protein. The protein partitioned into the fluid, or liquid expanded, phase. Increasing amounts of F-SP-C in DPPC or DPPC:DPPG monolayers decreased the size and total amounts of the condensed phase at all surface pressures. Calcium (1.6 mM) increased the amount of the condensed phase in monolayers of DPPC:DPPG but not of DPPC alone, and such monolayers were also perturbed by F-SP-C. The study indicates that SP-C perturbs the packing of neutral and anionic phospholipid monolayers even when the latter systems are condensed by calcium, indicating that interactions between SP-C and the lipids are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804608

  9. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Computational approaches for evaluating the effect of sequence variations and the intrinsically disordered C-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein on the interaction with tyrosine kinase Src.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Paula; Peñaranda, Natalia; Zamora, María Antonia; del Pilar Delgado, María; Bohorquez, Eliana; Castro, Harold; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The Helicobacter pylori CagA protein was the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified as important in the development of human malignancies such as gastric cancer. It is not clear how it is able to deregulate a set of cell control mechanisms to induce carcinogenesis following translocation into human gastric epithelial cells. It is likely, however, that structural variations in the CagA sequence alter its affinity with the host proteins inducing differences in the pathogenicity of different H. pylori strains. Using the recently elucidated N-terminal 3D structure of H. pylori CagA, information on the full cagA gene sequence, and intrinsically disordered protein structure predictions methods we evaluated the interaction of different CagA variants with the kinase Src. An automated docking followed by molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore CagA interaction modes with Src, one of its cellular partners. The computational approach let us establish that even in the presence of the same number and type of EPIYA motifs, CagA protein can reveal different spatial distributions. Based on the lowest affinity energy and higher number of interactions it was established that the principal forces governing the CagA-Src interaction are electrostatic. Results showed that EPIYA-D models presents higher affinity with some host proteins than EPIYA-C. Thus, we highlight the importance and advantage of the use of computational tools in combining chemical and biological data with bioinformatics for modeling and prediction purposes in some cases where experimental techniques present limitations.

  11. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-09

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Biochemical and Functional Properties of C-Terminal Domains of Autotransporters ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Bodelón, Gustavo; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are the largest group of proteins secreted by Gram-negative bacteria and include many virulence factors from human pathogens. ATs are synthesized as large precursors with a C-terminal domain that is inserted in the outer membrane (OM) and is essential for the translocation of an N-terminal passenger domain to the extracellular milieu. Several mechanisms have been proposed for AT secretion. Self-translocation models suggest transport across a hydrophilic channel formed by an internal pore of the β-barrel or by the oligomerization of C-terminal domains. Alternatively, an assisted-translocation model suggests that transport employs a conserved machinery of the bacterial OM such as the Bam complex. In this work we have investigated AT secretion by carrying out a comparative study to analyze the conserved biochemical and functional features of different C-terminal domains selected from ATs of gammaproteobacteria, betaproteobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, and epsilonproteobacteria. Our results indicate that C-terminal domains having an N-terminal α-helix and a β-barrel constitute functional transport units for the translocation of peptides and immunoglobulin domains with disulfide bonds. In vivo and in vitro analyses show that multimerization is not a conserved feature in AT C-terminal domains. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the deletion of the conserved α-helix severely impairs β-barrel folding and OM insertion and thereby blocks passenger domain secretion. These observations suggest that the AT β-barrel without its α-helix cannot form a stable hydrophilic channel in the OM for protein translocation. The implications of our data for an understanding of AT secretion are discussed. PMID:20802036

  13. TubZ filament assembly dynamics requires the flexible C-terminal tail

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Pérez, Maria E.; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Martín-González, Alejandro; Juan-Rodríguez, David; Llorca, Oscar; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Cytomotive filaments are essential for the spatial organization in cells, showing a dynamic behavior based on nucleotide hydrolysis. TubZ is a tubulin-like protein that functions in extrachromosomal DNA movement within bacteria. TubZ filaments grow in a helical fashion following treadmilling or dynamic instability, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have unraveled the molecular basis for filament assembly and dynamics combining electron and atomic force microscopy and biochemical analyses. Our findings suggest that GTP caps retain the filament helical structure and hydrolysis triggers filament stiffening upon disassembly. We show that the TubZ C-terminal tail is an unstructured domain that fulfills multiple functions contributing to the filament helical arrangement, the polymer remodeling into tubulin-like rings and the full disassembly process. This C-terminal tail displays the binding site for partner proteins and we report how it modulates the interaction of the regulator protein TubY. PMID:28230082

  14. TubZ filament assembly dynamics requires the flexible C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pérez, Maria E; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Martín-González, Alejandro; Juan-Rodríguez, David; Llorca, Oscar; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, Maria A

    2017-02-23

    Cytomotive filaments are essential for the spatial organization in cells, showing a dynamic behavior based on nucleotide hydrolysis. TubZ is a tubulin-like protein that functions in extrachromosomal DNA movement within bacteria. TubZ filaments grow in a helical fashion following treadmilling or dynamic instability, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have unraveled the molecular basis for filament assembly and dynamics combining electron and atomic force microscopy and biochemical analyses. Our findings suggest that GTP caps retain the filament helical structure and hydrolysis triggers filament stiffening upon disassembly. We show that the TubZ C-terminal tail is an unstructured domain that fulfills multiple functions contributing to the filament helical arrangement, the polymer remodeling into tubulin-like rings and the full disassembly process. This C-terminal tail displays the binding site for partner proteins and we report how it modulates the interaction of the regulator protein TubY.

  15. Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Kai Wen; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Ren, Pin; Youn, Yeoan; Deng, Xiang; Ge, Pinghua; Lee, Sang Hak; Belmont, Andrew S; Selvin, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins inside live mammalian cells has been achieved by employing Streptolysin O, a bacterial toxin which forms temporary pores in the membrane and allows delivery of virtually any fluorescent probes, ranging from labeled IgG’s to small ligands, with high efficiency (>85% of cells). The whole process, including recovery, takes 30 min, and the cell is ready to be imaged immediately. A variety of cell viability tests were performed after treatment with SLO to ensure that the cells have intact membranes, are able to divide, respond normally to signaling molecules, and maintains healthy organelle morphology. When combined with Oxyrase, a cell-friendly photostabilizer, a ~20x improvement in fluorescence photostability is achieved. By adding in glutathione, fluorophores are made to blink, enabling super-resolution fluorescence with 20–30 nm resolution over a long time (~30 min) under continuous illumination. Example applications in conventional and super-resolution imaging of native and transfected cells include p65 signal transduction activation, single molecule tracking of kinesin, and specific labeling of a series of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20378.001 PMID:27935478

  16. Synthesis of Peptides Containing C-Terminal Esters Using Trityl Side-Chain Anchoring: Applications to the Synthesis of C-Terminal Ester Analogs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mating Pheromone a-Factor.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Veronica; Ganusova, Elena; Rappe, Todd M; Becker, Jeffrey M; Distefano, Mark D

    2015-11-20

    Peptides containing C-terminal esters are an important class of bioactive molecules that includes a-factor, a farnesylated dodecapeptide, involved in the mating of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, results that expand the scope of solid-phase peptide synthetic methodology that uses trityl side-chain anchoring for the preparation of peptides with C-terminal cysteine alkyl esters are described. In this method, Fmoc-protected C-terminal cysteine esters are anchored to trityl chloride resin and extended by standard solid-phase procedures followed by acidolytic cleavage and HPLC purification. Analysis using a Gly-Phe-Cys-OMe model tripeptide revealed minimal epimerization of the C-terminal cysteine residue under basic conditions used for Fmoc deprotection. (1)H NMR analysis of the unfarnesylated a-factor precursor peptide confirmed the absence of epimerization. The side-chain anchoring method was used to produce wild-type a-factor that contains a C-terminal methyl ester along with ethyl-, isopropyl-, and benzyl-ester analogs in good yield. Activity assays using a yeast-mating assay demonstrate that while the ethyl and isopropyl esters manifest near-wild-type activity, the benzyl ester-containing analog is ca. 100-fold less active. This simple method opens the door to the synthesis of a variety of C-terminal ester-modified peptides that should be useful in studies of protein prenylation and other structurally related biological processes.

  17. The repressing and enhancing functions of the herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP27 map to C-terminal regions and are required to modulate viral gene expression very early in infection.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, L; Schaffer, P A

    1990-01-01

    mutant, which specifies an ICP27 peptide lacking the repressing region between residues 327 and 407, is able to (i) repress early gene expression, consistent with the repressing ability of the d3 mutation in transient expression assays, (ii) induce the synthesis of significant but reduced levels of delayed-early (gamma 1) proteins and no gamma 2 proteins (thus vd3 exhibits a late protein phenotype intermediate between that of the wild-type virus and 5dl 1.2), and (iii) confer altered electrophoretic mobility on ICP4, demonstrating a role for ICP27 in the posttranslational modification of this essential regulatory protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2161950

  18. A comparative study of natural immune responses against Plasmodium vivax C-terminal merozoite surface protein-1 (PvMSP-1) and apical membrane antigen-1 (PvAMA-1) in two endemic settings

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Fang, Qiang; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart; Zhiyong, Tao; Cui, Liwang; Li, Baiqing; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cellular and humoral immune responses against P. vivax parasite remain poorly understood. Several malaria immunological studies have been conducted in endemic regions where both P. falciparum and P. vivax parasites co-exist. In this study, a comparative analysis of immunity to Plasmodium vivax antigens in different geography and incidence of Plasmodium spp. infection was performed. We characterised antibodies against two P. vivax antigens, PvMSP-1 and PvAMA-1, and the cross-reactivity between these antigens using plasma from acute malaria infected patients living in the central region of China and in the western border of Thailand. P. vivax endemicity is found in central China whereas both P. vivax and P. falciparum are endemic in Thailand. There was an increased level of anti-PvMSP-1/anti-PvAMA-1 in both populations. An elevated level of antibodies to total P. vivax proteins and low level of antibodies to total P. falciparum proteins was found in acute P. vivax infected Chinese, suggesting antibody cross-reactivity between the two species. P. vivax infected Thai patients had both anti-P. vivax and anti-P. falciparum antibodies as expected since both species are present in Thailand. More information on humoral and cell mediated immunity during acute P. vivax-infection in the area where only single P. vivax species existed is of great interest in the relation of building up anti-disease severity caused by P. falciparum. This knowledge will support vaccine development in the future. PMID:26713085

  19. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs.

  20. Determination of protein conformation by isotopically labelled cross-linking and dedicated software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Tina; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Larsen, Nanna; Jørgensen, Flemming S.; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2007-12-01

    -links, a few corrections to a model of calreticulin obtained by homology modelling using calnexin as template can be suggested. Furthermore, the cross-links show that the C-terminal of the protein continues along the core region opposite the P-domain for at least 11 residues beyond the known structure. In addition, it was observed that the conformation of CRT does not change significantly in the presence or absence of the divalent ions, Ca2+ and Zn2+.

  1. Drop Coating Deposition Raman Spectroscopy of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate Labeled Protein

    PubMed Central

    Vangala, Karthikeshwar; Jiang, Dongping; Zou, Sige; Pechan, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the model protein normal Raman spectra of Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) -conjugated protein was systematically studied for the first time using both solution and the drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) sampling techniques. The FITC-BSA Raman spectra are dominated by the FITC Raman features that are strongly pH dependent. Current DCDR detection sensitivity obtained with a 10:1 FITC-BSA conjugate is 45 fmol in terms of total protein consumption and ~15 attomol at laser probed volume. Unlike the FITC-BSA solution Raman spectra where the FITC Raman features are photostable, concurrent FITC fluorescence and Raman photobleaching is observed in the DCDR spectra of FITC-BSA. While the FITC Raman photobleaching follows a single exponential decay function with a time constant independent of the FITC labeling ratio, the fluorescence background photobleaching is much more complicated and it depends strongly on the FITC labeling ratio and sample conditions. Mechanistically, the FITC Raman photobleaching is believed to be due to photochemical reaction of the FITC molecules in the electronically excited state. The FITC fluorescence photobleaching involves both concentration quenching and photochemical quenching, and the latter may involve a photochemical intermediate that is fluorescence inactive but Raman active. PMID:20925976

  2. Mechanistic studies of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Case, April; Stein, Ross L

    2006-02-21

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) cleave Ub-X bonds (Ub is ubiquitin and X an alcohol, an amine, or a protein) through a thioester intermediate that is produced by nucleophilic attack of the Cys residue of a Cys-SH/His-Im catalytic diad. We are studying the mechanism of UCH-L1, a UCH that is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and now wish to report our initial findings. (i) Pre-steady-state kinetic studies for UCH-L1-catalyzed hydrolysis of Ub-AMC (AMC, 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin) indicate that k(cat) is rate-limited by acyl-enzyme formation. Thus, K(m) = K(s), the dissociation constant for the Michaelis complex, and k(cat) = k(2), the rate constant for acyl-enzyme formation. (ii) For K(assoc) (=K(s)(-)(1)), DeltaC(p) = -0.8 kcal mol(-)(1) deg(-)(1) and is consistent with coupling between substrate association and a conformational change of the enzyme. For k(2), DeltaS(++) = 0 and suggests that in the E-S, substrate and active site residues are precisely aligned for reaction. (iii) Solvent isotope effects are (D)K(assoc) = 0.5 and (D)k(2) = 0.9, suggesting that the substrate binds to a form of free enzyme in which the active site Cys exists as the thiol. In the resultant Michaelis complex, the diad has tautomerized to ion pair Cys-S(-)/His-ImH(+). Subsequent attack of thiolate produces the acyl-enzyme species. In contrast, isotope effects for association of UCH-L1 with transition-state analogue ubiquitin aldehyde suggest that an alternative mechanistic pathway can sometimes be available to UCH-L1 involving general base-catalyzed attack of Cys-SH by His-Im.

  3. Recombinant isotope labeled and selenium quantified proteins for absolute protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Nico; Winter, Dominic; Lehmann, Wolf D

    2010-03-15

    A novel, widely applicable method for the production of absolutely quantified proteins is described, which can be used as internal standards for quantitative proteomic studies based on mass spectrometry. These standards are recombinant proteins containing an isotope label and selenomethionine. For recombinant protein expression, assembly of expression vectors fitted to cell-free protein synthesis was conducted using the gateway technology which offers fast access to a variety of genes via open reading frame libraries and an easy shuttling of genes between vectors. The proteins are generated by cell-free expression in a medium in which methionine is exchanged against selenomethionine and at least one amino acid is exchanged by a highly stable isotope labeled analogue. After protein synthesis and purification, selenium is used for absolute quantification by element mass spectrometry, while the heavy amino acids in the protein serve as reference in subsequent analyses by LC-ESI-MS or MALDI-MS. Accordingly, these standards are denominated RISQ (for recombinant isotope labeled and selenium quantified) proteins. In this study, a protein was generated containing Lys+6 ([(13)C(6)]-lysine) and Arg+10 ([(13)C(6),(15)N(4)]-arginine) so that each standard tryptic peptide contains a labeled amino acid. Apolipoprotein A1 was synthesized as RISQ protein, and its use as internal standard led to quantification of a reference material within the specified value. Owing to their cell-free expression, RISQ proteins do not contain posttranslational modifications. Thus, correct quantitative data by ESI- or MALDI-MS are restricted to quantifications based on peptides derived from unmodified regions of the analyte protein. Therefore, besides serving as internal standards, RISQ proteins stand out as new tools for quantitative analysis of covalent protein modifications.

  4. Naturally Acquired Antibody Responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP1) C-Terminal 19 kDa Domains in an Area of Unstable Malaria Transmission in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghui; Zhao, Zhenjun; Zhang, Xuexing; Li, Xuelian; Zhu, Min; Li, Peipei; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Ying; Yan, Guiyun; Shang, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Fan, Qi; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding naturally acquired immunity to infections caused by Plasmodia in different malaria endemicity settings is needed for better vaccine designs and for exploring antibody responses as a proxy marker of malaria transmission intensity. This study investigated the sero-epidemiology of malaria along the international border between China and Myanmar, where malaria elimination action plans are in place. This study recruited 233 P. vivax and 156 P. falciparum infected subjects with acute malaria at the malaria clinics and hospitals. In addition, 93 and 67 healthy individuals from the same endemic region or from non-endemic region, respectively, were used as controls. Acute malaria infections were identified by microscopy. Anti-recombinant PfMSP119 and PvMSP119 antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Antibody responses to respective MSP119 were detected in 50.9% and 78.2% patients with acute P. vivax and P. falciparum infections, respectively. There were cross-reacting antibodies in Plasmodium patients against these two recombinant proteins, though we could not exclude the possibility of submicroscopic mixed-species infections. IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 were the major subclasses. Interestingly, 43.2% of the healthy endemic population also had antibodies against PfMSP119, whereas only 3.9% of this population had antibodies against PvMSP119. Higher antibody levels were correlated with age and parasite density, but not with season, gender or malaria history. Both total IgG and individual IgG subclasses underwent substantial declines during the convalescent period in three months. This study demonstrated that individuals in a hypoendemic area with coexistence of P. vivax and P. falciparum can mount rapid antibody responses against both PfMSP119 and PvMSP119. The significantly higher proportion of responders to PfMSP119 in the healthy endemic population indicates higher prevalence of P. falciparum in the recent past. Specific antibodies against PvMSP119 could serve as a

  5. Naturally Acquired Antibody Responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP1) C-Terminal 19 kDa Domains in an Area of Unstable Malaria Transmission in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinghui; Zhao, Zhenjun; Zhang, Xuexing; Li, Xuelian; Zhu, Min; Li, Peipei; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Ying; Yan, Guiyun; Shang, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Fan, Qi; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding naturally acquired immunity to infections caused by Plasmodia in different malaria endemicity settings is needed for better vaccine designs and for exploring antibody responses as a proxy marker of malaria transmission intensity. This study investigated the sero-epidemiology of malaria along the international border between China and Myanmar, where malaria elimination action plans are in place. This study recruited 233 P. vivax and 156 P. falciparum infected subjects with acute malaria at the malaria clinics and hospitals. In addition, 93 and 67 healthy individuals from the same endemic region or from non-endemic region, respectively, were used as controls. Acute malaria infections were identified by microscopy. Anti-recombinant PfMSP119 and PvMSP119 antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Antibody responses to respective MSP119 were detected in 50.9% and 78.2% patients with acute P. vivax and P. falciparum infections, respectively. There were cross-reacting antibodies in Plasmodium patients against these two recombinant proteins, though we could not exclude the possibility of submicroscopic mixed-species infections. IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 were the major subclasses. Interestingly, 43.2% of the healthy endemic population also had antibodies against PfMSP119, whereas only 3.9% of this population had antibodies against PvMSP119. Higher antibody levels were correlated with age and parasite density, but not with season, gender or malaria history. Both total IgG and individual IgG subclasses underwent substantial declines during the convalescent period in three months. This study demonstrated that individuals in a hypoendemic area with coexistence of P. vivax and P. falciparum can mount rapid antibody responses against both PfMSP119 and PvMSP119. The significantly higher proportion of responders to PfMSP119 in the healthy endemic population indicates higher prevalence of P. falciparum in the recent past. Specific antibodies against PvMSP119 could serve as a

  6. C-terminal region of Mad2 plays an important role during mitotic spindle checkpoint in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaurav Kumar; Karade, Sharanbasappa Shrimant; Ranjan, Rajeev; Ahamad, Nafees; Ahmed, Shakil

    2017-02-01

    The mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (Mad2) protein is an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint that interacts with Cdc20/Slp1 and inhibit its ability to activate anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). In bladder cancer cell line the C-terminal residue of the mad2 gene has been found to be deleted. In this study we tried to understand the role of the C-terminal region of mad2 on the spindle checkpoint function. To envisage the role of C-terminal region of Mad2, we truncated 25 residues of Mad2 C-terminal region in fission yeast S.pombe and characterized its effect on spindle assembly checkpoint function. The cells containing C-terminal truncation of Mad2 exhibit sensitivity towards microtubule destabilizing agent suggesting perturbation of spindle assembly checkpoint. Further, the C-terminal truncation of Mad2 exhibit reduced viability in the nda3-KM311 mutant background at non-permissive temperature. Truncation in mad2 gene also affects its foci forming ability at unattached kinetochore suggesting that the mad2-∆CT mutant is unable to maintain spindle checkpoint activation. However, in response to the defective microtubule, only brief delay of mitotic progression was observed in Mad2 C-terminal truncation mutant. In addition we have shown that the deletion of two β strands of Mad2 protein abolishes its ability to interact with APC activator protein Slp1/Cdc20. We purpose that the truncation of two β strands (β7 and β8) of Mad2 destabilize the safety belt and affect the Cdc20-Mad2 interaction leading to defects in the spindle checkpoint activation.

  7. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tung O.; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C.; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M.; Armen, Roger S.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B.

    2015-01-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr308 in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr308 dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser473) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr308) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr308 phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin. PMID:26201515

  8. Correct processing of the kiwifruit protease actinidin in transgenic tobacco requires the presence of the C-terminal propeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, W; Amiss, J; Try, R; Praekelt, U; Scott, R; Smith, H

    1995-01-01

    A 355 cauliflower mosaic virus promoter and a tapetum-specific promoter were used to direct the synthesis in tobacco of preproactinidin and a derivative that lacked a C-terminal extension. Preproactinidin was processed into a form that migrated identically on protein gels with mature actinidin extracted from kiwifruit. This protein was proteolytically active in vitro, and high-level accumulation of this protein appeared to be detrimental to plant growth. Plants expressing an actinidin cDNA construct that lacked the sequence encoding the C-terminal propeptide were phenotypically normal but accumulated N-proactinidin, which was proteolytically active in vitro but did not self-cleave to mature actinidin. In transgenic tobacco, the C-terminal extension of actinidin is therefore required for correct processing. PMID:7784505

  9. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  10. Rearrangement of the histone H2A C-terminal domain in the nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Usachenko, S.I.; Bavykin, S.G.; Gavin, I.M.; Bradbury, M. |

    1994-07-19

    Using zero-length covalent protein-DNA crosslinking, the authors have mapped the histone-DNA contacts in nucleosome core particles from which the C- and N-terminal domains of histone H2A were selectively trimmed by trypsin or clostripain. They found that the flexible trypsin-sensitive C-terminal domain of histone H2A contacts the dyad axis, whereas its globular domain contacts the end of DNA in the nucleosome core particle. The appearance of the histone H2A contact at the dyad axis occurs only in the absence of linker DNA and does not depend on the absence of linker histones. The results show the ability of the histone H2A C-terminal domain to rearrange. This rearrangement might play a biological role in nucleosome disassembly and reassembly and the retention of the H2A-H2B dimer (or the whole octamer) during the passing of polymerases through the nucleosome.

  11. Unwinding of the C-Terminal Residues of Neuropeptide Y is critical for Y₂ Receptor Binding and Activation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Anette; Müller, Paul; Zellmann, Tristan; Scheidt, Holger A; Thomas, Lars; Bosse, Mathias; Meier, Rene; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Schmidt, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Despite recent breakthroughs in the structural characterization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), there is only sparse data on how GPCRs recognize larger peptide ligands. NMR spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and double-cycle mutagenesis studies were integrated to obtain a structural model of the peptide hormone neuropeptide Y (NPY) bound to its human G-protein-coupled Y2 receptor (Y2R). Solid-state NMR measurements of specific isotope-labeled NPY in complex with in vitro folded Y2R reconstituted into phospholipid bicelles provided the bioactive structure of the peptide. Guided by solution NMR experiments, it could be shown that the ligand is tethered to the second extracellular loop by hydrophobic contacts. The C-terminal α-helix of NPY, which is formed in a membrane environment in the absence of the receptor, is unwound starting at T(32) to provide optimal contacts in a deep binding pocket within the transmembrane bundle of the Y2R.

  12. Membrane-anchoring and charge effects in the interaction of myelin basic protein with lipid bilayers studied by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ian R; Boggs, Joan M; Feix, Jimmy B; Harauz, George

    2003-08-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) maintains the compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system by anchoring the cytoplasmic face of the two apposing bilayers and may also play a role in signal transduction. Site-directed spin labeling was done at eight matching sites in each of two recombinant murine MBPs, qC1 (charge +19) and qC8 charge (+13), which, respectively, emulate the native form of the protein (C1) and a post-translationally modified form (C8) that is increased in multiple sclerosis. When interacting with large unilamellar vesicles, most spin-labeled sites in qC8 were more mobile than those in qC1. Depth measurement via continuous wave power saturation indicated that the N-terminal and C-terminal sites in qC1 were located below the plane of the phospholipid headgroups. In qC8, the C-terminal domain dissociated from the membrane, suggesting a means by which the exposure of natural C8 to cytosolic enzymes and ligands might increase in vivo in multiple sclerosis. The importance of two Phe-Phe pairs in MBP to its interactions with lipids was investigated by separately mutating each pair to Ala-Ala. The mobility at F42A/F43A and especially F86A/F87A increased significantly. Depth measurements and helical wheel analysis indicated that the Phe-86/Phe-87 region could form a surface-seeking amphipathic alpha-helix.

  13. Labeling and purification of cellulose-binding proteins for high resolution fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Corgie, Stephane C; Bolewski, Jacob C; Smith, Hanna M; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Craighead, Harold G; Walker, Larry P

    2009-10-01

    The study of enzymatic reactions through fluorescence spectroscopy requires the use of bright, functional fluorescent molecules. In the case of proteins, labeling with fluorescent dyes has been carried out through covalent reactions with specific amino acids. However, these reactions are probabilistic and can yield mixtures of unlabeled and labeled enzymes with catalytic activities that can be modified by the addition of fluorophores. To have meaningful interpretations of results from the study of labeled enzymes, it is then necessary to reduce the variability in physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the labeled products. In this paper, a solid phase labeling protocol is described as an advantageous alternative to free solution labeling of cellulose-binding proteins and is applied to tag cellulases with three different fluorophores. The products from the labeling reactions were purified to remove the unreacted dye and separate labeled and unlabeled enzymes. Characterization of the catalytic and spectroscopic properties of the isolated labeled species confirmed that highly homogeneous populations of labeled cellulases can be achieved. The protocol for the separation of labeled products is applicable to any mixture of labeled proteins, making this an attractive methodology for the production of labeled proteins suitable for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

  14. C-terminal tail of FGF19 determines its specificity toward Klotho co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinle; Lemon, Bryan; Li, XiaoFan; Gupte, Jamila; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Stevens, Jennitte; Hawkins, Nessa; Shen, Wenyan; Lindberg, Richard; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Li, Yang

    2008-11-28

    FGF19 subfamily proteins (FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23) are unique members of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) that regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis in an endocrine fashion. Their activities require the presence of alpha or betaKlotho, two related single-pass transmembrane proteins, as co-receptors in relevant target tissues. We previously showed that FGF19 can bind to both alpha and betaKlotho, whereas FGF21 and FGF23 can bind only to either betaKlotho or alphaKlotho, respectively in vitro. To determine the mechanism regulating the binding and specificity among FGF19 subfamily members to Klotho family proteins, chimeric proteins between FGF19 subfamily members or chimeric proteins between Klotho family members were constructed to probe the interaction between those two families. Our results showed that a chimera of FGF19 with the FGF21 C-terminal tail interacts only with betaKlotho and a chimera with the FGF23 C-terminal tail interacts only with alphaKlotho. FGF signaling assays also reflected the change of specificity we observed for the chimeras. These results identified the C-terminal tail of FGF19 as a region necessary for its recognition of Klotho family proteins. In addition, chimeras between alpha and betaKlotho were also generated to probe the regions in Klotho proteins that are important for signaling by this FGF subfamily. Both FGF23 and FGF21 require intact alpha or betaKlotho for signaling, respectively, whereas FGF19 can signal through a Klotho chimera consisting of the N terminus of alphaKlotho and the C terminus of betaKlotho. Our results provide the first glimpse of the regions that regulate the binding specificity between this unique family of FGFs and their co-receptors.

  15. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  16. Site-directed spin labeling of proteins for distance measurements in vitro and in cells.

    PubMed

    Roser, P; Schmidt, M J; Drescher, M; Summerer, D

    2016-06-15

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy allows studying the structure, dynamics, and interactions of proteins via distance measurements in the nanometer range. We here give an overview of available spin labels, the strategies for their introduction into proteins, and the associated potentials for protein structural studies in vitro and in the context of living cells.

  17. Advances in chemical labeling of proteins in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The pursuit of quantitative biological information with imaging requires robust labeling approaches that can be used in multiple applications and with a variety of detectable colors and properties. In addition to conventional fluorescent proteins, chemists and biologists have come together to provide a range of approaches that combine dye chemistry with the convenience of genetic targeting. This hybrid-tagging approach combines the rational design of properties available through synthetic dye chemistry with the robust biological targeting available with genetic encoding. In this review, we discuss the current range of approaches that have been exploited for dye targeting, or targeting and activation, and some of the recent applications that are uniquely enabled by these hybrid-tagging approaches. PMID:25743694

  18. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  19. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  20. Probing the Impact of the EchinT C-Terminal Domain on Structure and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    S Bardaweel; J Pace; T Chou; V Cody; C Wagner

    2011-12-31

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint) is considered as the ancestor of the histidine triad protein superfamily and is highly conserved from bacteria to humans. Prokaryote genomes, including a wide array of both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, typically encode one Hint gene. The cellular function of Hint and the rationale for its evolutionary conservation in bacteria have remained a mystery. Despite its ubiquity and high sequence similarity to eukaryote Hint1 [Escherichia coli Hint (echinT) is 48% identical with human Hint1], prokaryote Hint has been reported in only a few studies. Here we report the first conformational information on the full-length N-terminal and C-terminal residues of Hint from the E. coli complex with GMP. Structural analysis of the echinT-GMP complex reveals that it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with four homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of electron density for both the N-terminal residues and the C-terminal residues of the echinT-GMP complex indicates that the loops in some monomers can adopt more than one conformation. The observation of conformational flexibility in terminal loop regions could explain the presence of multiple homodimers in the asymmetric unit of this structure. To explore the impact of the echinT C-terminus on protein structure and catalysis, we conducted a series of catalytic radiolabeling and kinetic experiments on the C-terminal deletion mutants of echinT. In this study, we show that sequential deletion of the C-terminus likely has no effect on homodimerization and a modest effect on the secondary structure of echinT. However, we observed a significant impact on the folding structure, as reflected by a significant lowering of the T{sub m} value. Kinetic analysis reveals that the C-terminal deletion mutants are within an order of magnitude less efficient in catalysis compared to wild type, while the overall kinetic mechanism that proceeds through a fast step

  1. [Research advances on ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase in oncogenesis and progression].

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Chen, Wei-lin

    2015-03-01

    By regulating the ubiquitination and deubiquitination of key proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system mediates a variety of cellular activities. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) is a deubiquitinating enzyme which can remove ubiquitin chains at the end of ubiquited proteins. The abnormal expression of UCH has been found in a variety of tumor tissues, indicating that it participates in the process of tumor development. Here we review the characteristics of UCH members and current understanding about the role of UCH in tumor development, and the potential target for cancer treatment.

  2. Molecular architecture of the nucleoprotein C-terminal domain from the Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura E; Ellena, Jeffrey F; Handing, Katarzyna B; Derewenda, Urszula; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Engel, Daniel A; Derewenda, Zygmunt S

    2016-01-01

    The Filoviridae family of negative-sense, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses is comprised of two species of Marburgvirus (MARV and RAVV) and five species of Ebolavirus, i.e. Zaire (EBOV), Reston (RESTV), Sudan (SUDV), Taï Forest (TAFV) and Bundibugyo (BDBV). In each of these viruses the ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. It is tightly associated with the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid, and during the lifecycle of the virus is essential for transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. The structure of the unique C-terminal globular domain of the NP from EBOV has recently been determined and shown to be structurally unrelated to any other known protein [Dziubańska et al. (2014), Acta Cryst. D70, 2420-2429]. In this paper, a study of the C-terminal domains from the NP from the remaining four species of Ebolavirus, as well as from the MARV strain of Marburgvirus, is reported. As expected, the crystal structures of the BDBV and TAFV proteins show high structural similarity to that from EBOV, while the MARV protein behaves like a molten globule with a core residual structure that is significantly different from that of the EBOV protein.

  3. Trypanosoma evansi: identification and characterization of a variant surface glycoprotein lacking cysteine residues in its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yonggen; Zhao, Xinxin; Zou, Jingru; Suo, Xun

    2011-01-01

    African trypanosomes are flagellated unicellular parasites which proliferate extracellularly in the mammalian host blood-stream and tissue spaces. They evade the hosts' antibody-mediated lyses by sequentially changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). VSG tightly coats the entire parasite body, serving as a physical barrier. In Trypanosoma brucei and the closely related species Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma equiperdum, each VSG polypeptide can be divided into N- and C-terminal domains, based on cysteine distribution and sequence homology. N-terminal domain, the basis of antigenic variation, is hypervariable and contains all the exposed epitopes; C-terminal domain is relatively conserved and a full set of four or eight cysteines were generally observed. We cloned two genes from two distinct variants of T. evansi, utilizing RT-PCR with VSG-specific primers. One contained a VSG type A N-terminal domain followed a C-terminal domain lacking cysteine residues. To confirm that this gene is expressed as a functional VSG, the expression and localization of the corresponding gene product were characterized using Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining of living trypanosomes. Expression analysis showed that this protein was highly expressed, variant-specific, and had a ubiquitous cellular surface localization. All these results indicated that it was expressed as a functional VSG. Our finding showed that cysteine residues in VSG C-terminal domain were not essential; the conserved C-terminal domain generally in T. brucei like VSGs would possibly evolve for regulating the VSG expression.

  4. Dual labeling of a binding protein allows for specific fluorescence detection of native protein.

    PubMed

    Karlström, A; Nygren, P A

    2001-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer has been investigated in the context of specific detection of unlabeled proteins. A model system based on the staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-IgG interaction was designed, in which a single domain was engineered to facilitate site-specific incorporation of fluorophores. An Asn23Cys mutant of the B domain from SPA was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently labeled at the introduced unique thiol and at an amino group, using N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS) and succinimidyl 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoate (NBD-X, SE), respectively. Biosensor analysis of purified doubly labeled protein showed that high-affinity binding to the Fc region of IgG was retained. The fluorescence emission spectrum of the doubly labeled protein showed a shift in the relative emission of the two fluorophores in the presence of Fc3(1) fragments, which bind specifically to the B domain. In addition, the fluorescence emission ratio 480/525 nm was shown to increase with increasing concentration of Fc3(1), whereas the presence of a control protein did not affect the emission ratio over the same concentration range.

  5. Hsp90 N- and C-terminal double inhibition synergistically suppresses Bcr-Abl-positive human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhuang, Yingting; Chen, Xianling; Chen, Xiaole; Li, Ding; Fan, Yingjuan; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Yuanzhong; Wu, Lixian

    2017-02-07

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) contains amino (N)-terminal domain, carboxyl(C)-terminal domain, and middle domains, which activate Hsp90 chaperone function cooperatively in tumor cells. One terminal occupancy might influence another terminal binding with inhibitor. The Bcr-Abl kinase is one of the Hsp90 clients implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Present studies demonstrate that double inhibition of the N- and C-terminal termini can disrupt Hsp90 chaperone function synergistically, but not antagonistically, in Bcr-Abl-positive human leukemia cells. Furthermore, both the N-terminal inhibitor 17-AAG and the C-terminal inhibitor cisplatin (CP) have the capacity to suppress progenitor cells; however, only CP is able to inhibit leukemia stem cells (LSCs) significantly, which implies that the combinational treatment is able to suppress human leukemia in different mature states.

  6. Heterologous C-terminal sequences disrupt transcriptional activation and oncogenesis by p59v-rel.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, J A; Hannink, M

    1993-01-01

    Members of the NF-kappa B/rel family of transcription factors are regulated through a trans association with members of a family of inhibitor proteins, collectively known as I kappa B proteins, that contain five to eight copies of a 33-amino-acid repeat sequence (ankyrin repeat). Certain NF-kappa B/rel proteins are also regulated by cis-acting ankyrin repeat-containing domains. The C terminus of p105NF-kappa B, the precursor of the 50-kDa subunit of NF-kappa B, contains a series of ankyrin repeats; proteolytic removal of this ankyrin domain is necessary for the manifestation of sequence-specific DNA binding and nuclear translocation of the N-terminal product. To investigate the structural requirements important for regulation of different NF-kappa B/rel family members by polypeptides containing ankyrin repeat domains, we have constructed a p59v-rel:p105NF-kappa B chimeric protein (p110v-rel-ank). The presence of C-terminal p105NF-kappa B-derived sequences in p110v-rel-ank inhibited nuclear translocation, sequence-specific DNA binding, pp40I kappa B-alpha association, and oncogenic transformation. Sequential truncation of the C-terminal ankyrin domain of p110v-rel-ank resulted in the restoration of nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and pp40I kappa B-alpha association but did not restore the oncogenic properties of p59v-rel. The presence of 67 C-terminal p105NF-kappa B-derived amino acids was sufficient to inhibit both transcriptional activation and oncogenic transformation by p59v-rel. These results support a model in which activation of gene expression by p59v-rel is required for its ability to induce oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:8230438

  7. The N- and C-terminal domains of MecA recognize different partners in the competence molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Persuh, M; Turgay, K; Mandic-Mulec, I; Dubnau, D

    1999-08-01

    ComK is a transcription factor required for the expression of competence genes in Bacillus subtilis. Binding to MecA targets ComK for degradation by the ClpCP protease. MecA therefore acts as an adapter protein recruiting a regulatory protein for proteolysis. However, when ComS is synthesized, ComK is released from binding by MecA and thereby protected from degradation. MecA binds to three protein partners during these processes: ComK, ClpC and ComS. Using limited proteolysis, we have defined N- and C-terminal structural domains of MecA and evaluated the interactions of these domains with the protein partners of MecA. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have determined that the N-terminal domain of MecA interacts with ComK and ComS and the C-terminal domain with ClpC. MecA is shown to exist as a dimer with dimerization sites on both the N- and C-terminal domains. The C-terminal domain stimulates the ATPase activity of ClpC and is degraded by the ClpCP protease, while the N-terminal domain is inactive in both of these assays. In vivo data were consistent with these findings, as comG-lacZ expression was decreased in a strain overproducing the N-terminal domain, indicating reduced ComK activity. We propose a model in which binding of ClpC to the C-terminal domain of MecA induces a conformational change enabling the N-terminal domain to bind ComK with enhanced affinity. MecA is widespread among Gram-positive organisms and may act generally as an adapter protein, targeting proteins for regulated degradation.

  8. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Protein-Ligand Binding Analysis in Multi-Component Protein Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeArmond, Patrick D.; West, Graham M.; Huang, Hai-Tsang; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    Described here is a stable isotope labeling protocol that can be used with a chemical modification- and mass spectrometry-based protein-ligand binding assay for detecting and quantifying both the direct and indirect binding events that result from protein-ligand binding interactions. The protocol utilizes an H{2/16}O2 and H{2/18}O2 labeling strategy to evaluate the chemical denaturant dependence of methionine oxidation in proteins both in the presence and absence of a target ligand. The differential denaturant dependence to the oxidation reactions performed in the presence and absence of ligand provides a measure of the protein stability changes that occur as a result of direct interactions of proteins with the target ligand and/or as a result of indirect interactions involving other protein-ligand interactions that are either induced or disrupted by the ligand. The described protocol utilizes the 18O/16O ratio in the oxidized protein samples to quantify the ligand-induced protein stability changes. The ratio is determined using the isotopic distributions observed for the methionine-containing peptides used for protein identification in the LC-MS-based proteomics readout. The strategy is applied to a multi-component protein mixture in this proof-of-principle experiment, which was designed to evaluate the technique's ability to detect and quantify the direct binding interaction between cyclosporin A and cyclophilin A and to detect the indirect binding interaction between cyclosporin A and calcineurin (i.e., the protein-protein interaction between cyclophilin A and calcineurin that is induced by cyclosporin A binding to cyclophilin A).

  9. The Low pH Unfolded State of the C-terminal Domain of the Ribosomal Protein L9 Contains Significant Secondary Structure in the Absence of Denaturant but is No More Compact than the Low pH Urea Unfolded State

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Bing; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the properties of the unfolded states of proteins, particularly unfolded states which can be populated in the absence of high concentrations of denaturants. Interest in the unfolded state ensemble reflects the fact that it is the starting point for protein folding as well as the reference state for protein stability studies, and can be the starting state for pathological aggregation. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain (residues 58 to 149) of the ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9) can be populated in the absence of denaturant at low pH. CTL9 is a 92 residue globular α, β protein. The low pH unfolded state contains more secondary structure than low pH urea unfolded state but it is not a molten globule. Backbone (1H, 13C and 15N) NMR assignments as well as side chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ assignments and 15N R2 values were obtained for the pH 2.0 unfolded form of CTL9 and for the urea unfolded state at pH 2.5. Analysis of the deviations of the chemical shifts from random coil values indicates that residues that comprise the two helices in the native state show a clear preference to adopt helical φ, ψ angles in the pH 2.0 unfolded state. There is a less pronounced but nevertheless clear tendency for residues 107 to 124 to preferentially populate helical φ, ψ values in the unfolded state. The urea unfolded state has no detectable tendency to populate any type of secondary structure even though it is as compact as the pH 2.0 unfolded state. Comparison of the two unfolded forms of CTL9 provides direct experimental evidence that states which differ significantly in their secondary structure can have identical hydrodynamic properties. This in turn demonstrates that global parameters such as Rh or Rg are very poor indicators of “random coil” behavior. PMID:18707127

  10. Site specific chemoselective labelling of proteins with robust and highly sensitive Ru(II) bathophenanthroline complexes.

    PubMed

    Uzagare, Matthew C; Claussnitzer, Iris; Gerrits, Michael; Bannwarth, Willi

    2012-03-21

    The bioorthogonal and chemoselective fluorescence labelling of several cell-free synthesized proteins containing a site-specifically incorporated azido amino acid was possible using different alkyne-functionalized Ru(II) bathophenanthroline complexes. We were able to achieve a selective labelling even in complex mixtures of proteins despite the fact that ruthenium dyes normally show a high tendency for unspecific interactions with proteins and are commonly used for total staining of proteins. Since the employed Ru complexes are extremely robust, photo-stable and highly sensitive, the approach should be applicable to the production of labelled proteins for single molecule spectroscopy and fluorescence-based interaction studies.

  11. Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticle Labels/Protein Microarray for Detection of Protein Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Huo, Qisheng; Varnum, Susan M.; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-10-20

    Biomarkers serve as indicators of biological and pathological processes, or physiological and pharmacological responses to a drug treatment. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a biomarker with its important biological and pathological functions, has been studied for decades. Conventional fluorescence immunoassay has been widely used for analysis of biomakers like IL-6. However, single fluorophore labeling shows its limitations of low intensity and poor stability. We report a dye-encapsulated silica nanoparticle as a label, with the advantages of high fluorescence intensity, photostability, and biocompatibility, in conjunction with microarray technology for sensitive immunoassay of IL-6 on a microarray format. The tris (2,2’-bipyridyl)ruthenium (II)chloride hexahydrate (Rubpy) dye incorporated into silica nanoparticles using a simple one-step microemulsion synthesis step. The nanoparticles are uniform in size with a diameter of 50 nm. The microarray fluorescent immunoassay approach based on dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels has high sensitivity for practical applications with a limit of detection for IL-6 down to 0.1 ng mL-1. The calibration curve is linear over the range from 0.1 ng mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1. Furthermore, results illustrated that the assay is highly specific for IL-6 in the presence of range of cytokines or proteins. The RuDS dye-labeled nanoparticles in connection with protein microarrays show the promise for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers.

  12. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-12-17

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites.

  13. Changes in labeling of soluble and solubilized hippocampus proteins after a learning experiment in rats.

    PubMed

    Popov, N; Schulzeck, S; Matthies, H

    1976-01-01

    At various intervals after acquisition of a brightness discrimination in rats labeled leucine was intraventricularly applied. Hippocampus tissue was fractionated in soluble and solubilized insoluble protein fractions. Protein content and labeling of several electrophoretically resolved bands showed a biphasic time course: a first increase was observed 20 minutes after training including preferably soluble proteins, whereas a second increase (about eight hours after training) was mainly related to solubilized insoluble proteins.

  14. Crystallization of the C-terminal globular domain of avian reovirus fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Raaij, Mark J. van; Hermo Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado Calvo, Pablo; Fox, Gavin C.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Costas, Celina; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier

    2005-07-01

    Partial proteolysis of the avian reovirus cell-attachment protein σC yields a major homotrimeric C-terminal fragment that presumably contains the receptor-binding domain. This fragment has been crystallized in the presence and absence of zinc sulfate and cadmium sulfate. One of the crystal forms diffracts synchrotron X-rays to 2.2–2.3 Å. Avian reovirus fibre, a homotrimer of the σC protein, is responsible for primary host-cell attachment. Using the protease trypsin, a C-terminal σC fragment containing amino acids 156–326 has been generated which was subsequently purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained, one grown in the absence of divalent cations and belonging to space group P6{sub 3}22 (unit-cell parameters a = 75.6, c = 243.1 Å) and one grown in the presence of either zinc or cadmium sulfate and belonging to space group P321 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.7, c = 74.5 Å and a = 73.1, c = 69.9 Å for the Zn{sup II}- and Cd{sup II}-grown crystals, respectively). The first crystal form diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0 Å resolution and the second form to 2.2–2.3 Å. Its closest related structure, the C-terminal fragment of mammalian reovirus fibre, has only 18% sequence identity and molecular-replacement attempts were unsuccessful. Therefore, a search is under way for suitable heavy-atom derivatives and attempts are being made to grow protein crystals containing selenomethionine instead of methionine.

  15. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Vera J.; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  16. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh; Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär; Coutard, Bruno; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  17. Bacillus subtilis GlnR contains an autoinhibitory C-terminal domain required for the interaction with glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wray, Lewis V; Fisher, Susan H

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus subtilis GlnR transcription factor regulates gene expression in response to changes in nitrogen availability. Glutamine synthetase transmits the nitrogen regulatory signal to GlnR. The DNA-binding activity of GlnR is activated by a transient protein-protein interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase that stabilizes GlnR-DNA complexes. This signal transduction mechanism was analysed by creating mutant GlnR proteins with partial or complete truncations of their C-terminal domains. The truncated GlnR proteins were found to constitutively repress gene expression in vivo. This constitutive repression did not require glutamine synthetase. Purified mutant GlnR proteins bound DNA in vitro more tightly than wild-type GlnR protein and this binding was not activated by feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. While full-length GlnR is monomeric, the truncated GlnR proteins contained significant levels of dimers. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of GlnR acts as an autoinhibitory domain that prevents GlnR dimerization and thus impedes DNA binding. The GlnR C-terminal domain is also required for the interaction between GlnR and feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase. Compared with the full-length GlnR protein, the truncated GlnR proteins were defective in their interaction with feedback-inhibited glutamine synthetase in cross-linking experiments.

  18. Extensive labeling with [3H]ethanolamine of a hydrophilic protein of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, E J; Tartakoff, A M

    1988-06-15

    Murine T-lymphomas and Thy-1- mutants were labeled overnight with [3H]ethanolamine to detect proteins which possess a glycophospholipid anchor. When labeled cells were treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid and then analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography, both Thy-1 and a second intensely labeled protein (46 kDa) were observed. The presence of the radiolabeled 46-kDa protein in wild type and class E Thy-1 negative cells (cells in which Thy-1 is synthesized but cannot be labeled with [3H]ethanolamine) suggested incorporation into a distinct moiety. Labeling of the 46-kDa protein with [3H]ethanolamine is rapidly inhibited by cycloheximide. Further characterization of the 46-kDa protein by subcellular fractionation and Triton X-114 partitioning indicated that the protein is located in the cytosol. The protein is basic and does not bind to either concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin. Labeling of a 46-kDa protein has also been demonstrated in Chinese hamster ovary, COS, rat myeloma, cloned human T-lymphocytes, and HeLa cells. Pronase digestion of the [3H]ethanolamine-labeled 46-kDa protein of wild type lymphoma cells generated a nonbasic and polar labeled fragment which is labile to strong acid and base ([3H]ethanolamine is liberated), insensitive to periodate oxidation and alkaline phosphatase, and does not bind to concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin. Judging from methylation studies, the labeled ethanolamine residue does not contain a free amino group. Based on these results, we report a novel post-translational modification of selected protein(s) by the covalent addition of [3H]ethanolamine.

  19. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  20. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  1. Protein-retention expansion microscopy of cells and tissues labeled using standard fluorescent proteins and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Zhao, Yongxin; Yu, Chih-Chieh (Jay); English, Brian P.; Gao, Linyi; Martorell, Anthony; Suk, Ho-Jun; Yoshida, Fumiaki; DeGennaro, Ellen M.; Roossien, Douglas H.; Gong, Guanyu; Seneviratne, Uthpala; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Desimone, Robert; Cai, Dawen; Boyden, Edward S.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy (ExM) enables imaging of preserved specimens with nanoscale precision on diffraction limited instead of specialized super-resolution microscopes. ExM works by physically separating fluorescent probes after anchoring them to a swellable gel. The first expansion microscopy method was unable to retain native proteins in the gel and used custom made reagents not widely available. Here, we describe protein retention ExM (proExM), a variant of ExM that anchors proteins to the swellable gel allowing the use of conventional fluorescently labeled antibodies and streptavidin, and fluorescent proteins. We validate and demonstrate utility of proExM for multi-color super-resolution (~70 nm) imaging of cells and mammalian tissues on conventional microscopes. PMID:27376584

  2. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  3. Determining the Composition and Stability of Protein Complexes Using an Integrated Label-Free and Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Guise, Amanda J.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    In biological systems, proteins catalyze the fundamental reactions that underlie all cellular functions, including metabolic processes and cell survival and death pathways. These biochemical reactions are rarely accomplished alone. Rather, they involve a concerted effect from many proteins that may operate in a directed signaling pathway and/or may physically associate in a complex to achieve a specific enzymatic activity. Therefore, defining the composition and regulation of protein complexes is critical for understanding cellular functions. In this chapter, we describe an approach that uses quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to assess the specificity and the relative stability of protein interactions. Isolation of protein complexes from mammalian cells is performed by rapid immunoaffinity purification, and followed by in-solution digestion and high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. We employ complementary quantitative MS workflows to assess the specificity of protein interactions using label-free MS and statistical analysis, and the relative stability of the interactions using a metabolic labeling technique. For each candidate protein interaction, scores from the two workflows can be correlated to minimize nonspecific background and profile protein complex composition and relative stability. PMID:26867737

  4. Learning to Extract Gene-Protein Names from Weakly-Labeled Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    gene -protein entities. We trained a VP -HMM extractor on the training corpus of YAPEX using Minorthird’s default features. The GENIA dataset...Learning to Extract Gene -Protein Names from Weakly-Labeled Text Richard C. Wang, Anthony Tomasic, Robert E. Frederking...Extract Gene -Protein Names from Weakly-Labeled Text 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  5. Selective labeling of polypeptides using protein farnesyltransferase via rapid oxime ligation.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Dozier, Jonathan K; Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-12-21

    An aldehyde-containing alternative substrate for protein farnesyltransferase was prepared and shown to be enzymatically incorporated into a peptide and a protein. The protein was subsequently immobilized onto aminooxy-functionalized agarose beads or labeled with a fluorophore. This method for protein modification provides an alternative to the commonly employed Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction.

  6. Selective Labeling of Polypeptides Using Protein Farnesyltransferase via Rapid Oxime Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    An aldehyde-containing alternative substrate for protein farnesyltransferase was prepared and shown to be enzymatically incorporated into a peptide and a protein. The protein was subsequently immobilized onto aminooxy-functionalized agarose beads or labeled with a fluorophore. This method for protein modification provides an alternative to the commonly employed Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction PMID:20967387

  7. Dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels/protein microarray for detection of protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Huo, Qisheng; Varnum, Susan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-11-01

    We report a dye-encapsulated silica nanoparticle as a label, with the advantages of high fluorescence intensity, photostability, and biocompatibility, in conjunction with microarray technology for sensitive immunoassay of a biomarker, interleukin-6 (IL-6), on a microarray format. The tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(ii) chloride hexahydrate (Rubpy) dye was incorporated into silica nanoparticles using a simple one-step microemulsion synthesis. In this synthesis process, Igepal CA520 was used as the surfactant, therefore, no requirement of cosolvent during the synthesis and the particle size was reduced comparing to the commonly used Triton surfactant system. The nanoparticles are uniform in size with a diameter of 50 nm. The microarray fluorescent immunoassay approach based on dye-doped silica nanoparticle labels has high sensitivity for practical applications with a limit of detection for IL-6 down to 0.1 ng mL(-1). The calibration curve is linear over the range from 0.1 ng mL(-1) to 10 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, results illustrated that the assay is highly specific for IL-6 in the presence of range of cytokines or proteins. The RuDS dye-labeled nanoparticles in connection with protein microarrays show the promise for clinical diagnosis of biomarkers.

  8. Modeling the contribution of individual proteins to mixed skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates over increasing periods of label incorporation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Wolff, Christopher A; Peelor, Fredrick F; Shipman, Patrick D; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-03-15

    Advances in stable isotope approaches, primarily the use of deuterium oxide ((2)H2O), allow for long-term measurements of protein synthesis, as well as the contribution of individual proteins to tissue measured protein synthesis rates. Here, we determined the influence of individual protein synthetic rates, individual protein content, and time of isotopic labeling on the measured synthesis rate of skeletal muscle proteins. To this end, we developed a mathematical model, applied the model to an established data set collected in vivo, and, to experimentally test the impact of different isotopic labeling periods, used (2)H2O to measure protein synthesis in cultured myotubes over periods of 2, 4, and 7 days. We first demonstrated the influence of both relative protein content and individual protein synthesis rates on measured synthesis rates over time. When expanded to include 286 individual proteins, the model closely approximated protein synthetic rates measured in vivo. The model revealed a 29% difference in measured synthesis rates from the slowest period of measurement (20 min) to the longest period of measurement (6 wk). In support of these findings, culturing of C2C12 myotubes with isotopic labeling periods of 2, 4, or 7 days revealed up to a doubling of the measured synthesis rate in the shorter labeling period compared with the longer period of labeling. From our model, we conclude that a 4-wk period of labeling is ideal for considering all proteins in a mixed-tissue fraction, while minimizing the slowing effect of fully turned-over proteins. In addition, we advocate that careful consideration must be paid to the period of isotopic labeling when comparing mixed protein synthetic rates between studies.

  9. Identification of Novel Short C-Terminal Transcripts of Human SERPINA1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Matamala, Nerea; Aggarwal, Nupur; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Gomez-Mariano, Gema; Lara, Beatriz; Martinez, Maria Teresa; Cuesta, Isabel; Stolk, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Human SERPINA1 gene is located on chromosome 14q31-32.3 and is organized into three (IA, IB, and IC) non-coding and four (II, III, IV, V) coding exons. This gene produces α1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a prototypical member of the serpin superfamily of proteins. We demonstrate that human peripheral blood leukocytes express not only a product corresponding to the transcript coding for the full-length A1AT protein but also two short transcripts (ST1C4 and ST1C5) of A1AT. In silico sequence analysis revealed that the last exon of the short transcripts contains an Open Reading Frame (ORF) and thus putatively can produce peptides. We found ST1C4 expression across different human tissues whereas ST1C5 was mainly restricted to leukocytes, specifically neutrophils. A high up-regulation (10-fold) of short transcripts was observed in isolated human blood neutrophils after activation with lipopolysaccharide. Parallel analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to C-terminal region of A1AT in supernatants of activated but not naïve neutrophils. Herein we report for the first time a tissue specific expression and regulation of short transcripts of SERPINA1 gene, and the presence of C-terminal peptides in supernatants from activated neutrophils, in vitro. This gives a novel insight into the studies on the transcription of SERPINA1 gene. PMID:28107454

  10. Identification of Novel Short C-Terminal Transcripts of Human SERPINA1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Matamala, Nerea; Aggarwal, Nupur; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Gomez-Mariano, Gema; Lara, Beatriz; Martinez, Maria Teresa; Cuesta, Isabel; Stolk, Jan; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Human SERPINA1 gene is located on chromosome 14q31-32.3 and is organized into three (IA, IB, and IC) non-coding and four (II, III, IV, V) coding exons. This gene produces α1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a prototypical member of the serpin superfamily of proteins. We demonstrate that human peripheral blood leukocytes express not only a product corresponding to the transcript coding for the full-length A1AT protein but also two short transcripts (ST1C4 and ST1C5) of A1AT. In silico sequence analysis revealed that the last exon of the short transcripts contains an Open Reading Frame (ORF) and thus putatively can produce peptides. We found ST1C4 expression across different human tissues whereas ST1C5 was mainly restricted to leukocytes, specifically neutrophils. A high up-regulation (10-fold) of short transcripts was observed in isolated human blood neutrophils after activation with lipopolysaccharide. Parallel analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to C-terminal region of A1AT in supernatants of activated but not naïve neutrophils. Herein we report for the first time a tissue specific expression and regulation of short transcripts of SERPINA1 gene, and the presence of C-terminal peptides in supernatants from activated neutrophils, in vitro. This gives a novel insight into the studies on the transcription of SERPINA1 gene.

  11. Site-specific labeling of proteins via sortase: protocols for the molecular biologist.

    PubMed

    Popp, Maximilian Wei-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Creation of site-specifically labeled protein bioconjugates is an important tool for the molecular biologist and cell biologist. Chemical labeling methods, while versatile with respect to the types of moieties that can be attached, suffer from lack of specificity, often targeting multiple positions within a protein. Here we describe protocols for the chemoenzymatic labeling of proteins at the C-terminus using the bacterial transpeptidase, sortase A. We detail a protocol for the purification of an improved pentamutant variant of the Staphylococcus aureus enzyme (SrtA 5(o)) that exhibits vastly improved kinetics relative to the wild-type enzyme. Importantly, a protocol for the construction of peptide probes compatible with sortase labeling using techniques that can be adapted to any cellular/molecular biology lab with no existing infrastructure for synthetic chemistry is described. Finally, we provide an example of how to optimize the labeling reaction using the improved SrtA 5(o) variant.

  12. The C-terminal region of laminin beta chains modulates the integrin binding affinities of laminins.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Ido, Hiroyuki; Sanzen, Noriko; Hayashi, Maria; Sato-Nishiuchi, Ryoko; Futaki, Sugiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2009-03-20

    Laminins are major cell-adhesive proteins in basement membranes that are capable of binding to integrins. Laminins consist of three chains (alpha, beta, and gamma), in which three laminin globular modules in the alpha chain and the Glu residue in the C-terminal tail of the gamma chain have been shown to be prerequisites for binding to integrins. However, it remains unknown whether any part of the beta chain is involved in laminin-integrin interactions. We compared the binding affinities of pairs of laminin isoforms containing the beta1 or beta2 chain toward a panel of laminin-binding integrins, and we found that beta2 chain-containing laminins (beta2-laminins) bound more avidly to alpha3beta1 and alpha7X2beta1 integrins than beta1 chain-containing laminins (beta1-laminins), whereas alpha6beta1, alpha6beta4, and alpha7X1beta1 integrins did not show any preference toward beta2-laminins. Because alpha3beta1 contains the "X2-type" variable region in the alpha3 subunit and alpha6beta1 and alpha6beta4 contain the "X1-type" region in the alpha6 subunit, we hypothesized that only integrins containing the X2-type region were capable of discriminating between beta1-laminins and beta2-laminins. In support of this possibility, a putative X2-type variant of alpha6beta1 was produced and found to bind preferentially to beta2-laminins. Production of a series of swap mutants between the beta1 and beta2 chains revealed that the C-terminal 20 amino acids in the coiled-coil domain were responsible for the enhanced integrin binding by beta2-laminins. Taken together, the results provide evidence that the C-terminal region of beta chains is involved in laminin recognition by integrins and modulates the binding affinities of laminins toward X2-type integrins.

  13. BS69/ZMYND11 C-Terminal Domains Bind and Inhibit EBNA2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Xu, Muyu; Martinez, Ernest; Peng, Chih-Wen; Song, Jikui

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) plays an important role in driving immortalization of EBV-infected B cells through regulating the expression of many viral and cellular genes. We report a structural study of the tumor suppressor BS69/ZMYND11 C-terminal region, comprised of tandem coiled-coil-MYND domains (BS69CC-MYND), in complex with an EBNA2 peptide containing a PXLXP motif. The coiled-coil domain of BS69 self-associates to bring two separate MYND domains in close proximity, thereby enhancing the BS69 MYND-EBNA2 interaction. ITC analysis of BS69CC-MYND with a C-terminal fragment of EBNA2 further suggests that the BS69CC-MYND homodimer synergistically binds to the two EBNA2 PXLXP motifs that are respectively located in the conserved regions CR7 and CR8. Furthermore, we showed that EBNA2 interacts with BS69 and down-regulates its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in EBV-infected B cells. Ectopic BS69CC-MYND is recruited to viral target promoters through interactions with EBNA2, inhibits EBNA2-mediated transcription activation, and impairs proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Substitution of critical residues in the MYND domain impairs the BS69-EBNA2 interaction and abolishes the BS69 inhibition of the EBNA2-mediated transactivation and LCL proliferation. This study identifies the BS69 C-terminal domains as an inhibitor of EBNA2, which may have important implications in development of novel therapeutic strategies against EBV infection. PMID:26845565

  14. Folding of the C-terminal bacterial binding domain in statherin upon adsorption onto hydroxyapatite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goobes, Gil; Goobes, Rivka; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Baker, David; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    Statherin is an enamel pellicle protein that inhibits hydroxyapatite (HAP) nucleation and growth, lubricates the enamel surface, and is recognized by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases. We report here from solid-state NMR measurements that the protein's C-terminal region folds into an α-helix upon adsorption to HAP crystals. This region contains the binding sites for bacterial fimbriae that mediate bacterial cell adhesion to the surface of the tooth. The helical segment is shown through long-range distance measurements to fold back onto the intermediate region (residues Y16–P28) defining the global fold of the protein. Statherin, previously shown to be unstructured in solution, undergoes conformation selection on its substrate mineral surface. This surface-induced folding of statherin can be related to its functionality in inhibiting HAP crystal growth and can explain how oral pathogens selectively recognize HAP-bound statherin. PMID:17060618

  15. Autoinhibition of the Nuclease ARTEMIS Is Mediated by a Physical Interaction between Its Catalytic and C-terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Niewolik, Doris; Peter, Ingrid; Butscher, Carmen; Schwarz, Klaus

    2017-02-24

    The nuclease ARTEMIS is essential for the development of B and T lymphocytes. It is required for opening DNA hairpins generated during antigen receptor gene assembly from variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) subgenic elements (V(D)J recombination). As a member of the non-homologous end-joining pathway, it is also involved in repairing a subset of pathological DNA double strand breaks. Loss of ARTEMIS function therefore results in radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID). The hairpin opening activity is dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), which can bind to and phosphorylate ARTEMIS. The ARTEMIS C terminus is dispensable for cellular V(D)J recombination and in vitro nuclease assays with C-terminally truncated ARTEMIS showing DNA-PKcs-independent hairpin opening activity. Therefore, it has been postulated that ARTEMIS is regulated via autoinhibition by its C terminus. To obtain evidence for the autoinhibition model, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments with combinations of ARTEMIS mutants. We show that an N-terminal fragment comprising the catalytic domain can interact both with itself and with a C-terminal fragment. Amino acid exchanges N456A+S457A+E458Q in the C terminus of full-length ARTEMIS resulted in unmasking of the N terminus and in increased ARTEMIS activity in cellular V(D)J recombination assays. Mutations in ARTEMIS-deficient patients impaired the interaction with the C terminus and also affected protein stability. The interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains was not DNA-PKcs-dependent, and phosphomimetic mutations in the C-terminal domain did not result in unmasking of the catalytic domain. Our experiments provide strong evidence that a physical interaction between the C-terminal and catalytic domains mediates ARTEMIS autoinhibition.

  16. Topology and dynamics of the 10 kDa C-terminal domain of DnaK in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, E. B.; Zhou, H.; Lowry, D. F.; Flynn, G. C.; Dahlquist, F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hsp70 molecular chaperones contain three distinct structural domains, a 44 kDa N-terminal ATPase domain, a 17 kDa peptide-binding domain, and a 10 kDa C-terminal domain. The ATPase and peptide binding domains are conserved in sequence and are functionally well characterized. The function of the 10 kDa variable C-terminal domain is less well understood. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the C-terminal domain from the Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK, in solution by high-resolution NMR. The domain was shown to be comprised of a rigid structure consisting of four helices and a flexible C-terminal subdomain of approximately 33 amino acids. The mobility of the flexible region is maintained in the context of the full-length protein and does not appear to be modulated by the nucleotide state. The flexibility of this region appears to be a conserved feature of Hsp70 architecture and may have important functional implications. We also developed a method to analyze 15N nuclear spin relaxation data, which allows us to extract amide bond vector directions relative to a unique diffusion axis. The extracted angles and rotational correlation times indicate that the helices form an elongated, bundle-like structure in solution. PMID:10048327

  17. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB) Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chang, Eric; Tseng, Andrew; Ptak, Christopher; Wu, Li-Chen; Su, Chun-Li; McDonough, Sean P.; Lin, Yi-Pin; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg) monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII). The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12), a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC). In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8). The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM) was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12) and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12). Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. PMID:27622634

  18. Mutational analysis of the C-terminal domain of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Denise F.; Stenzel, Rachelle A.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides response regulator PrrA directly activates transcription of genes necessary for energy conservation at low O2 tensions and under anaerobic conditions. It is proposed that PrrA homologues contain a C-terminal DNA-binding domain (PrrA-CTD) that lacks significant amino acid sequence similarity to those found in other response regulators. To test this hypothesis, single amino acid substitutions were created at 12 residues in the PrrA-CTD. These mutant PrrA proteins were purified and tested for the ability to be phosphorylated by the low-molecular-mass phosphate donor acetyl phosphate, to activate transcription and to bind promoter DNA. Each mutant PrrA protein accepted phosphate from 32P-labelled acetyl phosphate. At micromolar concentrations of acetyl phosphate-treated wild-type PrrA, a single 20 bp region in the PrrA-dependent cycA P2 promoter was protected from DNase I digestion. Of the mutant PrrA proteins tested, only acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA-N168A and PrrA-I177A protected cycA P2 from DNase I digestion at similar protein concentrations compared to wild-type PrrA. The use of in vitro transcription assays with the PrrA-dependent cycA P2 and puc promoters showed that acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA-N168A produced transcript levels similar to that of wild-type PrrA at comparable protein concentrations. Using concentrations of acetyl phosphate-treated PrrA that are saturating for the wild-type protein, PrrA-H170A and PrrA-I177A produced<45%as much transcript as wild-type PrrA. Under identical conditions, the remaining mutant PrrA proteins produced little or no detectable transcripts from either promoter in vitro. Explanations are presented for why these amino acid side chains in the PrrA-CTD are important for its ability to activate transcription. PMID:16339955

  19. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  20. Amino acid-selective isotope labeling of proteins for nuclear magnetic resonance study: proteins secreted by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Tanio, Michikazu; Tanaka, Rikou; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-15

    Here we report the first application of amino acid-type selective (AATS) isotope labeling of a recombinant protein secreted by Brevibacillus choshinensis for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study. To prepare the 15N-AATS-labeled protein, the transformed B. choshinensis was cultured in 15N-labeled amino acid-containing C.H.L. medium, which is commonly used in the Escherichia coli expression system. The analyses of the 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of the secreted proteins with a 15N-labeled amino acid demonstrated that alanine, arginine, asparagine, cysteine, glutamine, histidine, lysine, methionine, and valine are suitable for selective labeling, although acidic and aromatic amino acids are not suitable. The 15N labeling for glycine, isoleucine, leucine, serine, and threonine resulted in scrambling to specific amino acids. These results indicate that the B. choshinensis expression system is an alternative tool for AATS labeling of recombinant proteins, especially secretory proteins, for NMR analyses.

  1. Influence of C-terminal tail deletion on structure and stability of hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chu, Wen-Ting; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-06-01

    The C-terminus tail (G144-T149) of the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI) plays an important role in this protein's hyperstabilization and may therefore be a good protein stability tag. Detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic effects of C-terminus tail deletion is required for gaining insights into the thermal stability mechanism of Sto-RNase HI. Focused on Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI (Sto-RNase HI) and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI) (PDB codes: 2EHG and 3ALY), we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (300, 375, 475, and 500 K) to examine the effect of the C-terminal tail on the hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and to investigate the unfolding process of Sto-RNase HI and ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI. The simulations suggest that the C-terminal tail has significant impact in hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and the unfolding of these two proteins evolves along dissimilar pathways. Essential dynamics analysis indicates that the essential subspaces of the two proteins at different temperatures are non-overlapping within the trajectories and they exhibit different directions of motion. Our work can give important information to understand the three-state folding mechanism of Sto-RNase HI and to offer alternative strategies to improve the protein stability.

  2. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  3. Genetically Encoded Spin Labels for In Vitro and In-Cell EPR Studies of Native Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M J; Fedoseev, A; Summerer, D; Drescher, M

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful approach to study the structure, dynamics, and interactions of proteins. The genetic encoding of the noncanonical amino acid spin-labeled lysine 1 (SLK-1) eliminates the need for any chemical labeling steps in SDSL-EPR studies and enables the investigation of native, endogenous proteins with minimal structural perturbation, and without the need to create unique reactive sites for chemical labeling. We report detailed experimental procedures for the efficient synthesis of SLK-1, the expression and purification of SLK-1-containing proteins under conditions that ensure maximal integrity of the nitroxide radical moiety, and procedures for intramolecular EPR distance measurements in proteins by double electron-electron resonance.

  4. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  5. C-terminal functionalization of nylon-3 polymers: effects of C-terminal groups on antibacterial and hemolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihua; Markiewicz, Matthew J; Mowery, Brendan P; Weisblum, Bernard; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-02-13

    Nylon-3 polymers contain β-amino-acid-derived subunits and can be viewed as higher homologues of poly(α-amino acids). This structural relationship raises the possibility that nylon-3 polymers offer a platform for development of new materials with a variety of biological activities, a prospect that has recently begun to receive experimental support. Nylon-3 homo- and copolymers can be prepared via anionic ring-opening polymerization of β-lactams, and use of an N-acyl-β-lactam as coinitiator in the polymerization reaction allows placement of a specific functional group, borne by the N-acyl-β-lactam, at the N-terminus of each polymer chain. Controlling the unit at the C-termini of nylon-3 polymer chains, however, has been problematic. Here we describe a strategy for specifying C-terminal functionality that is based on the polymerization mechanism. After the anionic ring-opening polymerization is complete, we introduce a new β-lactam, approximately 1 equiv relative to the expected number of polymer chains. Because the polymer chains bear a reactive imide group at their C-termini, this new β-lactam should become attached at this position. If the terminating β-lactam bears a distinctive functional group, that functionality should be affixed to most or all C-termini in the reaction mixture. We use the new technique to compare the impact of N- and C-terminal placement of a critical hydrophobic fragment on the biological activity profile of nylon-3 copolymers. The synthetic advance described here should prove to be generally useful for tailoring the properties of nylon-3 materials.

  6. Metal-enhanced intrinsic fluorescence of proteins and label-free bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Krishanu; Szmacinski, Henryk; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2010-02-01

    Most of the applications of fluorescence require the use of labeled drugs and labeled biomolecules. Due to the need of labeling biomolecules with extrinsic fluorophores, there is a rapidly growing interest in methods which provide label-free detection (LFD). Proteins are highly fluorescent, which is due primarily to tryptophan residues. However, since most proteins contain tryptophan, this emission is not specific for proteins of interest in a biological sample. This is one of the reasons of not utilizing intrinsic tryptophan emission from proteins to detect specific proteins. Here, we present the intrinsic fluorescence for several proteins bound to the silver or aluminum metal nanostructured surfaces. We demonstrate the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of proteins with different numbers of tryptophan residues. Large increases in fluorescence intensity and decreases in lifetime provide the means of direct detection of bound protein without separation from the unbound. We present specific detection of individual types of proteins and measure the binding kinetics of proteins such as IgG and streptavidin. Additionally, specific detection of IgG and streptavidin has been accomplished in the presence of large concentrations of other proteins in sample solutions. These results will allow design of surface-based assays with biorecognitive layer that specifically bind the protein of interest and thus enhance its intrinsic fluorescence. The present study demonstrates the occurrence of MEF in the UV region and thus opens new possibilities to study tryptophan-containing proteins without labeling with longer wavelength fluorophores and provides an approach to label-free detection of biomolecules.

  7. Crystallization and halide phasing of the C-terminal domain of human KIN17

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Albane le; Schiltz, Marc; Braud, Sandrine; Gondry, Muriel; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Stura, Enrico

    2006-03-01

    Expression, purification, crystallization and phasing procedure are reported for the C-terminal domain of human KIN17. Here, the crystallization and initial phasing of the C-terminal domain of human KIN17, a 45 kDa protein mainly expressed in response to ionizing radiation and overexpressed in certain tumour cell lines, are reported. Crystals diffracting to 1.4 Å resolution were obtained from 10% ethylene glycol, 27% PEG 6000, 500 mM LiCl and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 6.3 in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 45.75, b = 46.31, c = 60.80 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Since this domain has a basic pI, heavy-atom derivatives were obtained by soaking the crystals with negatively charged ions such as tungstate and iodine. The replacement of LiCl by KI in the cryosolution allowed the determination of phases from iodide ions to give an interpretable electron-density map.

  8. Presynaptic C-terminal truncated tau is released from cortical synapses in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Sophie; Henkins, Kristen M.; Bilousova, Tina; Gonzalez, Bianca; Vinters, Harry V.; Miller, Carol A.; Cornwell, Lindsey; Poon, Wayne W.; Gylys, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has primarily been associated with axonal location and function; however, recent work shows tau release from neurons and suggests an important role for tau in synaptic plasticity. In our study, we measured synaptic levels of total tau using synaptosomes prepared from cryopreserved human postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control samples. Flow cytometry data show that a majority of synaptic terminals are highly immunolabeled with the total tau antibody (HT7) in both AD and control samples. Immunoblots of synaptosomal fractions reveal increases in a 20 kDa tau fragment and in tau dimers in AD synapses, and terminal-specific antibodies show that in many synaptosome samples tau lacks a C-terminus. Flow cytometry experiments to quantify the extent of C-terminal truncation reveal that only 15-25% of synaptosomes are positive for intact C-terminal tau. Potassium-induced depolarization demonstrates release of tau and tau fragments from presynaptic terminals, with increased release from AD compared to control samples. This study indicates that tau is normally highly localized to synaptic terminals in cortex where it is well-positioned to affect synaptic plasticity. Tau cleavage may facilitate tau aggregation as well as tau secretion and propagation of tau pathology from the presynaptic compartment in AD. PMID:25393609

  9. Activation of human prolegumain by cleavage at a C-terminal asparagine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    2000-01-01

    The processing and activation of prolegumain were studied using the recombinant protein synthesized by cells that had been stably transfected with a human legumain cDNA construct. A cell line termed C13 was selected for the high-level expression of prolegumain. C13 cells produced primarily 56 kDa prolegumain. The 56 kDa form was enzymically inactive but stable at neutral pH, unlike the 35 kDa mature pig legumain; it could be converted into a 46 kDa active form by incubation at pH 4.5. The 56 kDa pro-form and the 46 kDa active form were found to have the same N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicating that cleavage at the N-terminus was not necessary for prolegumain activation, and that the decrease in molecular mass was due to a C-terminal cleavage. The C-terminal processing site was identified as Asn(323). Replacement of Asn(323) at the cleavage site with aspartate, serine, alanine or glutamate abolished the processing and activation of prolegumain. In contrast, mutation of other asparagine and aspartate residues near the cleavage site had no effect. These results demonstrate that Asn(323) is essential for prolegumain activation. PMID:11085925

  10. Activation of human prolegumain by cleavage at a C-terminal asparagine residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    2000-12-01

    The processing and activation of prolegumain were studied using the recombinant protein synthesized by cells that had been stably transfected with a human legumain cDNA construct. A cell line termed C13 was selected for the high-level expression of prolegumain. C13 cells produced primarily 56 kDa prolegumain. The 56 kDa form was enzymically inactive but stable at neutral pH, unlike the 35 kDa mature pig legumain; it could be converted into a 46 kDa active form by incubation at pH 4.5. The 56 kDa pro-form and the 46 kDa active form were found to have the same N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicating that cleavage at the N-terminus was not necessary for prolegumain activation, and that the decrease in molecular mass was due to a C-terminal cleavage. The C-terminal processing site was identified as Asn(323). Replacement of Asn(323) at the cleavage site with aspartate, serine, alanine or glutamate abolished the processing and activation of prolegumain. In contrast, mutation of other asparagine and aspartate residues near the cleavage site had no effect. These results demonstrate that Asn(323) is essential for prolegumain activation.

  11. Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Transcription Facto IIB from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, B.; Kanneganti, N; Rieckhof, G; Das, A; Laurents, D; Palenchar, J; Bellofatto, V; Wah, D

    2009-01-01

    In trypanosomes, the production of mRNA relies on the synthesis of the spliced leader (SL) RNA. Expression of the SL RNA is initiated at the only known RNA polymerase II promoter in these parasites. In the pathogenic trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, transcription factor IIB (tTFIIB) is essential for SL RNA gene transcription and cell viability, but has a highly divergent primary sequence in comparison to TFIIB in well-studied eukaryotes. Here we describe the 2.3 A resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of tTFIIB (tTFIIBC). The tTFIIBC structure consists of 2 closely packed helical modules followed by a C-terminal extension of 32 aa. Using the structure as a guide, alanine substitutions of basic residues in regions analogous to functionally important regions of the well-studied eukaryotic TFIIB support conservation of a general mechanism of TFIIB function in eukaryotes. Strikingly, tTFIIBC contains additional loops and helices, and, in contrast to the highly basic DNA binding surface of human TFIIB, contains a neutral surface in the corresponding region. These attributes probably mediate trypanosome-specific interactions and have implications for the apparent bidirectional transcription by RNA polymerase II in protein-encoding gene expression in these organisms.

  12. The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T4 terminase docks on the prohead portal clip region during DNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Ray, Krishanu; Thomas, Julie A; Black, Lindsay W

    2013-11-01

    Bacteriophage ATP-based packaging motors translocate DNA into a pre-formed prohead through a dodecameric portal ring channel to high density. We investigated portal-terminase docking interactions at specifically localized residues within a terminase-interaction region (aa279-316) in the phage T4 portal protein gp20 equated to the clip domain of the SPP1 portal crystal structure by 3D modeling. Within this region, three residues allowed A to C mutations whereas three others did not, consistent with informatics analyses showing the tolerated residues are not strongly conserved evolutionarily. About 7.5nm was calculated by FCS-FRET studies employing maleimide Alexa488 dye labeled A316C proheads and gp17 CT-ReAsH supporting previous work docking the C-terminal end of the T4 terminase (gp17) closer to the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal (gp20) than the N-terminal end of the terminase. Such a terminase-portal orientation fits better to a proposed "DNA crunching" compression packaging motor and to portal determined DNA headful cutting.

  13. The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T4 terminase docks on the prohead portal clip region during DNA packaging

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Ray, Krishanu; Thomas, Julie A.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage ATP-based packaging motors translocate DNA into a pre-formed prohead through a dodecameric portal ring channel to high density. We investigated portal–terminase docking interactions at specifically localized residues within a terminase-interaction region (aa279–316) in the phage T4 portal protein gp20 equated to the clip domain of the SPP1 portal crystal structure by 3D modeling. Within this region, three residues allowed A to C mutations whereas three others did not, consistent with informatics analyses showing the tolerated residues are not strongly conserved evolutionarily. About 7.5 nm was calculated by FCS-FRET studies employing maleimide Alexa488 dye labeled A316C proheads and gp17 CT-ReAsH supporting previous work docking the C-terminal end of the T4 terminase (gp17) closer to the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal (gp20) than the N-terminal end of the terminase. Such a terminase–portal orientation fits better to a proposed “DNA crunching” compression packaging motor and to portal determined DNA headful cutting. PMID:24074593

  14. Application of multiplexed cysteine-labeled complex protein sample for 2D electrophoretic gel alignment.

    PubMed

    Haimi, Perttu; Sikorskaite-Gudziuniene, Sidona; Baniulis, Danas

    2015-06-01

    The analysis of cellular subproteomes by 2DE is hampered by the difficulty of aligning gel images from samples that have very different protein composition. Here, we present a sensitive and cost-effective fluorescent labeling method for analyzing protein samples that is not dependent on their composition. The alignment is guided by inclusion of a complex mixture of proteins that is co-run with the sample. Maleimide-conjugated fluorescent dyes Dy-560 and Dy-635 are used to label the cysteine residues of the sample of interest and the alignment standard, respectively. The two differently labeled mixtures are then combined and separated on a 2D gel and, after selective fluorescence detection, an unsupervised image registration process is used to align the protein patters. In a pilot study, this protocol significantly improved the accuracy of alignment of nuclear proteins with total cellular proteins.

  15. C-Terminal-oriented Immobilization of Enzymes Using Sortase A-mediated Technique.

    PubMed

    Hata, Yuto; Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, sortase A-mediated immobilization of enzymes was used for the preparation of immobilized enzymes. Thermobifida fusca YX β-glucosidase (BGL) or Streptococcus bovis 148 α-amylase (AmyA) were produced with C-terminal sortase A recognition sequences. The resulting fusion proteins were successfully immobilized on nanoparticle surfaces using sortase A. Some properties (activity, stability, and reusability) of the immobilized fusion proteins were evaluated. Both immobilized BGL and immobilized AmyA prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique retained their catalytic activity, exhibiting activities 3.0- or 1.5-fold (respectively) of those seen with the same enzymes immobilized by chemical crosslinking. Immobilized enzymes prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique did not undergo dramatic changes in stability compared with the respective free enzymes. Thus, the sortase A-mediated technique provides a promising method for immobilization of active, stable enzymes.

  16. Isotopic labeling of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) heterologously expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Miyagi, Masaru; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structural determination and dynamic characterization of membrane proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require their isotopic labeling. Although a number of labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins have been successfully expressed in bacteria, they lack posttranslational modifications and usually need to be refolded from inclusion bodies. This shortcoming of bacterial expression systems is particularly detrimental for the functional expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of drug targets, due to their inherent instability. In this work we show that proteins expressed by a eukaryotic organism can be isotopically labeled and produced with a quality and quantity suitable for NMR characterization. Using our previously described expression system in Caenorhabditis elegans, we showed the feasibility of labeling proteins produced by these worms with 15N,13C by providing them with isotopically labeled bacteria. 2H labeling also was achieved by growing C. elegans in presence of 70% heavy water. Bovine rhodopsin, simultaneously expressed in muscular and neuronal worm tissues, was employed as the ‘test’ GPCR to demonstrate the viability of this approach. Although the worms’ cell cycle was slightly affected by the presence of heavy isotopes, the final protein yield and quality was appropriate for NMR structural characterization. PMID:25461480

  17. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  18. Multi-label learning with fuzzy hypergraph regularization for protein subcellular location prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tang, Yuan Yan; Chen, C L Philip; Fang, Bin; Lin, Yuewei; Shang, Zhaowei

    2014-12-01

    Protein subcellular location prediction aims to predict the location where a protein resides within a cell using computational methods. Considering the main limitations of the existing methods, we propose a hierarchical multi-label learning model FHML for both single-location proteins and multi-location proteins. The latent concepts are extracted through feature space decomposition and label space decomposition under the nonnegative data factorization framework. The extracted latent concepts are used as the codebook to indirectly connect the protein features to their annotations. We construct dual fuzzy hypergraphs to capture the intrinsic high-order relations embedded in not only feature space, but also label space. Finally, the subcellular location annotation information is propagated from the labeled proteins to the unlabeled proteins by performing dual fuzzy hypergraph Laplacian regularization. The experimental results on the six protein benchmark datasets demonstrate the superiority of our proposed method by comparing it with the state-of-the-art methods, and illustrate the benefit of exploiting both feature correlations and label correlations.

  19. Differential Labeling of Cell-surface and Internalized Proteins after Antibody Feeding of Live Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the cell-surface localization of a putative transmembrane receptor in cultured neurons, we labeled the protein on the surface of live neurons with a specific primary antibody raised against an extracellular portion of the protein. Given that receptors are trafficked to and from the surface, if cells are permeabilized after fixation then both cell-surface and internal protein will be detected by the same labeled secondary antibody. Here, we adapted a method used to study protein trafficking (“antibody feeding”) to differentially label protein that had been internalized by endocytosis during the antibody incubation step and protein that either remained on the cell surface or was trafficked to the surface during this period. The ability to distinguish these two pools of protein was made possible through the incorporation of an overnight blocking step with highly-concentrated unlabeled secondary antibody after an initial incubation of unpermeabilized neurons with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody. After the blocking step, permeabilization of the neurons allowed detection of the internalized pool with a fluorescent secondary antibody labeled with a different fluorophore. Using this technique we were able to obtain important information about the subcellular location of this putative receptor, revealing that it was, indeed, trafficked to the cell-surface in neurons. This technique is broadly applicable to a range of cell types and cell-surface proteins, providing a suitable antibody to an extracellular epitope is available. PMID:24561550

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal fragment of Ski7 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Si Hoon; Jeong, Byung-Cheon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ski7 (superkiller protein 7) plays a critical role in the mRNA surveillance pathway. The C-terminal fragment of Ski7 (residues 520–747) from Saccharo­myces cerevisiae was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. It was successfully crystallized and preliminary X-ray data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to a trigonal space group, either P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.5, c = 83.6 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of the C-terminal fragment of Ski7 with a corresponding crystal volume per protein mass (V M) of 2.61 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 52.8% by volume. The merging R factor is 6.6%. Structure determination by MAD phasing is under way. PMID:25195903

  1. Self-assemble nanoparticles based on polypeptides containing C-terminal luminescent Pt-cysteine complex

    PubMed Central

    Vlakh, E. G.; Grachova, E. V.; Zhukovsky, D. D.; Hubina, A. V.; Mikhailova, A. S.; Shakirova, J. R.; Sharoyko, V. V.; Tunik, S. P.; Tennikova, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    The growing attention to the luminescent nanocarriers is strongly stimulated by their potential application as drug delivery systems and by the necessity to monitor their distribution in cells and tissues. In this communication we report on the synthesis of amphiphilic polypeptides bearing C-terminal phosphorescent label together with preparation of nanoparticles using the polypeptides obtained. The approach suggested is based on a unique and highly technological process where the new phosphorescent Pt-cysteine complex serves as initiator of the ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides to obtain the polypeptides bearing intact the platinum chromophore covalently bound to the polymer chain. It was established that the luminescent label retains unchanged its emission characteristics not only in the polypeptides but also in more complicated nanoaggregates such as the polymer derived amphiphilic block-copolymers and self-assembled nanoparticles. The phosphorescent nanoparticles display no cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity in the tested range of concentrations and easily internalize into living cells that makes possible in vivo cell visualization, including prospective application in time resolved imaging and drug delivery monitoring. PMID:28155880

  2. Self-assemble nanoparticles based on polypeptides containing C-terminal luminescent Pt-cysteine complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlakh, E. G.; Grachova, E. V.; Zhukovsky, D. D.; Hubina, A. V.; Mikhailova, A. S.; Shakirova, J. R.; Sharoyko, V. V.; Tunik, S. P.; Tennikova, T. B.

    2017-02-01

    The growing attention to the luminescent nanocarriers is strongly stimulated by their potential application as drug delivery systems and by the necessity to monitor their distribution in cells and tissues. In this communication we report on the synthesis of amphiphilic polypeptides bearing C-terminal phosphorescent label together with preparation of nanoparticles using the polypeptides obtained. The approach suggested is based on a unique and highly technological process where the new phosphorescent Pt-cysteine complex serves as initiator of the ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides to obtain the polypeptides bearing intact the platinum chromophore covalently bound to the polymer chain. It was established that the luminescent label retains unchanged its emission characteristics not only in the polypeptides but also in more complicated nanoaggregates such as the polymer derived amphiphilic block-copolymers and self-assembled nanoparticles. The phosphorescent nanoparticles display no cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity in the tested range of concentrations and easily internalize into living cells that makes possible in vivo cell visualization, including prospective application in time resolved imaging and drug delivery monitoring.

  3. The vacuolar targeting signal of the 2S albumin from Brazil nut resides at the C terminus and involves the C-terminal propeptide as an essential element.

    PubMed

    Saalbach, G; Rosso, M; Schumann, U

    1996-11-01

    Genetic constructs in which different N- and C-terminal segments of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) 2S albumin were fused to secretory yeast invertase were transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants to investigate the vacuolar targeting signal of the 2S albumin. None of the N-terminal segments, including the complete precursor containing all propeptides, was able to direct the invertase to the vacuoles. However, a short C-terminal segment comprising the last 20 amino acids of the precursor was sufficient for efficient targeting of yeast invertase to the vacuoles of the transformed tobacco plants. Further analyses showed that peptides of 16 and 13 amino acids of the C-terminal segment were still sufficient, although they had slightly lower efficiency. When segments of 9 amino acids or shorter were analyzed, a decrease to approximately 30% was observed. These segments included the C-terminal propeptide of four amino acids (Ile-Ala-Gly-Phe). When the 2S albumin was expressed in tobacco, it was also localized to the vacuoles of mesophyll cells. If the C-terminal propeptide was deleted from the 2S albumin precursor, all of this truncated 2S albumin was secreted from the tobacco cells. These results indicate that the C-terminal propeptide is necessary but not sufficient for vacuolar targeting. In addition, an adjacent segment of at least 12 amino acids of the mature protein is needed to form the complete signal for efficient targeting.

  4. Multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning for human protein subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed much progress in computational modelling for protein subcellular localization. However, the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance, and the gene ontology (GO) based models may take the risk of performance overestimation for novel proteins. Furthermore, many human proteins have multiple subcellular locations, which renders the computational modelling more complicated. Up to the present, there are far few researches specialized for predicting the subcellular localization of human proteins that may reside in multiple cellular compartments. In this paper, we propose a multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning model for human protein subcellular localization (MLMK-TLM). MLMK-TLM proposes a multi-label confusion matrix, formally formulates three multi-labelling performance measures and adapts one-against-all multi-class probabilistic outputs to multi-label learning scenario, based on which to further extends our published work GO-TLM (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization) and MK-TLM (multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization) for multiplex human protein subcellular localization. With the advantages of proper homolog knowledge transfer, comprehensive survey of model performance for novel protein and multi-labelling capability, MLMK-TLM will gain more practical applicability. The experiments on human protein benchmark dataset show that MLMK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline model and demonstrates good multi-labelling ability for novel human proteins. Some findings (predictions) are validated by the latest Swiss-Prot database. The software can be freely downloaded at http://soft.synu.edu.cn/upload/msy.rar.

  5. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method.

  6. The retroviral hypermutation specificity of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G is governed by the C-terminal DNA cytosine deaminase domain.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Liddament, Mark T; Harris, Reuben S

    2005-03-25

    The human proteins APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G restrict retroviral infection by deaminating cytosine residues in the first cDNA strand of a replicating virus. These proteins have two putative deaminase domains, and it is unclear whether one or both catalyze deamination, unlike their homologs, AID and APOBEC1, which are well characterized single domain deaminases. Here, we show that only the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3F and -3G governs retroviral hypermutation. A chimeric protein with the N-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3G and the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3F elicited a dinucleotide hypermutation preference nearly indistinguishable from that of APOBEC3F. This 5'-TC-->TT mutational specificity was confirmed in a heterologous Escherichia coli-based mutation assay, in which the 5'-CC-->CT dinucleotide hypermutation preference of APOBEC3G also mapped to the C-terminal deaminase domain. An N-terminal APOBEC3G deletion mutant displayed a preference indistinguishable from that of the full-length protein, and replacing the C-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3F with AID resulted in an AID-like mutational signature. Together, these data indicate that only the C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F and -3G dictates the retroviral minus strand 5'-TC and 5'-CC dinucleotide hypermutation preferences, respectively, leaving the N-terminal domain to perform other aspects of retroviral restriction.

  7. Structural determination of larger proteins using stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.; Hernandez, G.; Springer, P.; Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.; Lidstrom, M.

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to employ stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy to study protein structures and provide insight into important biochemical problems. A methylotrophic bacterial expression system has been developed for uniform deuterium and carbon-13 labeling of proteins for structural studies. These organisms grow using methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy. Because isotopically labeled methanol is relatively inexpensive, the methylotrophs are ideal for expressing proteins labeled uniformly with deuterium and/or carbon-13. This expression system has been employed to prepare deuterated troponin C. NMR spectroscopy measurements have been made on the inhibitory peptide from troponin I (residues 96--115), both as the free peptide and the peptide complexed with deuterated troponin C. Proton-NMR spectroscopy resonance-signal assignments have been made for the free peptide.

  8. Dynamic Proteomics: In Vivo Proteome-Wide Measurement of Protein Kinetics Using Metabolic Labeling.

    PubMed

    Holmes, W E; Angel, T E; Li, K W; Hellerstein, M K

    2015-01-01

    Control of biosynthetic and catabolic rates of polymers, including proteins, stands at the center of phenotype, physiologic adaptation, and disease pathogenesis. Advances in stable isotope-labeling concepts and mass spectrometric instrumentation now allow accurate in vivo measurement of protein synthesis and turnover rates, both for targeted proteins and for unbiased screening across the proteome. We describe here the underlying principles and operational protocols for measuring protein dynamics, focusing on metabolic labeling with (2)H2O (heavy water) combined with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in trypsin-generated peptides. The core principles of combinatorial analysis (mass isotopomer distribution analysis or MIDA) are reviewed in detail, including practical advantages, limitations, and technical procedures to ensure optimal kinetic results. Technical factors include heavy water labeling protocols, optimal duration of labeling, clean up and simplification of sample matrices, accurate quantitation of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, criteria for adequacy of mass spectrometric abundance measurements, and calculation algorithms. Some applications are described, including the noninvasive "virtual biopsy" strategy for measuring molecular flux rates in tissues through measurements in body fluids. In addition, application of heavy water labeling to measure flux lipidomics is noted. In summary, the combination of stable isotope labeling, particularly from (2)H2O, with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, provides a powerful approach for characterizing the dynamics of proteins across the global proteome. Many applications in research and clinical medicine have been achieved and many others can be envisioned.

  9. Application of Noncanonical Amino Acids for Protein Labeling in a Genomically Recoded Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Kalle; Lundius, Ebba G; Ćurić, Vladimir; Nikić, Ivana; Wiessler, Manfred; Lemke, Edward A; Elf, Johan

    2017-02-17

    Small synthetic fluorophores are in many ways superior to fluorescent proteins as labels for imaging. A major challenge is to use them for a protein-specific labeling in living cells. Here, we report on our use of noncanonical amino acids that are genetically encoded via the pyrrolysyl-tRNA/pyrrolysyl-RNA synthetase pair at artificially introduced TAG codons in a recoded E. coli strain. The strain is lacking endogenous TAG codons and the TAG-specific release factor RF1. The amino acids contain bioorthogonal groups that can be clicked to externally supplied dyes, thus enabling protein-specific labeling in live cells. We find that the noncanonical amino acid incorporation into the target protein is robust for diverse amino acids and that the usefulness of the recoded E. coli strain mainly derives from the absence of release factor RF1. However, the membrane permeable dyes display high nonspecific binding in intracellular environment and the electroporation of hydrophilic nonmembrane permeable dyes severely impairs growth of the recoded strain. In contrast, proteins exposed on the outer membrane of E. coli can be labeled with hydrophilic dyes with a high specificity as demonstrated by labeling of the osmoporin OmpC. Here, labeling can be made sufficiently specific to enable single molecule studies as exemplified by OmpC single particle tracking.

  10. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sotoma, Shingo; Iimura, Jun; Igarashi, Ryuji; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface. PMID:28335184

  11. Multi-instance multi-label distance metric learning for genome-wide protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghui; Min, Huaqing; Song, Hengjie; Wu, Qingyao

    2016-08-01

    Multi-instance multi-label (MIML) learning has been proven to be effective for the genome-wide protein function prediction problems where each training example is associated with not only multiple instances but also multiple class labels. To find an appropriate MIML learning method for genome-wide protein function prediction, many studies in the literature attempted to optimize objective functions in which dissimilarity between instances is measured using the Euclidean distance. But in many real applications, Euclidean distance may be unable to capture the intrinsic similarity/dissimilarity in feature space and label space. Unlike other previous approaches, in this paper, we propose to learn a multi-instance multi-label distance metric learning framework (MIMLDML) for genome-wide protein function prediction. Specifically, we learn a Mahalanobis distance to preserve and utilize the intrinsic geometric information of both feature space and label space for MIML learning. In addition, we try to deal with the sparsely labeled data by giving weight to the labeled data. Extensive experiments on seven real-world organisms covering the biological three-domain system (i.e., archaea, bacteria, and eukaryote; Woese et al., 1990) show that the MIMLDML algorithm is superior to most state-of-the-art MIML learning algorithms.

  12. Fully automated software solution for protein quantitation by global metabolic labeling with stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, L V; Cramer, R

    2011-06-15

    Metabolic stable isotope labeling is increasingly employed for accurate protein (and metabolite) quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS). It provides sample-specific isotopologues that can be used to facilitate comparative analysis of two or more samples. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) has been used for almost a decade in proteomic research and analytical software solutions have been established that provide an easy and integrated workflow for elucidating sample abundance ratios for most MS data formats. While SILAC is a discrete labeling method using specific amino acids, global metabolic stable isotope labeling using isotopes such as (15)N labels the entire element content of the sample, i.e. for (15)N the entire peptide backbone in addition to all nitrogen-containing side chains. Although global metabolic labeling can deliver advantages with regard to isotope incorporation and costs, the requirements for data analysis are more demanding because, for instance for polypeptides, the mass difference introduced by the label depends on the amino acid composition. Consequently, there has been less progress on the automation of the data processing and mining steps for this type of protein quantitation. Here, we present a new integrated software solution for the quantitative analysis of protein expression in differential samples and show the benefits of high-resolution MS data in quantitative proteomic analyses.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  14. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  15. Presence and in vivo biosynthesis of fragments of CPP (the C-terminal glycopeptide of the rat vasopressin precursor) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    SciTech Connect

    Seger, M.A.; Burbach, J.P.

    1987-09-01

    The existence and rate of formation of fragments of the 39-residue C-terminal glycopeptide of propressophysin (CPP1-39) was investigated in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. Newly-prepared antisera to CPP were used to confirm the existence of smaller C-terminal fragments derived from CPP1-39. Radiolabelled fucose was injected into rats in vivo into the area of the supraoptic nucleus, and the labelled peptides formed in the neurohypophysis were examined at various time intervals up to five weeks after the injection. The products derived from the neurohypophyseal hormone precursors were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The level of the major immunoreactive C-terminal fragment (CPP22-39) was constant and represented about 5% of the intact CPP1-39 in the neurohypophysis. The appearance of newly-synthesized N-terminal fragment of CPP1-39 occurred only after 3 or 4 days. This fucose labelled fragment increased slowly thereafter until it reached the same level as the CPP C-terminal fragment immunoreactivity between 21 and 28 days after injection. The results suggest that CPP1-39 is extremely stable in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal neurons, and that the cleavage at Arg21-Leu22 is a delayed proteolytic event in the magnocellular neurons of the SON.

  16. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  17. C-terminal truncation of GSK-3β enhances its dephosphorylation by PP2A.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nana; Wu, Yue; Xu, Wen; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2017-03-07

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is the major tau kinase. Its phosphorylation at Ser9 suppresses the activity. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, GSK-3β is truncated at the C-terminus by over-activated calpain I, leading to an increase in its activity. However, the effect of truncation on its phosphorylation is unknown. We found here that in AD brain and in cultured cells, C-terminally truncated GSK-3β is less phosphorylated at Ser9 than the full-length enzyme. The truncation promotes GSK-3β nuclear translocation and enhances its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to dephosphorylation. Thus, the truncation of GSK-3β may enhance its activity through Ser9 dephosphorylation by PP2A. Our findings shed new light onto the role of calpain - GSK-3β - PP2A in tau pathogenesis of AD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficient segmental isotope labeling of multi-domain proteins using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Freiburger, Lee; Sonntag, Miriam; Hennig, Janosch; Li, Jian; Zou, Peijian; Sattler, Michael

    2015-09-01

    NMR studies of multi-domain protein complexes provide unique insight into their molecular interactions and dynamics in solution. For large proteins domain-selective isotope labeling is desired to reduce signal overlap, but available methods require extensive optimization and often give poor ligation yields. We present an optimized strategy for segmental labeling of multi-domain proteins using the S. aureus transpeptidase Sortase A. Critical improvements compared to existing protocols are (1) the efficient removal of cleaved peptide fragments by centrifugal filtration and (2) a strategic design of cleavable and non-cleavable affinity tags for purification. Our approach enables routine production of milligram amounts of purified segmentally labeled protein for NMR and other biophysical studies.

  19. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  20. GFP-like fluorophores as DNA labels for studying DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Ménová, Petra; Pohl, Radek; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2012-09-21

    GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolinone (FBI) and 3,5-bis(methoxy)-4-hydroxy-benzylideneimidazolinone (MBI) labels were attached to dCTP through a propargyl linker, and the resulting labeled nucleotides (dC(MBI)TP and dC(FBI)TP) were used for a facile enzymatic synthesis of oligonucleotide or DNA probes by polymerase-catalyzed primer extension. The MBI/FBI-labeled DNA probes exerted low fluorescence that was increased 2-3.2 times upon binding of a protein. The concept was demonstrated on sequence-specific binding of p53 to dsDNA and on nonspecific binding of single strand binding protein to an oligonucleotide. The FBI label was also used for a time-resolved experiment monitoring a single-nucleotide incorporation followed by primer extension by Vent(exo-) polymerase.

  1. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  2. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  3. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor IIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; De Angelis, Jacqueline; Roeder, Robert G.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-12-13

    The x-ray structure of a C-terminal fragment of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor (TF) IIF has been determined at 1.02-{angstrom} resolution. The {alpha}/{beta} structure is strikingly similar to the globular domain of linker histone H5 and the DNA-binding domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3{gamma} (HNF-3{gamma}), making it a winged-helix protein. The surface electrostatic properties of this compact domain differ significantly from those of bona fide winged-helix transcription factors (HNF-3{gamma} and RFX1) and from the winged-helix domains found within the RAP30 subunit of TFIIF and the {beta} subunit of TFIIE. RAP74 has been shown to interact with the TFIIF-associated C-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1, and a putative phosphatase binding site has been identified within the RAP74 winged-helix domain.

  4. Solution conformation of the C-terminal domain of skeletal troponin C. Cation, trifluoperazine and troponin I binding effects.

    PubMed

    Drabikowski, W; Dalgarno, D C; Levine, B A; Gergely, J; Grabarek, Z; Leavis, P C

    1985-08-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the cation (Mg2+, Ca2+)-dependent conformational states of the C-terminal domain of rabbit skeletal troponin C under a variety of solution conditions. Nuclear Overhauser data and paramagnetic probe observations provide definition of the configuration of this region of troponin C. Comparative study of homologous proteins identify common features of the tertiary structure relevant to the cation binding reaction. Complex formation with troponin I and the drug trifluoperazine is observed to adjust the solution conformation of the C-terminal domain of troponin C. The interactive conformational response to cation coordination and the binding of the drug and troponin I are discussed.

  5. Crystal Structure in the Vivo-Assembled Bacillus subtilis Spx/RNA Polymerase alpha Subunit C-Terminal Domain Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, V.; Westblade, L; Campbell, E; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis Spx protein is a global transcription factor that interacts with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit ({alpha}CTD) and regulates transcription of genes involved in thiol-oxidative stress, sporulation, competence, and organosulfur metabolism. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Spx/{alpha}CTD complex from an entirely new crystal form than previously reported [Newberry, K.J., Nakano, S., Zuber, P., Brennan, R.G., 2005. Crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis anti-alpha, global transcriptional regulator, Spx, in complex with the alpha C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 15839-15844]. Comparison of the previously reported sulfate-bound complex and our sulfate-free complex reveals subtle conformational changes that may be important for the role of Spx in regulating organosulfur metabolism.

  6. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  7. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites. PMID:26675363

  8. Stepwise assembly of functional C-terminal REST/NRSF transcriptional repressor complexes as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Inui, Ken; Zhao, Zongpei; Yuan, Juan; Jayaprakash, Sakthidasan; Le, Le T M; Drakulic, Srdja; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M

    2017-02-20

    In human cells, thousands of predominantly neuronal genes are regulated by the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF). REST/NRSF represses transcription of these genes in stem cells and non-neuronal cells by tethering corepressor complexes. Aberrant REST/NRSF expression and intracellular localization are associated with cancer and neurodegeneration in humans. To date, detailed molecular analyses of REST/NRSF and its C-terminal repressor complex have been hampered largely by the lack of sufficient amounts of purified REST/NRSF and its complexes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to express and purify human REST/NRSF and its C-terminal interactors in a baculovirus multiprotein expression system as individual proteins and coexpressed complexes. All proteins were enriched in the nucleus, and REST/NRSF was isolated as a slower migrating form, characteristic of nuclear REST/NRSF in mammalian cells. Both REST/NRSF alone and its C-terminal repressor complex were functionally active in histone deacetylation and histone demethylation and bound to RE1/neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) sites. Additionally, the mechanisms of inhibition of the small-molecule drugs 4SC-202 and SP2509 were analyzed. These drugs interfered with the viability of medulloblastoma cells, where REST/NRSF has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Thus, a resource for molecular REST/NRSF studies and drug development has been established.

  9. NMR assignment and secondary structure of coiled coil domain of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Rigby, Alan C

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions between the C-terminal domain of Myosin Binding Subunit (MBS) of MLC Phosphatase (MBS(CT180); C-terminal 180 aa) and the N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKGIα, PKG-Iα(1-159) play an important role in the process of Smooth Muscle Cell relaxation. The paucity of three-dimensional structural information for MBS(CT180) prevents an atomic level understanding of the MBS-PKG contractile complex. MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally different sub-domains including a non-canonical CC, a CC, and a LZ. Recently we reported polypeptide purification and biophysical characterization of the CC domain and the LZ domain of MBS(CT180) (Sharma et al, Prot Expr Purif 2012). Here we report (1)H, (13)C, (15)N chemical shift assignments of homodimeric CC MBS domain encompassing amino acid residues Asp931-Leu980 using 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Secondary structure analyses deduced from these NMR chemical shift data have identified a contiguous stretch of 36 residues from Phe932 to Ala967 that is involved in the formation of coiled coil α-helical region within CC MBS domain. The N-terminal residue Asp931 and the C-terminally positioned residues Thr968-Ala975, Arg977, and Ser978 adopt nonhelical loop conformations.

  10. The AtMYB12 activation domain maps to a short C-terminal region of the transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Stracke, Ralf; Turgut-Kara, Neslihan; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2017-03-11

    The Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB12 is a light-inducible, flavonol-specific activator of flavonoid biosynthesis. The transactivation activity of the AtMYB12 protein was analyzed using a C-terminal deletion series in a transient A. thaliana protoplast assay with the goal of mapping the activation domain (AD). Although the deletion of the last 46 C-terminal amino acids did not affect the activation capacity, the deletion of the last 98 amino acids almost totally abolished transactivation of two different target promoters. A domain swap experiment using the yeast GAL4 DNA-binding domain revealed that the region from positions 282 to 328 of AtMYB12 was sufficient for transactivation. In contrast to the R2R3-MYB ADs known thus far, that of AtMYB12 is not located at the rearmost C-terminal end of the protein. The AtMYB12 AD is conserved in other experimentally proven R2R3-MYB flavonol regulators from different species.

  11. Discovery and validation of colonic tumor-associated proteins via metabolic labeling and stable isotopic dilution

    PubMed Central

    Huttlin, Edward L.; Chen, Xiaodi; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Halberg, Richard B.; Harms, Amy C.; Newton, Michael A.; Dove, William F.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The unique biology of a neoplasm is reflected by its distinct molecular profile compared with normal tissue. To understand tumor development better, we have undertaken a quantitative proteomic search for abnormally expressed proteins in colonic tumors from ApcMin/+ (Min) mice. By raising pairs of Min and wild-type mice on diets derived from natural-abundance or 15N-labeled algae, we used metabolic labeling to compare protein levels in colonic tumor versus normal tissue. Because metabolic labeling allows internal control throughout sample preparation and analysis, technical error is minimized as compared with in vitro labeling. Several proteins displayed altered expression, and a subset was validated via stable isotopic dilution using synthetic peptide standards. We also compared gene and protein expression among tumor and nontumor tissue, revealing limited correlation. This divergence was especially pronounced for species showing biological change, highlighting the complementary perspectives provided by transcriptomics and proteomics. Our work demonstrates the power of metabolic labeling combined with stable isotopic dilution as an integrated strategy for the identification and validation of differentially expressed proteins using rodent models of human disease. PMID:19805096

  12. Live-cell protein labelling with nanometre precision by cell squeezing

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsperger, Alina; Sharei, Armon; Raulf, Anika; Heilemann, Mike; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.; Wieneke, Ralph; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell labelling techniques to visualize proteins with minimal disturbance are important; however, the currently available methods are limited in their labelling efficiency, specificity and cell permeability. We describe high-throughput protein labelling facilitated by minimalistic probes delivered to mammalian cells by microfluidic cell squeezing. High-affinity and target-specific tracing of proteins in various subcellular compartments is demonstrated, culminating in photoinduced labelling within live cells. Both the fine-tuned delivery of subnanomolar concentrations and the minimal size of the probe allow for live-cell super-resolution imaging with very low background and nanometre precision. This method is fast in probe delivery (∼1,000,000 cells per second), versatile across cell types and can be readily transferred to a multitude of proteins. Moreover, the technique succeeds in combination with well-established methods to gain multiplexed labelling and has demonstrated potential to precisely trace target proteins, in live mammalian cells, by super-resolution microscopy. PMID:26822409

  13. Specific fluorescent labeling of chicken myofibril Z-line proteins catalyzed by guinea pig liver transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Guinea pig liver transglutaminase has been found to catalyze the covalent incorporation of dansylcadaverine into chicken skeletal muscle myofibril proteins. Epifluorescence microscopy reveals that the incorporated dansylcadaverine is specifically localized at or near the myofibril Z line. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicates that actin constitutes a major fraction of the labeled material; the Z-line proteins alpha-actinin and desmin also show significant labeling, as well as tropomyosin, several additional unidentified proteins, and material with an extremely high molecular weight. The Z-line-specific fluorescence can be removed by brief trypsinization, which releases fluorescent alpha-actinin into the supernate. The majority of the fluorescent protein species are resistant to extraction by either 0.6 M KCl or KI. These results, in conjunction with the microscopic localization, suggest that the dansyl- labeled proteins are constituents of the myofibril Z line. A significant amount of fluorescently labeled transglutaminase is also present in labeled myofibrils, which is resistant to extraction with either 0.6 M KCl or KI. This result indicates a strong, noncovalent interaction between the transglutaminase molecule and the myofibril Z line. PMID:38257

  14. Room-Temperature Distance Measurements of Immobilized Spin-Labeled Protein by DEER/PELDOR

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Virginia; Swanson, Michael A.; Clouston, Laura J.; Boratyński, Przemysław J.; Stein, Richard A.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Rajca, Andrzej; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide spin labels are used for double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements of distances between sites in biomolecules. Rotation of gem-dimethyls in commonly used nitroxides causes spin echo dephasing times (Tm) to be too short to perform DEER measurements at temperatures between ∼80 and 295 K, even in immobilized samples. A spirocyclohexyl spin label has been prepared that has longer Tm between 80 and 295 K in immobilized samples than conventional labels. Two of the spirocyclohexyl labels were attached to sites on T4 lysozyme introduced by site-directed spin labeling. Interspin distances up to ∼4 nm were measured by DEER at temperatures up to 160 K in water/glycerol glasses. In a glassy trehalose matrix the Tm for the doubly labeled T4 lysozyme was long enough to measure an interspin distance of 3.2 nm at 295 K, which could not be measured for the same protein labeled with the conventional 1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrroline-3-(methyl)methanethio-sulfonate label. PMID:25762332

  15. Intein applications: from protein purification and labeling to metabolic control methods.

    PubMed

    Wood, David W; Camarero, Julio A

    2014-05-23

    The discovery of inteins in the early 1990s opened the door to a wide variety of new technologies. Early engineered inteins from various sources allowed the development of self-cleaving affinity tags and new methods for joining protein segments through expressed protein ligation. Some applications were developed around native and engineered split inteins, which allow protein segments expressed separately to be spliced together in vitro. More recently, these early applications have been expanded and optimized through the discovery of highly efficient trans-splicing and trans-cleaving inteins. These new inteins have enabled a wide variety of applications in metabolic engineering, protein labeling, biomaterials construction, protein cyclization, and protein purification.

  16. Selective labelling of cell-surface proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes.

    PubMed

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-11-26

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods.

  17. Differential Contributions of Tacaribe Arenavirus Nucleoprotein N-Terminal and C-Terminal Residues to Nucleocapsid Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Foscaldi, Sabrina; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) is the main protein component of viral nucleocapsids and is strictly required for viral genome replication mediated by the L polymerase. Homo-oligomerization of NP is presumed to play an important role in nucleocapsid assembly, albeit the underlying mechanism and the relevance of NP-NP interaction in nucleocapsid activity are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the contribution of the New World Tacaribe virus (TCRV) NP self-interaction to nucleocapsid functional activity. We show that alanine substitution of N-terminal residues predicted to be available for NP-NP interaction strongly affected NP self-association, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, produced a drastic inhibition of transcription and replication of a TCRV minigenome RNA, and impaired NP binding to RNA. Mutagenesis and functional analysis also revealed that, while dispensable for NP self-interaction, key amino acids at the C-terminal domain were essential for RNA synthesis. Furthermore, mutations at these C-terminal residues rendered NP unable to bind RNA both in vivo and in vitro but had no effect on the interaction with the L polymerase. In addition, while all oligomerization-defective variants tested exhibited unaltered capacities to sustain NP-L interaction, NP deletion mutants were fully incompetent to bind L, suggesting that, whereas NP self-association is dispensable, the integrity of both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is required for binding the L polymerase. Overall, our results suggest that NP self-interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain may play a critical role in TCRV nucleocapsid assembly and activity and that the C-terminal domain of NP is implicated in RNA binding. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of arenavirus functional nucleocapsid assembly is still poorly understood. No detailed information is available on the nucleocapsid structure, and the regions of full-length NP involved in binding to viral RNA remain to be

  18. Visualizing Water Molecules in Transmembrane Proteins Using Radiolytic Labeling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, T.; Gupta, S; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Essential to cells and their organelles, water is both shuttled to where it is needed and trapped within cellular compartments and structures. Moreover, ordered waters within protein structures often colocalize with strategically placed polar or charged groups critical for protein function, yet it is unclear if these ordered water molecules provide structural stabilization, mediate conformational changes in signaling, neutralize charged residues, or carry out a combination of all these functions. Structures of many integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), reveal the presence of ordered water molecules that may act like prosthetic groups in a manner quite unlike bulk water. Identification of 'ordered' waters within a crystalline protein structure requires sufficient occupancy of water to enable its detection in the protein's X-ray diffraction pattern, and thus, the observed waters likely represent a subset of tightly bound functional waters. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest the structures of ordered waters within GPCRs are as conserved (and thus as important) as conserved side chains. In addition, methods of radiolysis, coupled to structural mass spectrometry (protein footprinting), reveal dynamic changes in water structure that mediate transmembrane signaling. The idea of water as a prosthetic group mediating chemical reaction dynamics is not new in fields such as catalysis. However, the concept of water as a mediator of conformational dynamics in signaling is just emerging, because of advances in both crystallographic structure determination and new methods of protein footprinting. Although oil and water do not mix, understanding the roles of water is essential to understanding the function of membrane proteins.

  19. Polycomb Group Targeting through Different Binding Partners of RING1B C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjing; Taylor, Alexander B.; Leal, Belinda Z.; Chadwell, Linda V.; Ilangovan, Udayar; Robinson, Angela K.; Schirf, Virgil; Hart, P. John; Lafer, Eileen M.; Demeler, Borries; Hinck, Andrew P.; McEwen, Donald G.; Kim, Chongwoo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RING1B, a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein, binds methylated chromatin through its association with another PcG protein called Polycomb (Pc). However, RING1B can associate with nonmethylated chromatin suggesting an alternate mechanism for RING1B interaction with chromatin. Here, we demonstrate that two proteins with little sequence identity between them, the Pc cbox domain and RYBP, bind the same surface on the C-terminal domain of RING1B (C-RING1B). Pc cbox and RYBP each fold into a nearly identical, intermolecular beta sheet with C-RING1B and a loop structure which are completely different in the two proteins. Both the beta sheet and loop are required for stable binding and transcription repression. Further, a mutation engineered to disrupt binding on the Drosophila dRING1 protein prevents chromatin association and PcG function in vivo. These results suggest that PcG targeting to different chromatin locations relies, in part, on binding partners of C-RING1B that are diverse in sequence and structure. PMID:20696397

  20. Structure of the C-terminal domain of Tup1, a corepressor of transcription in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sprague, E R; Redd, M J; Johnson, A D; Wolberger, C

    2000-06-15

    The Tup1-Ssn6 corepressor complex regulates the expression of several sets of genes, including genes that specify mating type in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Repression of mating-type genes occurs when Tup1-Ssn6 is brought to the DNA by the Matalpha2 DNA-binding protein and assembled upstream of a- and haploid-specific genes. We have determined the 2.3 A X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Tup1 (accesion No. 1ERJ), a 43 kDa fragment that contains seven copies of the WD40 sequence motif and binds to the Matalpha2 protein. Moreover, this portion of the protein can partially substitute for full-length Tup1 in bringing about transcriptional repression. The structure reveals a seven-bladed beta propeller with an N-terminal subdomain that is anchored to the side of the propeller and extends the beta sheet of one of the blades. Point mutations in Tup1 that specifically affect the Tup1-Matalpha2 interaction cluster on one surface of the propeller. We identified regions of Tup1 that are conserved among the fungal Tup1 homologs and may be important in protein-protein interactions with additional components of the Tup1-mediated repression pathways.

  1. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  2. Hydrophilic trans-Cyclooctenylated Noncanonical Amino Acids for Fast Intracellular Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Nikić, Ivana; Varga, Balázs R; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Kang, Jun Hee; Fackler, Oliver T; Lemke, Edward A; Kele, Péter

    2016-08-17

    Introduction of bioorthogonal functionalities (e.g., trans-cyclooctene-TCO) into a protein of interest by site-specific genetic encoding of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) creates uniquely targetable platforms for fluorescent labeling schemes in combination with tetrazine-functionalized dyes. However, fluorescent labeling of an intracellular protein is usually compromised by high background, arising from the hydrophobicity of ncAAs; this is typically compensated for by hours-long washout to remove excess ncAAs from the cellular interior. To overcome these problems, we designed, synthesized, and tested new, hydrophilic TCO-ncAAs. One derivative, DOTCO-lysine was genetically incorporated into proteins with good yield. The increased hydrophilicity shortened the excess ncAA washout time from hours to minutes, thus permitting rapid labeling and subsequent fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Internal Dynamics of the 3-Pyrroline-N-Oxide Ring in Spin-Labeled Proteins.

    PubMed

    Consentius, Philipp; Loll, Bernhard; Gohlke, Ulrich; Alings, Claudia; Müller, Carsten; Müller, Robert; Teutloff, Christian; Heinemann, Udo; Kaupp, Martin; Wahl, Markus C; Risse, Thomas

    2017-03-16

    Site-directed spin labeling is a versatile tool to study structure as well as dynamics of proteins using EPR spectroscopy. Methanethiosulfonate (MTS) spin labels tethered through a disulfide linkage to an engineered cysteine residue were used in a large number of studies to extract structural as well as dynamic information on the protein from the rotational dynamics of the nitroxide moiety. The ring itself was always considered to be a rigid body. In this contribution, we present a combination of high-resolution X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy of spin-labeled protein single crystals demonstrating that the nitroxide ring inverts fast at ambient temperature while exhibiting nonplanar conformations at low temperature. We have used quantum chemical calculations to explore the potential energy that determines the ring dynamics as well as the impact of the geometry on the magnetic parameters probed by EPR spectroscopy.

  4. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. IMPORTANCE While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed

  5. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  6. An Efficient Site-Specific Method for Irreversible Covalent Labeling of Proteins with a Fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Shoffner, Matthew; Albers, Aaron E; Bennett, Jared; Zatezalo, Rachel; Barfield, Robyn; Rabuka, David; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2015-11-19

    Fluorophore labeling of proteins while preserving native functions is essential for bulk Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interaction and single molecule imaging analysis. Here we describe a versatile, efficient, specific, irreversible, gentle and low-cost method for labeling proteins with fluorophores that appears substantially more robust than a similar but chemically distinct procedure. The method employs the controlled enzymatic conversion of a central Cys to a reactive formylglycine (fGly) aldehyde within a six amino acid Formylglycine Generating Enzyme (FGE) recognition sequence in vitro. The fluorophore is then irreversibly linked to the fGly residue using a Hydrazinyl-Iso-Pictet-Spengler (HIPS) ligation reaction. We demonstrate the robust large-scale fluorophore labeling and purification of E.coli (Ec) mismatch repair (MMR) components. Fluorophore labeling did not alter the native functions of these MMR proteins in vitro or in singulo. Because the FGE recognition sequence is easily portable, FGE-HIPS fluorophore-labeling may be easily extended to other proteins.

  7. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein’s folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca2+-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  8. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-Terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Close, D.; Robinson, H.; Johnson, S. J.; Sdano, M. A.; McDonald, S. M.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2011-05-13

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  9. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    D Close; S Johnson; M Sdano; S McDonald; H Robinson; T Formosa; C Hill

    2011-12-31

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  10. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production.

    PubMed

    Poksay, Karen S; Sheffler, Douglas J; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E; Cosford, Nicholas D P; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds - identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP - in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

  11. Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of Statin-Induced APP C-terminal Toxic Fragment Production

    PubMed Central

    Poksay, Karen S.; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Spilman, Patricia; Campagna, Jesus; Jagodzinska, Barbara; Descamps, Olivier; Gorostiza, Olivia; Matalis, Alex; Mullenix, Michael; Bredesen, Dale E.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; John, Varghese

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss. One process that could contribute to this loss is the intracellular caspase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in release of the toxic C-terminal 31-amino acid peptide APP-C31 along with the production of APPΔC31, full-length APP minus the C-terminal 31 amino acids. We previously found that a mutation in APP that prevents this caspase cleavage ameliorated synaptic loss and cognitive impairment in a murine AD model. Thus, inhibition of this cleavage is a reasonable target for new therapeutic development. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit the generation of APP-C31, we first used an APPΔC31 cleavage site-specific antibody to develop an AlphaLISA to screen several chemical compound libraries for the level of N-terminal fragment production. This antibody was also used to develop an ELISA for validation studies. In both high throughput screening (HTS) and validation testing, the ability of compounds to inhibit simvastatin- (HTS) or cerivastatin- (validation studies) induced caspase cleavage at the APP-D720 cleavage site was determined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with wildtype (wt) human APP (CHO-7W). Several compounds, as well as control pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, inhibited APPΔC31 production (measured fragment) and rescued cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The effective compounds fell into several classes including SERCA inhibitors, inhibitors of Wnt signaling, and calcium channel antagonists. Further studies are underway to evaluate the efficacy of lead compounds – identified here using cells and tissues expressing wt human APP – in mouse models of AD expressing mutated human APP, as well as to identify additional compounds and determine the mechanisms by which they exert their effects. PMID:28261092

  12. AMINO ACID COMPOSITION AND C-TERMINAL RESIDUES OF ALGAL BILIPROTEINS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    R-phycoerythrin from Ceramium rubrum and C- phycocyanin from Nostoc nuscorum were obtained in purified form by fractional crystallization, followed by...as amino acids. Alanine was identified as the only C-terminal amino acid of R-phycoerythrin, each molecule of which contained about 12 terminal groups. Serine was identified as the only C-terminal group of C- phycocyanin . (Author)

  13. Imaging Complex Protein Metabolism in Live Organisms by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy with Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein metabolism, consisting of both synthesis and degradation, is highly complex, playing an indispensable regulatory role throughout physiological and pathological processes. Over recent decades, extensive efforts, using approaches such as autoradiography, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy, have been devoted to the study of protein metabolism. However, noninvasive and global visualization of protein metabolism has proven to be highly challenging, especially in live systems. Recently, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic labeling of deuterated amino acids (D-AAs) was demonstrated for use in imaging newly synthesized proteins in cultured cell lines. Herein, we significantly generalize this notion to develop a comprehensive labeling and imaging platform for live visualization of complex protein metabolism, including synthesis, degradation, and pulse–chase analysis of two temporally defined populations. First, the deuterium labeling efficiency was optimized, allowing time-lapse imaging of protein synthesis dynamics within individual live cells with high spatial–temporal resolution. Second, by tracking the methyl group (CH3) distribution attributed to pre-existing proteins, this platform also enables us to map protein degradation inside live cells. Third, using two subsets of structurally and spectroscopically distinct D-AAs, we achieved two-color pulse–chase imaging, as demonstrated by observing aggregate formation of mutant hungtingtin proteins. Finally, going beyond simple cell lines, we demonstrated the imaging ability of protein synthesis in brain tissues, zebrafish, and mice in vivo. Hence, the presented labeling and imaging platform would be a valuable tool to study complex protein metabolism with high sensitivity, resolution, and biocompatibility for a broad spectrum of systems ranging from cells to model animals and possibly to humans. PMID:25560305

  14. Heterogenous turnover of sperm and seminal vesicle proteins in the mouse revealed by dynamic metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Amy J; Ramm, Steven A; Pennington, Andrea; Hurst, Jane L; Stockley, Paula; Beynon, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Plasticity in ejaculate composition is predicted as an adaptive response to the evolutionary selective pressure of sperm competition. However, to respond rapidly to local competitive conditions requires dynamic modulation in the production of functionally relevant ejaculate proteins. Here we combine metabolic labeling of proteins with proteomics to explore the opportunity for such modulation within mammalian ejaculates. We assessed the rate at which proteins are synthesized and incorporated in the seminal vesicles of male house mice (Mus musculus domesticus), where major seminal fluid proteins with potential roles in sperm competition are produced. We compared rates of protein turnover in the seminal vesicle with those during spermatogenesis, the timing of which is well known in mice. The subjects were fed a diet containing deuterated valine ([(2)H(8)]valine) for up to 35 days, and the incorporation of dietary-labeled amino acid into seminal vesicle- or sperm-specific proteins was assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of samples recovered from the seminal vesicle lumen and cauda epididymis, respectively. Analyses of epididymal contents were consistent with the known duration of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation in this species and in addition revealed evidence for a subset of epididymal proteins subject to rapid turnover. For seminal vesicle proteins, incorporation of the stable isotope was evident from day 2 of labeling, reaching a plateau of labeling by day 24. Hence, even in the absence of copulation, the seminal vesicle proteins and certain epididymal proteins demonstrate considerable turnover, a response that is consonant with the capacity to rapidly modulate protein production. These techniques can now be used to assess the extent of phenotypic plasticity in mammalian ejaculate production and allocation according to social and environmental cues of sperm competition.

  15. Fluorescein Derivatives as Bifunctional Molecules for the Simultaneous Inhibiting and Labeling of FTO Protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianlu; Hong, Tingting; Huang, Yue; Su, Haomiao; Wu, Fan; Chen, Yi; Wei, Lai; Huang, Wei; Hua, Xiaoluan; Xia, Yu; Xu, Jinglei; Gan, Jianhua; Yuan, Bifeng; Feng, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaolian; Yang, Cai-Guang; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-11-04

    The FTO protein is unequivocally reported to play a critical role in human obesity and in the regulation of cellular levels of m(6)A modification, which makes FTO a significant and worthy subject of study. Here, we identified that fluorescein derivatives can selectively inhibit FTO demethylation, and the mechanisms behind these activities were elucidated after we determined the X-ray crystal structures of FTO/fluorescein and FTO/5-aminofluorescein. Furthermore, these inhibitors can also be applied to the direct labeling and enrichment of FTO protein combined with photoaffinity labeling assay.

  16. The E. coli thioredoxin folding mechanism: the key role of the C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Garrote, Ana; Sica, Mauricio P; Santos, Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the unfolding mechanism of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (EcTRX) was investigated experimentally and computationally. We characterized seven point mutants distributed along the C-terminal α-helix (CTH) and the preceding loop. The mutations destabilized the protein against global unfolding while leaving the native structure unchanged. Global analysis of the unfolding kinetics of all variants revealed a linear unfolding route with a high-energy on-pathway intermediate state flanked by two transition state ensembles TSE1 and TSE2. The experiments show that CTH is mainly unfolded in TSE1 and the intermediate and becomes structured in TSE2. Structure-based molecular dynamics are in agreement with these experiments and provide protein-wide structural information on transient states. In our model, EcTRX folding starts with structure formation in the β-sheet, while the protein helices coalesce later. As a whole, our results indicate that the CTH is a critical module in the folding process, restraining a heterogeneous intermediate ensemble into a biologically active native state and providing the native protein with thermodynamic and kinetic stability.

  17. Structural characterization of a C-terminally truncated E5 oncoprotein from papillomavirus in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-12-01

    E5 is the major transforming oncoprotein of bovine papillomavirus, which activates the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β in a highly specific manner. The short transmembrane protein E5 with only 44 residues interacts directly with the transmembrane segments of the receptor, but structural details are not available. Biophysical investigations are challenging, because the hydrophobic E5 protein tends to aggregate and get cross-linked non-specifically via two Cys residues near its C-terminus. Here, we demonstrate that a truncation by 10 amino acids creates a more manageable protein that can be conveniently used for structure analysis. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and solid-state (15)N- and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that this E5 variant serves as a representative model for the wild-type protein. The helical conformation of the transmembrane segment, its orientation in the lipid bilayer, and the ability to form homodimers in the membrane are not affected by the C-terminal truncation.

  18. Effects of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 deficiency on mouse ova.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Sayaka; Hamasaki, Hiroko; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Hara, Kenshiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    Maternal proteins are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system during oocyte maturation in mice. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is highly and specifically expressed in mouse ova and is involved in the polyspermy block. However, the role of UCHL1 in the underlying mechanism of polyspermy block is poorly understood. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis to identify maternal proteins that were relevant to the role of UCHL1 in mouse ova using UCHL1-deficient gad. Furthermore, we assessed morphological features in gad mouse ova using transmission electron microscopy. NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing (NALP) family proteins and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones were identified by proteomic analysis. We also found that the 'maternal antigen that embryos require' (NLRP5 (MATER)) protein level increased significantly in gad mouse ova compared with that in wild-type mice. In an ultrastructural study, gad mouse ova contained less ER in the cortex than in wild-type mice. These results provide new insights into the role of UCHL1 in the mechanism of polyspermy block in mouse ova.

  19. Kar1 binding to Sfi1 C-terminal regions anchors the SPB bridge to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Christian; Elserafy, Menattallah; Rüthnick, Diana; Ozboyaci, Musa; Neuner, Annett; Flottmann, Benjamin; Heilemann, Mike; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    The yeast spindle pole body (SPB) is the functional equivalent of the mammalian centrosome. The half bridge is a SPB substructure on the nuclear envelope (NE), playing a key role in SPB duplication. Its cytoplasmic components are the membrane-anchored Kar1, the yeast centrin Cdc31, and the Cdc31-binding protein Sfi1. In G1, the half bridge expands into the bridge through Sfi1 C-terminal (Sfi1-CT) dimerization, the licensing step for SPB duplication. We exploited photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) to show that Kar1 localizes in the bridge center. Binding assays revealed direct interaction between Kar1 and C-terminal Sfi1 fragments. kar1Δ cells whose viability was maintained by the dominant CDC31-16 showed an arched bridge, indicating Kar1’s function in tethering Sfi1 to the NE. Cdc31-16 enhanced Cdc31–Cdc31 interactions between Sfi1–Cdc31 layers, as suggested by binding free energy calculations. In our model, Kar1 binding is restricted to Sfi1-CT and Sfi1 C-terminal centrin-binding repeats, and centrin and Kar1 provide cross-links, while Sfi1-CT stabilizes the bridge and ensures timely SPB separation. PMID:26076691

  20. 2D Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids such is a common method for investigating the biosynthetic rates of proteins. In this way, the abundance of newly synthesized proteins can be determined by several proteomic techniques including 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter describes a protocol for labelling pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of low and high concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation enrichment of secretory granule proteins and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This demonstrated that the biosynthetic rates of most of the granule proteins are co-ordinately regulated in the presence of stimulatory glucose concentrations.

  1. Detection of an azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine labeled protein transferred to nitrocellulose paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ivey, S.; Metz, J.G.; Berg, S.P.

    1986-04-01

    An electrophoretically similar protein in spinach and maize can be covalently labeled with azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine and separated by 10-18% gradient LDS-PAGE. The protein profile can be transferred to nitrocellulose paper (ncp) by western blotting. The ncp containing the protein profile is sliced into 2 mm slices and co