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Sample records for protein comp patterns

  1. In vivo human Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Davies, Sherri; Bales, Elise S; Haynes, Richard; Sandell, Linda J; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2005-12-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a large extracellular matrix protein whose function is unknown. Mutations in COMP cause pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, two skeletal dysplasias which are associated with intracellular retention of COMP in chondrocytes. In contrast, COMP null mice are normal suggesting gene redundancy or that the detrimental effect is associated with mutant COMP rather than the absence of functional COMP. To define the elements that regulate COMP transcription and tissue-specificity, we have evaluated the human COMP promoter driving fusion gene expression in vitro and in vivo. COMP promoter activity is higher in rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS) than in a fibroblast cell line. In RCS cells, expression of a reporter gene containing 1.7 kb of the human COMP promoter was three-fold higher than all shorter COMP promoter constructs. In transgenic mice, 1.7 kb of the human COMP promoter is active early in development in the limbs, spine, and eye. As development progresses, promoter activity diminishes in the eye and migrates from the center to the ends of the long bones. On the other hand, while 375 bp of the human COMP promoter is sufficient for proper tissue-specific expression, levels are less than those found with the 1.7-COMP promoter. The expression pattern of both promoters recapitulates endogenous cartilage COMP expression in mice. Our findings indicate that the elements required for chondrocyte-specific expression lie within 375 bp of the translational start site, while DNA enhancer elements are located between 1.0 to 1.7 kb.

  2. The distribution of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in equine carpal articular cartilage and its variation with exercise and cartilage deterioration.

    PubMed

    Murray, R C; Smith, R K; Henson, F M; Goodship, A

    2001-09-01

    Based on previous studies where tendons receiving the most load have been shown to have the highest levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), we hypothesized that COMP distribution in articular cartilage may be influenced by mechanical loading. This investigation aimed (a) to describe the pattern of COMP immunoreactivity in middle carpal joint cartilage of two-year-old Thoroughbred horses; (b) to determine topographical variations; (c) to compare high (group 1) and low (group 2) intensity training and (d) to describe COMP immunoreactivity at sites with early osteoarthritis. Group 1 (n =6) underwent a 19 week high-intensity treadmill training programme and group 2 (n =6) were given daily walking until euthanasia. Dorsal and palmar sites on radial and third carpal articular surfaces were prepared. Immunohistochemistry was performed with polyclonal rabbit anti-equine COMP antiserum using a biotin-streptavidin/peroxidase method. Results showed: (a) intracellular immunoreactivity was present in all cartilage zones, but the distribution of COMP staining within the matrix varied between cartilage zones; (b) differences in distribution between sites were not observed, but total COMP levels in exercised horses (n =2) did vary between sites with dorsal sites containing less COMP than palmar sites on the radial, intermediate and third carpal lateral facet; (c) group 1 cartilage showed marked interterritorial distribution in the deep layer compared to group 2 where staining was more generalized throughout the matrix and (d) fibrillated cartilage showed increased local immunoreactivity in the matrix. These findings demonstrate zonal variations in equine COMP distribution which may be influenced by loading. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Tendon Extracellular Matrix Reveals Disease Stage-specific Fragmentation and Differential Cleavage of COMP (Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein)*

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Khabut, Areej; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2014-01-01

    During inflammatory processes the extracellular matrix (ECM) is extensively remodeled, and many of the constituent components are released as proteolytically cleaved fragments. These degradative processes are better documented for inflammatory joint diseases than tendinopathy even though the pathogenesis has many similarities. The aims of this study were to investigate the proteomic composition of injured tendons during early and late disease stages to identify disease-specific cleavage patterns of the ECM protein cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). In addition to characterizing fragments released in naturally occurring disease, we hypothesized that stimulation of tendon explants with proinflammatory mediators in vitro would induce fragments of COMP analogous to natural disease. Therefore, normal tendon explants were stimulated with IL-1β and prostaglandin E2, and their effects on the release of COMP and its cleavage patterns were characterized. Analyses of injured tendons identified an altered proteomic composition of the ECM at all stages post injury, showing protein fragments that were specific to disease stage. IL-1β enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and release of COMP from tendon explants, whereas PGE2 had no catabolic effect. Of the cleavage fragments identified in early stage tendon disease, two fragments were generated by an IL-1-mediated mechanism. These fragments provide a platform for the development of neo-epitope assays specific to injury stage for tendon disease. PMID:24398684

  4. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) level is a marker of disease activity in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Kempta Lekpa, F; Piette, J C; Bastuji-Garin, S; Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Poole, A R; Marini-Portugal, A; Chevalier, X

    2010-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare and severe disease which may lead to destruction of elastic cartilages. Until now, no reliable biomarker of disease activity in RP has been available. This study was designed to measure serum levels of cartilage biomarkers during both active and inactive phases of the disease. Serum levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope (CS846) of proteoglycan aggrecan and collagen type II collagenase cleavage neoepitope (C2C) were measured retrospectively in 21 subjects with RP. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used for statistical comparisons of biomarker levels in active and inactive phases of RP. Only the serum level of COMP was significantly increased during disease flares. Steroids did not alter the serum cartilage-related biomarker levels. However, during the active phase, C2C levels were significantly higher in steroid treated patients compared with non-steroid treated patients. This study suggests that serum COMP level may be useful for monitoring disease activity of RP. Further prospective studies are required to confirm this result.

  5. Role of Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengxia; Wang, Xijuan; Zhang, Xude; Ren, Cuiai; Xin, Jie

    2016-08-01

    To analyse the role of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in the differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This case-control study analysed the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with RA and healthy control subjects. The diagnostic ability of COMP for RA was evaluated by comparing it with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody levels. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated. The study enrolled 82 patients with RA and 34 healthy control subjects. The serum COMP level was significantly higher in patients with RA compared with control subjects (mean ± SD 29.51 ± 9.21 ng/ml versus 17.85 ± 5.55 ng/ml, respectively). The serum COMP level was significantly higher in patients with active RA compared with patients with RA in remission (mean ± SD 33.08 ± 8.80 ng/ml versus 24.94 ± 7.65 ng/ml, respectively). The cut-off value for COMP to discriminate patients with RA from healthy individuals was 21.51 ng/ml (sensitivity 0.817, specificity 0.882, positive predictive value 0.944, negative predictive value 0.667, and accuracy 0.836). The serum COMP level has the potential to be used as a biological marker for differentiating between patients with RA and healthy individuals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-mediated cell differentiation to proteolysis mechanism networks from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Diao, Haizhen; Zhou, Huilei; Li, Xiaohe; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Wolfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To understand cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mechanism network from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma. COMP complete different activated (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC < 0.25) and uncomplete (partly no positive correlation except COMP, Pearson CC < 0.25) network were identified in higher lung adenocarcinoma compared with lower human normal adjacent tissues from the corresponding COMP-stimulated (≥0.25) or inhibited (Pearson CC ≤ -0.25) overlapping molecules of Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) and GRNInfer, respectively. COMP complete different activated and inhibited (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC < 0.25) mechanisms networks of higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues were constructed by integration of Pearson CC, GRNInfer and GO. As visualized by integration of GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and Disease, we deduced COMP complete different activated and inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues. As visualized by GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and disease database integration, we proposed mainly that the mechanism and function of COMP complete different activated network in higher lung adenocarcinoma was involved in COMP activation with matrix-localized insulin-like factor coupling carboxypeptidase to metallopeptidase-induced proteolysis, whereas the corresponding inhibited network in lower human normal adjacent tissues participated in COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized vasculogenesis, B and T cell differentiation and neural endocrine factors coupling pyrophosphatase-mediated proteolysis. However, COMP complete different inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma included COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized chromatin maintenance, licensing and assembly factors coupling phosphatase-inhibitor to cytokinesis regulators-mediated cell differentiation, whereas the corresponding activated network in lower human normal adjacent tissues

  7. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  8. Novel cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) neoepitopes identified in synovial fluids from patients with joint diseases using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Dahlberg, Leif E; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-07-25

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDSPAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization.Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided.

  9. Compact Structure Patterns in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Shi, Shuoyong; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-10-23

    Globular proteins typically fold into tightly packed arrays of regular secondary structures. We developed a model to approximate the compact parallel and antiparallel arrangement of α-helices and β-strands, enumerated all possible topologies formed by up to five secondary structural elements (SSEs), searched for their occurrence in spatial structures of proteins, and documented their frequencies of occurrence in the PDB. The enumeration model grows larger super-secondary structure patterns (SSPs) by combining pairs of smaller patterns, a process that approximates a potential path of protein fold evolution. The most prevalent SSPs are typically present in superfolds such as the Rossmann-like fold, the ferredoxin-like fold, and the Greek key motif, whereas the less frequent SSPs often possess uncommon structure features such as split β-sheets, left-handed connections, and crossing loops. This complete SSP enumeration model, for the first time, allows us to investigate which theoretically possible SSPs are not observed in available protein structures. All SSPs with up to four SSEs occurred in proteins. However, among the SSPs with five SSEs, approximately 20% (218) are absent from existing folds. Of these unobserved SSPs, 80% contain two or more uncommon structure features. To facilitate future efforts in protein structure classification, engineering, and design, we provide the resulting patterns and their frequency of occurrence in proteins at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ssps/. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in the articular cartilage on the equine third carpal bone in trained and untrained horses.

    PubMed

    Skiöldebrand, E; Ekman, S; Heinegård, D; Hultenby, K

    2010-04-01

    The present study was designed to delineate the presence of COMP at the ultrastructural level comparing concentrations between two areas of articular cartilage from the equine third carpal bone, subjected to different loading, from trained and untrained horses. We also analyzed the fibril thickness of collagen type II in the same compartments and zones. Samples were collected from high load-bearing areas of the dorsal radial facet (intermittent high load) and an area of the palmar condyle (low constant load) in five non-trained and three trained young racehorses. The data show that COMP is much less abundant in the matrix in intermittent high loaded areas of articular cartilage from trained horses as compared to the untrained horses (p=0.036). On the other hand, the untrained horses often displayed a higher immunolabeling in loaded areas compared to unloaded areas, indicating that an adequate dynamic load promotes COMP synthesis and/or retention, while an excessive load may have an opposite effect. The collagen fibril diameter showed marked variation between individuals. The present study indicates that dynamic in vivo compression at high load and frequency lowers matrix content of COMP in the articular cartilage of the third carpal bone. It also indicates that the collagen network is influenced by mechanical load following by strenuous exercise.

  11. CompNet: a GUI based tool for comparison of multiple biological interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kuntal, Bhusan K; Dutta, Anirban; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-04-26

    Network visualization and analysis tools aid in better understanding of complex biological systems. Furthermore, to understand the differences in behaviour of system(s) under various environmental conditions (e.g. stress, infection), comparing multiple networks becomes necessary. Such comparisons between multiple networks may help in asserting causation and in identifying key components of the studied biological system(s). Although many available network comparison methods exist, which employ techniques like network alignment and querying to compute pair-wise similarity between selected networks, most of them have limited features with respect to interactive visual comparison of multiple networks. In this paper, we present CompNet - a graphical user interface based network comparison tool, which allows visual comparison of multiple networks based on various network metrics. CompNet allows interactive visualization of the union, intersection and/or complement regions of a selected set of networks. Different visualization features (e.g. pie-nodes, edge-pie matrix, etc.) aid in easy identification of the key nodes/interactions and their significance across the compared networks. The tool also allows one to perform network comparisons on the basis of neighbourhood architecture of constituent nodes and community compositions, a feature particularly useful while analyzing biological networks. To demonstrate the utility of CompNet, we have compared a (time-series) human gene-expression dataset, post-infection by two strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, overlaid on the human protein-protein interaction network. Using various functionalities of CompNet not only allowed us to comprehend changes in interaction patterns over the course of infection, but also helped in inferring the probable fates of the host cells upon infection by the two strains. CompNet is expected to be a valuable visual data mining tool and is freely available for academic use from http

  12. Regulation of complement by COMP allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Happonen, Kaisa E.; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders; Mörgelin, Matthias; Heinegård, Dick; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). In this study we investigated the ability of COMP to regulate complement. Such capacity was previously shown for some cartilage proteins. Methods Regulation of complement by COMP was studied using functional assays in vitro. Interactions between complement proteins and COMP were investigated using direct binding assays and electron microscopy. Circulating COMP and COMP-C3b complexes in serum and synovial fluid from RA and OA patients and healthy controls were measured using a novel ELISA. Results We show in vivo evidence of complement activation by released COMP in the general circulation of patients with RA, but not OA patients. We found that COMP induces activation and deposition of C3b and C9 specifically via the alternative pathway of complement, which is attributable to a direct interaction between COMP and properdin. Furthermore, COMP inhibits the classical and the lectin complement pathways due to direct interaction with the stalk region of C1q and mannose-binding lectin, respectively. Conclusion COMP is the first extracellular matrix protein for which an active role is demonstrated in inflammation in vivo where it can activate one complement pathway at the same time as it has the potential to inhibit another. The net outcome of these interactions is most likely determined by the type of released COMP-fragments, which may be disease-specific. PMID:20737467

  13. A Novel Form of Chondrocyte Stress is Triggered by a COMP Mutation Causing Pseudoachondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Farhana; Gualeni, Benedetta; Gregson, Hannah J; Leighton, Matthew P; Piróg, Katarzyna A; Edwards, Sarah; Holden, Paul; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Briggs, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and the p.D469del mutation within the type III repeats of COMP accounts for approximately 30% of PSACH. To determine disease mechanisms of PSACH in vivo, we introduced the Comp D469del mutation into the mouse genome. Mutant animals were normal at birth but grew slower than their wild-type littermates and developed short-limb dwarfism. In the growth plates of mutant mice chondrocyte columns were reduced in number and poorly organized, while mutant COMP was retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Chondrocyte proliferation was reduced and apoptosis was both increased and spatially dysregulated. Previous studies on COMP mutations have shown mutant COMP is co-localized with chaperone proteins, and we have reported an unfolded protein response (UPR) in mouse models of PSACH-MED (multiple epiphyseal dysplasia) harboring mutations in Comp (T585M) and Matn3, Comp etc (V194D). However, we found no evidence of UPR in this mouse model of PSACH. In contrast, microarray analysis identified expression changes in groups of genes implicated in oxidative stress, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, which is consistent with the chondrocyte pathology. Overall, these data suggest that a novel form of chondrocyte stress triggered by the expression of mutant COMP is central to the pathogenesis of PSACH. Hum Mutat 33:218–231, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22006726

  14. Protein patterning by a DNA origami framework.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hüsnü; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Besenbacher, Flemming; Gothelf, Kurt V; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-18

    A spatial arrangement of proteins provides structural and functional advantages in vast technological applications as well as fundamental research. Most protein patterning procedures employ complicated, time consuming and very costly nanofabrication techniques. As an alternative route, we developed a fully biomolecular self-assembly method using DNA Origami Frames (DOF) as a template for both small and large scale protein patterning. We employed a triangular DOF (tDOF) to arrange the Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein. Our in situ protein patterning strategy provides a novel, fully organic platform using a fast and low-cost surface approach with possible utilization in fundamental science and technological applications.

  15. NDT-COMP9 microcomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Cowan, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    An 8080-based microcomputer system, the NDT-COMP9, has been designed for instrumentation control and data analysis in eddy-current tests. The NDT-COMP9 represents a significantly more powerful computer system than the NDT-COMP8 microcomputer from which it was developed. The NDT-COMP9 system is contained on a 240- by 120-mm (9.5- by 4.8-in.) circuit board and will fit in a four-wide Nuclear Instrumentation Module (NIM) BIN with 26-pin edge connectors. In addition to the 8080-compatible central processing unit (CPU), an arithmetic processing unit (APU) is available to provide up to 32-bit fixed- or floating-point, basic or transcendental math functions. The 16K of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM), one serial input-output (I/O) port (RS-232-C at a maximum speed of 9600 baud), and 72 parallel I/O ports are available. The baud rate is under software control. A system monitor and math package are available for use with the microcomputer.

  16. COMP-angiopoietin-1 promotes cavernous angiogenesis in a type 2 diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2013-05-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-angiopoietin-1 (COMP-Ang1) is an angiogenic factor for vascular angiogenesis. The aim was to investigate the effect of an intracavernosal injection of COMP-Ang1 on cavernosal angiogenesis in a diabetic rat model. Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats made up the experimental group (1 yr old) and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats made up the control group. The experimental group was divided into vehicle only, 10 µg COMP-Ang1, and 20 µg COMP-Ang1. COMP-Ang1 was injected into the corpus cavernosum of the penis. After 4 weeks, the penile tissues of the rats were obtained for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The immunoreactivity of PECAM-1 and VEGF was increased in the COMP-Ang1 group compared with the vehicle only group. Moreover, the expression of PECAM-1 and VEGF was notably augmented in the 20 µg Comp Ang-1 group. In the immunoblotting study, the expression of PECAM-1 and VEGF protein was significantly less in the OLEFT rats than in the control LETO rats. However, this expression was restored to control level after intracavernosal injection of COMP-Ang1. These results show that an intracavernosal injection of COMP-Ang1 enhances cavernous angiogenesis by structurally reinforcing the cavernosal endothelium.

  17. Decrement of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients achieving remission after 6 months of etanercept treatment: comparison with CRP, IgM-RF, MMP-3 and anti-CCP Ab.

    PubMed

    Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ueki, Yukitaka; Imazato, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Fujikawa, Keita; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serum COMP can estimate the therapeutic response of RA after 6 months of treatment with etanercept. Forty-five RA patients receiving 25 mg of etanercept twice a week for 6 months were registered in this prospective observational study. Clinical response to the therapy was evaluated by DAS 28. Laboratory variables- COMP, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, MMP-3, and anti-CCP Ab -were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. We assessed the correlations between serum COMP and other variables and whether serum COMP is associated with DAS28 remission. Serum COMP correlated with DAS28-ESR (p < 0.05, r = 0.40) at baseline. At 6 months of etanercept treatment, 10 patients entered remission (DAS28-ESR < 2.6) whereas the other 35 patients did not (DAS28-ESR > 2.6). The decrement of serum COMP at 6 months was significant in the remission group (N = 10) but not in the non-remission group (N = 35). On the other hand, CRP, ESR and MMP-3 decreased at 6 months regardless of remission status. IgM-RF titer as well as anti-CCP Ab titer did not differ at 6 months. Serum COMP at baseline reflects clinical disease activity of RA. Serum COMP is a valuable serologic marker to identify the subset of RA patients achieving remission during treatment with etanercept. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in Δ EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems. PMID:26739566

  19. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  20. Pattern Recognition of Adsorbing HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew S.; Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Schmid, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Protein adsorption is relevant in fields ranging from medicine to industry, and the qualitative behavior exhibited by course-grained models could shed insight for further research in such fields. Our study on the selective adsorption of lattice proteins utilizes the Wang-Landau algorithm to simulate the Hydrophobic-Polar (H-P) model with an efficient set of Monte Carlo moves. Each substrate is modeled as a square pattern of 9 lattice sites which attract either H or P monomers, and are located on an otherwise neutral surface. The fully enumerated set of 102 unique surfaces is simulated with each protein sequence. A collection of 27-monomer sequences is used- each of which is non-degenerate and protein-like. Thermodynamic quantities such as the specific heat and free energy are calculated from the density of states, and are used to investigate the adsorption of lattice proteins on patterned substrates. Research supported by NSF.

  1. Protein structure protection commits gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianping; Liang, Han; Fernández, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Gene co-expressions often determine module-defining spatial and temporal concurrences of proteins. Yet, little effort has been devoted to tracing coordinating signals for expression correlations to the three-dimensional structures of gene products. We performed a global structure-based analysis of the yeast and human proteomes and contrasted this information against their respective transcriptome organizations obtained from comprehensive microarray data. We show that protein vulnerability quantifies dosage sensitivity for metabolic adaptation phases and tissue-specific patterns of mRNA expression, determining the extent of co-expression similarity of binding partners. The role of protein intrinsic disorder in transcriptome organization is also delineated by interrelating vulnerability, disorder propensity and co-expression patterns. Extremely vulnerable human proteins are shown to be subject to severe post-transcriptional regulation of their expression through significant micro-RNA targeting, making mRNA levels poor surrogates for protein-expression levels. By contrast, in yeast the expression of extremely under-wrapped proteins is likely regulated through protein aggregation. Thus, the 85 most vulnerable proteins in yeast include the five confirmed prions, while in human, the genes encoding extremely vulnerable proteins are predicted to be targeted by microRNAs. Hence, in both vastly different organisms protein vulnerability emerges as a structure-encoded signal for post-transcriptional regulation. Vulnerability of protein structure and the concurrent need to maintain structural integrity are shown to quantify dosage sensitivity, compelling gene expression patterns across tissue types and temporal adaptation phases in a quantifiable manner. Extremely vulnerable proteins impose additional constraints on gene expression: They are subject to high levels of regulation at the post-transcriptional level.

  2. Patterning proteins and cells using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Kane, R S; Takayama, S; Ostuni, E; Ingber, D E; Whitesides, G M

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the pattering of proteins and cells using a non-photolithographic microfabrication technology, which we call 'soft lithography' because it consists of a set of related techniques, each of which uses stamps or channels fabricated in an elastomeric ('soft') material for pattern transfer. The review covers three soft lithographic techniques: microcontact printing, patterning using microfluidic channels, and laminar flow patterning. These soft lithographic techniques are inexpensive, are procedurally simple, and can be used to pattern a variety of planar and non-planar substrates. Their successful application does not require stringent regulation of the laboratory environment, and they can be used to pattern surfaces with delicate ligands. They provide control over both the surface chemistry and the cellular environment. We discuss both the procedures for patterning based on these soft lithographic techniques, and their applications in biosensor technology, in tissue engineering, and for fundamental studies in cell biology.

  3. Disulfide bonding patterns and protein topologies.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C. J.; Jafri, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the topological properties of protein disulfide bonding patterns. First, a description of these patterns in terms of partially directed graphs is developed. The topologically distinct disulfide bonding patterns available to a polypeptide chain containing n disulfide bonds are enumerated, and their symmetry and reducibility properties are examined. The theoretical probabilities are calculated that a randomly chosen pattern of n bonds will have any combination of symmetry and reducibility properties, given that all patterns have equal probability of being chosen. Next, the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence and Brookhaven National Laboratories protein structure (PDB) databases are examined, and the occurrences of disulfide bonding patterns in them are determined. The frequencies of symmetric and/or reducible patterns are found to exceed theoretical predictions based on equiprobable pattern selection. Kauzmann's model, in which disulfide bonds form during random encounters as the chain assumes random coil conformations, finds that bonds are more likely to form with near neighbor cysteines than with remote cysteines. The observed frequencies of occurrence of disulfide patterns are found here to be virtually uncorrelated with the predictions of this alternative random bonding model. These results strongly suggest that disulfide bond pattern formation is not the result of random factors, but instead is a directed process. Finally, the PDB structure database is examined to determine the extrinsic topologies of polypeptides containing disulfide bonds. A complete survey of all structures in the database found no instances in which two loops formed by disulfide bonds within the same polypeptide chain are topologically linked. Similarly, no instances are found in which two loops present on different polypeptide chains in a structure are catenated. Further, no examples of topologically knotted loops occur. In contrast, pseudolinking

  4. Protein patterns as endpoints in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.; Brown, D.

    1995-12-31

    Biological endpoints can complement chemical analyses in monitoring environmental remediation. In some cases the levels of chemical detection are so low that the costs of clean-up to no detection would be prohibitive. And chemical tests do not indicate the availability of the contaminants to the biota. On the other hand many if not most biological tests lack specificity. The authors have investigated a protein expression assay to establish an endpoint for clean-up of sulfur mustard and breakdown products. Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to sulfur mustard (SM), a breakdown product thiodiethanol (TDE), and ethylene glycol, the solvent for the two chemicals. Tissue from the lining of the coelomic cavity was taken from each of 6 worms in each treatment class. Soluble proteins were extracted and separated on one and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) gels. The 1 D gels showed no difference by eye but the patterns from control and solvent control worms on 2D gels differed from those of worms exposed to TDE and SM. The 1D gel data were digitized and analyzed by pattern recognition using artificial neural networks. The protein patterns under the two treatments and the two controls were learned in one set of data and successfully recognized in a second. This indicated that what was learned was useful in recognizing patterns induced by SM and TDE. Thus a possible endpoint for remediation would be the protein pattern at no effect levels of chemicals of interest.

  5. Finding protein-protein interaction patterns by contact map matching.

    PubMed

    Melo, R C; Ribeiro, C; Murray, C S; Veloso, C J M; da Silveira, C H; Neshich, G; Meira, W; Carceroni, R L; Santoro, M M

    2007-10-05

    We propose a novel method for defining patterns of contacts present in protein-protein complexes. A new use of the traditional contact maps (more frequently used for representation of the intra-chain contacts) is presented for analysis of inter-chain contacts. Using an algorithm based on image processing techniques, we can compare protein-protein interaction maps and also obtain a dissimilarity score between them. The same algorithm used to compare the maps can align the contacts of all the complexes and be helpful in the determination of a pattern of conserved interactions at the interfaces. We present an example for the application of this method by analyzing the pattern of interaction of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitors and trypsins, chymotrypsins, a thrombin, a matriptase, and a kallikrein - all classified as serine proteases. We found 20 contacts conserved in trypsins and chymotrypsins and 3 specific ones are present in all the serine protease complexes studied. The method was able to identify important contacts for the protein family studied and the results are in agreement with the literature.

  6. CompAction: Integrated compliance management software

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    CompAction is an integrated compliance management software tool for the solid waste disposal industry. The majority of environmental compliance software packages on the market allow users to access Federal and state regulations without increasing the usability of the information. By contrast, CompAction bridges the gap between regulatory requirements and the actions facilities must complete to ensure continued compliance. CompAction allows environmental compliance management personnel and consultants to schedule compliance assessment activities, verify, and track the related compliance status of the facility. CompAction modules allow facility managers to customize the system for specific Federal, state, local and permit requirements and assign. completion responsibilities to site personnel The system tracks completion of the assignment, the compliance status of the requirement and also an assigned plan of action for the requirements which are found to be deficient. CompAction may also assist facilities in demonstrating compliance with state audit privilege guidelines and is designed to adhere to compliance program requirements outlined by the USEPA and the Department of Justice. CompAction can schedule facility inspections and audits to ensure that the facility maintains an on-going compliance prevention and assessment program. Federal, State, local and permit Environmental, Health and Safety regulations can all be maintained by the system and modified as the requirements change. CompAction is an innovative compliance assessment and monitoring system designed for both public and private facilities. Use of CompAction will facilitate the maintenance of an efficient and effective environmental compliance management program for solid waste disposal facilities.

  7. Sedimentation Patterns of Rapidly Reversible Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The transport behavior of macromolecular mixtures with rapidly reversible complex formation is of great interest in the study of protein interactions by many different methods. Complicated transport patterns arise even for simple bimolecular reactions, when all species exhibit different migration velocities. Although partial differential equations are available to describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the interacting system given particular initial conditions, a general overview of the phase behavior of the systems in parameter space has not yet been reported. In the case of sedimentation of two-component mixtures, this study presents simple analytical solutions that solve the underlying equations in the diffusion-free limit previously subject to Gilbert-Jenkins theory. The new expressions describe, with high precision, the average sedimentation coefficients and composition of each boundary, which allow the examination of features of the whole parameter space at once, and may be used for experimental design and robust analysis of experimental boundary patterns to derive the stoichiometry and affinity of the complex. This study finds previously unrecognized features, including a phase transition between boundary patterns. The model reveals that the time-average velocities of all components in the reaction mixture must match—a condition that suggests an intuitive physical picture of an effective particle of the coupled cosedimentation of an interacting system. Adding to the existing numerical solutions of the relevant partial differential equations, the effective particle model provides physical insights into the relationships of the parameters that govern sedimentation patterns. PMID:20441765

  8. DETECTION OF TOPOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN PROTEIN NETWORKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.

    2003-11-17

    property of many biological networks that was recently brought to attention of the scientific community [3, 4, 5] is an extremely broad distribution of node connectivities defined as the number of immediate neighbors of a given node in the network. While the majority of nodes have just a few edges connecting them to other nodes in the network, there exist some nodes, that we will refer to as ''hubs'', with an unusually large number of neighbors. The connectivity of the most connected hub in such a network is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the average connectivity in the network. Often the distribution of connectivities of individual nodes can be approximated by a scale-free power law form [3] in which case the network is referred to as scale-free. Among biological networks distributions of node connectivities in metabolic [4], protein interaction [5], and brain functional [6] networks can be reasonably approximated by a power law extending for several orders of magnitude. The set of connectivities of individual nodes is an example of a low-level (single-node) topological property of a network. While it answers the question about how many neighbors a given node has, it gives no information about the identity of those neighbors. It is clear that most functional properties of networks are defined at a higher topological level in the exact pattern of connections of nodes to each other. However, such multi-node connectivity patterns are rather difficult to quantify and compare between networks. In this work we concentrate on multi-node topological properties of protein networks. These networks (as any other biological networks) lack the top-down design. Instead, selective forces of biological evolution shape them from raw material provided by random events such as mutations within individual genes, and gene duplications. As a result their connections are characterized by a large degree of randomness. One may wonder which connectivity patterns are indeed

  9. COMP and Col9A3 mutations and their relationship to the pseudoachondroplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Won; Balce, Gracia Cielo; Cho, Jae-Woo; Jung, Sung-Chul; Hong, Suk-Joo; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2010-12-01

    While pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is almost exclusively caused by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mutations, many patients identified with the PSACH phenotype do not have this mutation, suggesting gene and locus heterogeneity. In order to further characterize this entity, we studied 32 clinically and radiographically diagnosed PSACH patients, among 19 families. COMP and collagen (Col) IX (A1, A2 and A3) mutations, were determined. Patients who tested negative for pathological gene mutations but who were identified with the PSACH phenotype, were included. The phenotypes were characterized according to height deviation (cm) from normal, lower extremity mechanical axis deviation (MAD), cervical and thoracolumbar spine involvement, pelvic index, as well as hip, knee, ankle and hand involvement. We report an 81% mutation detection rate for PSACH, of which COMP+Col9A3 mutations were more prevalent (61%) than COMP mutations alone (30%). Of our PSACH patients, 19% tested negative for both COMP and Col9A3 mutations, and they presented with the greatest mean height deviations, but the least mean MADs. While all the PSACH mutations consistently produced the severe phenotype, the V426A mutation in Col9A3 produced the most severe. Mother-daughter and father-son phenotypic similarities were noted in the COMP+Col9A3 families. Col9A3 and gender play confounding roles in the phenotypic severity of PSACH. The presence of the PSACH phenotype in patients who tested negative for known mutations further confirms the genetic heterogeneity of this condition.

  10. Chop (Ddit3) Is Essential for D469del-COMP Retention and Cell Death in Chondrocytes in an Inducible Transgenic Mouse Model of Pseudoachondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L.; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C.; Liu, Peiman; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a secreted glycoprotein synthesized by chondrocytes, regulates proliferation and type II collagen assembly. Mutations in the COMP gene cause pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Previously, we have shown that expression of D469del-COMP in transgenic mice causes intracellular retention of D469del-COMP, thereby recapitulating pseudoachondroplasia chondrocyte pathology. This inducible transgenic D469del-COMP mouse is the only in vivo model to replicate the critical cellular and clinical features of pseudoachondroplasia. Here, we report developmental studies of D469del-COMP-induced chondrocyte pathology from the prenatal period to adolescence. D469del-COMP retention was limited prenatally and did not negatively affect the growth plate until 3 weeks after birth. Results of immunostaining, transcriptome analysis, and qRT-PCR suggest a molecular model in which D469del-COMP triggers apoptosis during the first postnatal week. By 3 weeks (when most chondrocytes are retaining D469del-COMP), inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage contribute to chondrocyte cell death by necroptosis. Importantly, by crossing the D469del-COMP mouse onto a Chop null background (Ddit3 null), thereby eliminating Chop, the unfolded protein response was disrupted, thus alleviating both D469del-COMP intracellular retention and premature chondrocyte cell death. Chop therefore plays a significant role in processes that mediate D469del-COMP retention. Taken together, these results suggest that there may be an optimal window before the induction of significant D469del-COMP retention during which endoplasmic reticulum stress could be targeted. PMID:22154935

  11. CompTox Chemistry Dashboard webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use. Within the application, users

  12. Conservation of complex knotting and slipknotting patterns in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Rawdon, Eric J; Millett, Kenneth C; Onuchic, Jose N; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2012-06-26

    While analyzing all available protein structures for the presence of knots and slipknots, we detected a strict conservation of complex knotting patterns within and between several protein families despite their large sequence divergence. Because protein folding pathways leading to knotted native protein structures are slower and less efficient than those leading to unknotted proteins with similar size and sequence, the strict conservation of the knotting patterns indicates an important physiological role of knots and slipknots in these proteins. Although little is known about the functional role of knots, recent studies have demonstrated a protein-stabilizing ability of knots and slipknots. Some of the conserved knotting patterns occur in proteins forming transmembrane channels where the slipknot loop seems to strap together the transmembrane helices forming the channel.

  13. Adsorption of HP Lattice Proteins on Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew; Shi, Guangjie; Landau, David P.; Li, Ying Wai; Wuest, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The HP lattice model[2] is a course-grained, yet useful tool for modeling protein sequences where amino acids are treated as either hydrophobic (H) or polar (P) monomers. With the use of Wang-Landau sampling and an efficient set of Monte-Carlo moves[3], HP lattice proteins adsorbed on patterned surfaces are studied. Each substrate is modeled as a periodically bounded pattern of lattice sites that interact with either H or P monomers in the lattice protein, where the energy contributions of the surface are determined by assigned coupling strengths. By analyzing energy degeneracies, along with the thermodynamic and structural quantities of the protein, both the protein folding and surface adsorption can be observed. The adsorption behavior of the lattice proteins on patterned surfaces will be compared to those interacting with uniform surfaces. Research supported by NSF.

  14. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  15. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  16. Stereomask lithography for multi-protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Arnold; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    The advances of biologically-friendly micropatterning technologies have benefited many areas of biological and medical research, including quantitative biochemical assay, point-of-care devices, biosensing and regenerative medicine. Conventional micropatterning techniques, for example, photolithography and soft lithography, have seen encouraging adaptation to creating biological micropatterns in the last decades. However, they still have not completely addressed the major needs of constructing multi-object biological microarrays with single-cell resolution without requiring cleanroom access. In this chapter, we present a novel versatile biological lithography technique to achieve integrated multi-object patterning with high feature resolution and high adaptability to various biomaterials, referred to as stereomask lithography (SML). A novel three-dimensional stereomask has been developed for successive patterning of multiple objects. The stereomask consists of both patterned through holes, which layout new micropatterns and non-through recesses, which protect pre-existing features on the substrate. Furthermore, high-precision reversible alignment among multiple bio-objects is achieved by adopting a peg-in-hole design between the substrate and stereomasks. As demonstration, we have successfully used the SML technique to construct complex biological microenvironment with various bio-functional components at single-cell resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Abnormal erythrocyte membrane protein pattern in severe megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, S K

    1978-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of patients with megaloblastic anemia was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. In severe megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was grossly abnormal, lacking bands 1, 2 (spectrin), and 3 and having several diffuse, faster migrating bands. After adequate vitamin replacement therapy, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern returned to normal. In mild megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid of vitamin B12 deficiency, and in severe iron deficiency anemia, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was normal. Erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of normal membranes did not change after mixing with abnormal membranes before polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protease activity extracted from membranes of megalocytes was not different from normal. These findings indicate that the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern is abnormal in severe megaloblastic anemia and that this abnormality is not secondary to increased activity of the endogenous erythrocyte membrane proteinase. Images PMID:659579

  18. Amino acid scoring patterns for protein quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Millward, D Joe

    2012-08-01

    The 1985 FAO/WHO/UNU protein report defined reference amino acid patterns for infants based on breast milk and for preschool children, schoolchildren and adults from age specific estimates of dietary indispensible amino acid requirements divided by the safe protein requirement for each age group. This report argued that the protein quality of a diet should be estimated from its digestibility adjusted by its amino acid score calculated from its limiting amino acid in comparison with the reference amino acid pattern. Subsequently a joint FAO/WHO expert consultation on protein quality evaluation (1991) endorsed this protein digestibility-corrected score approach. However it rejected the adult scoring pattern identified in the 1985 report arguing that the amino acid values for this pattern were too low. As an interim measure it suggested that the scoring pattern for preschool children should be used for all age groups apart from infants. The recent WHO/FAO/UNU (2007) report endorsed the 1985 report in recommending the amino acid content of breast milk as the best estimate of infant amino acid requirements. However it was only able to identify reliable requirement values for adults and adopted a factorial approach to derivation of age-related scoring patterns. This utilized the adult pattern for maintenance, and the pattern of human tissue protein for growth. Thus scoring patterns were derived for children aged 0·5, 1-2, 3-10, 11-14, 15-18 years and for adults. The total dietary amino acid requirements calculated for these age groups were divided by the mean protein requirement to give the scoring pattern which should be used to adjust digestible intakes to identify the available protein in specific diets. However because the adult values were determined in subjects at protein intakes much higher than the mean minimum protein requirement, i.e. at 1 g/kg/d rather than 0·66 g/kg/d, the pattern is likely to include higher values than the minimum requirement and should

  19. Mining the characteristic interaction patterns on protein-protein binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Zhihai; Han, Li; Li, Chengke; Wang, Renxiao

    2013-09-23

    Protein-protein interactions are observed in various biological processes. They are important for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and can be potential targets for developing small-molecule regulators of such processes. Previous studies suggest that certain residues on protein-protein binding interfaces are "hot spots". As an extension to this concept, we have developed a residue-based method to identify the characteristic interaction patterns (CIPs) on protein-protein binding interfaces, in which each pattern is a cluster of four contacting residues. Systematic analysis was conducted on a nonredundant set of 1,222 protein-protein binding interfaces selected out of the entire Protein Data Bank. Favored interaction patterns across different protein-protein binding interfaces were retrieved by considering both geometrical and chemical conservations. As demonstrated on two test tests, our method was able to predict hot spot residues on protein-protein binding interfaces with good recall scores and acceptable precision scores. By analyzing the function annotations and the evolutionary tree of the protein-protein complexes in our data set, we also observed that protein-protein interfaces sharing common characteristic interaction patterns are normally associated with identical or similar biological functions.

  20. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%.

  1. Elastohydrodynamics and Kinetics of Protein Patterning in the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L

    2015-12-01

    We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the immunological synapse (IS), which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment shows that passive elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein binding in the synaptic cleft can describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, without evoking any active processes in the cytoskeleton. Despite the apparent complexity of the process, our analysis shows that just two dimensionless parameters characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the protein pattern: a ratio of membrane elasticity to protein stiffness, and the ratio of a hydrodynamic time scale for fluid flow relative to the protein binding rate. A simple phase diagram encompasses the variety of patterns that can arise.

  2. Elastohydrodynamics and Kinetics of Protein Patterning in the Immunological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the immunological synapse (IS), which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment shows that passive elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein binding in the synaptic cleft can describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, without evoking any active processes in the cytoskeleton. Despite the apparent complexity of the process, our analysis shows that just two dimensionless parameters characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the protein pattern: a ratio of membrane elasticity to protein stiffness, and the ratio of a hydrodynamic time scale for fluid flow relative to the protein binding rate. A simple phase diagram encompasses the variety of patterns that can arise. PMID:26699430

  3. Patterns in protein primary sequences: classification, display and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Saurugger, P. N.; Metfessel, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    The protein folding code, which is contained in the amino acid chain of a protein, has so far eluded elucidation. However, patterns of hydrophobic residues have previously been identified which show a specificity towards certain secondary structural elements. We are developing an analysis toolkit to find, visualize, and analyze patterns in primary sequences. Preliminary results show that there exist patterns in primary sequences which are useful for predicting the structural class of amino acid chains, performing especially well for the all-alpha helix and all-beta sheet classes. PMID:1807631

  4. An efficient, versatile and scalable pattern growth approach to mine frequent patterns in unaligned protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Kosters, Walter A; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2007-03-15

    Pattern discovery in protein sequences is often based on multiple sequence alignments (MSA). The procedure can be computationally intensive and often requires manual adjustment, which may be particularly difficult for a set of deviating sequences. In contrast, two algorithms, PRATT2 (http//www.ebi.ac.uk/pratt/) and TEIRESIAS (http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/) are used to directly identify frequent patterns from unaligned biological sequences without an attempt to align them. Here we propose a new algorithm with more efficiency and more functionality than both PRATT2 and TEIRESIAS, and discuss some of its applications to G protein-coupled receptors, a protein family of important drug targets. In this study, we designed and implemented six algorithms to mine three different pattern types from either one or two datasets using a pattern growth approach. We compared our approach to PRATT2 and TEIRESIAS in efficiency, completeness and the diversity of pattern types. Compared to PRATT2, our approach is faster, capable of processing large datasets and able to identify the so-called type III patterns. Our approach is comparable to TEIRESIAS in the discovery of the so-called type I patterns but has additional functionality such as mining the so-called type II and type III patterns and finding discriminating patterns between two datasets. The source code for pattern growth algorithms and their pseudo-code are available at http://www.liacs.nl/home/kosters/pg/.

  5. Predicting protein function by frequent functional association pattern mining in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Rae; Zhang, Aidong

    2010-01-01

    Predicting protein function from protein interaction networks has been challenging because of the complexity of functional relationships among proteins. Most previous function prediction methods depend on the neighborhood of or the connected paths to known proteins. However, their accuracy has been limited due to the functional inconsistency of interacting proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for function prediction by identifying frequent patterns of functional associations in a protein interaction network. A set of functions that a protein performs is assigned into the corresponding node as a label. A functional association pattern is then represented as a labeled subgraph. Our frequent labeled subgraph mining algorithm efficiently searches the functional association patterns that occur frequently in the network. It iteratively increases the size of frequent patterns by one node at a time by selective joining, and simplifies the network by a priori pruning. Using the yeast protein interaction network, our algorithm found more than 1400 frequent functional association patterns. The function prediction is performed by matching the subgraph, including the unknown protein, with the frequent patterns analogous to it. By leave-one-out cross validation, we show that our approach has better performance than previous link-based methods in terms of prediction accuracy. The frequent functional association patterns generated in this study might become the foundations of advanced analysis for functional behaviors of proteins in a system level.

  6. Excimer laser ablation for spatially controlled protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Kingshott, Peter; Johnson, Graham; Harvey, Erol C.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2001-11-01

    Two-dimensional control over the location of proteins on surfaces is desired for a number of applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Many of these applications require patterns of specific proteins that allow subsequent two-dimensionally controlled cell attachment. The ideal technique would allow the deposition of specific protein patterns in areas where cell attachment is required, with complete prevention of unspecific protein adsorption in areas where cells are not supposed to attach. In our study, collagen I was used as an example for an extracellular matrix protein known to support the attachment of bovine corneal epithelial cells. An allylamine plasma polymer was deposited on a silicon wafer substrate, followed by grafting of poly(ethylene oxide). Two-dimensional control over the surface chemistry was achieved using a 248 nm excimer laser. Results obtained by XPS and AFM show that the combination of extremely low-fouling surfaces with excimer laser ablation can be used effectively for the production of spatially controlled protein patterns with a resolution of less than 1 micrometers . Furthermore, it was shown that bovine corneal epithelial cell attachment followed exactly the created protein patterns. The presented method is an effective tool for a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  7. Microtubule patterning in the presence of moving motor proteins.

    PubMed

    White, D; de Vries, G; Martin, J; Dawes, A

    2015-10-07

    Cytoskeletal polymers such as microtubules (MTs) interact with motor proteins to form higher-order structures. In vitro experiments have shown that MT patterns such as asters, bundles, and vortices can form under the influence of a single type of dynamic motor protein. MTs also can form anti-parallel bundles, similar to bundles that form the mitotic spindle during cell division, under the influence of two types of moving motors with opposite directionality. Despite the importance of MT structures, their mechanism of formation is not yet understood. We develop an integro-partial differential equation model to describe the dynamic interactions between MTs and moving motor proteins. Our model takes into account motor protein speed, processivity, density, and directionality, as well as MT treadmilling and reorganization due to interactions with motors. Simulation results show that plus-end directed motor proteins can form vortex patterns at low motor density, while minus-end directed motor proteins form aster patterns at similar densities. Also, motor proteins with opposite directionality are able to organize MTs into anti-parallel bundles. Our model is able to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of MT patterning, providing insights into possible mechanisms of spindle formation.

  8. Biomimetic Replication of Microscopic Metal-Organic Framework Patterns Using Printed Protein Patterns.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kang; Carbonell, Carlos; Styles, Mark J; Ricco, Raffaele; Cui, Jiwei; Richardson, Joseph J; Maspoch, Daniel; Caruso, Frank; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-12-02

    It is demonstrated that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be replicated in a biomimetic fashion from protein patterns. Bendable, fluorescent MOF patterns are formed with micrometer resolution under ambient conditions. Furthermore, this technique is used to grow MOF patterns from fingerprint residue in 30 s with high fidelity. This technique is not only relevant for crime-scene investigation, but also for biomedical applications.

  9. Read-Comp as an Additional Measure of Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghbar, Ali-Asghar

    The effectiveness of the "read-comp" technique in assessing writing ability and the usefulness of a rubric and procedure devised for scoring read-comp samples and essays were evaluated. Subjects were 100 freshman students enrolled in general and remedial English classes in a 6-week summer session at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.…

  10. Patterns of fluorescent protein expression in Scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Kao, Hung-Teh; Janoschka, Stephen; Tsai, Julia; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2008-10-01

    Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.

  11. Geometry sensing by self-organized protein patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Jakob; Loose, Martin; Bonny, Mike; Kruse, Karsten; Mönch, Ingolf; Schwille, Petra

    2012-01-01

    In the living cell, proteins are able to organize space much larger than their dimensions. In return, changes of intracellular space can influence biochemical reactions, allowing cells to sense their size and shape. Despite the possibility to reconstitute protein self-organization with only a few purified components, we still lack knowledge of how geometrical boundaries affect spatiotemporal protein patterns. Following a minimal systems approach, we used purified proteins and photolithographically patterned membranes to study the influence of spatial confinement on the self-organization of the Min system, a spatial regulator of bacterial cytokinesis, in vitro. We found that the emerging protein pattern responds even to the lateral, two-dimensional geometry of the membrane such that, as in the three-dimensional cell, Min protein waves travel along the longest axis of the membrane patch. This shows that for spatial sensing the Min system does not need to be enclosed in a three-dimensional compartment. Using a computational model we quantitatively analyzed our experimental findings and identified persistent binding of MinE to the membrane as requirement for the Min system to sense geometry. Our results give insight into the interplay between geometrical confinement and biochemical patterns emerging from a nonlinear reaction–diffusion system. PMID:22949703

  12. Multistability and dynamic transitions of intracellular Min protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fabai; Halatek, Jacob; Reiter, Matthias; Kingma, Enzo; Frey, Erwin; Dekker, Cees

    2016-06-08

    Cells owe their internal organization to self-organized protein patterns, which originate and adapt to growth and external stimuli via a process that is as complex as it is little understood. Here, we study the emergence, stability, and state transitions of multistable Min protein oscillation patterns in live Escherichia coli bacteria during growth up to defined large dimensions. De novo formation of patterns from homogenous starting conditions is observed and studied both experimentally and in simulations. A new theoretical approach is developed for probing pattern stability under perturbations. Quantitative experiments and simulations show that, once established, Min oscillations tolerate a large degree of intracellular heterogeneity, allowing distinctly different patterns to persist in different cells with the same geometry. Min patterns maintain their axes for hours in experiments, despite imperfections, expansion, and changes in cell shape during continuous cell growth. Transitions between multistable Min patterns are found to be rare events induced by strong intracellular perturbations. The instances of multistability studied here are the combined outcome of boundary growth and strongly nonlinear kinetics, which are characteristic of the reaction-diffusion patterns that pervade biology at many scales. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Turn prediction in proteins using a pattern-matching approach.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F E; Abarbanel, R M; Kuntz, I D; Fletterick, R J

    1986-01-14

    We extend the use of amino acid sequence patterns [Cohen, F.E., Abarbanel, R. M., Kuntz, I. D., & Fletterick, R. J. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 4894-4904] to the identification of turns in globular proteins. The approach uses a conservative strategy, combined with a hierarchical search (strongest patterns first) and length-dependent masking, to achieve high accuracy (95%) on a test set of proteins of known structure. Applying the same procedure to homologous families gives a 90% success rate. Straightforward changes are suggested to improve the predictive power. The computer program, written in Lisp, provides a general pattern-recognition language well suited for a number of investigations of protein and nucleic acid sequences.

  14. Systematic and fully automated identification of protein sequence patterns.

    PubMed

    Hart, R K; Royyuru, A K; Stolovitzky, G; Califano, A

    2000-01-01

    We present an efficient algorithm to systematically and automatically identify patterns in protein sequence families. The procedure is based on the Splash deterministic pattern discovery algorithm and on a framework to assess the statistical significance of patterns. We demonstrate its application to the fully automated discovery of patterns in 974 PROSITE families (the complete subset of PROSITE families which are defined by patterns and contain DR records). Splash generates patterns with better specificity and undiminished sensitivity, or vice versa, in 28% of the families; identical statistics were obtained in 48% of the families, worse statistics in 15%, and mixed behavior in the remaining 9%. In about 75% of the cases, Splash patterns identify sequence sites that overlap more than 50% with the corresponding PROSITE pattern. The procedure is sufficiently rapid to enable its use for daily curation of existing motif and profile databases. Third, our results show that the statistical significance of discovered patterns correlates well with their biological significance. The trypsin subfamily of serine proteases is used to illustrate this method's ability to exhaustively discover all motifs in a family that are statistically and biologically significant. Finally, we discuss applications of sequence patterns to multiple sequence alignment and the training of more sensitive score-based motif models, akin to the procedure used by PSI-BLAST. All results are available at httpl//www.research.ibm.com/spat/.

  15. Towards quantitative prediction of proteasomal digestion patterns of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Zaikin, Alexey

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the problem of proteasomal degradation of proteins. Though proteasomes are important for all aspects of cellular metabolism, some details of the physical mechanism of the process remain unknown. We introduce a stochastic model of the proteasomal degradation of proteins, which accounts for the protein translocation and the topology of the positioning of cleavage centers of a proteasome from first principles. For this model we develop a mathematical description based on a master equation and techniques for reconstruction of the cleavage specificity inherent to proteins and the proteasomal translocation rates, which are a property of the proteasome species, from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns. With these properties determined, one can quantitatively predict digestion patterns for new experimental set-ups. Additionally we design an experimental set-up for a synthetic polypeptide with a periodic sequence of amino acids, which enables especially reliable determination of translocation rates.

  16. Fourier Analysis of Conservation Patterns in Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Jakobsson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Residue conservation is a common observation in alignments of protein families, underscoring positions important in protein structure and function. Though many methods measure the level of conservation of particular residue positions, currently we do not have a way to study spatial oscillations occurring in protein conservation patterns. It is known that hydrophobicity shows spatial oscillations in proteins, which is characterized by computing the hydrophobic moment of the protein domains. Here, we advance the study of moments of conservation of protein families to know whether there might exist spatial asymmetry in the conservation patterns of regular secondary structures. Analogous to the hydrophobic moment, the conservation moment is defined as the modulus of the Fourier transform of the conservation function of an alignment of related protein, where the conservation function is the vector of conservation values at each column of the alignment. The profile of the conservation moment is useful in ascertaining any periodicity of conservation, which might correlate with the period of the secondary structure. To demonstrate the concept, conservation in the family of potassium ion channel proteins was analyzed using moments. It was shown that the pore helix of the potassium channel showed oscillations in the moment of conservation matching the period of the α-helix. This implied that one side of the pore helix was evolutionarily conserved in contrast to its opposite side. In addition, the method of conservation moments correctly identified the disposition of the voltage sensor of voltage-gated potassium channels to form a 310 helix in the membrane.

  17. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  18. Chemicals and heat generate different protein patterns in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1997-01-01

    The effect of exposing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V to DNP-stress and heat shock was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, which were detected either by autoradiography or by silver staining. Both DNP stress and heat shock led to altered patterns of protein synthesis or concentration. About 10% of the proteins which were synthesized newly or at an increased rate and about 25% of those which were found newly or with an increased concentration after DNP treatment were identified after heat shock, too.

  19. Serum level of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein is lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in non-scoliotic controls.

    PubMed

    Gerdhem, P; Topalis, C; Grauers, A; Stubendorff, J; Ohlin, A; Karlsson, K M

    2015-02-01

    The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown, but growth is a risk factor for progression. Growth pattern differs in children with and without scoliosis. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) may be associated with scoliosis and growth. We, therefore, studied COMP in children with and without idiopathic scoliosis. We included 105 children, with mean age 14.4 years (range 10-16), under observation or treatment for idiopathic scoliosis, and 103 children from an age-matched population-based cohort. COMP was measured in serum at the time of inclusion. Growth velocity was estimated from repeated height measurements. T tests, analysis of covariance or linear regression were used for statistical comparisons. COMP was mean (SD) 11 (5) units/liter (U/L) in children with scoliosis and 13 (5) U/L in the control cohort (p = 0.005, adjusted for sex and sampling time of the day). When patients and controls were analyzed together, high COMP was correlated with high growth velocity (β = 0.19, p = 0.003). When patients and controls were analyzed separately, COMP was correlated with growth velocity in children with scoliosis (β = 0.27, p = 0.007), but not in children without scoliosis (β = 0.02, p = 0.83) (all analyses adjusted for age, sex and sampling time). Low COMP was significantly correlated with large curve size in children with scoliosis (β = -0.29, p = 0.003), but not after adjustment for age, sex and sampling time (β = -0.16; p = 0.14). COMP was lower in children with idiopathic scoliosis than in a control cohort. In children with scoliosis, high COMP was modestly correlated with high growth velocity, but not with curve severity.

  20. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  1. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-01-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity. Images PMID:6286971

  2. A Versatile Method of Patterning Proteins and Cells.

    PubMed

    Shrirao, Anil B; Kung, Frank H; Yip, Derek; Firestein, Bonnie L; Cho, Cheul H; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2017-02-26

    Substrate and cell patterning techniques are widely used in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This article describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. This method enables researchers to pattern multiple substrates including fibronectin, collagen, antibodies (Sal-1), poly-D-lysine (PDL), and laminin. Patterning of substrates allows one to indirectly pattern a variety of cells. We have tested C2C12 myoblasts, the PC12 neuronal cell line, embryonic rat cortical neurons, and amphibian retinal neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that this technique can directly pattern fibroblasts in microfluidic channels via brief application of a low vacuum on cell suspensions. The low vacuum does not significantly decrease cell viability as shown by cell viability assays. Modifications are discussed for application of the method to different cell and substrate types. This technique allows researchers to pattern cells and proteins in specific patterns without the need for exotic materials or equipment and can be done in any laboratory with a vacuum.

  3. Improved method for predicting protein fold patterns with ensemble classifiers.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Liu, X; Huang, Y; Jiang, Y; Zou, Q; Lin, C

    2012-01-27

    Protein folding is recognized as a critical problem in the field of biophysics in the 21st century. Predicting protein-folding patterns is challenging due to the complex structure of proteins. In an attempt to solve this problem, we employed ensemble classifiers to improve prediction accuracy. In our experiments, 188-dimensional features were extracted based on the composition and physical-chemical property of proteins and 20-dimensional features were selected using a coupled position-specific scoring matrix. Compared with traditional prediction methods, these methods were superior in terms of prediction accuracy. The 188-dimensional feature-based method achieved 71.2% accuracy in five cross-validations. The accuracy rose to 77% when we used a 20-dimensional feature vector. These methods were used on recent data, with 54.2% accuracy. Source codes and dataset, together with web server and software tools for prediction, are available at: http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/main/~cwc/ProteinPredict.html.

  4. Discovering patterns to extract protein-protein interactions from full texts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minlie; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Hao, Yu; Payan, Donald G; Qu, Kunbin; Li, Ming

    2004-12-12

    Although there are several databases storing protein-protein interactions, most such data still exist only in the scientific literature. They are scattered in scientific literature written in natural languages, defying data mining efforts. Much time and labor have to be spent on extracting protein pathways from literature. Our aim is to develop a robust and powerful methodology to mine protein-protein interactions from biomedical texts. We present a novel and robust approach for extracting protein-protein interactions from literature. Our method uses a dynamic programming algorithm to compute distinguishing patterns by aligning relevant sentences and key verbs that describe protein interactions. A matching algorithm is designed to extract the interactions between proteins. Equipped only with a dictionary of protein names, our system achieves a recall rate of 80.0% and precision rate of 80.5%. The program is available on request from the authors.

  5. Protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos grown in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Gabriella; Pagliato, Lara; Negroni, Manuela; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Nonnis, Simona; Negri, Armando; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies indicate that microgravity affects cell growth and differentiation in many living organisms, and various processes are modified when cells are placed under conditions of weightlessness. However, until now, there is no coherent explanation for these observations, and little information is available concerning the biomolecules involved. Our aim has been to investigate the protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to simulated microgravity during the first 6 days of development. A proteomic approach was applied to compare the protein profiles of Xenopus embryos developed in simulated microgravity and in normal conditions. Attention was focused on embryos that do not present visible malformations in order to investigate if weightlessness has effects at protein level in the absence of macroscopic alterations. The data presented strongly suggest that some of the major components of the cytoskeleton vary in such conditions. Three major findings are described for the first time: (i) the expression of important factors involved in the organization and stabilization of the cytoskeleton, such as Arp (actin-related protein) 3 and stathmin, is heavily affected by microgravity; (ii) the amount of the two major cytoskeletal proteins, actin and tubulin, do not change in such conditions; however, (iii) an increase in the tyrosine nitration of these two proteins can be detected. The data suggest that, in the absence of morphological alterations, simulated microgravity affects the intracellular movement system of cells by altering cytoskeletal proteins heavily involved in the regulation of cytoskeleton remodelling.

  6. Nanoscale protein patterning using self-assembled diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Hahm, Jong-in

    2005-07-19

    Novel methods for immobilizing proteins on surfaces have the potential to impact basic biological research as well as various biochip applications. Here, we demonstrate a unique method to pattern proteins with a nanometer periodicity on silicon oxide substrates using microphase-separated diblock copolymer thin films. We developed a straightforward and effective protein immobilization technique using the microphase-separated domains of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) to localize various model protein molecules such as bovine immunoglobulin G, fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-bovine immunoglobulin G, and protein G. The self-organizing nature of the diblock copolymer was exploited to produce periodically alternating, nanometer-spaced polymeric domains exposing the two chemical compositions of the diblock to surface. We demonstrate that the model proteins selectively self-organize themselves on the microdomain regions of specific polymer components due to their preferential interactions with one of the two polymer segments. This diblock copolymer-based, self-assembly approach represents a step forward for facile, nanometer-spaced protein immobilization with high areal density and could provide a pathway to high-throughput proteomic arrays and biosensors.

  7. Assembly of designed protein scaffolds into monolayers for nanoparticle patterning.

    PubMed

    Mejias, Sara H; Couleaud, Pierre; Casado, Santiago; Granados, Daniel; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Abad, Jose M; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-05-01

    The controlled assembly of building blocks to achieve new nanostructured materials with defined properties at different length scales through rational design is the basis and future of bottom-up nanofabrication. This work describes the assembly of the idealized protein building block, the consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR), into monolayers by oriented immobilization of the blocks. The selectivity of thiol-gold interaction for an oriented immobilization has been verified by comparing a non-thiolated protein building block. The physical properties of the CTPR protein thin biomolecular films including topography, thickness, and viscoelasticity, are characterized. Finally, the ability of these scaffolds to act as templates for inorganic nanostructures has been demonstrated by the formation of well-packed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) monolayer patterned by the CTPR monolayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. COMP-angiopoietin 1 increases proliferation, differentiation, and migration of stem-like cells through Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Lim, Shin-Saeng; Cho, Eui-Sic; Lee, Young-Hoon; Han, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kwon, Jungkee; Hwang, Jae-Won; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COMP-Ang1 induces Tie-2 activation in BMMSCs, but not in primary osteoblasts. • Tie-2 knockdown inhibits COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. • Tie-2 knockdown prevents COMP-Ang1-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK. • COMP-Ang1 induces migration of cells via activation of PI3K/Akt and CXCR4 pathways. • COMP-Ang1 stimulates in vivo migration of PDLSCs into a calvarial defect site of rats. - Abstract: Recombinant COMP-Ang1, a chimera of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and a short coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), is under consideration as a therapeutic agent capable of inducing the homing of cells with increased angiogenesis. However, the potentials of COMP-Ang1 to stimulate migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the associated mechanisms are not completely understood. We examined the potential of COMP-Ang1 on bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and calvarial osteoblasts. COMP-Ang1 augmented Tie-2 induction at protein and mRNA levels and increased proliferation and expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix, and CXCR4 in BMMSCs, but not in osteoblasts. The COMP-Ang1-mediated increases were inhibited by Tie-2 knockdown and by treating inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), SB203580. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt was prevented by siRNA-mediated silencing of Tie-2. COMP-Ang1 also induced in vitro migration of BMMSCs and PDLSCs. The induced migration was suppressed by Tie-2 knockdown and by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonist or LY294002, but not by SB203580. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of PDLSCs into calvarial defect site of rats. Collectively, our results demonstrate that COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration of progenitor cells may involve the Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  9. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum.

    PubMed

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-07-16

    Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth.

  10. Pbx homeodomain proteins pattern both the zebrafish retina and tectum

    PubMed Central

    French, Curtis R; Erickson, Timothy; Callander, Davon; Berry, Karyn M; Koss, Ron; Hagey, Daniel W; Stout, Jennifer; Wuennenberg-Stapleton, Katrin; Ngai, John; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Background Pbx genes encode TALE class homeodomain transcription factors that pattern the developing neural tube, pancreas, and blood. Within the hindbrain, Pbx cooperates with Hox proteins to regulate rhombomere segment identity. Pbx cooperates with Eng to regulate midbrain-hindbrain boundary maintenance, and with MyoD to control fast muscle cell differentiation. Although previous results have demonstrated that Pbx is required for proper eye size, functions in regulating retinal cell identity and patterning have not yet been examined. Results Analysis of retinal ganglion cell axon pathfinding and outgrowth in pbx2/4 null embryos demonstrated a key role for pbx genes in regulating neural cell behavior. To identify Pbx-dependent genes involved in regulating retino-tectal pathfinding, we conducted a microarray screen for Pbx-dependent transcripts in zebrafish, and detected genes that are specifically expressed in the eye and tectum. A subset of Pbx-dependent retinal transcripts delineate specific domains in the dorso-temporal lobe of the developing retina. Furthermore, we determined that some Pbx-dependent transcripts also require Meis1 and Gdf6a function. Since gdf6a expression is also dependent on Pbx, we propose a model in which Pbx proteins regulate expression of the growth factor gdf6a, which in turn regulates patterning of the dorso-temporal lobe of the retina. This, in concert with aberrant tectal patterning in pbx2/4 null embryos, may lead to the observed defects in RGC outgrowth. Conclusion These data define a novel role for Pbx in patterning the vertebrate retina and tectum in a manner required for proper retinal ganglion cell axon outgrowth. PMID:17634100

  11. Mapping out Min protein patterns in fully confined fluidic chambers

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Yaron; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Min protein system provides a major model system for studying reaction-diffusion processes in biology. Here we present the first in vitro study of the Min system in fully confined three-dimensional chambers that are lithography-defined, lipid-bilayer coated and isolated through pressure valves. We identify three typical dynamical behaviors that occur dependent on the geometrical chamber parameters: pole-to-pole oscillations, spiral rotations, and traveling waves. We establish the geometrical selection rules and show that, surprisingly, Min-protein spiral rotations govern the larger part of the geometrical phase diagram. Confinement as well as an elevated temperature reduce the characteristic wavelength of the Min patterns, although even for confined chambers with a bacterial-level viscosity, the patterns retain a ~5 times larger wavelength than in vivo. Our results provide an essential experimental base for modeling of intracellular Min gradients in bacterial cell division as well as, more generally, for understanding pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19271.001 PMID:27885986

  12. Mapping out Min protein patterns in fully confined fluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Yaron; Dekker, Cees

    2016-11-25

    The bacterial Min protein system provides a major model system for studying reaction-diffusion processes in biology. Here we present the first in vitro study of the Min system in fully confined three-dimensional chambers that are lithography-defined, lipid-bilayer coated and isolated through pressure valves. We identify three typical dynamical behaviors that occur dependent on the geometrical chamber parameters: pole-to-pole oscillations, spiral rotations, and traveling waves. We establish the geometrical selection rules and show that, surprisingly, Min-protein spiral rotations govern the larger part of the geometrical phase diagram. Confinement as well as an elevated temperature reduce the characteristic wavelength of the Min patterns, although even for confined chambers with a bacterial-level viscosity, the patterns retain a ~5 times larger wavelength than in vivo. Our results provide an essential experimental base for modeling of intracellular Min gradients in bacterial cell division as well as, more generally, for understanding pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems.

  13. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  14. Pbx Homeodomain Proteins: TALEnted regulators of Limb Patterning and Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Terence D.; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. PMID:21416555

  15. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  16. [The Reading Literacy test for Secondary Education (CompLEC)].

    PubMed

    Llorens Tatay, Ana Cristina; Gil Pelluch, Laura; Vidal-Abarca Gámez, Eduardo; Martínez Giménez, Tomás; Mañá Lloriá, Amelia; Gilabert Pérez, Ramiro

    2011-11-01

    A new test to evaluate reading literacy, the Test of Reading Literacy for Secondary Education (CompLEC) is presented. CompLEC is based on the PISA assessment framework and new definitions of reading literacy. The test, easy to apply and score, assesses the level of reading literacy of children between 11 and 14 years of age in several reading situations (i.e., public, educational, personal and occupational) and with different types of texts (i.e., continuous and non-continuous). The scale has been standardized with a sample of 1,854 students from five different Spanish regions. Empirical results show that CompLEC is a homogeneous, reliable and valid instrument.

  17. COMP-1 promotes competitive advantage of nematode sperm.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jody M; Chavez, Daniela R; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2015-03-19

    Competition among sperm to fertilize oocytes is a ubiquitous feature of sexual reproduction as well as a profoundly important aspect of sexual selection. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms sperm use to gain competitive advantage or how these mechanisms are regulated genetically. In this study, we utilize a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify a gene, comp-1, whose function is specifically required in competitive contexts. We show that comp-1 functions in sperm to modulate their migration through and localization within the reproductive tract, thereby promoting their access to oocytes. Contrary to previously described models, comp-1 mutant sperm show no defects in size or velocity, thereby defining a novel pathway for preferential usage. Our results indicate not only that sperm functional traits can influence the outcome of sperm competition, but also that these traits can be modulated in a context-dependent manner depending on the presence of competing sperm.

  18. Morphology and protein patterns of honey bee drone accessory glands.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Landim, Carminda da; Dallacqua, Rodrigo Pires

    2005-09-30

    We used light and transmission electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the accessory glands of immature and mature adult males of Apis mellifera L. We also made an electrophoretic analysis of the protein content of the mature gland. The glands of the immature male actively secrete a mucous substance that can be seen in the lumen of the gland of the mature male. This secretion stains with mercury bromophenol blue and with periodic acid-Schiff reaction, which stain glyconjugates. The protein content was higher in the lumen secretion than in the gland wall extracts. The electrophoresis patterns of the wall extracts were different from those of the secretion found in the gland lumen.

  19. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  20. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) interacting proteins exhibit different expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, C M; Spatuzza, M; Di Marco, B; Gloria, A; Barrancotto, G; Cupo, A; Musumeci, S A; D'Antoni, S; Bardoni, B; Catania, M V

    2015-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the lack of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in mRNA transport and translation. FMRP is a component of mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and it can interact with a range of proteins either directly or indirectly, as demonstrated by two-hybrid selection and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. Most of FMRP-interacting proteins are RNA-binding proteins such as FXR1P, FXR2P and 82-FIP. Interestingly, FMRP can also interact directly with the cytoplasmic proteins CYFIP1 and CYFIP2, which do not bind RNA and link FMRP to the RhoGTPase pathway. The interaction with these different proteins may modulate the functions of FMRP by influencing its affinity to RNA and by affecting the FMRP ability of cytoskeleton remodeling through Rho/Rac GTPases. To better define the relationship of FMRP with its interacting proteins during brain development, we have analyzed the expression pattern of FMRP and its interacting proteins in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum at different ages in wild type (WT) mice. FMRP and FXR2P were strongly expressed during the first week and gradually decreased thereafter, more rapidly in the cerebellum than in the cortex. FXR1P was also expressed early and showed a reduction at later stages of development with a similar developmental pattern in these two regions. CYFIP1 was expressed at all ages and peaked in the third post-natal week. In contrast, CYFIP2 and 82-FIP (only in forebrain regions) were moderately expressed at P3 and gradually increased after P7. In general, the expression pattern of each protein was similar in the regions examined, except for 82-FIP, which exhibited a strong expression at P3 and low levels at later developmental stages in the cerebellum. Our data indicate that FMRP and its interacting proteins have distinct developmental patterns of expression and suggest that FMRP may be preferentially associated to certain proteins in

  1. Concentration Dependent Ion-Protein Interaction Patterns Underlying Protein Oligomerization Behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batoulis, Helena; Schmidt, Thomas H.; Weber, Pascal; Schloetel, Jan-Gero; Kandt, Christian; Lang, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Salts and proteins comprise two of the basic molecular components of biological materials. Kosmotropic/chaotropic co-solvation and matching ion water affinities explain basic ionic effects on protein aggregation observed in simple solutions. However, it is unclear how these theories apply to proteins in complex biological environments and what the underlying ionic binding patterns are. Using the positive ion Ca2+ and the negatively charged membrane protein SNAP25, we studied ion effects on protein oligomerization in solution, in native membranes and in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that concentration-dependent ion-induced protein oligomerization is a fundamental chemico-physical principle applying not only to soluble but also to membrane-anchored proteins in their native environment. Oligomerization is driven by the interaction of Ca2+ ions with the carboxylate groups of aspartate and glutamate. From low up to middle concentrations, salt bridges between Ca2+ ions and two or more protein residues lead to increasingly larger oligomers, while at high concentrations oligomers disperse due to overcharging effects. The insights provide a conceptual framework at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology to explain binding of ions to charged protein surfaces on an atomistic scale, as occurring during protein solubilisation, aggregation and oligomerization both in simple solutions and membrane systems.

  2. Robust regulation of oscillatory Min-protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Robust spatial patterning was crucial just from the beginning of cellular evolution, and is key to the development of multicellular organisms. In E. Coli, the oscillatory pole-to-pole dynamics of MinCDE proteins functionality prevent improper cell divisions apart from midcell. Min-oscillations are characterized by the remarkable robustness with which spatial patterns dynamically adapt to variations of cell geometry. Moreover, adaption, and therefore proper cell division, is independent of temperature. These observations raise fundamental questions about the underlying core mechanisms, and about the role of spatial cues. With a conceptually novel and universal approach to cellular geometries, we introduce a robust model based on experimental data, consistently explaining the mechanisms underlying pole-to-pole, striped and circular patterns, as well as the observed temperature-dependence. Contrary to prior conjectures, the model predicts that MinD and cardiolipin domains are not colocalized. The key mechanisms are transient sequestration of MinE, and highly canalized transfer of MinD between polar zones. MinD channeling enhances midcell localization and facilitates stripe formation, revealing the potential optimization process from which robust Min-oscillations originally arose.

  3. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  4. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    the E1^E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4.

  5. Computation of a diverging Comp-B detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The expansion which occurs in diverging detonations weakens the wave and yields pressures and densities below those occurring in planar geometry. We study the problem of a spherically expanding detonation of Comp-B. The effect of varying the order of reaction as well as the rate law parameters (using an Arrhenius burn model) is studied. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. An Evaluation of the Comp-Lab Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epes, Mary; And Others

    This final report summarizes an extensive evaluation of the COMP-LAB project, a course which integrates carefully defined classroom instruction with an autotutorial writing laboratory for teaching basic writing and rhetoric, particularly to students impaired by foreign language or nonstandard speech. Information on the project background and the…

  7. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions. PMID:28266541

  8. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-03-07

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions.

  9. Hierarchical protein patterning by meso to molecular scale self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Andreas S.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-10-01

    Numerous protein patterning methodologies are used extensively for biomedical research and development. We have developed a novel bottom-up protein patterning method using a combination of self-assembly processes in the meso to molecular scale range to allow hierarchical protein patterns to be straightforwardly fabricated with low cost over large areas. As a proof of principle, we patterned vitronectin in various dimensional hierarchies using meso to nanoscale colloids and self-assembled monolayers.

  10. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  11. Pbx homeodomain proteins: TALEnted regulators of limb patterning and outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Terence D; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-05-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Patterns of soybean proline-rich protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R E; Nagao, R T; Key, J L

    1992-01-01

    The expression patterns of three members of a gene family that encodes proline-rich proteins in soybean (SbPRPs) were examined using in situ hybridization experiments. In most instances, the expression of SbPRP genes was intense in a limited number of cell types of a particular organ. SbPRP1 RNA was localized in several cell types of soybean hypocotyls, including cells within the phloem and xylem. SbPRP1 expression increased within epidermal cells in the elongating and mature regions of the hypocotyl; expression was detected also in lignified cells surrounding the hilum of mature seeds. SbPRP2 RNA was present in cortical cells and in the vascular tissue of the hypocotyl, especially cells of the phloem. This gene was expressed also in the inner integuments of the mature seed coat. SbPRP3 RNA was localized specifically to the endodermoid layer of cells surrounding the stele in the elongating region of the hypocotyl, as well as in the epidermal cells of leaves and cotyledons. These data show that members of this gene family exhibit cell-specific expression. The members of the SbPRP gene family are expressed in different types of cells and in some cell types that also express the glycine-rich protein or hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein classes of genes. PMID:1525563

  13. Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Wadu-Mesthrige, K; Amro, N A; Garno, J C; Xu, S; Liu , G

    2001-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced to produce nanometer-sized protein patterns. The approach includes two main steps, nanopatterning of self-assembled monolayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanolithography and subsequent selective immobilization of proteins on the patterned monolayers. The resulting templates and protein patterns are characterized in situ using AFM. Compared with conventional protein fabrication methods, this approach is able to produce smaller patterns with higher spatial precision. In addition, fabrication and characterization are completed in near physiological conditions. The adsorption configuration and bioreactivity of the proteins within the nanopatterns are also studied in situ. PMID:11259301

  14. Protein patterning on silicon-based surface using background hydrophobic thin film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2003-04-01

    A new and convenient protein patterning method on silicon-based surface was developed for protein array by spin coating of hydrophobic thin film (CYTOP). Photolithographic lift-off process was used to display two-dimensional patterns of spatially hydrophilic region. The background hydrophobic thin film was used to suppress nonspecific protein binding, and the hydrophilic target protein binding region was chemically modified to introduce aldehyde group after removal of the photoresist layer. The difference in surface energy between the hydrophilic pattern and background hydrophobic film would induce easier covalent binding of proteins onto defined hydrophilic areas having physical and chemical constraints. Below 1 microg/ml of total protein concentration, the CYTOP hydrophobic film effectively suppressed nonspecific binding of the protein. During the process of protein patterning, inherent property of the hydrophobic thin film was not changed judging from static and dynamic contact angle survey. Quantitative analysis of the protein binding was demonstrated by streptavidin-biotin system.

  15. Infrared light induced patterning of proteins on ppNIPAM thermoresponsive thin films: a "protein laser printer".

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Yegan Erdem, E; Takeuchi, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ratner, Buddy D; Böhringer, Karl F

    2010-04-21

    Protein micropatterns have applications in fundamental life sciences and clinical medicine. In this work, we present a new technique to create 2-D protein micropatterns by local activation of a thin film of thermoresponsive plasma-deposited poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (ppNIPAM) using a computer-controlled infrared laser beam. While the whole substrate is exposed to the protein solution, protein deposition happens only at laser-activated locations. A few seconds of laser exposure is all that is required to form a pattern with resolution in the single micrometre range. Successful ligand binding after protein deposition indicates that protein function remains intact after laser-induced adsorption onto ppNIPAM. This rapid, simple technique advances currently available strategies for protein patterning by its potential to pattern proteins in an enclosed environment or onto a 3-D scaffold.

  16. Matrix Gla Protein expression pattern in the early avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Correia, Elizabeth; Conceição, Natércia; Cancela, M Leonor; Belo, José A

    2016-01-01

    MGP (Matrix Gla Protein) is an extracellular matrix vitamin K dependent protein previously identified as a physiological inhibitor of calcification and shown to be well conserved among vertebrates during evolution. MGP is involved in other mechanisms such as TGF-β and BMP activity, and a proposed modulator of cell-matrix interactions. MGP is expressed early in vertebrate development although its role has not been clarified. Previous work in the chicken embryo found MGP localization predominantly in the aorta and aortic valve base, but no data is available earlier in development. Here we examined MGP expression pattern using whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sectioning during the initial stages of chick development. MGP was first detected at HH10 in the head and in the forming dorsal aorta. At the moment of the onset of blood circulation, MGP was expressed additionally in the venous plexus which will remodel into the vitelline arteries. By E2.25, it is clear that the vitelline arteries are MGP positive. MGP expression progresses centrifugally throughout the area vasculosa of the yolk sac. Between stages HH17 and HH19 MGP is seen in the dorsal aorta, heart, notochord, nephric duct, roof plate, vitelline arteries and in the yolk sac, beneath main arterial branches and in the vicinity of several vessels and venules. MGP expression persists in these areas at least until E4.5. These data suggest that MGP expression could be associated with cell migration and differentiation and to the onset of angiogenesis in the developing chick embryo. This data has biomedical relevance by pointing to the potential use of chick embryo explants to study molecules involved in artery calcification.

  17. Hierarchical polymer brush nanoarrays: a versatile way to prepare multiscale patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Junhu; Liu, Wendong; Li, Daowei; Fang, Liping; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a versatile way to prepare multiscale and gradient patterns of proteins. The protein patterns are fabricated by conjugating proteins covalently on patterns of polymer brush that are prepared by techniques combining colloidal lithography with photolithography, and two-step colloidal lithography. Taking advantages of this technique, the parameters of protein patterns, such as height, diameters, periods, and distances between two dots, can be arbitrarily tuned. In addition, the protein patterns with varies of architectures, such as microdiscs, microstripes, microrings, microtriangles, microgrids, etc., consisting of protein nanodots, are prepared and the sample size is up to 4 cm(2). The as-prepared patterns of fibronectin can promote the cell adhesion and cell location.

  18. COMP-1 promotes competitive advantage of nematode sperm

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jody M; Chavez, Daniela R; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Competition among sperm to fertilize oocytes is a ubiquitous feature of sexual reproduction as well as a profoundly important aspect of sexual selection. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms sperm use to gain competitive advantage or how these mechanisms are regulated genetically. In this study, we utilize a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify a gene, comp-1, whose function is specifically required in competitive contexts. We show that comp-1 functions in sperm to modulate their migration through and localization within the reproductive tract, thereby promoting their access to oocytes. Contrary to previously described models, comp-1 mutant sperm show no defects in size or velocity, thereby defining a novel pathway for preferential usage. Our results indicate not only that sperm functional traits can influence the outcome of sperm competition, but also that these traits can be modulated in a context-dependent manner depending on the presence of competing sperm. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05423.001 PMID:25789512

  19. Polyion complex libraries possessing naturally occurring differentiation for pattern-based protein discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Shunsuke; Yoshimoto, Keitaro

    2013-11-14

    Polyion complexes with naturally occurring differentiation of enzymes serve to create receptor libraries with high differentiability and lower synthetic demands for pattern-based protein discrimination.

  20. Variants within the COMP and THBS2 genes are not associated with Achilles tendinopathy in a case-control study of South African and Australian populations.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Colleen J; Van Der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix, while thrombospondin-2 is a matricellular protein involved in cell-matrix interactions. Recent studies have shown that genetic variation is a significant risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy, and the genes encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and thrombospondin-2 (THBS2) were identified as good candidate genes for association with Achilles tendinopathy. This study aimed to test the association of sequence variants within these candidate genes with the risk of Achilles tendinopathy in participants from South Africa (SA) and Australia (AUS). Three-hundred and forty (133 SA; 207 AUS) control participants with no history of Achilles tendinopathy and 178 (94 SA; 84 AUS) participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms within the COMP and THBS2 genes in this case-control study. There was no difference in genotype distributions between control and tendinopathy groups for either the THBS2 variants rs9505888, rs6422747 and rs9283850, or the COMP variants rs730079 and rs28494505 in the SA and AUS populations. As the selection of COMP and THBS2 as candidate genes was hypothesis driven, based on biological function, the possibility that other variants within these genes are associated with Achilles tendinopathy cannot be excluded.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of mesoscale protein patterns using atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pei

    2011-07-01

    A versatile AFM local oxidation lithography was developed for fabricating clean protein patterns ranging from nanometer to sub-millimeter scale on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) layer of Si (100) wafer. This protein patterning method can generate bio-active protein pattern with a clean background without the need of the anti-fouling the surface or repetitive rinsing. As a model system, lysozyme protein patterns were investigated through their binding reactions with antibodies and aptamers by AFM. Polyclonal anti-lysozyme antibodies and anti-lysozyme aptamer are found to preferentially bind to the lysozyme molecules on the edge of a protein pattern before their binding to the interior ones. It was also demonstrated that the topography of the immobilized protein pattern affects the antibody binding direction. We found that the anti-lysozyme antibodies binding to the edge lysozyme molecules on the half-buried pattern started from the top but the binding on the extruded pattern started from the side because of their different spatial accessibility. In addition, after incubating lysozyme pattern with anti-lysozyme aptamer in buffer solution for enough long time, some fractal-shaped aptamer fibers with 1-6nm high and up to tens of micrometers long were formed by the self-assembling of aptamer molecules on the surface. The aptamer fibers anchor specifically on the edge of protein patterns, which originates from the biospecific recognition between the aptamer and its target protein. Once these edge-bound fibers have formed, they can serve as scaffolds for further assembly processes. We used these aptamer fibers as templates to fabricate palladium and streptavidin nanowires, which anchored on the pattern edges and never cross over or collapse over each other. The aptamer fiber scaffold potentially can lead to an effective means to fabricate and interface nanowires to existing surface patterns. KEYWORDS: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Protein Patterns, Lysozyme, Aptamer

  2. Protein kinase C modulates ventilatory patterning in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Bandla, H P; Simakajornboon, N; Graff, G R; Gozal, D

    1999-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) mediates important components of signal transduction pathways underlying neuronal excitability and modulates respiratory timing mechanisms in adult rats. To determine ventilatory effects of systemic PKC inhibition during development, whole-body plethysmographic recordings were conducted in 2-3-d (n = 11), 5-6-d (n = 19), 10-12-d (n = 14), and 20-21-d-old (n = 14) rat pups after treatment with vehicle and Ro 32-0432 (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Ro 32-0432 decreased minute ventilation (V E) by 51.0 +/- 5.5% (mean +/- SEM) in youngest pups (p < 0.01) but only 19.1 +/- 6.8% in 20-21-d-old pups (p < 0.01). V E decreases were always due to frequency reductions with tidal volume (VT) remaining unaffected. Respiratory rate decreases primarily resulted from marked expiratory time (TE) prolongations being more pronounced in 2-3-d-old (115.5 +/- 28.9%) compared with 20-21-d old (36.6 +/- 10.9%; p < 0.002 analysis of variance [ANOVA] ). Expression of the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, gamma, delta, iota, and mu was further examined in brainstem and cortex by immunoblotting and revealed different patterns with postnatal age and location. We conclude that endogenous PKC inhibition elicits age-dependent ventilatory reductions which primarily affect timing mechanisms rather than changes in volume drive. This effect on ventilation abates with increasing postnatal age suggesting that the neural substrate mediating overall respiratory output may be more critically dependent on PKC activity in the immature animal.

  3. Aggrecan- and COMP-loaded poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles stimulate chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Ji Sun; Yang, Han Na; Woo, Dae Gyun; Park, Keun-Hong

    2014-02-01

    During embryogenesis, specific proteins expressed in cells have key roles in the formation of differentiated cells and tissues. Delivery of specific proteins into specific cells, both in vitro and in vivo, has proved to be exceedingly difficult. In this study, we developed a safe and efficient protein delivery system using encapsulation of proteins into biodegradable poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs). The PLGA NPs were used to deliver proteins into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Fluorescent markers loaded into the PLGA NPs were used to verify the internalization of NPs into hMSCs using FACS analysis and confocal microscopy. With these methods, we demonstrated that the encapsulated model proteins are readily delivered into hMSCs, released from the NP vehicles, and, finally, moved into the cytosols. Using chondrogenesis-related proteins such as aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs treated with aggrecan and COMP encapsulated PLGA NPs was clearly observed and caused to differentiate into chondrocytes.

  4. Trehalose Glycopolymer Resists Allow Direct Writing of Protein Patterns by Electron-Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively cross-link to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometer and nanometer scale without requiring cleanroom conditions. PMID:25791943

  5. Trehalose glycopolymer resists allow direct writing of protein patterns by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Bat, Erhan; Lee, Juneyoung; Lau, Uland Y; Maynard, Heather D

    2015-03-20

    Direct-write patterning of multiple proteins on surfaces is of tremendous interest for a myriad of applications. Precise arrangement of different proteins at increasingly smaller dimensions is a fundamental challenge to apply the materials in tissue engineering, diagnostics, proteomics and biosensors. Herein, we present a new resist that protects proteins during electron-beam exposure and its application in direct-write patterning of multiple proteins. Polymers with pendant trehalose units are shown to effectively crosslink to surfaces as negative resists, while at the same time providing stabilization to proteins during the vacuum and electron-beam irradiation steps. In this manner, arbitrary patterns of several different classes of proteins such as enzymes, growth factors and immunoglobulins are realized. Utilizing the high-precision alignment capability of electron-beam lithography, surfaces with complex patterns of multiple proteins are successfully generated at the micrometre and nanometre scale without requiring cleanroom conditions.

  6. Easy fabrication of thin membranes with through holes. Application to protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas; Engl, Wilfried; Weng, Zhe L; Arasi, Bakya; Gauthier, Nils; Viasnoff, Virgile

    2012-01-01

    Since protein patterning on 2D surfaces has emerged as an important tool in cell biology, the development of easy patterning methods has gained importance in biology labs. In this paper we present a simple, rapid and reliable technique to fabricate thin layers of UV curable polymer with through holes. These membranes are as easy to fabricate as microcontact printing stamps and can be readily used for stencil patterning. We show how this microfabrication scheme allows highly reproducible and highly homogeneous protein patterning with micron sized resolution on surfaces as large as 10 cm(2). Using these stencils, fragile proteins were patterned without loss of function in a fully hydrated state. We further demonstrate how intricate patterns of multiple proteins can be achieved by stacking the stencil membranes. We termed this approach microserigraphy.

  7. Designed angiopoietin-1 variant, COMP-angiopoietin-1, rescues erectile function through healthy cavernous angiogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Kim, Woo Jean; Koh, Young Jun; Piao, Shuguang; Jin, Hai-Rong; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Min Ji; Shin, Hwa-Yean; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Jung, Keehoon; Koh, Gou Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, curative treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) remains unavailable. Recently, the link between ED and cardiovascular disease was unveiled and the main etiology of ED was found to be vasculogenic. Therefore, neovascularization is a promising strategy for curing ED. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is an angiogenic growth factor that promotes the generation of stable and functional vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that local delivery of the soluble, stable, and potent Ang1 variant, COMP-Ang1 gene or protein, into the penises of hypercholesterolemic mice increases cavernous angiogenesis, eNOS phosphorylation, and cGMP expression, resulting in full recovery of erectile function and cavernous blood flow up to 8 weeks after treatment. COMP-Ang1-induced promotion of cavernous angiogenesis and erectile function was abolished in Nos3-/- mice and in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. COMP-Ang1 also restored the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junction by down-regulating the expression of histone deacetylase 2 in the penis of hypercholesterolemic mice and in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells. These findings constitute a new paradigm toward curative treatment of both cavernous angiopathy and ED. PMID:25783805

  8. BindML/BindML+: Detecting Protein-Protein Interaction Interface Propensity from Amino Acid Substitution Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; La, David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites in a protein structure provides important information for elucidating the mechanism of protein function and can also be useful in guiding a modeling or design procedures of protein complex structures. Since prediction methods essentially assess the propensity of amino acids that are likely to be part of a protein docking interface, they can help in designing protein-protein interactions. Here, we introduce BindML and BindML+ protein-protein interaction sites prediction methods. BindML predicts protein-protein interaction sites by identifying mutation patterns found in known protein-protein complexes using phylogenetic substitution models. BindML+ is an extension of BindML for distinguishing permanent and transient types of protein-protein interaction sites. We developed an interactive web-server that provides a convenient interface to assist in structural visualization of protein-protein interactions site predictions. The input data for the web-server are a tertiary structure of interest. BindML and BindML+ are available at http://kiharalab.org/bindml/ and http://kiharalab.org/bindml/plus/ .

  9. Shift of Macrophage Phenotype Due to Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Deficiency Drives Atherosclerotic Calcification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Liang, Ying; Wang, Meili; Huang, Yaqian; Ma, Wei; Li, Tuoyi; Jia, Yiting; Yu, Fang; Zhu, Wanlin; Cui, Qinghua; Li, Yanhui; Xu, Qingbo; Wang, Xian; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-08

    Intimal calcification is highly correlated with atherosclerotic plaque burden, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We recently reported that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a component of vascular extracellular matrix, is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification. To investigate whether COMP affects atherosclerotic calcification. ApoE(-/-)COMP(-/-) mice fed with chow diet for 12 months manifested more extensive atherosclerotic calcification in the innominate arteries than did ApoE(-/-) mice. To investigate which origins of COMP contributed to atherosclerotic calcification, bone marrow transplantation was performed between ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-)COMP(-/-) mice. Enhanced calcification was observed in mice transplanted with ApoE(-/-)COMP(-/-) bone marrow compared with mice transplanted with ApoE(-/-) bone marrow, indicating that bone marrow-derived COMP may play a critical role in atherosclerotic calcification. Furthermore, microarray profiling of wild-type and COMP(-/-) macrophages revealed that COMP-deficient macrophages exerted atherogenic and osteogenic characters. Integrin β3 protein was attenuated in COMP(-/-) macrophages, and overexpression of integrin β3 inhibited the shift of macrophage phenotypes by COMP deficiency. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus 2-integrin β3 infection attenuated atherosclerotic calcification in ApoE(-/-)COMP(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, COMP bound directly to β-tail domain of integrin β3 via its C-terminus, and blocking of the COMP-integrin β3 association by β-tail domain mimicked the COMP deficiency-induced shift in macrophage phenotypes. Similar to COMP deficiency in mice, transduction of adeno-associated virus 2-β-tail domain enhanced atherosclerotic calcification in ApoE(-/-) mice. These results reveal that COMP deficiency acted via integrin β3 to drive macrophages toward the atherogenic and osteogenic phenotype and thereby aggravate atherosclerotic calcification.

  10. THE USE OF EVOLUTIONARY PATTERNS IN PROTEIN ANNOTATION

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Angela; Bachman, Ben; Erdin, Serkan; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Summary With genomic data skyrocketing, their biological interpretation remains a serious challenge. Diverse computational methods address this problem by pointing to the existence of recurrent patterns among sequence, structure, and function. These patterns emerge naturally from evolutionary variation, natural selection, and divergence—the defining features of biological systems—and they identify molecular events and shapes that underlie specificity of function and allosteric communication. Here we review these methods, and the patterns they identify in case studies and in proteome-wide applications, to infer and rationally redesign function. PMID:22633559

  11. Protein expression pattern of human MIER1 alpha, a novel estrogen receptor binding protein

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Patti L.; Paterno, Gary D.; Gillespie, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    MIER1 is a transcriptional regulator that exists as several isoforms. Of particular interest is the MIER1α isoform, which contains in its unique C-terminus an LXXLL motif for interaction with nuclear hormone receptors. Indeed, MIER1α has been shown to interact with ERα and inhibit estrogen-stimulated growth of breast carcinoma cells. Moreover, the subcellular localization of MIER1α changes dramatically, from nuclear to cytoplasmic, during progression to invasive breast carcinoma. While human MIER1 RNA and protein expression pattern data have been posted on several websites, none of these studies use probes or antibodies that distinguish between the α and β isoforms. We report here the first immunohistochemical study of the MIER1α protein expression pattern in human tissues. Our analysis revealed intense staining of specific cell types within virtually every endocrine and reproductive tissue except for the thyroid gland. In particular, we detected intense staining of ovarian follicles and germinal epithelium, ductal epithelial cells of the breast, pancreatic islet cells, all areas of the anterior pituitary and all zones of the adrenal cortex; moderate staining of germ cells and Leydig cells within the testis, patches of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla and weak staining of the fibromuscular stroma within the prostate. Immunoreactivity was limited to the cytoplasm in all positive cells except for oocytes and germinal epithelial cells in which the nucleus was also stained and in ductal epithelial cells of the breast in which staining was exclusively nuclear. In general, non-endocrine tissues were negative, however a few exceptions were noted. These included hepatocytes, myocardial fibers and neurons in all regions of the brain examined, with the exception of the thalamus. Neuronal staining was restricted to the cell bodies and dendrites, as most axons were negative. These data suggest that human MIER1α functions specifically in endocrine tissues and in

  12. The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - an online resource ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data driven approaches that integrate chemistry, exposure and biological data. As an outcome of these efforts the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) has measured, assembled and delivered an enormous quantity and diversity of data for the environmental sciences including high-throughput in vitro screening data, in vivo and functional use data, exposure models and chemical databases with associated properties. A series of software applications and databases have been produced over the past decade to deliver these data. Recent work has focused on the development of a new architecture that assembles the resources into a single platform. With a focus on delivering access to Open Data streams, web service integration accessibility and a user-friendly web application the CompTox Dashboard provides access to data associated with ~720,000 chemical substances. These data include research data in the form of bioassay screening data associated with the ToxCast program, experimental and predicted physicochemical properties, product and functional use information and related data of value to environmental scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the CompTox Dashboard and its va

  13. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  14. Complex chromatin condensation patterns and nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis: examples from mollusks.

    PubMed

    Chiva, M; Saperas, N; Ribes, E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we review and analyze the chromatin condensation pattern during spermiogenesis in several species of mollusks. Previously, we had described the nuclear protein transitions during spermiogenesis in these species. The results of our study show two types of condensation pattern: simple patterns and complex patterns, with the following general characteristics: (a) When histones (always present in the early spermatid nucleus) are directly replaced by SNBP (sperm nuclear basic proteins) of the protamine type, the spermiogenic chromatin condensation pattern is simple. However, if the replacement is not direct but through intermediate proteins, the condensation pattern is complex. (b) The intermediate proteins found in mollusks are precursor molecules that are processed during spermiogenesis to the final protamine molecules. Some of these final protamines represent proteins with the highest basic amino acid content known to date, which results in the establishment of a very strong electrostatic interaction with DNA. (c) In some instances, the presence of complex patterns of chromatin condensation clearly correlates with the acquisition of specialized forms of the mature sperm nuclei. In contrast, simple condensation patterns always lead to rounded, oval or slightly cylindrical nuclei. (d) All known cases of complex spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns are restricted to species with specialized sperm cells (introsperm). At the time of writing, we do not know of any report on complex condensation pattern in species with external fertilization and, therefore, with sperm cells of the primitive type (ect-aquasperm). (e) Some of the mollusk an spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterns of the complex type are very similar (almost identical) to those present in other groups of animals. Interestingly, the intermediate proteins involved in these cases can be very different.In this study, we discuss the biological significance of all these features and

  15. PatternQuery: web application for fast detection of biomacromolecular structural patterns in the entire Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Sehnal, David; Pravda, Lukáš; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-07-01

    Well defined biomacromolecular patterns such as binding sites, catalytic sites, specific protein or nucleic acid sequences, etc. precisely modulate many important biological phenomena. We introduce PatternQuery, a web-based application designed for detection and fast extraction of such patterns. The application uses a unique query language with Python-like syntax to define the patterns that will be extracted from datasets provided by the user, or from the entire Protein Data Bank (PDB). Moreover, the database-wide search can be restricted using a variety of criteria, such as PDB ID, resolution, and organism of origin, to provide only relevant data. The extraction generally takes a few seconds for several hundreds of entries, up to approximately one hour for the whole PDB. The detected patterns are made available for download to enable further processing, as well as presented in a clear tabular and graphical form directly in the browser. The unique design of the language and the provided service could pave the way towards novel PDB-wide analyses, which were either difficult or unfeasible in the past. The application is available free of charge at http://ncbr.muni.cz/PatternQuery. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Modulation of cell adhesion complexes by surface protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Haviland, David B

    2009-03-01

    Cell adhesion is an important process in several biological phenomena. To investigate the formation and organization of focal adhesions, we developed a patterning approach based on electron beam lithography. Nanodots (radius <1230 nm) and nanorings (inner radius <320 nm) of fibronectin (FN) were patterned on a K-Casein background. Intracellular vinculin immunofluorescence mirrored the FN nanopatterns. Atomic force microscopy showed that FN nanodots and nanorings organize the immediate cytoskeleton into straight fibrils and diverging fibril bundles, respectively. Our results suggest that a minimum of approximately 40 FN molecules is required for a cell to form a focal adhesion.

  17. Regular Nanoscale Protein Patterns via Directed Adsorption through Self-Assembled DNA Origami Masks.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Stewart, A Francis; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2016-11-16

    DNA origami has become a widely used method for synthesizing well-defined nanostructures with promising applications in various areas of nanotechnology, biophysics, and medicine. Recently, the possibility to transfer the shape of single DNA origami nanostructures into different materials via molecular lithography approaches has received growing interest due to the great structural control provided by the DNA origami technique. Here, we use ordered monolayers of DNA origami nanostructures with internal cavities on mica surfaces as molecular lithography masks for the fabrication of regular protein patterns over large surface areas. Exposure of the masked sample surface to negatively charged proteins results in the directed adsorption of the proteins onto the exposed surface areas in the holes of the mask. By controlling the buffer and adsorption conditions, the protein coverage of the exposed areas can be varied from single proteins to densely packed monolayers. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, regular nanopatterns of four different proteins are fabricated: the single-strand annealing proteins Redβ and Sak, the iron-storage protein ferritin, and the blood protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). We furthermore demonstrate the desorption of the DNA origami mask after directed protein adsorption, which may enable the fabrication of hierarchical patterns composed of different protein species. Because selectivity in adsorption is achieved by electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the exposed surface areas, this approach may enable also the large-scale patterning of other charged molecular species or even nanoparticles.

  18. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  19. Image reversal for direct electron beam patterning of protein coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Erlandsson, Anna; Ulfendahl, Mats; Haviland, David B

    2007-11-01

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) is used to create surfaces with protein patterns, which are characterized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopies. Both negative and positive image processes are realized by electron beam irradiation of proteins absorbed on a silicon surface, where image reversal is achieved by selectively binding a second species of protein to the electron beam exposed areas on the first protein layer. Biofunctionality at the cellular level was established by culturing cortical cells on patterned lines of fibronectin adsorbed on a bovine serum albumin background for 7 days in culture.

  20. Patterns and plasticity in RNA-protein interactions enable recruitment of multiple proteins through a single site

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, Cary T.; Porter, Douglas F.; Qiu, Chen; Campbell, Zachary T.; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-06-28

    mRNA control hinges on the specificity and affinity of proteins for their RNA binding sites. Regulatory proteins must bind their own sites and reject even closely related noncognate sites. In the PUF [Pumilio and fem-3 binding factor (FBF)] family of RNA binding proteins, individual proteins discriminate differences in the length and sequence of binding sites, allowing each PUF to bind a distinct battery of mRNAs. Here, we show that despite these differences, the pattern of RNA interactions is conserved among PUF proteins: the two ends of the PUF protein make critical contacts with the two ends of the RNA sites. Despite this conserved 'two-handed' pattern of recognition, the RNA sequence is flexible. Among the binding sites of yeast Puf4p, RNA sequence dictates the pattern in which RNA bases are flipped away from the binding surface of the protein. Small differences in RNA sequence allow new modes of control, recruiting Puf5p in addition to Puf4p to a single site. This embedded information adds a new layer of biological meaning to the connections between RNA targets and PUF proteins.

  1. Neuronal Cell Patterning on Covalently Bound Protein Patterns by Micro-Contact Printing Techniques and the Functioning of Proteins Bound on Silane Monolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Buttler, J.E., Ni, L ., Brown, W.R., Joshi, K.S., Cha g , J., n Rosenberg, B., and Voss, Jr. E.W., 1993: The Immunochemistry of Sandwich Elisas—VI...CONTRACT NUMBER g 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...biotin, lectins, protein A and protein G , and a fragment of specific antibodies. We believe that the patterns of neuronal cells on the protein

  2. Different evolutionary patterns of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever, which is a highly contagious disease of the domestic pig as well as wild boar. The proteins E(rns), E1, and E2 are components of the viral envelope membrane. They are also implicated in virus attachment and entry, replication, and (or) anti-immune response. Here, we studied the genetic variations of these envelope proteins in the evolution of CSFV. The results reveal that the envelope proteins underwent different evolutionary fates. In E(rns) and E1, but not E2, a number of amino acid sites experienced functional divergence. Furthermore, the diversification in E(rns) and E1 was generally episodic because the divergence-related changes of E1 only occurred with the separation of 2 major groups of CSFV and that of E(rns) took place with the division of 1 major group. The major divergence-related sites of E(rns) are located on one of the substrate-binding regions of the RNase domain and C-terminal extension. These functional domains have been reported to block activation of the innate immune system and attachment and entry into host cells, respectively. Our results may shed some light on the divergent roles of the envelope proteins.

  3. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Margaret M.; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across…

  4. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Margaret M.; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across…

  5. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-29

    Two species of microcolonial fungi - Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts-Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure.

  6. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Two species of microcolonial fungi - Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts-Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure.

  7. Protein patterns of black fungi under simulated Mars-like conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Kristina; Marzban, Gorji; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Lorek, Andreas; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Two species of microcolonial fungi – Cryomyces antarcticus and Knufia perforans - and a species of black yeasts–Exophiala jeanselmei - were exposed to thermo-physical Mars-like conditions in the simulation chamber of the German Aerospace Center. In this study the alterations at the protein expression level from various fungi species under Mars-like conditions were analyzed for the first time using 2D gel electrophoresis. Despite of the expectations, the fungi did not express any additional proteins under Mars simulation that could be interpreted as stress induced HSPs. However, up-regulation of some proteins and significant decreasing of protein number were detected within the first 24 hours of the treatment. After 4 and 7 days of the experiment protein spot number was increased again and the protein patterns resemble the protein patterns of biomass from normal conditions. It indicates the recovery of the metabolic activity under Martian environmental conditions after one week of exposure. PMID:24870977

  8. A photoreversible protein-patterning approach for guiding stem cell fate in three-dimensional gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, Cole A.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-05-01

    Although biochemically patterned hydrogels are capable of recapitulating many critical aspects of the heterogeneous cellular niche, exercising spatial and temporal control of the presentation and removal of biomolecular signalling cues in such systems has proved difficult. Here, we demonstrate a synthetic strategy that exploits two bioorthogonal photochemistries to achieve reversible immobilization of bioactive full-length proteins with good spatial and temporal control within synthetic, cell-laden biomimetic scaffolds. A photodeprotection-oxime-ligation sequence permits user-defined quantities of proteins to be anchored within distinct subvolumes of a three-dimensional matrix, and an ortho-nitrobenzyl ester photoscission reaction facilitates subsequent protein removal. By using this approach to pattern the presentation of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin, we accomplished reversible differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts in a spatially defined manner. Our protein-patterning approach should provide further avenues to probe and direct changes in cell physiology in response to dynamic biochemical signalling.

  9. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  10. Channel surface patterning of alternating biomimetic protein combinations for enhanced microfluidic tumor cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Launiere, Cari; Gaskill, Marissa; Czaplewski, Gregory; Myung, Ja Hye; Hong, Seungpyo; Eddington, David T

    2012-05-01

    Here, we report a new method for multicomponent protein patterning in a microchannel and also a technique for improving immunoaffinity-based circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture by patterning regions of alternating adhesive proteins using the new method. The first of two proteins, antiepithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM), provides the specificity for CTC capture. The second, E-selectin, increases CTC capture under shear. Patterning regions with and without E-selectin allows captured leukocytes, which also bind E-selectin and are unwanted impurities in CTC isolation, to roll a short distance and detach from the capture surface. This reduces leukocyte capture by up to 82%. The patterning is combined with a leukocyte elution step in which a calcium chelating buffer effectively deactivates E-selectin so that leukocytes may be rinsed away 60% more efficiently than with a buffer containing calcium. The alternating patterning of this biomimetic protein combination, used in conjunction with the elution step, reduces capture of leukocytes while maintaining a high tumor cell capture efficiency that is up to 1.9 times higher than the tumor cell capture efficiency of a surface with only anti-EpCAM. The new patterning technique described here does not require mask alignment and can be used to spatially control the immobilization of any two proteins or protein mixtures inside a sealed microfluidic channel.

  11. Quantity of dietary protein intake, but not pattern of intake, affects net protein balance primarily through differences in protein synthesis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace; Kortebein, Patrick; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R; Ferrando, Arny A

    2015-01-01

    To examine whole body protein turnover and muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (MPS) following ingestions of protein in mixed meals at two doses of protein and two intake patterns, 20 healthy older adult subjects (52-75 yr) participated in one of four groups in a randomized clinical trial: a level of protein intake of 0.8 g (1RDA) or 1.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (∼2RDA) with uneven (U: 15/20/65%) or even distribution (E: 33/33/33%) patterns of intake for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the day (1RDA-U, 1RDA-E, 2RDA-U, or 2RDA-E). Subjects were studied with primed continuous infusions of L-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and L-[(2)H2]tyrosine on day 4 following 3 days of diet habituation. Whole body protein kinetics [protein synthesis (PS), breakdown, and net balance (NB)] were expressed as changes from the fasted to the fed states. Positive NB was achieved at both protein levels, but NB was greater in 2RDA vs. 1RDA (94.8 ± 6.0 vs. 58.9 ± 4.9 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0001), without effects of distribution on NB. The greater NB was due to the higher PS with 2RDA vs. 1RDA (15.4 ± 4.8 vs. -18.0 ± 8.4 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0018). Consistent with PS, MPS was greater with 2RDA vs. 1RDA, regardless of distribution patterns. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance was greater with protein intake above recommended dietary allowance (0.8 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in the context of mixed meals, without demonstrated effects of protein intake pattern, primarily through higher rates of protein synthesis at whole body and muscle levels.

  12. Glycosylation patterns of membrane proteins of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed

    Schetz, J A; Anderson, P A

    1995-02-01

    Integral and membrane-associated proteins extracted from neuron-enriched perirhopalial tissue of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata were probed with a panel of lectins that recognize sugar epitopes of varying complexity. Of the 13 lectins tested, only concanavalin A, jacalin lectin and tomato lectin stained distinct bands on Western blots, indicating the presence of repeating alpha-1,6-mannoses, terminal Gal-alpha-1,6-GalNAc and repeating beta-1,4-linked GlcNAc, respectively. In whole-mounted perirhopalial tissue, jacalin lectin stained several cell types, including neurons, muscle, cilia and mucus strands. Tomato lectin stained secretory cells intensely, and neurons in a punctate fashion. Concanavalin A stained cytoplasmic epitopes in both ecto- and endodermal cells, and ectodermal secretory cells and the mucus strands emanating from them. With the exception of tomato lectin's sugar epitope, the other sugar epitopes identified in this study are "non-complex". This study suggests that while glycosylation of integral and membrane-associated proteins occurs in Cyanea, the sugars post-translationally linked to these proteins tend to be simple.

  13. Enhanced Activity of Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) Bound to Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Haudenschild, Dominik R.; Hong, Eunmee; Yik, Jasper H. N.; Chromy, Brett; Mörgelin, Matthias; Snow, Kaylene D.; Acharya, Chitrangada; Takada, Yoshikazu; Di Cesare, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is an important non-collagenous cartilage protein that is essential for the structural integrity of the cartilage extracellular matrix. The repeated modular structure of COMP allows it to “bridge” and assemble multiple cartilage extracellular matrix components such as collagens, matrilins, and proteoglycans. With its modular structure, COMP also has the potential to act as a scaffold for growth factors, thereby affecting how and when the growth factors are presented to cell-surface receptors. However, it is not known whether COMP binds growth factors. We studied the binding interaction between COMP and TGF-β1 in vitro and determined the effect of COMP on TGF-β1-induced signal transduction in reporter cell lines and primary cells. Our results demonstrate that mature COMP protein binds to multiple TGF-β1 molecules and that the peak binding occurs at slightly acidic pH. These interactions were confirmed by dual polarization interferometry and visualized by rotary shadow electron microscopy. There is cation-independent binding of TGF-β1 to the C-terminal domain of COMP. In the presence of manganese, an additional TGF-β-binding site is present in the TSP3 repeats of COMP. Finally, we show that COMP-bound TGF-β1 causes increased TGF-β1-dependent transcription. We conclude that TGF-β1 binds to COMP and that TGF-β1 bound to COMP has enhanced bioactivity. PMID:21940632

  14. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. Images PMID:2296575

  15. Stromal Protein Ecm1 Regulates Ureteric Bud Patterning and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Paroly, Suneeta S.; Wang, Fengwei; Spraggon, Lee; Merregaert, Joseph; Batourina, Ekatherina; Tycko, Benjamin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Grimmond, Sean; Little, Melissa; Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between the nephrogenic mesenchyme and the ureteric bud during kidney development are well documented. While recent studies have shed some light on the importance of the stroma during renal development, many of the signals generated in the stroma, the genetic pathways and interaction networks involving the stroma are yet to be identified. Our previous studies demonstrate that retinoids are crucial for branching of the ureteric bud and for patterning of the cortical stroma. In the present study we demonstrate that autocrine retinoic acid (RA) signaling in stromal cells is critical for their survival and patterning, and show that Extracellular matrix 1, Ecm1, a gene that in humans causes irritable bowel syndrome and lipoid proteinosis, is a novel RA-regulated target in the developing kidney, which is secreted from the cortical stromal cells surrounding the cap mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Our studies suggest that Ecm1 is required in the ureteric bud for regulating the distribution of Ret which is normally restricted to the tips, as inhibition of Ecm1 results in an expanded domain of Ret expression and reduced numbers of branches. We propose a model in which retinoid signaling in the stroma activates expression of Ecm1, which in turn down-regulates Ret expression in the ureteric bud cleft, where bifurcation normally occurs and normal branching progresses. PMID:24391906

  16. Guided protein/cell patterning on superhydrophilic polymer brushes functionalized with mussel-inspired polydopamine coatings.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Liu, Tao; Chen, Runhai; Liu, Jingchuan; Chen, Jiayue; Zhao, Chunyu; Yin, Ligang; Li, Chunming; Xu, Xiaodong; Shi, Qiang; Yin, Jinghua

    2017-06-20

    A simple approach for preparing bicomponent polymer patterns was developed by coating polydopamine (PDA) on superhydrophilic poly(2-acryl-amido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS) brushes. Well-defined and versatile arrays of proteins and cells were achieved without harm to proteins and cells.

  17. Urinary protein patterns in patients with Balkan endemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Djukanović, Ljubica; Djordjević, Vidosava; Ležaić, Višnja; Cukuranović, Rade; Marić, Ivko; Bukvić, Danica; Marinković, Jelena; Cukuranović, Jovana; Rajić, Milena; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2013-12-01

    Urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin (beta2-MG), albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and protein was examined in patients with Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), glomerulonephritis (GN) and healthy controls. The proteins were measured in morning urine samples from 74 patients with BEN, 50 healthy persons and 22 patients with GN. In BEN patients, median values for albumin, beta2-MG and protein were above upper normal limits, but median IgG was inside normal range. All patients with GN had microalbuminuria (MAU) and half of them had increased urinary beta2-MG, which was also found in eleven patients with increased urinary IgG. In BEN patients, there were significant negative correlations between eGFR and all measured urinary proteins, the composition of which changed during the course of BEN. In patients with eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) isolated beta2-MG was the most frequent finding (10/12 patients), but MAU was present in 4/12 patients. In BEN patients with eGFR between 30 and 59 ml/min/1.73 m(2), beta2-MG appeared as often as the combination of beta2-MG and albumin and isolated MAU. Out of 49 BEN patients with eGFR > 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) 15 had increased urinary IgG either alone (1) or together with beta2-MG (3) or albumin (3) or beta2-MG and albumin (8). In BEN patients with GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) only 1/25 had isolated beta2-MG but increased urinary IgG with increased beta2-MG, and albumin was the most frequent. Although low-molecular weight proteinuria was the most frequent urinary finding in BEN patients, MAU was frequently detected in advanced stages of BEN but also in some patients with eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). IgG was increasingly found as eGFR decreased.

  18. Comparative SDS-page protein patterns of four ascaridid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ashour, A A; Taha, H A; Mohammad A el-H

    1995-12-01

    In order to investigate the degree of homogeneity and heterogeneity of the ascaridid nematodes. Toxascaris leonina, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis and T. vitulorum, protein extracts from adult worms of the four nematodes were resolved into a number of bands. Comparative analysis of dominant bands showed that 13 bands were common among the four species, but certain unique bands were also found in each species including 4 in T. vitulorum, one in T. leonina, two in T. canis, while P. equorum shares both T. canis and T. leonina in most of their bands. Among the four ascaridid studied, T. vitulorum appears to be the most divergent species.

  19. High-quality combinatorial protein libraries using the binary patterning approach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Luke H

    2014-01-01

    Protein combinatorial libraries have become a platform technology for exploring protein sequence space for novel molecules for use in research, synthetic biology, biotechnology, and medicine. To expedite the isolation of proteins with novel/desired functions using screens and selections, high-quality approaches that generate protein libraries rich in folded and soluble structures are desirable for this goal. The binary patterning approach is a protein library design method that incorporates elements of both rational design and combinatorial diversity to specify the arrangement of polar and nonpolar amino acid residues in the context of a desired, folded tertiary structure template. An overview of the considerations necessary to design and construct binary patterned libraries of de novo and natural proteins is presented.

  20. Fluorescent Biotin Analogues for Microstructure Patterning and Selective Protein Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K Vijaya; Ghosh, Subhadip; Sharma, Bikramjit; Singh, Leeju; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Verma, Sandeep

    2015-11-24

    Benzyl substitution on ureido nitrogens of biotin led to manifestation of aggregation-induced emission, which was studied by steady-state fluorescence, microscopy, and TD-DFT, providing a rationale into the observed photophysical behavior. Besides exhibiting solvatochromism, the biotin derivatives revealed emission peaks centered at ∼430 and 545 nm, which has been attributed to the π-π stacking interactions. Our TD-DFT results also correlate the spectroscopic data and quantify the nature of transitions involved. The isothermal titration calorimetry data substantiates that the binding of the biotin derivatives with avidin are pretty strong. These derivatives on lithographic patterning present a platform for site specific strept(avidin) immobilization, thus opening avenues for potential applications exploiting these interactions. The fluorescent biotin derivatives can thus find applications in cellular biology and imaging.

  1. Differential extraction and protein sequencing reveals major differences in patterns of primary cell wall proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Mitchell, G P; Gilroy, J S; Gerrish, C; Bolwell, G P; Slabas, A R

    1997-06-20

    The proteins of the primary cell walls of suspension cultured cells of five plant species, Arabidopsis, carrot, French bean, tomato, and tobacco, have been compared. The approach that has been adopted is differential extraction followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), rather than two-dimensional gel analysis, to facilitate protein sequencing. Whole cells were washed sequentially with the following aqueous solutions, CaCl2, CDTA (cyclohexane diaminotetraacetic acid, DTT (dithiothreitol), NaCl, and borate. SDS-PAGE analysis showed consistent differences between species. From the 233 proteins that were selected for sequencing, 63% gave N-terminal data. This analysis shows that (i) patterns of proteins revealed by SDS-PAGE are strikingly different for all five species, (ii) a large number of these proteins cannot be identified by data base searches indicating that a significant proportion of wall proteins have not been previously described, (iii) the major proteins that can be identified belong to very different classes of proteins, (iv) the majority of proteins found in the extracellular growth media are absent from their respective cell wall extracts, and (v) the results of the extraction process are indicative of higher order structure. It appears that aspects of speciation reside in the complement of extracellular wall proteins. The data represent a protein resource for cell wall studies complementary to EST (expressed sequence tag) and DNA sequencing strategies.

  2. [Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid. Relation of isoelectric focusing protein patterns to clinical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Yoshinaga, E; Tamazawa, O

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein patterns in gingival crevicular fluid relation to the isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF and to clinical evaluations. GCF was collected with filter paper from 105 subjects. The probing depth, the gingival index (Löe & Silness) and the plaque index (Silness & Löe) as clinical evaluations The results follow: 1. The main isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF were between pH 5.5 and 7.5. In comparison, the GCF and the serum from the same patients showed patterns to similar serum albumin. 2. Between of GCF pH 5.5 and 7.5 the protein patterns that ranged over 60% was pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55, 6.75 and 7.00. The frequencies of the ranges of protein patterns and clinical evaluation were compared by the X2 test. pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and PD were significant different, as were pI 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and GI. But each pI and PIl. were not significantly different.

  3. Extracellular matrix protein patterns guide human chondrocytes adhesion and alignment characterized by vimentin and matrilin-3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influences of collagen VI (col-VI) patterns on human chondrocytes behaviors. To this end, col-VI stripes with varying width and interstripe spacing are created on polystyrene (PS) surfaces by microcontact printing (μCP). Human chondrocytes are then seeded on these protein patterns and the cell adhesion and alignment are investigated by staining the vimentin and matrilin-3 secreted by seeded chondrocytes. The results indicate that the cells preferentially attach onto the protein areas, rendering cell patterns and the elongated cell shapes. The pattern dimensions can significantly influence cell adhesion, spreading and orientation. The stripe protein patterns can guide cell adhesion and alignment. The cell morphologies can be controlled by carefully designing the pattern shapes and sizes. Our results suggest that the protein patterns can be used to modify biomaterials' surfaces for selective cell-binding and cell alignment. It could provide some cues for the development of novel implantable biomaterials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds for cartilage replacement, where specific cell alignment is needed.

  4. Microcontact printing of substrate-bound protein patterns for cell and tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Martin; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Patterned distributions of signalling molecules play fundamental roles during embryonic development. Several attempts have been made to reproduce these patterns in vitro. In order to study substrate-bound or membrane proteins, microcontact printing (μCP) is a suitable method for tethering molecules on various surfaces. Here, we describe three μCP variants to produce patterns down to feature sizes of about 300 nm, which are highly variable with respect to shape, protein spacing, and density. Briefly, the desired pattern is etched into a silicon master, which is then used as a master for the printing process. Each variant offers certain advantages and the method of choice depends on the desired protein and the biological question.

  5. Protein patterning utilizing region-specific control of wettability by surface modification under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Jun, Chang-Duk; Chung, Euiheon; Yang, Sung

    2013-09-01

    Wettability control can be crucial in improving the uniformity of selective protein immobilization in high-density microarrays. In this study, we propose an atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD)-based method in conjunction with photolithography to implement region-specific control of wettability on Si substrate. The proposed PECVD method under atmospheric pressure condition would be a useful alternative of conventional reactive plasma-based treatments methods requiring vacuum condition for uniform protein patterning. Layers with dissimilar wettability and roughness prepared by AP-PECVD process using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) or TEOS-O2 as precursors could realize uniform protein patterning in a micrometer-scale.

  6. Detection of protein three-dimensional side-chain patterns: new examples of convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, R B

    1998-06-26

    Detection of recurring three-dimensional side-chain patterns is a potential means of inferring protein function. This paper presents a new method for detecting such patterns and discusses various implications. The method allows detection of side-chain patterns without any prior knowledge of function, requiring only protein structure data and associated multiple sequence alignments. A recursive, depth-first search algorithm finds all possible groups of identical amino acids common to two protein structures independent of sequence order. The search is highly constrained by distance constraints, and by ignoring amino acids unlikely to be involved in protein function. A weighted root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between equivalenced groups of amino acids is used as a measure of similarity. The statistical significance of any RMSD is assigned by reference to a distribution fitted to simulated data. Searches with the Ser/His/Asp catalytic triad, a His/His porphyrin binding pattern, and the zinc-finger Cys/Cys/His/His pattern are performed to test the method on known examples. An all-against-all comparison of representatives from the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) is performed, revealing several new examples of evolutionary convergence to common patterns of side-chains within different tertiary folds and in different orders along the sequence. These include a di-zinc binding Asp/Asp/His/His/Ser pattern common to alkaline phosphatase/bacterial aminopeptidase, and an Asp/Glu/His/His/Asn/Asn pattern common to the active sites of DNase I and endocellulase E1. Implications for protein evolution, function prediction and the rational design of functional regulators are discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Unsupervised Clustering of Subcellular Protein Expression Patterns in High-Throughput Microscopy Images Reveals Protein Complexes and Functional Relationships between Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Handfield, Louis-François; Chong, Yolanda T.; Simmons, Jibril; Andrews, Brenda J.; Moses, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization has been systematically characterized in budding yeast using fluorescently tagged proteins. Based on the fluorescence microscopy images, subcellular localization of many proteins can be classified automatically using supervised machine learning approaches that have been trained to recognize predefined image classes based on statistical features. Here, we present an unsupervised analysis of protein expression patterns in a set of high-resolution, high-throughput microscope images. Our analysis is based on 7 biologically interpretable features which are evaluated on automatically identified cells, and whose cell-stage dependency is captured by a continuous model for cell growth. We show that it is possible to identify most previously identified localization patterns in a cluster analysis based on these features and that similarities between the inferred expression patterns contain more information about protein function than can be explained by a previous manual categorization of subcellular localization. Furthermore, the inferred cell-stage associated to each fluorescence measurement allows us to visualize large groups of proteins entering the bud at specific stages of bud growth. These correspond to proteins localized to organelles, revealing that the organelles must be entering the bud in a stereotypical order. We also identify and organize a smaller group of proteins that show subtle differences in the way they move around the bud during growth. Our results suggest that biologically interpretable features based on explicit models of cell morphology will yield unprecedented power for pattern discovery in high-resolution, high-throughput microscopy images. PMID:23785265

  8. Unsupervised clustering of subcellular protein expression patterns in high-throughput microscopy images reveals protein complexes and functional relationships between proteins.

    PubMed

    Handfield, Louis-François; Chong, Yolanda T; Simmons, Jibril; Andrews, Brenda J; Moses, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization has been systematically characterized in budding yeast using fluorescently tagged proteins. Based on the fluorescence microscopy images, subcellular localization of many proteins can be classified automatically using supervised machine learning approaches that have been trained to recognize predefined image classes based on statistical features. Here, we present an unsupervised analysis of protein expression patterns in a set of high-resolution, high-throughput microscope images. Our analysis is based on 7 biologically interpretable features which are evaluated on automatically identified cells, and whose cell-stage dependency is captured by a continuous model for cell growth. We show that it is possible to identify most previously identified localization patterns in a cluster analysis based on these features and that similarities between the inferred expression patterns contain more information about protein function than can be explained by a previous manual categorization of subcellular localization. Furthermore, the inferred cell-stage associated to each fluorescence measurement allows us to visualize large groups of proteins entering the bud at specific stages of bud growth. These correspond to proteins localized to organelles, revealing that the organelles must be entering the bud in a stereotypical order. We also identify and organize a smaller group of proteins that show subtle differences in the way they move around the bud during growth. Our results suggest that biologically interpretable features based on explicit models of cell morphology will yield unprecedented power for pattern discovery in high-resolution, high-throughput microscopy images.

  9. COMP-Ang1 Potentiates EPC Treatment of Ischemic Brain Injury by Enhancing Angiogenesis Through Activating AKT-mTOR Pathway and Promoting Vascular Migration Through Activating Tie2-FAK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Eun; Byun, Kyunghee; Park, Hyung Woo; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hur, Jin; Park, Joong Shin; Jun, Jong Kwan; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Paek, Seung Leal; Kim, In Keyoung; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Dong Gyu; Sung, Young Chul; Koh, Gou-Young; Song, Chang W; Lee, Bonghee; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-03-01

    Successful recovery from brain ischemia is limited due to poor vascularization surrounding the ischemic zone. Cell therapy with strong angiogenic factors could be an effective strategy to rescue the ischemic brain. We investigated whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-Ang1, a soluble, stable and potent Ang1 variant, enhances the angiogenesis of human cord blood derived endothelial progenitor cells (hCB-EPCs) for rescuing brain from ischemic injury. COMP-Ang1 markedly improved the tube formation of capillaries by EPCs and incorporation of EPCs into tube formation with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) upon incubation on matrigel in vitro. COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of EPCs more than HUVECs in a scratch wound migration assay. The transplanted EPCs and COMP-Ang1 were incorporated into the blood vessels and decreased the infarct volume in the rat ischemic brain. Molecular studies revealed that COMP-Ang1 induced an interaction between Tie2 and FAK, but AKT was separated from the Tie2-FAK-AKT complex in the EPC plasma membrane. Tie2-FAK increased pp38, pSAPK/JNK, and pERK-mediated MAPK activation and interacted with integrins ανβ3, α4, β1, finally leading to migration of EPCs. AKT recruited mTOR, SDF-1, and HIF-1α to induce angiogenesis. Taken together, it is concluded that COMP-Ang1 potentiates the angiogenesis of EPCs and enhances the vascular morphogenesis indicating that combination of EPCs with COMP-Ang1 may be a potentially effective regimen for ischemic brain injury salvage therapy.

  10. Protein functional features are reflected in the patterns of mRNA translation speed.

    PubMed

    López, Daniel; Pazos, Florencio

    2015-07-09

    The degeneracy of the genetic code makes it possible for the same amino acid string to be coded by different messenger RNA (mRNA) sequences. These "synonymous mRNAs" may differ largely in a number of aspects related to their overall translational efficiency, such as secondary structure content and availability of the encoded transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Consequently, they may render different yields of the translated polypeptides. These mRNA features related to translation efficiency are also playing a role locally, resulting in a non-uniform translation speed along the mRNA, which has been previously related to some protein structural features and also used to explain some dramatic effects of "silent" single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs). In this work we perform the first large scale analysis of the relationship between three experimental proxies of mRNA local translation efficiency and the local features of the corresponding encoded proteins. We found that a number of protein functional and structural features are reflected in the patterns of ribosome occupancy, secondary structure and tRNA availability along the mRNA. One or more of these proxies of translation speed have distinctive patterns around the mRNA regions coding for certain protein local features. In some cases the three patterns follow a similar trend. We also show specific examples where these patterns of translation speed point to the protein's important structural and functional features. This support the idea that the genome not only codes the protein functional features as sequences of amino acids, but also as subtle patterns of mRNA properties which, probably through local effects on the translation speed, have some consequence on the final polypeptide. These results open the possibility of predicting a protein's functional regions based on a single genomic sequence, and have implications for heterologous protein expression and fine-tuning protein function.

  11. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    PubMed Central

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  12. Index-Based Searching of Interaction Patterns in Large Collections of Protein-Ligand Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Inhester, Therese; Bietz, Stefan; Hilbig, Matthias; Schmidt, Robert; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-02-27

    Comparison of three-dimensional interaction patterns in large collections of protein-ligand interfaces is a key element for understanding protein-ligand interactions and supports various steps in the structure-based drug design process. Different methods exist that provide query systems to search for geometrical patterns in protein-ligand complexes. However, these tools do not meet all of the requirements, which are high query variability, an adjustable search set, and high retrieval speed. Here we present a new tool named PELIKAN that is able to search for a variety of geometrical queries in large protein structure collections in a reasonably short time. The data are stored in an SQLite database that can easily be constructed from any set of protein-ligand complexes. We present different test queries demonstrating the performance of the PELIKAN approach. Furthermore, two application scenarios show the usefulness of PELIKAN in structure-based design endeavors.

  13. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-09-05

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M–C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design.

  14. Field observations of the persistence of Comp B explosives residues in a salt marsh impact area.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Marianne E; Taylor, Susan; Hewitt, Alan D; Walsh, Michael R; Ramsey, Charles A; Collins, Charles M

    2010-01-01

    Field observations of weathering Comp B (RDX/TNT 60/40) residue were made on a live-fire training range over four years. The Comp B residue was formed by low-order detonations of 120-mm mortar projectiles. Physical changes were the disaggregation of initially solid chunks into masses of smaller diameter pieces and formation of red phototransformation products that washed off with rain or tidal flooding. Disaggregation increased the surface area of the residue, thereby increasing the potential for dissolution. The bulk of the mass of Comp B was in the craters, but solid chunks were scattered asymmetrically up to 30m away. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Identifying Similar Patterns of Structural Flexibility in Proteins by Disorder Prediction and Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Petrovich, Aidan; Borne, Adam; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Xue, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods are prevailing in identifying protein intrinsic disorder. The results from predictors are often given as per-residue disorder scores. The scores describe the disorder propensity of amino acids of a protein and can be further represented as a disorder curve. Many proteins share similar patterns in their disorder curves. The similar patterns are often associated with similar functions and evolutionary origins. Therefore, finding and characterizing specific patterns of disorder curves provides a unique and attractive perspective of studying the function of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, we developed a new computational tool named IDalign using dynamic programming. This tool is able to identify similar patterns among disorder curves, as well as to present the distribution of intrinsic disorder in query proteins. The disorder-based information generated by IDalign is significantly different from the information retrieved from classical sequence alignments. This tool can also be used to infer functions of disordered regions and disordered proteins. The web server of IDalign is available at (http://labs.cas.usf.edu/bioinfo/service.html). PMID:26086829

  16. Changes in the pattern of protein synthesis during zoospore germination in Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, A M; Maia, J C; Juliani, M H

    1987-01-01

    Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we analyzed the pattern of proteins synthesized during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination in an inorganic solution, in both the presence and absence of actinomycin D. During the transition from zoospore to round cells (the first 25 min), essentially no qualitative differences were noticeable, indicating that the earliest stages of germination are entirely preprogrammed with stored RNA. Later in germination (after 25 min), however, changes in the pattern of protein synthesis were found. Some of these proteins (a total of 6 polypeptides) correspond possibly to a selective translation of stored messages, whereas the majority of the changed proteins (22 polypeptides) corresponds to newly synthesized mRNA. Thus, multiple levels of protein synthesis regulation seem to occur during zoospore germination, involving both transcriptional and translational controls. We also analyzed the pattern of protein synthesis during germination in a nutrient medium; synthesis of specific polypeptides occurred during late germination. During early germination posttranslational control was also observed, several labeled proteins from zoospores being specifically degraded or charge modified. Images PMID:3571161

  17. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  18. Identifying known unknowns using the US EPA's CompTox ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical features observed using high-resolution mass spectrometry can be tentatively identified using online chemical reference databases by searching molecular formulae and monoisotopic masses and then rank-ordering of the hits using appropriate relevance criteria. The most likely candidate “known unknowns,” which are those chemicals unknown to an investigator but contained within a reference database or literature source, rise to the top of a chemical list when rank-ordered by the number of associated data sources. The U.S. EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is a curated and freely available resource for chemistry and computational toxicology research, containing more than 720,000 chemicals of relevance to environmental health science. In this research, the performance of the Dashboard for identifying “known unknowns” was evaluated against that of the online ChemSpider database, one of the primary resources used by mass spectrometrists, using multiple previously studied datasets reported in the peer-reviewed literature totaling 162 chemicals. These chemicals were examined using both applications via molecular formula and monoisotopic mass searches followed by rank-ordering of candidate compounds by associated references or data sources. A greater percentage of chemicals ranked in the top position when using the Dashboard, indicating an advantage of this application over ChemSpider for identifying known unknowns using data source ranking. Addition

  19. Inverse immunostaining pattern for synthesized versus endocytosed alpha-granule proteins in human bone marrow megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    de Larouzière, V; Brouland, J P; Souni, F; Drouet, L; Cramer, E

    1998-06-01

    The time of appearance and pattern of expression of several alpha-granule proteins, von Willebrand factor (VWF), fibrinogen and immunoglobulins (Ig) were examined and compared in human bone marrow megakaryocytes (MK) using an immunocytochemical approach. VWF is synthesized by immature MK, whereas it has been shown that fibrinogen is incorporated from the plasma into alpha-granules. The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether there are chronological and morphological differences in the expression of VWF and fibrinogen in vivo in human MK. Seven paraffin-embedded biopsies of normal human bone marrow were labelled with specific antibodies for VWF and for fibrinogen, detected by the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method. and analysed by immunomorphometry. We found a clear, statistically significant. difference in the labelling pattern of VWF and fibrinogen. The expression of other endocytosed alpha-granule proteins, immunoglobulins G and A, was therefore studied in bone marrow MK from two patients with multiple myeloma, one with monoclonal IgG and one with monoclonal IgA. The immunostaining pattern was similar to that of fibrinogen and different from VWF, and characteristic of endocytosed alpha-granule proteins. This study demonstrates that: (i) immunohistochemical staining of MK alpha-granules proteins distinguishes the peripheral cockade distribution pattern of endocytosed protein from the perinuclear pattern of endogenously synthesized proteins; (ii) VWF is present in human bone marrow MK when fibrinogen is not yet detectable: (iii) VWF synthesis ceases while fibrinogen is still being incorporated: (iv) immunoglobulins can be detected in MK cytoplasm, with a staining pattern resembling that of fibrinogen.

  20. Inference of Hopfield-Potts patterns from covariation in protein families: calculation and statistical error bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rémi; Weigt, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We consider the Hopfield-Potts model for the covariation between residues in protein families recently introduced in Cocco, Monasson, Weigt (2013). The patterns of the model are inferred from the data within a new gauge, more symmetric in the residues. We compute the statistical error bars on the pattern components. Results are illustrated on real data for a response regulator receiver domain (Pfam ID PF00072) family.

  1. Authentication of Whey Protein Powders by Portable Mid-Infrared Spectrometers Combined with Pattern Recognition Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow Ying; Mutilangi, William; Aykas, Didem P; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm(-1) were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (∼1570 cm(-1)). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients. A rapid, simple and accurate method was developed to authenticate commercial whey protein products by using portable mid-infrared spectrometers combined with chemometrics, which could help ensure the functionality of whey protein ingredients in food applications. © 2015

  2. Detection and identification of Vibrio species using whole-cell protein pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae-Yoon; Hong, Yeun; Ryu, Jio; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Sang-Suk; Lee, Soon-Ho; Hwang, In-Gyun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2012-08-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with Vibrio species such as V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae frequently occur in countries having a dietary habit of raw seafood consumption. For rapid identification of different Vibrio species involved in foodborne diseases, whole-cell protein pattern analysis for 13 type strains of 12 Vibrio species was performed using SDS-PAGE analysis. Pathogenic Vibrio species such as V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. cholerae, V. alginolyticus, V. fluvialis, and V. mimicus were included in the 12 Vibrio species used in this study. Each of the 12 Vibrio species showed clearly specific band patterns of its own. Two different strains of V. parahaemolyticus showed two different SDS-PAGE wholecell protein patterns, giving the possibility of categorizing isolated strains in the same V. parahaemolyticus species into two subgroups. The 36 Vibrio isolates collected from sushi restaurants in Busan were all identified as V. parahaemolyticus by comparing their protein patterns with those of Vibrio type strains. The identified isolates were categorized into two different subgroups of V. parahaemolyticus. The whole-cell protein pattern analysis by SDS-PAGE can be used as a specific, rapid, and simple identification method for Vibrio spp. involved in foodborne diseases at the subspecies level.

  3. Changes in protein patterns and in vivo protein synthesis during senescence of hibiscus petals. [Hibiscus rosa-sinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, W.R.; Handa, A.K.

    1986-04-01

    Changes in proteins associated with senescence of the flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis was studied using SDS-PAGE. Total extractable protein from petals decreased with senescence. Changes were noted in patterns of proteins from aging petals. Flower opening and senescence was associated with appearance and disappearance of several polypeptides. One new polypeptide with an apparent mw of 41 kd was first seen the day of flower opening and increased to over 9% of the total protein content of senescent petal tissue. Protein synthesis during aging was investigated by following uptake and incorporation of /sup 3/H-leucine into TCA-insoluble fraction of petal discs. Protein synthesis, as evidenced by the percent of label incorporated into the TCA-insoluble fraction, was greatest (32%) the day before flower opening. Senescent petal tissue incorporated 4% of label taken up into protein. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and labelled polypeptides identified by fluorography. In presenescent petal tissue, radioactivity was distributed among several major polypeptides. In senescent tissue, much of the radioactivity was concentrated in the 41 kd polypeptide.

  4. How Surface Heterogeneity Affects Protein Adsorption: Annealing of OTS Patterns and Albumin Adsorption Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Gerald N.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy and intensity histogram analysis techniques were used to monitor spatially-resolved albumin adsorption kinetics to model heterogeneous surfaces on sub-μm scales. Several distinct protein subpopulations were resolved, each represented by a normal distribution of adsorption densities on the adsorbent surface. Histogram analyses provided dynamic information of mean adsorption density, spread in adsorption density, and surface area coverage for each distinct protein subpopulation. A simple adsorption model is proposed in which individual protein binding events are predicted by the summation of multiple protein's surface sub-site interactions with different binding energy sub-sites on adsorbent surfaces. This model is predictive of the albumin adsorption on the patterns produced by one step μ-contact printing (μCP) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on glass but fails to describe adsorption once the same patterns are altered by a thermal annealing step. PMID:19746205

  5. The effect of venting on cookoff of a melt-castable explosive (Comp-B)

    DOE PAGES

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Kaneshige, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Occasionally, our well-controlled cookoff experiments with Comp-B give anomalous results when venting conditions are changed. For example, a vented experiment may take longer to ignite than a sealed experiment. In the current work, we show the effect of venting on thermal ignition of Comp-B. We use Sandia’s Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) experiment with various headspace volumes in both vented and sealed geometries to study ignition of Comp-B. In some of these experiments, we have used a boroscope to observe Comp-B as it melts and reacts. We propose that the mechanism for ignition involves TNT melting, dissolution of RDX, and complexmore » bubbly liquid flow. High pressure inhibits bubble formation and flow is significantly reduced. At low pressure, a vigorous dispersed bubble flow was observed.« less

  6. The effect of venting on cookoff of a melt-castable explosive (Comp-B)

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Kaneshige, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Occasionally, our well-controlled cookoff experiments with Comp-B give anomalous results when venting conditions are changed. For example, a vented experiment may take longer to ignite than a sealed experiment. In the current work, we show the effect of venting on thermal ignition of Comp-B. We use Sandia’s Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) experiment with various headspace volumes in both vented and sealed geometries to study ignition of Comp-B. In some of these experiments, we have used a boroscope to observe Comp-B as it melts and reacts. We propose that the mechanism for ignition involves TNT melting, dissolution of RDX, and complex bubbly liquid flow. High pressure inhibits bubble formation and flow is significantly reduced. At low pressure, a vigorous dispersed bubble flow was observed.

  7. Pattern recognition of the secondary structure of proteins (alpha-helix and beta-structure).

    PubMed

    Tohá, J C; Soto, M A; Chinga, H

    1990-09-21

    In this paper, an algorithm for the pattern recognition of secondary structure of proteins is proposed. The procedure simultaneously evaluates the contribution of all the residues of a given peptide to its conformation. By means of the algorithm it is possible to select from a universe of well known proteins the most representative alpha-helix and beta-structure peptides, and to use these peptides, as screening matrices to define the unknown structure of any peptide.

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein associates differentially with erosions and synovitis and has a different temporal course in cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive versus anti-CCP-negative early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anne F; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete L; Ejbjerg, Bo; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jacobsen, Søren; Lottenburger, Tine; Ellingsen, Torkell; Andersen, Lis S; Hansen, Ib; Skjødt, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens K; Lauridsen, Ulrik B; Svendsen, Anders; Tarp, Ulrik; Pødenphant, Jan; Østergaard, Mikkel; Junker, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive and anti-CCP-negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been suggested as 2 distinctive disease subsets with respect to disease activity and prognosis. Previously, we proposed that anti-CCP antibodies might have a chondrocyte-suppressive effect. We aimed to compare circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a marker of cartilage turnover, in untreated anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA, and to study the temporal pattern of COMP through 4 years of treatment, including the relationship to imaging and clinical findings. A total of 160 patients with newly diagnosed RA who were naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were included in the CIMESTRA trial. Ninety healthy blood donors served as controls. Demographic and disease measures including Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, IgM rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP, Health Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale scores for pain and global and physician assessment, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nondominant hand were recorded at baseline. COMP in serum was measured by ELISA at inclusion and serially through 4 years. Median baseline COMP was higher in patients with RA [9.8 U/l (interquartile range 8.96, 10.5)] compared with controls [8.3 U/l (IQR 7.84, 8.9); p < 0.001] and remained elevated at 4 years [10.8 U/l (IQR 10.2, 11.7); p < 0.001]. At baseline, anti-CCP-positive patients had lower COMP than anti-CCP-negative patients (p = 0.048). In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP exhibited a parabolic course over 4 years, while COMP in anti-CCP-negative patients had an almost linear course. In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP was associated with MRI edema and erosion score, while COMP was correlated with synovitis score in anti-CCP-negative individuals. Our study provides additional evidence for the existence of different disease pathways in anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative subsets of RA, and evidence that anti-CCP antibodies

  9. The Kinase Regulator Mob1 Acts as a Patterning Protein for Stentor Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Slabodnick, Mark M.; Ruby, J. Graham; Dunn, Joshua G.; Feldman, Jessica L.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenesis and pattern formation are vital processes in any organism, whether unicellular or multicellular. But in contrast to the developmental biology of plants and animals, the principles of morphogenesis and pattern formation in single cells remain largely unknown. Although all cells develop patterns, they are most obvious in ciliates; hence, we have turned to a classical unicellular model system, the giant ciliate Stentor coeruleus. Here we show that the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery is conserved in Stentor. Using RNAi, we identify the kinase coactivator Mob1—with conserved functions in cell division and morphogenesis from plants to humans—as an asymmetrically localized patterning protein required for global patterning during development and regeneration in Stentor. Our studies reopen the door for Stentor as a model regeneration system. PMID:24823688

  10. The kinase regulator mob1 acts as a patterning protein for stentor morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Slabodnick, Mark M; Ruby, J Graham; Dunn, Joshua G; Feldman, Jessica L; DeRisi, Joseph L; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-05-01

    Morphogenesis and pattern formation are vital processes in any organism, whether unicellular or multicellular. But in contrast to the developmental biology of plants and animals, the principles of morphogenesis and pattern formation in single cells remain largely unknown. Although all cells develop patterns, they are most obvious in ciliates; hence, we have turned to a classical unicellular model system, the giant ciliate Stentor coeruleus. Here we show that the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery is conserved in Stentor. Using RNAi, we identify the kinase coactivator Mob1--with conserved functions in cell division and morphogenesis from plants to humans-as an asymmetrically localized patterning protein required for global patterning during development and regeneration in Stentor. Our studies reopen the door for Stentor as a model regeneration system.

  11. Deployed Flight Test of the Iraqi Air Force Comp Air 7SLX (CA-7)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    support of U.S. Central Command and the Iraqi Air Force. The Comp Air 7SLX (CA-7) aircraft was an experimental aircraft, also known as a homebuilt or...acceleration; test surge; Combat Logistics Support Squadron(CLSS); Aero Comp Inc.; deployment; predeployment; teams (personnel); flight training; homebuilt ...aircraft to the Iraqi Air Force in 2004. As an experimental 2 aircraft, also known as a homebuilt or kitplane, the CA-7 was built from a kit

  12. Establishing knowledge on the sequence arrangement pattern of nucleated protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Fei; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The heat-tolerance mechanisms of (hyper)thermophilic proteins provide a unique opportunity to investigate the unsolved protein folding problem. In an attempt to determine whether the interval between residues in sequence might play a role in determining thermostability, we constructed a sequence interval-dependent value function to calculate the residue pair frequency. Additionally, we identified a new sequence arrangement pattern, where like-charged residues tend to be adjacently assembled, while unlike-charged residues are distributed over longer intervals, using statistical analysis of a large sequence database. This finding indicated that increasing the intervals between unlike-charged residues can increase protein thermostability, with the arrangement patterns of these charged residues serving as thermodynamically favorable nucleation points for protein folding. Additionally, we identified that the residue pairs K-E, R-E, L-V and V-V involving long sequence intervals play important roles involving increased protein thermostability. This work demonstrated a novel approach for considering sequence intervals as keys to understanding protein folding. Our findings of novel relationships between residue arrangement and protein thermostability can be used in industry and academia to aid the design of thermostable proteins. PMID:28273143

  13. Versatile functional microstructured polystyrene-based platforms for protein patterning and recognition.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cuesta, Marta; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; García, Olga; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2013-09-09

    We report the preparation of different functional surface patterns based on the optimization of the photo-cross-linking/degradation kinetics of polystyrene (PS) upon exposure to UV-light. We employed a PS-b-PGA (polystyrene-block-poly(l-glutamic acid)) block copolymer that will, in addition to the surface pattern, provide functionality. By using short irradiation times, PS can be initially cross-linked, whereas an excess of the exposure time provokes the degradation of the material. As a result of the optimization of time of exposure, the use of an appropriate cover, or the incorporation of an appropriate amount of absorbing active species (photoinitiator), different tailor-made surface patterns can be obtained, from boxes to needles. Moreover, in addition to the surface pattern, we introduced changes on the chemical composition of the polystyrene using an amphiphilic block copolymer (for instance, we employ PS-b-PGA) that will provide functional surfaces with major advantages. In particular, the presence of carboxylic functional groups provides a unique opportunity to anchor, for instance polypeptide sequences. We describe the immobilization of polypeptide sequences in precise surface positions that allows the use of the surfaces for protein recognition purposes. The immobilization of the proteins evidence the success of the recognition and opens a new alternative for protein patterning on surfaces for many biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  14. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Cornelia M.; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics. PMID:24300396

  15. Flexible method for fabricating protein patterns on superhydrophobic platforms controlled by magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Hao; Zou, Haoyang; Wang, Chenmiao; Zhang, Hao; Mano, João F; Song, Wenlong

    2017-02-28

    Inspired by the rolling of water droplets on lotus leaves, we developed a novel, magnetic field-controlled patterning method for water-soluble proteins and other functional materials on superhydrophobic platforms. This simple method can be used to fabricate biochips and open micro-fluidic devices in a simple way.

  16. Protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis isolates in stage-specific forms and during cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salem-Izacc, S M; Jesuino, R S; Brito, W A; Pereira, M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we compared the protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates. The protein profiles were compared for both yeast and mycelial forms and similarity analysis among them was performed by calculating similarity matrices and grouping the isolates in dendrograms. The examined isolates exhibited highly variable cellular morphology at 36 degrees C, when typical yeast cells were expected. On the other hand, at 26 degrees C all the isolates showed mycelial morphology. The analysis of protein synthesis profiles made it possible to cluster the P. brasiliensis isolates into groups that correlated with the morphological data. Interestingly, growth at 36 degrees C strongly decreased the heterogeneity of protein synthesis patterns seen in mycelial isolates. It was possible to cluster the isolates grown at 36 degrees C in three groups based on their two-dimensional protein synthesis analysis. The similarity index observed among the mycelial isolates was lower than that obtained with yeast cells, suggesting a more homogenous gene expression pattern in the host-adapted form than in the saprobic phase.

  17. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Pattern in Sperm Proteins Isolated from Normospermic and Teratospermic Men

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Sepideh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Amirjanati, Naser; Lakpour, Niknam; Asgharpour, Lima; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In mammalian system, spermatozoa are not able to fertilize the oocyte immediately upon ejaculation, thus they undergo a series of biochemical and molecular changes which is termed capacitation. During sperm capacitation, signal transduction pathways are activated which lead to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have an important role in sperm capacitation such as hyperactive motility, interaction with zona pellucida and acrosome reaction. Evaluation of tyrosine phosphorylation pattern is important for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of fertilization and the etiology of sperm dysfunctions and abnormalities such as teratospermia. The goal of this study is to characterize tyrosine phosphorylation pattern in sperm proteins isolated from normospermic and teratospermic infertile men attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic in Tehran. Materials and Methods Semen samples were collected and the spermatozoa were isolated using Percoll gradient centrifugation. Then the spermatozoa were incubated up to 6h at 37°C with 5% CO2 in 3% Bovine Serum Albumin-supplemented Ham's F-10 for capacitation to take place. The total proteins from spermatozoa were extracted and were subjected to SDS-PAGE before and after capacitation. To evaluate protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern, western blotting with specific antibody against phosphorylated tyrosines was performed. Results The results upon western blotting showed: 1) at least six protein bands were detected before capacitation in the spermatozoa from normospermic samples. However, comparable levels of tyrosine phosphorylation was not observed in the spermatozoa from teratospermic samples. 2) The intensity of protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to have been increased during capacitation in the normospermic relative to the teratospermic group. Conclusion For the first time, these findings demonstrate and suggest that the differences in the types of proteins and diminished

  18. Inheritance patterns of enzymes and serum proteins of mallard-black duck hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, R.P.; Meritt, D.W.; Block, S.B.; Cole, M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1976, a breeding program was used to produce hybrids of black ducks and mallards for the evaluation of inheritance patterns of serum proteins and serum, liver and muscle enzymes. In addition to the crosses designed to produce hybrids, a series of matings in 1975 and 1976 were designed to evaluate inheritance patterns of a hybrid with either a black duck or mallard. At the F1 level, hybrids were easily distinguished using serum proteins. However, once a hybrid was crossed back to either a mallard or black duck, only 12-23% of the progeny were distinguishable from black ducks or mallards using serum proteins and 23-39% using esterases. Muscle, serum and liver enzymes were similar between the two species.

  19. Inheritance patterns of enzymes and serum proteins of mallard-black duck hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, R.P.; Meritt, D.W.; Block, S.B.; Cole, M.A.; Sulkin, S.T.; Lee, F.B.; Henny, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1976, a breeding program was used to produce hybrids of black ducks and mallards for the evaluation of inheritance patterns of serum proteins and serum, liver and muscle enzymes. In addition to the crosses designed to produce hybrids, a series of matings in 1975 and 1976 were designed to evaluate inheritance patterns of a hybrid with either a black duck or mallard. At the F1 level, hybrids were easily distinguished using serum proteins. However, once a hybrid was crossed back to either a mallard or black duck, only 12?23% of the progeny were distinguishable from black ducks or mallards using serum proteins and 23?39% using esterases. Muscle, serum and liver enzymes were similar between the two species.

  20. Protein secretory patterns of rat Sertoli and peritubular cells are influenced by culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kierszenbaum, A.L.; Crowell, J.A.; Shabanowitz, R.B.; DePhilip, R.M.; Tres, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    An approach combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography was used to correlate patterns of secretory proteins in cultures of Sertoli and peritubular cells with those observed in the incubation medium from segments of seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells in culture and in seminiferous tubules secreted three proteins designated S70 (Mr 72,000-70,000), S45 (Mr 45,000), and S35 (Mr 35,000). Cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells and incubated seminiferous tubules secreted two proteins designated SP1 (Mr 42,000) and SP2 (Mr 50,000). SP1 and S45 have similar Mr but differ from each other in isoelectric point (pI). Cultured peritubular cells secreted a protein designated P40 (Mr 40,000) that was also seen in intact seminiferous tubules but not in seminiferous tubules lacking the peritubular cell wall. However, a large number of high-Mr proteins were observed only in the medium of cultured peritubular cells but not in the incubation medium of intact seminiferous tubules. Culture conditions influence the morphology and patterns of protein secretion of cultured peritubular cells. Peritubular cells that display a flat-stellate shape transition when placed in culture medium free of serum (with or without hormones and growth factors), accumulate various proteins in the medium that are less apparent when these cells are maintained in medium supplemented with serum. Two secretory proteins stimulated by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (designated SCm1 and SCm2) previously found in the medium of cultured Sertoli cells, were also observed in the incubation medium of seminiferous tubular segments stimulated by FSH. Results of this study show that, although cultured Sertoli and peritubular cells synthesize and secrete proteins also observed in segments of incubated seminiferous tubules anther group of proteins lacks seminiferous tubular correlates.

  1. Ser/Thr Motifs in Transmembrane Proteins: Conservation Patterns and Effects on Local Protein Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; White, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    We combined systematic bioinformatics analyses and molecular dynamics simulations to assess the conservation patterns of Ser and Thr motifs in membrane proteins, and the effect of such motifs on the structure and dynamics of α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. We find that Ser/Thr motifs are often present in β-barrel TM proteins. At least one Ser/Thr motif is present in almost half of the sequences of α-helical proteins analyzed here. The extensive bioinformatics analyses and inspection of protein structures led to the identification of molecular transporters with noticeable numbers of Ser/Thr motifs within the TM region. Given the energetic penalty for burying multiple Ser/Thr groups in the membrane hydrophobic core, the observation of transporters with multiple membrane-embedded Ser/Thr is intriguing and raises the question of how the presence of multiple Ser/Thr affects protein local structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations of four different Ser-containing model TM peptides indicate that backbone hydrogen bonding of membrane-buried Ser/Thr hydroxyl groups can significantly change the local structure and dynamics of the helix. Ser groups located close to the membrane interface can hydrogen bond to solvent water instead of protein backbone, leading to an enhanced local solvation of the peptide. PMID:22836667

  2. Effects of salt on the pattern of protein synthesis in barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkman, W.J.; Tanaka, C.K.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of salt stress on the incorporation of (/sup 3//sub 5/S)methionine into protein was examined in roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.cv California Mariout 72). Plants were grown in nutrient solution with or without 200 millimolar NaCl. Roots of intact plants were labeled in vivo and proteins were extracted and analyzed by fluorography of two-dimensional gels. Although the protein patterns for control and salt-stressed plants were qualitatively similar, the net synthesis of a number of proteins was quantitatively changed. The most striking change was a significant increase of label in two protein pairs that had pls of approximately 6.3 and 6.5. Each pair consisted of proteins of approximately 26 and 27 kilodaltons (kD). In roots of control plants, the 27-kD proteins were more heavily labeled in the microsomal fraction relative to the 26-kD proteins, whereas the 26-kD proteins were enriched in the post 178,000g supernatant fraction; in roots of salt treated plants, the 26- and 27-kD proteins were more intensely labeled in both fractions. Labeling of the 26- and 27-kD proteins returned to control levels when salt-stressed plants were transferred to nutrient solution without NaCl. No cross-reaction was detected between the antibody to the 26-kD protein from salt-adapted tobacco cells and the 26- and 27-kD proteins of barley.

  3. Biophysical Models of Protein Evolution: Understanding the Patterns of Evolutionary Sequence Divergence.

    PubMed

    Echave, Julian; Wilke, Claus O

    2017-03-15

    For decades, rates of protein evolution have been interpreted in terms of the vague concept of functional importance. Slowly evolving proteins or sites within proteins were assumed to be more functionally important and thus subject to stronger selection pressure. More recently, biophysical models of protein evolution, which combine evolutionary theory with protein biophysics, have completely revolutionized our view of the forces that shape sequence divergence. Slowly evolving proteins have been found to evolve slowly because of selection against toxic misfolding and misinteractions, linking their rate of evolution primarily to their abundance. Similarly, most slowly evolving sites in proteins are not directly involved in function, but mutating these sites has a large impact on protein structure and stability. In this article, we review the studies in the emerging field of biophysical protein evolution that have shaped our current understanding of sequence divergence patterns. We also propose future research directions to develop this nascent field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biophysics Volume 46 is May 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Alteration of protein patterns in black rock inhabiting fungi as a response to different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Zakharova, Kristina; Isola, Daniela; Selbmann, Laura; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Rock inhabiting fungi are among the most stress tolerant organisms on Earth. They are able to cope with different stressors determined by the typical conditions of bare rocks in hot and cold extreme environments. In this study first results of a system biological approach based on two-dimensional protein profiles are presented. Protein patterns of extremotolerant black fungi – Coniosporium perforans, Exophiala jeanselmei – and of the extremophilic fungus – Friedmanniomyces endolithicus – were compared with the cosmopolitan and mesophilic hyphomycete Penicillium chrysogenum in order to follow and determine changes in the expression pattern under different temperatures. The 2D protein gels indicated a temperature dependent qualitative change in all the tested strains. Whereas the reference strain P. chrysogenum expressed the highest number of proteins at 40 °C, thus exhibiting real signs of temperature induced reaction, black fungi, when exposed to temperatures far above their growth optimum, decreased the number of proteins indicating a down-regulation of their metabolism. Temperature of 1 °C led to an increased number of proteins in all of the analysed strains, with the exception of P. chrysogenum. These first results on temperature dependent reactions in rock inhabiting black fungi indicate a rather different strategy to cope with non-optimal temperature than in the mesophilic hyphomycete P. chrysogenum. PMID:22862921

  5. Unique Pattern of Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) Honey.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Rückriemen, Jana; Sandner, Daniel; Henle, Thomas

    2017-05-03

    As a unique feature, honey from the New Zealand manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium) contains substantial amounts of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). Although MGO is a reactive intermediate in the Maillard reaction, very little is known about reactions of MGO with honey proteins. We hypothesized that the abundance of MGO should result in a particular pattern of protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in manuka honey. A protein-rich high-molecular-weight fraction was isolated from 12 manuka and 8 non-manuka honeys and hydrolyzed enzymatically. By HPLC-MS/MS, 8 MRPs, namely, N-ε-fructosyllysine, N-ε-maltulosyllysine, carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine (CEL), pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1), were quantitated. Compared to non-manuka honeys, the manuka honeys were characterized by high concentrations of CEL and MG-H1, whereas the formation of N-ε-fructosyllysine was suppressed, indicating concurrence reactions of glucose and MGO at the ε-amino group of protein-bound lysine. Up to 31% of the lysine and 8% of the arginine residues, respectively, in the manuka honey protein can be modified to CEL and MG-H1, respectively. CEL and MG-H1 concentrations correlated strongly with the MGO concentration of the honeys. Manuka honey possesses a special pattern of protein-bound MRPs, which might be used to prove the reliability of labeled MGO levels in honeys and possibly enable the detection of fraudulent MGO or DHA addition to honey.

  6. Alteration of protein patterns in black rock inhabiting fungi as a response to different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Zakharova, Kristina; Isola, Daniela; Selbmann, Laura; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-08-01

    Rock inhabiting fungi are among the most stress tolerant organisms on Earth. They are able to cope with different stressors determined by the typical conditions of bare rocks in hot and cold extreme environments. In this study first results of a system biological approach based on two-dimensional protein profiles are presented. Protein patterns of extremotolerant black fungi -Coniosporium perforans, Exophiala jeanselmei - and of the extremophilic fungus -Friedmanniomyces endolithicus - were compared with the cosmopolitan and mesophilic hyphomycete Penicillium chrysogenum in order to follow and determine changes in the expression pattern under different temperatures. The 2D protein gels indicated a temperature dependent qualitative change in all the tested strains. Whereas the reference strain P. chrysogenum expressed the highest number of proteins at 40 °C, thus exhibiting real signs of temperature induced reaction, black fungi, when exposed to temperatures far above their growth optimum, decreased the number of proteins indicating a down-regulation of their metabolism. Temperature of 1 °C led to an increased number of proteins in all of the analysed strains, with the exception of P. chrysogenum. These first results on temperature dependent reactions in rock inhabiting black fungi indicate a rather different strategy to cope with non-optimal temperature than in the mesophilic hyphomycete P. chrysogenum.

  7. COMP mutation screening as an aid for the clinical diagnosis and counselling of patients with a suspected diagnosis of pseudoachondroplasia or multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jason; Jackson, Gail; Ramsden, Simon; Taylor, Jacky; Newman, William; Wright, Michael J; Donnai, Dian; Elles, Rob; Briggs, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of conditions affecting the development of the osseous skeleton and fall into the category of rare genetic diseases in which the diagnosis can be difficult for the nonexpert. Two such diseases are pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), which result in varying degrees of short stature, joint pain and stiffness and often resulting in early onset osteoarthritis. PSACH and some forms of MED result from mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene and to aid the clinical diagnosis and counselling of patients with a suspected diagnosis of PSACH or MED, we developed an efficient and accurate molecular diagnostic service for the COMP gene. In a 36-month period, 100 families were screened for a mutation in COMP and we identified disease-causing mutations in 78% of PSACH families and 36% of MED families. Furthermore, in several of these families, the identification of a disease-causing mutation provided information that was immediately used to direct reproductive decision-making. PMID:15756302

  8. Ultrathin coatings from isocyanate terminated star PEG prepolymers: patterning of proteins on the layers.

    PubMed

    Groll, Juergen; Haubensak, Wulf; Ameringer, Thomas; Moeller, Martin

    2005-03-29

    This study presents the easy and fast patterning of low molecular weight molecules that act as binding partners for proteins on Star PEG coatings. These coatings are prepared from isocyanate terminated star shaped prepolymers and form a highly cross-linked network on the substrate in which the stars are connected via urea groups and free amino groups are present. Streptavidin has been patterned on these layers by microcontact printing (muCP) of an amino reactive biotin derivative and consecutive binding of streptavidin to the biotin. Patterns of Ni(2+)-nitriltriacetic acid (NTA) receptors have been prepared by printing amino functional NTA molecules in freshly prepared Star PEG layers that still contain amino reactive isocyanate groups. Complexation of the NTA groups with Ni(II) ions enabled the binding of His-tag enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the desired pattern on the substrates. Since the unmodified Star PEG layers prevent unspecific protein adsorption, His-EGFP could selectively be bound to the sample by immersion into crude, nonpurified His-tag EGFP containing cell lysate.

  9. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  10. Characterizing Genes with Distinct Methylation Patterns in the Context of Protein-Protein Interaction Network: Application to Human Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. Results In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. Conclusions We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms. PMID:23776563

  11. Biased inheritance of the protein PatN frees vegetative cells to initiate patterned heterocyst differentiation.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Wong, Francis C Y; Meeks, John C

    2012-09-18

    Heterocysts, cells specialized for nitrogen fixation in certain filamentous cyanobacteria, appear singly in a nonrandom spacing pattern along the chain of vegetative cells. A two-stage, biased initiation and competitive resolution model has been proposed to explain the establishment of this spacing pattern. There is substantial evidence that competitive resolution of a subset of cells initiating differentiation occurs by interactions between a self-enhancing activator protein, HetR, and a diffusible pentapeptide inhibitor PatS-5 (RGSGR). Results presented here show that the absence of a unique membrane protein, PatN, in Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 leads to a threefold increase in heterocyst frequency and a fourfold decrease in the vegetative cell interval between heterocysts. A PatN-GFP translational fusion shows a pattern of biased inheritance in daughter vegetative cells of ammonium-grown cultures. Inactivation of another heterocyst patterning gene, patA, is epistatic to inactivation of patN, and transcription of patA increases in a patN-deletion strain, implying that patN may function by modulating levels of patA. The presence of PatN is hypothesized to decrease the competency of a vegetative cell to initiate heterocyst differentiation, and the cellular concentration of PatN is dependent on cell division that results in cells transiently depleted of PatN. We suggest that biased inheritance of cell-fate determinants is a phylogenetic domain-spanning paradigm in the development of biological patterns.

  12. Finite cell-size effects on protein variability in Turing patterned tissues.

    PubMed

    Buceta, Javier

    2017-08-01

    Herein we present a framework to characterize different sources of protein expression variability in Turing patterned tissues. In this context, we introduce the concept of granular noise to account for the unavoidable fluctuations due to finite cell-size effects and show that the nearest-neighbours autocorrelation function provides the means to measure it. To test our findings, we perform in silico experiments of growing tissues driven by a generic activator-inhibitor dynamics. Our results show that the relative importance of different sources of noise depends on the ratio between the characteristic size of cells and that of the pattern domains and on the ratio between the pattern amplitude and the effective intensity of the biochemical fluctuations. Importantly, our framework provides the tools to measure and distinguish different stochastic contributions during patterning: granularity versus biochemical noise. In addition, our analysis identifies the protein species that buffer the stochasticity the best and, consequently, it can help to determine key instructive signals in systems driven by a Turing instability. Altogether, we expect our study to be relevant in developmental processes leading to the formation of periodic patterns in tissues. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Analysis of evolutionary conservation patterns and their influence on identifying protein functional sites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chun; Noguchi, Tamotsu; Yamana, Hayato

    2014-10-01

    Evolutionary conservation information included in position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) has been widely adopted by sequence-based methods for identifying protein functional sites, because all functional sites, whether in ordered or disordered proteins, are found to be conserved at some extent. However, different functional sites have different conservation patterns, some of them are linear contextual, some of them are mingled with highly variable residues, and some others seem to be conserved independently. Every value in PSSMs is calculated independently of each other, without carrying the contextual information of residues in the sequence. Therefore, adopting the direct output of PSSM for prediction fails to consider the relationship between conservation patterns of residues and the distribution of conservation scores in PSSMs. In order to demonstrate the importance of combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of functional sites for prediction, three different PSSM-based methods for identifying three kinds of functional sites have been analyzed. Results suggest that, different PSSM-based methods differ in their capability to identify different patterns of functional sites, and better combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of residues would largely facilitate the prediction.

  14. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process.

  15. Protein interaction patterns in different cellular environments are revealed by in-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In-cell NMR allows obtaining atomic-level information on biological macromolecules in their physiological environment. Soluble proteins may interact with the cellular environment in different ways: either specifically, with their functional partners, or non-specifically, with other cellular components. Such behaviour often causes the disappearance of the NMR signals. Here we show that by introducing mutations on the human protein profilin 1, used here as a test case, the in-cell NMR signals can be recovered. In human cells both specific and non-specific interactions are present, while in bacterial cells only the effect of non-specific interactions is observed. By comparing the NMR signal recovery pattern in human and bacterial cells, the relative contribution of each type of interaction can be assessed. This strategy allows detecting solution in-cell NMR spectra of soluble proteins without altering their fold, thus extending the applicability of in-cell NMR to a wider range of proteins. PMID:26399546

  16. Patterns of molecular evolution and predicted function in thaumatin-like proteins of Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia Ping; Su, Xiao Hua

    2010-09-01

    Some pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) are subject to positive selection, while others are under negative selection. Here, we report the patterns of molecular evolution in thaumatin-like protein (TLP, PR5 protein) genes of Populus trichocarpa. Signs of positive selection were found in 20 out of 55 Populus TLPs using the likelihood ratio test and ML-based Bayesian methods. Due to the connection between the acidic cleft and the antifungal activity, the secondary structure and three-dimensional structure analyses predicted antifungal activity beta-1,3-glucanase activities in these TLPs. Moreover, the coincidence with variable basic sites in the acidic cleft and positively selected sites suggested that fungal diseases may have been the main environmental stress that drove rapid adaptive evolution in Populus.

  17. Plasma-assisted nanoscale protein patterning on Si substrates via colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Malainou, A; Tsougeni, K; Ellinas, K; Petrou, P S; Constantoudis, V; Sarantopoulou, E; Awsiuk, K; Bernasik, A; Budkowski, A; Markou, A; Panagiotopoulos, I; Kakabakos, S E; Gogolides, E; Tserepi, A

    2013-12-19

    Selective immobilization of proteins in well-defined patterns on substrates has recently attracted considerable attention as an enabling technology for applications ranging from biosensors and BioMEMS to tissue engineering. In this work, a method is reported for low-cost, large scale and high throughput, selective immobilization of proteins on nanopatterned Si, based on colloidal lithography and plasma processing to define the areas (<300 nm) where proteins are selectively immobilized. A close-packed monolayer of PS microparticles is deposited on oxidized Si and, either after microparticle size reduction or alternatively after metal deposition through the PS close-packed monolayer, is used as etching mask to define SiO2 nanoislands (on Si). C4F8 plasma was used to selectively etch and modify the SiO2 nanoislands while depositing a fluorocarbon layer on the Si surface. The plasma-treated surfaces were chemically characterized in terms of functional group identification through XPS analysis and reaction with specific molecules. Highly selective protein immobilization mainly through physical adsorption on SiO2 nanoislands and not on surrounding Si was observed after C4F8 plasma-induced chemical modification of the substrate. The thickness of the immobilized protein monolayer was estimated by means of AFM image analysis. The method reported herein constitutes a cost-efficient route toward rapid, large surface, and high-density patterning of biomolecules on solid supports that can be easily applied in BioMEMS or microanalytical systems.

  18. Developmental expression patterns of cuticular protein genes with the R&R Consensus from Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Togawa, Toru; Dunn, W. Augustine; Emmons, Aaron C.; Nagao, John; Willis, Judith H.

    2008-01-01

    CPR proteins are the largest cuticular protein family in arthropods. The whole genome sequence of Anopheles gambiae revealed 156 genes that code for proteins with the R&R Consensus and named CPRs. This protein family can be divided into RR-1 and RR-2 subgroups, postulated to contribute to different regions of the cuticle. We determined the temporal expression patterns of these genes throughout post-embryonic development by means of real-time qRT-PCR. Based on expression profiles, these genes were grouped into 21 clusters. Most of the genes were expressed with sharp peaks at single or multiple periods associated with molting. Genes coding for RR-1 and RR-2 proteins were found together in several co-expression clusters. Twenty-five genes were expressed exclusively at one metamorphic stage. Five out of six X-linked genes showed equal expression in males and females, supporting the presence of a gene dosage compensation system in An. gambiae. Many RR-2 genes are organized into sequence clusters whose members are extremely similar to each other and generally closely associated on a chromosome. Most genes in each sequence cluster are expressed with the same temporal expression pattern and at the same level, suggesting a shared mechanism to regulate their expression. PMID:18405829

  19. Geomfinder: a multi-feature identifier of similar three-dimensional protein patterns: a ligand-independent approach.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Vivanco, Gabriel; Valdés-Jiménez, Alejandro; Besoaín, Felipe; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Since the structure of proteins is more conserved than the sequence, the identification of conserved three-dimensional (3D) patterns among a set of proteins, can be important for protein function prediction, protein clustering, drug discovery and the establishment of evolutionary relationships. Thus, several computational applications to identify, describe and compare 3D patterns (or motifs) have been developed. Often, these tools consider a 3D pattern as that described by the residues surrounding co-crystallized/docked ligands available from X-ray crystal structures or homology models. Nevertheless, many of the protein structures stored in public databases do not provide information about the location and characteristics of ligand binding sites and/or other important 3D patterns such as allosteric sites, enzyme-cofactor interaction motifs, etc. This makes necessary the development of new ligand-independent methods to search and compare 3D patterns in all available protein structures. Here we introduce Geomfinder, an intuitive, flexible, alignment-free and ligand-independent web server for detailed estimation of similarities between all pairs of 3D patterns detected in any two given protein structures. We used around 1100 protein structures to form pairs of proteins which were assessed with Geomfinder. In these analyses each protein was considered in only one pair (e.g. in a subset of 100 different proteins, 50 pairs of proteins can be defined). Thus: (a) Geomfinder detected identical pairs of 3D patterns in a series of monoamine oxidase-B structures, which corresponded to the effectively similar ligand binding sites at these proteins; (b) we identified structural similarities among pairs of protein structures which are targets of compounds such as acarbose, benzamidine, adenosine triphosphate and pyridoxal phosphate; these similar 3D patterns are not detected using sequence-based methods; (c) the detailed evaluation of three specific cases showed the versatility

  20. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  1. Mapping Protein Abundance Patterns in the Brain Using Voxelation Combined with Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2009-01-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps. PMID:19654045

  2. Patterning protein molecules on poly(ethylene glycol) coated Si(111).

    PubMed

    Jun, Yongseok; Cha, Taewoon; Guo, Athena; Zhu, X-Y

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate spatially localized immobilization of protein molecules on high-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated Si(111). Patterns of HO- and CH3O-terminated PEG regions are formed on silicon surfaces based on soft lithography techniques and an efficient reaction between alcohol functional groups and chlorine-terminated silicon. Activation of the HO-terminated PEG brush is achieved via either partial oxidation to form aldehyde groups or via attachment of efficient leaving groups. Protein molecules are covalently immobilized to these activated regions on the PEG/Si surface.

  3. Polyanion cluster patterning on polymer surface through microemulsion approach for selective adsorption of proteins.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Ma, Yingyi; Sun, Hang; Li, Wen; Wu, Lixin

    2013-11-01

    A facile method to fabricate honeycomb-patterned polymer films bearing cavities that are locally decorated with inorganic component is developed in this study. By mixing poly(methyl methacrylate) dichloromethane solution containing P123 with polyoxometalate (POM) aqueous solution through shaking, a reversed hybrid microemulsion is obtained. The evaporation of solvent in the microemulsion on solid surface yields an ordered porous film accompanied by the accumulation of P123 and POMs on the inner surface of the cavities. The formation of patterned structure is proved to be independent from the type of POMs, but the size of the cavities can be adjusted to some extent by changing the concentration of surfactant and polymer, and the volume ratio of water and dichloromethane in the solution used for casting. The locally anchored POMs can be readily applied for the selective recognition of proteins. BSA and hemoglobin patterns are then fabricated through their electrostatic interactions with POMs. At lower pH, POM pattern could prior recognize hemoglobin from its mixed solution of BSA, generating a characteristic pattern. The reported work creates an efficient way of patterning organically incompatible components, such as water-soluble molecules and nanoparticles, on porous polymer films for the fabrication of multi-functional hybrid surface structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The ZIC gene family encodes multi-functional proteins essential for patterning and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, Rob; Souopgui, Jacob; Tejpar, Sabine; Arkell, Ruth

    2013-10-01

    The zinc finger of the cerebellum gene (ZIC) discovered in Drosophila melanogaster (odd-paired) has five homologs in Xenopus, chicken, mice, and humans, and seven in zebrafish. This pattern of gene copy expansion is accompanied by a divergence in gene and protein structure, suggesting that Zic family members share some, but not all, functions. ZIC genes are implicated in neuroectodermal development and neural crest cell induction. All share conserved regions encoding zinc finger domains, however their heterogeneity and specification remain unexplained. In this review, the evolution, structure, and expression patterns of the ZIC homologs are described; specific functions attributable to individual family members are supported. A review of data from functional studies in Xenopus and murine models suggest that ZIC genes encode multifunctional proteins operating in a context-specific manner to drive critical events during embryogenesis. The identification of ZIC mutations in congenital syndromes highlights the relevance of these genes in human development.

  5. Stable sol-gel microstructured and microfluidic networks for protein patterning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y D; Park, C B; Clark, D S

    2001-06-05

    We demonstrate the formation of micropatterned sol-gel structures containing active proteins by patterning with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels. To transport sol solution efficiently into the hydrophobic PDMS microchannels, a hydrophilic-hydrophobic block copolymer was used to impart hydrophilicity to the PDMS microchannels. Poor adhesion of the micropatterned gel structure onto glass slides was improved by treating the glass surface with a polymeric substrate. To minimize cracks in the gel microstructure, hybrid matrices of interpenetrating organic and inorganic networks were prepared containing the reactive organic moieties polyvinylalcohol or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Retention of biochemical activity within the micropatterned gel was demonstrated by performing immunobinding assays with immobilized immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. The potential application of microfluidics technology to immobilized-enzyme biocatalysis was demonstrated using PDMS-patterned microchannels filled with trypsin-containing sol-gels. This work provides a foundation for the microfabrication of functional protein chips using sol-gel processes. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. MAMP (microbe-associated molecular pattern)-induced changes in plasma membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Uhlíková, Hana; Solanský, Martin; Hrdinová, Vendula; Šedo, Ondrej; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Hejátko, Jan; Lochman, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Plant plasma membrane associated proteins play significant roles in Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern (MAMP) mediated defence responses including signal transduction, membrane transport or energetic metabolism. To elucidate the dynamics of proteins associated with plasma membrane in response to cryptogein, a well-known MAMP of defence reaction secreted by the oomycete Phytophthora cryptogea, 2D-Blue Native/SDS gel electrophoresis of plasma membrane fractions was employed. This approach revealed 21 up- or down-regulated protein spots of which 15 were successfully identified as proteins related to transport through plasma membrane, vesicle trafficking, and metabolic enzymes including cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme and glutamine synthetase. Observed changes in proteins were also confirmed on transcriptional level by qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, a significantly decreased accumulation of transcripts observed after employment of a mutant variant of cryptogein Leu41Phe, exhibiting a conspicuous defect in induction of resistance, sustains the contribution of identified proteins in cryptogein-triggered cellular responses. Our data provide further evidence for dynamic MAMP-induced changes in plasma membrane associated proteins.

  7. Automatic classification and pattern discovery in high-throughput protein crystallization trials.

    PubMed

    Cumbaa, Christian; Jurisica, Igor

    2005-01-01

    Conceptually, protein crystallization can be divided into two phases search and optimization. Robotic protein crystallization screening can speed up the search phase, and has a potential to increase process quality. Automated image classification helps to increase throughput and consistently generate objective results. Although the classification accuracy can always be improved, our image analysis system can classify images from 1,536-well plates with high classification accuracy (85%) and ROC score (0.87), as evaluated on 127 human-classified protein screens containing 5,600 crystal images and 189,472 non-crystal images. Data mining can integrate results from high-throughput screens with information about crystallizing conditions, intrinsic protein properties, and results from crystallization optimization. We apply association mining, a data mining approach that identifies frequently occurring patterns among variables and their values. This approach segregates proteins into groups based on how they react in a broad range of conditions, and clusters cocktails to reflect their potential to achieve crystallization. These results may lead to crystallization screen optimization, and reveal associations between protein properties and crystallization conditions. We also postulate that past experience may lead us to the identification of initial conditions favorable to crystallization for novel proteins.

  8. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  9. Abundantly and rarely expressed Lhc protein genes exhibit distinct regulation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Klimmek, Frank; Sjödin, Andreas; Noutsos, Christos; Leister, Dario; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We have analyzed gene regulation of the Lhc supergene family in poplar (Populus spp.) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using digital expression profiling. Multivariate analysis of the tissue-specific, environmental, and developmental Lhc expression patterns in Arabidopsis and poplar was employed to characterize four rarely expressed Lhc genes, Lhca5, Lhca6, Lhcb7, and Lhcb4.3. Those genes have high expression levels under different conditions and in different tissues than the abundantly expressed Lhca1 to 4 and Lhcb1 to 6 genes that code for the 10 major types of higher plant light-harvesting proteins. However, in some of the datasets analyzed, the Lhcb4 and Lhcb6 genes as well as an Arabidopsis gene not present in poplar (Lhcb2.3) exhibited minor differences to the main cooperative Lhc gene expression pattern. The pattern of the rarely expressed Lhc genes was always found to be more similar to that of PsbS and the various light-harvesting-like genes, which might indicate distinct physiological functions for the rarely and abundantly expressed Lhc proteins. The previously undetected Lhcb7 gene encodes a novel plant Lhcb-type protein that possibly contains an additional, fourth, transmembrane N-terminal helix with a highly conserved motif. As the Lhcb4.3 gene seems to be present only in Eurosid species and as its regulation pattern varies significantly from that of Lhcb4.1 and Lhcb4.2, we conclude it to encode a distinct Lhc protein type, Lhcb8.

  10. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as ‘FPKATD’ and ‘Y/FTNEKL’ without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids’ pattern in different proteins. PMID:27930687

  11. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Das, Provas; Ray, Korak Kumar; Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as 'FPKATD' and 'Y/FTNEKL' without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids' pattern in different proteins.

  12. Discovering co-occurring patterns and their biological significance in protein families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The large influx of biological sequences poses the importance of identifying and correlating conserved regions in homologous sequences to acquire valuable biological knowledge. These conserved regions contain statistically significant residue associations as sequence patterns. Thus, patterns from two conserved regions co-occurring frequently on the same sequences are inferred to have joint functionality. A method for finding conserved regions in protein families with frequent co-occurrence patterns is proposed. The biological significance of the discovered clusters of conserved regions with co-occurrences patterns can be validated by their three-dimensional closeness of amino acids and the biological functionality found in those regions as supported by published work. Methods Using existing algorithms, we discovered statistically significant amino acid associations as sequence patterns. We then aligned and clustered them into Aligned Pattern Clusters (APCs) corresponding to conserved regions with amino acid conservation and variation. When one APC frequently co-occured with another APC, the two APCs have high co-occurrence. We then clustered APCs with high co-occurrence into what we refer to as Co-occurrence APC Clusters (Co-occurrence Clusters). Results Our results show that for Co-occurrence Clusters, the three-dimensional distance between their amino acids is closer than average amino acid distances. For the Co-occurrence Clusters of the ubiquitin and the cytochrome c families, we observed biological significance among the residing amino acids of the APCs within the same cluster. In ubiquitin, the residues are responsible for ubiquitination as well as conventional and unconventional ubiquitin-bindings. In cytochrome c, amino acids in the first co-occurrence cluster contribute to binding of other proteins in the electron transport chain, and amino acids in the second co-occurrence cluster contribute to the stability of the axial heme ligand

  13. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  14. Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to pattern the midbrain-hindbrain and diencephalic-mesencephalic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Timothy; Scholpp, Steffen; Brand, Michael; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2007-01-15

    Pbx proteins are a family of TALE-class transcription factors that are well characterized as Hox co-factors acting to impart segmental identity to the hindbrain rhombomeres. However, no role for Pbx in establishing more anterior neural compartments has been demonstrated. Studies done in Drosophila show that Engrailed requires Exd (Pbx orthologue) for its biological activity. Here, we present evidence that zebrafish Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to compartmentalize the midbrain by regulating the maintenance of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) and the diencephalic-mesencephalic boundary (DMB). Embryos lacking Pbx function correctly initiate midbrain patterning, but fail to maintain eng2a, pax2a, fgf8, gbx2, and wnt1 expression at the MHB. Formation of the DMB is also defective as shown by a caudal expansion of diencephalic epha4a and pax6a expression into midbrain territory. These phenotypes are similar to the phenotype of an Engrailed loss-of-function embryo, supporting the hypothesis that Pbx and Engrailed act together on a common genetic pathway. Consistent with this model, we demonstrate that zebrafish Engrailed and Pbx interact in vitro and that this interaction is required for both the eng2a overexpression phenotype and Engrailed's role in patterning the MHB. Our data support a novel model of midbrain development in which Pbx and Engrailed proteins cooperatively pattern the mesencephalic region of the neural tube.

  15. Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to pattern the midbrain-hindbrain and diencephalic-mesencephalic boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Timothy; Scholpp, Steffen; Brand, Michael; Moens, Cecilia B.; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2007-01-01

    Pbx proteins are a family of TALE-class transcription factors that are well characterized as Hox co-factors acting to impart segmental identity to the hindbrain rhombomeres. However, no role for Pbx in establishing more anterior neural compartments has been demonstrated. Studies done in Drosophila show that Engrailed requires Exd (Pbx orthologue) for its biological activity. Here, we present evidence that zebrafish Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to compartmentalize the midbrain by regulating the maintenance of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) and the diencephalic-mesencephalic boundary (DMB). Embryos lacking Pbx function correctly initiate midbrain patterning, but fail to maintain eng2a, pax2a, fgf8, gbx2, and wnt1 expression at the MHB. Formation of the DMB is also defective as shown by a caudal expansion of diencephalic epha4a and pax6a expression into midbrain territory. These phenotypes are similar to the phenotype of an Engrailed loss-of-function embryo, supporting the hypothesis that Pbx and Engrailed act together on a common genetic pathway. Consistent with this model, we demonstrate that zebrafish Engrailed and Pbx interact in vitro, and that this interaction is required for both the eng2a overexpression phenotype and Engrailed’s role in patterning the MHB. Our data support a novel model of midbrain development in which Pbx and Engrailed proteins cooperatively pattern the mesencephalic region of the neural tube. PMID:16959235

  16. Ethanol and Cancer Induce Similar Changes on Protein Expression Pattern of Human Fibroblast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian–Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Rahmati-Rad, Sara; Rezaei Tavirani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has a vast consumption around the world. Many researches confirmed some adverse effect of this component on human health. In addition, recent studies showed significant alteration in both cellular population, and protein profile of human foreskin fibroblast cell line (HFFF2) in the specific dosage of ethanol. Here, the role and interaction of some proteins (characterized by significant alteration in expression due to ethanol effect) analyzed by proteomics and evaluated by considering cancerous case. 2D-electrophoresis findings of comparison of normal fibroblast cells and treated fibroblast with 270 mM dosage of ethanol analyzed by using SameSpots software, R software, and Cytoscape for protein-protein interaction (PPI) investigation. Six proteins with significantly altered expression associated with fundamental properties in a cell identified in ethanol-treated sample. These include AnnexinA5, Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor, Cathepsin L, Cu/Zn-SOD, Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor, and Serpin peptidase inhibitor. Surprisingly, all these proteins were down-regulated and this pattern is similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated stromal fibroblast sample. Additionally, protein-protein interaction (PPI) indicates that HNRNPA1, SERPINE1 are hub proteins. Once their expression alters, it can impose vast changes on other molecular function. Based on this approach, ethanol may target same pathways that are related to cancer onset. In addition, some epidemiologic studies proved that ethanol consumption is related to increment of cancer risk. Therefore, more investigation is required in this regard to elicit the feasible relationship. PMID:28228815

  17. Comparative proteomics reveals recruitment patterns of some protein families in the venoms of Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Becerra, Adrian; Chung, Ray; Morandini, André C; Weston, Andrew J; Padilla, Gabriel; Gacesa, Ranko; Ward, Malcolm; Long, Paul F; Marques, Antonio C

    2017-10-01

    Cnidarians are probably the oldest group of animals to be venomous, yet our current picture of cnidarian venom evolution is highly imbalanced due to limited taxon sampling. High-throughput tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine venom composition of the scyphozoan Chrysaora lactea and two cubozoans Tamoya haplonema and Chiropsalmus quadrumanus. Protein recruitment patterns were then compared against 5 other cnidarian venom proteomes taken from the literature. A total of 28 putative toxin protein families were identified, many for the first time in Cnidaria. Character mapping analysis revealed that 17 toxin protein families with predominantly cytolytic biological activities were likely recruited into the cnidarian venom proteome before the lineage split between Anthozoa and Medusozoa. Thereafter, venoms of Medusozoa and Anthozoa differed during subsequent divergence of cnidarian classes. Recruitment and loss of toxin protein families did not correlate with accepted phylogenetic patterns of Cnidaria. Selective pressures that drive toxin diversification independent of taxonomic positioning have yet to be identified in Cnidaria and now warrant experimental consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. From particle self-assembly to functionalized sub-micron protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, T. M.; Binkert, A.; Zimmermann, M.; Textor, M.; Vörös, J.; Reimhult, E.

    2008-02-01

    Biologically relevant nanopatterns are useful platforms to address fundamental questions, for example, regarding protein-protein and cell-protein interactions. For the creation of nanopatterns, complex and expensive instrumentation is often needed. We present a simple but versatile patterning method using a combination of particle and subsequent molecular self-assembly to produce ordered structures in the micron and sub-micron range. Polystyrene particles were, in a first step, assembled via dip-coating or dried in a drying cell. Silicon wafers and glass slides coated with SiO2 and a top layer of 11 nm of TiO2 were used as substrates. Large hexagonally ordered particle monolayers were formed with high reproducibility. These were subsequently shrunk in a controlled manner by exposure to a O2/N2 plasma and subsequently used as etching masks to transfer the particle pattern onto the substrate, creating TiO2 features in an SiO2 background. After removing the mask the oxide contrast was translated in three simple dip-and-rinse steps into a biochemical contrast of protein-coated features in an inert background. In short, alkane phosphates were first selectively adsorbed to the TiO2 features. Then the SiO2 background was backfilled using poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) and finally streptavidin was adsorbed to the hydrophobic alkane phosphate SAMs, allowing subsequent binding and hybridization of biotinylated DNA.

  19. Mining frequent patterns in protein structures: a study of protease families

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shann-Ching; Bahar, Ivet

    2005-01-01

    Motivation Analysis of protein sequence and structure databases usually reveal frequent patterns (FP) associated with biological function. Data mining techniques generally consider the physicochemical and structural properties of amino acids and their microenvironment in the folded structures. Dynamics is not usually considered, although proteins are not static, and their function relates to conformational mobility in many cases. Results This work describes a novel unsupervised learning approach to discover FPs in the protein families, based on biochemical, geometric and dynamic features. Without any prior knowledge of functional motifs, the method discovers the FPs for each type of amino acid and identifies the conserved residues in three protease subfamilies; chymotrypsin and subtilisin subfamilies of serine proteases and papain subfamily of cysteine proteases. The catalytic triad residues are distinguished by their strong spatial coupling (high interconnectivity) to other conserved residues. Although the spatial arrangements of the catalytic residues in the two subfamilies of serine proteases are similar, their FPs are found to be quite different. The present approach appears to be a promising tool for detecting functional patterns in rapidly growing structure databases and providing insights in to the relationship among protein structure, dynamics and function. PMID:15262784

  20. Plasma protein adsorption patterns on surfaces of Amphotericin B-containing fat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sven; Müller, Rainer H

    2003-03-18

    Nephrotoxicity of the conventional Amphotericin B formulation Fungizone is the most common side effect in treatment of systemic fungal infections. Lipid formulations of Amphotericin B including fat emulsions showed a reduced nephrotoxicity. In vivo distribution studies of lipid formulations have shown an accumulation of Amphotericin B in liver and spleen, while concentration in the kidneys is reduced. Blood proteins adsorbed onto particles after intravenous administration are regarded as the key factors determining their in vivo fate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for analysis of protein adsorption patterns. This paper deals with the question if there is any correlation between proteins adsorbed on surfaces of AmB fat emulsions produced with a new production technique and the potentially organ distribution of this formulation.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in prediapausing embryos of the silkworm, Bombyx mori: pattern of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dorel, C; Coulon, M

    1988-03-01

    Specific qualitative and quantitative changes in protein synthesis occur from the fertilization to the onset of diapause in the silkworm. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyse the patterns of proteins synthesized in prediapausing eggs of Bombyx. This analysis has been carried out with in vivo labelled polypeptides and with proteins synthesized in vitro by RNA isolated at different stages. The oocyte contains an abundant supply of diverse mRNA which are translatable in vitro. A set of proteins with molecular weight range of 68,000 to 74,000 and isoelectric points of 5.85-5.95 (hereafter referred to as No. 30) is specific of the germ-anlage stage. Transcripts encoding the No. 30 proteins are not detectable in oocytes, and inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D indicates that No. 30 mRNA are synthesized de novo. Treating eggs at the germ-anlage stage with 4 N HCl at 46 degrees C prevents diapause and is accompanied by overproduction of No. 30 protein. The induction of No. 30 synthesis is also the main event of the heat shock response. The implications of these findings in relation to early embryonic development and prevention of diapause are discussed.

  2. Protein and alkaloid patterns of the floral nectar in some solanaceous species.

    PubMed

    Kerchner, András; Darók, Judit; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila; Jakab, Gábor; Farkas, Ágnes

    2015-09-01

    The family Solanaceae includes several melliferous plants, which tend to produce copious amounts of nectar. Floral nectar is a chemically complex aqueous solution, dominated by sugars, but minor components such as amino acids, proteins, flavonoids and alkaloids are present as well. This study aimed at analysing the protein and alkaloid profile of the nectar in seven solanaceous species. Proteins were examined with SDS-PAGE and alkaloids were analyzed with HPLC. The investigation of protein profile revealed significant differences in nectar-protein patterns not only between different plant genera, but also between the three Nicotiana species investigated. SDS-PAGE suggested the presence of several Nectarin proteins with antimicrobial activity in Nicotiana species. The nectar of all tobacco species contained the alkaloid nicotine, N. tabacum having the highest nicotine content. The nectar of Brugmansia suaveolens, Datura stramonium, Hyoscyamus niger and Lycium barbarum contained scopolamine, the highest content of which was measured in B. suaveolens. The alkaloid concentrations in the nectars of most solanaceous species investigated can cause deterrence in honeybees, and the nectar of N. rustica and N. tabacum can be considered toxic for honeybees.

  3. Evolutionarily Conserved Pattern of Interactions in a Protein Revealed by Local Thermal Expansion Properties.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Caro, Jose A; Roche, Julien; Fossat, Martin; Barthe, Philippe; García-Moreno E, Bertrand; Royer, Catherine A; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-07-29

    The way in which the network of intramolecular interactions determines the cooperative folding and conformational dynamics of a protein remains poorly understood. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to examine this problem because it combines the site-specific resolution of the NMR experiments with the local character of pressure perturbations. Here we report on the temperature dependence of the site-specific volumetric properties of various forms of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), including three variants with engineered internal cavities, as measured with high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The strong temperature dependence of pressure-induced unfolding arises from poorly understood differences in thermal expansion between the folded and unfolded states. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the global thermal expansion of the folded proteins and the number of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined by the temperature coefficient of the backbone amide chemical shifts. Comparison of the identity of these strong H-bonds with the co-evolution of pairs of residues in the SNase protein family suggests that the architecture of the interactions detected in the NMR experiments could be linked to a functional aspect of the protein. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the residue-specific volume changes of unfolding yielded residue-specific differences in expansivity and revealed how mutations impact intramolecular interaction patterns. These results show that intramolecular interactions in the folded states of proteins impose constraints against thermal expansion and that, hence, knowledge of site-specific thermal expansivity offers insight into the patterns of strong intramolecular interactions and other local determinants of protein stability, cooperativity, and potentially also of function.

  4. clustComp, a Bioconductor package for the comparison of clustering results.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Aurora; Brazma, Alvis

    2017-08-23

    clustComp is an open source Bioconductor package that implements different techniques for the comparison of two gene expression clustering results. These include flat versus flat and hierarchical versus flat comparisons. The visualisation of the similarities is provided by means of a bipartite graph, whose layout is heuristically optimised. Its flexibility allows a suitable visualisation for both small and large datasets. The package is available at http://bioconductor.org/packages/clustComp / and contains a 'vignette' outlying the typical use of the algorithms. etorrent@est-econ.uc3m.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Assembly of transmembrane helices of simple polytopic membrane proteins from sequence conservation patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, Yungki; Helms, Volkhard

    2006-09-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of most membrane proteins consist of helix bundles. The seemingly simple task of TM helix bundle assembly has turned out to be extremely difficult. This is true even for simple TM helix bundle proteins, i.e., those that have the simple form of compact TM helix bundles. Herein, we present a computational method that is capable of generating native-like structural models for simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices based on sequence conservation patterns. Thus, the only requirement for our method is the presence of more than 30 homologous sequences for an accurate extraction of sequence conservation patterns. The prediction method first computes a number of representative well-packed conformations for each pair of contacting TM helices, and then a library of tertiary folds is generated by overlaying overlapping TM helices of the representative conformations. This library is scored using sequence conservation patterns, and a subsequent clustering analysis yields five final models. Assuming that neighboring TM helices in the sequence contact each other (but not that TM helices A and G contact each other), the method produced structural models of Calpha atom root-mean-square deviation (CA RMSD) of 3-5 A from corresponding crystal structures for bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, sensory rhodopsin II, and rhodopsin. In blind predictions, this type of contact knowledge is not available. Mimicking this, predictions were made for the rotor of the V-type Na(+)-adenosine triphosphatase without such knowledge. The CA RMSD between the best model and its crystal structure is only 3.4 A, and its contact accuracy reaches 55%. Furthermore, the model correctly identifies the binding pocket for sodium ion. These results demonstrate that the method can be readily applied to ab initio structure prediction of simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices.

  6. Characterization of the pattern of ribosomal protein L19 production during the lifecycle of Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Bizzo, Janayna Hammes; Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Castro, Felipe F; Garcia, Juliana Bório Ferreira; Goldenberg, Samuel; Cruz, Angela Kaysel

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites causing a wide clinical spectrum of diseases in humans. Analysis of a region of chromosome 6 from Leishmania major (Iribar et al.) showed that the transcript of a putative L19 ribosomal protein (RPL19) was most abundant at the amastigote stage. We therefore decided to characterize L19 protein abundance throughout the lifecycle of Leishmania. Differential expression of the L19 gene during development has been observed for all Leishmania species studied to date (L. major, L. braziliensis, L. donovani, and L. amazonensis). Immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies against L. major RPL19 revealed that changes to L19 protein abundance follow a similar pattern in various species. The amount of L19 protein was higher in exponentially growing promastigotes than in stationary phase promastigotes. The L19 protein was barely detectable in amastigotes, despite the abundance of L19 transcripts observed in L. major at this stage. Immunofluorescence assays showed a granular, dispersed distribution of RPL19 throughout the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the presence of the protein in the ribosomal fraction, but not in the cytosol of L. major. We generated a L. major transfectant bearing a plasmid-borne L19 gene. Overproduction of the L19 transcript and protein resulted in impaired growth of the transfectants in association with high polysome peaks. We also showed by metabolic labeling that L19 overexpressing clones display low rates of translation. These data suggest that L19 overexpression affects negatively translation elongation or termination. The lack of correlation between L19 transcript and protein abundances suggest that the translation of L19 is differentially controlled during development in the various species investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antisense Reduction of Mutant COMP Reduces Growth Plate Chondrocyte Pathology.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C; Hossain, Mohammad; Gattis, Danielle; Booten, Sheri; Alcorn, Joseph L; Seth, Punit P; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein cause pseudoachondroplasia, a severe disproportionate short stature disorder. Mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein produces massive intracellular retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, stimulating ER and oxidative stresses and inflammation, culminating in post-natal loss of growth plate chondrocytes, which compromises linear bone growth. Treatments for pseudoachondroplasia are limited because cartilage is relatively avascular and considered inaccessible. Here we report successful delivery and treatment using antisense oligonucleotide technology in our transgenic pseudoachondroplasia mouse model. We demonstrate delivery of human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-specific antisense oligonucleotides to cartilage and reduction of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein expression, which largely alleviates pseudoachondroplasia growth plate chondrocyte pathology. One antisense oligonucleotide reduced steady-state levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA and dampened intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, leading to a reduction of inflammatory markers and cell death and partial restoration of proliferation. This novel and exciting work demonstrates that antisense-based therapy is a viable approach for treating pseudoachondroplasia and other human cartilage disorders. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Different mechanical loading protocols influence serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in young healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, A; Kersting, U G; Helling, S; Dargel, J; Maurer, J; Thevis, M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a relationship between the loading mode of physical activity and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration exists and whether the lymphatic system contributes to COMP release into the serum. Serum COMP levels were determined in healthy male subjects before, after and at 18 further time points within 7 h at four separate experimental days with four different loading interventions. The loading intervention included high impact running exercise, slow but deep knee bends, and lymphatic drainage of 30 min duration, respectively, and a resting protocol. The serum COMP levels were measured using a commercially available quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An increase (p < 0.001) in serum COMP concentration was detected immediately after 30 min running exercise. Slow but deep knee bends did not cause any significant changes in serum COMP levels. Lymphatic drainage also had no effect on the serum COMP concentration. After 30 min of complete rest the serum COMP level was significantly (p = 0.008) reduced. The elevation of COMP serum concentration seems to depend on the loading mode of the physical activity and to reflect the extrusion of COMP fragments from the impact loaded articular cartilage or synovial fluid.

  9. Strategic Pay Reform: A Student Outcomes-Based Evaluation of Denver's ProComp Teacher Pay Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan; Walch, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Denver Public Schools utilizes one of the nation's highest profile alternative teacher compensation systems, and a key element of Denver's Professional Compensation System for Teachers (ProComp) is pay for performance. This study analyzes the student achievement implications of ProComp utilizing matched student- and teacher-level data from 2003 to…

  10. 76 FR 61747 - CompONE Services, LTD, Ithaca, NY; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration CompONE Services, LTD, Ithaca, NY; Notice of Negative Determination... administrative reconsideration of the negative ] determination regarding workers' eligibility to apply for Trade... York (CompONE Services). The negative determination was issued on August 3, 2011. The...

  11. Strategic Pay Reform: A Student Outcomes-Based Evaluation of Denver's ProComp Teacher Pay Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan; Walch, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Denver Public Schools utilizes one of the nation's highest profile alternative teacher compensation systems, and a key element of Denver's Professional Compensation System for Teachers (ProComp) is pay for performance. This study analyzes the student achievement implications of ProComp utilizing matched student- and teacher-level data from 2003 to…

  12. Engineering the Pattern of Protein Glycosylation Modulates the Thermostability of a GH11 Xylanase*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Maldonado, Raquel; Vieira, Davi Serradella; Alponti, Juliana Sanchez; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Ward, Richard John

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is a common post-translational modification, the effect of which on protein conformational and stability is incompletely understood. Here we have investigated the effects of glycosylation on the thermostability of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A (XynA) expressed in Pichia pastoris. Intact mass analysis of the heterologous wild-type XynA revealed two, three, or four Hex8–16GlcNAc2 modifications involving asparagine residues at positions 20, 25, 141, and 181. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the XynA modified with various combinations of branched Hex9GlcNAc2 at these positions indicated a significant contribution from protein-glycan interactions to the overall energy of the glycoproteins. The effect of glycan content and glycosylation position on protein stability was evaluated by combinatorial mutagenesis of all six potential N-glycosylation sites. The majority of glycosylated enzymes expressed in P. pastoris presented increased thermostability in comparison with their unglycosylated counterparts expressed in Escherichia coli. Steric effects of multiple glycosylation events were apparent, and glycosylation position rather than the number of glycosylation events determined increases in thermostability. The MD simulations also indicated that clustered glycan chains tended to favor less stabilizing glycan-glycan interactions, whereas more dispersed glycosylation patterns favored stabilizing protein-glycan interactions. PMID:23846692

  13. Expression Pattern and Subcellular Localization of the Ovate Protein Family in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Jiang, Wenzhu; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Hui; Piao, Mingxin; Chen, Zhengdao; Bian, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ovate family proteins (AtOFPs) have been shown to function as transcriptional repressors and regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. There are 31 genes that encode the full-length OVATE-domain containing proteins in the rice genome. In this study, the gene structure analysis revealed that OsOFPs are intron poor. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that OVATE proteins from rice, Arabidopsis and tomato can be divided into 4 groups (I–IV). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis identified OsOFPs with different tissue-specific expression patterns at all stages of development in the rice plant. Interestingly, nearly half of the total number of OsOFP family was more highly expressed during the seed developmental stage. In addition, seed developmental cis-elements were found in the promoter region of the OsOFPs. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that YFP-OsOFP fusion proteins predominantly localized in the nucleus. Our results suggest that OsOFPs may act as regulatory proteins and play pivotal roles in the growth and development of rice. PMID:25760462

  14. Pattern similarity study of functional sites in protein sequences: lysozymes and cystatins

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Shuryo; Li-Chan, Eunice CY; Dou, Jinglie

    2005-01-01

    Background Although it is generally agreed that topography is more conserved than sequences, proteins sharing the same fold can have different functions, while there are protein families with low sequence similarity. An alternative method for profile analysis of characteristic conserved positions of the motifs within the 3D structures may be needed for functional annotation of protein sequences. Using the approach of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), we have proposed a new algorithm for postulating functional mechanisms on the basis of pattern similarity and average of property values of side-chains in segments within sequences. This approach was used to search for functional sites of proteins belonging to the lysozyme and cystatin families. Results Hydrophobicity and β-turn propensity of reference segments with 3–7 residues were used for the homology similarity search (HSS) for active sites. Hydrogen bonding was used as the side-chain property for searching the binding sites of lysozymes. The profiles of similarity constants and average values of these parameters as functions of their positions in the sequences could identify both active and substrate binding sites of the lysozyme of Streptomyces coelicolor, which has been reported as a new fold enzyme (Cellosyl). The same approach was successfully applied to cystatins, especially for postulating the mechanisms of amyloidosis of human cystatin C as well as human lysozyme. Conclusion Pattern similarity and average index values of structure-related properties of side chains in short segments of three residues or longer were, for the first time, successfully applied for predicting functional sites in sequences. This new approach may be applicable to studying functional sites in un-annotated proteins, for which complete 3D structures are not yet available. PMID:15904486

  15. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G. C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-08-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale of its subcellular organization. However, the effects of the cell's spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shaped Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2 × 1 × 1 to 11 × 6 × 1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale with the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3-6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of the cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood.

  16. Discovery of protein acetylation patterns by deconvolution of peptide isomer mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Rajan, Roshan Elizabeth; Jamai, Adil; Pomies, Christelle; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-10-15

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in the control of various biological processes including protein-protein interactions, epigenetics and cell cycle regulation. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches enable comprehensive identification and quantitation of numerous types of PTMs. However, the analysis of PTMs is complicated by the presence of indistinguishable co-eluting isomeric peptides that result in composite spectra with overlapping features that prevent the identification of individual components. In this study, we present Iso-PeptidAce, a novel software tool that enables deconvolution of composite MS/MS spectra of isomeric peptides based on features associated with their characteristic fragment ion patterns. We benchmark Iso-PeptidAce using dilution series prepared from mixtures of known amounts of synthetic acetylated isomers. We also demonstrate its applicability to different biological problems such as the identification of site-specific acetylation patterns in histones bound to chromatin assembly factor-1 and profiling of histone acetylation in cells treated with different classes of HDAC inhibitors.

  17. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G.C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale for its subcellular organisation. However, the effects of the cell’s spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shape Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2x1x1 to 11x6x1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe, and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale in adaptation to the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3–6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling, and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood. PMID:26098227

  18. [Effects of Radix Astragali and Fructus Corni on urinary protein pattern in nephropathy mice by microfluidic chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-ming; Shi, Xiao-qiang; Liang, Heng

    2007-07-01

    To study the urinary protein patterns of nephropathy mice induced by dextran and the effects of aquesous extract of Fructus Corni (AEFC) and Radix Astragali (AERA). Nephropathy model was established by administrated with dextran to mice. Some of the dextran treated mice were given AERA (20 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) as AERA group, other mice were given AEFC (10 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) as AEFC group. Some of the dextran treated mice were given water as model group, some normal mice as normal control group. After a 12 weeks' treatment, 24 hour urine of four groups was collected, respectively. Each urinary sample was divided into two parts, one was non-concentrated urine sample, another was used as concentrated urine sample. Two kinds of urinary sample of four groups were analyzed with microfluidic chips on Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Each group's urinary protein patterns were obtained, more than 20 proteins were were detected. Compared with normal group, about five kinds of protein were found in urinary sample of model group, among which M > 43 x 10(3) proteins were increased. Compared with model group, significant treated-related protein's kind and quantitative changes in AERA treated group and AEFC group were found. Urinary protein kinds were reduced, especially certain the proteins (M > 50 x 10(3)) were significantly decreased approach to normal patterns. Non-concentrated urine samples' protein pattern mainly included were proteins (M=29, 32, 43, 52, 68, 76 x 10(3) and concentrated urine samples mainly included the proteins (M=22, 24, 32, 46 x 10(3)). AERA and AEFC could reduce the urinary protein and made protein pattern different, which showed that radix astragali and fructus corni could play an important role in protecting renal function of nephropathy mice and finding the target protein markers related to AERA and AEFC effects on nephropathy mice.

  19. Altered Prion Protein Expression Pattern in CSF as a Biomarker for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Mauricio; Cartier, Luis; Matamala, José Manuel; Hernández, Nancy; Woehlbier, Ute; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most frequent human Prion-related disorder (PrD). The detection of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is used as a molecular diagnostic criterion for patients clinically compatible with CJD. However, there is a pressing need for the identification of new reliable disease biomarkers. The pathological mechanisms leading to accumulation of 14-3-3 protein in CSF are not fully understood, however neuronal loss followed by cell lysis is assumed to cause the increase in 14-3-3 levels, which also occurs in conditions such as brain ischemia. Here we investigated the relation between the levels of 14-3-3 protein, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and expression of the prion protein (PrP) in CSF of sporadic and familial CJD cases. Unexpectedly, we found normal levels of LDH activity in CJD cases with moderate levels of 14-3-3 protein. Increased LDH activity was only observed in a percentage of the CSF samples that also exhibited high 14-3-3 levels. Analysis of the PrP expression pattern in CSF revealed a reduction in PrP levels in all CJD cases, as well as marked changes in its glycosylation pattern. PrP present in CSF of CJD cases was sensitive to proteases. The alterations in PrP expression observed in CJD cases were not detected in other pathologies affecting the nervous system, including cases of dementia and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (HAM/TSP). Time course analysis in several CJD patients revealed that 14-3-3 levels in CSF are dynamic and show a high degree of variability during the end stage of the disease. Post-mortem analysis of brain tissue also indicated that 14-3-3 protein is upregulated in neuronal cells, suggesting that its expression is modulated during the course of the disease. These results suggest that a combined analysis of 14-3-3 and PrP expression pattern in CSF is a reliable biomarker to confirm the clinical diagnosis of CJD patients and follow disease progression

  20. Coordinate control of terminal dendrite patterning and dynamics by the membrane protein Raw.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiae; Peng, Yun; Lin, Wen-Yang; Parrish, Jay Z

    2015-01-01

    The directional flow of information in neurons depends on compartmentalization: dendrites receive inputs whereas axons transmit them. Axons and dendrites likewise contain structurally and functionally distinct subcompartments. Axon/dendrite compartmentalization can be attributed to neuronal polarization, but the developmental origin of subcompartments in axons and dendrites is less well understood. To identify the developmental bases for compartment-specific patterning in dendrites, we screened for mutations that affect discrete dendritic domains in Drosophila sensory neurons. From this screen, we identified mutations that affected distinct aspects of terminal dendrite development with little or no effect on major dendrite patterning. Mutation of one gene, raw, affected multiple aspects of terminal dendrite patterning, suggesting that Raw might coordinate multiple signaling pathways to shape terminal dendrite growth. Consistent with this notion, Raw localizes to branch-points and promotes dendrite stabilization together with the Tricornered (Trc) kinase via effects on cell adhesion. Raw independently influences terminal dendrite elongation through a mechanism that involves modulation of the cytoskeleton, and this pathway is likely to involve the RNA-binding protein Argonaute 1 (AGO1), as raw and AGO1 genetically interact to promote terminal dendrite growth but not adhesion. Thus, Raw defines a potential point of convergence in distinct pathways shaping terminal dendrite patterning.

  1. Direct Write Protein Patterns for Multiplexed Cytokine Detection From Live Cells Using Electron Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Uland Y.; Saxer, Sina S.; Lee, Juneyoung; Bat, Erhan; Maynard, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers, such as extracellular signaling molecules, is a critical aspect in disease profiling and diagnostics. Precise positioning of antibodies on surfaces, especially at the micro- and nano- scale, is important for the improvement of assays, biosensors, and diagnostics on the molecular level, and therefore, the pursuit of device miniaturization for parallel, fast, low-volume assays is a continuing challenge. Here, we describe a multiplexed cytokine immunoassay utilizing electron beam lithography and a trehalose glycopolymer as a resist for the direct writing of antibodies on silicon substrates allowing for micro- and nano-scale precision of protein immobilization. Specifically, anti-interleukin 6 (IL-6) and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibodies were directly patterned. Retention of the specific binding properties of the patterned antibodies was shown by the capture of secreted cytokines from stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. A sandwich immunoassay was employed using gold nanoparticles and enhancement with silver for the detection and visualization of bound cytokines to the patterns by localized surface plasmon resonance detected with dark field microscopy. Multiplexing with both IL-6 and TNFα on a single chip was also successfully demonstrated with high specificity and in relevant cell culture conditions and at different times after cell stimulation. The direct fabrication of capture antibody patterns for cytokine detection described here could be useful for biosensing applications. PMID:26679368

  2. Direct Write Protein Patterns for Multiplexed Cytokine Detection from Live Cells Using Electron Beam Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lau, Uland Y; Saxer, Sina S; Lee, Juneyoung; Bat, Erhan; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-01-26

    Simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers, such as extracellular signaling molecules, is a critical aspect in disease profiling and diagnostics. Precise positioning of antibodies on surfaces, especially at the micro- and nanoscale, is important for the improvement of assays, biosensors, and diagnostics on the molecular level, and therefore, the pursuit of device miniaturization for parallel, fast, low-volume assays is a continuing challenge. Here, we describe a multiplexed cytokine immunoassay utilizing electron beam lithography and a trehalose glycopolymer as a resist for the direct writing of antibodies on silicon substrates, allowing for micro- and nanoscale precision of protein immobilization. Specifically, anti-interleukin 6 (IL-6) and antitumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibodies were directly patterned. Retention of the specific binding properties of the patterned antibodies was shown by the capture of secreted cytokines from stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. A sandwich immunoassay was employed using gold nanoparticles and enhancement with silver for the detection and visualization of bound cytokines to the patterns by localized surface plasmon resonance detected with dark-field microscopy. Multiplexing with both IL-6 and TNFα on a single chip was also successfully demonstrated with high specificity and in relevant cell culture conditions and at different times after cell stimulation. The direct fabrication of capture antibody patterns for cytokine detection described here could be useful for biosensing applications.

  3. Precise Manipulation and Patterning of Protein Crystals for Macromolecular Crystallography using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Zhou, Weijie; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Yennawar, Neela; French, Jarrod B.; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Advances in modern X-ray sources and detector technology have made it possible for crystallographers to collect usable data on crystals of only a few micrometers or less in size. Despite these developments, sample handling techniques have significantly lagged behind and often prevent the full realization of current beamline capabilities. In order to address this shortcoming we have developed a surface acoustic wave-based method for manipulating and patterning crystals. This method, which does not damage the fragile protein crystals, can precisely manipulate and pattern micrometer and sub-micrometer sized crystals for data collection and screening. The technique is robust, inexpensive, and easy to implement. This method not only promises to significantly increase efficiency and throughput of both conventional and serial crystallography experiments, but also will make it possible to collect data on samples that were previously intractable. PMID:25641793

  4. Precise Manipulation and Patterning of Protein Crystals for Macromolecular Crystallography Using Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhou, Weijie; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Yennawar, Neela H; French, Jarrod B; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-06-01

    Advances in modern X-ray sources and detector technology have made it possible for crystallographers to collect usable data on crystals of only a few micrometers or less in size. Despite these developments, sample handling techniques have significantly lagged behind and often prevent the full realization of current beamline capabilities. In order to address this shortcoming, a surface acoustic wave-based method for manipulating and patterning crystals is developed. This method, which does not damage the fragile protein crystals, can precisely manipulate and pattern micrometer and submicrometer-sized crystals for data collection and screening. The technique is robust, inexpensive, and easy to implement. This method not only promises to significantly increase efficiency and throughput of both conventional and serial crystallography experiments, but will also make it possible to collect data on samples that were previously intractable.

  5. Plasticity in patterns of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins in Drosophila heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Nicole C.; Minoda, Aki; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Kennedy, Cameron; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Peach, Sally E.; Shanower, Gregory; Zheng, Haiyan; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Park, Peter J.; Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged in two basic forms, euchromatin and heterochromatin. We have examined the composition and organization of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin in different cell types using ChIP-array analysis of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins. As anticipated, the pericentric heterochromatin and chromosome 4 are on average enriched for the “silencing” marks H3K9me2, H3K9me3, HP1a, and SU(VAR)3-9, and are generally depleted for marks associated with active transcription. The locations of the euchromatin–heterochromatin borders identified by these marks are similar in animal tissues and most cell lines, although the amount of heterochromatin is variable in some cell lines. Combinatorial analysis of chromatin patterns reveals distinct profiles for euchromatin, pericentric heterochromatin, and the 4th chromosome. Both silent and active protein-coding genes in heterochromatin display complex patterns of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications; a majority of the active genes exhibit both “activation” marks (e.g., H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) and “silencing” marks (e.g., H3K9me2 and HP1a). The hallmark of active genes in heterochromatic domains appears to be a loss of H3K9 methylation at the transcription start site. We also observe complex epigenomic profiles of intergenic regions, repeated transposable element (TE) sequences, and genes in the heterochromatic extensions. An unexpectedly large fraction of sequences in the euchromatic chromosome arms exhibits a heterochromatic chromatin signature, which differs in size, position, and impact on gene expression among cell types. We conclude that patterns of heterochromatin/euchromatin packaging show greater complexity and plasticity than anticipated. This comprehensive analysis provides a foundation for future studies of gene activity and chromosomal functions that are influenced by or dependent upon heterochromatin. PMID:21177972

  6. Plasticity in patterns of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins in Drosophila heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Nicole C; Minoda, Aki; Kharchenko, Peter V; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Schwartz, Yuri B; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Jaffe, Jacob D; Kennedy, Cameron; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Peach, Sally E; Shanower, Gregory; Zheng, Haiyan; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Park, Peter J; Elgin, Sarah C R; Karpen, Gary H

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged in two basic forms, euchromatin and heterochromatin. We have examined the composition and organization of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin in different cell types using ChIP-array analysis of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins. As anticipated, the pericentric heterochromatin and chromosome 4 are on average enriched for the "silencing" marks H3K9me2, H3K9me3, HP1a, and SU(VAR)3-9, and are generally depleted for marks associated with active transcription. The locations of the euchromatin-heterochromatin borders identified by these marks are similar in animal tissues and most cell lines, although the amount of heterochromatin is variable in some cell lines. Combinatorial analysis of chromatin patterns reveals distinct profiles for euchromatin, pericentric heterochromatin, and the 4th chromosome. Both silent and active protein-coding genes in heterochromatin display complex patterns of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications; a majority of the active genes exhibit both "activation" marks (e.g., H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) and "silencing" marks (e.g., H3K9me2 and HP1a). The hallmark of active genes in heterochromatic domains appears to be a loss of H3K9 methylation at the transcription start site. We also observe complex epigenomic profiles of intergenic regions, repeated transposable element (TE) sequences, and genes in the heterochromatic extensions. An unexpectedly large fraction of sequences in the euchromatic chromosome arms exhibits a heterochromatic chromatin signature, which differs in size, position, and impact on gene expression among cell types. We conclude that patterns of heterochromatin/euchromatin packaging show greater complexity and plasticity than anticipated. This comprehensive analysis provides a foundation for future studies of gene activity and chromosomal functions that are influenced by or dependent upon heterochromatin.

  7. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  8. Joint Factor Analysis of the College Student Experiences Questionnaire and the ACT COMP Objective Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Todd M.; Murrell, Patricia H.

    1990-01-01

    The American College Testing Program's College Outcome Measures Project Objective test (COMP-O) and College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) scales for graduating college seniors were analyzed for joint factor structure at a large doctoral-granting institution. No common constructs were found in the two instruments. (Author/MSE)

  9. Schools, Teachers, Students and Computers: A Cross-National Perspective. IEA-Comped Study Stage 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelgrum, W. J., Ed.; And Others

    The Computers in Education (Comped) study was designed as a two-stage survey. The first stage (1987-1990) was aimed at gathering information from a representative sample of schools at elementary, lower secondary and upper secondary level with regard to the state of computer use in education. The survey's focus was on the extent and availability of…

  10. Teacher Mobility and Financial Incentives: A Descriptive Analysis of Denver's ProComp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulbeck, Eleanor S.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive teacher mobility can undermine policy efforts to develop a high-quality workforce. In response, policymakers have increasingly championed financial incentives to retain teachers. In 2006, the Denver Public Schools adopted an alternative teacher compensation reform, the Professional Compensation System for Teachers ("ProComp").…

  11. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  12. Teacher Mobility and Financial Incentives: A Descriptive Analysis of Denver's ProComp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulbeck, Eleanor S.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive teacher mobility can undermine policy efforts to develop a high-quality workforce. In response, policymakers have increasingly championed financial incentives to retain teachers. In 2006, the Denver Public Schools adopted an alternative teacher compensation reform, the Professional Compensation System for Teachers ("ProComp").…

  13. Light at night alters daily patterns of cortisol and clock proteins in female Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, T A; Galan, A; Vaughn, C A; Weil, Z M; Nelson, R J

    2013-06-01

    Humans and other organisms have adapted to a 24-h solar cycle in response to life on Earth. The rotation of the planet on its axis and its revolution around the sun cause predictable daily and seasonal patterns in day length. To successfully anticipate and adapt to these patterns in the environment, a variety of biological processes oscillate with a daily rhythm of approximately 24 h in length. These rhythms arise from hierarchally-coupled cellular clocks generated by positive and negative transcription factors of core circadian clock gene expression. From these endogenous cellular clocks, overt rhythms in activity and patterns in hormone secretion and other homeostatic processes emerge. These circadian rhythms in physiology and behaviour can be organised by a variety of cues, although they are most potently entrained by light. In recent history, there has been a major change from naturally-occurring light cycles set by the sun, to artificial and sometimes erratic light cycles determined by the use of electric lighting. Virtually every individual living in an industrialised country experiences light at night (LAN) but, despite its prevalence, the biological effects of such unnatural lighting have not been fully considered. Using female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), we investigated the effects of chronic nightly exposure to dim light on daily rhythms in locomotor activity, serum cortisol concentrations and brain expression of circadian clock proteins (i.e. PER1, PER2, BMAL1). Although locomotor activity remained entrained to the light cycle, the diurnal fluctuation of cortisol concentrations was blunted and the expression patterns of clock proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus were altered. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to dim LAN can dramatically affect fundamental cellular function and emergent physiology.

  14. Probing thyroglobulin in undiluted human serum based on pattern recognition and competitive adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chae, Junseok

    2014-10-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a sensitive indicator of persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin. Detection of Tg in human serum is challenging as bio-receptors, such as anti-Tg, used in immunoassay have relatively weak binding affinity. We engineer sensing surfaces using the competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman Effect. Coupled with Surface Plasmon Resonance, the "cross-responsive" interactions of Tg on the engineered surfaces produce uniquely distinguishable multiple signature patterns, which are discriminated using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Tg-spiked samples, down to 2 ng/ml Tg in undiluted human serum, are sensitively and selectively discriminated from the control (undiluted human serum).

  15. MetaComp: comprehensive analysis software for comparative meta-omics including comparative metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Yang, Longshu; Guo, Xiao; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Huaiqiu

    2017-10-02

    During the past decade, the development of high throughput nucleic sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis techniques have enabled the characterization of microbial communities through metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics data. To reveal the diversity of microbial communities and interactions between living conditions and microbes, it is necessary to introduce comparative analysis based upon integration of all four types of data mentioned above. Comparative meta-omics, especially comparative metageomics, has been established as a routine process to highlight the significant differences in taxon composition and functional gene abundance among microbiota samples. Meanwhile, biologists are increasingly concerning about the correlations between meta-omics features and environmental factors, which may further decipher the adaptation strategy of a microbial community. We developed a graphical comprehensive analysis software named MetaComp comprising a series of statistical analysis approaches with visualized results for metagenomics and other meta-omics data comparison. This software is capable to read files generated by a variety of upstream programs. After data loading, analyses such as multivariate statistics, hypothesis testing of two-sample, multi-sample as well as two-group sample and a novel function-regression analysis of environmental factors are offered. Here, regression analysis regards meta-omic features as independent variable and environmental factors as dependent variables. Moreover, MetaComp is capable to automatically choose an appropriate two-group sample test based upon the traits of input abundance profiles. We further evaluate the performance of its choice, and exhibit applications for metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics samples. MetaComp, an integrative software capable for applying to all meta-omics data, originally distills the influence of living environment on microbial community by regression analysis

  16. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    PubMed

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  17. Identification and expression pattern of the chemosensory protein gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gong, Da-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Zhao, Ping; Lin, Ying; Xia, Qing-You; Xiang, Zhong-Huai

    2007-03-01

    Insect chemosensory proteins (CSPs) as well as odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) have been supposed to transport hydrophobic chemicals to receptors on sensory neurons. Compared with OBPs, CSPs are expressed more broadly in various insect tissues. We performed a genome-wide analysis of the candidate CSP gene family in the silkworm. A total of 20 candidate CSPs, including 3 gene fragments and 2 pseudogenes, were characterized based on their conserved cysteine residues and their similarity to CSPs in other insects. Some of these genes were clustered in the silkworm genome. The gene expression pattern of these candidates was investigated using RT-PCR and microarray, and the results showed that these genes were expressed primarily in mature larvae and the adult moth, suggesting silkworm CSPs may be involved in development. The majority of silkworm CSP genes are expressed broadly in tissues including the antennae, head, thorax, legs, wings, epithelium, testes, ovaries, pheromone glands, wing disks, and compound eyes.

  18. Injury, nerve, and wound epidermis related electrophoretic and fluorographic protein patterns in forelimbs of adult newts

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, D.J.; Tassava, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    Polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis and (/sup 35/S)methionine fluorography were used to examine proteins in regenerating newt limbs, amputated denervated limbs, unamputated denervated limbs, and separated blastema mesodermal core and wound epidermis. A total of 27 protein electrophoretic bands were obtained from amputated limbs and 24 bands from unamputated limbs. Amputation resulted in the appearance of 4 new bands and the loss of 1 band as compared to unamputated limbs. These 5 banding differences were apparent on stained gels 3 days postamputation and were maintained through 10 weeks postamputation (complete regenerate stage). Only one band in unamputated limbs was always detectable on fluorographs, whereas virtually all of the stainable bands of amputated limbs were visible on fluorographs. Amputation clearly stimulated a marked, generalized increase in the synthesis of limb proteins. The 5 amputation induced changes were equally evident in stained gels of both innervated and denervated limbs. Amputated denervated limbs possessed a full set of fluorographic bands (including the 5 differences) through 18 days postamputation. However, denervation without amputation was not sufficient to alter the stainable banding pattern. Wound epidermis and mesodermal core both displayed the 5 banding differences and had identical banding patterns with the exception of one epidermal specific band. This band was also present in whole limb skin but was absent in unamputated mesodermal limb tissue. This was the only band of unamputated limbs that was consistently detectable by fluorography. It is concluded that amputation induces nerve independent changes in protein synthesis that are common to both mesodermal core and wound epidermis. These changes may represent preparation for cellular proliferation.

  19. Fabrication of Self-Cleaning, Reusable Titania Templates for Nanometer and Micrometer Scale Protein Patterning.

    PubMed

    Moxey, Mark; Johnson, Alexander; El-Zubir, Osama; Cartron, Michael; Dinachali, Saman Safari; Hunter, C Neil; Saifullah, Mohammad S M; Chong, Karen S L; Leggett, Graham J

    2015-06-23

    The photocatalytic self-cleaning characteristics of titania facilitate the fabrication of reuseable templates for protein nanopatterning. Titania nanostructures were fabricated over square centimeter areas by interferometric lithography (IL) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). With the use of a Lloyd's mirror two-beam interferometer, self-assembled monolayers of alkylphosphonates adsorbed on the native oxide of a Ti film were patterned by photocatalytic nanolithography. In regions exposed to a maximum in the interferogram, the monolayer was removed by photocatalytic oxidation. In regions exposed to an intensity minimum, the monolayer remained intact. After exposure, the sample was etched in piranha solution to yield Ti nanostructures with widths as small as 30 nm. NIL was performed by using a silicon stamp to imprint a spin-cast film of titanium dioxide resin; after calcination and reactive ion etching, TiO2 nanopillars were formed. For both fabrication techniques, subsequent adsorption of an oligo(ethylene glycol) functionalized trichlorosilane yielded an entirely passive, protein-resistant surface. Near-UV exposure caused removal of this protein-resistant film from the titania regions by photocatalytic degradation, leaving the passivating silane film intact on the silicon dioxide regions. Proteins labeled with fluorescent dyes were adsorbed to the titanium dioxide regions, yielding nanopatterns with bright fluorescence. Subsequent near-UV irradiation of the samples removed the protein from the titanium dioxide nanostructures by photocatalytic degradation facilitating the adsorption of a different protein. The process was repeated multiple times. These simple methods appear to yield durable, reuseable samples that may be of value to laboratories that require nanostructured biological interfaces but do not have access to the infrastructure required for nanofabrication.

  20. Cell patterning via linker-free protein functionalization of an organic conducting polymer (polypyrrole) electrode.

    PubMed

    Bax, Daniel V; Tipa, Roxana S; Kondyurin, Alexey; Higgins, Michael J; Tsoutas, Kostadinos; Gelmi, Amy; Wallace, Gordon G; McKenzie, David R; Weiss, Anthony S; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of proteins and cells with polymers is critical to their use in scientific and medical applications. In this study, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was used to modify the surface of the conducting polymer, polypyrrole, which possesses electrical properties. PIII treatment enabled persistent, covalent binding of the cell adhesive protein, tropoelastin, without employing chemical linking molecules. In contrast tropoelastin was readily eluted from the untreated surface. Through this differential persistence of binding, surface bound tropoelastin supported cell adhesion and spreading on the PIII treated but not the untreated polypyrrole surface. The application of a steel shadow mask during PIII treatment allowed for spatial definition of tropoelastin exclusively to PIII treated regions. The general applicability of this approach to other extracellular matrix proteins was illustrated using collagen I, which displayed similar results to tropoelastin but required extended washing conditions. This approach allowed fine patterning of cell adhesion and spreading to tropoelastin and collagen, specifically on PIII treated polypyrrole regions. We therefore present a methodology to alter the functionality of polypyrrole surfaces, generating surfaces that can spatially control cellular interactions through protein functionalization with the potential for electrical stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic Pattern of HOXB9 Protein Localization during Oocyte Maturation and Early Embryonic Development in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Sauvegarde, Caroline; Paul, Delphine; Bridoux, Laure; Jouneau, Alice; Degrelle, Séverine; Hue, Isabelle; Rezsohazy, René; Donnay, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously showed that the homeodomain transcription factor HOXB9 is expressed in mammalian oocytes and early embryos. However, a systematic and exhaustive study of the localization of the HOXB9 protein, and HOX proteins in general, during mammalian early embryonic development has so far never been performed. Results The distribution of HOXB9 proteins in oocytes and the early embryo was characterized by immunofluorescence from the immature oocyte stage to the peri-gastrulation period in both the mouse and the bovine. HOXB9 was detected at all studied stages with a dynamic expression pattern. Its distribution was well conserved between the two species until the blastocyst stage and was mainly nuclear. From that stage on, trophoblastic cells always showed a strong nuclear staining, while the inner cell mass and the derived cell lines showed important dynamic variations both in staining intensity and in intra-cellular localization. Indeed, HOXB9 appeared to be progressively downregulated in epiblast cells and only reappeared after gastrulation had well progressed. The protein was also detected in the primitive endoderm and its derivatives with a distinctive presence in apical vacuoles of mouse visceral endoderm cells. Conclusions Together, these results could suggest the existence of unsuspected functions for HOXB9 during early embryonic development in mammals. PMID:27798681

  2. Sex hormones and expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in the rat brain throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Flores, Oscar; Galván-Rosas, Agustín; Porfirio Gómora-Arrati; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy involves diverse changes in brain function that implicate a re-organization in neuronal cytoskeleton. In this physiological state, the brain is in contact with several hormones that it has never been exposed, as well as with very high levels of hormones that the brain has been in touch throughout life. Among the latter hormones are progesterone and estradiol which regulate several brain functions, including learning, memory, neuroprotection, and the display of sexual and maternal behavior. These functions involve changes in the structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity is regulated by estradiol and progesterone. We have found that the expression pattern of Microtubule Associated Protein 2, Tau, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain of the rat throughout gestation and the start of lactation, suggesting that these proteins participate in the plastic changes observed in the brain during pregnancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  3. Experimental manipulation of compaction of the mouse embryo alters patterns of protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, T. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction, occurring at the eight-cell stage of mouse development, is the process of cell flattening and polarisation by which cellular asymmetry is first established. Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation have been correlated with this early event of development. In the study reported here, groups of embryos were treated in ways known to affect particular features of compaction and were then labeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate; the phosphoproteins obtained were examined following electrophoresis in one and two dimensions. Four-cell embryos were treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, which advance cell flattening. This treatment resulted in only minor differences from the phosphoprotein profile of untreated four-cell embryos. Inhibition of protein synthesis at the eight-cell stage has little effect on cell flattening or polarisation. However, some phosphoproteins that are observed normally in eight-cell but not in four-cell embryos were no longer detectable if labeling took place in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. Eight-cell embryos incubated in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which disrupts various features of compaction, showed a relative increase in the phosphorylation of a group of phosphoprotein spots associated with the eight-cell but not with the four-cell stage. Embryos incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium, which prevents intercellular flattening and delays polarisation, showed a relative decrease in the phosphorylation of the same group of phosphoprotein spots. The behaviour of these phosphoproteins may therefore be correlated with some of the features of compaction.

  4. Comparison of Abnormal Prion Protein Glycoform Patterns from Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent-Infected Deer, Elk, Sheep, and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Race, Richard E.; Raines, Anne; Baron, Thierry G. M.; Miller, Michael W.; Jenny, Allen; Williams, Elizabeth S.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of abnormal prion protein glycoform patterns from chronic wasting disease (CWD)-affected deer and elk, scrapie-affected sheep and cattle, and cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy failed to identify patterns capable of reliably distinguishing these transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases. However, PrP-res patterns sometimes differed among individual animals, suggesting infection by different or multiple CWD strains in some species. PMID:12414979

  5. Discovery of protein acetylation patterns by deconvolution of peptide isomer mass spectra

    PubMed Central

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Rajan, Roshan Elizabeth; Jamai, Adil; Pomies, Christelle; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in the control of various biological processes including protein–protein interactions, epigenetics and cell cycle regulation. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches enable comprehensive identification and quantitation of numerous types of PTMs. However, the analysis of PTMs is complicated by the presence of indistinguishable co-eluting isomeric peptides that result in composite spectra with overlapping features that prevent the identification of individual components. In this study, we present Iso-PeptidAce, a novel software tool that enables deconvolution of composite MS/MS spectra of isomeric peptides based on features associated with their characteristic fragment ion patterns. We benchmark Iso-PeptidAce using dilution series prepared from mixtures of known amounts of synthetic acetylated isomers. We also demonstrate its applicability to different biological problems such as the identification of site-specific acetylation patterns in histones bound to chromatin assembly factor-1 and profiling of histone acetylation in cells treated with different classes of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26468920

  6. Predicting protein fold pattern with functional domain and sequential evolution information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-02-07

    The fold pattern of a protein is one level deeper than its structural classification, and hence is more challenging and complicated for prediction. Many efforts have been made in this regard, but so far all the reported success rates are still under 70%, indicating that it is extremely difficult to enhance the success rate even by 1% or 2%. To address this problem, here a novel approach is proposed that is featured by combining the functional domain information and the sequential evolution information through a fusion ensemble classifier. The predictor thus developed is called PFP-FunDSeqE. Tests were performed for identifying proteins among their 27 fold patterns. Compared with the existing predictors tested by a same stringent benchmark dataset, the new predictor can, for the first time, achieve over 70% success rate. The PFP-FunDSeqE predictor is freely available to the public as a web server at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/PFP-FunDSeqE/.

  7. Genome-wide expression patterns of calcium-dependent protein kinases in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Chen, Jia; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-04

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in plants and some Apicomplexan parasites but not in animals or fungi. CDPKs have been shown to play important roles in various calcium-signaling pathways such as host cell invasion, egress and protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. The objectives of the present study were to examine the T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns during different development stages and stress responses. We carried out a comprehensive expression analysis of CDPK genes based on previously published microarray datasets, and we also used real time quantitative RT-PCR to study ten T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns under acid, alkali, high temperature and low temperature conditions. Microarrays analysis indicated that some TgCDPK genes exhibited different expression levels in IFN-γ stimuli conditions or at different developmental stages, suggesting that CDPK genes may play different roles in these processes. Expression profiles under low temperature, high temperature, acid and alkaline indicated that most CDPK may be involved in regulating high temperature, acid and alkaline signaling pathways. We present a genome-wide expression analysis of CDPK genes in T. gondii for the first time, and the mRNA levels change with abiotic and biotic stresses, suggesting their functional roles in these processes. These results will provide a solid basis for future functional studies of the CDPK gene family in T. gondii.

  8. Lead exposure in pheochromocytoma cells induces persistent changes in amyloid precursor protein gene methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Tian; Wan, Yanjian; Xu, Shun-qing

    2012-08-01

    It has been suggested that lead (Pb) exposure in early life may increase amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression and promote the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease in old age. The current study examined whether the DNA methylation patterns of APP gene in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells changed after Pb acetate exposure. Undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to three doses of Pb acetate (50, 250, and 500 nM) and one control for 2 days or 1 week. The methylation patterns of APP promoter and global DNA methylation were analyzed. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) expression and the level of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) were also investigated. The results showed that the exposure of the three concentrations of Pb acetate could make the APP promoter hypomethylated. The global DNA methylation level and the expression of DNMT1 were changed in the 500 nM group after 2 days exposure and in the 250 and 500 nM group after 7 days exposure. Thus, Pb may exert neurotoxic effects through mechanisms that alter the global and promoter methylation patterns of APP gene. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2012. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The bone morphogenic protein antagonist gremlin regulates proximal-distal patterning of the lung.

    PubMed

    Lu, M M; Yang, H; Zhang, L; Shu, W; Blair, D G; Morrisey, E E

    2001-12-01

    The proximal-distal patterning of lung epithelium involves a complex series of signaling and transcriptional events resulting in the programmed differentiation of highly specialized cells for gas exchange and surfactant protein expression essential for postnatal lung function. The BMP signaling pathway has been shown to regulate cellular differentiation in the lung as well as other tissues. In this report, we show that the can family of related BMP antagonists, including gremlin, cer-1, PRDC, and Dan are expressed in the lung during embryonic development with gremlin expression observed in the proximal airway epithelium. The role of gremlin in lung development was explored by overexpressing it in the distal lung epithelium of transgenic mice using the human SP-C promoter. SP-C/gremlin transgenic mice exhibited a disruption of the proximal-distal patterning found in the airways of the mammalian lung. Expanded expression of the proximal epithelial cell markers CC10 and HFH-4 (Foxj1) was observed in the distal regions of transgenic lungs. Furthermore, smooth muscle alpha-actin expression was observed surrounding the distal airways of SP-C/gremlin mice, indicating a proximalization of distal lung tubules. These data suggest that gremlin plays an important role in lung morphogenesis by regulating the proximal-distal patterning of the lung during development. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein prevents vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meili; Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Jia, Yiting; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Limei; Wang, Xian; Wang, Wengong; Kong, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Aging-related vascular dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a vascular extracellular matrix protein, has been described as a negative regulatory factor for the vascular aging-related processes including atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, whether COMP is implicated in the process of vascular aging remains unclear. Here, we identified a novel function of COMP in preventing vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) senescence. Firstly, vascular COMP expression was decreased in three different senescence-accelerated mouse models and was also declining with age. COMP(-/-) mice displayed elevated senescence-associated markers expression, including p53, p21 and p16, in the aortas compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In accordance, COMP deficiency induced aging-related vascular dysfunction as evidenced by the significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction and increased vascular stiffness as evaluated by pulse wave velocity. The aortic wall of COMP(-/-) mice was susceptible to senescence by displaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity induced by periadventitial application of CaCl2 to the abdominal aorta. In vitro, COMP knockdown by small interfering (si) RNA led to the elevation of p53, p21 and p16 as well as SA β-gal activity in VSMCs after H2O2 stimulation. VSMCs isolated from COMP(-/-) mice showed elevated senescence-associated markers expression and supplement of COMP adenovirus to COMP-deficient VSMCs greatly rescued cellular senescence. Taken together, these findings revealed the essential role of COMP in retarding the development of vascular aging and VSMC senescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid Patterning of 1-D Collagenous Topography as an ECM Protein Fibril Platform for Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Niannan; Li, Xia; Bertulli, Cristina; Li, Zhaoying; Patharagulpong, Atipat; Sadok, Amine; Huang, Yan Yan Shery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM). For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein fibrils, seen among

  12. A fibrinogen-related protein identified from hepatopancreas of crayfish is a potential pattern recognition receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiming; Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related protein (FREP) family is a large group of proteins containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and plays multiple physiological roles in animals. However, their immune functions in crayfish are not fully explored. In the present study, a novel fibrinogen-like protein (designated as PcFBN1) was identified and characterized from hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA sequence of PcFBN1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1353 bp encoding a protein of 450 amino acids. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that PcFBN1 contains an FBG domain in C-terminal and a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids in N-terminal. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the main expression of PcFBN1 was observed in hepatopancreas and hemocyte. Temporal expression analysis exhibited that PcFBN1 expression could be significantly induced by heat-killed Aeromonas hydrophila. Tissue distribution and temporal change of PcFBN1 suggested that PcFBN1 may be involved in immune responses of red swamp crayfish. Recombinant PcFBN1 protein binds and agglutinates both gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, binding and agglutination is Ca(2+) dependent. Further analysis indicated that PcFBN1 recognizes some acetyl group-containing substance LPS and PGN. RNAi experiment revealed that PcFBN1 is required for bacterial clearance and survival from A. hydrophila infection. Reduction of PcFBN1 expression significantly decreased the survival and enhanced the number of A. hydrophila in the hemolymph. These results indicated that PcFBN1 plays an important role in the innate immunity of red swamp crayfish as a potential pattern recognition receptor.

  13. A Robust and Engineerable Self-Assembling Protein Template for the Synthesis and Patterning of Ordered Nanoparticle Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Li, Yi-Fen; Paavola, Chad D.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules that form highly ordered structures have attracted interest as potential alternatives to conventional lithographic processes for patterning materials. Here we introduce a general technique for patterning materials on the nanoscale using genetically modified protein cage structures called chaperonins that self-assemble into crystalline templates. Constrained chemical synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles is specific to templates genetically functionalized with poly-Histidine sequences. These arrays of materials are ordered by the nanoscale structure of the crystallized protein. This system may be easily adapted to pattern a variety of materials given the rapidly growing list of peptide sequences selected by screening for specificity for inorganic materials.

  14. Altered temporal patterns of anxiety in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedrosian, Tracy A.; Herring, Kamillya L.; Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2011-01-01

    Both normal aging and dementia are associated with dysregulation of the biological clock, which contributes to disrupted circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Diminished circadian organization in conjunction with the loss of cholinergic input to the cortex likely contributes to impaired cognition and behavior. One especially notable and relatively common circadian disturbance among the aged is “sundowning syndrome,” which is characterized by exacerbated anxiety, agitation, locomotor activity, and delirium during the hours before bedtime. Sundowning has been reported in both dementia patients and cognitively intact elderly individuals living in institutions; however, little is known about temporal patterns in anxiety and agitation, and the neurobiological basis of these rhythms remains unspecified. In the present study, we explored the diurnal pattern of anxiety-like behavior in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We then attempted to treat the observed behavioral disturbances in the aged mice using chronic nightly melatonin treatment. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that time-of-day differences in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase expression and general neuronal activation (i.e., c-Fos expression) coincide with the behavioral symptoms. Our results show a temporal pattern of anxiety-like behavior that emerges in elderly mice. This behavioral pattern coincides with elevated locomotor activity relative to adult mice near the end of the dark phase, and with time-dependent changes in basal forebrain acetylcholinesterase expression. Transgenic APP mice show a similar behavioral phenomenon that is not observed among age-matched wild-type mice. These results may have useful applications to the study and treatment of age- and dementia-related circadian behavioral disturbances, namely, sundowning syndrome. PMID:21709248

  15. Altered temporal patterns of anxiety in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Herring, Kamillya L; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-07-12

    Both normal aging and dementia are associated with dysregulation of the biological clock, which contributes to disrupted circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Diminished circadian organization in conjunction with the loss of cholinergic input to the cortex likely contributes to impaired cognition and behavior. One especially notable and relatively common circadian disturbance among the aged is "sundowning syndrome," which is characterized by exacerbated anxiety, agitation, locomotor activity, and delirium during the hours before bedtime. Sundowning has been reported in both dementia patients and cognitively intact elderly individuals living in institutions; however, little is known about temporal patterns in anxiety and agitation, and the neurobiological basis of these rhythms remains unspecified. In the present study, we explored the diurnal pattern of anxiety-like behavior in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We then attempted to treat the observed behavioral disturbances in the aged mice using chronic nightly melatonin treatment. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that time-of-day differences in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase expression and general neuronal activation (i.e., c-Fos expression) coincide with the behavioral symptoms. Our results show a temporal pattern of anxiety-like behavior that emerges in elderly mice. This behavioral pattern coincides with elevated locomotor activity relative to adult mice near the end of the dark phase, and with time-dependent changes in basal forebrain acetylcholinesterase expression. Transgenic APP mice show a similar behavioral phenomenon that is not observed among age-matched wild-type mice. These results may have useful applications to the study and treatment of age- and dementia-related circadian behavioral disturbances, namely, sundowning syndrome.

  16. Differential expression patterns of metastasis suppressor proteins in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Onder; Yulug, Isik G; Vargel, Ibrahim; Cavusoglu, Tarik; Karabulut, Ayse A; Karahan, Gurbet; Sayar, Nilufer

    2015-08-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are common malignant skin tumors. Despite having a significant invasion capacity, they metastasize only rarely. Our aim in this study was to detect the expression patterns of the NM23-H1, NDRG1, E-cadherin, RHOGDI2, CD82/KAI1, MKK4, and AKAP12 metastasis suppressor proteins in BCCs. A total of 96 BCC and 10 normal skin samples were included for the immunohistochemical study. Eleven frozen BCC samples were also studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect the gene expression profile. NM23-H1 was strongly and diffusely expressed in all types of BCC. Significant cytoplasmic expression of NDRG1 and E-cadherin was also detected. However, AKAP12 and CD82/KAI1 expression was significantly decreased. The expressions of the other proteins were somewhere between the two extremes. Similarly, qRT-PCR analysis showed down-regulation of AKAP12 and up-regulation of NM23-H1 and NDRG1 in BCC. Morphologically aggressive BCCs showed significantly higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression scores and lower CD82/KAI1 scores than non-aggressive BCCs. The relatively preserved levels of NM23-H1, NDRG1, and E-cadherin proteins may have a positive effect on the non-metastasizing features of these tumors. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. Expression pattern of tumor endothelial marker 8 protein in gallbladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Thakur, Mahendra Kumar; Shukla, Hari Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 protein (TEM8) is highly specific to tumor angiogenesis and is not required for normal adult angiogenesis and hence might prove to be a target for anti-angiogenic therapies in the future. We here evaluated protein and gene expression patterns in human endothelial cells of benign gallbladder - gallstone diseases (GSDs) and gallbladder carcinomas (GBCs) using immunostaining, immunofluorescence and western blotting techniques. Subjects comprised 175 GBC patients, 38 males and 137 females, aged 30-85 years (mean age 50.3 ± 13.4 years) and twenty with GSDs, aged 30-75 years, (51.4 ± 10.0 years) for comparison (male 4/20 and females 16/20). TEM8 protein expression increased significantly (p < 0.0001) with increasing stage of GBC and was mostly limited to endothelial cells, although there was no significant change with the grade. Interestingly, only 80-85 kDa and 60 kDa isoforms of TEM8 increased significantly whereas 45 kDa isoform was absent in GBCs. Conclusions- These results suggest that TEM8 plays an unknown important biological role to promote tumor angiogenesis in GBC.

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and its binding partners in the cartilage extracellular matrix: interaction, regulation and role in chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chitrangada; Yik, Jasper H N; Kishore, Ashleen; Van Dinh, Victoria; Di Cesare, Paul E; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2014-07-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are widely known as a family of five calcium-binding matricellular proteins. While these proteins belong to the same family, they are encoded by different genes, regulate different cellular functions and are localized to specific regions of the body. TSP-5 or Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) is the only TSP that has been associated with skeletal disorders in humans, including pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). The pentameric structure of COMP, the evidence that it interacts with multiple cellular proteins, and the recent reports of COMP acting as a 'lattice' to present growth factors to cells, inspired this review of COMP and its interacting partners. In our review, we have compiled the interactions of COMP with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix and summarized their importance in maintaining the structural integrity of cartilage as well as in regulating cellular functions.

  19. Many Local Pattern Texture Features: Which Is Better for Image-Based Multilabel Human Protein Subcellular Localization Classification?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying-Ying; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Human protein subcellular location prediction can provide critical knowledge for understanding a protein's function. Since significant progress has been made on digital microscopy, automated image-based protein subcellular location classification is urgently needed. In this paper, we aim to investigate more representative image features that can be effectively used for dealing with the multilabel subcellular image samples. We prepared a large multilabel immunohistochemistry (IHC) image benchmark from the Human Protein Atlas database and tested the performance of different local texture features, including completed local binary pattern, local tetra pattern, and the standard local binary pattern feature. According to our experimental results from binary relevance multilabel machine learning models, the completed local binary pattern, and local tetra pattern are more discriminative for describing IHC images when compared to the traditional local binary pattern descriptor. The combination of these two novel local pattern features and the conventional global texture features is also studied. The enhanced performance of final binary relevance classification model trained on the combined feature space demonstrates that different features are complementary to each other and thus capable of improving the accuracy of classification. PMID:25050396

  20. Two different immunostaining patterns of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) may distinguish traumatic from nontraumatic axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, but it also detects axonal injury due to ischemic or other metabolic causes. Previously, we reported two different patterns of APP staining: labeled axons oriented along with white matter bundles (pattern 1) and labeled axons scattered irregularly (pattern 2) (Hayashi et al. (Leg Med (Tokyo) 11:S171-173, 2009). In this study, we investigated whether these two patterns are consistent with patterns of trauma and hypoxic brain damage, respectively. Sections of the corpus callosum from 44 cases of blunt head injury and equivalent control tissue were immunostained for APP. APP was detected in injured axons such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons in 24 of the 44 cases of head injuries that also survived for three or more hours after injury. In 21 of the 24 APP-positive cases, pattern 1 alone was observed in 14 cases, pattern 2 alone was not observed in any cases, and both patterns 1 and 2 were detected in 7 cases. APP-labeled injured axons were detected in 3 of the 44 control cases, all of which were pattern 2. These results suggest that pattern 1 indicates traumatic axonal injury, while pattern 2 results from hypoxic insult. These patterns may be useful to differentiate between traumatic and nontraumatic axonal injuries.

  1. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  2. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory R; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors.

  3. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply “vesicular”. We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors. PMID:26624011

  4. Raft Protein Clustering Alters N-Ras Membrane Interactions and Activation Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Sharon; Beckett, Alison J.; Prior, Ian A.; Dekker, Frank J.; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Henis, Yoav I.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking, membrane localization, and lipid raft association of Ras proteins, which are crucial oncogenic mediators, dictate their isoform-specific biological responses. Accordingly, their spatiotemporal dynamics are tightly regulated. While extensively studied for H- and K-Ras, such information on N-Ras, an etiological oncogenic factor, is limited. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating the activation-dependent spatiotemporal organization of N-Ras, its modulation by biologically relevant stimuli, and isoform-specific effects on signaling. We combined patching/immobilization of another membrane protein with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (patch-FRAP) and FRAP beam size analysis to investigate N-Ras membrane interactions. Clustering of raft-associated proteins, either glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA-GPI) or fibronectin receptors, selectively enhanced the plasma membrane-cytoplasm exchange of N-Ras–GTP (preferentially associated with raft domains) in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Electron microscopy (EM) analysis showed N-Ras–GTP localization in cholesterol-sensitive clusters, from which it preferentially detached upon HA-GPI cross-linking. HA-GPI clustering enhanced the Golgi compartment (GC) accumulation and signaling of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated N-Ras–GTP. Notably, the cross-linking-mediated enhancement of N-Ras–GTP exchange and GC accumulation depended strictly on depalmitoylation. We propose that the N-Ras activation pattern (e.g., by EGF) is altered by raft protein clustering, which enhances N-Ras–GTP raft localization and depalmitoylation, entailing its exchange and GC accumulation following repalmitoylation. This mechanism demonstrates a functional signaling role for the activation-dependent differential association of Ras isoforms with raft nanodomains. PMID:21807892

  5. The application of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) in ocular protein studies. Part I: time dependent deposition patterns of immunoregulatory proteins on anionic hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aisling M; Jones, Lyndon W; Tighe, Brian J

    2002-06-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of wear regime on the deposition pattern of important immunoregulatory proteins on FDA Group IV etafilcon-A lenses. Specifically, the aim was to assess the extent to which the daily disposable wear modality produces a different deposition of proteins from the conventional daily wear regime which is coupled with cleaning and disinfection. Counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was employed to detect individual proteins in lens extracts from individual patients and focused on the analysis of five proteins, IgA, IgG, lactoferrin, albumin and kininogen. Deposition was monitored as a function of time; significantly lower deposition was detected on the daily disposable lenses.

  6. Proteomic Analyses Reveal Common Promiscuous Patterns of Cell Surface Proteins on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Sperms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bin; Zhang, Jiarong; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xinzong; Tan, Zhou; Lin, Yuanji; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Liangbiao; Yao, Kangshou; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Background It has long been proposed that early embryos and reproductive organs exhibit similar gene expression profiles. However, whether this similarity is propagated to the protein level remains largely unknown. We have previously characterised the promiscuous expression pattern of cell surface proteins on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. As cell surface proteins also play critical functions in human embryonic stem (hES) cells and germ cells, it is important to reveal whether a promiscuous pattern of cell surface proteins also exists for these cells. Methods and Principal Findings Surface proteins of hES cells and human mature sperms (hSperms) were purified by biotin labelling and subjected to proteomic analyses. More than 1000 transmembrane or secreted cell surface proteins were identified on the two cell types, respectively. Proteins from both cell types covered a large variety of functional categories including signal transduction, adhesion and transporting. Moreover, both cell types promiscuously expressed a wide variety of tissue specific surface proteins, and some surface proteins were heterogeneously expressed. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the promiscuous expression of functional and tissue specific cell surface proteins may be a common pattern in embryonic stem cells and germ cells. The conservation of gene expression patterns between early embryonic cells and reproductive cells is propagated to the protein level. These results have deep implications for the cell surface signature characterisation of pluripotent stem cells and germ cells and may lead the way to a new area of study, i.e., the functional significance of promiscuous gene expression in pluripotent and germ cells. PMID:21559292

  7. Modification of the endogenous NO level influences apple embryos dormancy by alterations of nitrated and biotinylated protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    NO donors and Arg remove dormancy of apple embryos and stimulate germination. Compounds lowering NO level (cPTIO, L -NAME, CAN) strengthen dormancy. Embryo transition from dormancy state to germination is linked to increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity. Germination of embryos is associated with declined level of biotin containing proteins and nitrated proteins in soluble protein fraction of root axis. Pattern of nitrated proteins suggest that storage proteins are putative targets of nitration. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as a key regulatory factor in removal of seed dormancy and is a signal necessary for seed transition from dormant state into germination. Modulation of NO concentration in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos by NO fumigation, treatment with NO donor (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine, SNAP), application of 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), canavanine (CAN) or arginine (Arg) allowed us to investigate the NO impact on seed dormancy status. Arg analogs and NO scavenger strengthened embryo dormancy by lowering reactive nitrogen species level in embryonic axes. This effect was accompanied by strong inhibition of NOS-like activity, without significant influence on tissue NO2 (-) concentration. Germination sensu stricto of apple embryos initiated by dormancy breakage via short term NO treatment or Arg supplementation were linked to a reduced level of biotinylated proteins in root axis. Decrease of total soluble nitrated proteins was observed at the termination of germination sensu stricto. Also modulation of NO tissue status leads to modification in nitrated protein pattern. Among protein bands that correspond to molecular mass of approximately 95 kDa, storage proteins (legumin A-like and seed biotin-containing protein) were identified, and can be considered as good markers for seed dormancy status. Moreover, pattern of nitrated proteins suggest that

  8. Architectural adaptation and protein expression patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Lawrence, John R; Swerhone, George D W; Korber, Darren R

    2008-03-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant biofilm-forming pathogen. The influence of a 10-fold difference in nutrient laminar flow velocity on the dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation and protein expression profiles were compared in order to ascertain how flow velocity influenced biofilm structure and function. Low-flow (0.007 cm s(-1)) biofilms consisted of diffusely-arranged microcolonies which grew until merging by approximately 72 h. High-flow (0.07 cm s(-1)) biofilms were significantly thicker (36+/-3 microm (arithmetic mean+/-standard error; n=225) versus 16+/-2 microm for low-flow biofilms at 120 h) and consisted of large bacterial mounds interspersed by water channels. Lectin-binding analysis of biofilm exopolymers revealed a significantly higher (P<0.05) proportion of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in low-flow biofilms (55.2%), relative to only 1.2% in high-flow biofilms. Alternatively, the proportions of alpha-L-fucose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc2)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) polymer-conjugates were significantly higher (P<0.05) in high-flow biofilms (69.1% and 29.6%, respectively) than low-flow biofilms (33.1% and 11.7%, respectively). Despite an apparent flow rate-based physiologic effect on biofilm structure and exopolymer composition, no major shift in whole-cell protein expression patterns was seen between 168 h-old low-flow and high-flow biofilms, and notably did not include any response involving the stress response proteins, DnaK, SodB, and Tpx. Proteins involved in degradation and energy metabolism (PduA, GapA, GpmA, Pgk, and RpiA), RNA and protein biosynthesis (Tsf, TufA, and RpoZ), cell processes (Crr, MalE, and PtsH), and adaptation (GrcA), and some hypothetical proteins (YcbL and YnaF) became up-regulated in both biofilm systems relative to a 168 h-old planktonic cell control. Our results indicate that Salmonella Enteritidis biofilms altered their structure and extracellular glycoconjugate composition

  9. On-line process analysis innovation: DiComp (tm) shunting dielectric sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Craig R.; Waldman, Frank A.

    1993-01-01

    The DiComp Shunting Dielectric Sensor (SDS) is a new patent-pending technology developed under the Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) for NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The incorporation of a shunt electrode into a conventional fringing field dielectric sensor makes the SDS uniquely sensitive to changes in material dielectric properties in the KHz to MHz range which were previously detectable only at GHz measurement frequencies. The initial NASA application of the SDS for Nutrient Delivery Control has demonstrated SDS capabilities for thickness and concentration measurement of Hoagland nutrient solutions. The commercial introduction of DiComp SDS technology for concentration and percent solids measurements in dispersions, emulsions and solutions represents a new technology for process measurements for liquids in a variety of industries.

  10. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for computational chemistry : CompChem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a subdomain chemistry format for storing computational chemistry data called CompChem. It has been developed based on the design, concepts and methodologies of Chemical Markup Language (CML) by adding computational chemistry semantics on top of the CML Schema. The format allows a wide range of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of individual molecules to be stored. These calculations include, for example, single point energy calculation, molecular geometry optimization, and vibrational frequency analysis. The paper also describes the supporting infrastructure, such as processing software, dictionaries, validation tools and database repositories. In addition, some of the challenges and difficulties in developing common computational chemistry dictionaries are discussed. The uses of CompChem are illustrated by two practical applications. PMID:22870956

  11. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML) for computational chemistry : CompChem.

    PubMed

    Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Kraft, Markus; Townsend, Joe A; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2012-08-07

    : This paper introduces a subdomain chemistry format for storing computational chemistry data called CompChem. It has been developed based on the design, concepts and methodologies of Chemical Markup Language (CML) by adding computational chemistry semantics on top of the CML Schema. The format allows a wide range of ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of individual molecules to be stored. These calculations include, for example, single point energy calculation, molecular geometry optimization, and vibrational frequency analysis. The paper also describes the supporting infrastructure, such as processing software, dictionaries, validation tools and database repositories. In addition, some of the challenges and difficulties in developing common computational chemistry dictionaries are discussed. The uses of CompChem are illustrated by two practical applications.

  12. User's Guide to PreComp (Pre-Processor for Computing Composite Blade Properties)

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    PreComp (Pre-processor for computing Composite blade structural properties) was developed to compute the stiffness and inertial properties of a composite blade. The code may also be used to compute the structural properties of a metallic blade by treating it as a special case of an isotropic composite material. This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to prepare input files (specify blade external geometry and internal structural layup of composite laminates), how to execute the code, and how to interpret the output properties. PreComp performs extensive checks for completeness, range, and viability of input data; these are also discussed in this manual. The code runs fast, usually in a fraction of a second, and requires only a modest knowledge of the composites and laminates schedule typically used in blades.

  13. Three scrapie prion isolates exhibit different accumulation patterns of the prion protein scrapie isoform.

    PubMed Central

    DeArmond, S J; Yang, S L; Lee, A; Bowler, R; Taraboulos, A; Groth, D; Prusiner, S B

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis of prion diversity, we inoculated transgenic mice expressing the Syrian hamster prion protein (PrP) with three distinct prion isolates. We compared the three isolates designated Sc237, 139H, and Me7H in Tg(SHaPrP)7 mice with clinical signs of scrapie because the incubation times with these mice are considerably shorter than the times found with hamsters. Each prion isolate produced a distinctive pattern of the scrapie isoform of PrP (PrPSc) accumulation, as determined by histoblotting, a technique developed for the regional mapping of PrPSc deposition. The PrPSc pattern with the Me7H isolate was particularly interesting because it appeared to be confined to the hypothalamus and related structures--including the interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and periaqueductal grey. Additionally, the regions of PrPSc accumulation remained highly restricted, even though the incubation time for Me7H scrapie was significantly longer than with Sc237 and 139H isolates. Neuropathological changes characterized by neuronal vacuolation and astrocytic gliosis were confined to those regions where PrPSc accumulated. These findings argue that the cell-specific propagation of prion isolates may be responsible for different properties exhibited by each of the isolates. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8101989

  14. The CompHP core competencies framework for health promotion in Europe.

    PubMed

    Barry, Margaret M; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-12-01

    The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across the European Union Member States and Candidate Countries. A phased, multiple-method approach was employed to facilitate a consensus-building process on the development of the core competencies. Key stakeholders in European health promotion were engaged in a layered consultation process using the Delphi technique, online consultations, workshops, and focus groups. Based on an extensive literature review, a mapping process was used to identify the core domains, which informed the first draft of the Framework. A consultation process involving two rounds of a Delphi survey with national experts in health promotion from 30 countries was carried out. In addition, feedback was received from 25 health promotion leaders who participated in two focus groups at a pan-European level and 116 health promotion practitioners who engaged in four country-specific consultations. A further 54 respondents replied to online consultations, and there were a number of followers on various social media platforms. Based on four rounds of redrafting, the final Framework document was produced, consisting of 11 core domains and 68 core competency statements. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion provides a resource for workforce development in Europe, by articulating the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities that are required for effective practice. The core domains are based on the multidisciplinary concepts, theories, and research that make health promotion distinctive. It is the combined application of all the domains, the knowledge base, and the ethical values that constitute the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health

  15. util_2comp: Planck-based two-component dust model utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    The util_2comp software utilities generate predictions of far-infrared Galactic dust emission and reddening based on a two-component dust emission model fit to Planck HFI, DIRBE and IRAS data from 100 GHz to 3000 GHz. These predictions and the associated dust temperature map have angular resolution of 6.1 arcminutes and are available over the entire sky. Implementations in IDL and Python are included.

  16. Distinctive patterns of p53 protein expression and microsatellite instability in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nyiraneza, Christine; Jouret-Mourin, Anne; Kartheuser, Alex; Camby, Philippe; Plomteux, Olivier; Detry, Roger; Dahan, Karin; Sempoux, Christine

    2011-12-01

    Although evidence suggests an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability and p53 alterations in colorectal cancer, no study has thoroughly examined the use of p53 immunohistochemistry in phenotyping colorectal cancers. We investigated the value of p53 immunohistochemistry in microsatellite instability-positive colorectal cancers prescreening and attempted to clarify the relationship between DNA mismatch repair system and p53 pathway. In a series of 104 consecutive colorectal cancers, we performed p53 immunohistochemistry, TP53 mutational analysis, DNA mismatch repair system efficiency evaluation (DNA mismatch repair system immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability status, MLH1/MSH2 germ line, and BRAF, murine double minute 2, and p21 immunohistochemistry. Microsatellite instability high was observed in 25 of 104 colorectal cancers, with DNA mismatch repair system protein loss (24/25) and germ line (8/25) or BRAF mutations (8/25). p53 immunohistochemistry revealed 3 distinct patterns of expression: complete negative immunostaining associated with truncating TP53 mutations (P < .0001), diffuse overexpression associated with missense TP53 mutations (P < .0001), and restricted overexpression characterized by a limited number of homogenously scattered strongly positive tumor cells in 36.5% of colorectal cancers. This latest pattern was associated with wild-type TP53 and microsatellite instability high colorectal cancers (P < .0001) including all Lynch tumors (8/8), but its presence among 22% of DNA mismatch repair system-competent colorectal cancers decreased its positive predictive value (55.2% [95% confidence interval, 45%-65%]). It was also correlated with murine double minute 2 overexpression (P < .0001) and inversely with p21 loss (P = .0002), independently of microsatellite instability status. In conclusion, a restricted pattern of p53 overexpression is preferentially associated with microsatellite instability high phenotype and could

  17. Two dimensional protein patterns of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from non-smokers, smokers, and subjects exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, M.; Ekström, T.; Sörensen, J.; Tagesson, C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid contains a large number of proteins which comprise a potential resource for studying respiratory effects due to occupational and environmental exposures. A study was undertaken to compare protein patterns of BAL fluid from non-smokers, smokers, and subjects exposed to asbestos. METHODS: BAL fluid samples were analysed with two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The separated proteins were detected, quantified, and pattern-matched between different individuals with a computerised imaging system designed for evaluations of 2-DE patterns. RESULTS: About 200 different protein spots were detected in each sample of BAL fluid. As is the case with blood plasma, the BAL fluid samples contained large amounts of albumin, transferrin, and immunoglobulins. Higher levels of basic proteins were found in smokers than in non-smokers, while subjects exposed to asbestos had increased amounts of several high molecular weight proteins as well as basic proteins. Lower levels of albumin and higher levels of immunoglobulins were found in smokers than in non-smokers, while higher levels of transferrin were found in asbestos exposed subjects than in unexposed subjects. Moreover, in the group exposed to asbestos differences were found between patients with pleuritis and patients with pleural plaque, and one protein spot was found only in two patients with progressive pleural disease. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that both smokers and asbestos exposed subjects have significant changes in their airway protein expression compared with non-smokers and unexposed subjects. It is inferred that analysis of protein patterns in the BAL fluid with 2-DE may be used to detect and characterise, at a molecular level, respiratory effects due to occupational and environmental exposures. Images PMID:8977605

  18. The CoMP-S Instrument at the Lomnický Peak Observatory: Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, A.; Ambróz, J.; Gömöry, P.; Habaj, P.; Kavka, J.; Kozák, M.; Schwartz, P.; Rybák, J.; Tomczyk, S.; Sewell, S.; Aumiller, P.; Summers, R.; Watt, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter for Slovakia (CoMP-S) has been installed at the high-altitude Lomnicky Peak Observatory of the Astronomical Institute of SAS (2633 m a.s.l.) in 2011. The instrument was designed and manufactured by HAO/NCAR (Boulder, USA) with a tunable Lyot filter and polarimeter for visible and near IR spectral regions. This instrument is proposed for coronagraphic observations of magnetic and velocity fields in the solar corona and in prominences. A fundamental upgrade of this instrument has been prepared with pair of cameras sensitive in the near IR spectral region in a new camera module. This upgrade is being incorporated to the instrument in course of the year 2014. In this contribution the technical parameters of the final configuration of the CoMP-S instrument containing four cameras, covering both visible and near IR spectral regions, are described. We also present a potential of the CoMP-S instrument for coronagraphic spectro-polarimetric observations of the solar corona and prominences with a capability for sequential measurements of the spectral profiles of all prominent emission lines in spectral region from 500 to 1100 nm.

  19. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M.; Vinod, Shalini K.

    2012-10-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  20. Differentiating disease subtypes by using pathway patterns constructed from gene expressions and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fei-Hung; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression profiles differ in different diseases. Even if diseases are at the same stage, such diseases exhibit different gene expressions, not to mention the different subtypes at a single lesion site. Distinguishing different disease subtypes at a single lesion site is difficult. In early cases, subtypes were initially distinguished by doctors. Subsequently, further differences were found through pathological experiments. For example, a brain tumor can be classified according to its origin, its cell-type origin, or the tumor site. Because of the advancements in bioinformatics and the techniques for accumulating gene expressions, researchers can use gene expression data to classify disease subtypes. Because the operation of a biopathway is closely related to the disease mechanism, the application of gene expression profiles for clustering disease subtypes is insufficient. In this study, we collected gene expression data of healthy and four myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes and applied a method that integrated protein-protein interaction and gene expression data to identify different patterns of disease subtypes. We hope it is efficient for the classification of disease subtypes in adventure.

  1. Decreased expression of Fyn protein and disbalanced alternative splicing patterns in platelets from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Kotaro; Fukuzako, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Tomo; Hamada, Shun; Murata, Yoji; Isosaka, Tomoko; Yuasa, Shigeki; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-07-30

    Fyn, a Src-family kinase, is highly expressed in brain tissue and blood cells. In the mouse brain, Fyn participates in brain development, synaptic transmission through the phosphorylation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits, and the regulation of emotional behavior. Recently, we found that Fyn is required for the signal transduction in striatal neurons that is initiated by haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug. To determine whether Fyn abnormalities are present in patients with schizophrenia, we analyzed Fyn expression in platelet samples from 110 patients with schizophrenia, 75 of the patients' first-degree relatives, and 130 control subjects. A Western blot analysis revealed significantly lower levels of Fyn protein among the patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, compared with the level in the control group. At the mRNA level, the splicing patterns of fyn were altered in the patients and their relatives; specifically, the ratio of fynDelta7, in which exon 7 is absent, was elevated. An expression study in HEK293T cells revealed that FynDelta7 had a dominant-negative effect on the phosphorylation of Fyn's substrate. These results suggest novel deficits in Fyn function, manifested as the downregulation of Fyn protein or the altered transcription of the fyn gene, in patients with schizophrenia.

  2. Sec14-nodulin proteins and the patterning of phosphoinositide landmarks for developmental control of membrane morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ratna; de Campos, Marília K. F.; Huang, Jin; Huh, Seong K.; Orlowski, Adam; Yang, Yuan; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Nile, Aaron; Lee, Hsin-Chieh; Dynowski, Marek; Schäfer, Helen; Róg, Tomasz; Lete, Marta G.; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Alonso, Alicia; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Igumenova, Tatyana I.; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2015-01-01

    Polarized membrane morphogenesis is a fundamental activity of eukaryotic cells. This process is essential for the biology of cells and tissues, and its execution demands exquisite temporal coordination of functionally diverse membrane signaling reactions with high spatial resolution. Moreover, mechanisms must exist to establish and preserve such organization in the face of randomizing forces that would diffuse it. Here we identify the conserved AtSfh1 Sec14-nodulin protein as a novel effector of phosphoinositide signaling in the extreme polarized membrane growth program exhibited by growing Arabidopsis root hairs. The data are consistent with Sec14-nodulin proteins controlling the lateral organization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) landmarks for polarized membrane morphogenesis in plants. This patterning activity requires both the PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding and homo-oligomerization activities of the AtSfh1 nodulin domain and is an essential aspect of the polarity signaling program in root hairs. Finally, the data suggest a general principle for how the phosphoinositide signaling landscape is physically bit mapped so that eukaryotic cells are able to convert a membrane surface into a high-definition lipid-signaling screen. PMID:25739452

  3. Stem fasciation in cacti and succulent species--tissue anatomy, protein pattern and RAPD polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    El-Banna, A N; El-Nady, M F; Dewir, Y H; El-Mahrouk, M E

    2013-09-01

    Fasciated and normal stem segments of Opuntia microdasys, Opuntia cylindrica, Huernia primulina and Euphorbia lactea were collected from the same plant and compared for their anatomy, water relations and genetic variations. Anatomical differences in terms of thickness of cuticle, vascular bundle, xylem and phloem were analyzed in both normal and fasciated stems. The mucilage cells were higher in the fasciated form of Opuntia microdasys than that in the normal form. Water status in terms of total water content (TWC), water deficit and relative water content (RWC) was influenced by fasciation. Genetic variations were tested in normal and fasciated stems using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprints and SDS-PAGE of soluble protein extracts. SDS-PAGE protein and RAPD analysis confirmed that normal and fasciated tissues were genetically different. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) yielded different polymorphic banding patterns that were unique to each primer and distinguishable over all samples. The PCR results of normal and fasciated samples were significantly different in cases of primers P1, P2 and P3. These results indicate that occurrence of fasciation in Opuntia microdasys, Opuntia cylindrica, Huernia primulina and Euphorbia lactea is an epigenetic mutation of tissues.

  4. Using phylogenomic patterns and gene ontology to identify proteins of importance in plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; De la Torre-Bárcena, Jose E; Lee, Ernest K; Katari, Manpreet S; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis W; Martienssen, Rob; Coruzzi, Gloria M; DeSalle, Rob

    2010-07-12

    We use measures of congruence on a combined expressed sequenced tag genome phylogeny to identify proteins that have potential significance in the evolution of seed plants. Relevant proteins are identified based on the direction of partitioned branch and hidden support on the hypothesis obtained on a 16-species tree, constructed from 2,557 concatenated orthologous genes. We provide a general method for detecting genes or groups of genes that may be under selection in directions that are in agreement with the phylogenetic pattern. Gene partitioning methods and estimates of the degree and direction of support of individual gene partitions to the overall data set are used. Using this approach, we correlate positive branch support of specific genes for key branches in the seed plant phylogeny. In addition to basic metabolic functions, such as photosynthesis or hormones, genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation by small RNAs were significantly overrepresented in key nodes of the phylogeny of seed plants. Two genes in our matrix are of critical importance as they are involved in RNA-dependent regulation, essential during embryo and leaf development. These are Argonaute and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 found to be overrepresented in the angiosperm clade. We use these genes as examples of our phylogenomics approach and show that identifying partitions or genes in this way provides a platform to explain some of the more interesting organismal differences among species, and in particular, in the evolution of plants.

  5. Using Phylogenomic Patterns and Gene Ontology to Identify Proteins of Importance in Plant Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; De la Torre-Bárcena, Jose E.; Lee, Ernest K.; Katari, Manpreet S.; Little, Damon P.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Martienssen, Rob; Coruzzi, Gloria M.; DeSalle, Rob

    2010-01-01

    We use measures of congruence on a combined expressed sequenced tag genome phylogeny to identify proteins that have potential significance in the evolution of seed plants. Relevant proteins are identified based on the direction of partitioned branch and hidden support on the hypothesis obtained on a 16-species tree, constructed from 2,557 concatenated orthologous genes. We provide a general method for detecting genes or groups of genes that may be under selection in directions that are in agreement with the phylogenetic pattern. Gene partitioning methods and estimates of the degree and direction of support of individual gene partitions to the overall data set are used. Using this approach, we correlate positive branch support of specific genes for key branches in the seed plant phylogeny. In addition to basic metabolic functions, such as photosynthesis or hormones, genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation by small RNAs were significantly overrepresented in key nodes of the phylogeny of seed plants. Two genes in our matrix are of critical importance as they are involved in RNA-dependent regulation, essential during embryo and leaf development. These are Argonaute and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 found to be overrepresented in the angiosperm clade. We use these genes as examples of our phylogenomics approach and show that identifying partitions or genes in this way provides a platform to explain some of the more interesting organismal differences among species, and in particular, in the evolution of plants. PMID:20624728

  6. APC and beta-catenin protein expression patterns in HNPCC-related endometrial and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kariola, Reetta; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Ollikainen, Miina; Butzow, Ralf; Peltomäki, Päivi; Nyström, Minna

    2005-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1) genes are the two major components of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. The overactivation of the pathway, which results in abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei, contributes to most colorectal cancers (CRCs), both sporadic and hereditary, as well as sporadic endometrial cancers (ECs). Here, we studied the involvement of APC and beta-catenin in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)-related ECs, and compared the expression patterns to those in HNPCC-related CRCs. Nineteen ECs and 31 CRCs derived from HNPCC patients were immunohistochemically stained with anti-APC- and anti-beta-catenin-antibodies. Tumor-specific loss of APC was observed in 16 of endometrial cancers (3 of 19) and in 39 of colorectal cancers (12 of 31). Consistently, the loss of APC expression was associated with nuclear beta-catenin staining. Altogether, aberrant beta-catenin localization was observed in 53 of ECs (10 of 19) as compared to 84 of CRCs (26 of 31) (P=0.02). Our results suggest a frequent overactivation of the Wnt signaling pathway in hereditary endometrial cancer. In accordance with studies on sporadic cancers, abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei occurred much less frequently in HNPCC-related ECs than CRCs, which may reflect organ-specific differences in their pathogenesis.

  7. Distinct patterns of increased translocator protein in posterior cortical atrophy and amnestic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kreisl, William C; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Liow, Jeih-San; Snow, Joseph; Page, Emily; Jenko, Kimberly J; Morse, Cheryl L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Pike, Victor W; Turner, R Scott; Innis, Robert B

    2017-03-01

    We sought to determine whether patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) demonstrate a pattern of binding to translocator protein 18 kDa, a marker of microglial activation, that is distinct from that in patients with amnestic presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Eleven PCA patients, 11 amnestic AD patients, and 15 age-matched controls underwent positron emission tomography with (11)C-PBR28 to measure translocator protein 18 kDa. PCA patients showed greater (11)C-PBR28 binding than controls in occipital, posterior parietal, and temporal regions. In contrast, amnestic AD patients showed greater (11)C-PBR28 binding in inferior and medial temporal cortex. Increased (11)C-PBR28 binding overlapped with reduced cortical volume for both PCA and amnestic AD patients, and with areas of reduced glucose metabolism in PCA patients. While both patient groups showed diffuse amyloid binding, PCA patients showed greater binding than amnestic AD patients in bilateral occipital cortex. These results suggest that microglial activation is closely associated with neurodegeneration across different subtypes of AD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Serum pattern profiling for analyzing different types of stress by protein chip technology: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Hou, Diandong; Wu, Da; Yin, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyi

    2010-01-01

    ProteinChip is a widely accepted tool for exploring serum pattern profile to evaluate the risk of somatic diseases from different stressors. In this study, by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-ToF), the serum proteome from mice under restraint and thermal stresses were profiled in detail and compared with the control group. Around 150 characteristic peaks were detected in all three groups, with m/z ranging from 1500 to 50,000, with most peaks being within the 2000 m/z to 20,000 m/z range. Compared with the control group, three significant protein peaks with m/z values of 2780, 3303 and 3450 appeared specifically in the restrained stress group and four other peaks with m/z values of 7500, 7811, 29,950 and 38,565 in the thermal stress group. Unexpectedly, no universal positive stress peaks were detected. These preliminary results clearly suggested that there might not be a common mechanism shared by various psychophysiological disorders under different stressors. By fast serum proteomics profiling, SELDI-ToF may be a convenient tool for evaluating the risk of stress-induced illness.

  9. Heterogeneous patterns on block copolymer thin film via solvent annealing: Effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Zhu, Jintao; Liang, Haojun

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous patterns consisting of nanometer-scaled hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains were generated by self-assembly of poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PHEMA) block copolymer thin film. The effect of the heterogeneity of the polymer film surface on the nonspecific adsorption of the protein human plasma fibrinogen (FBN, 5.0 × 5.0 × 47.5 nm3) was investigated. The kinetics of the FBN adsorption varies from a single-component Langmuir model on homogeneous hydrophilic PHEMA to a two-stage spreading relaxation model on homogeneous hydrophobic PS surface. On a heterogeneous PS-b-PHEMA surface with majority PS part, the initial FBN adsorption rate remains the same as that on the homogeneous PS surface. However, hydrophilic PHEMA microdomains on the heterogeneous surface slow down the second spreading stage of the FBN adsorption process, leading to a surface excess of adsorbed FBN molecules less than the presumed one simply calculated as adsorption onto multiple domains. Importantly, when the PS-b-PHEMA surface is annealed to form minority domelike PS domains (diameter: ˜50-100 nm) surrounded by a majority PHEMA matrix, such surface morphology proves to be strongly protein-repulsive. These interesting findings can be attributed to the enhancement of the spread FBN molecule in a mobile state by the heterogeneity of polymer film surface before irreversible adsorption occurs.

  10. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  11. Distinct patterns of gene and protein expression elicited by organophosphorus pesticides in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John A; Szilagyi, Maria; Gehman, Elizabeth; Dennis, William E; Jackson, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background The wide use of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides makes them an important public health concern. Persistent effects of exposure and the mechanism of neuronal degeneration are continuing issues in OP toxicology. To elucidate early steps in the mechanisms of OP toxicity, we studied alterations in global gene and protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to OPs using microarrays and mass spectrometry. We tested two structurally distinct OPs (dichlorvos and fenamiphos) and employed a mechanistically different third neurotoxicant, mefloquine, as an out-group for analysis. Treatment levels used concentrations of chemical sufficient to prevent the development of 10%, 50% or 90% of mid-vulval L4 larvae into early gravid adults (EGA) at 24 h after exposure in a defined, bacteria-free medium. Results After 8 h of exposure, the expression of 87 genes responded specifically to OP treatment. The abundance of 34 proteins also changed in OP-exposed worms. Many of the genes and proteins affected by the OPs are expressed in neuronal and muscle tissues and are involved in lipid metabolism, cell adhesion, apoptosis/cell death, and detoxification. Twenty-two genes were differentially affected by the two OPs; a large proportion of these genes encode cytochrome P450s, UDP-glucuronosyl/UDP-glucosyltransferases, or P-glycoproteins. The abundance of transcripts and the proteins they encode were well correlated. Conclusion Exposure to OPs elicits a pattern of changes in gene expression in exposed worms distinct from that of the unrelated neurotoxicant, mefloquine. The functional roles and the tissue location of the genes and proteins whose expression is modulated in response to exposure is consistent with the known effects of OPs, including damage to muscle due to persistent hypercontraction, neuronal cell death, and phase I and phase II detoxification. Further, the two different OPs evoked distinguishable changes in gene expression; about half the differences are in

  12. Protein expression patterns of cell cycle regulators in operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagouri, Flora; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Kouvatseas, George; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Gavressea, Theofani; Valavanis, Christos; Trihia, Helen; Bobos, Mattheos; Lazaridis, Georgios; Koutras, Angelos; Pentheroudakis, George; Skarlos, Pantelis; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Arnogiannaki, Niki; Chrisafi, Sofia; Christodoulou, Christos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Kosmidis, Paris; Karanikiotis, Charisios; Zografos, George; Papadimitriou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic role of elaborate molecular clusters encompassing cyclin D1, cyclin E1, p21, p27 and p53 in the context of various breast cancer subtypes. Cyclin E1, cyclin D1, p53, p21 and p27 were evaluated with immunohistochemistry in 1077 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from breast cancer patients who had been treated within clinical trials. Jaccard distances were computed for the markers and the resulted matrix was used for conducting unsupervised hierarchical clustering, in order to identify distinct groups correlating with prognosis. Luminal B and triple-negative (TNBC) tumors presented with the highest and lowest levels of cyclin D1 expression, respectively. By contrast, TNBC frequently expressed Cyclin E1, whereas ER-positive tumors did not. Absence of Cyclin D1 predicted for worse OS, while absence of Cyclin E1 for poorer DFS. The expression patterns of all examined proteins yielded 3 distinct clusters; (1) Cyclin D1 and/or E1 positive with moderate p21 expression; (2) Cyclin D1 and/or E1, and p27 positive, p53 protein negative; and, (3) Cyclin D1 or E1 positive, p53 positive, p21 and p27 negative or moderately positive. The 5-year DFS rates for clusters 1, 2 and 3 were 70.0%, 79.1%, 67.4% and OS 88.4%, 90.4%, 78.9%, respectively. It seems that the expression of cell cycle regulators in the absence of p53 protein is associated with favorable prognosis in operable breast cancer.

  13. Multiplex protein pattern unmixing using a non-linear variable-weighted support vector machine as optimized by a particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Zou, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Li-Juan; Shen, Guo-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-15

    Most of the proteins locate more than one organelle in a cell. Unmixing the localization patterns of proteins is critical for understanding the protein functions and other vital cellular processes. Herein, non-linear machine learning technique is proposed for the first time upon protein pattern unmixing. Variable-weighted support vector machine (VW-SVM) is a demonstrated robust modeling technique with flexible and rational variable selection. As optimized by a global stochastic optimization technique, particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, it makes VW-SVM to be an adaptive parameter-free method for automated unmixing of protein subcellular patterns. Results obtained by pattern unmixing of a set of fluorescence microscope images of cells indicate VW-SVM as optimized by PSO is able to extract useful pattern features by optimally rescaling each variable for non-linear SVM modeling, consequently leading to improved performances in multiplex protein pattern unmixing compared with conventional SVM and other exiting pattern unmixing methods.

  14. Label-free detection of the aptamer binding on protein patterns using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM).

    PubMed

    Gao, Pei; Cai, Yuguang

    2009-05-01

    Anti-lysozyme aptamers are found to preferentially bind to the edge of a tightly packed lysozyme pattern. Such edge-binding is due to the better accessibility and flexibility of the edge lysozyme molecules. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was used to study the aptamer-lysozyme binding. Our results show that KPFM is capable of detecting the aptamer-protein binding down to the 30 nm scale. The surface potential of the aptamer-lysozyme complex is approximately 12 mV lower than that of the lysozyme. The surface potential images of the aptamer-bound lysozyme patterns have the characteristic shoulder steps around the pattern edge, which is much wider than that of a clean lysozyme pattern. These results demonstrate the potentials of KPFM as a label-free method for the detection of protein-DNA interactions.

  15. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Leffers, Henrik; Juul, Anders; Brunak, Søren

    2017-03-22

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies, gene and protein level alterations have fatal consequences. We used genome-wide protein-protein interaction data to identify chromosome-specific patterns of protein interactions. We found that some chromosomes encode proteins that interact infrequently with each other, chromosome 21 in particular. We combined the protein interaction data with transcriptome data from human brain tissue to investigate how this pattern of global interactions may affect cellular function. We identified highly connected proteins that also had coordinated gene expression. These proteins were associated with important neurological functions affecting the characteristic phenotypes for Down syndrome and have previously been validated in mouse knockout experiments. Our approach is general and applicable to other gene-dosage changes, such as arm-level amplifications in cancer.

  16. Electrophoretic protein patterns and numerical analysis of Candida albicans from the oral cavities of healthy children.

    PubMed

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Bernardo, Wagner Luis de Carvalho; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Höfling, José Francisco

    2003-01-01

    dissemination route of these microorganisms in some groups of healthy scholars, which may be dependent of either socioeconomic categories or geographic site of each child. In contrast to the higher similarity, the lower similarity or higher polymorphism degree (0.499 < or = SD < 0.788) of protein profiles was shown in 23 (30.6%) C. albicans oral isolates. Considering the social epidemiological aspect, 42.1%, 41.7%, 26.6%, 23.5%, and 16.7% were isolates from children concerning to socioeconomic categories A, D, C, B, and E, respectively, and geographically, 63.6%, 50%, 33.3%, 33.3%, 30%, 25%, and 14.3% were isolates from children from schools LAE (Liceu Colégio Albert Einstein), MA (E.E.P.S.G. "Prof. Elias de Melo Ayres"), CS (E.E.P.G. "Prof. Carlos Sodero"), AV (Alphaville), HF (E.E.P.S.G. "Honorato Faustino), FMC (E.E.P.G. "Prof. Francisco Mariano da Costa"), and MEP (E.E.P.S.G. "Prof. Manasses Ephraim Pereira), respectively. Such results suggest a higher protein polymorphism degree among some strains isolated from healthy children independent of their socioeconomic strata or geographic sites. Complementary studies, involving healthy students and their families, teachers, servants, hygiene and nutritional habits must be done in order to establish the sources of such colonization patterns in population groups of healthy children. The whole-cell protein profile obtained by SDS-PAGE associated with computer-assisted numerical analysis may provide additional criteria for the taxonomic and epidemiological studies of C. albicans.

  17. Terminal sequence importance of de novo proteins from binary-patterned library: stable artificial proteins with 11- or 12-amino acid alphabet.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2012-06-01

    Successful approaches of de novo protein design suggest a great potential to create novel structural folds and to understand natural rules of protein folding. For these purposes, smaller and simpler de novo proteins have been developed. Here, we constructed smaller proteins by removing the terminal sequences from stable de novo vTAJ proteins and compared stabilities between mutant and original proteins. vTAJ proteins were screened from an α3β3 binary-patterned library which was designed with polar/ nonpolar periodicities of α-helix and β-sheet. vTAJ proteins have the additional terminal sequences due to the method of constructing the genetically repeated library sequences. By removing the parts of the sequences, we successfully obtained the stable smaller de novo protein mutants with fewer amino acid alphabets than the originals. However, these mutants showed the differences on ANS binding properties and stabilities against denaturant and pH change. The terminal sequences, which were designed just as flexible linkers not as secondary structure units, sufficiently affected these physicochemical details. This study showed implications for adjusting protein stabilities by designing N- and C-terminal sequences.

  18. Patterns of Protein Evolution in Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COI) from the Class Arachnida

    PubMed Central

    Young, Monica R; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Because sequence information is now available for the 648bp barcode region of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) from more than 400,000 animal species, this gene segment can be used to probe patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The present study examines levels of amino acid substitution and the frequency of indels in COI from 4177 species of arachnids, including representatives from all 16 orders and 43% of its families (267/625). It examines divergences at three taxonomic levels—among members of each order to an outgroup, among families in each order and among BINs, a species proxy, in each family. Order Distances vary fourfold (0.10–0.39), while the mean of the Family Distances for the ten orders ranges fivefold (0.07–0.35). BIN Distances show great variation, ranging from 0.01 or less in 12 families to more than 0.25 in eight families. Patterns of amino acid substitution in COI are generally congruent with previously reported variation in nucleotide substitution rates in arachnids, but provide some new insights, such as clear rate acceleration in the Opiliones. By revealing a strong association between elevated rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, this study builds evidence for the selective importance of the rate variation among arachnid lineages. Moreover, it establishes that groups whose COI genes have elevated levels of amino acid substitution also regularly possess indels, a dramatic form of protein reconfiguration. Overall, this study suggests that the mitochondrial genome of some arachnid groups is dynamic with high rates of amino acid substitution and frequent indels, while it is ‘locked down’ in others. Dynamic genomes are most prevalent in arachnids with short generation times, but the possible impact of breeding system deserves investigation since many of the rapidly evolving lineages reproduce by haplodiploidy, a mode of reproduction absent in ‘locked down’ taxa. PMID:26308206

  19. Nucleotide substitution patterns can predict the requirements for drug-resistance of HIV-1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Keulen, W; Boucher, C; Berkhout, B

    1996-06-01

    The enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a fundamental role in the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and several antiviral agents that target this key enzyme have been developed. Unfortunately, treatment of patients with RT inhibitors results in the appearance of drug-resistant variants with specific mutations in the RT protein. We hypothesized that if "difficult' resistance mutations (e.g. transversions/double-hits) are consistently observed at certain positions, it is likely that "easier' nucleotide substitutions (transitions/single-hits) at that codon do not result in a drug-resistant and/or active RT enzyme. In this study, we examined codon changes involved in RT drug resistance against nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors and listed all easier substitutions, which apparently were not selected, either due to reduced enzyme RT activity or lack of drug resistance. These predictions on the requirements for resistance were confirmed by published mutational data on RT variants. We also propose that differences in mutation type can explain the order of appearance of substitutions in case multiple amino acid changes are required for optimal fitness. Differences in mutation pattern have been reported for drug-resistant HIV-1 variants selected in tissue culture compared with variants found in treated patients. In contrast to the in vivo situation, a relatively small population size is handled in in vitro tissue culture systems and this may limit the chances of creating a resistance mutation. Indeed, inspection of the codon changes indicates that the in vitro culture system is more strongly biased towards the relatively easy nucleotide substitutions. These results suggest that the nucleotide substitution pattern can provide important information on RT drug resistance.

  20. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2014-04-01

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D1) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the 15N-1H bond (diffusion tensor, D2), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D1, D2, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 1012 rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D1/D2, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D1/D2 ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 kBT, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D1/D2 = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized-local-diffusion eigenmode. For D1/D2 > 0.1, most eigenmodes are of a mixed type. The analysis is

  1. Phenols content and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern: a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Luciana; Rotini, Alice; Randazzo, Davide; Albanese, Nadia N; Giallongo, Agata

    2007-01-01

    Background The endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile colonizes soft bottoms producing highly productive meadows that play a crucial role in coastal ecosystems dynamics. Human activities and natural events are responsible for a widespread meadows regression; to date the identification of "diagnostic" tools to monitor conservation status is a critical issue. In this study the feasibility of a novel tool to evaluate ecological impacts on Posidonia meadows has been tested. Quantification of a putative stress indicator, i.e. phenols content, has been coupled to 2-D electrophoretic protein analysis of rhizome samples. Results The overall expression pattern from Posidonia rhizome was determined using a preliminary proteomic approach, 437 protein spots were characterized by pI and molecular weight. We found that protein expression differs in samples belonging to sites with high or low phenols: 22 unique protein spots are peculiar of "low phenols" and 27 other spots characterize "high phenols" samples. Conclusion Posidonia showed phenols variations within the meadow, that probably reflect the heterogeneity of environmental pressures. In addition, comparison of the 2-D electrophoresis patterns allowed to highlight qualitative protein expression differences in response to these pressures. These differences may account for changes in metabolic/physiological pathways as adaptation to stress. A combined approach, based on phenols content determination and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern, seems a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state. PMID:17663776

  2. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability are responsible for recognition of human C4b-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complex with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies targeting the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design. PMID:27595425

  3. Mining frequent patterns for AMP-activated protein kinase regulation on skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingfeng; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2006-01-01

    Background AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as a significant signaling intermediary that regulates metabolisms in response to energy demand and supply. An investigation into the degree of activation and deactivation of AMPK subunits under exercise can provide valuable data for understanding AMPK. In particular, the effect of AMPK on muscle cellular energy status makes this protein a promising pharmacological target for disease treatment. As more AMPK regulation data are accumulated, data mining techniques can play an important role in identifying frequent patterns in the data. Association rule mining, which is commonly used in market basket analysis, can be applied to AMPK regulation. Results This paper proposes a framework that can identify the potential correlation, either between the state of isoforms of α, β and γ subunits of AMPK, or between stimulus factors and the state of isoforms. Our approach is to apply item constraints in the closed interpretation to the itemset generation so that a threshold is specified in terms of the amount of results, rather than a fixed threshold value for all itemsets of all sizes. The derived rules from experiments are roughly analyzed. It is found that most of the extracted association rules have biological meaning and some of them were previously unknown. They indicate direction for further research. Conclusion Our findings indicate that AMPK has a great impact on most metabolic actions that are related to energy demand and supply. Those actions are adjusted via its subunit isoforms under specific physical training. Thus, there are strong co-relationships between AMPK subunit isoforms and exercises. Furthermore, the subunit isoforms are correlated with each other in some cases. The methods developed here could be used when predicting these essential relationships and enable an understanding of the functions and metabolic pathways regarding AMPK. PMID:16939655

  4. Sec14-nodulin proteins and the patterning of phosphoinositide landmarks for developmental control of membrane morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ratna; de Campos, Marília K F; Huang, Jin; Huh, Seong K; Orlowski, Adam; Yang, Yuan; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Nile, Aaron; Lee, Hsin-Chieh; Dynowski, Marek; Schäfer, Helen; Róg, Tomasz; Lete, Marta G; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Alonso, Alicia; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Igumenova, Tatyana I; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2015-05-01

    Polarized membrane morphogenesis is a fundamental activity of eukaryotic cells. This process is essential for the biology of cells and tissues, and its execution demands exquisite temporal coordination of functionally diverse membrane signaling reactions with high spatial resolution. Moreover, mechanisms must exist to establish and preserve such organization in the face of randomizing forces that would diffuse it. Here we identify the conserved AtSfh1 Sec14-nodulin protein as a novel effector of phosphoinositide signaling in the extreme polarized membrane growth program exhibited by growing Arabidopsis root hairs. The data are consistent with Sec14-nodulin proteins controlling the lateral organization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) landmarks for polarized membrane morphogenesis in plants. This patterning activity requires both the PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding and homo-oligomerization activities of the AtSfh1 nodulin domain and is an essential aspect of the polarity signaling program in root hairs. Finally, the data suggest a general principle for how the phosphoinositide signaling landscape is physically bit mapped so that eukaryotic cells are able to convert a membrane surface into a high-definition lipid-signaling screen. © 2015 Ghosh, de Campos, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Patterns of sequence conservation in the S-Layer proteins and related sequences in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Calabi, Emanuela; Fairweather, Neil

    2002-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Among the factors that may play a role in infection are S-layer proteins (SLPs). Previous work has shown these to consist mainly of two components, resulting from the cleavage of a precursor encoded by the slpA gene. The high-molecular-weight (MW) subunit is related both to amidases from B. subtilis and to at least another 28 gene products in C. difficile strain 630. To gain insight into the functions of the SLPs and related proteins, we have further investigated the pattern of variability both at the slpA locus and at six nearby paralogs. Sequencing of the slpA gene from an S-layer group II strain and a variant S-layer group strain confirms a high degree of divergence in the low-MW SLP, which may result from diversifying selection. A highly conserved motif, however, is found at the C terminus in all low-MW subunits and may be essential for SlpA precursor cleavage. In strain 167, a variant cleavage product is present, suggesting a secondary processing site. Southern blotting analysis shows slpA-like open reading frames (ORFs) 2 to 7 to be conserved in all nine strains tested, with one exception: ORF2, which encodes a 66-kDa polypeptide coextracted at low pH with the main SLPs in strain 630, may be partially deleted in strain 167. Polymorphism within the slpA-ORF7 cluster may be more pronounced in the region proximal to the slpA gene. Unexpectedly, a high-MW subunit probe cross hybridizes to sequences outside the slpA locus, which appear to vary in number in different strains.

  6. Patterns and mechanisms of ancestral histone protein inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Radman-Livaja, Marta; Verzijlbergen, Kitty F; Weiner, Assaf; van Welsem, Tibor; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Replicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5' ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns.

  7. The relationship between serum and urine metallothionein, renal function, protein excretion patterns and occupational cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Falck, F.Y. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between renal function, metallothionein (MT), protein excretion patterns, and chronic cadmium (Cd) exposure. Two groups (A and B) of Cd-exposed workers were studied.Group A (n = 33) was exposed to Cd fume from silver brazing and Group B (n = 20) was exposed to Cd fume, Cd oxide dust and Cd sulfate mist refining Cd. MT excretion was significantly higher in abnormal renal function subjects in Groups A and B. Serum MT and serum creatinine levels were also significantly higher in abnormal renal function subjects in Group A. The findings suggest that MT is better predictor of dose than Cd of ..beta../sub 2/-M excretion and that MT is related to Cd nephrotoxicity. MT is a potential biological monitor for Cd-exposed humans which may be useful for preventing Cd nephropathy. It is not known if MT is a specific indicator for Cd-induced proximal tubule dysfunction. The renal status of Group A subjects was examined since this group had been exposed to Cd fume at and below the current permissible exposure level (PEL) of 100..mu..g/m/sup 3/ for at least 21 years. The prevalence of renal dysfunction was 21% (7) after adjustment for confounding factors. The findings suggest that the PEL does not protect against renal dysfunction for a working lifetime.

  8. Bone morphogenetic proteins, eye patterning, and retinocollicular map formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Daniel T.; Dhande, Onkar; Lopez, Joshua E.; Murali, Deepa; Thaller, Christina; Henkemeyer, Mark; Furuta, Yasuhide; Overbeek, Paul; Crair, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Patterning events during early eye formation determine retinal cell fate and can dictate the behavior of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons as they navigate toward central brain targets. The temporally and spatially regulated expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors in the retina are thought to play a key role in this process, initiating gene expression cascades that distinguish different regions of the retina, particularly along the dorsoventral axis. Here, we examine the role of BMP and a potential downstream effector, EphB, in retinotopic map formation in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC). RGC axon behaviors during retinotopic map formation in wild type mice are compared with those in several strains of mice with engineered defects of BMP and EphB signaling. Normal RGC axon sorting produces axon order in the optic tract that reflects the dorsoventral position of the parent RGCs in the eye. A dramatic consequence of disrupting BMP signaling is a missorting of RGC axons as they exit the optic chiasm. This sorting is not dependent on EphB. When BMP signaling in the developing eye is genetically modified, RGC order in the optic tract and targeting in the LGN and SC are correspondingly disrupted. These experiments show that BMP signaling regulates dorsoventral RGC cell fate, RGC axon behavior in the ascending optic tract and retinotopic map formation in the LGN and SC through mechanisms that are in part distinct from EphB signaling in the LGN and SC. PMID:18614674

  9. *CHANGING PATTERN OF THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ERYTHROBLAST MACROPHAGE PROTEIN (EMP) DURING MACROPHAGE DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp), mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages, and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data shows that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture show that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data shows that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation, and suggests that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions. PMID:17071116

  10. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  11. Endomembrane trafficking protein SEC24A regulates cell size patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xian; Chatty, Prerana Rao; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2014-12-01

    Size is a critical property of a cell, but how it is determined is still not well understood. The sepal epidermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains cells with a diversity of sizes ranging from giant cells to small cells. Giant cells have undergone endoreduplication, a specialized cell cycle in which cells replicate their DNA but fail to divide, becoming polyploid and enlarged. Through forward genetics, we have identified a new mutant with ectopic giant cells covering the sepal epidermis. Surprisingly, the mutated gene, SEC24A, encodes a coat protein complex II vesicle coat subunit involved in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi trafficking in the early secretory pathway. We show that the ectopic giant cells of sec24a-2 are highly endoreduplicated and that their formation requires the activity of giant cell pathway genes LOSS OF GIANT CELLS FROM ORGANS, DEFECTIVE KERNEL1, and Arabidopsis CRINKLY4. In contrast to other trafficking mutants, cytokinesis appears to occur normally in sec24a-2. Our study reveals an unexpected yet specific role of SEC24A in endoreduplication and cell size patterning in the Arabidopsis sepal. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. On-chip parylene-C microstencil for simple-to-use patterning of proteins and cells on polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghee; Yang, Sung

    2013-04-10

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used as a substrate in miniaturized devices, given its suitability for execution of biological and chemical assays. Here, we present a patterning approach for PDMS, which uses an on-chip Parylene-C microstencil to pattern proteins and cells. To implement the on-chip Parylene-C microstencil, we applied SiOx-like nanoparticle layers using atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixed with oxygen. The complete removal of Parylene-C from PDMS following application of SiOx-like nanoparticle layers was demonstrated by various surface characterization analysis, including optical transparency, surface morphology, chemical composition, and peel-off force. Furthermore, the effects of the number of AP-PECVD treatments were investigated. Our approach overcomes the tendency of Parylene-C to peel off incompletely from PDMS, which has limited its use with PDMS to date. The on-chip Parylene-C microstencil approach that is based on this Parylene-C peel-off process on PDMS can pattern proteins with 2-μm resolution and cells at single-cell resolution with a vacancy ratio as small as 10%. This provides superior user-friendliness and a greater degree of geometrical freedom than previously described approaches that require meticulous care in handling of stencil. Thus, this patterning method could be applied in various research fields to pattern proteins or cells on the flexible PDMS substrate.

  13. Identifying known unknowns using the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard.

    PubMed

    McEachran, Andrew D; Sobus, Jon R; Williams, Antony J

    2017-03-01

    Chemical features observed using high-resolution mass spectrometry can be tentatively identified using online chemical reference databases by searching molecular formulae and monoisotopic masses and then rank-ordering of the hits using appropriate relevance criteria. The most likely candidate "known unknowns," which are those chemicals unknown to an investigator but contained within a reference database or literature source, rise to the top of a chemical list when rank-ordered by the number of associated data sources. The U.S. EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is a curated and freely available resource for chemistry and computational toxicology research, containing more than 720,000 chemicals of relevance to environmental health science. In this research, the performance of the Dashboard for identifying known unknowns was evaluated against that of the online ChemSpider database, one of the primary resources used by mass spectrometrists, using multiple previously studied datasets reported in the peer-reviewed literature totaling 162 chemicals. These chemicals were examined using both applications via molecular formula and monoisotopic mass searches followed by rank-ordering of candidate compounds by associated references or data sources. A greater percentage of chemicals ranked in the top position when using the Dashboard, indicating an advantage of this application over ChemSpider for identifying known unknowns using data source ranking. Additional approaches are being developed for inclusion into a non-targeted analysis workflow as part of the CompTox Chemistry Dashboard. This work shows the potential for use of the Dashboard in exposure assessment and risk decision-making through significant improvements in non-targeted chemical identification. Graphical abstract Identifying known unknowns in the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard from molecular formula and monoisotopic mass inputs.

  14. Strategic compliance planning using the NO{sub x}COMP computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Baublis, D.; Frazier, W.; Killen, D.; Copolo, T.; Flynn, D.; Nelson, J.

    1997-09-01

    Strategic planning for NO{sub x} compliance becomes more important as the NO{sub x} emission limits are reduced further for Phase 2 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). Utilities in sensitive areas such as the Ozone Transport Region (OTR), or others which may be affected by the activities of the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) may face still lower limits than the current Title 4, Phase 2 regulations. Effective compliance strategy development must take into account baseline NO{sub x} emissions, actual or future regulatory limits, emissions averaging and bubbling schemes, unit capacity factors and economic parameters, as well as the potential of various NO{sub x} control techniques under consideration. Stone and Webster has developed and used the NO{sub x}COMP technical/economic computer model to aid utilities in determining the least-cost, least-risk strategy for compliance with the NO{sub x} provisions of the CAAA. Designed specifically to be used throughout the implementation of a NO{sub x} compliance program, NO{sub x}COMP can be updated with post-modification data. By inputting actual cost and emissions performance information, the impact to the utility compliance program can be determined and the strategy adjusted accordingly. Better, or worse than expected, performance can be evaluated based on overall compliance cost. NO{sub x}COMP uses input directly from the major load forecasting programs such as ENPRO and PROMOD, and when combined with the actual NO{sub x} vs. load profile for each boiler, develops projections of baseline annual NO{sub x} emissions. Least-cost compliance plans are determined by evaluating all applicable technologies to each unit, allowing marginal costs to be generated. For each scenario, the optimal NO{sub x} technology for each unit and associated costs are developed.

  15. Electrophoretic pattern and distribution of cytoskeletal proteins in flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski-Treska, J; Ulrich, G; Mensch, C; Aunis, D

    1984-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis patterns and distribution of major cytoskeletal proteins were studied in primary astrocytes with either flat-epitheloid or stellate appearance. No major differences in the electrophoretic patterns of actin, tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin were detected between flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes produced by the exposure of cultures to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dBcAMP). However the morphological changes of astrocytes were accompanied by marked changes in the quantitative distribution of cytoskeletal proteins. The most prominent change was a large and specific decrease in the amount of actin, detected by [(35)S]methionine incorporation, densitometric scanning of one-dimensional gels and DNase inhibition assay. In stellate astrocytes produced by a 4 day treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, the amount of actin decreased by 50%. This decrease was not apparently related to the depolymerization of actin.

  16. Protein patterns of brush-border fragments in congenital lactose malabsorption and in specific hypolactasia of the adult.

    PubMed

    Freiburghaus, A U; Schmitz, J; Schindler, M; Rotthauwe, H W; Kuitunen, P; Launiala, K; Hadorn, B

    1976-05-06

    Brush-border membrane proteins of the small-bowel mucosa were separated on polyacrylamide gels from intestinal biopsy specimens obtained from four children with congenital lactose malabsorption and from two adults with specific hypolactasia. In three patients with the congenital type of lactase deficiency the protein band corresponding to brush-border lactase was reduced in intensity, but was never completely absent. No difference in gel patterns was detected when this pattern in congenital deficiency was compared to that obtained from the two patients with adult-type selective hypolactasia. In one patient with congenital lactose malabsorption the protein band corresponding to lactase activity was not detectable. The findings suggest that the mechanisms leading to low lactase activity in the congenital and adult forms of lactose intolerance are similar.

  17. Dissolution Rate, Weathering Mechanics, and Friability of TNT, Comp B, Tritonal, and Octol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    instrumentation (Figure 77). We selected five Comp B chunks from a LO detonation (LO 5), a piece of C4 whose history is not known from Demolition...the explosive pieces and the camera were somewhat protected from birds and wolves . The disadvantage was that the tripod might have protected the...military ranges: Camp Edwards, Massachusetts, USA . Environmental Pollution, 129(1):13–21. Dionne, B.C., D.P. Rounbehler, E.K. Achter, J.R. Hobbs and D.H

  18. Timing and pattern of postexercise protein ingestion affects whole-body protein balance in healthy children: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Volterman, Kimberly A; Moore, Daniel R; Breithaupt, Peter; Grathwohl, Dominik; Offord, Elizabeth A; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Timmons, Brian W

    2017-07-06

    The dose and timing of postexercise protein ingestion can influence whole-body protein balance (WBPB) in adults, although comparable data from children are scarce. This study investigated how protein intake (both amount and distribution) postexercise can affect WBPB in physically active children. Thirty-five children (26 males; 9-13 years old) underwent a 5-day adaptation diet, maintaining a protein intake of 0.95 g·kg(-1)·day(-1). Participants consumed [(15)N]glycine (2 mg·kg(-1)) before performing 3 × 20 min of variable-intensity cycling, and whole-body protein kinetics were assessed over 6 and 24 h of recovery. Fifteen grams of protein was distributed across 2 isoenergetic carbohydrate-containing beverages (15 and 240 min postexercise) containing reciprocal amounts of protein (i.e., 0 + 15 g, 5 + 10 g, 10 + 5 g, and 15 + 0 g for Groups A-D, respectively). Over the 6 h that included the exercise bout and consumption of the first beverage at 15 min postexercise, WBPB (i.e., synthesis - breakdown) demonstrated a linear increase of 0.647 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) per 1 g protein intake (P < 0.001). Over 24 h, robust regression revealed that WBPB was best modeled by a parabola (P < 0.05), suggesting that a maximum in WBPB was achieved between groups B and C. In conclusion, despite a dose response early in recovery, a periodized protein intake with multiple smaller doses after physical activity may be more beneficial than a single bolus dose in promoting daily WBPB in healthy active children.

  19. A component based noise correction method (CompCor) for BOLD and perfusion based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Yashar; Restom, Khaled; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T

    2007-08-01

    A component based method (CompCor) for the reduction of noise in both blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is presented. In the proposed method, significant principal components are derived from noise regions-of-interest (ROI) in which the time series data are unlikely to be modulated by neural activity. These components are then included as nuisance parameters within general linear models for BOLD and perfusion-based fMRI time series data. Two approaches for the determination of the noise ROI are considered. The first method uses high-resolution anatomical data to define a region of interest composed primarily of white matter and cerebrospinal fluid, while the second method defines a region based upon the temporal standard deviation of the time series data. With the application of CompCor, the temporal standard deviation of resting-state perfusion and BOLD data in gray matter regions was significantly reduced as compared to either no correction or the application of a previously described retrospective image based correction scheme (RETROICOR). For both functional perfusion and BOLD data, the application of CompCor significantly increased the number of activated voxels as compared to no correction. In addition, for functional BOLD data, there were significantly more activated voxels detected with CompCor as compared to RETROICOR. In comparison to RETROICOR, CompCor has the advantage of not requiring external monitoring of physiological fluctuations.

  20. CompGO: an R package for comparing and visualizing Gene Ontology enrichment differences between DNA binding experiments.

    PubMed

    Waardenberg, Ashley J; Basset, Samuel D; Bouveret, Romaric; Harvey, Richard P

    2015-09-02

    Gene ontology (GO) enrichment is commonly used for inferring biological meaning from systems biology experiments. However, determining differential GO and pathway enrichment between DNA-binding experiments or using the GO structure to classify experiments has received little attention. Herein, we present a bioinformatics tool, CompGO, for identifying Differentially Enriched Gene Ontologies, called DiEGOs, and pathways, through the use of a z-score derivation of log odds ratios, and visualizing these differences at GO and pathway level. Through public experimental data focused on the cardiac transcription factor NKX2-5, we illustrate the problems associated with comparing GO enrichments between experiments using a simple overlap approach. We have developed an R/Bioconductor package, CompGO, which implements a new statistic normally used in epidemiological studies for performing comparative GO analyses and visualizing comparisons from . BED data containing genomic coordinates as well as gene lists as inputs. We justify the statistic through inclusion of experimental data and compare to the commonly used overlap method. CompGO is freely available as a R/Bioconductor package enabling easy integration into existing pipelines and is available at: http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/CompGO.html packages/release/bioc/html/CompGO.html.

  1. A novel competence gene, comP, is essential for natural transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413.

    PubMed Central

    Porstendörfer, D; Drotschmann, U; Averhoff, B

    1997-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 (= ATCC 33305), a nutritionally versatile bacterium, has an extremely efficient natural transformation system. Here we describe the generation of eight transformation-affected mutants of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by insertional mutagenesis. These mutants were found by Southern blot analysis and complementation studies to result from single nptII marker insertions at different chromosomal loci. DNA binding and uptake studies with one mutant, T205, revealed that the transformation deficiency of this mutant results from a complete lack of DNA binding and, therefore, uptake activity. A novel competence gene essential for natural transformation, named comP, was cloned by complementation of mutant T205. The nucleotide sequence of comP was determined, and its deduced 15-kDa polypeptide displays significant similarities to type IV pilins. Analysis of the ultrastructure of a transformation-deficient comP mutant and the transformation-competent wild-type strain revealed that both are covered with bundle-forming thin fimbriae (3 to 4 nm in diameter) and individual thick fimbriae (6 nm in diameter). These results provide evidence that the pilinlike ComP is unrelated to the piluslike structures of strain BD413. Taking all data into account, we propose that ComP functions as a major subunit of an organelle acting as a channel or pore mediating DNA binding and/or uptake in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413. PMID:9361398

  2. Using contrast patterns between true complexes and random subgraphs in PPI networks to predict unknown protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanzhong; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Most protein complex detection methods utilize unsupervised techniques to cluster densely connected nodes in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, in spite of the fact that many true complexes are not dense subgraphs. Supervised methods have been proposed recently, but they do not answer why a group of proteins are predicted as a complex, and they have not investigated how to detect new complexes of one species by training the model on the PPI data of another species. We propose a novel supervised method to address these issues. The key idea is to discover emerging patterns (EPs), a type of contrast pattern, which can clearly distinguish true complexes from random subgraphs in a PPI network. An integrative score of EPs is defined to measure how likely a subgraph of proteins can form a complex. New complexes thus can grow from our seed proteins by iteratively updating this score. The performance of our method is tested on eight benchmark PPI datasets and compared with seven unsupervised methods, two supervised and one semi-supervised methods under five standards to assess the quality of the predicted complexes. The results show that in most cases our method achieved a better performance, sometimes significantly. PMID:26868667

  3. Evaluation of stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) patterns for automated structural analysis of proteins with CYANA.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Teppei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Güntert, Peter; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2006-07-01

    Recently we have developed the stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) technique to overcome the conventional molecular size limitation in NMR protein structure determination by employing complete stereo- and regiospecific patterns of stable isotopes. SAIL sharpens signals and simplifies spectra without the loss of requisite structural information, thus making large classes of proteins newly accessible to detailed solution structure determination. The automated structure calculation program CYANA can efficiently analyze SAIL-NOESY spectra and calculate structures without manual analysis. Nevertheless, the original SAIL method might not be capable of determining the structures of proteins larger than 50 kDa or membrane proteins, for which the spectra are characterized by many broadened and overlapped peaks. Here we have carried out simulations of new SAIL patterns optimized for minimal relaxation and overlap, to evaluate the combined use of SAIL and CYANA for solving the structures of larger proteins and membrane proteins. The modified approach reduces the number of peaks to nearly half of that observed with uniform labeling, while still yielding well-defined structures and is expected to enable NMR structure determinations of these challenging systems.

  4. A Comparison between Manual and Automated Evaluations of Tissue Microarray Patterns of Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Arthur W.; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M.; Rodrigues, Bruna R.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Torres, Luiz Fernando B.; Martins, Vilma R.; da Cunha, Isabela W.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue microarray technology enables us to evaluate the pattern of protein expression in large numbers of samples. However, manual data acquisition and analysis still represent a challenge because they are subjective and time-consuming. Automated analysis may thus increase the speed and reproducibility of evaluation. However, the reliability of automated analysis systems should be independently evaluated. Herein, the expression of phosphorylated AKT and mTOR was determined by ScanScope XT (Aperio; Vista, CA) and ACIS III (Dako; Glostrup, Denmark) and compared with the manual analysis by two observers. The percentage of labeled pixels or nuclei analysis had a good correlation between human observers and automated systems (κ = 0.855 and 0.879 for ScanScope vs. observers and κ = 0.765 and 0.793 for ACIS III vs. observers). The intensity of labeling determined by ScanScope was also correlated with that found by the human observers (correlation index of 0.946 and 0.851 for pAKT and 0.851 and 0.875 for pmTOR). However, the correlation between ACIS III and human observation varied for labeling intensity and was considered poor in some cases (correlation index of 0.718 and 0.680 for pAKT and 0.223 and 0.225 for pmTOR). Thus, the percentage of positive pixels or nuclei determination was satisfactorily performed by both systems; however, labeling intensity was better identified by ScanScope XT. PMID:23340270

  5. Effect of water salinity on total protein and electrophoretic pattern of serum proteins of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    PubMed Central

    Peyghan, Rahim; Khadjeh, Gholam Hosain; Enayati, Ala

    2014-01-01

    In this study the effects of water salinity on serum total protein and its components in grass carp were investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of salinity tolerance of fish on total serum protein level and its components as an indicator of liver and kidney activity. One hundred and twenty grass carp were divided into four groups, randomly. The first three groups were reared in concentration of 4, 8 and 12 g L-1 of salt solution, respectively, and the fourth group was reared in freshwater and served as control. After 3 weeks, blood samples were collected and after harvesting the blood serum, serum total protein and protein components were measured with Biuret and electrophoresis methods, respectively. Results showed that mean value of serum total protein in the control and three salinities groups were 2.75, 3.28, 2.90 and 3.13 g dL-1, respectively. Five fractions of serum protein were electrophoretically observed as: albumin (Alb), alpha-1 globulin (α1-glu), alpha-2 globulin (α2-glu), beta globulin (β-glu) and gamma globulin (γ-glu). There were not any significant differences between the average mean of serum total protein of experimental and control groups (p > 0.05). However, Alb, α1-glu and β-glu levels in the experimental groups were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). The average of α2-glu and γ-glu revealed no significant difference between the experimental groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that increasing water salinity could have a significant effect on Alb, α1-glu and β-glu levels but not on total serum protein in grass carp. PMID:25568723

  6. [Calculation of the Pearl Index of Lady-Comp, Baby-Comp and Pearly cycle computers used as a contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Binkiewicz, Przemysław; Michaluk, Krzysztof; Demiańczyk, Aleksandra

    2010-11-01

    Lady-Comp, Baby-Comp and Pearly cycle computers are medical devices that use sophisticated statistical gathering methods, as well as a comprehensive database, to precisely determine fertile and infertile phases of a menstrual cycle on the basis of everyday basal body temperature measurements. They have been produced and distributed worldwide by Valley Electronics GmbH (Eschenlohe, Bavaria, Germany) for over 25 years. The aim of the study was to calculate the Pearl Index of cycle computers in order to determine their contraceptive effectiveness. 510 Polish women, randomly chosen from the database of the distributor, who had been using the device for over one year or during 13 menstrual cycles, received the questionnaire. The Pearl Index was calculated as a quotient of the number of unplanned pregnancies and the total number of cycles during which cycle computers were used and the obtained value was then multiplied by 1300. Statistical methods were applied to analyze data from the questionnaires and to calculate the Pearl Index. Unplanned pregnancy odds ratio for women using additionally condoms during the fertile phase of the cycle was also calculated. 139 properly filled questionnaires were the source of data about 3332 cycles. After the initial analysis, 290 cycles were declined because the respondents had not complied with the computer indications and 1021 cycles were declined because the respondents had been using other contraceptive methods at the same time--no unplanned pregnancy was noted in that group. In the investigated group of 2040 cycles of correct cycle computers use, one unplanned pregnancy was observed. Calculated Pearl Index for this group amounted to 0.64; it means, that less than 7 out of 1000 users of cycle computer as a contraceptive method may become pregnant within one year The odds of pregnancy in women using a cycle computer and condoms on fertile days amounted to 1.035%; it means that 1 out of 100 users of the combined methods may become

  7. FoxP2 protein levels regulate cell morphology changes and migration patterns in the vertebrate developing telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Calero, Elena; Botella-Lopez, Arancha; Bahamonde, Olga; Perez-Balaguer, Ariadna; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    In the mammalian telencephalon, part of the progenitor cells transition from multipolar to bipolar morphology as they invade the mantle zone. This associates with changing patterns of radial migration. However, the molecules implicated in these morphology transitions are not well known. In the present work, we analyzed the function of FoxP2 protein in this process during telencephalic development in vertebrates. We analyzed the expression of FoxP2 protein and its relation with cell morphology and migratory patterns in mouse and chicken developing striatum. We observed FoxP2 protein expressed in a gradient from the subventricular zone to the mantle layer in mice embryos. In the FoxP2 low domain cells showed multipolar migration. In the striatal mantle layer where FoxP2 protein expression is higher, cells showed locomoting migration and bipolar morphology. In contrast, FoxP2 showed a high and homogenous expression pattern in chicken striatum, thus bipolar morphology predominated. Elevation of FoxP2 in the striatal subventricular zone by in utero electroporation promoted bipolar morphology and impaired multipolar radial migration. In mouse cerebral cortex we obtained similar results. FoxP2 promotes transition from multipolar to bipolar morphology by means of gradiental expression in mouse striatum and cortex. Together these results indicate a role of FoxP2 differential expression in cell morphology control of the vertebrate telencephalon.

  8. UV lithography-based protein patterning on silicon: Towards the integration of bioactive surfaces and CMOS electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenci, S.; Tedeschi, L.; Pieri, F.; Domenici, C.

    2011-08-01

    A simple and fast methodology for protein patterning on silicon substrates is presented, providing an insight into possible issues related to the interaction between biological and microelectronic technologies. The method makes use of standard photoresist lithography and is oriented towards the implementation of biosensors containing Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) conditioning circuitry. Silicon surfaces with photoresist patterns were prepared and hydroxylated by means of resist- and CMOS backend-compatible solutions. Subsequent aminosilane deposition and resist lift-off in organic solvents resulted into well-controlled amino-terminated geometries. The discussion is focused on resist- and CMOS-compatibility problems related to the used chemicals. Some samples underwent gold nanoparticle (Au NP) labeling and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation, in order to investigate the quality of the silane layer. Antibodies were immobilized on other samples, which were subsequently exposed to a fluorescently labeled antigen. Fluorescence microscopy observation showed that this method provides spatially selective immobilization of protein layers onto APTES-patterned silicon samples, while preserving protein reactivity inside the desired areas and low non-specific adsorption elsewhere. Strong covalent biomolecule binding was achieved, giving stable protein layers, which allows stringent binding conditions and a good binding specificity, really useful for biosensing.

  9. An insight into the sialome of Anopheles funestus reveals an emerging pattern in anopheline salivary protein families

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Eric; Dao, Adama; Pham, Van M.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2007-01-01

    Anopheles funestus, together with Anopheles gambiae, is responsible for most malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known about molecular aspects of its biology. To investigate the salivary repertoire of this mosquito, we randomly sequenced 916 clones from a salivary-gland cDNA library from adult female F1 offspring of field-caught An. funestus. Thirty-three protein sequences, mostly full-length transcripts, are predicted to be secreted salivary proteins. We additionally describe 25 full-length housekeeping-associated transcripts. In accumulating mosquito sialotranscriptome information—which includes An. gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles darlingi, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, and now An. funestus—a pattern is emerging. First, ubiquitous protein families are recruited for a salivary role, such as members of the antigen-5 family and enzymes of nucleotide and carbohydrate catabolism. Second, a group of protein families exclusive to blood-feeding Nematocera includes the abundantly expressed D7 proteins also found in sand flies and Culicoides. A third group of proteins, only found in Culicidae, includes the 30-kDa allergen family and several mucins. Finally, ten protein and peptide families, five of them multigenic, are exclusive to anophelines. Among these proteins may reside good epidemiological markers to measure human exposure to anopheline species such as An. funestus and An. gambiae. PMID:17244545

  10. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated.

  11. Tissue specificity of the hormonal response in sex accessory tissues is associated with nuclear matrix protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Getzenberg, R H; Coffey, D S

    1990-09-01

    The DNA of interphase nuclei have very specific three-dimensional organizations that are different in different cell types, and it is possible that this varying DNA organization is responsible for the tissue specificity of gene expression. The nuclear matrix organizes the three-dimensional structure of the DNA and is believed to be involved in the control of gene expression. This study compares the nuclear structural proteins between two sex accessory tissues in the same animal responding to the same androgen stimulation by the differential expression of major tissue-specific secretory proteins. We demonstrate here that the nuclear matrix is tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, and undergoes characteristic alterations in its protein composition upon androgen withdrawal. Three types of nuclear matrix proteins were observed: 1) nuclear matrix proteins that are different and tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, 2) a set of nuclear matrix proteins that either appear or disappear upon androgen withdrawal, and 3) a set of proteins that are common to both the ventral prostate and seminal vesicle and do not change with the hormonal state of the animal. Since the nuclear matrix is known to bind androgen receptors in a tissue- and steroid-specific manner, we propose that the tissue specificity of the nuclear matrix arranges the DNA in a unique conformation, which may be involved in the specific interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences, resulting in tissue-specific patterns of secretory protein expression.

  12. Gradient and Patterned Protein Films Stabilized via Nanoimprint Lithography for Engineered Interactions with Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Sheng; Duncan, Bradley; Tang, Rui; Lee, Yi-Wei; Creran, Brian; Elci, Sukru Gokhan; Zhu, Jiaxin; Yesilbag Tonga, Gülen; Doble, Jesse; Fessenden, Matthew; Bayat, Mahin; Nonnenmann, Stephen; Vachet, Richard W; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-01-11

    Protein-based biomaterials provide versatile scaffolds for generating functional surfaces for biomedical applications. However, tailoring the functional and biological properties of protein films remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput method to designing stable, functional biomaterials by combining inkjet deposition of protein inks with a nanoimprint lithography based methodology. The translation of the intrinsically charged proteins into functional materials properties was demonstrated through controlled cellular adhesion. This modular strategy offers a rapid method to produce customizable biomaterials.

  13. Distribution patterns of small-molecule ligands in the protein universe and implications for origin of life and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Kong, De-Xin; Shen, Liang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Extant life depends greatly on the binding of small molecules (such as ligands) with macromolecules (such as proteins), and one ligand can bind multiple proteins. However, little is known about the global patterns of ligand-protein mapping. By examining 2,186 well-defined small-molecule ligands and thousands of protein domains derived from a database of druggable binding sites, we show that a few ligands bind tens of protein domains or folds, whereas most ligands bind only one, which indicates that ligand-protein mapping follows a power law. Through assigning the protein-binding orders (early or late) for bio-ligands, we demonstrate that the preferential attachment principle still holds for the power-law relation between ligands and proteins. We also found that polar molecular surface area, H-bond acceptor counts, H-bond donor counts and partition coefficient are potential factors to discriminate ligands from ordinary molecules and to differentiate super ligands (shared by three or more folds) from others. These findings have significant implications for evolution and drug discovery. First, the chronology of ligand-protein binding can be inferred by the power-law feature of ligand-protein mapping. Some nucleotide-containing ligands, such as ATP, ADP, GDP, NAD, FAD, dihydro-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NDP), nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NAP), flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and AMP, are found to be the earliest cofactors bound to proteins, agreeing with the current understanding of evolutionary history. Second, the finding that about 30% of ligands are shared by two or more domains will help with drug discovery, such as in finding new functions from old drugs, developing promiscuous drugs and depending more on natural products.

  14. Distribution patterns of small-molecule ligands in the protein universe and implications for origin of life and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Kong, De-Xin; Shen, Liang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Background Extant life depends greatly on the binding of small molecules (such as ligands) with macromolecules (such as proteins), and one ligand can bind multiple proteins. However, little is known about the global patterns of ligand-protein mapping. Results By examining 2,186 well-defined small-molecule ligands and thousands of protein domains derived from a database of druggable binding sites, we show that a few ligands bind tens of protein domains or folds, whereas most ligands bind only one, which indicates that ligand-protein mapping follows a power law. Through assigning the protein-binding orders (early or late) for bio-ligands, we demonstrate that the preferential attachment principle still holds for the power-law relation between ligands and proteins. We also found that polar molecular surface area, H-bond acceptor counts, H-bond donor counts and partition coefficient are potential factors to discriminate ligands from ordinary molecules and to differentiate super ligands (shared by three or more folds) from others. Conclusion These findings have significant implications for evolution and drug discovery. First, the chronology of ligand-protein binding can be inferred by the power-law feature of ligand-protein mapping. Some nucleotide-containing ligands, such as ATP, ADP, GDP, NAD, FAD, dihydro-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NDP), nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NAP), flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and AMP, are found to be the earliest cofactors bound to proteins, agreeing with the current understanding of evolutionary history. Second, the finding that about 30% of ligands are shared by two or more domains will help with drug discovery, such as in finding new functions from old drugs, developing promiscuous drugs and depending more on natural products. PMID:17727706

  15. Modification of structure and pattern of lipid monolayer on water and solid surfaces in presence of globular protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Bijay Kumar; Kundu, Sarathi

    2017-05-01

    Langmuir monolayers of phospholipids at the air-water interface are well-established model systems for mimicking biological membranes and hence are useful for studying lipid-protein interactions. In the present work, phases and phase transformations occurring in the lipid (DMPA) monolayer in the presence of globular protein (BSA) at neutral subphase pH (≈7.0) are highlighted and the corresponding in-plane pattern and morphology are explored from the surface pressure (π) - specific molecular area (A) isotherm, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) both at air-water and air-solid interfaces. Films of pure lipid and lipid-protein complexes are deposited on solid surfaces by Langmuir-Blodgett method. Due to the presence of BSA molecules, phases and domain pattern changes in comparison with that of the pure DMPA. Moreover, accumulations of globular proteins in between lipid domains are also visible through BAM. AFM shows that the mixed film has relatively bigger globular-like morphology in comparison with that of pure DMPA domains. Combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between protein and lipid are responsible for such modifications.

  16. [A novel mutation of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene underlies multiple epiphyseal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Weiqing; Xu, Zhiyong; Luo, Fuwei; Geng, Qian

    2013-06-01

    To perform mutation analysis for a female with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and provide pre-symptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. Mutation screening of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene was carried out through targeted next-generation DNA sequencing and Sanger sequencing. A novel c.956 A>T resulting in substitution of Aspartic acid 319 for Valine (p.Asp319Val) has been identified in exon 9 of the COMP gene in the patient. As predicted by a SIFT software, above mutation can cause damage to the structure of COMP protein. A novel c.956 A>T substitution mutation has been identified in a patient featuring MED.

  17. Distinct contractile and cytoskeletal protein patterns in the Antarctic midge are elicited by desiccation and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiqing; Benoit, Joshua B; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Elnitsky, Michael A; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    Desiccation presents a major challenge for the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. In this study, we use proteomic profiling to evaluate protein changes in the larvae elicited by dehydration and rehydration. Larvae were desiccated at 75% relative humidity (RH) for 12 h to achieve a body water loss of 35%, approximately half of the water that can be lost before the larvae succumb to dehydration. To evaluate the rehydration response, larvae were first desiccated, then rehydrated for 6 h at 100% RH and then in water for 6 h. Controls were held continuously at 100% RH. Protein analysis was performed using 2-DE and nanoscale capillary LC/MS/MS. Twenty-four identified proteins changed in abundance in response to desiccation: 16 were more abundant and 8 were less abundant; 84% of these proteins were contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Thirteen rehydration-regulated proteins were identified: 8 were more abundant and 5 were less abundant, and 69% of these proteins were also contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Additional proteins responsive to desiccation and rehydration were involved in functions including stress responses, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, glucogenesis and membrane transport. We conclude that the major protein responses elicited by both desiccation and rehydration are linked to body contraction and cytoskeleton rearrangements.

  18. Immunolocalization of Collagens (I and III) and Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Normal and Injured Equine Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive study of tendon pathology with different structural appearances of repair tissue correlated to immunolocalization of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type I and III collagens and expression of COMP mRNA. The material consists of nine tendons from seven horses (5–25 years old; mean age of 10 years) with clinical tendinopathy and three normal tendons from horses (3, 3, and 13 years old) euthanized for non-orthopedic reasons. The injured tendons displayed different repair-tissue appearances with organized and disorganized fibroblastic regions as well as areas of necrosis. The normal tendons presented distinct immunoreactivity for COMP and expression of COMP mRNA and type I collagen in the normal aligned fiber structures, but no immunolabeling of type III collagen. However, immunoreactivity for type III collagen was present in the endotenon surrounding the fiber bundles, where no expression of COMP could be seen. Immunostaining for type I and III collagens was present in all of the pathologic regions indicating repair tissue. Interestingly, the granulation tissues showed immunostaining for COMP and expression of COMP mRNA, indicating a role for COMP in repair and remodeling of the tendon after fiber degeneration and rupture. The present results suggest that not only type III collagen but also COMP is involved in the repair and remodeling processes of the tendon. PMID:23020676

  19. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of biomineralization proteins during early development in the stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Putnam, Hollie M; Drake, Jeana L; Zelzion, Ehud; Gates, Ruth D; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Falkowski, Paul G

    2016-04-27

    Reef-building corals begin as non-calcifying larvae that, upon settling, rapidly begin to accrete skeleton and a protein-rich skeletal organic matrix that attach them to the reef. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression pattern of a suite of biomineralization genes during three stages of larval development in the reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis: stage I, newly released; stage II, oral-aborally compressed and stage III, settled and calcifying spat. Transcriptome analysis revealed 3882 differentially expressed genes that clustered into four distinctly different patterns of expression change across the three developmental stages. Immunolocalization analysis further reveals the spatial arrangement of coral acid-rich proteins (CARPs) in the overall architecture of the emerging skeleton. These results provide the first analysis of the timing of the biomineralization 'toolkit' in the early life history of a stony coral. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of biomineralization proteins during early development in the stony coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Hollie M.; Drake, Jeana L.; Zelzion, Ehud; Gates, Ruth D.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Reef-building corals begin as non-calcifying larvae that, upon settling, rapidly begin to accrete skeleton and a protein-rich skeletal organic matrix that attach them to the reef. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression pattern of a suite of biomineralization genes during three stages of larval development in the reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis: stage I, newly released; stage II, oral-aborally compressed and stage III, settled and calcifying spat. Transcriptome analysis revealed 3882 differentially expressed genes that clustered into four distinctly different patterns of expression change across the three developmental stages. Immunolocalization analysis further reveals the spatial arrangement of coral acid-rich proteins (CARPs) in the overall architecture of the emerging skeleton. These results provide the first analysis of the timing of the biomineralization ‘toolkit’ in the early life history of a stony coral. PMID:27122561

  1. Microcystin-Bound Protein Patterns in Different Cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Nian; Hu, Lili; Song, Lirong; Gan, Nanqin

    2016-01-01

    Micocystin (MC) exists in Microcystis cells in two different forms, free and protein-bound. We examined the dynamic change in extracellular free MCs, intracellular free MCs and protein-bound MCs in both batch cultures and semi-continuous cultures, using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blot. The results showed that the free MC per cell remained constant, while the quantity of protein-bound MCs increased with the growth of Microcystis cells in both kinds of culture. Significant changes in the dominant MC-bound proteins occurred in the late exponential growth phase of batch cultures, while the dominant MC-bound proteins in semi-continuous cultures remained the same. In field samples collected at different months in Lake Taihu, the dominant MC-bound proteins were shown to be similar, but the amount of protein-bound MC varied and correlated with the intracellular MC content. We identified MC-bound proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis immunoblots and mass spectrometry. The 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL was a prominent MC-bound protein. Three essential glycolytic enzymes and ATP synthase alpha subunit were also major targets of MC-binding, which might contribute to sustained growth in semi-continuous culture. Our results indicate that protein-bound MC may be important for sustaining growth and adaptation of Microcystis sp. PMID:27754336

  2. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  3. Patterns of indirect protein interactions suggest a spatial organization to metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bercoff, Åsa; McLysaght, Aoife; Conant, Gavin C

    2011-11-01

    It has long been believed that cells organize their cytoplasm so as to efficiently channel metabolites between sequential enzymes. This metabolic channeling has the potential to yield higher metabolic fluxes as well as better regulatory control over metabolism. One mechanism for achieving such channeling is to ensure that sequential enzymes in a pathway are physically close to each other in the cell. We present evidence that indirect protein interactions between related enzymes represent a global mechanism for achieving metabolic channeling; the intuition being that protein interactions between enzymes and non-enzymatic mediator proteins are a powerful means of physically associating enzymes in a modular fashion. By analyzing the metabolic and protein-protein interactions networks of Escherichia coli, yeast and humans, we are able to show that all three species have many more indirect protein interactions linking enzymes that share metabolites than would be expected by chance. Moreover, these interactions are distributed non-randomly in the metabolic network. Our analyses in yeast and E. coli show that reactions possessing such interactions also show higher flux than do those lacking them. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that an important role of protein interactions with mediator proteins is to contribute to the spatial organization of the cell. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that these mediator proteins are also enriched with annotations related to signal transduction, a system where scaffolding proteins are known to limit cross-talk by controlling spatial localization.

  4. Dietary Protein Intake and Distribution Patterns of Well-Trained Dutch Athletes.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Jenna B; Trommelen, Jorn; Wardenaar, Floris C; Brinkmans, Naomi Y J; Versteegen, Joline J; Jonvik, Kristin L; Kapp, Christoph; de Vries, Jeanne; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Gibala, Martin J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-04-01

    Dietary protein intake should be optimized in all athletes to ensure proper recovery and enhance the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. In addition to total protein intake, the use of specific proteincontaining food sources and the distribution of protein throughout the day are relevant for optimizing protein intake in athletes. In the present study, we examined the daily intake and distribution of various proteincontaining food sources in a large cohort of strength, endurance and team-sport athletes. Well-trained male (n=327) and female (n=226) athletes completed multiple web-based 24-hr dietary recalls over a 2-4 wk period. Total energy intake, the contribution of animal- and plant-based proteins to daily protein intake, and protein intake at six eating moments were determined. Daily protein intake averaged 108±33 and 90±24 g in men and women, respectively, which corresponded to relative intakes of 1.5±0.4 and 1.4±0.4 g/kg. Dietary protein intake was correlated with total energy intake in strength (r=0.71, p <.001), endurance (r=0.79, p <.001) and team-sport (r=0.77, p <.001) athletes. Animal and plant-based sources of protein intake was 57% and 43%, respectively. The distribution of protein intake was 19% (19±8 g) at breakfast, 24% (25±13 g) at lunch and 38% (38±15 g) at dinner. Protein intake was below the recommended 20 g for 58% of athletes at breakfast, 36% at lunch and 8% at dinner. In summary, this survey of athletes revealed they habitually consume > 1.2 g protein/kg/d, but the distribution throughout the day may be suboptimal to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to training.

  5. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  6. The identification of global patterns and unique signatures of proteins across 14 environments using outer membrane proteomics of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schliep, Martin; Ryall, Ben; Ferenci, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We test the hypothesis that organisms sourced from different environments exhibit unique fingerprints in macromolecular composition. Experimentally, we followed proteomic changes with 14 different sub-lethal environmental stimuli in Escherichia coli at controlled growth rates. The focus was on the outer membrane sub-proteome, which is known to be extremely sensitive to environmental controls. The analyses surprisingly revealed that pairs of proteins belonging to very different regulons, such as Slp and OmpX or FadL and OmpF, have the closest patterns of change with the 14 conditions. Fe-limited and cold-cultured bacteria have the most distinct global patterns of spot changes, but the patterns with fast growth and oxygen limitation are the closest amongst the 14 environments. These unexpected but statistically robust results suggest that we have an incomplete picture of bacterial regulation across different stress responses; baseline choices and growth-rate influences are probably underestimated factors in such systems-level analysis. In terms of our aim of getting a unique profile for each of the 14 investigated environments, we find that it is unnecessary to compare all the proteins in a proteome and that a panel of five proteins is sufficient for identification of environmental fingerprints. This demonstrates the future feasibility of tracing the history of contaminating bacteria in hospitals, foods or industrial settings as well as for released organisms and biosecurity purposes.

  7. Changes in Expression Pattern of Selected Endometrial Proteins following Mesenchymal Stem Cells Infusion in Mares with Endometrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mambelli, Lisley I.; Mattos, Rodrigo C.; Winter, Gustavo H. Z.; Madeiro, Dener S.; Morais, Bruna P.; Malschitzky, Eduardo; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Kerkis, Alexandre; Kerkis, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their self-renewal potential and differentiation capacity are useful for tissue regeneration. Immunomodulatory and trophic properties of MSCs were demonstrated suggesting their use as medicinal signaling cells able to positively change local environment in injured tissue. Equine endometrosis is a progressive degenerative disease responsible for glandular alterations and endometrial fibrosis which causes infertility in mares. More precisely, this disease is characterized by phenotypic changes in the expression pattern of selected endometrial proteins. Currently, no effective treatment is available for endometrosis. Herein, we aimed at the evaluation of expression pattern of these proteins after allogeneic equine adipose tissue-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (eAT-MSCs) infusion as well as at testing the capacity of these cells to promote endometrial tissue remodeling in mares with endometrosis. eAT-MSC (2×107/animal) were transplanted into mares’ uterus and control animals received only placebo. Uterine biopsies were collected before (day 0) and after (days 7, 21 and 60) cells transplantation. Conventional histopathology as well as expression analysis of such proteins as laminin, vimentin, Ki-67-antigen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) have been performed before and after eAT-MSCs transplantation. We demonstrated that eAT-MSCs induced early (at day 7) remodeling of endometrial tissue microenvironment through changes observed in intra cellular and intra glandular localization of aforementioned proteins. We demonstrated that eAT-MSCs were able to positively modulate the expression pattern of studied secretory proteins as well as, to promote the induction of glandular epithelial cells proliferation suggesting local benefits to committed endometrial tissue environment after eAT-MSCs transplantation. PMID:24901368

  8. Zebrafish Meis functions to stabilize Pbx proteins and regulate hindbrain patterning.

    PubMed

    Waskiewicz, A J; Rikhof, H A; Hernandez, R E; Moens, C B

    2001-11-01

    Homeodomain-containing Hox proteins regulate segmental identity in Drosophila in concert with two partners known as Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth). These partners are themselves DNA-binding, homeodomain proteins, and probably function by revealing the intrinsic specificity of Hox proteins. Vertebrate orthologs of Exd and Hth, known as Pbx and Meis (named for a myeloid ecotropic leukemia virus integration site), respectively, are encoded by multigene families and are present in multimeric complexes together with vertebrate Hox proteins. Previous results have demonstrated that the zygotically encoded Pbx4/Lazarus (Lzr) protein is required for segmentation of the zebrafish hindbrain and proper expression and function of Hox genes. We demonstrate that Meis functions in the same pathway as Pbx in zebrafish hindbrain development, as expression of a dominant-negative mutant Meis results in phenotypes that are remarkably similar to that of lzr mutants. Surprisingly, expression of Meis protein partially rescues the lzr(-) phenotype. Lzr protein levels are increased in embryos overexpressing Meis and are reduced for lzr mutants that cannot bind to Meis. This implies a mechanism whereby Meis rescues lzr mutants by stabilizing maternally encoded Lzr. Our results define two functions of Meis during zebrafish hindbrain segmentation: that of a DNA-binding partner of Pbx proteins, and that of a post-transcriptional regulator of Pbx protein levels.

  9. Spinal motor neuron protein supersaturation patterns are associated with inclusion body formation in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Lambert-Smith, Isabella A.; Bean, Daniel M.; Freer, Rosie; Cid, Fernando; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Saunders, Darren N.; Wilson, Mark R.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Favrin, Giorgio; Yerbury, Justin J.

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a heterogeneous degenerative motor neuron disease linked to numerous genetic mutations in apparently unrelated proteins. These proteins, including SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS, are highly aggregation-prone and form a variety of intracellular inclusion bodies that are characteristic of different neuropathological subtypes of the disease. Contained within these inclusions are a variety of proteins that do not share obvious characteristics other than coaggregation. However, recent evidence from other neurodegenerative disorders suggests that disease-affected biochemical pathways can be characterized by the presence of proteins that are supersaturated, with cellular concentrations significantly greater than their solubilities. Here, we show that the proteins that form inclusions of mutant SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS are not merely a subset of the native interaction partners of these three proteins, which are themselves supersaturated. To explain the presence of coaggregating proteins in inclusions in the brain and spinal cord, we observe that they have an average supersaturation even greater than the average supersaturation of the native interaction partners in motor neurons, but not when scores are generated from an average of other human tissues. These results suggest that inclusion bodies in various forms of ALS result from a set of proteins that are metastable in motor neurons, and thus prone to aggregation upon a disease-related progressive collapse of protein homeostasis in this specific setting. PMID:28396410

  10. Spinal motor neuron protein supersaturation patterns are associated with inclusion body formation in ALS.

    PubMed

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Lambert-Smith, Isabella A; Bean, Daniel M; Freer, Rosie; Cid, Fernando; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Saunders, Darren N; Wilson, Mark R; Oliver, Stephen G; Morimoto, Richard I; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele; Favrin, Giorgio; Yerbury, Justin J

    2017-05-16

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a heterogeneous degenerative motor neuron disease linked to numerous genetic mutations in apparently unrelated proteins. These proteins, including SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS, are highly aggregation-prone and form a variety of intracellular inclusion bodies that are characteristic of different neuropathological subtypes of the disease. Contained within these inclusions are a variety of proteins that do not share obvious characteristics other than coaggregation. However, recent evidence from other neurodegenerative disorders suggests that disease-affected biochemical pathways can be characterized by the presence of proteins that are supersaturated, with cellular concentrations significantly greater than their solubilities. Here, we show that the proteins that form inclusions of mutant SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS are not merely a subset of the native interaction partners of these three proteins, which are themselves supersaturated. To explain the presence of coaggregating proteins in inclusions in the brain and spinal cord, we observe that they have an average supersaturation even greater than the average supersaturation of the native interaction partners in motor neurons, but not when scores are generated from an average of other human tissues. These results suggest that inclusion bodies in various forms of ALS result from a set of proteins that are metastable in motor neurons, and thus prone to aggregation upon a disease-related progressive collapse of protein homeostasis in this specific setting.

  11. C-H…pi interactions in proteins: prevalence, pattern of occurrence, residue propensities, location, and contribution to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjeet; Balaji, Petety V

    2014-02-01

    C-H…pi interactions are a class of non-covalent interactions found in different molecular systems including organic crystals, proteins and nucleic acids. High-resolution protein structures have been analyzed in the present study to delineate various aspects of C-H…pi interactions. Additionally, to determine the extent to which redundancy of a database biases the outcome, two datasets differing from each other in the level of redundancy have been analyzed. On average, only one out of six {with C-H(Aro) group} or eight {with C-H(Ali) group} residues in a protein participate as C-H group donors. Neither the frequency of occurrence in proteins nor the number of C-H groups present in it is correlated to the propensity of an amino acid to participate in C-H…pi interactions. Most of the residues that participate in C-H…pi interactions are solvent-shielded. Solvent shielded nature of most of the C-H…pi interactions and prevalence of intra- as well as inter-secondary structural element C-H…pi interactions suggest that the contribution of these interactions to the enthalpy of folded form will be significant. The separation in the primary structure between donor and acceptor residues is found to be correlated to secondary structure type. Other insights obtained from this study include the presence of networks of C-H…pi interactions spanning multiple secondary structural elements. To our knowledge this has not been reported so far. A substantial number of residues involved in C-H…pi interactions are found in catalytic and ligand binding sites suggesting their possible role in maintaining active site geometry. No significant differences of C-H…pi interactions in the two datasets are found for any of the parameters/features analyzed.

  12. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of spore coat proteins in two Bacillus species groups are linked to a difference in cellular structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Bacillus subtilis-group and the Bacillus cereus-group are two well-studied groups of species in the genus Bacillus. Bacteria in this genus can produce a highly resistant cell type, the spore, which is encased in a complex protective protein shell called the coat. Spores in the B. cereus-group contain an additional outer layer, the exosporium, which encircles the coat. The coat in B. subtilis spores possesses inner and outer layers. The aim of this study is to investigate whether differences in the spore structures influenced the divergence of the coat protein genes during the evolution of these two Bacillus species groups. Results We designed and implemented a computational framework to compare the evolutionary histories of coat proteins. We curated a list of B. subtilis coat proteins and identified their orthologs in 11 Bacillus species based on phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic profiles of these coat proteins show that they can be divided into conserved and labile ones. Coat proteins comprising the B. subtilis inner coat are significantly more conserved than those comprising the outer coat. We then performed genome-wide comparisons of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratio, dN/dS, and found contrasting patterns: Coat proteins have significantly higher dN/dS in the B. subtilis-group genomes, but not in the B. cereus-group genomes. We further corroborated this contrast by examining changes of dN/dS within gene trees, and found that some coat protein gene trees have significantly different dN/dS between the B subtilis-clade and the B. cereus-clade. Conclusions Coat proteins in the B. subtilis- and B. cereus-group species are under contrasting selective pressures. We speculate that the absence of the exosporium in the B. subtilis spore coat effectively lifted a structural constraint that has led to relaxed negative selection pressure on the outer coat. PMID:24283940

  13. Influence of dynamic flow environment on nanoparticle-protein corona: From protein patterns to uptake in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Palchetti, Sara; Pozzi, Daniela; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Barbera, Giorgia La; Chiozzi, Riccardo Zenezini; Digiacomo, Luca; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Caracciolo, Giulio; Laganà, Aldo

    2017-05-01

    The fast growing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biotechnology and biomedicine raises concerns about human health and the environment. When introduced in physiological milieus, NPs adsorb biomolecules (especially proteins) forming the so-called protein corona (PC). As it is the PC that mostly interacts with biological systems, it represents a major element of the NPs' biological identity with impact on nanotoxicology, nanosafety and targeted delivery of nanomedicines. To date, NP-protein interactions have been largely investigated in vitro, but this condition is far from mimicking the dynamic nature of physiological environments. Here we investigate the effect of shear stress on PC by exposing lipid NPs with different surface chemistry (either unmodified and PEGylated) to circulating fetal bovine serum (FBS). PC formed upon in vitro incubation was used as a reference. We demonstrate that PC is significantly influenced by exposure to dynamic flow and that changes in PC composition are dependent on both exposure time and NP's surface chemistry. Notably, alterations induced by dynamic flow affected cellular uptake of lipid NPs in both human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CapsidMaps: Protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L.; Reddy, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. PMID:25697908

  15. CapsidMaps: protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear levels and patterns of histone H3 modification and HP1 proteins after inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Pacherník, Jirí; Harnicarová, Andrea; Kovarík, Ales; Kovaríková, Martina; Hofmanová, Jirina; Skalníková, Magdalena; Kozubek, Michal; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2005-11-01

    The effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (NaBt) were studied in A549, HT29 and FHC human cell lines. Global histone hyperacetylation, leading to decondensation of interphase chromatin, was characterized by an increase in H3(K9) and H3(K4) dimethylation and H3(K9) acetylation. The levels of all isoforms of heterochromatin protein, HP1, were reduced after HDAC inhibition. The observed changes in the protein levels were accompanied by changes in their interphase patterns. In control cells, H3(K9) acetylation and H3(K4) dimethylation were substantially reduced to a thin layer at the nuclear periphery, whereas TSA and NaBt caused the peripheral regions to become intensely acetylated at H3(K9) and dimethylated at H3(K4). The dispersed pattern of H3(K9) dimethylation was stable even at the nuclear periphery of HDACi-treated cells. After TSA and NaBt treatment, the HP1 proteins were repositioned more internally in the nucleus, being closely associated with interchromatin compartments, while centromeric heterochromatin was relocated closer to the nuclear periphery. These findings strongly suggest dissociation of HP1 proteins from peripherally located centromeres in a hyperacetylated and H3(K4) dimethylated environment. We conclude that inhibition of histone deacetylases caused dynamic reorganization of chromatin in parallel with changes in its epigenetic modifications.

  17. SHH Protein Variance in the Limb Bud Is Constrained by Feedback Regulation and Correlates with Altered Digit Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Lee, Chanmi; Lawson, Lisa Y.; Svete, Lillian J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Harfe, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    mRNA variance has been proposed to play key roles in normal development, population fitness, adaptability, and disease. While variance in gene expression levels may be beneficial for certain cellular processes, for example in a cell’s ability to respond to external stimuli, variance may be detrimental for the development of some organs. In the bilaterally symmetric vertebrate limb buds, the amount of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) protein present at specific stages of development is essential to ensure proper patterning of this structure. To our surprise, we found that SHH protein variance is present during the first 10 hr of limb development. The variance is virtually eliminated after the first 10 hr of limb development. By examining mutant animals, we determined that the ability of the limb bud apical ectodermal ridge (AER) to respond to SHH protein was required for reducing SHH variance during limb formation. One consequence of the failure to eliminate variance in SHH protein was the presence of polydactyly and an increase in digit length. These data suggest a potential novel mechanism in which alterations in SHH variance during evolution may have driven changes in limb patterning and digit length. PMID:28131983

  18. Pineapple translation factor SUI1 and ribosomal protein L36 promoters drive constitutive transgene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni; Moyle, Richard; Hendry, Caroline; Lim, Lionel; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    The availability of a variety of promoter sequences is necessary for the genetic engineering of plants, in basic research studies and for the development of transgenic crops. In this study, the promoter and 5' untranslated regions of the evolutionally conserved protein translation factor SUI1 gene and ribosomal protein L36 gene were isolated from pineapple and sequenced. Each promoter was translationally fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into the heterologous plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters drove GUS expression in all tissues of Arabidopsis at levels comparable to the CaMV35S promoter. Transient assays determined that the pineapple SUI1 promoter also drove GUS expression in a variety of climacteric and non-climacteric fruit species. Thus the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters demonstrate the potential for using translation factor and ribosomal protein genes as a source of promoter sequences that can drive constitutive transgene expression patterns.

  19. Genetic diversity study of some medicinal plant accessions belong to Apiaceae family based on seed storage proteins patterns.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Kahrizi, Danial; Rostami-Ahmadvandi, Hossein; Soorni, Jahad; Kiani, Sara; Mostafaie, Ali; Yari, Kheirollah

    2012-12-01

    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) and Longleaf (Falcaria vulgaris Bernh) that all belong to Apiaceae family as medicinal plants are very important in many countries. Study of genetic diversity for medicinal plant is important for researches in future. One of the methods to evaluate plant genetic diversity and classification of them is the electrophoresis of seed storage proteins. This research was conducted in order to evaluate seed protein variability in different Iranian Cumin, Fennel and Longleaf accessions and grouping them based on these proteins as a biochemical marker. For this purpose, the samples were first powdered in liquid nitrogen and seed protein was extracted with extraction buffer. Then total soluble proteins were resolved on 12.5 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. The electrophoretic protein pattern showed 38 bands that were low polymorphism among the accessions. The result of cluster analysis showed that the accessions were classified in three groups (all 29 Cumin accessions in the first group, three Fennel ecotypes in second group and three Longleaf accessions in the last one).

  20. Salt stress-induced protein pattern associated with photosynthetic parameters and andrographolide content in Andrographis paniculata Nees.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Abiri, Rambod

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a multifunctional medicinal plant and a potent source of bioactive compounds. Impact of environmental stresses such as salinity on protein diversification, as well as the consequent changes in the photosynthetic parameters and andrographolide content (AG) of the herb, has not yet been thoroughly investigated. The present study showed that the salinity affects the protein pattern, and subsequently, it decreased the photosynthetic parameters, protein content, total dry weight, and total crude extract. Exceptionally, the AG content was increased (p ≤ 0.01). Moreover, it was noticed that the salinity at 12 dS m(-1) led to the maximum increase in AG content in all accessions. Interestingly, the leaf protein analysis revealed that the two polymorphic protein bands as low- and medium-sized of 17 and 45 kDa acted as the activator agents for the photosynthetic parameters and AG content. Protein sequencing and proteomic analysis can be conducted based on the present findings in the future.

  1. RNA-protein distance patterns in ribosomes reveal the mechanism of translational attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yu, DongMei; Zhang, Chao; Qin, PeiWu; Cornish, Peter V; Xu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Elucidating protein translational regulation is crucial for understanding cellular function and drug development. A key molecule in protein translation is ribosome, which is a super-molecular complex extensively studied for more than a half century. The structure and dynamics of ribosome complexes were resolved recently thanks to the development of X-ray crystallography, Cryo-EM, and single molecule biophysics. Current studies of the ribosome have shown multiple functional states, each with a unique conformation. In this study, we analyzed the RNA-protein distances of ribosome (2.5 MDa) complexes and compared these changes among different ribosome complexes. We found that the RNA-protein distance is significantly correlated with the ribosomal functional state. Thus, the analysis of RNA-protein binding distances at important functional sites can distinguish ribosomal functional states and help understand ribosome functions. In particular, the mechanism of translational attenuation by nascent peptides and antibiotics was revealed by the conformational changes of local functional sites.

  2. Progesterone-dependent sexual behavior and protein patterns in the ventromedial hypothalamus of the adult female rat

    SciTech Connect

    Montemayor, M.E.; Roy, E.J.; Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.

    1994-09-01

    Controversy exists concerning mechanisms by which progesterone exerts central nervous system effects on behavior. Progesterone may affect behavior by genomic regulation of protein synthesis. Alternatively, it may work through non-genomic mechanisms, consistent with its short latency to act. Recent work suggests that progesterone may elicit its effects on sexual behavior by more than one mechanism in a tissue specific manner. In the present study, we have examined whether progesterone facilitation of sexual behavior is correlated with modification of protein synthesis patterns in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). Ovariectomized rats were divided into three groups: estradiol (4 ug/ka at 0 and 18 hrs), estradiol (at 0 and 18 hrs) plus progesterone (2 mg/kg at 37 hrs), and vehicle only. {sup 35}S-labeled cysteine and methionine were bilaterally infused into the VMH at 37 hrs (the time of progesterone administration). Following 4 hrs of infusion, animals were tested for sexual behavior and sacrificed. Newly synthesized VMH proteins were separated by two dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. Analysis of approximately 660 spots/fluorogram in two independent replications indicated that no protein was completely induced or lost as a result of being treated with progesterone. The abundances of several proteins were significantly altered in response to progesterone treatment in each replication; however, none were changed in abundance in both replications. These findings present no evidence that progesterone causes detectable alterations in VIMH protein patterns between 10-100 kDa in the 4.8-6.7 apparent pI range.

  3. CompSim: Cross sectional modeling of geometrical complex and inhomogeneous slender structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashuri, Turaj; Zhang, Jie

    Many engineering disciplines require a fast and accurate estimate of structural properties in initial design phase for analysis and optimization studies. This paper presents an open-source computational code named CompSim to develop the structural properties of complex geometries with inhomogeneous materials. Weighted average technique is used to compute properties such as stiffness coefficients, area moment of inertia, and mass distribution. The accuracy of the code is evaluated for a multi-layer composite cross-section. As an illustrative example, the properties of the 20 MW common research wind turbine model are computed and presented. The code helps users to develop and optimize an initial structure in conceptual and preliminary design for further analysis in detailed design phase.

  4. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of PBXN-5 and comp-B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Ten Cate, James A; Deluca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Todd, Steven N

    2009-03-12

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of PBXN-5 and Comp-B explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on a load frame. Hopkinson bar and quasistatic testing was done at five temperatures from -50{sup o}C to 50{sup o}C. Our results were dominated by the low density of the samples and showed up as low acoustic velocities and lower strengths, as compared to other materials of the same or similar formulations. The effects seem to be consistent with the high porosity of the materials. The data do provide useful input to models that include density as a parameter and suggest caution when using measurements of ideal materials to predict behavior of damaged materials.

  5. Ovocalyxin-36 is a pattern recognition protein in chicken eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cristianne M M; Esmaili, Hamed; Ansah, George; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2013-01-01

    The avian eggshell membranes are essential elements in the fabrication of the calcified shell as a defense against bacterial penetration. Ovocalyxin-36 (OCX-36) is an abundant avian eggshell membrane protein, which shares protein sequence homology to bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) proteins. We have developed an efficient method to extract OCX-36 from chicken eggshell membranes for purification with cation and anion exchange chromatographies. Purified OCX-36 protein exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding activity and bound lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli O111:B4 in a dose-dependent manner. OCX-36 showed inhibitory activity against growth of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. OCX-36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were verified at cDNA 211 position and the corresponding proteins proline-71 (Pro-71) or serine-71 (Ser-71) were purified from eggs collected from genotyped hens. A significant difference between Pro-71 and Ser-71 OCX-36 for S. aureus lipoteichoic acid (LTA) binding activity was detected. The current study is a starting point to understand the innate immune role that OCX-36 may play in protection against bacterial invasion of both embryonated eggs (relevant to avian reproductive success) and unfertilized table eggs (relevant to food safety).

  6. G protein-coupled receptors show unusual patterns of intrinsic unfolding.

    PubMed

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Prilusky, Jaime; Sussman, Joel L; Goldman, Adrian

    2005-02-01

    Intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) or IUP-like regions often play key roles in controlling processes ranging from transcription to the cell cycle. In silico such proteins can be identified by their sequence properties; they have low hydrophobicity and high net charge. In this study, we applied the FoldIndex (http://bioportal.weizmann.ac.il/fldbin/findex) program to analyze human G protein-coupled receptors and compared them with membrane proteins of known structure and with IUPs. We show that human G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) extramembranous domains include long (>50 residues) disordered segments, unlike membrane proteins of known structure. The predicted disorder occurred primarily in the N-terminal, C-terminal and third intracellular domain regions: 55, 69 and 56% of the human GPCRs were disordered in these regions, respectively. This increased flexibility may therefore be critical for GPCR function. Surprisingly, however, the kinds of residues used in GPCR unstructured regions were different than in hitherto-identified IUPs. The GPCR third intracellular loop domains contain very high percentages of Arg, Lys and His residues, especially Arg, but the percentage of Glu, Asp and Pro is no higher than in folded proteins. We propose that this has structural and functional consequences.

  7. Enhanced protein adsorption and patterning on nanostructured latex-coated paper.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, Helka; Määttänen, Anni; Ihalainen, Petri; Viitala, Tapani; Sarfraz, Jawad; Peltonen, Jouko

    2014-06-01

    Specific interactions of extracellular matrix proteins with cells and their adhesion to the substrate are important for cell growth. A nanopatterned latex-coated paper substrate previously shown to be an excellent substrate for cell adhesion and 2D growth was studied for directed immobilization of proteins. The nanostructured latex surface was formed by short-wavelength IR irradiation of a two-component latex coating consisting of a hydrophilic film-forming styrene butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer and hydrophobic polystyrene particles. The hydrophobic regions of the IR-treated latex coating showed strong adhesion of bovine serum albumin (cell repelling protein), fibronectin (cell adhesive protein) and streptavidin. Opposite to the IR-treated surface, fibronectin and streptavidin had a poor affinity toward the untreated pristine latex coating. Detailed characterization of the physicochemical surface properties of the latex-coated substrates revealed that the observed differences in protein affinity were mainly due to the presence or absence of the protein repelling polar and charged surface groups. The protein adsorption was assisted by hydrophobic (dehydration) interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Different zinc sensitivity of Brassica organs is accompanied by distinct responses in protein nitration level and pattern.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Lehotai, Nóra; Molnár, Árpád; Ördög, Attila; Bordé, Ádám; Laskay, Gábor; Erdei, László

    2016-03-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement, but its excess exerts toxic effects in plants. Heavy metal stress can alter the metabolism of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) leading to oxidative and nitrosative damages; although the participation of these processes in Zn toxicity and tolerance is not yet known. Therefore this study aimed to evaluate the zinc tolerance of Brassica organs and the putative correspondence of it with protein nitration as a relevant marker for nitrosative stress. Both examined Brassica species (B. juncea and B. napus) proved to be moderate Zn accumulators; however B. napus accumulated more from this metal in its organs. The zinc-induced damages (growth diminution, altered morphology, necrosis, chlorosis, and the decrease of photosynthetic activity) were slighter in the shoot system of B. napus than in B. juncea. The relative zinc tolerance of B. napus shoot was accompanied by moderate changes of the nitration pattern. In contrast, the root system of B. napus suffered more severe damages (growth reduction, altered morphology, viability loss) and slighter increase in nitration level compared to B. juncea. Based on these, the organs of Brassica species reacted differentially to excess zinc, since in the shoot system modification of the nitration pattern occurred (with newly appeared nitrated protein bands), while in the roots, a general increment in the nitroproteome could be observed (the intensification of the same protein bands being present in the control samples). It can be assumed that the significant alteration of nitration pattern is coupled with enhanced zinc sensitivity of the Brassica shoot system and the general intensification of protein nitration in the roots is attached to relative zinc endurance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Conversion of proteins from a non-polarized to an apical secretory pattern in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Lotte K. . E-mail: vogel@imbg.ku.dk; Larsen, Jakob E.; Hansen, Martin; Truffer, Renato

    2005-05-13

    Previously it was shown that fusion proteins containing the amino terminus of an apical targeted member of the serpin family fused to the corresponding carboxyl terminus of the non-polarized secreted serpin, antithrombin, are secreted mainly to the apical side of MDCK cells. The present study shows that this is neither due to the transfer of an apical sorting signal from the apically expressed proteins, since a sequence of random amino acids acts the same, nor is it due to the deletion of a conserved signal for correct targeting from the non-polarized secreted protein. Our results suggest that the polarity of secretion is determined by conformational sensitive sorting signals.

  10. Effects of Dicto-Comp and Dictation on the Writing Skill of Female Adult Iranian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adel, Rahil; Hashemian, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    This study was an attempt to clarify and remind L2 learners/teachers of 2 kinds of writing: dicto-comp and dictation. We explored the effect of controlled writing on the accuracy of the writing of adult Iranian EFL learners. Prior to the study, the homogeneity of 30 adult EFL learners was checked through an OPT test. Thirty participants were…

  11. Just What Does the ACT Assessment and ACT/COMP Measure Anyway? AIR 1992 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippi, Raymond H.

    A study was done of the relationship between the American College Testing (ACT) Assessment and the ACT/COMP (College Outcomes Measures Program) test and general intellectual ability of college students. The subjects for the study were 133 undergraduates, mostly freshmen, in Introductory Psychology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The…

  12. eComp at the University of New Mexico: Emphasizing Twenty-First Century Literacies in an Online Composition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourelle, Tiffany; Bourelle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    With distance education on the rise, a new program at the University of New Mexico provides an innovative way to teach first-year composition in a fully online format. The program, called eComp (short for Electronic Composition), insists that instructors receive formal and educational training before working in the model. In addition, the…

  13. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoC...

  14. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoC...

  15. Intravitreal AAV2.COMP-Ang1 Prevents Neurovascular Degeneration in a Murine Model of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Judd M.; Rai, Ruju R.; Carroll, Lara S.; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; Medina, Reinhold J.; Das, Subtrata K.; Muddana, Santosh K.; Olson, Paul R.; Nielson, Spencer; Walker, Kortnie; Flood, Maggie M.; Messenger, Wyatt B.; Archer, Bonnie J.; Barabas, Peter; Krizaj, David; Gibson, Christopher C.; Li, Dean Y.; Koh, Gou Y.; Gao, Guangping; Stitt, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in the U.S. The vision-threatening processes of neuroglial and vascular dysfunction in DR occur in concert, driven by hyperglycemia and propelled by a pathway of inflammation, ischemia, vasodegeneration, and breakdown of the blood retinal barrier. Currently, no therapies exist for normalizing the vasculature in DR. Here, we show that a single intravitreal dose of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 encoding a more stable, soluble, and potent form of angiopoietin 1 (AAV2.COMP-Ang1) can ameliorate the structural and functional hallmarks of DR in Ins2Akita mice, with sustained effects observed through six months. In early DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 restored leukocyte-endothelial interaction, retinal oxygenation, vascular density, vascular marker expression, vessel permeability, retinal thickness, inner retinal cellularity, and retinal neurophysiological response to levels comparable with nondiabetic controls. In late DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 enhanced the therapeutic benefit of intravitreally delivered endothelial colony-forming cells by promoting their integration into the vasculature and thereby stemming further visual decline. AAV2.COMP-Ang1 single-dose gene therapy can prevent neurovascular pathology, support vascular regeneration, and stabilize vision in DR. PMID:26340930

  16. Molecular identification and expression patterns of odorant binding protein and chemosensory protein genes in Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Ma, Ji-Fang; Dong, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Ji-Wei; Kang, Ke

    2017-01-01

    The olfaction system of insects plays an important role in mediating various physiological behaviors, including locating hosts, avoiding predators, and recognizing mates and oviposition sites. Therefore, some key genes in the system present valuable opportunities as targets for developing novel green pesticides. Athetis lepigone, a noctuid moth can feed on more than 30 different host plants making it a serious polyphagous pest worldwide, and it has become one of the major maize pests in northern China since 2011. However, there are no reports on effective and environmentally friendly pesticides for the control of this pest. In this study, we identified 28 genes encoding putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and 20 chemosensory protein (CSPs) genes based on our previous A. lepigone transcriptomic data. A tissue expression investigation and phylogenetic analysis were conducted in an effort to postulate the functions of these genes. Our results show that nearly half (46.4%) of the AlOBPs exhibited antennae-biased expression while many of the AlCSPs were highly abundant in non-antennal tissues. These results will aid in exploring the chemosensory mechanisms of A. lepigone and developing environmentally friendly pesticides against this pest in the future. PMID:28382236

  17. A SELDI mass spectrometry study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: sample preparation, reproducibility, and differential protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Sausan; Broadwater, Laurie; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest J; McDonough, Jennifer; Gregory, Roger B

    2013-05-01

    Da) levels were lower in EAE samples with advanced disease relative to controls, while an MBP fragment (12. 4kDa), likely due to calpain digestion, was increased in EAE relative to controls. The appearance of MBP in mitochondrially enriched fractions is due to tissue freezing and storage, as MBP was not found associated with mitochondria obtained from fresh tissue. SELDI mass spectrometry can be employed to explore the proteome of a complex tissue (brain) and obtain protein profiles of differentially expressed proteins from protein fractions. Appropriate homogenization protocols and protein fractionation using anion exchange beads can be employed to reduce sample complexity without introducing significant additional variation into the SELDI mass spectra beyond that inherent in the SELDI- MS method itself. SELDI-MS coupled with principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis provides protein patterns that can clearly distinguish the disease state from controls. However, identification of individual differentially expressed proteins requires a separate purification of the proteins of interest by polyacrylamide electrophoresis prior to trypsin digestion and peptide mass fingerprint analysis, and unambiguous identification of differentially expressed proteins can be difficult if protein bands consist of several proteins with similar molecular weights.

  18. A SELDI mass spectrometry study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: sample preparation, reproducibility, and differential protein expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    isoform 8 (MBP8) (14.2 kDa) levels were lower in EAE samples with advanced disease relative to controls, while an MBP fragment (12. 4kDa), likely due to calpain digestion, was increased in EAE relative to controls. The appearance of MBP in mitochondrially enriched fractions is due to tissue freezing and storage, as MBP was not found associated with mitochondria obtained from fresh tissue. Conclusions SELDI mass spectrometry can be employed to explore the proteome of a complex tissue (brain) and obtain protein profiles of differentially expressed proteins from protein fractions. Appropriate homogenization protocols and protein fractionation using anion exchange beads can be employed to reduce sample complexity without introducing significant additional variation into the SELDI mass spectra beyond that inherent in the SELDI- MS method itself. SELDI-MS coupled with principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis provides protein patterns that can clearly distinguish the disease state from controls. However, identification of individual differentially expressed proteins requires a separate purification of the proteins of interest by polyacrylamide electrophoresis prior to trypsin digestion and peptide mass fingerprint analysis, and unambiguous identification of differentially expressed proteins can be difficult if protein bands consist of several proteins with similar molecular weights. PMID:23635033

  19. Effects of light on protein patterns in gravitropically stimulated root caps of corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Gildow, V.

    1984-01-01

    In certain cultivars of corn (Zea mays var. Merit), light stimulates gravitropic bending of the root by influencing events in the root cap. In this paper, we report on changes in root cap proteins which occur as a result of the light treatment and single out specific proteins as potentially having a role in mediating the gravitropic response. For this work, we have used root caps maintained aseptically in culture media supplemented with auxin. If auxin is deleted from the culture medium, the protein profiles observed following illumination differ from that seen in caps provided light while in auxin-supplemented media. We also report that several of the proteins for which synthesis is stimulated by light appear to turn over rapidly, usually within 0.5 hour of formation.

  20. Effects of light on protein patterns in gravitropically stimulated root caps of corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Gildow, V.

    1984-01-01

    In certain cultivars of corn (Zea mays var. Merit), light stimulates gravitropic bending of the root by influencing events in the root cap. In this paper, we report on changes in root cap proteins which occur as a result of the light treatment and single out specific proteins as potentially having a role in mediating the gravitropic response. For this work, we have used root caps maintained aseptically in culture media supplemented with auxin. If auxin is deleted from the culture medium, the protein profiles observed following illumination differ from that seen in caps provided light while in auxin-supplemented media. We also report that several of the proteins for which synthesis is stimulated by light appear to turn over rapidly, usually within 0.5 hour of formation.

  1. Identification of Methanococcus Jannaschii Proteins in 2-D Gel Electrophoresis Patterns by Mass Spectrometry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Liang, X.

    1998-06-10

    The genome of Methanococcus jannaschii has been sequenced completely and has been found to contain approximately 1,770 predicted protein-coding regions. When these coding regions are expressed and how their expression is regulated, however, remain open questions. In this work, mass spectrometry was combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify which proteins the genes produce under different growth conditions, and thus investigate the regulation of genes responsible for functions characteristic of this thermophilic representative of the methanogenic Archaea.

  2. Thermodynamic instability of viral proteins is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern targeted by human defensins

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Koneru, Pratibha C.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Strömstedt, Adam A.; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2016-01-01

    Human defensins are innate immune defense peptides with a remarkably broad repertoire of anti-pathogen activities. In addition to modulating immune response, inflammation, and angiogenesis, disintegrating bacterial membranes, and inactivating bacterial toxins, defensins are known to intercept various viruses at different stages of their life cycles, while remaining relatively benign towards human cells and proteins. Recently we have found that human defensins inactivate proteinaceous bacterial toxins by taking advantage of their low thermodynamic stability and acting as natural “anti-chaperones”, i.e. destabilizing the native conformation of the toxins. In the present study we tested various proteins produced by several viruses (HIV-1, PFV, and TEV) and found them to be susceptible to destabilizing effects of human α-defensins HNP-1 and HD-5 and the synthetic θ-defensin RC-101, but not β-defensins hBD-1 and hBD-2 or structurally related plant-derived peptides. Defensin-induced unfolding promoted exposure of hydrophobic groups otherwise confined to the core of the viral proteins. This resulted in precipitation, an enhanced susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage, and a loss of viral protein activities. We propose, that defensins recognize and target a common and essential physico-chemical property shared by many bacterial toxins and viral proteins – the intrinsically low thermodynamic protein stability. PMID:27581352

  3. Aquaporin inhibition changes protein phosphorylation pattern following sperm motility activation in fish.

    PubMed

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Cabrita, Elsa; Storelli, Carlo; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2011-09-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that osmolality is the key signal in sperm motility activation in Sparus aurata spermatozoa. In particular, we have proposed that the hyper-osmotic shock triggers water efflux from spermatozoa via aquaporins. This water efflux determines the cell volume reduction and, in turn, the rise in the intracellular concentration of ions. This increase could lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase and of the cAMP-signaling pathway, causing the phosphorylation of sperm proteins and then the initiation of sperm motility. This study confirms the important role of sea bream AQPs (Aqp1a and Aqp10b) in the beginning of sperm motility. In fact, when these proteins are inhibited by HgCl(2), the phosphorylation of some proteins (174 kDa protein of head; 147, 97 and 33 kDa proteins of flagella), following the hyper-osmotic shock, was inhibited (totally or partially). However, our results also suggest that more than one transduction pathways could be activated when sea bream spermatozoa were ejaculated in seawater, since numerous proteins showed an HgCl(2)(AQPs)-independent phosphorylation state after motility activation. The role played by each different signal transduction pathways need to be clarified.

  4. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OFMEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims at enhancing membrane-bound proteins that are expressed between epithelial cells so that quantitative analysis can be enabled on a cell-by-cell basis. We propose a method to detect and enhance membrane-bound protein signal from noisy images. More precisely, we build upon the tensor voting framework in order to produce an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting linear structures in images. The novelty of the proposed method is in its iterative tuning of the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. The method is shown to produce high quality enhancements of membrane-bound protein signals with combined punctate and diffused characteristics. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of using tunable tensor voting for enhancing and differentiating cell-cell adhesion mediated by integral cell membrane protein.

  5. Determination of the electrophoretic pattern of somatic and excretory-secretory proteins of Ligula intestinalis parasite in spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus).

    PubMed

    Youssefi, M R; Hosseinifard, S M; Halimi, M; Kordafshari, S

    2012-12-01

    Ligula intestinalis parasite is a cestodes that causes remarkable damages to fish. It is also of prime importance in economic and hygienic aspects. SDS-PAGE and western blotting are the methods that can be used to determine the electerophoretic pattern of somatic and excretory-secretory proteins of parasites. In this study, after obtaining the plerocercoidal stage of this parasite from the spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus), its somatic proteins were prepared using ultrasonicae, and excretory-secretory proteins were prepared using the PBS solution. After protein assay, which included using the Bradford method and then SDS-PAGE on these two antigenic solutions, 5 protein bands of 26, 33, 38, 58, 70kDa in somatic antigens, and 7 bands of 25, 28, 33, 43, 49, 60, 70kDa in excretory-secretory antigens were observed. After western blotting on both antigens and adding the primary antibody (the sera of infected fish) and then the secondary antibody (Rabbit Anti-fish Polyclonal Antibody Conjugated from Abnova Corporation) no band was seen in excretory-secretory antigen. And only in the 55kDa band of somatic antigen, a positive response, in comparison of fish positive serum was observed.

  6. Human protein secretory pathway genes are expressed in a tissue-specific pattern to match processing demands of the secretome.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Gatto, Francesco; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Protein secretory pathway in eukaryal cells is responsible for delivering functional secretory proteins. The dysfunction of this pathway causes a range of important human diseases from congenital disorders to cancer. Despite the piled-up knowledge on the molecular biology and biochemistry level, the tissue-specific expression of the secretory pathway genes has not been analyzed on the transcriptome level. Based on the recent RNA-sequencing studies, the largest fraction of tissue-specific transcriptome encodes for the secretome (secretory proteins). Here, the question arises that if the expression levels of the secretory pathway genes have a tissue-specific tuning. In this study, we tackled this question by performing a meta-analysis of the recently published transcriptome data on human tissues. As a result, we detected 68 as called "extreme genes" which show an unusual expression pattern in specific gene families of the secretory pathway. We also inspected the potential functional link between detected extreme genes and the corresponding tissues enriched secretome. As a result, the detected extreme genes showed correlation with the enrichment of the nature and number of specific post-translational modifications in each tissue's secretome. Our findings conciliate both the housekeeping and tissue-specific nature of the protein secretory pathway, which we attribute to a fine-tuned regulation of defined gene families to support the diversity of secreted proteins and their modifications.

  7. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  8. Cell-type-specific expression pattern of ceramide synthase 2 protein in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Christiane; Klemm, Anna-Lena; van Uelft, Martina; Imgrund, Silke; Ginkel, Christina; Hartmann, Dieter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) catalyzes the synthesis of dihydroceramides from dihydrosphingosine and very long fatty acyl (C22-C24)-CoAs. CerS2-deficient (gene trap) mice were reported to exhibit myelin and behavioral abnormalities, associated with the expression of CerS2 in oligodendrocytes and neurons based on expression of lacZ reporter cDNA instead of the cers2 gene in these mice. In order to clarify the cell-type-specific expression of CerS2 protein, we have raised antibodies that specifically recognize the glycosylated and non-glycosylated CerS2 protein in wild-type but not in CerS2-deficient mouse tissues. In early postnatal, juvenile and adult mouse brain, the new antibodies detect CerS2 protein only in oligodendrocytes but not in neurons, suggesting that the gene trap vector in CerS2-deficient mice led to ectopic expression of the lacZ reporter gene in neurons. In liver, the CerS2 protein is expressed in hepatocytes but not in Ito cells or Kupffer cells. We conclude that the behavioral abnormalities observed in CerS2-deficient mice originate primarily in oligodendrocytes and not in neurons. The identification of specific cell types in which CerS2 protein is expressed is prerequisite to further mechanistic characterization of phenotypic abnormalities exhibited by CerS2-deficient mice. The amount of CerS2 protein detected in different tissues by immunoblot analyses does not strictly correspond to the activity of the CerS2 enzyme. Disproportional results are likely due to post-translational regulation of the CerS2 protein.

  9. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-07-12

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling.

  10. Competing Lipid-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions Determine Clustering and Gating Patterns in the Potassium Channel from Streptomyces lividans (KcsA)*

    PubMed Central

    Molina, M. Luisa; Giudici, A. Marcela; Poveda, José A.; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Montoya, Estefanía; Renart, M. Lourdes; Fernández, Asia M.; Encinar, José A.; Riquelme, Gloria; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the notion that membrane proteins, instead of being isolated components floating in a fluid lipid environment, can be assembled into supramolecular complexes that take part in a variety of cooperative cellular functions. The interplay between lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions is expected to be a determinant factor in the assembly and dynamics of such membrane complexes. Here we report on a role of anionic phospholipids in determining the extent of clustering of KcsA, a model potassium channel. Assembly/disassembly of channel clusters occurs, at least partly, as a consequence of competing lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions at nonannular lipid binding sites on the channel surface and brings about profound changes in the gating properties of the channel. Our results suggest that these latter effects of anionic lipids are mediated via the Trp67–Glu71–Asp80 inactivation triad within the channel structure and its bearing on the selectivity filter. PMID:26336105

  11. Comprehensive characterization of expression patterns of protein 4.1 family members in mouse adrenal gland: implications for functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Congrong; Debnath, Gargi; Baines, Anthony J; Conboy, John G; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2010-10-01

    The members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B, are encoded by four genes, all of which undergo complex alternative splicing. It is well established that 4.1R, the prototypical member of the family, serves as an adapter that links the spectrin-actin based cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane in red cells. It is required for mechanical resilience of the membrane, and it ensures the cell surface accumulation of selected membrane proteins. However, the function of 4.1 proteins outside erythrocytes remains under-explored, especially in endocrine tissues. Transcripts of all 4.1 homologs have previously been documented to be abundantly expressed in adrenal gland. In order to begin to decipher the function of 4.1 proteins in adrenal gland, we performed a detailed characterization of the expression pattern of various 4.1 proteins and their cellular localization. We show that 4.1R (~80 and ~135 kDa) splice forms are expressed on the membrane of all cells, while a ~160 kDa 4.1G splice form is distributed in the cytoplasm and the membrane of zona glomerulosa and of medullary cells. Two 4.1N splice forms, ~135 and ~95 kDa, are present in the peri-nuclear region of both zona glomerulosa and medullary cells, while a single ~130 kDa 4.1B splice form, is detected in all layers of adrenal gland in both the cytoplasm and the membrane. The characterization of distinct splice forms of various 4.1 proteins with diverse cellular and sub-cellular localization indicates multiple functions for this family of proteins in endocrine functions of adrenal gland.

  12. Dorsal–Ventral patterning: Crescent is a dorsally secreted Frizzled-related protein that competitively inhibits Tolloid proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ploper, Diego; Lee, Hojoon X.; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In Xenopus, dorsal–ventral (D–V) patterning can self-regulate after embryo bisection. This is mediated by an extracellular network of proteins secreted by the dorsal and ventral centers of the gastrula. Different proteins of similar activity can be secreted at these two poles, but under opposite transcriptional control. Here we show that Crescent, a dorsal protein, can compensate for the loss of Sizzled, a ventral protein. Crescent is a secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP) known to regulate Wnt8 and Wnt11 activity. We now find that Crescent also regulates the BMP pathway. Crescent expression was increased by the BMP antagonist Chordin and repressed by BMP4, while the opposite was true for Sizzled. Crescent knock-down increased the expression of BMP target genes, and synergized with Sizzled morpholinos. Thus, Crescent loss-of-function is compensated by increased expression of its ventral counterpart Sizzled. Crescent overexpression dorsalized whole embryos but not ventral half-embryos, indicating that Crescent requires a dorsal component to exert its anti-BMP activity. Crescent protein lost its dorsalizing activity in Chordin-depleted embryos. When co-injected, Crescent and Chordin proteins greatly synergized in the dorsalization of Xenopus embryos. The molecular mechanism of these phenotypes is explained by the ability of Crescent to inhibit Tolloid metalloproteinases, which normally degrade Chordin. Enzyme kinetic studies showed that Crescent was a competitive inhibitor of Tolloid activity, which bound to Tolloid/BMP1 with a KD of 11 nM. In sum, Crescent is a new component of the D–V pathway, which functions as the dorsal counterpart of Sizzled, through the regulation of chordinases of the Tolloid family. PMID:21295563

  13. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J.; Wagner, Matthew S.; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs+, Au+, Au3+, Bi+, Bi3+, Bi3++, C60+) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs+, Au+ and Bi+ primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C60 primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C4H8N+ to K+ peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness of the protein films and Bi1+ primary ions

  14. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J; Wagner, Matthew S; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G

    2011-12-15

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs(+), Au(+), Au(3) (+), Bi(+), Bi(3) (+), Bi(3) (++), C(60) (+)) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs(+), Au(+) and Bi(+) primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C(60) primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C(4)H(8)N(+) to K(+) peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness

  15. Hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions of pore, channel, and transporter proteins contain beta-burst patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Selz, K A; Mandell, A J; Shlesinger, M F

    1998-01-01

    Hydropathy plots are often used in place of missing physical data to model transmembrane proteins that are difficult to crystallize. The sequential maxima of their graphs approximate the number and locations of transmembrane segments, but potentially useful additional information about sequential hydrophobic variation is lost in this smoothing procedure. To explore a broader range of hydrophobic variations without loss of the transmembrane segment-relevant sequential maxima, we utilize a sequence of linear decompositions and transformations of the n-length hydrophobic free energy sequences, Hi, i = 1...n, of proteins. Constructions of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions, psil, from M-lagged, M x M autocovariance matrices, CM, were followed by their all-poles, maximum entropy power spectral, Somega(psil), and Mexican Hat wavelet, Wa,b(psil), transformations. These procedures yielded graphs indicative of inverse frequencies, omega-1, and sequence locations of hydrophobic modes suggestive of secondary and supersecondary protein structures. The graphs of these computations discriminated between Greek Key, Jelly Role, and Up and Down categories of antiparallel beta-barrel proteins. With these methods, examples of porins, connexins, hexose transporters, nuclear membrane proteins, and potassium but not sodium channels appear to belong to the Up and Down antiparallel beta-barrel variety. PMID:9788928

  16. Hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions of pore, channel, and transporter proteins contain beta-burst patterns.

    PubMed

    Selz, K A; Mandell, A J; Shlesinger, M F

    1998-11-01

    Hydropathy plots are often used in place of missing physical data to model transmembrane proteins that are difficult to crystallize. The sequential maxima of their graphs approximate the number and locations of transmembrane segments, but potentially useful additional information about sequential hydrophobic variation is lost in this smoothing procedure. To explore a broader range of hydrophobic variations without loss of the transmembrane segment-relevant sequential maxima, we utilize a sequence of linear decompositions and transformations of the n-length hydrophobic free energy sequences, Hi, i = 1...n, of proteins. Constructions of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions, psil, from M-lagged, M x M autocovariance matrices, CM, were followed by their all-poles, maximum entropy power spectral, Somega(psil), and Mexican Hat wavelet, Wa,b(psil), transformations. These procedures yielded graphs indicative of inverse frequencies, omega-1, and sequence locations of hydrophobic modes suggestive of secondary and supersecondary protein structures. The graphs of these computations discriminated between Greek Key, Jelly Role, and Up and Down categories of antiparallel beta-barrel proteins. With these methods, examples of porins, connexins, hexose transporters, nuclear membrane proteins, and potassium but not sodium channels appear to belong to the Up and Down antiparallel beta-barrel variety.

  17. Gene expression patterns, and protein metabolic and histological analyses for muscle development in Peking duck.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Ping; Liu, He-He; Li, Qing-Qing; Wang, Yan; Liu, Jun-Ying; Hu, Ji-Wei; Yan, Xi-Ping; Gou, Hua; Li, Liang; Wang, Ji-Wen

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to use duck breast muscle and leg muscle, the 2 main productive muscle organs, as a model to elucidate the molecular mechanism controlling how the 2 muscles have different deposition capabilities, and to analyze the mechanisms facilitating duck muscle development posthatching. Peking duck breast muscle and leg muscle were collected 3, 7, and 16 wk posthatching. The morphology of the myofibers was observed by paraffin sectioning the muscles. The expression of genes involved in protein metabolism [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RPS6-p70-protein kinase (S6K), forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1), and atrogin-1 (MAFbx)] was detected using real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot assays, and the results indicated that breast muscle had a stronger capacity for both protein synthesis and protein degradation compared with leg muscle. Satellite cell frequency declined during muscle development in both tissues, and the expression of Pax3/7, satellite cell marker genes, was not significantly different between breast muscle and leg muscle. No notable apoptosis was observed in either tissue. The results of this study suggest that protein metabolism signaling is the main reason promoting duck skeletal muscle mass gain.

  18. Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF): isoelectric focusing pattern and tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Kawashima, Ken; Hori, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Gc protein is the precursor for Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), with three phenotypes: Gc1f, Gc1s and Gc2, based on its electrophoretic mobility. The difference in electrophoretic mobility is because of the difference in its posttranslational sugar moiety composition. We compared the difference between Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility using the isoelectric focusing (IEF) method. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was evaluated after coculture with L-929 cell. The tumoricidal mechanism was investigated using TNF bioassay and nitric oxide (NO) release. The difference in Gc protein and GcMAF electrophoretic mobility was detected. The tumoricidal activity of GcMAF-treated macrophage was detected, but no release of TNF and NO was detected. The difference of isoelectric focusing mobility in Gc protein and GcMAF would be useful to develop a GcMAF detection method. GcMAF increased macrophage tumoricidal activity but TNF and NO release were not involved in the mechanism.

  19. The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin C, a disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich protein isolated from Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J. J.; Moreno-Murciano, M. P.; Sanz, L.; Jürgens, M.; Schrader, M.; Raida, M.; Benjamin, D. C.; Fox, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin-C was determined by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The N-terminal disintegrin-like domain is a compact structure including eight disulfide bonds, seven of them in the same pattern as the disintegrin bitistatin. The protein has two extra cysteine residues (XIII and XVI) that form an additional disulfide bond that is characteristically found in the disintegrin-like domains of cellular metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and PIII snake venom Zn-metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of catrocollastatin-C contains five disulfide bonds between nearest-neighbor cysteines and a long range disulfide bridge between CysV and CysX. These results provide structural evidence for a redefinition of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain boundaries. An evolutionary pathway for ADAMs, PIII, and PII SVMPs based on disulfide bond engineering is also proposed. PMID:10933502

  20. Alteration of a yeast SH3 protein leads to conditional viability with defects in cytoskeletal and budding patterns.

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Urdaci, M; Aigle, M; Crouzet, M

    1993-08-01

    Mutations in genes necessary for survival in stationary phase were isolated to understand the ability of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remain viable during prolonged periods of nutritional deprivation. Here we report results concerning one of these mutants, rvs167, which shows reduced viability and abnormal cell morphology upon carbon and nitrogen starvation. The mutant exhibits the same response when cells are grown in high salt concentrations and other unfavorable growth conditions. The RVS167 gene product displays significant homology with the Rvs161 protein and contains a SH3 domain at the C-terminal end. Abnormal actin distribution is associated with the mutant phenotype. In addition, while the budding pattern of haploid strains remains axial in standard growth conditions, the budding pattern of diploid mutant strains is random. The gene RVS167 therefore could be implicated in cytoskeletal reorganization in response to environmental stresses and could act in the budding site selection mechanism.

  1. Alteration of a yeast SH3 protein leads to conditional viability with defects in cytoskeletal and budding patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, F; Urdaci, M; Aigle, M; Crouzet, M

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in genes necessary for survival in stationary phase were isolated to understand the ability of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remain viable during prolonged periods of nutritional deprivation. Here we report results concerning one of these mutants, rvs167, which shows reduced viability and abnormal cell morphology upon carbon and nitrogen starvation. The mutant exhibits the same response when cells are grown in high salt concentrations and other unfavorable growth conditions. The RVS167 gene product displays significant homology with the Rvs161 protein and contains a SH3 domain at the C-terminal end. Abnormal actin distribution is associated with the mutant phenotype. In addition, while the budding pattern of haploid strains remains axial in standard growth conditions, the budding pattern of diploid mutant strains is random. The gene RVS167 therefore could be implicated in cytoskeletal reorganization in response to environmental stresses and could act in the budding site selection mechanism. Images PMID:8336735

  2. Twist on protein microarrays: layering wax-patterned nitrocellulose to create customizable and separable arrays of multiplexed affinity columns.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Victoria; Vörös, János

    2014-05-06

    We developed the simple and inexpensive FoRe microarray to simultaneously test several 1 μL samples for multiple proteins. By combining forward and reverse phase microarrays into an innovative three-dimensional format, the FoRe array exploits the advantages and eliminates several drawbacks of the traditional approaches (i.e., large sample volumes, protein loss, and cross-reactivity between detection antibodies). Samples are pipetted into an array of separable, multiplexed affinity columns. Several nitrocellulose membranes, each functionalized with a different capture antibody, are stacked to create a customizable affinity column. The nitrocellulose is patterned with wax to form 25 isolated microspots on each layer, allowing us to analyze multiple samples in parallel. After running the immunoassay, the stacks are quickly disassembled, revealing 2D microarrays of different fractions from multiple samples. By combining the stack-and-separate technique with wax patterning, we keep the arrays low cost and easily tailored to a variety of applications. We successfully performed 3D multiplexing using a model system with mouse and rabbit IgG. Binding proved to be independent of the position in the stack, and the limit of detection for a mouse IgG sandwich assay was 7.3 pM in BSA and 15 pM in human plasma. The FoRe microarray makes it possible to identify protein expression patterns across several minute volume samples; for example, it could be used to analyze cell lysate in drug response studies or pricks of blood from small animal studies.

  3. Improved plasma amino acids pattern following 12 months of supplemented low-protein diet in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Na; Qian, Jiaqi; Lin, Aiwu; Fang, Wei; Cao, Liou; Wang, Qin; Ni, Zhaohui; Lindholm, Bengt; Axelsson, Jonas; Yao, Qiang

    2010-07-01

    Decreased plasma essential amino acid (EAA) levels, increased nonessential amino acid (NEAA) levels, and low EAA to NEAA ratio (E/NEAA) are common in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and may impact uremic complications. In the present study, we investigate the impact of keto acids-supplemented low-protein (sLP) diet on plasma amino acids (AAs) patterns in stable PD patients. This is a supplemental analysis of a previously published prospective and randomized trial. Thirty-nine PD patients selected from the original population were divided to receive either low (LP: 0.6-0.8 g/kg ideal body weight [IBW]/d, n = 13), keto acids-supplemented low- (sLP: 0.6-0.8 g/kg IBW/d + 0.12 g/kg IBW/d of keto acids, n = 12), or high- (HP: 1.0-1.2 g/kg IBW/d, n = 14) protein diets and followed for 1 year. Plasma AA patterns were assessed at baseline and 12 months using high-performance liquid chromatography. Whereas there were no significant differences between the three groups at baseline, following 12 months, the E/NEAA had increased significantly in group sLP (0.58 +/- 0.16 to 0.83 +/- 0.20, p < 0.05), but was not different in either LP (0.62 +/- 0.20 to 0.72 +/- 0.13, p = ns) or HP (0.66 +/- 0.14 to 0.74 +/- 0.12, p = ns) group. This change in E/NEAA in group sLP was due to a significant decrease in NEAA concomitantly with maintained EAA levels, whereas in the other two groups, neither EAA nor NEAA changed significantly. A low-protein diet supplemented with keto acids significantly improved the pattern of plasma AA in prevalent PD patients.

  4. Chelating Surfaces for Native State Proteins Patterning: The Human Serum Albumin Case.

    PubMed

    Giamblanco, Nicoletta; Tuccitto, Nunzio; Zappalà, Gabriella; Sfuncia, Gianfranco; Licciardello, Antonino; Marletta, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    The paper reports a new "soft" surface functionalization strategy, based on a highly selective ion metal chelation process. The proposed stepwise methodology implies at first the construction of a monolayer of terpyridine-based thiol (Tpy), whose highly packed structuring has been followed in situ by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) measurements, showing that the monolayers consist of about 2.7 × 10(14) Tpy/cm(2). Then, the tridentate sites of the each Tpy moiety are employed to partially chelate divalent metal ions, providing an effective platform to anchoring proteins by completing the metal ion coordination with an available site on the protein of interest. We report the case study of the application of the process to the HSA immobilization onto various surfaces, including Tpy-Fe(II) and Tpy-Cu(II) complexes, as well as hydrophilic bare gold substrates and hydrophobic self-assembled Tpy-based monolayers. It is shown that the chelation interaction between Tpy-Cu(II) complexes and HSA produces the highest and most robust HSA immobilization, with an adsorbed mass at the steady state of ∼800 ng/cm(2), with respect to an average adsorption of ∼350 ng/cm(2) for the other surfaces. Furthermore, Cu(II)-chelated surfaces seem to promote a sort of protein "soft" landing, preventing the ubiquitous surface-induced major unfolding and transmitting an orientation information to the protein, owing to the highly specific symmetry coordination of the Tpy-Cu(II)-protein complex. Indeed, the interaction with a specific monoclonal antiboby (anti-HSA) indicated the lack of a significant protein denaturation, while a massive reorientation/denaturation process was found for all the remaining surfaces, including the Tpy-Fe(II) complex. Finally, the metal-ion-dependent HSA immobilization selectivity has been exploited to obtain micropatterned surfaces, based on the strikingly different strength of interaction and stability observed for Fe(II) and Cu(II) complexes.

  5. Fit3D: a web application for highly accurate screening of spatial residue patterns in protein structure data.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Florian; Eisold, Alexander; Bittrich, Sebastian; Labudde, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    The clarification of linkage between protein structure and function is still a demanding process and can be supported by comparison of spatial residue patterns, so-called structural motifs. However, versatile up-to-date resources to search for local structure similarities are rare. We present Fit3D, an easily accessible web application for highly accurate screening of structural motifs in 3D protein data. The web application is accessible at https://biosciences.hs-mittweida.de/fit3d and program sources of the command line version were released under the terms of GNU GPLv3. Platform-independent binaries and documentations for offline usage are available at https://bitbucket.org/fkaiser/fit3d florian.kaiser@hs-mittweida.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2013-02-21

    The suitable optical properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with the ease of modifying their surface for the attachment of recognition molecules make them ideal candidates in many biochip applications. This paper reports the rapid one-step photochemical surface patterning of biomolecules in microfluidic thiol-ene chips. This work focuses on thiol-ene substrates featuring an excess of thiol groups at their surface. The thiol-ene stoichiometric composition can be varied to precisely control the number of surface thiol groups available for surface modification up to an average surface density of 136 ± 17 SH nm(-2). Biotin alkyne was patterned directly inside thiol-ene microchannels prior to conjugation with fluorescently labelled streptavidin. The surface bound conjugates were detected by evanescent wave-induced fluorescence (EWIF), demonstrating the success of the grafting procedure and its potential for biochip applications.

  7. Laboratory-scale protein striping system for patterning biomolecules onto paper-based immunochromatographic test strips.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael A; Hoffman, John M; Stevens, Dean Y; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S; Yager, Paul

    2010-09-07

    A method for patterning narrow lines of biomolecules onto nitrocellulose membranes using laboratory syringe pumps is described. One syringe pump is used to drive the biomolecule solution through a needle, while another modified syringe pump acts as a one-dimensional translation stage, moving the needle across the membrane much like a pen. This method consumes very small volumes of reagents, and is a viable option for laboratory-scale fabrication and prototyping of point-of-care rapid diagnostic test strips.

  8. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  9. The SBASE protein domain library, release 2.0: a collection of annotated protein sequence segments.

    PubMed Central

    Pongor, S; Skerl, V; Cserzö, M; Hátsági, Z; Simon, G; Bevilacqua, V

    1993-01-01

    SBASE 2.0 is the second release of SBASE, a collection of annotated protein domain sequences. SBASE entries represent various structural, functional, ligand-binding and topogenic segments of proteins [Pongor, S. et al. (1993) Prot. Eng., in press]. This release contains 34,518 entries provided with standardized names and it is cross-referenced to the major protein and nucleic acid databanks as well as to the PROSITE catalog of protein sequence patterns [Bairoch, A. (1992) Nucl. Acids Res., 20 suppl, 2013-2018]. SBASE can be used for establishing domain homologies using different database-search tools such as FASTA [Lipman and Pearson (1985) Science, 227, 1436-1441], FASTDB [Brutlag et al. (1990) Comp. Appl. Biosci., 6, 237-245] or BLAST3 [Altschul and Lipman (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87, 5509-5513] which is especially useful in the case of loosely defined domain types for which efficient consensus patterns can not be established. SBASE 2.0 and a set of search and retrieval tools are freely available on request to the authors or by anonymous 'ftp' file transfer from mean value of ftp.icgeb.trieste.it. PMID:8332532

  10. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tyleckova, Jirina; Valekova, Ivona; Zizkova, Martina; Rakocyova, Michaela; Marsala, Silvia; Marsala, Martin; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-30

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived committed neural precursors are an important source of cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases including spinal cord injury. There remains an urgency to identify markers for monitoring of neural progenitor specificity, estimation of neural fate and follow-up correlation with therapeutic effect in preclinical studies using animal disease models. Cell surface capture technology was used to uncover the cell surface exposed N-glycoproteome of neural precursor cells upon neuronal differentiation as well as post-mitotic mature hNT neurons. The data presented depict an extensive study of surfaceome during neuronal differentiation, confirming glycosylation at a particular predicted site of many of the identified proteins. Quantitative changes detected in cell surface protein levels reveal a set of proteins that highlight the complexity of the neuronal differentiation process. Several of these proteins including the cell adhesion molecules ICAM1, CHL1, and astrotactin1 as well as LAMP1 were validated by SRM. Combination of immunofluorescence staining of ICAM1 and flow cytometry indicated a possible direction for future scrutiny of such proteins as targets for enrichment of the neuronal subpopulation from mixed cultures after differentiation of neural precursor cells. These surface proteins hold an important key for development of safe strategies in cell-replacement therapies of neuronal disorders. Neural stem and/or precursor cells have a great potential for cell-replacement therapies of neuronal diseases. Availability of well characterised and expandable neural cell lineage specific populations is critical for addressing such a challenge. In our study we identified and relatively quantified several hundred surface N-glycoproteins in the course of neuronal differentiation. We further confirmed the abundant changes for several cell adhesion proteins by SRM and outlined a strategy for utilisation of such N-glycoproteins in antibody based cell

  11. Molecular characterization and expression pattern of tumor suppressor protein p53 in mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi following virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huizhi; Fu, Xiaozhe; Li, Ningqiu; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Lihui; Wu, Shuqin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the tumor suppressor protein p53, which is crucial for cellular defense against tumor development, has also been implicated in host antiviral defense. In the present study, a 1555 bp full-length cDNA of p53 from mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) (Sc-p53) was cloned and characterized. Quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed that Sc-p53 was expressed in all tissues examined, and it was most abundant in the gill and kidney. Recombinant Sc-p53 fused with a His·Tag was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and a rabbit polyclonal antibody was raised against recombinant Sc-p53. In addition, the regulation of Sc-p53 gene expression after experimental viral infection was determined and characterized. The mRNA and protein expression of Sc-p53 were significantly up-regulated in the Chinese perch brain (CPB) cell line and mandarin fish after infection with infectious kidney and spleen necrosis virus (ISKNV). The results showed a biphasic expression pattern of Sc-p53 protein in CPB. However, a different expression pattern of Sc-p53 in response to S. chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) infection was found. The mRNA expression of Sc-p53 was significantly up-regulated in CPB at 6 h and spleen of mandarin fish at 24 h post-infection. The protein expression of Sc-p53 was significantly up-regulated in CPB at 1 h, remained elevated at 4 h, and then decreased to control level at 8 h post-infection by SCRV. All of these data suggested that Sc-p53 plays a critical role in immune defense and antiviral responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategy for allosteric analysis based on protein-patterned stationary phase in microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongyan; Weng, Xuexiang; Qu, Haiyun; Kong, Jilie; Yang, Pengyuan; Liu, Baohong

    2005-01-01

    An effective method is presented for the on-chip analysis of chiral interactions with a successful depression of nonspecific adsorption. The alumina gel-derived protein network on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchannel was explored to form a protein-stationary phase and then used to carry out electrophoresis for fast enantioseparation coupled with electrochemical detection. On the basis of the chemical modification of a synthesized copolymer containing silane-functionalized scaffold, alumina sol-gel could react readily with the silane groups and form steady microstructure on the chip surface achieving the encapsulation of functional biomolecules. Compared with the native PMMA microchannels, the modified surfaces exhibited much better wettability, more stable and enhanced electroosmotic mobility, and less nonspecific adsorption. The water contact angle and EOF of alumina-gel-derived PMMA substrate were 22 degrees and 4.3 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), compared to those of 73 degrees and 1.9 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from the untreated one, respectively. Bovine serum albumin, acting as a target protein, could be stably and homogeneously immobilized in the modified PMMA microchannel to fabricate a protein-stationary phase. Under a mild condition, D- and L-tryptophan were efficiently separated with a resolution of 1.57. The as-prepared microchip can perform chiral separations within short time, indicating that the general protocol has the potential to provide a platform for high throughput screening of enantiomer candidates such as those biochemical drugs with protein targets and the research of receptor interactions.

  13. Application of SAIL phenylalanine and tyrosine with alternative isotope-labeling patterns for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ono, Akira M; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-01-01

    The extensive collection of NOE constraint data involving the aromatic ring signals is essential for accurate protein structure determination, although it is often hampered in practice by the pervasive signal overlapping and tight spin couplings for aromatic rings. We have prepared various types of stereo-array isotope labeled phenylalanines (epsilon- and zeta-SAIL Phe) and tyrosine (epsilon-SAIL Tyr) to overcome these problems (Torizawa et al. 2005), and proven that these SAIL amino acids provide dramatic spectral simplification and sensitivity enhancement for the aromatic ring NMR signals. In addition to these SAIL aromatic amino acids, we recently synthesized delta-SAIL Phe and delta-SAIL Tyr, which allow us to observe and assign delta-(13)C/(1)H signals very efficiently. Each of the various types of SAIL Phe and SAIL Tyr yields well-resolved resonances for the delta-, epsilon- or zeta-(13)C/(1)H signals, respectively, which can readily be assigned by simple and robust pulse sequences. Since the delta-, epsilon-, and zeta-proton signals of Phe/Tyr residues give rise to complementary NOE constraints, the concomitant use of various types of SAIL-Phe and SAIL-Tyr would generate more accurate protein structures, as compared to those obtained by using conventional uniformly (13)C, (15)N-double labeled proteins. We illustrated this with the case of an 18.2 kDa protein, Escherichia coli peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), and concluded that the combined use of zeta-SAIL Phe and epsilon-SAIL Tyr would be practically the best choice for protein structural determinations.

  14. Different BCR/Abl protein suppression patterns as a converging trait of chronic myeloid leukemia cell adaptation to energy restriction.

    PubMed

    Bono, Silvia; Lulli, Matteo; D'Agostino, Vito Giuseppe; Di Gesualdo, Federico; Loffredo, Rosa; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Provenzani, Alessandro; Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2016-12-20

    BCR/Abl protein drives the onset and progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). We previously showed that BCR/Abl protein is suppressed in low oxygen, where viable cells retain stem cell potential. This study addressed the regulation of BCR/Abl protein expression under oxygen or glucose shortage, characteristic of the in vivo environment where cells resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) persist. We investigated, at transcriptional, translational and post-translational level, the mechanisms involved in BCR/Abl suppression in K562 and KCL22 CML cells. BCR/abl mRNA steady-state analysis and ChIP-qPCR on BCR promoter revealed that BCR/abl transcriptional activity is reduced in K562 cells under oxygen shortage. The SUnSET assay showed an overall reduction of protein synthesis under oxygen/glucose shortage in both cell lines. However, only low oxygen decreased polysome-associated BCR/abl mRNA significantly in KCL22 cells, suggesting a decreased BCR/Abl translation. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk extended BCR/Abl expression under oxygen/glucose shortage in K562 cells. Glucose shortage induced autophagy-dependent BCR/Abl protein degradation in KCL22 cells. Overall, our results showed that energy restriction induces different cell-specific BCR/Abl protein suppression patterns, which represent a converging route to TKi-resistance of CML cells. Thus, the interference with BCR/Abl expression in environment-adapted CML cells may become a useful implement to current therapy.

  15. Two secretory protein genes in Chironomus tentans have arisen by gene duplication and exhibit different developmental expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Galli, J; Wieslander, L

    1993-05-20

    The salivary gland cells in the dipteran Chironomus tentans produce approximately 15 different secretory proteins, with relative molecular masses ranging between 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(6). Together these proteins form two types of extra corporal tubes, a larval protective housing and feeding tube or a pupation tube. The developmental change in tube formation is accompanied by a switch in production from one combination of secretory proteins to another. Here we characterize two genes, the sp38-40.A and B genes, which encode secretory proteins with relative molecular masses of 38,000 to 40,000. The two genes are located 346 base-pairs apart in the same orientation and have presumably arisen by gene duplication as the result of an illegitimate recombination event. Both genes contain two regions with cysteine codons, surrounded by regions with short repeats coding for proline and charged amino acid residues. The two genes and alleles of the genes differ in their number of repeats. This structure resembles the structure of the Balbiani ring (BR) genes, which encode the four largest salivary gland secretory proteins. The sp38-40.A and B genes are therefore likely to belong to a BR multigene family containing all or most of the 15 salivary gland secretory protein genes. The expression of the sp38-40.A and B genes are different: the A gene is expressed throughout the larval fourth instar but considerably less in the prepupal stage, while the B gene shows the opposite expression pattern. The developmental regulation of the expression of the two genes has therefore diverged after the gene duplication event.

  16. DNA-dependent homodimerization, sub-cellular partitioning, and protein destabilization control WUSCHEL levels and spatial patterning.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kevin; Perales, Mariano; Snipes, Stephen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Reddy, G Venugopala

    2016-10-11

    The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) promotes stem cell maintenance in inflorescence meristems of Arabidopsis thaliana WUS, which is synthesized in the rib meristem, migrates and accumulates at lower levels in adjacent cells. Maintenance of WUS protein levels and spatial patterning distribution is not well-understood. Here, we show that the last 63-aa stretch of WUS is necessary for maintaining different levels of WUS protein in the rib meristem and adjacent cells. The 63-aa region contains the following transcriptional regulatory domains: the acidic region, the WUS-box, which is conserved in WUS-related HOMEOBOX family members, and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR-like) domain. Our analysis reveals that the opposing functions of WUS-box, which is required for nuclear retention, and EAR-like domain, which participates in nuclear export, are necessary to maintain higher nuclear levels of WUS in cells of the rib meristem and lower nuclear levels in adjacent cells. We also show that the N-terminal DNA binding domain, which is required for both DNA binding and homodimerization, along with the homodimerization sequence located in the central part of the protein, restricts WUS from spreading excessively and show that the homodimerization is critical for WUS function. Our analysis also reveals that a higher level of WUS outside the rib meristem leads to protein destabilization, suggesting a new tier of regulation in WUS protein regulation. Taken together our data show that processes that influence WUS protein levels and spatial distribution are highly coupled to its transcriptional activity.

  17. A close relative of the adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene codes for a peroxisomal protein with a specific expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platet, G; Savary, S; Sarde, C O; Mandel, J L; Chimini, G

    1996-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a severe demyelinating disease, is caused by mutations in a gene coding for a peroxisomal membrane protein (ALDP), which belongs to the superfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and has the structure of a half transporter. ALDP showed 38% sequence identity with another peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70, up to now its closest homologue. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a mouse ALD-related gene (ALDR), which codes for a protein with 66% identity with ALDP and shares the same half transporter structure. The ALDR protein was overexpressed in COS cells and was found to be associated with the peroxisomes. The ALD and ALDR genes show overlapping but clearly distinct expression patterns in mouse and may thus play similar but nonequivalent roles. The ALDR gene, which appears highly conserved in man, is a candidate for being a modifier gene that could account for some of the extreme phenotypic variability of ALD. The ALDR gene is also a candidate for being implicated in one of the complementation groups of Zellweger syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous disorder of peroxisome biogenesis, rare cases of which were found to be associated with mutations in the PMP70 (PXMP1) gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8577752

  18. The Evolution and Expression Pattern of Human Overlapping lncRNA and Protein-coding Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qianqian; Li, Yixue; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Songwen; Sun, Hong; Yu, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA overlapping with protein-coding gene (lncRNA-coding pair) is a special type of overlapping genes. Protein-coding overlapping genes have been well studied and increasing attention has been paid to lncRNAs. By studying lncRNA-coding pairs in human genome, we showed that lncRNA-coding pairs were more likely to be generated by overprinting and retaining genes in lncRNA-coding pairs were given higher priority than non-overlapping genes. Besides, the preference of overlapping configurations preserved during evolution was based on the origin of lncRNA-coding pairs. Further investigations showed that lncRNAs promoting the splicing of their embedded protein-coding partners was a unilateral interaction, but the existence of overlapping partners improving the gene expression was bidirectional and the effect was decreased with the increased evolutionary age of genes. Additionally, the expression of lncRNA-coding pairs showed an overall positive correlation and the expression correlation was associated with their overlapping configurations, local genomic environment and evolutionary age of genes. Comparison of the expression correlation of lncRNA-coding pairs between normal and cancer samples found that the lineage-specific pairs including old protein-coding genes may play an important role in tumorigenesis. This work presents a systematically comprehensive understanding of the evolution and the expression pattern of human lncRNA-coding pairs. PMID:28344339

  19. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: mRNA and protein expression patterns of E1α subunit genes in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Graça, Inês; Silva, Joaquina; Sá, Rosália; Sousa, Mário; Barros, Alberto; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2012-09-10

    During spermatogenesis, germ cells undergo a complex process of cell differentiation and morphological restructuring, which depends on the coordinated expression of different genes. Some vital examples are those involved in cell energy metabolism, namely the genes encoding the E1α subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the somatic PDHA1 (X-linked) and the testis-specific PDHA2 (autosomal). There are no data related to the study at the RNA and protein levels of PDHA genes during human spermatogenesis. The present study aimed to describe the mRNA and protein expression patterns of the human PDHA genes during spermatogenesis. Expression profiles of the PDHA1 and PDHA2 genes were characterized using different human tissues and cells. Diploid and haploid germ cells fractions were obtained from testis tissues. The mRNA profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, whereas the protein profiles were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Expression of the PDHA1 gene was found in all somatic cells, whereas expression of PDHA2 gene was restricted to germ cells. The switch from X-linked to autosomic gene expression occurred in spermatocytes. Data suggest the activation of PDHA2 gene expression is most probably a mechanism to ensure the continued expression of the protein, thus allowing germ cell viability and functionality.

  20. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  1. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  2. Target pattern recognition by complement proteins of the classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Hoi; Tan, Lee Aun; Carroll, Maria V; Gentle, Madeleine E; Sim, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a major component of the innate defence of animals against invading microorganisms, and is also essential for the recognition and clearance of damaged or structurally-altered host cells or macromolecules. The system is activated by three different pathways, each of which responds, using different recognition molecules, to a very wide range of activators. The recognition protein of the complement classical pathway, C1q is described in detail here, with comparisons to the alternative pathway.

  3. Distinct Patterns of Gene and Protein Expression Elicited by Organophosphorus Pesticides in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    pro- vide adequate biomass for RNA and protein preparation. The worms were treated with mefloquine ( Ash Stevens, Inc., Detroit, MI), dichlorvos, or...recommendations except that (1) a high pressure liquid chromatography ( HPLC )-purified T24T7 promoter primer (Integrated DNA Technologies, Coralville, IA) was...early gravid adult; EGTA: ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid; FDR: false discovery rate; g: gravity; h: hour; HPLC : high pressure liquid chromatog- raphy

  4. Persistent dominant follicle alters pattern of oviductal secretory proteins from cows at estrus.

    PubMed

    Binelli, M; Hampton, J; Buhi, W C; Thatcher, W W

    1999-07-01

    The experimental objective was to compare synthesis of oviductal secretory proteins of dairy cows bearing a persistent dominant follicle (PDF) versus a fresh dominant follicle (FDF) at estrus. On Day 7 after synchronized estrus (Day 0), cows received an intravaginal progesterone device and injection of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). On Day 9, cows received an injection of a GnRH agonist (FDF group; n = 3) or received no injection (PDF group, n = 3). On Day 16, all cows received PGF2alpha, and progesterone devices were removed. At slaughter on Day 18 or Day 19, oviducts ipsilateral and contralateral to the dominant follicle were divided into infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus regions. Explants from oviductal regions were cultured in minimal essential medium supplemented with [3H]leucine for 24 h. Two-dimensional fluorographs of proteins in conditioned media were analyzed by densitometry. Rate of incorporation of [3H]leucine into macromolecules was greater in the infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus of FDF cows (p < 0.01). Overall, intensities of radiolabeled secretory protein (P) 2 and P13 were greater for FDF than for PDF. In the ampulla, P14 was more intense for FDF while P7 was more intense for PDF. Abundance of P1 in the isthmus was greater for PDF cows. Across regions, P5, P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for PDF than for FDF in the ipsilateral side. In the contralateral side, P19 was more intense for PDF than for FDF, whereas P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for FDF. Differences in biosynthetic activity and in secreted oviductal proteins from cows bearing a PDF may contribute to the decrease in fertility associated with a PDF.

  5. Multiplexed protein profiling after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: characterization of differential expression patterns in cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Patel, Anoop P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Trivedi, Rikin A; Young, Adam M H; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a major contributor to delayed morbidity following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We sought to evaluate differential plasma protein levels across time in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage to identify potential biomarkers and to better understand the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nine female patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage underwent serial analysis of 239 different serum protein levels using quantitative, multiplexed immunoassays (DiscoveryMAP 250+ v2.0, Myriad RBM, Austin, TX, USA) on post-hemorrhage days 0 and 5. A repeated measures analysis of variance determined that mean protein concentration decreased significantly in patients who developed vasospasm versus those who did not for alpha-2-macroglobulin (F [1.00,7.00]=16.33, p=0.005), angiogenin (F [1.00,7.00]=7.65, p=0.028), apolipoprotein A-IV (F [1.00,7.00]=6.308, p=0.040), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (F [1.00,7.00]=9.08, p=0.020), macrophage-stimulating protein (F [1.00,7.00]=24.21, p=0.002), tetranectin (F [1.00,7.00]=5.46, p<0.039), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (F [1.00,7.00]=6.94, p=0.034), and significantly increased for vitronectin (F [1.00,7.00]=5.79, p=0.047). These biomarkers may be of value in detecting cerebral vasospasm, possibly aiding in the identification of patients at high-risk prior to neurological deterioration.

  6. Global Alignment of Pairwise Protein Interaction Networks for Maximal Common Conserved Patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Wenhong; Samatova, Nagiza F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of tools for the alignment of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have laid the foundation for PPI network analysis. Most of alignment tools focus on finding conserved interaction regions across the PPI networks through either local or global mapping of similar sequences. Researchers are still trying to improve the speed, scalability, and accuracy of network alignment. In view of this, we introduce a connected-components based fast algorithm, HopeMap, for network alignment. Observing that the size of true orthologs across species is small comparing to the total number of proteins in all species, we take a different approach basedmore » on a precompiled list of homologs identified by KO terms. Applying this approach to S. cerevisiae (yeast) and D. melanogaster (fly), E. coli K12 and S. typhimurium , E. coli K12 and C. crescenttus , we analyze all clusters identified in the alignment. The results are evaluated through up-to-date known gene annotations, gene ontology (GO), and KEGG ortholog groups (KO). Comparing to existing tools, our approach is fast with linear computational cost, highly accurate in terms of KO and GO terms specificity and sensitivity, and can be extended to multiple alignments easily.« less

  7. Epidemiology of virulence-associated plasmids and outer membrane protein patterns within seven common Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, R; Stephan, R; Bunge, C; Hoog, B; Steinbeck, A; Bulling, E

    1985-04-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella isolates belonging to seven common serotypes and originating from 29 different countries from all continents were investigated for their plasmid DNA content (337 isolates) and their outer membrane protein profiles (216 isolates). Of the S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. dublin, and S. choleraesuis isolates, 90% or more carried a serotype-specific plasmid. The molecular sizes of the plasmids were 60 megadaltons (Md) for S. typhimurium, 37 Md for S. enteritidis, 56 Md for S. dublin, and 30 Md for S. choleraesuis. The outer membrane protein profiles were homogeneous within each of the seven serotypes, except that a minority of S. enteritidis and S. dublin strains were lacking one major outer membrane protein. Virulence studies were performed with 39 representative strains by measuring the 50% lethal doses (LD50S) after oral infection of mice. The LD50 values obtained for plasmid-positive strains of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and S. dublin were up to 10(6)-fold lower than the values obtained for the plasmid-free strains of the same serotype. Only the plasmid-positive strains could invade the livers of orally infected mice, and only they were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 90% guinea pig serum. Strains of S. infantis were generally plasmid free, whereas S. panama and S. heidelberg isolates carried heterogeneous plasmid populations. The virulence properties of the latter three serotypes could not be correlated with the predominant plasmids found in these strains.

  8. Adaptive expression pattern of different proteins involved in cellular calcium homeostasis in denervated rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Cunha, Valéria M N; Scaramello, Christianne B V; da Silva, Cláudia L M; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Lafayette, Simone S L; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Noël, François

    2005-11-21

    The activity and protein expression of plasma membrane and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPases and ryanodine receptors were investigated in surgically denervated rat vas deferens. The function of thapsigargin-sensitive but not thapsigargin-resistant (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase (from sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, respectively), evidenced by enzyme activity and Ca2+ uptake experiments, was significantly depressed by 30-50% when compared to innervated vas. Western blots showed that such reduction in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase performance was accompanied by a decrement of similar magnitude in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase type 2 protein expression, without any significant change in plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase expression. Finally, [3H]ryanodine binding revealed that the density of ryanodine binding sites was reduced by 45% after denervation without modification in affinity. The present findings demonstrate that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum proteins involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis are clearly down-regulated and brings further evidence of a modified calcium translocation in denervated rat vas deferens.

  9. Epidemiology of virulence-associated plasmids and outer membrane protein patterns within seven common Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Helmuth, R; Stephan, R; Bunge, C; Hoog, B; Steinbeck, A; Bulling, E

    1985-01-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella isolates belonging to seven common serotypes and originating from 29 different countries from all continents were investigated for their plasmid DNA content (337 isolates) and their outer membrane protein profiles (216 isolates). Of the S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. dublin, and S. choleraesuis isolates, 90% or more carried a serotype-specific plasmid. The molecular sizes of the plasmids were 60 megadaltons (Md) for S. typhimurium, 37 Md for S. enteritidis, 56 Md for S. dublin, and 30 Md for S. choleraesuis. The outer membrane protein profiles were homogeneous within each of the seven serotypes, except that a minority of S. enteritidis and S. dublin strains were lacking one major outer membrane protein. Virulence studies were performed with 39 representative strains by measuring the 50% lethal doses (LD50S) after oral infection of mice. The LD50 values obtained for plasmid-positive strains of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and S. dublin were up to 10(6)-fold lower than the values obtained for the plasmid-free strains of the same serotype. Only the plasmid-positive strains could invade the livers of orally infected mice, and only they were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 90% guinea pig serum. Strains of S. infantis were generally plasmid free, whereas S. panama and S. heidelberg isolates carried heterogeneous plasmid populations. The virulence properties of the latter three serotypes could not be correlated with the predominant plasmids found in these strains. Images PMID:3980081

  10. Cadmium accumulation and protein binding patterns in tissues of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J; Thomas, D G; Brown, M W; Cryer, A; Shurben, D; Solbe, J F; Garvey, J S

    1986-01-01

    Rainbow trout were exposed to defined levels of cadmium in their aquarium water for differing periods at a variety of near-lethal concentrations that ensured the survival of the majority of the fish. The gills, liver and kidney together accounted for 99% of the accumulated load of body cadmium in the fish under these conditions. Although the proportion of total cadmium present in the liver remained relatively constant throughout, the distribution of the remainder between gill and kidney altered with the time of exposure. The cadmium in all three organs was bound by two low molecular weight proteins distinct in character from metallothionein. The isoforms of metallothionein were also present but were found to bind only zinc and copper. By contrast, when trout were injected with cadmium intraperitoneally, most of the metal accumulated in the liver where it was sequestered by the two isoforms of metallothionein. Pre-exposure of the trout to either a low concentration of cadmium (for several months) or to an elevated concentration of zinc (for 5 days) allowed the animals to survive a subsequent exposure to a high, otherwise lethal concentration of cadmium. The proteins responsible for sequestration of the two metals were identified, but two different mechanisms seemed to be involved in the protection of the animals. The significance of these observations in terms of the induction of proteins and the prevention of the toxic effects of cadmium is considered. PMID:3709433

  11. Old and new findings on lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: a soluble pattern-recognition molecule.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Ralf R

    2011-08-01

    LBP [LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein] was discovered approximately 25 years ago. Since then, substantial progress has been made towards our understanding of its function in health and disease. Furthermore, the discovery of a large protein family sharing functional and structural attributes has helped in our knowledge. Still, key questions are unresolved, and here an overview on the old and new findings on LBP is given. LBP is an acute-phase protein of the liver, but is also synthesized in other cells of the organism. While LBP is named after the ability to bind to LPS of Gram-negative bacteria, it also can recognize other bacterial compounds, such as lipopeptides. It has been shown that LBP is needed to combat infections; however, the main mechanism of action is still not clear. New findings on natural genetic variations of LBP leading to functional consequences may help in further elucidating the mechanism of LBP and its role in innate immunity and disease.

  12. The Arabidopsis STV1 Protein, Responsible for Translation Reinitiation, Is Required for Auxin-Mediated Gynoecium PatterningW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Taisuke; Wada, Takuji; Yamamoto, Kotaro T.; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2005-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) is implicated in translation reinitiation of polycistronic genes. A newly isolated Arabidopsis thaliana short valve1 (stv1) mutant, in which one of the RPL24-encoding genes, RPL24B, is deleted, shows specific defects in the apical-basal patterning of the gynoecium, in addition to phenotypes induced by ribosome deficiency. A similar gynoecium phenotype is caused by mutations in the auxin response factor (ARF) genes ETTIN (ETT) and MONOPTEROS (MP), which have upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in their 5′-transcript leader sequences. Gynoecia of a double mutant of stv1 and a weak ett mutant allele are similar to those of a strong ett allele, and transformation with a uORF-eliminated ETT construct partially suppressed the stv1 gynoecium phenotype, implying that STV1 could influence ETT translation through its uORFs. Analyses of 5′-leader-reporter gene fusions showed that the uORFs of ETT and MP negatively regulate the translation of the downstream major ORFs, indicating that translation reinitiation is an important step for the expression of these proteins. Taken together, we propose that perturbation of translation reinitiation of the ARF transcripts causes the defects in gynoecium patterning observed in the stv1 mutant. PMID:16227452

  13. Profenofos induced modulation in physiological indices, genomic template stability and protein banding patterns of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Balkrishna; Chakraborty, Sindhunath; Singh, Savita; Mishra, Arun K

    2016-11-01

    To understand the mechanism underlying organophosphate pesticide toxicity, cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 was subjected to varied concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mg L(-1)) of profenofos and the effects were investigated in terms of changes in cellular physiology, genomic template stability and protein expression pattern. The supplementation of profenofos reduced the growth, total pigment content and photosynthetic efficiency of the test organism in a dose dependent manner with maximum toxic effect at 30 mg L(-1). The high fluorescence intensity of 2', 7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate and increased production of malondialdehyde confirmed the prevalence of acute oxidative stress condition inside the cells of the cyanobacterium. Rapid amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting and SDS-PAGE analyses showed a significant alteration in the banding patterns of DNA and proteins respectively. A marked increase in superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase activity and a concomitant reduction in glutathione content indicated their possible role in supporting the growth of Anabaena 7120 up to 20 mg L(-1). These findings suggest that the uncontrolled use of profenofos in the agricultural fields may not only lead to the destruction of the cyanobacterial population, but it would also disturb the nutrient dynamics and energy flow.

  14. Cadmium and zinc induced similar changes in protein and glycoprotein patterns in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum l.) seedlings and plants.

    PubMed

    Peharec Štefanić, Petra; Sikić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Balen, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    The effects of 10 μmol L-1 and 15 μmol L-1 cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic element and 25 μmol L-1 and 50 μmol L-1 zinc (Zn), an essential micronutrient, on proteins and glycoproteins of Nicotiana tabacum L. seedlings and plants were investigated after exposure to each metal alone or to their combinations. Changes in only few polypeptides related to heavy metal treatments were observed in tobacco seedlings and leaves of adult plants, while the greatest change in total soluble protein pattern was observed in plant roots. Differences between control and treated tobacco tissues were more pronounced in the glycoprotein pattern, which was analysed by application of different lectins. The majority of the detected glycoproteins in leaves and roots of adult plants can be considered as a result of enhanced glycosylation due to heavy metal stress. The difference in glycoproteins between Cd and Zn application on tobacco seedlings and adult plants could not be determined since enhanced glycosylation was noticed after treatment with either metal alone or in combination. Therefore, it can be concluded that both metals induced N- and Oglycosylation as a result of changed environmental conditions.

  15. Ambulation speed and corresponding mechanics are associated with changes in serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Denning, W Matt; Becker Pardo, Michael; Winward, Jason G; Hunter, Iain; Ridge, Sarah; Hopkins, J Ty; Reese, C Shane; Parcell, Allen C; Seeley, Matthew K

    2016-02-01

    Because serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been used to reflect articular cartilage condition, we aimed to identify walking and running mechanics that are associated with changes in serum COMP. Eighteen subjects (9 male, 9 female; age=23 ± 2 yrs.; mass=68.3 ± 9.6 kg; height=1.70 ± 0.08 m) completed 4000 steps on an instrumented treadmill on three separate days. Each day corresponded to a different ambulation speed: slow (preferred walking speed), medium (+50% of slow), and fast (+100% of slow). Synchronized ground reaction force and video data were collected to evaluate walking mechanics. Blood samples were collected pre-, post-, 30-minute post-, and 60-minute post-ambulation to determine serum COMP concentration at these times. Serum COMP increased 29%, 18%, and 5% immediately post ambulation for the fast, medium, and slow sessions (p<0.01). When the speeds were pooled, peak ankle inversion, knee extension, knee abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, and hip abduction moment, and knee flexion angle at impact explained 61.4% of total variance in COMP concentration change (p<0.001). These results indicate that (1) certain joint mechanics are associated with acute change in serum COMP due to ambulation, and (2) increased ambulation speed increases serum COMP concentration.

  16. Pattern of seroreactivity against feline foamy virus proteins in domestic cats from Germany.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Anne; Mühle, Michael; Hechler, Torsten; Bevins, Sarah; vandeWoude, Sue; Denner, Joachim; Löchelt, Martin

    2011-10-15

    The prevalence of feline foamy virus (FFV, spumaretrovirinae) in naturally infected domestic cats ranges between 30 and 80% FFV positive animals depending on age, sex and geographical region analyzed. Two serotypes have been reported for FFV designated FUV7-like and F17/951-like. Serotype-specific neutralization has been shown to correlate with sequence divergence in the surface (SU) domain of the envelope protein (Env). We analyzed a serum collection of 262 domestic cat sera from Germany using a GST-capture ELISA setup screening for Gag and Bet specific antibodies and identified 39% FFV positive animals. Due to the heterogeneity of the serological samples, cut-offs for Gag and Bet reactivity had to be experimentally determined since application of calculated cut-off values yielded some false-positive results; the new cut-off values turned out to be also fully applicable to a previous study. Using the already established FUV7 ElpSU antigen and the newly cloned and produced F17/951 ElpSU antigen, both consisting of the corresponding ectodomains of the envelope leader protein (Elp) and SU protein, we aimed at the detection of Env-specific antibodies and discrimination between the two known FFV serotypes within the diagnostic FFV ELISA. We validated the ElpSU antigens using cat reference sera of known serotype and screened with this assay domestic cat sera from Germany. Use of the FUV7- and F17/951 ElpSU antigens in ELISA resulted in the detection of Env-specific antibodies in both cat reference sera and sera from domestic cats in Germany, but failed to allow serotyping at the same time.

  17. DNA methylation patterns of protein coding gen