Science.gov

Sample records for protein delivery activity

  1. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  2. Transdermal delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptides and proteins avoids the disadvantages associated with the invasive parenteral route of administration and other alternative routes such as the pulmonary and nasal routes. Since proteins have a large size and are hydrophilic in nature, they cannot permeate passively across the skin due to the stratum corneum which allows the transport of only small lipophilic drug molecules. Enhancement techniques such as chemical enhancers, iontophoresis, microneedles, electroporation, sonophoresis, thermal ablation, laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and noninvasive jet injectors aid in the delivery of proteins by overcoming the skin barrier in different ways. In this review, these enhancement techniques that can enable the transdermal delivery of proteins are discussed, including a discussion of mechanisms, sterility requirements, and commercial development of products. Combination of enhancement techniques may result in a synergistic effect allowing increased protein delivery and these are also discussed.

  3. Nanotechnologies in protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Stefano; Bersani, Sara; Semenzato, Alessandra; Caliceti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The growth rate for biotech drugs, namely proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides, is dictated by the parallel progresses in biotechnology and nanotechnology. Actually, biotechnology techniques have expanded enormously the arsenal of therapeutically useful peptides and proteins making these products of primary interest for future pharmaceutical market. Nevertheless, the exploitation of protein and peptide drugs is strictly related to the development of innovative delivery systems which should provide for controlled, prolonged, or targeted delivery, improved stability during storage and delivery, reduced adverse effects, increased bioavailability, improved patient compliance and allow for administration through the desired route and cope with cost-containment therapeutic protocols. Colloidal formulations ideally possess the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical requisites for protein delivery. Pharmaceutical nanotechnology is a tool of techniques applied to design, develop and produce these systems. It involves the investigation of innovative materials and production procedures for preparation of a variety of nanosized dosage forms, which range from solid nanoparticles to soluble bioconjugates. The research and development of innovative tailor made protein delivery systems, which must be designed according to the drug candidate pharmacological and physicochemical properties, is one of the primary aim of modern pharmaceutical technology. Therefore, as an unmet need exists for technologies that combine innovative drug delivery solutions, a close un-prejudicial interaction between academic and industrial researchers as well as business thought leaders is required.

  4. Near-Infrared Light Activation of Proteins Inside Living Cells Enabled by Carbon Nanotube-Mediated Intracellular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Fan, Xinqi; Chen, Xing

    2016-02-01

    Light-responsive proteins have been delivered into the cells for controlling intracellular events with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the choice of wavelength is limited to the UV and visible range; activation of proteins inside the cells using near-infrared (NIR) light, which has better tissue penetration and biocompatibility, remains elusive. Here, we report the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based bifunctional system that enables protein intracellular delivery, followed by NIR activation of the delivered proteins inside the cells. Proteins of interest are conjugated onto SWCNTs via a streptavidin-desthiobiotin (SA-DTB) linkage, where the protein activity is blocked. SWCNTs serve as both a nanocarrier for carrying proteins into the cells and subsequently a NIR sensitizer to photothermally cleave the linkage and release the proteins. The released proteins become active and exert their functions inside the cells. We demonstrated this strategy by intracellular delivery and NIR-triggered nuclear translocation of enhanced green fluorescent protein, and by intracellular delivery and NIR-activation of a therapeutic protein, saporin, in living cells. Furthermore, we showed that proteins conjugated onto SWCNTs via the SA-DTB linkage could be delivered to the tumors, and optically released and activated by using NIR light in living mice.

  5. Biologically active breast milk proteins in association with very preterm delivery and stage of lactation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, R; Petrova, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the independent effect of very preterm gestation on breast milk content of biologically active proteins (secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), lysozyme, lactoferrin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), leptin, adiponectin and β-endorphin (b-EP)) during the first month of lactation. We collected samples of transitional (6 to 8 and 13 to 15 days) and mature (20 to 22 and 27 to 29 days) milk from mothers after term (38 to 41 weeks) or very preterm (24 to 31 weeks) delivery. The levels of sIgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, OPG, leptin, adiponectin and b-EP in the breast milk were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or enzyme immunoassay kits. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Sixty breast milk samples were collected from 15 mothers after very preterm (preterm breast milk, PBM) and 20 samples from 5 mothers after term (term breast milk, TBM) deliveries. Decrease in lysozyme, lactoferrin, OPG, leptin, adiponectin and b-EP but no change in sIgA was recorded during the first month of lactation in both TBM and PBM. The IgA, lysozyme and adiponectin were higher in PBM than in TBM, whereas concentrations of lactoferrin, OPG and leptin were higher in TBM than in PBM (P<0.05 to 0.0001). A similar pattern was seen in the lysozyme, leptin and adiponectin concentration in mature milk. Increased b-EP levels in breast milk were associated with the vaginal mode of delivery but not gestational age. Although a similar pattern of change was observed in the breast milk bioactive proteins during the first month of lactation after term and very preterm gestation, PBM is a better source of factors with antibacterial/anti-inflammatory activities but is constantly deficient in leptin, which is involved in neuroendocrine regulation.

  6. Nanodiamonds Mediate Oral Delivery of Proteins for Stem Cell Activation and Intestinal Remodeling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingjie; Li, Xiaojiao; Yin, Min; Li, Ping; Huang, Ping; Wang, Lihua; Jiang, Yiguo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Nan; Fan, Chunhai; Song, Haiyun

    2017-06-07

    Introduction of exogenous biomacromolecules into living systems is of great interest in genome editing, cancer immunotherapy, and stem cell reprogramming. Whereas current strategies generally depend on nucleic acids transfection, direct delivery of functional proteins that provides enhanced specificity, increased safety, and fast and temporal regulation is highly desirable. Nevertheless, intracellular delivery of intact and bioactive proteins, especially in vivo, remains poorly explored. In this study, we developed a nanodiamonds (NDs)-based protein delivery system in cultured cells and in Drosophila that showed high adsorption, high efficiency, and effective cytosolic release of fully functional proteins. Through live-cell imaging, we observed a novel phenomenon wherein a substantial amount of internalized NDs-protein complex rejected fusion with the early endosome, thereby evading protein degradation in the lysosome. More significantly, we demonstrated that dietary NDs-RNase induced apoptosis in enterocytes, stimulating regenerative divisions in intestinal stem cells and increasing the number of stem cells and precursor cells in Drosophila intestine. As stem cells are poorly accessible by exogenous agents in vivo, NDs-mediated oral delivery of proteins provides a new approach to modulate the stem cell microenvironment for intestinal remodeling, which has important implications for colorectal cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

  7. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  8. Towards mimicking natural protein channels with aligned carbon nanotube membranes for active drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mainak; Stinchcomb, Audra; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes offer an exciting opportunity to mimic natural protein channels due to 1) a mechanism of dramatically enhanced fluid flow 2) ability to place ‘gatekeeper’ chemistry at the entrance to pores 3) the ability for biochemical reactions to occur on gatekeeper molecules and 4) an ability to chemically functionalize each side of the membrane independently. Main methods Aligned CNT membranes were fabricated and CNT pore entrances modified with gatekeeper chemistry. Pressure driven fluid flow and diffusion experiments were performed to study the mechanisms of transport through CNTs. Key findings The transport mechanism through CNT membranes is primarily 1) ionic diffusion near bulk expectation 2) gas flow enhanced 1–2 orders of magnitude primarily due to specular reflection 3) fluid flow 4–5 orders of magnitude faster than conventional materials due to a nearly ideal slip-boundary interface. The transport can be modulated by ‘gatekeeper’ chemistry at the pore entrance using steric hindrance, electrostatic attraction/repulsion, or biochemical state. The conformation of charged tethered molecules can be modulated by applied bias setting the stage for programmable drug release devices. Significance The membrane structure is mechanically far more robust than lipid bilayer films, allowing for large-scale chemical separations, delivery or sensing based on the principles of protein channels. The performance of protein channels is several orders of magnitude faster than conventional membrane materials. The fundamental requirements of mimicking protein channels are present in the CNT membrane system. PMID:19383500

  9. Virus-Like Particles Derived from HIV-1 for Delivery of Nuclear Proteins: Improvement of Production and Activity by Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Robert, Marc-André; Lytvyn, Viktoria; Deforet, Francis; Gilbert, Rénald; Gaillet, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from retroviruses and lentiviruses can be used to deliver recombinant proteins without the fear of causing insertional mutagenesis to the host cell genome. In this study we evaluate the potential of an inducible lentiviral vector packaging cell line for VLP production. The Gag gene from HIV-1 was fused to a gene encoding a selected protein and it was transfected into the packaging cells. Three proteins served as model: the green fluorescent protein and two transcription factors-the cumate transactivator (cTA) of the inducible CR5 promoter and the human Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4). The sizes of the VLPs were 120-150 nm in diameter and they were resistant to freeze/thaw cycles. Protein delivery by the VLPs reached up to 100% efficacy in human cells and was well tolerated. Gag-cTA triggered up to 1100-fold gene activation of the reporter gene in comparison to the negative control. Protein engineering was required to detect Gag-KLF4 activity. Thus, insertion of the VP16 transactivation domain increased the activity of the VLPs by eightfold. An additional 2.4-fold enhancement was obtained by inserting nuclear export signal. In conclusion, our platform produced VLPs capable of efficient protein transfer, and it was shown that protein engineering can be used to improve the activity of the delivered proteins as well as VLP production.

  10. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Dave; Xue, Ye; Medina, Jethro; Hu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based polymers compared to synthetic polymers have the advantages of good biocompatibility, biodegradability, environmental sustainability, cost effectiveness and availability. This review addresses the sources of protein-based polymers, compares the similarity and differences, and highlights characteristic properties and functionality of these protein materials for sustained and controlled drug release. Targeted drug delivery using highly functional multicomponent protein composites to guide active drugs to the site of interest will also be discussed. A systematical elucidation of drug-delivery efficiency in the case of molecular weight, particle size, shape, morphology, and porosity of materials will then be demonstrated to achieve increased drug absorption. Finally, several important biomedical applications of protein-based materials with drug-delivery function—including bone healing, antibiotic release, wound healing, and corneal regeneration, as well as diabetes, neuroinflammation and cancer treatments—are summarized at the end of this review. PMID:28772877

  11. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  12. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  13. Nanochemistry of protein-based delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Subin; Udenigwe, Chibuike; Yada, Rickey

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  14. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Subin R. C. K.; Udenigwe, Chibuike C.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior. PMID:27489854

  15. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Subin R C K; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  16. Polyelectrolyte/silver nanocomposite multilayer films as multifunctional thin film platforms for remote activated protein and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Anandhakumar, S; Raichur, Ashok M

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate a nanoparticle loading protocol to develop a transparent, multifunctional polyelectrolyte multilayer film for externally activated drug and protein delivery. The composite film was designed by alternate adsorption of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and dextran sulfate (DS) on a glass substrate followed by nanoparticle synthesis through a polyol reduction method. The films showed a uniform distribution of spherical silver nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50±20 nm, which increased to 80±20 nm when the AgNO3 concentration was increased from 25 to 50 mM. The porous and supramolecular structure of the polyelectrolyte multilayer film was used to immobilize ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) within the polymeric network of the film. When exposed to external triggers such as ultrasonication and laser light the loaded films were ruptured and released the loaded BSA and CH. The release of CH is faster than that of BSA due to a higher diffusion rate. Circular dichroism measurements confirmed that there was no significant change in the conformation of released BSA in comparison with native BSA. The fabricated films showed significant antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Applications envisioned for such drug-loaded films include drug and vaccine delivery through the transdermal route, antimicrobial or anti-inflammatory coatings on implants and drug-releasing coatings for stents. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined neurothrombectomy or thrombolysis with adjunctive delivery of 3K3A-activated protein C in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul; Griffin, John H; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), vessel recanalization correlates with improved functional status and reduced mortality. Mechanical neurothrombectomy achieves a higher likelihood of revascularization than intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), but there remains significant discrepancy between rates of recanalization and rates of favorable outcome. The poor neurological recovery among some stroke patients despite successful recanalization confirms the need for adjuvant therapy, such as pharmacological neuroprotection. Prior clinical trials of neuroprotectant drugs failed perhaps due to inability of the agent to reach the ischemic tissue beyond the occluded artery. A protocol that couples mechanical neurothrombectomy with concurrent delivery of a neuroprotectant overcomes this pitfall. Activated protein C (APC) exerts pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antithrombotic, cytoprotective, and neuroregenerative effects in stroke and appears a compelling candidate for this novel approach.

  18. Combined neurothrombectomy or thrombolysis with adjunctive delivery of 3K3A-activated protein C in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arun Paul; Griffin, John H.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), vessel recanalization correlates with improved functional status and reduced mortality. Mechanical neurothrombectomy achieves a higher likelihood of revascularization than intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), but there remains significant discrepancy between rates of recanalization and rates of favorable outcome. The poor neurological recovery among some stroke patients despite successful recanalization confirms the need for adjuvant therapy, such as pharmacological neuroprotection. Prior clinical trials of neuroprotectant drugs failed perhaps due to inability of the agent to reach the ischemic tissue beyond the occluded artery. A protocol that couples mechanical neurothrombectomy with concurrent delivery of a neuroprotectant overcomes this pitfall. Activated protein C (APC) exerts pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antithrombotic, cytoprotective, and neuroregenerative effects in stroke and appears a compelling candidate for this novel approach. PMID:26388732

  19. Enhanced Tumor Delivery and Antitumor Activity in Vivo of Liposomal Doxorubicin Modified with MCF-7-Specific Phage Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hartner, William C.; Gillespie, James W.; Praveen, Kulkarni P.; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    A novel strategy to improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy has been developed by the integration of nanotechnology with phage technique. The objective of this study was to combine phage display, identifying tumor-targeting ligands, with a liposomal nanocarrier for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Following the proof of concept in cell-based experiments, this study focused on in vivo assessment of antitumor activity and potential side-effects of phage fusion protein-modified liposomal doxorubicin. MCF-7-targeted phage-Doxil treatments led to greater tumor remission and faster onset of antitumor activity than the treatments with non-targeted formulations. The enhanced anticancer effect induced by the targeted phage-Doxil correlated with an improved tumor accumulation of doxorubicin. Tumor sections consistently revealed enhanced apoptosis, reduced proliferation activity and extensive necrosis. Phage-Doxil-treated mice did not show any sign of hepatotoxicity and maintained overall health. Therefore, MCF-7-targeted phage-Doxil seems to be an active and tolerable chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment. PMID:24028893

  20. Protein transduction domain delivery of therapeutic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Arjen; Dowdy, Steven F

    2011-12-01

    Owing to their unprecedented selectivity, specific activity and potential for 1000+ fold amplification of signal, macromolecules, such as peptides, catalytic protein domains, complete proteins, and oligonucleotides, offer great potential as therapeutic molecules. However, therapeutic use of macromolecules is limited by their poor penetration in tissues and their inability to cross the cellular membrane. The discovery of small cationic peptides that cross the membrane, called Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs) or Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs), in the late 1980s opened the door to cellular delivery of large, bioactive molecules. Now, PTDs are widely used as research tools, and impressively, multiple clinical trials are testing PTD-mediated delivery of macromolecular drug conjugates in patients with a variety of diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lentiviral Delivery of Proteins for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved to traverse cellular barriers and travel to the nucleus by mechanisms that involve active transport through the cytoplasm and viral quirks to resist cellular restriction factors and innate immune responses. Virus-derived vector systems exploit the capacity of viruses to ferry genetic information into cells, and now - more than three decades after the discovery of HIV - lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 have become instrumental in biomedical research and gene therapies that require genomic insertion of transgenes. By now, the efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery to stem cells, cells of the immune system including T cells, hepatic cells, and many other therapeutically relevant cell types is well established. Along with nucleic acids, HIV-1 virions carry the enzymatic tools that are essential for early steps of infection. Such capacity to package enzymes, even proteins of nonviral origin, has unveiled new ways of exploiting cellular intrusion of HIV-1. Based on early findings demonstrating the packaging of heterologous proteins into virus particles as part of the Gag and GagPol polypeptides, we have established lentiviral protein transduction for delivery of DNA transposases and designer nucleases. This strategy for delivering genome-engineering proteins facilitates high enzymatic activity within a short time frame and may potentially improve the safety of genome editing. Exploiting the full potential of lentiviral vectors, incorporation of foreign protein can be combined with the delivery of DNA transposons or a donor sequence for homology-directed repair in so-called 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors. Here, we briefly describe intracellular restrictions that may affect lentiviral gene and protein delivery and review the current status of lentiviral particles as carriers of tool kits for genome engineering.

  2. Application of proteins in burst delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, E.; Weiland, L. M.; Meng, W. S.

    2010-09-01

    Biological proteins embedded in either a biological or an engineered membrane will actively maintain electrochemical balance across that membrane. In this study two applications will be examined. First a system of governing equations will be calibrated for a biological endosome. The endocytosis predictions presented then serve to validate the model. In addition, these predictions introduce new insights into endosome burst, which is of interest for advancing DNA vaccine delivery. The calibrated model is subsequently adapted to an analogous engineering scenario for targeted payload delivery. In the presence of a specific external stimulus, burst release of an arbitrary payload encased in a vesicle akin to an endosome is explored. Control of the process through manipulation of vesicle size, stimulus, and transporters is presented. A case is made for application of proteins as building blocks in the design of targeted response materials.

  3. Inhalation delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn; Conk, Michelle; Picha, Kristen

    2013-04-01

    Inhaled therapeutics are used routinely to treat a variety of pulmonary diseases including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis. In addition, biological therapies represent the fastest growing segment of approved pharmaceuticals. However, despite the increased availability of biological therapies, nearly all inhaled therapeutics are small molecule drugs with only a single inhaled protein therapeutic approved. There remains a significant unmet need for therapeutics in pulmonary diseases, and biological therapies with potential to alter disease progression represent a significant opportunity to treat these challenging diseases. This review provides a background into efforts to develop inhaled biological therapies and highlights some of the associated challenges. In addition, we speculate on the ideal properties of a biologic therapy for inhaled delivery.

  4. Protein delivery with infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Bremer, U; Horres, C R; Francoeur, M L

    1997-01-01

    When a therapeutic effect is optimized by precise control of specific temporal patterns of plasma levels, infusion offers distinct advantages over oral administration, bolus injection, or depot delivery of polypeptides. The limitations of oral delivery are well known, and although research is under way into development of carrier systems that prevent degradation of labile agents, it is unlikely that the variances in absorption will meet the need for precise control. Depot delivery from subcutaneous or intramuscular implants presents a difficult situation when local tissue reactions to the agent sometimes occur. Removal of a depot system in the event of adverse reactions presents additional difficulties. Bolus injections are unable to sustain constant plasma levels unless the drug half-life is long or the injections are frequently administered. Insulin injections, for example, would be required every 30-60 minutes to approximate the plasma levels provided by a continuous infusion; such frequent injections would not be practical on a 24-hour basis. For the developer of new polypeptides, parenteral administration offers the most direct route to the marketplace. The step from periodic injections to tightly controlled infusion is a logical progression as compared with modification of the molecules or vehicles to obtain equivalent profiles. In Table II several different types of devices that can be used for infusion of proteins are compared. Microelectronics have played a major role in the miniaturization of infusion devices and undoubtedly will continue to do so. Micromachining, a spin-off technology of integrated circuit manufacture, will also find application in small infusion devices. In the future, we will have cost-effective disposable devices (Saaman et al., 1994) built on this technology that are programmable and thus can be adapted to meet each individual therapeutic need (Horres, 1994). We can also expect to see more closed-loop drug delivery systems where

  5. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics.

  6. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  7. Long-Term Delivery of Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Ravi; Khurana, Varun; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proteins are effective biotherapetics with applications in diverse ailments. Despite being specific and potent, their full clinical potential has not yet been realized. This can be attributed to short half-lives, complex structures, poor in vivo stability, low permeability frequent parenteral administrations and poor adherence to treatment in chronic diseases. A sustained release system, providing controlled release of proteins, may overcome many of these limitations. Areas covered This review focuses on recent development in approaches, especially polymer-based formulations, which can provide therapeutic levels of proteins over extended periods. Advances in particulate, gel based formulations and novel approaches for extended protein delivery are discussed. Emphasis is placed on dosage form, method of preparation, mechanism of release and stability of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Substantial advancements have been made in the field of extended protein delivery via various polymer-based formulations over last decade despite the unique delivery-related challenges posed by protein biologics. A number of injectable sustained-release formulations have reached market. However, therapeutic application of proteins is still hampered by delivery related issues. A large number of protein molecules are under clinical trials and hence there is an urgent need to develop new methods to deliver these highly potent biologics. PMID:25251334

  8. Graphene Nanoribbons Elicit Cell Specific Uptake and Delivery Via Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Enhanced by Human PapillomaVirus E5 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Mannepalli, Prady; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Ligands such as peptides, antibodies or other epitopes bind and activate specific cell receptors, and are employed for targeted cellular delivery of pharmaceuticals such as drugs, genes and imaging agents. Herein, we show that oxidized graphene nanoribbons, non-covalently functionalized with PEG-DSPE (1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N[amino(polyethyleneglycol)]) (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). This activation generates predominantly dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like response, and results in significant O-GNR-PEG-DSPE uptake into cells with high EGFR expression. Cells with an integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) genome also show increased uptake due to the modulation of the activated EFGR by the viral protein E5. We demonstrate that this cell specific uptake of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE can be exploited to achieve significantly enhanced drug efficacies even in drug resistant cells. These results have implications towards the development of active targeting and delivery agents without ligand functionalization for use in the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies that overexpress EGFR or mediated by HPV. PMID:24980059

  9. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  10. Enzyme-Responsive Delivery of Multiple Proteins with Spatiotemporal Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Suwei; Nih, Lina; Carmichael, S. Thomas; Lu, Yunfeng; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The growth of tissues and organs is regulated by orchestrated signals from biomolecules such as enzymes and growth factors. The ability to deliver signal molecules in response to particular biological events (e.g., enzyme expression and activation) holds great promise towards tissue healing and regeneration. The current delivery vehicles mainly rely on hydrolysable scaffolds and thin films of protein-containing polymers, which cannot be programmed to respond to biological signals. We report herein an injectable delivery platform based on enantiomeric protein nanocapsules, which can deliver multiple proteins with spatiotemporal control in response to the tissue proteases secreted during wound healing. Exemplified by stroke and diabetic wound healing in mice, sequential delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) greatly enhances tissue revascularization and vessel maturation, providing effective delivery vehicles for tissue engineering and reparative medicine. PMID:25962336

  11. Emerging hydrogel designs for controlled protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-08-19

    Hydrogels have evolved into indispensable biomaterials in the fields of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. This minireview aims to highlight the recent advances in the hydrogel design for controlled release of bioactive proteins. The latest developments of enzyme-responsive and externally regulated drug delivery systems are summarized. The design strategies and applications of phase-separated hydrogel systems are also described. We expect that these emerging approaches will enable expanded use of hydrogels in biomedicine and healthcare.

  12. Liposomal dry powders as aerosols for pulmonary delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Hickey, Anthony J

    2005-12-21

    The purpose of this research was to develop liposomal dry powder aerosols for protein delivery. The delivery of stable protein formulations is essential for protein subunit vaccine delivery, which requires local delivery to macrophages in the lungs. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS) was used as a model protein to evaluate dry powder liposomes as inhaled delivery vehicles. Dimyristoyl phosphatylcholine:cholesterol (7:3) was selected as the liposome composition. The lyophilization of liposomes, micronization of the powders, aerosolization using a dry powder inhaler (DPI), and in vitro aerodynamic fine particle fraction upon collection in a twin-stage liquid impinger were evaluated. After lyophilization and jet-milling, the total amount of GUS and its activity, representing encapsulation efficiency and stability, were evaluated. The GUS amount and activity were measured and compared with freshly-prepared liposomes in the presence of mannitol, 43% of initial GUS amount, 29% of GUS activity after lyophilization and 36% of GUS amount, 22% of activity after micronization were obtained. Emitted doses from dry powder inhaler were 53%, 58%, 66%, and 73% for liposome powder:mannitol carrier ratios of 1:0, 1:4, 1:9, and 1:19. Fifteen percent of the liposome particles were less than 6.4 mum in aerodynamic diameter. The results demonstrate that milled liposome powders containing protein molecules can be aerosolized effectively at a fixed flow rate. Influences of different cryoprotectants on lyophilization of protein liposome formulations are reported. The feasibility of using liposomal dry powder aerosols for protein delivery has been demonstrated but further optimization is required in the context of specific therapeutic proteins.

  13. The assembly of the plant urease activation complex and the essential role of the urease accessory protein G (UreG) in delivery of nickel to urease.

    PubMed

    Myrach, Till; Zhu, Anting; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2017-09-01

    Urease is a ubiquitous nickel metalloenzyme. In plants, its activation requires three urease accessory proteins (UAPs), UreD, UreF, and UreG. In bacteria, the UAPs interact with urease and facilitate activation, which involves the channeling of two nickel ions into the active site. So far this process has not been investigated in eukaryotes. Using affinity pulldowns of Strep-tagged UAPs from Arabidopsis and rice transiently expressed in planta, we demonstrate that a urease-UreD-UreF-UreG complex exists in plants and show its stepwise assembly. UreG is crucial for nickel delivery because UreG-dependent urease activation in vitro was observed only with UreG obtained from nickel-sufficient plants. This activation competence could not be generated in vitro by incubation of UreG with nickel, bicarbonate, and GTP. Compared with their bacterial orthologs, plant UreGs possess an N-terminal extension containing a His- and Asp/Glu-rich hypervariable region followed by a highly conserved sequence comprising two potential HXH metal-binding sites. Complementing the ureG-1 mutant of Arabidopsis with N-terminal deletion variants of UreG demonstrated that the hypervariable region has a minor impact on activation efficiency, whereas the conserved region up to the first HXH motif is highly beneficial and up to the second HXH motif strictly required for activation. We also show that urease reaches its full activity several days after nickel becomes available in the leaves, indicating that urease activation is limited by nickel accessibility in vivo Our data uncover the crucial role of UreG for nickel delivery during eukaryotic urease activation, inciting further investigations of the details of this process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Rapid activity-dependent delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface of neurons in intact Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Cantallops, Isabel; Cline, Hollis T

    2008-05-01

    CPG15 (aka neuritin) is an activity-induced GPI-anchored axonal protein that promotes dendritic and axonal growth, and accelerates synaptic maturation in vivo. Here we show that CPG15 is distributed inside axons and on the axon surface. CPG15 is trafficked to and from the axonal surface by membrane depolarization. To assess CPG15 trafficking in vivo, we expressed an ecliptic pHluorin (EP)-CPG15 fusion protein in optic tectal explants and in retinal ganglion cells of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Depolarization by KCl increased EP-CPG15 fluorescence on axons. Intraocular kainic acid (KA) injection rapidly increased cell-surface EP-CPG15 in retinotectal axons, but coinjection of TTX and KA did not. Consistent with this, we find that intracellular CPG15 is localized to vesicles and endosomes in presynaptic terminals and colocalizes with synaptic vesicle proteins. The results indicate that the delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface can be regulated on a rapid time scale by activity-dependent mechanisms in vivo.

  15. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries.

  16. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  17. General Strategy for Direct Cytosolic Protein Delivery via Protein-Nanoparticle Co-engineering.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-06-27

    Endosomal entrapment is a key hurdle for most intracellular protein-based therapeutic strategies. We report a general strategy for efficient delivery of proteins to the cytosol through co-engineering of proteins and nanoparticle vehicles. The proteins feature an oligo(glutamate) sequence (E-tag) that binds arginine-functionalized gold nanoparticles, generating hierarchical spherical nanoassemblies. These assemblies fuse with cell membranes, releasing the E-tagged protein directly into the cytosol. Five different proteins with diverse charges, sizes, and functions were effectively delivered into cells, demonstrating the generality of our method. Significantly, the engineered proteins retained activity after cytosolic delivery, as demonstrated through the delivery of active Cre recombinase, and granzyme A to kill cancer cells.

  18. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    delivery approach. This is a platform to deliver proteins in native forms into cells. The key design feature of our strategy is to first encapsulate ...with a Cyclodextrin ." J. Biol. Chem. 271: 21604-21613. Pelkmans, L. and A. Helenius (2002). "Endocytosis Via Caveolae." Traffic 3: 311-320

  19. Cry Protein Crystals: A Novel Platform for Protein Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A.; Dean, Donald H.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Burry, Richard W.; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Chan, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer’s patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues. PMID:26030844

  20. Cry protein crystals: a novel platform for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manoj S; Lee, Marianne M; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A; Dean, Donald H; Ostrowski, Michael C; Burry, Richard W; Boyaka, Prosper N; Chan, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer's patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues.

  1. Bioengineering novel floating nanoparticles for protein and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Priya; Karan, Ram; Kim, Jong-Myoung; Pecher, Wolf; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2016-01-01

    Gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) are hollow protein nanoparticles produced by Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 which are being engineered for protein delivery. To advance the bioengineering potential of GVNPs, a strain of NRC-1 deleted for the gvpC gene (ΔgvpC) was constructed and a synthetic gene coding for Gaussia princeps luciferase was fused to an abbreviated gvpC gene on an expression plasmid. When introduced into theΔgvpC strain, an active GvpC-luciferase fusion protein bound to GVNPs resulted. These results represent both a technical improvement in the GVNP display system and its expansion for the display of active enzymes. PMID:27158595

  2. Antimalarial Activity of Granzyme B and Its Targeted Delivery by a Granzyme B–Single-Chain Fv Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kapelski, Stephanie; de Almeida, Melanie; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We present here the first evidence that granzyme B acts against Plasmodium falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 1,590 nM; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1,197 to 2,112 nM). We created a novel antimalarial fusion protein consisting of granzyme B fused to a merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4)-specific single-chain Fv protein (scFv), which targets the enzyme to infected erythrocytes, with up to an 8-fold reduction in the IC50 (176 nM; 95% CI, 154 to 202 nM). This study confirms the therapeutic efficacies of recombinant antibody-mediated antimalarial immunotherapeutics based on granzyme B. PMID:25313223

  3. Antimalarial activity of granzyme B and its targeted delivery by a granzyme B-single-chain Fv fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Kapelski, Stephanie; de Almeida, Melanie; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Fendel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first evidence that granzyme B acts against Plasmodium falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 1,590 nM; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1,197 to 2,112 nM). We created a novel antimalarial fusion protein consisting of granzyme B fused to a merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4)-specific single-chain Fv protein (scFv), which targets the enzyme to infected erythrocytes, with up to an 8-fold reduction in the IC50 (176 nM; 95% CI, 154 to 202 nM). This study confirms the therapeutic efficacies of recombinant antibody-mediated antimalarial immunotherapeutics based on granzyme B.

  4. Intercellular trafficking and protein delivery by a herpesvirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Hare, P

    1997-01-24

    We show that the HSV-1 structural protein VP22 has the remarkable property of intercellular transport, which is so efficient that following expression in a subpopulation the protein spreads to every cell in a monolayer, where it concentrates in the nucleus and binds chromatin. VP22 movement was observed both after delivery of DNA by transfection or microinjection and during virus infection. Moreover, we demonstrate that VP22 trafficking occurs via a nonclassical Golgi-independent mechanism. Sensitivity to cytochalasin D treatment suggests that VP22 utilizes a novel trafficking pathway that involves the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, we demonstrate intercellular transport of a VP22 fusion protein after endogenous synthesis or exogenous application, indicating that VP22 may have potential in the field of protein delivery.

  5. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  6. Lack of Relationship between Cord Serum Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 (ANGPTL4) and Lipolytic Activity in Human Neonates Born by Spontaneous Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Senovilla, Henar; Schaefer-Graf, Ute; Meitzner, Katrin; Graf, Kristof; Abou-Dakn, Michael; Herrera, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Background Ligands of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), such as non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), induce expression of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4). Recently ANGPTL4 has been reported to be a mediator of intracellular adipose lipolysis induced by glucocorticoids. Objective To determine the concentrations of ANGPTL4 in cord serum of neonates born by spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) and by pre-labor cesarean section (CS) from healthy women, and to relate them to parameters of neonatal lipolytic activity at birth. Measurements In 54 neonates born by SVD and in 56 neonates born by CS, arterial cord blood was drawn to determine insulin, cortisol, triacylglycerols (TAGs), glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), individual fatty acids, ANGPTL4, adiponectin, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and leptin. Results Birth weight and neonatal fat mass in SVD and CS showed no difference, but the concentrations of glycerol, adiponectin, RBP4, NEFAs and most individual fatty acids were higher in cord serum of neonates born by SVD compared to CS, indicating a higher adipose tissue breakdown in the SVD group. The concentrations of TAG and cortisol were also higher and that of insulin was lower in cord serum of SVD compared to the CS group. However, the concentration in cord serum of ANGPTL4 did not differ between the two groups and no positive correlation with either NEFA or glycerol concentrations were detected. Conclusion ANGPTL4 is known to stimulate lipolysis in adults, but does not appear to mediate the increased activity in SVD, indicating the presence of different regulatory inputs. PMID:24324678

  7. Continuous release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 through nano-graphene oxide-based delivery influences the activation of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cheng; Feng, Jun; Lin, Xiangjin; Bao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been used as a delivery vehicle for small molecule drugs and nucleotides. To further investigate GO as a smart biomaterial for the controlled release of cargo molecules, we hypothesized that GO may be an appropriate delivery vehicle because it releases bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). GO characterization indicated that the size distribution of the GO flakes ranged from 81.1 nm to 45,749.7 nm, with an approximate thickness of 2 nm. After BMP2 adsorption onto GO, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal gravimetric analysis were performed. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce significant changes in the characteristics of the materials. GO continuously released BMP2 for at least 40 days. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes were treated with BMP2-GO in interleukin-1 media and assessed in terms of cell viability, flow cytometric characterization, and expression of particular mRNA. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce any significant changes in biocompatibility. We treated osteoarthritic rats with BMP2 and BMP2-GO, which showed significant differences in Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores (P<0.05). Quantitative assessment revealed significant differences compared to that using BMP2 and BMP2-GO (P<0.05). These findings indicate that GO may be potentially used to control the release of carrier materials. The combination of BMP2 and GO slowed the progression of NF-κB-activated degenerative changes in osteoarthritis. Therefore, we infer that our BMP2-GO strategy could alleviate the NF-κB pathway by inducing continuous BMP2 release. PMID:28243085

  8. Continuous release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 through nano-graphene oxide-based delivery influences the activation of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; Feng, Jun; Lin, Xiangjin; Bao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been used as a delivery vehicle for small molecule drugs and nucleotides. To further investigate GO as a smart biomaterial for the controlled release of cargo molecules, we hypothesized that GO may be an appropriate delivery vehicle because it releases bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). GO characterization indicated that the size distribution of the GO flakes ranged from 81.1 nm to 45,749.7 nm, with an approximate thickness of 2 nm. After BMP2 adsorption onto GO, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal gravimetric analysis were performed. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce significant changes in the characteristics of the materials. GO continuously released BMP2 for at least 40 days. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes were treated with BMP2-GO in interleukin-1 media and assessed in terms of cell viability, flow cytometric characterization, and expression of particular mRNA. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce any significant changes in biocompatibility. We treated osteoarthritic rats with BMP2 and BMP2-GO, which showed significant differences in Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores (P<0.05). Quantitative assessment revealed significant differences compared to that using BMP2 and BMP2-GO (P<0.05). These findings indicate that GO may be potentially used to control the release of carrier materials. The combination of BMP2 and GO slowed the progression of NF-κB-activated degenerative changes in osteoarthritis. Therefore, we infer that our BMP2-GO strategy could alleviate the NF-κB pathway by inducing continuous BMP2 release.

  9. Controlled delivery of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Degim, I Tuncer; Celebi, Nevin

    2007-01-01

    The final aim/target of Pharmaceutical Sciences is to design successful dosage forms for effective therapy, considering individual patient needs and compliance. Development of new drug entities, particularly using peptides and proteins, is growing in importance and attracting increased interest, as they are specifically effective at a comparably low dose. These very potent and specific peptides and proteins can now be produced in large quantities due to increased knowledge and advancements in biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. A number of peptide and protein products are now available on the market, and numerous studies investigating them have been published in the literature. Although many peptide/protein like products are generally designed for parenteral administration, some other noninvasive routes have also been used. For example, desmopressin is delivered nasally and deoxyribonuclease by inhalation. Although peptides and proteins are generally orally inactive, cyclosporine is an exception. In order to design and develop long-acting, more effective peptide/protein drugs, the controlled release mechanisms and effective parameters need to be understood and clarified. Therefore, we review herein various peptide/protein delivery systems, including biodegradable and nondegradable microspheres, microcapsules, nanocapsules, injectable implants, diffusion-controlled hydrogels and other hydrophilic systems, microemulsions and multiple emulsions, and the use of iontophoresis or electroporation, and discuss the results of recent researches.

  10. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Solaro, Roberto; Chiellini, Federica; Battisti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  11. Polymeric-based particulate systems for delivery of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid; Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric-based particulate systems have been intensively developed to increase the short biological half-life and prevent enzymatic degradation of therapeutic proteins. These techniques demonstrate the useful characteristics for the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides to the targeted site of application and prevent the interaction of encapsulated drug with the normal cells. In this article, we have described the in depth of different pharmaceutical-based techniques that are currently being practiced for efficient delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides. A comprehensive English literature was searched using different electronic search databases including PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, google scholar and library search. Different search terms and advanced search were made by combining all the search fields in abstract, keywords and/or titles. Findings of various studies that have been discussed in this article clearly indicate that polymeric-based techniques can significantly increase the therapeutic potentials of incorporated proteins with no known toxic effects. These techniques have shown to maintain the stability and retain biological activity of protein therapeutics. Hence it can be suggested that pharmaceutical-based techniques are promising drug carriers for efficient delivery of therapeutic proteins.

  12. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  13. Protein-coated nanoparticles embedded in films as delivery platforms.

    PubMed

    Morales, Javier O; Ross, Alistair C; McConville, Jason T

    2013-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the performance of nanoparticle-loaded films based on matrices of polymethacrylates and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) intended for delivery of macromolecules. Lysozyme (Lys)-loaded nanoparticles were manufactured by antisolvent co-precipitation. After size, loading efficiency and stability characterization, the selected batch of particles was further formulated into films. Films were characterized for mechanical properties, mucoadhesion, Lys release and activity after manufacture. We found that protein-coated nanoparticles could be obtained in USP phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Particles obtained at pH 6.8 had a z-average of 347.2 nm, a zeta-potential of 21.9 mV and 99.2% remaining activity after manufacture. This formulation was further studied for its application in films for buccal delivery. Films loaded with nanoparticles that contained Eudragit RLPO (ERL) exhibited excellent mechanical and mucoadhesive properties. Due to its higher water-swelling and solubility compared with ERL, the use of HPMC allowed us to tailor the release of Lys from films. The formulation composed of equal amounts of ERL and HPMC revealed a sustained release over 4 h, with Lys remaining fully active at the end of the study. Mucoadhesive films containing protein-coated nanoparticles are promising carriers for the buccal delivery of proteins and peptides in a stable form. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Negative cooperativity in the nitrogenase Fe protein electron delivery cycle

    PubMed Central

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Page, Taylor R.; Duval, Simon; Horitani, Masaki; Marts, Amy R.; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Dean, Dennis R.; Raugei, Simone; Hoffman, Brian M.; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Antony, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the ATP-dependent reduction of dinitrogen (N2) to two ammonia (NH3) molecules through the participation of its two protein components, the MoFe and Fe proteins. Electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein involves a series of synchronized events requiring the transient association of one Fe protein with each αβ half of the α2β2 MoFe protein. This process is referred to as the Fe protein cycle and includes binding of two ATP to an Fe protein, association of an Fe protein with the MoFe protein, ET from the Fe protein to the MoFe protein, hydrolysis of the two ATP to two ADP and two Pi for each ET, Pi release, and dissociation of oxidized Fe protein-(ADP)2 from the MoFe protein. Because the MoFe protein tetramer has two separate αβ active units, it participates in two distinct Fe protein cycles. Quantitative kinetic measurements of ET, ATP hydrolysis, and Pi release during the presteady-state phase of electron delivery demonstrate that the two halves of the ternary complex between the MoFe protein and two reduced Fe protein-(ATP)2 do not undergo the Fe protein cycle independently. Instead, the data are globally fit with a two-branch negative-cooperativity kinetic model in which ET in one-half of the complex partially suppresses this process in the other. A possible mechanism for communication between the two halves of the nitrogenase complex is suggested by normal-mode calculations showing correlated and anticorrelated motions between the two halves. PMID:27698129

  15. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-30

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects.

  16. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  17. Nanostructured thin film polymer devices for constant-rate protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Bernards, Daniel A; Lance, Kevin D; Ciaccio, Natalie A; Desai, Tejal A

    2012-10-10

    Herein long-term delivery of proteins from biodegradable thin film devices is demonstrated, where a nanostructured polymer membrane controls release. Protein was sealed between two poly(caprolactone) films, which generated the thin film devices. Protein release for 210 days was shown in vitro, and stable activity was established through 70 days with a model protein. These thin film devices present a promising delivery platform for biologic therapeutics, particularly for application in constrained spaces.

  18. Nanostructured Thin Film Polymer Devices for Constant-Rate Protein Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bernards, Daniel A.; Lance, Kevin D.; Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2012-01-01

    Herein long-term delivery of proteins from biodegradable thin film devices is demonstrated, where a nanostructured polymer membrane controls release. Protein was sealed between two poly(caprolactone) films, which generated the thin film devices. Protein release for 210 days was shown in vitro, and stable activity was established through 70 days with a model protein. These thin film devices present a promising delivery platform for biologic therapeutics, particularly for application in constrained spaces. PMID:22985294

  19. Peptide-chaperone-directed transdermal protein delivery requires energy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Changli; Chen, Chuanjun; Ding, Weiping; Wen, Longping

    2014-11-03

    The biologically inspired transdermal enhanced peptide TD1 has been discovered to specifically facilitate transdermal delivery of biological macromolecules. However, the biological behavior of TD1 has not been fully defined. In this study, we find that energy is required for the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery through rat and human skins. Our results show that the permeation activity of TD1-hEGF, a fusion protein composed of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and the TD1 sequence connected with a glycine-serine linker (GGGGS), can be inhibited by the energy inhibitor, rotenone or oligomycin. In addition, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the essential energetic molecule in organic systems, can effectively facilitate the TD1 directed permeation of the protein-based drug into the skin in a dose-dependent fashion. Our results here demonstrate a novel energy-dependent permeation process during the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery that could be valuable for the future development of promising new transdermal drugs.

  20. Development of an inducible platform for intercellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Siller, Richard; Dufour, Eric; Lycke, Max; Wilmut, Ian; Jung, Yong-Wook; Park, In Hyun; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2017-04-30

    A challenge to protein based therapies is the ability to produce biologically active proteins and their ensured delivery. Various approaches have been utilised including fusion of protein transduction domains with a protein or biomolecule of interest. A compounding issue is lack of specificity, efficiency and indeed whether the protein fusions are actually translocated into the cell and not merely an artefact of the fixation process. Here we present a novel platform, allowing the inducible export and uptake of a protein of interest. The system utilises a combination of the Tetracyline repressor system, combined with a fusion protein containing the N-terminal signal peptide from human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit, and a C-terminal poly-arginine domain for efficient uptake by target cells. This novel platform was validated using enhanced green fluorescent protein as the gene of interest. Doxycycline efficiently induced expression of the fusion protein. The human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit facilitated the export of the fusion protein into the cell culture media. Finally, the fusion protein was able to efficiently enter into neighbouring cells (target cells), mediated by the poly-arginine cell penetrating peptide. Importantly we have addressed the issue of whether the observed uptake is an artefact of the fixation process or indeed genuine translocation. In addition this platform provides a number of potential applications in diverse areas such as stem cell biology, immune therapy and cancer targeting therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  2. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles

    PubMed Central

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-01-01

    abstract Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  3. Rational Design of a Polymer with Robust Efficacy for Intracellular Protein and Peptide Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Lv, Jia; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hui; He, Xu; Li, Lei; Cheng, Yiyun

    2017-03-08

    The efficient delivery of biopharmaceutical drugs such as proteins and peptides into the cytosol of target cells poses substantial challenges owing to their large size and susceptibility to degradation. Current protein delivery vehicles have limitations such as the need for protein modification, insufficient delivery of large-size proteins or small peptides, and loss of protein function after the delivery. Here, we adopted a rational approach to design a polymer with robust efficacy for intracellular protein and peptide delivery. The polymer is composed of a dendrimer scaffold, a hydrophobic membrane-disruptive region, and a multivalent protein binding surface. It allows efficient protein/peptide binding, endocytosis, and endosomal disruption and is capable of efficiently delivering various biomacromolecules including bovine serum albumin, R-phycoerythrin, p53, saporin, β-galactosidase, and peptides into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of apoptotic proteins and peptides successfully induces apoptosis in cancer cells, suggesting that the activities of proteins and peptides are maintained during the delivery. This technology represents an efficient and useful tool for intracellular protein and peptide delivery and has broad applicability for basic research and clinical applications.

  4. Stimuli-Responsive Nanomaterials for Therapeutic Protein Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; Sun, Wujin; Gu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have emerged as a significant role in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases, including cancer, metabolic disorders and autoimmune diseases. The efficacy of protein therapeutics, however, is limited by their instability, immunogenicity and short half-life. In order to overcome these barriers, tremendous efforts have recently been made in developing controlled protein delivery systems. Stimuli-triggered release is an appealing and promising approach for protein delivery and has made protein delivery with both spatiotemporal- and dosage-controlled manners possible. This review surveys recent advances in controlled protein delivery of proteins or peptides using stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. Strategies utilizing both physiological and external stimuli are introduced and discussed. PMID:25151983

  5. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse; Yang, Mingshi; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use of biorelevant media when applicable can increase the knowledge about the quality of DDS for oral protein delivery. Hopefully, the knowledge provided in this review will aid the establishment of improved biorelevant models capable of forecasting the performance of particulate DDS for oral peptide/protein delivery.

  6. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanocapsules, Nanoparticles , Apoptin, Breast Cancer , Targeted Delivery, Nanomedicine, Nanogel, Redox-responsive, Apoptosis, p53... Nanoparticles , Apoptin, Breast Cancer , Targeted Delivery, Nanomedicine, Nanogel, Redox-responsive, Apoptosis, p53 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS... Cancer Cell Targeting Ligands iRGD-conjugated Nanoparticles As we are working on the design of targeting strategies for nanocapsules, new

  7. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  8. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  9. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-H.; Chen, C.-P.; Chan, M.-H.; Chang, M.; Hou, Y.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsu, H.-R.; Liu, Kevin; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-08-04

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or {beta}-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo.

  10. Proteins: emerging carrier for delivery of cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yewale, Chetan; Baradia, Dipesh; Vhora, Imran; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decades, proteins have emerged as versatile carriers for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and many more diseases. Proteins have gained considerable attention in formulation of several delivery systems for anticancer drugs due to their nontoxic, non-immunogenic, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. Proteins are good candidates for conjugation with drugs as they provide good pharmacokinetics as well as better cancer tissue accumulation. Protein nanoparticulate systems are also of advancing importance owing to their modifiable functionalities and potential applications in various biological fields. The customizable nature of proteins also makes them outstanding carriers as target-specific delivery systems. This review emphasizes on protein conjugates (drug-albumin, drug-gelatin, drug-transferrin, and drug-antibody conjugates), protein nanoparticles (prepared using albumin, gelatin, casein, silk proteins, elastin, and lectins), surface modification of protein nanoparticles (using surfactant, polyethylene glycol, cationic/thermosensitive polymers, folic acid, monoclonal antibodies, and peptides/proteins), and their preclinical and clinical status with respect to cancer therapy. The major obstacles for commercial success of protein-based delivery are lack of inexpensive as well as quality methods for their preparation and quality control; and if overcome, proteins will stand out as a superior drug-delivery carrier for cancer therapy.

  11. Liposome-Mediated Cellular Delivery of Active gp91phox

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Bruno; Liguori, Lavinia; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Villegas-Mendéz, Ana; Rothe, Romy; Morel, Françoise; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Background Gp91phox is a transmembrane protein and the catalytic core of the NADPH oxidase complex of neutrophils. Lack of this protein causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe and recurrent infections due to the incapacity of phagocytes to kill microorganisms. Methodology Here we optimize a prokaryotic cell-free expression system to produce integral mammalian membrane proteins. Conclusions Using this system, we over-express truncated forms of the gp91phox protein under soluble form in the presence of detergents or lipids resulting in active proteins with a “native-like” conformation. All the proteins exhibit diaphorase activity in the presence of cytosolic factors (p67phox, p47phox, p40phox and Rac) and arachidonic acid. We also produce proteoliposomes containing gp91phox protein and demonstrate that these proteins exhibit activities similar to their cellular counterpart. The proteoliposomes induce rapid cellular delivery and relocation of recombinant gp91phox proteins to the plasma membrane. Our data support the concept of cell-free expression technology for producing recombinant proteoliposomes and their use for functional and structural studies or protein therapy by complementing deficient cells in gp91phox protein. PMID:17848987

  12. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed. PMID:24228993

  13. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2013-11-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed.

  14. Mechanisms allowing protein delivery in nasal mucosa using NPL nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, B; Carpentier, R; Lantier, I; Ducournau, C; Dimier-Poisson, I; Betbeder, D

    2016-06-28

    The intranasal administration of proteins using nanoparticles is a promising approach for several applications, especially for mucosal vaccines. Delivery of protein within the epithelial barrier is a key point to elicit an immune response and nano-carrier has to show no toxicity. The aim of this work was to elucidate the interactions of cationic porous nanoparticles loaded with protein delivery for antigen delivery in the nose. We investigated the loading, the cellular delivery and the epithelial transcytosis of proteins associated to these nanoparticles containing an anionic lipid in their core (NPL). NPL were highly endocytosed by airway epithelial cells and significantly improved the protein delivery into the cell. In vitro transcytosis studies showed that NPL did not modify the in vitro epithelial permeability suggesting no toxicity of these carriers. Moreover protein and NPL did not translocate the epithelial barrier. In vivo studies demonstrated that NPL prolonged the nasal residence time of the protein and no NPL were found beyond the epithelial barrier in vivo, precluding a negative side effect. All together these results establish the NPL as a bio-eliminable and optimal vaccine carrier. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of carbohydrate-protein matrices for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yankun; Roos, Yrjö H

    2011-05-01

    Amorphous carbohydrates may show glass transition and crystallization as a result of thermal or water plasticization. Proteins often affect the state transitions of carbohydrates in carbohydrate-protein systems. Water sorption behavior and effects of water on glass transition and crystallization in freeze-dried lactose, trehalose, lactose-casein (3: 1), lactose-soy protein isolate (3:1), trehalose-casein (3:1), and trehalose-soy protein isolate (3:1) systems were studied. Water sorption was determined gravimetrically as a function of time, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) models were fitted to the experimental data. Glass transition temperature (T(g)) and instant crystallization temperature (T(ic)) in anhydrous and water plasticized systems were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The Gordon-Taylor equation was used to model water content dependence of the T(g) values. The critical water content and water activity (a(w)) at 24 °C were calculated and crystallization of lactose and trehalose in the systems was followed at and above 0.54 a(w). Carbohydrate-protein systems showed higher amounts of sorbed water and less rapid sugar crystallization than pure sugars. A greater sugar crystallization delay was found in carbohydrate-casein systems than in carbohydrate-soy protein isolate systems. The T(g) and T(ic) values decreased with increasing water content and a(w). However, higher T(ic) values for lactose-protein systems were found than for lactose at the same a(w). Trehalose showed lower T(ic) value than lactose at 0.44 a(w) but no instant crystallization was measured below 0.44 a(w). State diagrams for each system are useful in selecting processing parameters and storage conditions in nutrient delivery applications. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Cytosolic Delivery of Proteins by Bioreversible Esterification.

    PubMed

    Mix, Kalie A; Lomax, Jo E; Raines, Ronald T

    2017-10-10

    Cloaking its carboxyl groups with a hydrophobic moiety is shown to enable a protein to enter the cytosol of a mammalian cell. Diazo compounds derived from (p-methylphenyl)glycine were screened for the ability to esterify the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in an aqueous environment. Esterification of GFP with 2-diazo-2-(p-methylphenyl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide was efficient. The esterified protein entered the cytosol by traversing the plasma membrane directly, like a small-molecule prodrug. As with prodrugs, the nascent esters are substrates for endogenous esterases, which regenerate native protein. Thus, esterification could provide a general means to deliver native proteins to the cytosol.

  17. Next Generation Delivery System for Proteins and Genes of Therapeutic Purpose: Why and How?

    PubMed Central

    Priya Doss, C. George; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and genes of therapeutic interests in conjunction with different delivery systems are growing towards new heights. “Next generation delivery systems” may provide more efficient platform for delivery of proteins and genes. In the present review, snapshots about the benefits of proteins or gene therapy, general procedures for therapeutic protein or gene delivery system, and different next generation delivery system such as liposome, PEGylation, HESylation, and nanoparticle based delivery have been depicted with their detailed explanation. PMID:25126554

  18. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2014-12-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including: i) elastin-like peptides for delivery of anticancer therapeutics; ii) heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery; iii) carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery; iv) Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future.

  19. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  20. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  1. Activity restriction and risk of preterm delivery().

    PubMed

    Levin, Heather I; Sciscione, Anthony; Ananth, Cande V; Drassinower, Daphnie; Obican, Sarah G; Wapner, Ronald J

    2017-07-06

    We sought to determine whether activity restriction (AR) in a cohort of women at high risk for preterm delivery is associated with the risk of preterm delivery. This is a secondary analysis of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units MFMU's Preterm Prediction Study; a multicenter prospective cohort study designed to identify risk factors of preterm birth (PTB). The study group consisted of women with a singleton gestation that at their first study visit (23-24 weeks) had at least one of the following criteria: patient reported contractions, severe back pain, a cervical length <15 mm, spotting, protruding membranes, or positive fetal fibronectin. Women were assessed for AR at a 27- to 29-week study visit. Associations between AR and preterm delivery (<37 weeks) were examined through logistic regression models before and after adjustment for confounders. Of the 1086 women that met the inclusion criteria, 16.5% (n = 179) delivered preterm. In this cohort, 9.7% (n = 105) of women were recommended AR, with 37.1% (n = 39) having a PTB. In the group not recommended AR (n = 981), 14.3% (n = 140) delivered preterm. In this cohort of women at high risk for PTB, activity restriction was associated with an increased risk of PTB. The use of AR in this population should be discouraged.

  2. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    um filters to fully clear cell lysate. The protein was then purified by an amylase column and MBP-APO was eluted from the column and buffer exchanged...lysate. Afterwards, the protein was then purified on an amylase column (New England BioLabs), which was passed over 5 times with lysate under gravity

  3. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    chose to work with maltose -binding-protein fused apoptin (MBP-APO) which can be highly expressed in soluble form from Escherichia coli, whereas...MBP-APO was eluted from the column with 10 mM maltose buffer and buffer exchanged into PBS. The protein concentration was qualitatively assessed by

  4. Engineering protein self-assembling in protein-based nanomedicines for drug delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Corchero, José Luis; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Lack of targeting and improper biodistribution are major flaws in current drug-based therapies that prevent reaching high local concentrations of the therapeutic agent. Such weaknesses impose the administration of high drug doses, resulting in undesired side effects, limited efficacy and enhanced production costs. Currently, missing nanosized containers, functionalized for specific cell targeting will be then highly convenient for the controlled delivery of both conventional and innovative drugs. In an attempt to fill this gap, health-focused nanotechnologies have put under screening a growing spectrum of materials as potential components of nanocages, whose properties can be tuned during fabrication. However, most of these materials pose severe biocompatibility concerns. We review in this study how proteins, the most versatile functional macromolecules, can be conveniently exploited and adapted by conventional genetic engineering as efficient building blocks of fully compatible nanoparticles for drug delivery and how selected biological activities can be recruited to mimic viral behavior during infection. Although engineering of protein self-assembling is still excluded from fully rational approaches, the exploitation of protein nano-assemblies occurring in nature and the direct manipulation of protein-protein contacts in bioinspired constructs open intriguing possibilities for further development. These methodologies empower the construction of new and potent vehicles that offer promise as true artificial viruses for efficient and safe nanomedical applications.

  5. Maize arabinoxylan gels as protein delivery matrices.

    PubMed

    Berlanga-Reyes, Claudia M; Carvajal-Millán, Elizabeth; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Rascón-Chu, Agustin; Marquez-Escalante, Jorge A; Martínez-López, Ana Luisa

    2009-04-08

    The laccase induced gelation of maize bran arabinoxylans at 2.5% (w/v) in the presence of insulin or beta-lactoglobulin at 0.1% (w/v) was investigated. Insulin and beta-lacto-globulin did not modify either the gel elasticity (9 Pa) or the cross-links content (0.03 and 0.015 microg di- and triferulic acids/mg arabinoxylan, respectively). The protein release capability of the gel was also investigated. The rate of protein release from gels was dependent on the protein molecular weight. The apparent diffusion coefficient was 0.99 x 10(-7) and 0.79 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s for insulin (5 kDa) and beta-lactoglobulin (18 kDa), respectively. The results suggest that maize bran arabinoxylan gels can be potential candidates for the controlled release of proteins.

  6. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Mach, Nicolas; Schneider, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines. PMID:26006227

  7. Proteolistics: a biolistic method for intracellular delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ortigosa, Susana; Wang, Kan

    2014-10-01

    In this work, an intracellular protein delivery methodology termed "proteolistics" is described. This method utilizes a biolistic gun apparatus and involves a simple protein/projectile preparation step. The protein to be delivered is mixed with a gold particle microprojectile suspension and is placed onto a gene gun cartridge, where it is dehydrated using either lyophilization or room-temperature air-drying. Subsequent intracellular protein delivery is achieved in plant and mammalian tissues upon bombardment. Because the method does not require modification of delivery agents or cargo biomolecules and involves a simple physical deposition of the protein onto the microprojectiles, there is no restriction on protein type in terms of molecular weight, isoelectric point or tertiary structure. Because the method delivers protein through the widely used gene gun system, it can be readily applied to any tissue or organism amenable to biolistics. A variety of proteins with molecular weight ranging from 24 to 68 kDa and isoelectric point from 4.8 to 10.1 were tested in this work. It is anticipated that this simple and versatile technique will offer biologists a powerful tool for basic research in areas such as understanding of cell and gene functions and for biotechnological applications such as genome editing.

  8. Virus-Mimetic Fusogenic Exosomes for Direct Delivery of Integral Membrane Proteins to Target Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoosoo; Hong, Yeonsun; Nam, Gi-Hoon; Chung, Jin Hwa; Koh, Eunee; Kim, In-San

    2017-02-06

    An efficient system for direct delivery of integral membrane proteins is successfully developed using a new biocompatible exosome-based platform. Fusogenic exosomes harboring viral fusogen, vascular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein, can fuse with and modify plasma membranes in a process called "membrane editing." This can facilitate the transfer of biologically active membrane proteins into the target cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Sublingual delivery of insulin: effects of enhancers on the mucosal lipid fluidity and protein conformation, transport, and in vivo hypoglycemic activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Ying; Lu, Wan-Liang; Xiao, Lan; Zhang, Shuang-Qing; Huang, Yan-Bei; Li, Sheng-Lin; Zhang, Rui-Juan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2005-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate effects of enhancers for sublingual delivering insulin on the mucosal lipid fluidity and protein conformation, transport, and in vivo hypoglycemic activity in normal rats. The effects on sublingual mucosa, and aggregation states of insulin were estimated using fluorescence polarization, and circular dichroism method, respectively. The human immortalized oral epithelial cell monolayer was used for evaluating transport of insulin. Hydroxylpropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD), chitosan, polyethylene-polypropylene glycol, polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, polysorbate 80, egg lecithin, or oleic acid, was used as a penetration enhancer, respectively. The fluidity of sublingual mucosal lipid was markedly reduced by these enhancers excluding polysorbate 80, and the secondary structure of the mucosal proteins was also influenced by these enhancers. The hexamers of insulin were dissociated to monomers only by chitosan, polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, and egg lecithin. Nonetheless, plasma glucose levels in normal rats were significantly lowered after sublingual administration of insulin with an enhancer compared with those without an enhancer at the same time-point. The enhancing effects may be due to one or multiple factors: increasing the mucosal lipid fluidity, directly loosing the tight junction of epithelia, and dissociating the hexamers of insulin to monomers. Among these, the opened tight junction may correlate most with the enhancing effect in the mucosal permeability. Because the aggregates of insulin exist, the dissociation of the aggregates by an enhancer would benefit the permeability.

  10. Enhancing the buccal mucosal delivery of peptide and protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Caon, Thiago; Jin, Liang; Simões, Cláudia M O; Norton, Raymond S; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    With continuing advances in biotechnology and genetic engineering, there has been a dramatic increase in the availability of new biomacromolecules, such as peptides and proteins that have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of many poorly-treated diseases. Although most of these macromolecular therapeutics exhibit high potency, their large molecular mass, susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, immunogenicity and tendency to undergo aggregation, adsorption, and denaturation have limited their ability to be administered via the traditional oral route. As a result, alternative noninvasive routes have been investigated for the systemic delivery of these macromolecules, one of which is the buccal mucosa. The buccal mucosa offers a number of advantages over the oral route, making it attractive for the delivery of peptides and proteins. However, the buccal mucosa still exhibits some permeability-limiting properties, and therefore various methods have been explored to enhance the delivery of macromolecules via this route, including the use of chemical penetration enhancers, physical methods, particulate systems and mucoadhesive formulations. The incorporation of anti-aggregating agents in buccal formulations also appears to show promise in other mucosal delivery systems, but has not yet been considered for buccal mucosal drug delivery. This review provides an update on recent approaches that have shown promise in enhancing the buccal mucosal transport of macromolecules, with a major focus on proteins and peptides.

  11. Bioengineered Silk Protein-Based Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Silk proteins self-assemble into mechanically robust material structures that are also biodegradable and non-cytotoxic, suggesting utility for gene delivery. Since silk proteins can also be tailored in terms of chemistry, molecular weight and other design features via genetic engineering, further control of this system for gene delivery can be considered. In the present study, silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered with poly(l-lysine) domains for gene delivery. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine based block copolymers with plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared for gene delivery to human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The polymers self-assembled in solution and complexed plasmid DNA through ionic interactions. The pDNA complexes with 30-lysine residues prepared at a polymer/nucleotide ratio of 10 and with a solution diameter of 380 nm, showed the highest efficiency for transfection. The pDNA complexes were also immobilized on silk films and demonstrated direct cell transfection from these surfaces. The results demonstrate the potential of bioengineered silk proteins as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:19577803

  12. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  13. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field.

  14. Protein Delivery into Plant Cells: Toward In vivo Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Cedeño, Cesyen; Pauwels, Kris; Tompa, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biologically relevant structural and functional behavior of proteins inside living plant cells is only possible through the combination of structural biology and cell biology. The state-of-the-art structural biology techniques are typically applied to molecules that are isolated from their native context. Although most experimental conditions can be easily controlled while dealing with an isolated, purified protein, a serious shortcoming of such in vitro work is that we cannot mimic the extremely complex intracellular environment in which the protein exists and functions. Therefore, it is highly desirable to investigate proteins in their natural habitat, i.e., within live cells. This is the major ambition of in-cell NMR, which aims to approach structure-function relationship under true in vivo conditions following delivery of labeled proteins into cells under physiological conditions. With a multidisciplinary approach that includes recombinant protein production, confocal fluorescence microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and different intracellular protein delivery strategies, we explore the possibility to develop in-cell NMR studies in living plant cells. While we provide a comprehensive framework to set-up in-cell NMR, we identified the efficient intracellular introduction of isotope-labeled proteins as the major bottleneck. Based on experiments with the paradigmatic intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) Early Response to Dehydration protein 10 and 14, we also established the subcellular localization of ERD14 under abiotic stress.

  15. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Protein and DNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Ravikumar, Priya; Pise, Amruta; Gyawali, Dipendra; Hsia, Connie C.W.; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are promising carriers of biological agents to lung due to advantages including biocompatibility, ease of surface modification, localized action and reduced systemic toxicity. However, there have been no studies extensively characterizing and comparing the behavior of polymeric NPs for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery both in vitro and in vivo. We screened six polymeric NPs: gelatin, chitosan, alginate, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA-chitosan, and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PEG), for inhalational protein/ DNA delivery. All NPs except PLGA-PEG and alginate were <300 nm in size with bi-phasic core compound release profile. Gelatin, PLGA NPs and PLGA-PEG NPs remained stable in deionized water, serum, saline and simulated lung fluid (Gamble’s solution) over 5 days. PLGA-based NPs and natural polymer NPs exhibited highest cytocompatibility and dose-dependent in vitro uptake respectively by human alveolar type-1 epithelial cells. Based on these profiles, gelatin and PLGA NPs were used to encapsulate a) plasmid DNA encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or b) rhodamine-conjugated erythropoietin (EPO) for inhalational delivery to rats. Following a single inhalation, widespread pulmonary EPO distribution persisted for up to 10 days while increasing YFP expression was observed for at least 7 days for both NPs. The overall results support both PLGA and gelatin NPs as promising carriers for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery. PMID:24512977

  16. Feasibility of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Formulated for Pulmonary Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, John S.; Nayar, Rajiv; Campos, Jackie; Hybertson, Brooks M.; Zhou, Yue; Manning, Mark Cornell; Repine, John E.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of a pulmonary formulation of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for nebulization into the airway by measuring protein stability, biologic activity, particle size, and estimating human lung distribution. Methods Formulations were derived by varying the surfactant and protein concentrations. Protein stability and recovery of each nebulized tPA formulation were assessed by ultraviolet spectroscopy. Formulations that met protein stability feasibility criteria were assessed for biologic and fibrinolytic activities. Biologic activity was determined by their ability to inhibit superoxide anion production by human neutrophils. Fibrinolytic activity was assessed by the cleavage of plasminogen to plasmin. Aerodynamic properties were assessed using a cascade impactor, and an estimation of human airway deposition was made via a human lung replica. Results Twenty-seven tPA formulations were initially assessed, 15 of which met protein stability criteria. Subsequently, three of these formulations maintained biologic and fibrinolytic activities. These formulations exhibited particle sizes of 2.4–3.1 μm, and had respirable doses ≥65%. A formulation of 1 mg mL−1 tPA and 0.1% Tween 80 exhibited a 45% deposition in the lower airways of a human lung replica. Conclusions A suitable pulmonary tPA formulation was identified that, following nebulization, maintained protein stability as well as biologic and fibrinolytic activities, and resulted in an optimal respirable dose and human airway deposition. This formulation may be applicable in the treatment of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome by permitting targeted pulmonary delivery of a therapeutic protein to the lungs. PMID:16180128

  17. Intracellular Protein Delivery for treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    is included. Specific Aim 2: Equipping protein nanocapsules with specific cancer cell targeting ligands; Task 3. Preparing and testing of MMP...next tested cytotoxicity of the p53 delivered by using three different cancer cell lines, MDA-MB- 231, SK-BR-3, and BT-474. S-S p53 NC reduced viable...NCs, the selectivity is desirable. 10 Next, to test the selectivity of the LHRH tagged S121F p53 towards only the breast cancer cell lines that

  18. Issues in long-term protein delivery using biodegradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mingli; Kim, Sungwon; Park, Kinam

    2010-09-01

    Recently, a variety of bioactive protein drugs have been available in large quantities as a result of advances in biotechnology. Such availability has prompted development of long-term protein delivery systems. Biodegradable microparticulate systems have been used widely for controlled release of protein drugs for days and months. The most widely used biodegradable polymer has been poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Protein-containing microparticles are usually prepared by the water/oil/water (W/O/W) double emulsion method, and variations of this method, such as solid/oil/water (S/O/W) and water/oil/oil (W/O/O), have also been used. Other methods of preparation include spray drying, ultrasonic atomization, and electrospray methods. The important factors in developing biodegradable microparticles for protein drug delivery are protein release profile (including burst release, duration of release, and extent of release), microparticle size, protein loading, encapsulation efficiency, and bioactivity of the released protein. Many studies used albumin as a model protein, and thus, the bioactivity of the release protein has not been examined. Other studies which utilized enzymes, insulin, erythropoietin, and growth factors have suggested that the right formulation to preserve bioactivity of the loaded protein drug during the processing and storage steps is important. The protein release profiles from various microparticle formulations can be classified into four distinct categories (Types A, B, C, and D). The categories are based on the magnitude of burst release, the extent of protein release, and the protein release kinetics followed by the burst release. The protein loading (i.e., the total amount of protein loaded divided by the total weight of microparticles) in various microparticles is 6.7+/-4.6%, and it ranges from 0.5% to 20.0%. Development of clinically successful long-term protein delivery systems based on biodegradable microparticles requires

  19. Synthetic materials and macromolecular assemblies for control over the delivery of DNA and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Christopher M.

    The work described in this thesis is focused on the design, characterization, and application of synthetic materials that can be used to manipulate and control the delivery of biomacromolecules such as DNA and proteins to cells. The work described herein was conducted in two primary contexts: (1) the fabrication and characterization of multilayered films comprised of DNA and degradable polyamines, with applications to the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins, and (2) the formation of self-assembled aggregates of DNA and redox-active lipids that could allow active control over the delivery of DNA. The first approach described in this thesis is based on the layer-by-layer assembly and characterization of thin films fabricated from hydrolytically-degradable polyamines and biomacromolecules. When contacted with cells in culture, these assemblies permit the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins and may prove useful in the development of methods seeking the localized delivery of therapeutics. Additional work involving DNA-containing multilayered films deposited on the surfaces of biomedical devices such as intravascular stents has demonstrated that these assemblies are able to withstand mechanical stresses similar to those associated with stent deployment in vivo, and further, that film-coated stents are able to mediate high levels of cell transfection in vitro. The second approach described in this thesis demonstrates that lipoplexes formed from DNA and a ferrocene-containing, redox-active cationic lipid can be used to control the delivery of DNA to cells in ways that depend critically upon the redox-state of the lipid. Additional studies demonstrate that these assemblies can be chemically transformed from an inactive state (e.g., a state this is unable to mediate cell transfection) to an active state (e.g., a state that mediates high levels of cell transfection) using a chemical reducing agent. This approach could thus serve as a platform for exerting

  20. Oral delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides: a review on recent developments.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonal; Jain, Arushi; Chakraborty, Mainak; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed; Dang, Shweta

    2013-08-01

    Advent of recombinant technology in protein synthesis has given birth to a new range of biopharmaceuticals. These therapeutic peptides and proteins are now emerging as an imperative part of various treatment protocols especially in the cancer therapeutics. Despite extensive research efforts, oral delivery of therapeutic peptide or protein is still a challenge for pharmaceutical industries and researchers. Number of factors including high proteolytic activity and low pH conditions of gastrointestinal tract act as major barriers in the successful delivery of intact protein/peptide to the targeted site. Low permeability of protein/peptide across the intestinal barrier is also a factor adding to the low bioavailability. Therefore, because of the short circulatory half-life exhibited by peptides in vivo, they need to be administered frequently resulting in increased cost of treatment and low patient compliance. Nano-carrier-based delivery presents an appropriate choice of drug carriers owing to their property to protect proteins from degradation by the low pH conditions in stomach or by the proteolytic enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on recent aspects and patents on oral delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides with special emphasis on nano-carrier-based approach.

  1. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  2. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  3. 77 FR 65900 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket... and other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Delivery... concerning the following information collection: Title: Delivery Ticket. OMB Number: 1651-0081. Form...

  4. Nanoparticle Delivery Enhancement With Acoustically Activated Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, Lee B; Phillips, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The application of microbubbles and ultrasound to deliver nanoparticle carriers for drug and gene delivery is an area that has expanded greatly in recent years. Under ultrasound exposure, microbubbles can enhance nanoparticle delivery by increasing cellular and vascular permeability. In this review, the underlying mechanisms of enhanced nanoparticle delivery with ultrasound and microbubbles and various proposed delivery techniques are discussed. Additionally, types of nanoparticles currently being investigated in preclinical studies, as well as the general limitations and benefits of a microbubble-based approach to nanoparticle delivery are reviewed. PMID:23287914

  5. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein-protein interaction module.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Heo, Won Do; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-07-22

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named 'exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein-protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein-protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues.

  6. Aerosol delivery of Akt controls protein translation in the lungs of dual luciferase reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, A M; Hwang, S-K; Kim, T-H; Cho, C-S; Hua, J; Nah, W-S; Kwon, J-T; Kim, J-S; Chang, S-H; Yu, K-N; Park, S-J; Bhandari, D R; Lee, K-H; An, G-H; Beck, G R; Cho, M-H

    2007-03-01

    Lung cancer has emerged as a leading cause of cancer death in the world; however, most of the current conventional therapies are not sufficiently effective in altering the progression of disease. Therefore, development of novel treatment approaches is needed. Although several genes and methods have been used for cancer gene therapy, a number of problems such as specificity, efficacy and toxicity reduce their application. This has led to re-emergence of aerosol gene delivery as a noninvasive method for lung cancer treatment. In this study, nano-sized glucosylated polyethyleneimine (GPEI) was used as a gene delivery carrier to investigate the effects of Akt wild type (WT) and kinase deficient (KD) on Akt-related signaling pathways and protein translation in the lungs of CMV- LucR-cMyc-IRES-LucF dual reporter mice. These mice are a powerful tool for the discrimination between cap-dependent/-independent protein translation. Aerosols containing self-assembled nano-sized GPEI/Akt WT or GPEI/Akt KD were delivered into the lungs of reporter mice through nose-only-inhalation-chamber with the aid of nebulizer. Aerosol delivery of Akt WT caused the increase of protein expression levels of Akt-related signals, whereas aerosol delivery of Akt KD did not. Furthermore, dual luciferase activity assay showed that aerosol delivery of Akt WT enhanced cap-dependent protein translation, whereas a reduction in cap-dependent protein translation by Akt KD was observed. Our results clearly showed that targeting Akt may be a good strategy for prevention as well as treatment of lung cancer. These studies suggest that our aerosol delivery is compatible for in vivo gene delivery which could be used as a noninvasive gene therapy in the future.

  7. Bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals as sustained delivery systems for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, Shakila B; Boyd, Ben J; Rades, Thomas; Hook, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Self-assembling lipid-based liquid crystalline systems are a broad and active area of research. Of these mesophases, the cubic phase with its highly twisted bilayer and two non-intersecting water channels has been investigated extensively for drug delivery. The cubic phase has been shown to accommodate and control the release of drugs with varying physicochemical properties. Also, the lipids used to prepare these delivery systems are generally cheap, safe and biodegradable, making these systems highly attractive. Early research investigating the potential of cubic phases as delivery systems showed that several peptides or proteins entrapped within these gel-based systems showed retarded release. Furthermore, entrapment within the cubic phase protected the selected peptide or protein from chemical and physical degradation with its native confirmation and bioactivity retained. In this review, the literature pertaining to the delivery of various bioactives from cubic liquid crystalline phases is examined, with a particular focus on peptides and proteins. The scope and limitations of the cubic phases in this respect and the future of cubic liquid crystalline systems as sustained delivery systems are highlighted. The reader will be able to gain an understanding of the properties of the bicontinuous cubic phase and how its structural attributes make these systems desirable for sustained delivery of bioactives, in particular peptides and proteins, but also how these same structural properties have hindered progress towards clinical applications. Current strategies to overcome these issues will also be discussed. The bicontinuous cubic phase offers great potential in the field of peptide and protein delivery, but limited research in this area precludes definite conclusions to its future in this respect.

  8. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  9. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  10. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation.

  11. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood–brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery. PMID:27378236

  12. Effective polymer adjuvants for sustained delivery of protein subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Adams, Justin R; Haughney, Shannon L; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2015-03-01

    We have synthesized thermogelling cationic amphiphilic pentablock copolymers that have the potential to act as injectable vaccine carriers and adjuvants that can simultaneously provide sustained delivery and enhance the immunogenicity of released antigen. While these pentablock copolymers have shown efficacy in DNA delivery in past studies, the ability to deliver both DNA and protein for subunit vaccines using the same polymeric carrier can provide greater flexibility and efficacy. We demonstrate the ability of these pentablock copolymers, and the parent triblock Pluronic copolymers to slowly release structurally intact and antigenically stable protein antigens in vitro, create an antigen depot through long-term injection-site persistence and enhance the in vivo immune response to these antigens. We show release of the model protein antigen ovalbumin in vitro from the thermogelling block copolymers with the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of the released protein unchanged compared to the native protein, and its antigenicity preserved upon release. The block copolymers form a gel at physiological temperatures that serves as an antigenic depot and persists in vivo at the site of injection for over 50days. The pentablock copolymers show a significant fivefold enhancement in the immune response compared to soluble protein alone, even 6weeks after the administration, based on measurement of antibody titers. These results demonstrate the potential of these block copolymers hydrogels to persist for several weeks and sustain the release of antigen with minimal effects on protein stability and antigenicity; and their ability to be used simultaneously as a sustained delivery device as well as a subunit vaccine adjuvant platform.

  13. Specifically targeted delivery of protein to phagocytic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Chen, Zeming; Guo, Wenjun; Wang, Jin; Feng, Yupeng; Kong, Xiuqi; Hong, Zhangyong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases, and are important potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, macrophages are key antigen-presenting cells and important in vaccine design. In this study, we report on the novel formulation (bovine serum albumin [BSA]-loaded glucan particles [GMP-BSA]) based on β-glucan particles from cell walls of baker’s yeast for the targeted delivery of protein to macrophages. Using this formulation, chitosan, tripolyphosphate, and alginate were used to fabricate colloidal particles with the model protein BSA via electrostatic interactions, which were caged and incorporated BSA very tightly within the β-glucan particle shells. The prepared GMP-BSA exhibited good protein-release behavior and avoided protein leakage. The particles were also highly specific to phagocytic macrophages, such as Raw 264.7 cells, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and peritoneal exudate macrophages, whereas the particles were not taken up by nonphagocytic cells, including NIH3T3, AD293, HeLa, and Caco-2. We hypothesize that these tightly encapsulated protein-loaded glucan particles deliver various types of proteins to macrophages with notably high selectivity, and may have broad applications in targeted drug delivery or vaccine design against macrophages. PMID:25784802

  14. Repurposing bacterial toxins for intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Melnyk, Roman A

    2017-10-15

    Despite enormous efforts, achieving efficacious levels of proteins inside mammalian cells remains one of the greatest challenges in biologics-based drug discovery and development. The inability of proteins to readily cross biological membranes precludes access to the wealth of intracellular targets and applications that lie within mammalian cells. Existing methods of delivery commonly suffer from an inability to target specific cells and tissues, poor endosomal escape, and limited in vivo efficacy. The aim of the present commentary is to highlight the potential of certain classes of bacterial toxins, which naturally deliver a large protein into the cytosolic compartment of target cells after binding a host cell-surface receptor with high affinity, as robust protein delivery platforms. We review the progress made in recent years toward demonstrating the utility of these systems at delivering a wide variety of protein cargo, with special attention paid to three distinct toxin-based platforms. We contend that with recent advances in protein deimmunization strategies, bacterial toxins are poised to introduce biologics into the inner sanctum of cells and treat a wealth of heretofore untreatable diseases with a new generation of therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and substance P using graphene oxide for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    La, Wan-Geun; Jin, Min; Park, Saibom; Yoon, Hee-Hun; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Bhang, Suk Ho; Park, Hoyoung; Char, Kookheon; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) can be used for the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and substance P (SP), and that this delivery promotes bone formation on titanium (Ti) implants that are coated with GO. GO coating on Ti substrate enabled a sustained release of BMP-2. BMP-2 delivery using GO-coated Ti exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity in bone-forming cells in vitro compared with bare Ti. SP, which is known to recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), was co-delivered using Ti or GO-coated Ti to further promote bone formation. SP induced the migration of MSCs in vitro. The dual delivery of BMP-2 and SP using GO-coated Ti showed the greatest new bone formation on Ti implanted in the mouse calvaria compared with other groups. This approach may be useful to improve osteointegration of Ti in dental or orthopedic implants. PMID:24872706

  16. Remotely activated protein-producing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Avi; Goldberg, Michael S; Kastrup, Christian; Wang, Yingxia; Jiang, Shan; Joseph, Brian J; Levins, Christopher G; Kannan, Sneha T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-13

    The development of responsive nanomaterials, nanoscale systems that actively respond to stimuli, is one general goal of nanotechnology. Here we develop nanoparticles that can be controllably triggered to synthesize proteins. The nanoparticles consist of lipid vesicles filled with the cellular machinery responsible for transcription and translation, including amino acids, ribosomes, and DNA caged with a photolabile protecting group. These particles served as nanofactories capable of producing proteins including green fluorescent protein (GFP) and enzymatically active luciferase. In vitro and in vivo, protein synthesis was spatially and temporally controllable, and could be initiated by irradiating micrometer-scale regions on the time scale of milliseconds. The ability to control protein synthesis inside nanomaterials may enable new strategies to facilitate the study of orthogonal proteins in a confined environment and for remotely activated drug delivery.

  17. Genetic engineering, expression, and activity of a chimeric monoclonal antibody-avidin fusion protein for receptor-mediated delivery of biotinylated drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-fang; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-03-01

    The genetic engineering, expression, and validation of a fusion protein of avidin (AV) and a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR) is described. The 15 kDa avidin monomer was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the HIRMAb. The fusion protein heavy chain reacted with antibodies specific for human IgG and avidin, and had the same affinity for binding to the HIR extracellular domain as the original chimeric HIRMAb. The fusion protein qualitatively bound biotinylated ligands, but was secreted fully saturated with biotin by COS cells, owing to the high level of biotin in tissue culture medium. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were permanently transfected with a tandem vector expressing the fusion protein genes, and high expressing cell lines were isolated by methotrexate amplification and dilutional cloning. The product expressed by CHO cells had high binding to the HIR, and migrated as a homogeneous species in size exclusion HPLC and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The CHO cells were adapted to a 4 week culture in biotin depleted medium, and the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein expressed under these conditions had 1 unoccupied biotin binding site per molecule, based on a [3H]-biotin ultrafiltration assay. The HIRMAb-AV increased biotin uptake by human cells >15-fold, and mediated the endocytosis of fluorescein-biotin, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. In summary, the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug targeting system for humans that can be adapted to monobiotinylated drugs or nucleic acids.

  18. The NIFS protein can function as a selenide delivery protein in the biosynthesis of selenophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lacourciere, G M; Stadtman, T C

    1998-11-20

    The NIFS protein from Azobacter vinelandii is a pyridoxal phosphate-containing homodimer that catalyzes the formation of equimolar amounts of elemental sulfur and L-alanine from the substrate L-cysteine (Zheng, L., White, R. H., Cash, V. L., Jack, R. F., and Dean, D. R. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 90, 2754-2758). A sulfur transfer role of NIFS in which the enzyme donates sulfur for iron sulfur center formation in nitrogenase was suggested. The fact that NIFS also can catalyze the decomposition of L-selenocysteine to elemental selenium and L-alanine suggested the possibility that this enzyme might serve as a selenide delivery protein for the in vitro biosynthesis of selenophosphate. In agreement with this hypothesis, we have shown that replacement of selenide with NIFS and L-selenocysteine in the in vitro selenophosphate synthetase assay results in an increased rate of formation of selenophosphate. These results thus support the view that a selenocysteine-specific enzyme similar to NIFS may be involved as an in vivo selenide delivery protein for selenophosphate biosynthesis. A kinetic characterization of the two NIFS catalyzed reactions carried out in the present study indicates that the enzyme favors L-cysteine as a substrate compared with its selenium analog. A specific activity for L-cysteine of 142 nmol/min/mg compared with 55 nmol/min/mg for L-selenocysteine was determined. This level of enzyme activity on the selenoamino acid substrate is adequate to deliver selenium to selenophosphate synthetase in the in vitro assay system described.

  19. Evaluation of interstitial protein delivery in multicellular layers model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyung; Choi, Jong Hoon; Lee, Kang Choon; Park, Ki Dong; Lee, Seung-Jin; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2012-03-01

    The limited efficacy of anticancer protein drugs is related to their poor distribution in tumor tissue. We examined interstitial delivery of four model proteins of different molecular size and bioaffinity in multicellular layers (MCL) of human cancer cells. Model proteins were tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-including ligand (TRAIL), cetuximab, RNase A, and IgG. MCLs were cultured in Transwell inserts, exposed to drugs, then cryo-sectioned for image acquisition using fluorescence microscopy (fluorescent dye-labeled TRAIL, RNase A, IgG) or immunohistochemistry (cetuximab). TRAIL and cetuximab showed partial penetration into MCLs, whereas RNase A and IgG showed insignificant penetration. At 10-fold higher dose, a significant increase in penetration was observed for IgG only, while cetuximab showed an intense accumulation limited to the front layers. PEGylated TRAIL and RNase A formulated in a heparin-Pluronic (HP) nanogel showed significantly improved penetration attributable to increased stability and extracellular matrix binding, respectively. IgG penetration was significantly enhanced with paclitaxel pretreatment as a penetration enhancer. The present study suggests that MCL culture may be useful in evaluation of protein delivery in the tumor interstitium. Four model proteins showed limited interstitial penetration in MCL cultures. Bioaffinity, rather than molecular size, seems to have a positive effect on tissue penetration, although high binding affinity may lead to sequestration in the front cell layers. Polymer conjugation and nanoformulation, such as PEGylation and HP nanogel, or use of penetration enhancers are potential strategies to increase interstitial delivery of anticancer protein drugs.

  20. Bifunctional chimeric fusion proteins engineered for DNA delivery: Optimization of the protein to DNA ratio

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Simon, Melissa J.; Morrison, Barclay; Banta, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Background Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been used to deliver nucleotide-based therapeutics to cells, but this approach has produced mixed results. Ionic interactions and covalent bonds between the CPPs and the cargos may inhibit the effectiveness of the CPPs or interfere with the bioactivity of the cargos. Methods We have created a bifunctional chimeric protein that binds DNA using the p50 domain of the NF-κB transcription factor and is functionalized for delivery with the TAT CPP. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been incorporated for tracking delivery. The new chimeric protein, p50-GFP-TAT, was compared to p50-GFP, GFP-TAT and GFP as controls for the ability to transduce PC12 cells with and without oligonucleotide cargos. Results The p50-GFP-TAT construct can deliver 30bp and 293bp oligonucleotides to PC12 cells with an optimal ratio of 1.89 protein molecules per base pair of DNA length. This correlation was validated through the delivery of a fluorescent protein transgene encoded in a plasmid to PC12 cells. Conclusion Self-assembling CPP-based bifunctional fusion proteins can be engineered for the non-viral delivery of nucleotide-based cargos to mammalian cells. General significance This work represents an important step forward in the rational design of protein-based systems for the delivery of macromolecular cargos. PMID:19402206

  1. Pullulan-based nanoparticles as carriers for transmucosal protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Dionísio, Marita; Cordeiro, Clara; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Seijo, Begoña; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; Grenha, Ana

    2013-09-27

    Polymeric nanoparticles have revealed very effective in transmucosal delivery of proteins. Polysaccharides are among the most used materials for the production of these carriers, owing to their structural flexibility and propensity to evidence biocompatibility and biodegradability. In parallel, there is a preference for the use of mild methods for their production, in order to prevent protein degradation, ensure lower costs and easier procedures that enable scaling up. In this work we propose the production of pullulan-based nanoparticles by a mild method of polyelectrolyte complexation. As pullulan is a neutral polysaccharide, sulfated and aminated derivatives of the polymer were synthesized to provide pullulan with a charge. These derivatives were then complexed with chitosan and carrageenan, respectively, to produce the nanocarriers. Positively charged nanoparticles of 180-270 nm were obtained, evidencing ability to associate bovine serum albumin, which was selected as model protein. In PBS pH 7.4, pullulan-based nanoparticles were found to have a burst release of 30% of the protein, which maintained up to 24h. Nanoparticle size and zeta potential were preserved upon freeze-drying in the presence of appropriate cryoprotectants. A factorial design was approached to assess the cytotoxicity of raw materials and nanoparticles by the metabolic test MTT. Nanoparticles demonstrated to not cause overt toxicity in a respiratory cell model (Calu-3). Pullulan has, thus, demonstrated to hold potential for the production of nanoparticles with an application in protein delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Updates on smart polymeric carrier systems for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim; Khalil, Islam; Ali, Isra; Yacoub, Magdi

    2017-10-01

    Smart materials are those materials that are responsive to chemical (organic molecules, chemical agents or specific agents), biochemical (protein, enzymes, growth factors, substrates or ligands), physical (electric field, magnetic field, temperature, pH, ionic strength or radiation) or mechanical (pressure or mechanical stress) signals. These responsive materials interact with the stimuli by changing their properties or conformational structures in a predictable manner. Recently, smart polymers have been utilized in various biomedical applications. Particularly, they have been used as a platform to synthesize stimuli-responsive systems that could deliver therapeutics to a specific site for a specific period with minimal adverse effects. For instance, stimuli-responsive polymers-based systems have been recently reported to deliver different bioactive molecules such as carbohydrates (heparin), chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin), small organic molecules (anti-coagulants), nucleic acids (siRNA), and proteins (growth factors and hormones). Protein therapeutics played a fundamental role in treatment of various chronic and some autoimmune diseases. For instance insulin has been used in treatment of diabetes. However, being a protein in nature, insulin delivery is limited by its instability, short half-life, and easy denaturation when administered orally. To overcome these challenges, and as highlighted in this review article, much research efforts have been recently devoted to design and develop convenient smart controlled nanosystems for protein therapeutics delivery.

  3. Extended and Sequential Delivery of Protein from Injectable Thermoresponsive Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Devin M; Ma, Zuwei; Leeson, Cory E; Wagner, William R

    2011-01-01

    Thermoresponsive hydrogels are attractive for their injectability and retention in tissue sites where they may serve as a mechanical support and as a scaffold to guide tissue remodeling. Our objective in this report was to develop a thermoresponsive, biodegradable hydrogel system that would be capable of protein release from two distinct reservoirs – one where protein was attached to the hydrogel backbone, and one where protein was loaded into biodegradable microparticles mixed into the network. Thermoresponsive hydrogels consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and biodegradable methacrylate polylactide (MAPLA) were synthesized along with modified copolymers incorporating 1 mol% protein-reactive methacryloxy N,hydroxysuccinimide (MANHS), hydrophilic acrylic acid (AAc), or both. In vitro, bovine serum albumin (BSA) release was studied from hydrogels, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles, or microparticles mixed into the hydrogels. The synthesized copolymers were able to gel below 37°C and release protein in excess of 3 months. The presence of MANHS and AAc in the copolymers was associated with higher loaded protein retention during thermal transition (45% vs 22%) and faster release (2 months), respectively. Microspheres entrapped in the hydrogel released protein in a delayed fashion relative to microspheres in saline. The combination of a protein-reactive hydrogel mixed with protein-loaded microspheres demonstrated a sequential release of specific BSA populations. Overall, the described drug delivery system combines the advantages of injectability, degradability, extended release, and sequential release which may be useful in tissue engineering applications. PMID:22237975

  4. Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Kumar, Thallapuranam K.S.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan-based nano/microencapsulation is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Despite widespread interest, the literature lacks a defined methodology to control chitosan particle size and drug/protein release kinetics. In this study, the effects of precipitation-coacervation formulation parameters on chitosan particle size, protein encapsulation efficiency and protein release were investigated. Chitosan particle sizes, which ranged from 300 nm to 3 μm, were influenced by chitosan concentration, chitosan molecular weight and addition rate of precipitant salt. The composition of precipitant salt played a significant role in particle formation with upper Hofmeister series salts containing strongly hydrated anions yielding particles with a low polydispersity index (PDI) while weaker anions resulted in aggregated particles with high PDIs. Sonication power had minimal effect on mean particle size, however, it significantly reduced polydispersity. Protein loading efficiencies in chitosan nano/microparticles, which ranged from 14.3% to 99.2%, was inversely related to the hydration strength of precipitant salts, protein molecular weight and directly related to the concentration and molecular weight of chitosan. Protein release rates increased with particle size and were generally inversely related to protein molecular weight. This study demonstrates that chitosan nano/microparticles with high protein loading efficiencies can be engineered with well-defined sizes and controllable release kinetics through manipulation of specific formulation parameters. PMID:24560459

  5. Characterization of protein rheology and delivery forces for combination products.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Nitin; Pranay, Pratik; Bernacki, Joseph; Eu, Bruce; Ji, Wenchang; Walls, Ed

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of a protein-device combination product over a wide range of operating parameters defined by end-user requirements is critical for developing a product presentation that is convenient for patient use. In addition to the device components, several product attributes, such as product rheology and product-container interactions, govern the functionality of a delivery system. This article presents results from a characterization study conducted for a high-concentration antibody product in a prefilled syringe. Analytical models are used to study the rheological behavior and to estimate delivery forces over a broad design space comprising temperature, concentration, and shear stress. Data suggest that high-viscosity products may exhibit significant shear thinning under the shear rates encountered under desired injection times.

  6. Secretion, delivery and function of oomycete effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Wawra, Stephan; Belmonte, Rodrigo; Löbach, Lars; Saraiva, Marcia; Willems, Ariane; van West, Pieter

    2012-12-01

    Oomycetes are responsible for multi-billion dollar damages in aquaculture, agriculture and forestry. One common strategy they share with most cellular disease agents is the secretion of effector proteins. Effectors are molecules that change host physiology by initiating and allowing an infection to develop. Oomycetes secrete both extracellular and intracellular effectors. Studying secretion, delivery and function of effectors will hopefully lead to alternative control measures, which is much needed as several chemicals to control plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes cannot be used anymore; due to resistance in the host, or because the control measures have been prohibited as a result of toxicity to the environment and/or consumers. Here the latest findings on oomycete effector secretion, delivery and function are discussed.

  7. Photo-synthesis of protein-based nanoparticles and the application in drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Jinbing; Wang, Hongyang; Cao, Yi; Qin, Meng Wang, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Recently, protein-based nanoparticles as drug delivery systems have attracted great interests due to the excellent behavior of high biocompatibility and biodegradability, and low toxicity. However, the synthesis techniques are generally costly, chemical reagents introduced, and especially present difficulties in producing homogeneous monodispersed nanoparticles. Here, we introduce a novel physical method to synthesize protein nanoparticles which can be accomplished under physiological condition only through ultraviolet (UV) illumination. By accurately adjusting the intensity and illumination time of UV light, disulfide bonds in proteins can be selectively reduced and the subsequent self-assembly process can be well controlled. Importantly, the co-assembly can also be dominated when the proteins mixed with either anti-cancer drugs, siRNA, or active targeting molecules. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that our synthesized protein–drug nanoparticles (drug-loading content and encapsulation efficiency being ca. 8.2% and 70%, respectively) not only possess the capability of traditional drug delivery systems (DDS), but also have a greater drug delivery efficiency to the tumor sites and a better inhibition of tumor growth (only 35% of volume comparing to the natural growing state), indicating it being a novel drug delivery system in tumor therapy.

  8. Review on the delivery of steroids by carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Vesper, A R; Bariyanga, J; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-08-01

    Due to the poor solubility of steroids in aqueous solution, delivery of these biomaterials is of major biomedical importance. We have reviewed the conjugation of testosterone and it aliphatic dimer and aromatic dimer with several carrier proteins, human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The results of multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling were compared here. Steroid-protein bindings are via hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts. HSA forms more stable conjugate than BSA and b-LG. The stability of steroid-protein conjugates is testosterone>dimer-aromatic>dimer-aliphatic. Encapsulation of steroids by protein is shown by TEM images. Modeling showed the presence of H-bonding, which stabilized testosterone-protein complexes with the free binding energy of -12.95 for HSA and -11.55 for BSA and -8.92kcal/mol for b-LG conjugates. Steroid conjugation induced major perturbations of serum protein conformations. Serum proteins can transport steroids to the target molecules.

  9. Long acting porous microparticle for pulmonary protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Bae, Jun Ho; Kim, Jung Ju; Na, Kun; Lee, Eun Seong

    2007-03-21

    This study investigated the porous-microparticle (PM) with low mass density and large size for pulmonary drug delivery. PM was prepared by the water-in-oil-in-water (W(1)/O/W(2)) multi-emulsion method with cyclodextrin derivative as a porogen and a stabilizer of peptide drugs. Herein, sucrose ethyl acetate (SAIB) was incorporated in PM for long acting protein release. In vitro release studies, the rapid release rate of proteins from PM was reduced due to the high viscosity of the added SAIB. As a result, BSA release from PM continued up to 7 days. This result suggests that PM having sustained release characteristics may be successfully applied for long-term pulmonary administration of protein or peptide drug. In addition, it is expected that these particles arrive at a deep lung epithelium due to low density (high porosity) and limit macrophage recognition because of big particle size (more than 5 microm).

  10. Integrating Protein Engineering and Bioorthogonal Click Conjugation for Extracellular Vesicle Modulation and Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Altinoglu, Sarah; Takeda, Yuji S.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small, cell-secreted vesicles that transfer proteins and genetic information between cells. This intercellular transmission regulates many physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, exosomes have emerged as novel biomarkers for disease diagnosis and as nanocarriers for drug delivery. Here, we report an easy-to-adapt and highly versatile methodology to modulate exosome composition and conjugate exosomes for intracellular delivery. Our strategy combines the metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins or glycan/glycoproteins of exosome-secreting cells with active azides and bioorthogonal click conjugation to modify and functionalize the exosomes. The azide-integrated can be conjugated to a variety of small molecules and proteins and can efficiently deliver conjugates into cells. The metabolic engineering of exosomes diversifies the chemistry of exosomes and expands the functions that can be introduced into exosomes, providing novel, powerful tools to study the roles of exosomes in biology and expand the biomedical potential of exosomes. PMID:26529317

  11. High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the combined use of an enzyme-based glucose release system (EnBase®) and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™). The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli. Compared to Terrific Broth and ZYM-5052 autoinduction medium, the EnBase system improved yield mainly through increased productivity per cell. Four-fold increase in oxygen transfer by the Ultra Yield Flask contributed to higher cell density with EnBase but not with the other tested media, and consequently the product yield per ml of EnBase culture was further improved. PMID:22152005

  12. Light activated liposomes: Functionality and prospects in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Nurmi, Riikka; Kontturi, Leena; Viitala, Lauri; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2016-12-28

    Ocular drug delivery, especially to the retina and choroid, is a major challenge in drug development. Liposome technology may be useful in ophthalmology in enabling new routes of delivery, prolongation of drug action and intracellular drug delivery, but drug release from the liposomes should be controlled. For that purpose, light activation may be an approach to release drug at specified time and site in the eye. Technical advances have been made in the field of light activated drug release, particularly indocyanine green loaded liposomes are a promising approach with safe materials and effective light triggered release of small and large molecules. This review discusses the liposomal drug delivery with light activated systems in the context of ophthalmic drug delivery challenges.

  13. Carrier Mediated Systemic Delivery of Protein and Peptide Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Rahela; Othman, Iekhan; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades proteins and peptide therapeutics have occupied an enormous fraction of pharmaceutical industry. Despite their high potential as therapeutics, the big challenge often encountered is the effective administration and bioavailability of protein therapeutics in vivo system. Peptide molecules are well known for their in vivo short half-lives. In addition, due to high molecular weight and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, often it is not easy to administer peptides and proteins orally or through any other noninvasive routes. Conventional drug management system often demands for frequent and regular interval intravenous/subcutaneous administration, which decreases overall patient compliance and increases chances of side-effects related to dose-fluctuation in systemic circulation. A controlled mode of delivery system could address all these short-comings at a time. Therefore, long-acting sustained release formulations for both invasive and noninvasive routes are under rigorous study currently. Long-acting formulations through invasive routes can address patient compliance and dose-fluctuation issues by less frequent administration. Also, any new route of administration other than invasive routes will address cost-effectiveness of the therapeutic by lessening the need to deal with health professional and health care facility. Although a vast number of studies are dealing with novel drug delivery systems, till now only a handful of controlled release formulations for proteins and peptides have been approved by FDA. This study therefore focuses on current and perspective controlled release formulations of existing and novel protein/peptide therapeutics via conventional invasive routes as well as potential novel non-invasive routes of administration, e.g., oral, buccal, sublingual, nasal, ocular, rectal, vaginal and pulmonary.

  14. Smart polymers for controlled delivery of proteins and peptides: a review of patents.

    PubMed

    Fogueri, Laxmi R; Singh, Somnath

    2009-01-01

    Protein and peptide-based therapeutic agents have unique physiochemical properties such as high molecular weight, short half life, requirement of a sustained plasma level for the desired therapeutic effect, liable to physical and chemical instability by gastric enzymes and harsh acidic environment as well as first pass metabolism, which makes their delivery a challenge. The delivery of proteins and peptides using various routes of administration like oral, nasal, rectal, pulmonary, buccal, vaginal and transdermal route is found to exhibit limitations, poor permeability and degradation being major limitations. Use of parenteral route is found to overcome these problems but patient compliance is poor due to the need for frequent administration. Use of control delivery for these drugs using smart polymers seems promising as they overcome the limitations posed by other routes of delivery. Smart polymers increase patient compliance, maintain stability of the drug, and maintain drug level in therapeutic window and are easy to manufacture. Different types of smart polymer-based delivery systems, such as sensitive to temperature, phase, pH, electric charge, light, and biochemicals, and their application in controlling the release of the incorporated drug to obtain a sustained plasma level has been discussed. Smart polymers, however, face challenges with regard to high burst release, unpredictable behavior in later part of biphasic release profile, overall drug release kinetics, conformational stability during processing, and preserving biological activity after getting released. Several patents overcoming these inherent problems associated with smart polymers have been reviewed. At the end, the future direction and potential of smart polymer-based delivery system for drug delivery has been presented in brief.

  15. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  16. Cross-Linked Protein Crystals for Vaccine Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, Nancy; Shenoy, Bhami; Jacob, Lawrence D.; Margolin, Alexey L.

    1999-08-01

    The progress toward subunit vaccines has been limited by their poor immunogenicity and limited stability. To enhance the immune response, subunit vaccines universally require improved adjuvants and delivery vehicles. In the present paper, we propose the use of cross-linked protein crystals (CLPCs) as antigens. We compare the immunogenicity of CLPCs of human serum albumin with that of soluble protein and conclude that there are marked differences in the immune response to the different forms of human serum albumin. Relative to the soluble protein, crystalline forms induce and sustain over almost a 6-month study a 6- to 10-fold increase in antibody titer for highly cross-linked crystals and an approximately 30-fold increase for lightly cross-linked crystals. We hypothesize that the depot effect, the particulate structure of CLPCs, and highly repetitive nature of protein crystals may play roles in the enhanced production of circulating antibodies. Several features of CLPCs, such as their remarkable stability, purity, biodegradability, and ease of manufacturing, make them highly attractive for vaccine formulations. This work paves the way for a systematic study of protein crystallinity and cross-linking on enhancement of humoral and T cell responses.

  17. Cross-linked protein crystals for vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Nancy; Shenoy, Bhami; Jacob, Lawrence D.; Margolin, Alexey L.

    1999-01-01

    The progress toward subunit vaccines has been limited by their poor immunogenicity and limited stability. To enhance the immune response, subunit vaccines universally require improved adjuvants and delivery vehicles. In the present paper, we propose the use of cross-linked protein crystals (CLPCs) as antigens. We compare the immunogenicity of CLPCs of human serum albumin with that of soluble protein and conclude that there are marked differences in the immune response to the different forms of human serum albumin. Relative to the soluble protein, crystalline forms induce and sustain over almost a 6-month study a 6- to 10-fold increase in antibody titer for highly cross-linked crystals and an approximately 30-fold increase for lightly cross-linked crystals. We hypothesize that the depot effect, the particulate structure of CLPCs, and highly repetitive nature of protein crystals may play roles in the enhanced production of circulating antibodies. Several features of CLPCs, such as their remarkable stability, purity, biodegradability, and ease of manufacturing, make them highly attractive for vaccine formulations. This work paves the way for a systematic study of protein crystallinity and cross-linking on enhancement of humoral and T cell responses. PMID:10449716

  18. Protein cages and synthetic polymers: a fruitful symbiosis for drug delivery applications, bionanotechnology and materials science.

    PubMed

    Rother, Martin; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Renggli, Kasper; Bruns, Nico

    2016-11-07

    Protein cages are hollow protein nanoparticles, such as viral capsids, virus-like particles, ferritin, heat-shock proteins and chaperonins. They have well-defined capsule-like structures with a monodisperse size. Their protein subunits can be modified by genetic engineering at predetermined positions, allowing for example site-selective introduction of attachment points for functional groups, catalysts or targeting ligands on their outer surface, in their interior and between subunits. Therefore, protein cages have been extensively explored as functional entities in bionanotechnology, as drug-delivery or gene-delivery vehicles, as nanoreactors or as templates for the synthesis of organic and inorganic nanomaterials. The scope of functionalities and applications of protein cages can be significantly broadened if they are combined with synthetic polymers on their surface or within their interior. For example, PEGylation reduces the immunogenicity of protein cage-based delivery systems and active targeting ligands can be attached via polymer chains to favour their accumulation in diseased tissue. Polymers within protein cages offer the possibility of increasing the loading density of drug molecules, nucleic acids, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents or catalysts. Moreover, the interaction of protein cages and polymers can be used to modulate the size and shape of some viral capsids to generate structures that do not occur with native viruses. Another possibility is to use the interior of polymer cages as a confined reaction space for polymerization reactions such as atom transfer radical polymerization or rhodium-catalysed polymerization of phenylacetylene. The protein nanoreactors facilitate a higher degree of control over polymer synthesis. This review will summarize the hybrid structures that have been synthesized by polymerizing from protein cage-bound initiators, by conjugating polymers to protein cages, by embedding protein cages into bulk polymeric

  19. Functional polymeric nanoparticles: an efficient and promising tool for active delivery of bioactives.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Manoj; Dutta, Tathagata; Murugesan, Senthilkumar; Asthana, Abhay; Mishra, Dinesh; Rajkumar, Vijayaraj; Tare, Manoj; Saraf, Surbhi; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field and has achieved breakthroughs in bioengineering, molecular biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics. A recent advance in nanotechnology is the development of a functional nanosystem by incorporation, adsorption, or covalent coupling of polymers, carbohydrates, endogenous substances/ligands, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides to the surface of nanoparticles. Functionalization confers a wide array of interesting properties such as stealth characteristics, a bioadhesive property, and that it prevents aggregation of nanoparticles, imparts biostability and solubility, reduces toxicity, and provides site-specific delivery. This makes the nanosystem an intelligent tool for diagnostics, prognostics, and controlled and sustained delivery of protein, peptide, pDNA, and other therapeutic agents to specific targets (tissue, cell, and intracellular). Various types of functional nanosystems, such as carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, metallic nanoparticles, and liposomes, are being extensively explored. However, high tissue accumulation of nonbiodegradable nanoparticles has caused toxicity problems and rendered them as not-so-popular therapeutic and diagnostic systems. The toxicity and safety of nonbiodegradable nanoparticles are subject to future research. Polymeric nanoparticles have offered attractive alternative modules due to biocompatibility, nonimmunogenicity, nontoxicity, biodegradability, simple preparation methods, high physical stability, possibility of sustained drug release, and higher probability for surface functionalization. Depending on properties that have been modified, polymeric nanoparticles can be grouped in to four classes, namely, stealth, polysaccharide decorated biomimetic, bioadhesive, and ligand-anchored functional polymeric nanoparticles (f-PNPs). This review explores the ligand-anchored f-PNP as a carrier for active delivery of bioactives, envisaged to date

  20. Enteral delivery of proteins enhances the expression of proteins involved in the cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis in human duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Goichon, Alexis; Bertrand, Julien; Chan, Philippe; Lecleire, Stéphane; Coquard, Aude; Cailleux, Anne-Françoise; Vaudry, David; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2015-08-01

    Amino acids are well known to be key effectors of gut protein turnover. We recently reported that enteral delivery of proteins markedly stimulated global duodenal protein synthesis in carbohydrate-fed healthy humans, but specifically affected proteins remain unknown. We aimed to assess the influence of an enteral protein supply on the duodenal mucosal proteome in carbohydrate-fed humans. Six healthy volunteers received for 5 h, on 2 occasions and in random order, either an enteral infusion of maltodextrins alone (0.25 g · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) mimicking the fed state or maltodextrins with a protein powder (0.14 g proteins · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹). Endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were then collected and frozen until analysis. A 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics analysis was then performed, and differentially expressed proteins (at least ±1.5-fold change; Student's t test, P < 0.05) were identified by mass spectrometry. Protein expression changes were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Thirty-two protein spots were differentially expressed after protein delivery compared with maltodextrins alone: 28 and 4 spots were up- or downregulated, respectively. Among the 22 identified proteins, 11 upregulated proteins were involved either in the cytoskeleton (ezrin, moesin, plastin 1, lamin B1, vimentin, and β-actin) or in protein biosynthesis (glutamyl-prolyl-transfer RNA synthetase, glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase, elongation factor 2, elongation factor 1δ, and eukaryotic translation and initiation factor 3 subunit f). Enteral delivery of proteins altered the duodenal mucosal proteome and mainly stimulated the expression of proteins involved in cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis. These results suggest that protein supply may affect intestinal morphology by stimulating actin cytoskeleton remodeling. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Polyester-Based Nanoparticles for Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Pedro; Sousa, Flávia; Sarmento, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins are widely used to treat severe conditions, such as oncologic and metabolic diseases, and also for vaccination. They are recognized for its high biopotency, but their hydrophilicity and high molecular weight make its transport through membranes difficult to achieve. They may also suffer in vivo structural instability caused by a proteolytic cleavage, turning them biological inactive. Polyester-based nanoparticles are useful tools to overcome such problems, and deliver therapeutic proteins in a controlled and localized manner, decreasing the number of administrations needed and enhancing the therapeutic outcome. The biodegradable and biocompatible nature of such carriers makes them feasible to be administered by invasive and noninvasive routes. Since nanoparticles are produced in suspension form, they are usually lyophilized to increase its long-term storage stability. Therefore, the aim of this work is to propose an intuitive protocol for production and lyophilization of polyester-based nanoparticles for therapeutic proteins delivery. The characterization techniques to evaluate the nanoparticle and lyophilisate features, as well as the structural stability of the loaded protein are also described. For these purposes, PLGA nanoparticles and human insulin are used as models.

  2. On prilled Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral Systems for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    de Kruif, Jan Kendall; Ledergerber, Gisela; Garofalo, Carla; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Newly discovered active macromolecules are highly promising for therapy, but poor bioavailability hinders their oral use. Microencapsulation approaches, such as protein prilling into microspheres, may enable protection from gastrointestinal (GI) enzymatic degradation. This would increase bioavailability mainly for local delivery to GI lumen or mucosa. This work's purpose was to design a novel architecture, namely a Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral System, by prilling for protein delivery. Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) were selected as orally acceptable clay particles and their lumen was enlarged by alkaline etching. This chemical modification increased the luminal volume to a mean of 216.3 μL g(-1) (+40.8%). After loading albumin as model drug, the HNT were entrapped in microgels by prilling. The formation of Nanoparticles-in-Microsphere Oral System (NiMOS) yielded entrapment efficiencies up to 63.2%. NiMOS shape was spherical to toroidal, with a diameter smaller than 320 μm. Release profiles depended largely on the employed system and HNT type. Protein stability was determined throughout prilling and after in vitro enzymatic degradation. Prilling did not harm protein structure, and NiMOS demonstrated higher enzymatic protection than pure nanotubes or microgels, since up to 82% of BSA remained unscathed after in vitro digestion. Therefore, prilled NiMOS was shown to be a promising and flexible multi-compartment system for oral (local) macromolecular delivery.

  3. Inflammation responsive logic gate nanoparticles for the delivery of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Enas A.; Sankaranarayanan, Jagadis; Morachis, Jose’ M.; Kim, Gloria; Almutairi, Adah

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reduced pH are important stimuli targets for intracellular delivery and for delivery to diseased tissue. However, there is a dearth of materials able to deliver bioactive agents selectively under these conditions. We employed our recently developed dual response strategy to build a polymeric nanoparticle that degrades upon exposure to two stimuli in tandem. Our poly thioether ketal based nanoparticles undergo two chemical transformations, the first is the oxidation of the thioether groups along the polymer backbone of the nanoparticles upon exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS). This transformation switches the polymeric backbone from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and thus allows, in mildly acidic environments, the rapid acid catalyzed degradation of the ketal groups also along the polymer backbone. Dynamic light scattering and payload release studies showed full particles degradation only in conditions that combined both oxidative stress and acidity and these conditions led to higher release of encapsulated protein within 24 hours. Nanoparticles in neutral pH and under oxidative conditions showed small molecule release and swelling of otherwise intact nanparticles. Notably, cellular studies show absence of toxicity and efficient uptake of nanoparticles by macrophages followed by cytoplasmic release of ovalbumin. Future work will apply this system to inflammatory diseases. PMID:21688843

  4. Smart polymer based delivery systems for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Al-Tahami, Khaled; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric systems represent promising means for delivering many bioactive agents, including peptide and protein drugs. The importance of these systems grew with the advancement in the understanding of peptide and protein pharmacology as well as the ability to mass-produce these compounds. Some polymers undergo sol-gel transition once administered. In situ gel formation happens in response to one or a combination of two or more stimuli. These stimuli include UV-irradiation, pH change, temperature change, and solvent exchange. These smart polymeric systems have several advantages over conventional methods, such as ease of manufacturing, ease of administration, biodegradability, and the ability to alter release profiles of the incorporated agents. In the past few years, an increasing number of in situ gel-forming systems have been investigated and many patents for their use in various biomedical applications, including drug delivery, have been reported. In this article, we introduce the different strategies that have been developed and patented for the use of smart polymers in delivering peptide and protein drugs. The advantage, disadvantages, possibilities, and limitations of each of the smart polymer systems have been discussed.

  5. Nucleic Acid-Mediated Intracellular Protein Delivery by Lipid-like Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Eltoukhy, Ahmed A.; Chen, Delai; Veiseh, Omid; Pelet, Jeisa; Dong, Yizhou; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular protein delivery has potential biotechnological and therapeutic application, but remains technically challenging. In contrast, a plethora of nucleic acid carriers have been developed, with lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) among the most clinically advanced reagents for oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we validate the hypothesis that oligonucleotides can serve as packaging materials to facilitate protein entrapment within and intracellular delivery by LNPs. Using two distinct model proteins, horseradish peroxidase and NeutrAvidin, we demonstrate that LNPs can yield efficient intracellular protein delivery in vitro when one or more oligonucleotides have been conjugated to the protein cargo. Moreover, in experiments with NeutrAvidin in vivo, we show that oligonucleotide conjugation significantly enhances LNP-mediated protein uptake within various spleen cell populations, suggesting that this approach may be particularly suitable for improved delivery of protein-based vaccines to antigen-presenting cells. PMID:24831975

  6. Nucleic acid-mediated intracellular protein delivery by lipid-like nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Chen, Delai; Veiseh, Omid; Pelet, Jeisa M; Yin, Hao; Dong, Yizhou; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular protein delivery has potential biotechnological and therapeutic application, but remains technically challenging. In contrast, a plethora of nucleic acid carriers have been developed, with lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) among the most clinically advanced reagents for oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we validate the hypothesis that oligonucleotides can serve as packaging materials to facilitate protein entrapment within and intracellular delivery by LNPs. Using two distinct model proteins, horseradish peroxidase and NeutrAvidin, we demonstrate that LNPs can yield efficient intracellular protein delivery in vitro when one or more oligonucleotides have been conjugated to the protein cargo. Moreover, in experiments with NeutrAvidin in vivo, we show that oligonucleotide conjugation significantly enhances LNP-mediated protein uptake within various spleen cell populations, suggesting that this approach may be particularly suitable for improved delivery of protein-based vaccines to antigen-presenting cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of protein stability and in vitro permeation of lyophilized polysaccharides-based microparticles for intranasal protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Jong; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2011-09-15

    Biocompatible microparticles prepared by lyophilization were developed for intranasal protein delivery. To test for the feasibility of this formulation, stability of the incorporated protein and enhancement of in vitro permeation across the nasal epithelium were evaluated. Lyophilization was processed with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) or water soluble chitosan (WCS) as biocompatible polymers, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and d-alpha-tocopheryl poly(ethylene glycol 1000) succinate (TPGS 1000) as permeation enhancers, sugars as cryoprotectants and lysozyme as the model protein. As a result, microparticles ranging from 6 to 12μm were developed where the maintenance of the protein conformation was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism and fluorescence intensity detection. Moreover, in vitro bioassay showed that the lysozyme activity was preserved during the preparation process while exhibiting less cytotoxicity in primary human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells. Results of the in vitro release study revealed slower release rate in these microparticles compared to that of the lysozyme itself. On the other hand, the in vitro permeation study exhibited a 9-fold increase in absorption of lysozyme when prepared in lyophilized microparticles with HPMC, HP-β-CD and TPGS 1000 (F4-2). These microparticles could serve as efficient intranasal delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-assembling polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced intra-articular anti-inflammatory protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Rachel Elisabeth

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 26 million Americans, or approximately 14% of the adult population. The incidence of OA is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 20 years as the US grows older and the rate of obesity continues to increase. There are currently no clinical interventions that cure OA. Current biomaterial delivery systems exhibit several limitations. First, most drug-delivery particles are hydrophobic, which is not optimal for hydrophilic protein encapsulation. Second, hydrophobic particles, such as PLGA, could cause wear damage to the already-fragile OA cartilage structure. Additionally, these particles usually suffer from non-specific protein adsorption, which causes increased phagocytosis and can lead to increased inflammation. New therapies that increase the effectiveness of OA treatments or reverse OA disease progression will greatly decrease the economic costs and individual pain associated with this disease. The goal of this thesis was to develop a new drug-delivering material to deliver anti-inflammatory protein for treating OA. Our central hypothesis for this work is that a controlled release/presentation system will more effectively deliver anti-inflammatory protein therapies to the OA joint. The primary goal of this work was to synthesize a block copolymer that could self-assemble into injectable, sub-micron-scale particles and would allow an anti-inflammatory protein, IL-1ra, to be tethered to its surface for efficient protein delivery. The block copolymer incorporated an oligo-ethylene monomer for tissue compatibility and non-fouling behavior, a 4-nitrophenol group for efficient protein tethering, and cyclohexyl methacrylate, a hydrophobic monomer, for particle stability. We engineered the copolymer and tested it in both in vitro culture experiments and an in vivo model to evaluate protein retention in the knee joint. The rationale for this project was that the rational design and synthesis of a new drug- and protein

  9. Polysaccharides-based polyelectrolyte nanoparticles as protein drugs delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shujun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinge; Wu, Zhongming; Wang, Zhen; Li, Chaoxing

    2011-09-01

    Polysaccharides-based nanoparticles were prepared by synthesized quaternized chitosan and dextran sulfate through simple ionic-gelation self-assembled method. Introduction of quaternized groups was intended to increase water solubility of chitosan and make the nanoparticles have broader pH sensitive range which can remain more stable in physiological pH and decrease the loss of protein drugs caused by the gastric cavity. The load of BSA was affected by molecular parameter, i.e., degree of substitution, and average molecular weight of quaternized chitosan, as well as concentration of BSA. Fast release occurred in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) while the release was slow in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.4). The drug release mechanism is Fickian diffusion through release kinetics analysis. Cell uptake demonstrated nanoparicles can internalize into Caco-2 cells, which suggested that nanoparticles had good biocompatibility. No significant conformation change was noted for the released BSA in comparison with native BSA using circular dichroism spectroscopy. This kind of novel composite nanoparticles may be a promising delivery system for oral protein and peptide drugs.

  10. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery.

  11. Therapeutics and carriers: the dual role of proteins in nanoparticles for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Pescina, Silvia; Sonvico, Fabio; Santi, Patrizia; Nicoli, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Blindness and visual impairment affect millions of people worldwide and have a very important impact on patients quality of life. Proteins and peptides represent nowadays an important therapeutic tool for the treatment of ocular diseases but, despite their potential, have significant limitations, as the administration of protein-based pharmaceuticals represents a real challenge. Moreover, administration of ocular medications is difficult due to the peculiar structure of this organ and the presence of numerous barriers protecting the eye inner structure. Nanoencapsulation of peptides and proteins presents a number of advantages for their ocular delivery since it can protect the drug from metabolic activity, control and sustain the release and increase drug bioavailability after topical or intravitreal administration. In fact, nanoparticulate formulations are contributing to overcome ocular barriers, such as the corneal or the blood-retinal barrier, improve the residence time in the eye, increase local drug level, reduce the drug dosage and showing improved performance when compared to conventional formulations. Besides, proteins have also been proposed for the preparation of nanocarriers intended for ophthalmic administration, since they are highly biocompatible, biodegradable and easily modified to link surface ligands. The present review focuses the attention on the use of proteins in ocular drug delivery nanotechnology: their dual role as both therapeutics and carriers has been critically evaluated and discussed.

  12. Recent Advances in Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: A Special Emphasis on Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly employed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transdermal, and ocular administrations. PMID:25106908

  13. Recent advances in protein and Peptide drug delivery: a special emphasis on polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly em- ployed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transder mal, and ocular administrations.

  14. Predicting protein instability in sustained protein delivery systems using spectral-phase interference.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Nina; Sitterberg, Johannes; Vornholt, Wolfgang; Bakowsky, Udo; Keusgen, Michael; Kissel, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers represent promising materials for sustained protein delivery systems. However, structural protein instabilities due to interactions with the polymer surface are often observed. Aim of the present study was to analyze and predict these instabilities by determination of adsorption pattern and extent via biomolecular interaction analysis. A new optical method based on spectral-phase interference successfully demonstrated its suitability for this new application scope. It was characterized in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility and dynamic range using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model compound. For protein-polymer interaction studies, materials with different wettabilities and zeta potential were selected and successfully applied on the sensor chip: Glass, poly(styrene), poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), and poly(ethylene carbonate). Concentration dependent adsorption curves revealed two principal adsorption patterns based on the connection between BSA spreading and supply rate. This connection was stronger influenced by polymer hydrophobicity than surface charge. Association, dissociation and binding rate constants in the range from 0.15 to 34.19 × 10(-6) M were obtained. Atomic force microscopy images of the films before and after adsorption confirmed the previous elaborated model. Poly(ethylene carbonate) emerged as highly promising biomaterial for protein delivery due to its favorable adsorption behavior based on low polymer-protein interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GFP-complementation assay to detect functional CPP and protein delivery into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Milech, Nadia; Longville, Brooke AC; Cunningham, Paula T; Scobie, Marie N; Bogdawa, Heique M; Winslow, Scott; Anastasas, Mark; Connor, Theresa; Ong, Ferrer; Stone, Shane R; Kerfoot, Maria; Heinrich, Tatjana; Kroeger, Karen M; Tan, Yew-Foon; Hoffmann, Katrin; Thomas, Wayne R; Watt, Paul M; Hopkins, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cargo uptake is essential for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) therapeutics, which deliver widely diverse cargoes by exploiting natural cell processes to penetrate the cell’s membranes. Yet most current CPP activity assays are hampered by limitations in assessing uptake, including confounding effects of conjugated fluorophores or ligands, indirect read-outs requiring secondary processing, and difficulty in discriminating internalization from endosomally trapped cargo. Split-complementation Endosomal Escape (SEE) provides the first direct assay visualizing true cytoplasmic-delivery of proteins at biologically relevant concentrations. The SEE assay has minimal background, is amenable to high-throughput processes, and adaptable to different transient and stable cell lines. This split-GFP-based platform can be useful to study transduction mechanisms, cellular imaging, and characterizing novel CPPs as pharmaceutical delivery agents in the treatment of disease. PMID:26671759

  16. Berberine hydrochloride: anticancer activity and nanoparticulate delivery system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2011-01-01

    Berberine hydrochloride is a conventional component in Chinese medicine, and is characterized by a diversity of pharmacological effects. However, due to its hydrophobic properties, along with poor stability and bioavailability, the application of berberine hydrochloride was hampered for a long time. In recent years, the pharmaceutical preparation of berberine hydrochloride has improved to achieve good prospects for clinical application, especially for novel nanoparticulate delivery systems. Moreover, anticancer activity and novel mechanisms have been explored, the chance of regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in cancer cells showing more potential than ever. Therefore, it is expected that appropriate pharmaceutical procedures could be applied to the enormous potential for anticancer efficacy, to give some new insights into anticancer drug preparation in Chinese medicine. We accessed conventional databases, such as PubMed, Scope, and Web of Science, using "berberine hydrochloride", "anti-cancer mechanism", and "nanoparticulate delivery system" as search words, then summarized the progress in research, illustrating the need to explore reprogramming of cancer cell metabolism using nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. With increasing research on regulation of cancer cell metabolism by berberine hydrochloride and troubleshooting of issues concerning nanoparticulate delivery preparation, berberine hydrochloride is likely to become a natural component of the nanoparticulate delivery systems used for cancer therapy. Meanwhile, the known mechanisms of berberine hydrochloride, such as decreased multidrug resistance and enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs, along with improvement in patient quality of life, could also provide new insights into cancer cell metabolism and nanoparticulate delivery preparation.

  17. Integration of drug, protein, and gene delivery systems with regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lorden, Elizabeth R; Levinson, Howard M; Leong, Kam W

    2015-04-01

    Regenerative medicine has the potential to drastically change the field of health care from reactive to preventative and restorative. Exciting advances in stem cell biology and cellular reprogramming have fueled the progress of this field. Biochemical cues in the form of small molecule drugs, growth factors, zinc finger protein transcription factors and nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, monoclonal antibodies, plasmid DNA, aptamers, or RNA interference agents can play an important role to influence stem cell differentiation and the outcome of tissue regeneration. Many of these biochemical factors are fragile and must act intracellularly at the molecular level. They require an effective delivery system, which can take the form of a scaffold (e.g., hydrogels and electrospun fibers), carrier (viral and nonviral), nano- and microparticle, or genetically modified cell. In this review, we will discuss the history and current technologies of drug, protein, and gene delivery in the context of regenerative medicine. Next, we will present case examples of how delivery technologies are being applied to promote angiogenesis in nonhealing wounds or prevent angiogenesis in age related macular degeneration. Finally, we will conclude with a brief discussion of the regulatory pathway from bench to bedside for the clinical translation of these novel therapeutics.

  18. Integration of Drug, Protein, and Gene Delivery Systems with Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lorden, Elizabeth R.; Levinson, Howard M.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine has the potential to drastically change the field of health care from reactive to preventative and restorative. Exciting advances in stem cell biology and cellular reprogramming have fueled the progress of this field. Biochemical cues in the form of small molecule drugs, growth factors, zinc finger protein transcription factors and nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, monoclonal antibodies, plasmid DNA, aptamers, or RNA interference agents can play an important role to influence stem cell differentiation and the outcome of tissue regeneration. Many of these biochemical factors are fragile and must act intracellularly at the molecular level. They require an effective delivery system, which can take the form of a scaffold (e.g. hydrogels and electrospun fibers), carrier (viral and nonviral), nano- and micro-particle, or genetically modified cell. In this review, we will discuss the history and current technologies of drug, protein and gene delivery in the context of regenerative medicine. Next we will present case examples of how delivery technologies are being applied to promote angiogenesis in non-healing wounds or prevent angiogenesis in age related macular degeneration. Finally, we will conclude with a brief discussion of the regulatory pathway from bench-to-bedside for the clinical translation of these novel therapeutics. PMID:25787742

  19. Negative cooperativity in the nitrogenase Fe protein electron delivery cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Page, Taylor R.; Duval, Simon; Horitani, Masaki; Marts, Amy R.; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Dean, Dennis R.; Raugei, Simone; Hoffman, Brian M.; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Antony, Edwin

    2016-10-04

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) to two ammonia (NH3) molecules, through the action of two component proteins, the MoFe protein and the Fe protein. The catalytic MoFe protein is a symmetric dimer of αβ units, each of which contains one active site FeMo-co (FeMo-co; [7Fe-9S-Mo-C-homocitrate]) and an electron-carrier P cluster. Each half of the nitrogenase ternary complex, in which one Fe protein with two bound ATP molecules has bound to each MoFe protein αβ unit, undergoes an electron transfer (ET) cycle with ET from a Fe protein [4Fe-4S] cluster into its αβ unit followed by the hydrolysis of the two ATP to two ADP and two Pi. The prevailing model holds that each αβ unit of the MoFe protein functions independently. We now report that the ET cycle exhibits negative cooperativity, with ET and ATP hydrolysis in one half of the ternary nitrogenase complex suppressing these processes in the other half. The observed ET, ATP hydrolysis, and Pi release behavior is captured in a global fit to a two-branch negative-cooperativity kinetic model. A possible mechanism for communication between the two halves of MoFe protein is suggested by normal mode analysis showing correlated and anti-correlated motions between the two nitrogenase αβ halves. EPR spectra furthermore show small differences between those of resting-state and singly-reduced MoFe protein that can be attributed to an intra-complex allosteric perturbation of the resting-state FeMo-co in one αβ unit by reduction of FeMo-co in the other. This work is supported as a part of the Biological and Electron Transfer and Catalysis (EFRC) program, an Energy Frontiers Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science (DE-SC0012518) to LCS, by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants HL 63203 and GM 111097to BMH, and R15GM110671 to EA, and by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Bio-Sciences, DOE to SR. The protein

  20. Tailor-Made Pentablock Copolymer Based Formulation for Sustained Ocular Delivery of Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sulabh P.; Mishra, Gyan Prakash; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research article is to report the synthesis and evaluation of novel pentablock copolymers for controlled delivery of macromolecules in the treatment of posterior segment diseases. Novel biodegradable PB copolymers were synthesized by sequential ring-opening polymerization. Various ratios and molecular weights of each block (polyglycolic acid, polyethylene glycol, polylactic acid, and polycaprolactone) were selected for synthesis and to optimize release profile of FITC-BSA, IgG, and bevacizumab from nanoparticles (NPs) and thermosensitive gel. NPs were characterized for particle size, polydispersity, entrapment efficiency, and drug loading. In vitro release study of proteins from NPs alone and composite formulation (NPs suspended in thermosensitive gel) was performed. Composite formulations demonstrated no or negligible burst release with continuous near zero-order release in contrast to NPs alone. Hydrodynamic diameter of protein therapeutics and hydrophobicity of PB copolymer exhibited significant effect on entrapment efficiency and in vitro release profile. CD spectroscopy confirmed retention of structural conformation of released protein. Biological activity of released bevacizumab was confirmed by in vitro cell proliferation and cell migration assays. It can be concluded that novel PB polymers can serve a platform for sustained delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:25045540

  1. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein–protein interaction module

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R.; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Do Heo, Won; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named ‘exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein–protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein–protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues. PMID:27447450

  2. Smart Nanostructures for Cargo Delivery: Uncaging and Activating by Light.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Baghaee-Ravari, Soodeh; Ghazadeh, Mehdi; Mirshekari, Hamid; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-04-05

    Nanotechnology has begun to play a remarkable role in various fields of science and technology. In biomedical applications, nanoparticles have opened new horizons, especially for biosensing, targeted delivery of therapeutics, and so forth. Among drug delivery systems (DDSs), smart nanocarriers that respond to specific stimuli in their environment represent a growing field. Nanoplatforms that can be activated by an external application of light can be used for a wide variety of photoactivated therapies, especially light-triggered DDSs, relying on photoisomerization, photo-cross-linking/un-cross-linking, photoreduction, and so forth. In addition, light activation has potential in photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy, radiotherapy, protected delivery of bioactive moieties, anticancer drug delivery systems, and theranostics (i.e., real-time monitoring and tracking combined with a therapeutic action to different diseases sites and organs). Combinations of these approaches can lead to enhanced and synergistic therapies, employing light as a trigger or for activation. Nonlinear light absorption mechanisms such as two-photon absorption and photon upconversion have been employed in the design of light-responsive DDSs. The integration of a light stimulus into dual/multiresponsive nanocarriers can provide spatiotemporal controlled delivery and release of therapeutic agents, targeted and controlled nanosystems, combined delivery of two or more agents, their on-demand release under specific conditions, and so forth. Overall, light-activated nanomedicines and DDSs are expected to provide more effective therapies against serious diseases such as cancers, inflammation, infections, and cardiovascular disease with reduced side effects and will open new doors toward the treatment of patients worldwide.

  3. Microencapsulated SLN: An innovative strategy for pulmonary protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Diana P; Serra, Carmen; Lino, Paulo R; Gonçalves, Lídia; Taboada, Pablo; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Almeida, António J

    2017-01-10

    Associating protein with nanoparticles is an interesting strategy to improve their bioavailability and biological activity. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been sought as carriers for therapeutic proteins transport to the lung epithelium. Nevertheless, because of their low inertia, nanoparticles intended for pulmonary application usually escape from lung deposition. To overcome this problem, the production of spray-dried powders containing nanoparticles has been recently reported. Herein we developed new hybrid microencapsulated SLN for pulmonary administration, containing a model protein (papain, PAP). PAP was adsorbed onto glyceryl dibehenate and glyceryl tristearate SLN. Physical characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) confirmed the interaction between PAP and SLN corroborating that the protein was efficiently adsorbed at SLN's surface. PAP adsorption onto SLN (PAP-SLN) slightly increased particle size, while decreasing the SLN negative surface charge. The adsorption process followed a Freundlich type of adsorption isotherm. Nanoformulations were then spray-dried, originating spherical microparticles with suitable aerodynamic characteristics. Full characterization of microparticles was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). PAP was released from dry powders in a higher extent when compared with non spray-dried SLN. Nevertheless, protein stability was kept throughout microsphere production, as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The kinetics of ER fusion protein activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Catherine H.; Gamper, Ivonne; Perfetto, Alessandra; Auw, Jeremy; Littlewood, Trevor D.; Evan, Gerard I.

    2014-01-01

    Reversibly switchable proteins are powerful tools with which to explore protein function in vitro and in vivo. For example, the activity of many proteins fused to the hormone-binding domain of the modified estrogen receptor (ERTAM) can be regulated by provision or removal of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Despite the widespread use of ERTAM fusions in vivo, inadequate data are available as to the most efficacious routes for systemic tamoxifen delivery. In this study, we have used two well-characterised ERTAM fusion proteins, both reversibly activated by 4-OHT, to compare the effectiveness and kinetics of 4-OHT delivery in mice in vivo by either tamoxifen in food or by intraperitoneal injection. Our data indicate that dietary tamoxifen offers an effective, facile and ethically preferable means for long term activation of ERTAM fusion proteins in vivo. PMID:24662815

  5. In vitro and in vivo delivery of therapeutic proteins using cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam; Jafarzade, Behnaz Sadat; Mardani, Golnaz

    2017-01-01

    The failure of proteins to penetrate mammalian cells or target tumor cells restricts their value as therapeutic tools in a variety of diseases such as cancers. Recently, protein transduction domains (PTDs) or cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to promote the delivery of therapeutic proteins or peptides into live cells. The successful delivery of proteins mainly depends on their physicochemical properties. Although, linear cell penetrating peptides are one of the most effective delivery vehicles; but currently, cyclic CPPs has been developed to potently transport bioactive full-length proteins into cells. Up to now, several small protein transduction domains from viral proteins including Tat or VP22 could be fused to other peptides or proteins to entry them in various cell types at a dose-dependent approach. A major disadvantage of PTD-fusion proteins is primary uptake into endosomal vesicles leading to inefficient release of the fusion proteins into the cytosol. Recently, non-covalent complex formation (Chariot) between proteins and CPPs has attracted a special interest to overcome some delivery limitations (e.g., toxicity). Many preclinical and clinical trials of CPP-based delivery are currently under evaluation. Generally, development of more efficient protein transduction domains would significantly increase the potency of protein therapeutics. Moreover, the synergistic or combined effects of CPPs with other delivery systems for protein/peptide drug delivery would promote their therapeutic effects in cancer and other diseases. In this review, we will describe the functions and implications of CPPs for delivering the therapeutic proteins or peptides in preclinical and clinical studies.

  6. 78 FR 1219 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing information collection. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and...

  7. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon.

  8. In vivo protein transduction: delivery of PEP-1-SOD1 fusion protein into myocardium efficiently protects against ischemic insult.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-En; Wang, Jia-Ning; Tang, Jun-Ming; Guo, Ling-Yun; Yang, Jian-Ye; Huang, Yong-Zhang; Tan, Yan; Fu, Shou-Zhi; Kong, Xia; Zheng, Fei

    2009-02-28

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is a medical problem occurring as damage to the myocardium following blood flow restoration after a critical period of coronary occlusion. Oxygen free radicals (OFR) are implicated in reperfusion injury after myocardial ischemia. The antioxidant enzyme, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD, also called SOD1) is one of the major means by which cells counteract the deleterious effects of OFR after ischemia. Recently, we reported that a PEP-1-SOD1 fusion protein was efficiently delivered into cultured cells and isolated rat hearts with ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of the PEP-1-SOD1 fusion protein after ischemic insult. Immunofluorescecnce analysis revealed that the expressed and purified PEP-1-SOD1 fusion protein injected into rat tail veins was efficiently transduced into the myocardium with its native protein structure intact. When injected into Sprague-Dawley rat tail veins, the PEP-1- SOD1 fusion protein significantly attenuated myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damage; characterized by improving cardiac function of the left ventricle, decreasing infarct size, reducing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), decreasing the release of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and relieving cardiomyocyte apoptosis. These results suggest that the biologically active intact forms of PEP-1-SOD1 fusion protein will provide an efficient strategy for therapeutic delivery in various diseases related to SOD1 or to OFR.

  9. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation.

  10. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-05-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (A549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment.

  11. Effect of physical activity during pregnancy on mode of delivery.

    PubMed

    Domenjoz, Iris; Kayser, Bengt; Boulvain, Michel

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of structured physical exercise programs during pregnancy on the course of labor and delivery. We conducted a systematic review and metaanalysis using the following data sources: Medline and The Cochrane Library. In our study, we used randomized controlled trials (RCT) that evaluated the effects of exercise programs during pregnancy on labor and delivery. The results are summarized as relative risks. In the 16 RCTs that were included there were 3359 women. Women in exercise groups had a significantly lower risk of cesarean delivery (relative risk, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.99). Birthweight was not significantly reduced in exercise groups. The risk of instrumental delivery was similar among groups (relative risk, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.82-1.22). Data on Apgar score, episiotomy, epidural anesthesia, perineal tear, length of labor, and induction of labor were insufficient to draw conclusions. With the use of data from 11 studies (1668 women), our analysis showed that women in the exercise groups gained significantly less weight than women in control groups (mean difference, -1.13 kg; 95% CI, -1.49 to -0.78). Structured physical exercise during pregnancy reduces the risk of cesarean delivery. This is an important finding to convince women to be active during their pregnancy and should lead the physician to recommend physical exercise to pregnant women, when this is not contraindicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium alginate/dextran methacrylate IPN beads as protecting carriers for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Di Meo, Chiara; Pescosolido, Laura; Coviello, Tommasina; Alhaique, Franco; Matricardi, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, mechanical and protein delivery properties of a system based on the interpenetration of calcium-alginate (Ca-Alg) and dextran-methacrylate (Dex-MA) networks are shown. Interpenetrated hydrogels beads were prepared by means of the alginate chains crosslinking with calcium ions, followed by the exposure to UV light that allows the Dex-MA network formation. Optical microscope analysis showed an average diameter of the IPN beads (Ca-Alg/Dex-MA) of 2 mm. This dimension was smaller than that of Ca-Alg beads because of the Dex-MA presence. Moreover, the strength of the IPN beads, and of their corresponding hydrogels, was influenced by the Dex-MA concentration and the crosslinking time. Model proteins (BSA and HRP) were successfully entrapped into the beads and released at a controlled rate, modulated by changing the Dex-MA concentration. The enzymatic activity of HRP released from the beads was maintained. These novel IPN beads have great potential as protein delivery system.

  13. Catalytic Mesoporous Janus Nanomotors for Active Cargo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synergy between catalytic propulsion and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for the design of Janus nanomotors as active cargo delivery systems with sizes <100 nm (40, 65, and 90 nm). The Janus asymmetry of the nanomotors is given by electron beam (e-beam) deposition of a very thin platinum (2 nm) layer on MSNPs. The chemically powered Janus nanomotors present active diffusion at low H2O2 fuel concentration (i.e., <3 wt %). Their apparent diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 100% compared to their Brownian motion. Due to their mesoporous architecture and small dimensions, they can load cargo molecules in large quantity and serve as active nanocarriers for directed cargo delivery on a chip. PMID:25844893

  14. A Novel Mechanism for Protein Delivery by the Type 3 Secretion System for Extracellularly Secreted Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Dominguez, Farid; Huerta-Cantillo, Jazmin; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2017-03-28

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is essential for bacterial virulence through delivering effector proteins directly into the host cytosol. Here, we identified an alternative delivery mechanism of virulence factors mediated by the T3SS, which consists of the association of extracellularly secreted proteins from bacteria with the T3SS to gain access to the host cytosol. Both EspC, a protein secreted as an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) autotransporter, and YopH, a protein detected on the surface of Yersinia, require a functional T3SS for host cell internalization; here we provide biophysical and molecular evidence to support the concept of the EspC translocation mechanism, which requires (i) an interaction between EspA and an EspC middle segment, (ii) an EspC translocation motif (21 residues that are shared with the YopH translocation motif), (iii) increases in the association and dissociation rates of EspC mediated by EspA interacting with EspD, and (iv) an interaction of EspC with the EspD/EspB translocon pore. Interestingly, this novel mechanism does not exclude the injection model (i.e., EspF) operating through the T3SS conduit; therefore, T3SS can be functioning as an internal conduit or as an external railway, which can be used to reach the translocator pore, and this mechanism appears to be conserved among different T3SS-dependent pathogens.IMPORTANCE The type 3 secretion system is essential for injection of virulence factors, which are delivered directly into the cytosol of the host cells for usurping and subverting host processes. Recent studies have shown that these effectors proteins indeed travel inside an "injectisome" conduit through a single step of translocation by connecting the bacterium and host cell cytoplasms. However, all findings are not compatible with this model. For example, both YopH, a protein detected on the surface of Yersinia, and EspC, an autotransporter protein secreted by enteropathogenic E. coli, require a functional T3

  15. Berberine hydrochloride: anticancer activity and nanoparticulate delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2011-01-01

    Background Berberine hydrochloride is a conventional component in Chinese medicine, and is characterized by a diversity of pharmacological effects. However, due to its hydrophobic properties, along with poor stability and bioavailability, the application of berberine hydrochloride was hampered for a long time. In recent years, the pharmaceutical preparation of berberine hydrochloride has improved to achieve good prospects for clinical application, especially for novel nanoparticulate delivery systems. Moreover, anticancer activity and novel mechanisms have been explored, the chance of regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in cancer cells showing more potential than ever. Therefore, it is expected that appropriate pharmaceutical procedures could be applied to the enormous potential for anticancer efficacy, to give some new insights into anticancer drug preparation in Chinese medicine. Methods and results We accessed conventional databases, such as PubMed, Scope, and Web of Science, using “berberine hydrochloride”, “anti-cancer mechanism”, and “nanoparticulate delivery system” as search words, then summarized the progress in research, illustrating the need to explore reprogramming of cancer cell metabolism using nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Conclusion With increasing research on regulation of cancer cell metabolism by berberine hydrochloride and troubleshooting of issues concerning nanoparticulate delivery preparation, berberine hydrochloride is likely to become a natural component of the nanoparticulate delivery systems used for cancer therapy. Meanwhile, the known mechanisms of berberine hydrochloride, such as decreased multidrug resistance and enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs, along with improvement in patient quality of life, could also provide new insights into cancer cell metabolism and nanoparticulate delivery preparation. PMID:21931477

  16. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    PubMed

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  17. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  18. Protein Conjugation with Amphiphilic Block Copolymers for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Batrakova, Elena; Banks, William A.; Vinogradov, Serguei; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Modification of a model protein, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), with amphiphilic block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (Pluronic), was previously shown to enhance the transport of this protein across the blood—brain barrier in vivo and brain microvessel endothelial cells in vitro. This work develops procedures for synthesis and characterization of HRP with Pluronic copolymers, having different lengths of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) blocks. Four monoamine Pluronic derivatives (L81, P85, L121, P123) were synthesized and successfully conjugated to a model protein, HRP, via biodegradable or nondegradable linkers (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) (DSP), dimethyl 3,3′-dithiobispropionimidate (DTBP), and disuccinimidyl propionate (DSS)). The conjugation was confirmed by HRP amino group titration, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight spectroscopy, and cation-exchange chromatography. HRP conjugates containing an average of one to two Pluronic moieties and retaining in most cases over 70% of the activity were synthesized. Increased cellular uptake of these conjugates was demonstrated using the Mardin-Derby canine kidney cell line and primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells. The optimal modifications included Pluronic L81 and P85. These copolymers have shorter PPO chains compared to Pluronic P123 and L121, which were less efficient. There was little if any dependence of the uptake on the length of the hydrophilic PEO block for the optimal modifications. The proposed modifications may be used to increase cellular uptake of other proteins. PMID:18447367

  19. Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Consumption During Evoked Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Masamoto, Kazuto; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:20616881

  20. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  1. A platform for actively loading cargo RNA to elucidate limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Michelle E.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate intercellular communication through transfer of RNA and protein between cells. Thus, understanding how cargo molecules are loaded and delivered by EVs is of central importance for elucidating the biological roles of EVs and developing EV-based therapeutics. While some motifs modulating the loading of biomolecular cargo into EVs have been elucidated, the general rules governing cargo loading and delivery remain poorly understood. To investigate how general biophysical properties impact loading and delivery of RNA by EVs, we developed a platform for actively loading engineered cargo RNAs into EVs. In our system, the MS2 bacteriophage coat protein was fused to EV-associated proteins, and the cognate MS2 stem loop was engineered into cargo RNAs. Using this Targeted and Modular EV Loading (TAMEL) approach, we identified a configuration that substantially enhanced cargo RNA loading (up to 6-fold) into EVs. When applied to vesicles expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) – gesicles – we observed a 40-fold enrichment in cargo RNA loading. While active loading of mRNA-length (>1.5 kb) cargo molecules was possible, active loading was much more efficient for smaller (~0.5 kb) RNA molecules. We next leveraged the TAMEL platform to elucidate the limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery of mRNA and protein to prostate cancer cells, as a model system. Overall, most cargo was rapidly degraded in recipient cells, despite high EV-loading efficiencies and substantial EV uptake by recipient cells. While gesicles were efficiently internalized via a VSVG-mediated mechanism, most cargo molecules were rapidly degraded. Thus, in this model system, inefficient endosomal fusion or escape likely represents a limiting barrier to EV-mediated transfer. Altogether, the TAMEL platform enabled a comparative analysis elucidating a key opportunity for enhancing EV-mediated delivery to prostate cancer cells, and this technology should be of

  2. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  3. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  4. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particles incorporating a recombinant protein. This recombinant protein was produced with or without a c-terminal peptide previously shown to have high affinity binding to Claudin 4, a protein associated with M cell endocytosis. While the PLGA nanoparticles incorporate the protein throughout the matrix, much of the protein was also displayed on the surface, allowing us to take advantage of the binding activity of the targeting peptide. Accordingly, we found that instillation of these nanoparticles into the nasal passages or stomach of mice was found to significantly enhance their uptake by upper airway and intestinal M cells. Our results suggest that a reasonably simple nanoparticle manufacture method can provide insight into developing an effective needle-free delivery system. PMID:19896996

  5. Protein delivery into live cells by incubation with an endosomolytic agent

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Dayani, Laila; Wang, Ting-Yi; Johnson, Gregory A.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We report on how a dimer of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT, dfTAT, penetrates live cells by escaping from endosomes with a particularly high efficiency. By mediating endosomal leakage, dfTAT also delivers proteins into cultured cells after a simple co-incubation procedure. Cytosolic delivery is achieved in most cells in a culture and only a relatively small amount of material remains trapped inside endosomes. Delivery does not require binding interactions between dfTAT and a protein, multiple molecules can be delivered at once, and delivery can be repeated. Remarkably, dfTAT-mediated delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation, or gene expression. This new delivery strategy should be extremely useful for cell-based assays, cellular imaging applications, and the ex vivo manipulation of cells. PMID:24930129

  6. [Development of a novel transdermal delivery system of peptide and protein drugs using microneedle arrays].

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptide and protein drugs may be limited by the stratum corneum, which is a protective barrier against the entry of microorganisms and water. Many approaches have been utilized to promote peptide and protein drugs delivery across the stratum corneum, including chemical enhancer modification and physical disruption of barrier function. However, it has been difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of peptide and protein drugs via this route without any skin irritation. Recently, attention has been paid to the possibility of using microneedle arrays in delivering peptide and protein drugs into the skin. As a novel and minimally invasive approach, microneedle arrays are capable of creating superficial pathways across the skin for peptide and protein drugs to achieve enhanced transdermal drug delivery. This method combines the efficacy of conventional injection needles with the convenience of transdermal patches, while minimizing the disadvantages of these administration methods. Therefore, microneedle arrays are a very useful alternative method for delivering peptide and protein drugs from the skin into the systemic circulation without any serious damage to skin. In this review, recent challenges in the developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are summarized. Then, future developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are also discussed in order to improve their therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  7. Bioengineered Vaults: Self-Assembling Protein Shell–Lipophilic Core Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  8. A Novel Mechanism for Protein Delivery by the Type 3 Secretion System for Extracellularly Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tejeda-Dominguez, Farid; Huerta-Cantillo, Jazmin; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is essential for bacterial virulence through delivering effector proteins directly into the host cytosol. Here, we identified an alternative delivery mechanism of virulence factors mediated by the T3SS, which consists of the association of extracellularly secreted proteins from bacteria with the T3SS to gain access to the host cytosol. Both EspC, a protein secreted as an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) autotransporter, and YopH, a protein detected on the surface of Yersinia, require a functional T3SS for host cell internalization; here we provide biophysical and molecular evidence to support the concept of the EspC translocation mechanism, which requires (i) an interaction between EspA and an EspC middle segment, (ii) an EspC translocation motif (21 residues that are shared with the YopH translocation motif), (iii) increases in the association and dissociation rates of EspC mediated by EspA interacting with EspD, and (iv) an interaction of EspC with the EspD/EspB translocon pore. Interestingly, this novel mechanism does not exclude the injection model (i.e., EspF) operating through the T3SS conduit; therefore, T3SS can be functioning as an internal conduit or as an external railway, which can be used to reach the translocator pore, and this mechanism appears to be conserved among different T3SS-dependent pathogens. PMID:28351918

  9. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) for oral delivery of protein drugs: II. In vitro transport study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sripriya Venkata Ramana; Agarwal, Payal; Shao, Jun

    2008-10-01

    To develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for protein drugs, and particularly, to test the in vitro transport of beta-lactamase (BLM) by SNEDDS across the cell monolayer. Fluorescently labeled BLM (FITC-BLM), a model protein, formulated into 16 SNEDDS preparations through a solid dispersion technique were studied for transport across MDCK monolayer. All the SNEDDS nanoemulsions resulted in higher transport rate than the free solution. The transport rate by SNEDDS depends on the SNEDDS composition. SNEDDS NE-12-7 (oil: Lauroglycol FCC, surfactant: Cremophor EL and a cosurfactant: Transcutol HP) at the ratio of 5:4:3, rendered the highest transportation rate, 33% as compared to negligible transport by the free solution. FITC-BLM solution mixed with the surfactant and the cosurfactant of SNEDDS NE-12-7 or with blank SNEDDS NE-12-7 increased the transport only by 3.3 and 1.5 folds, respectively, compared to free solution alone. It was found that the monolayer integrity was not compromised in the presence of SNEDDS NE-12-7 or its surfactant/cosurfactant. The SNEDDS significantly increased the transport of FITC-BLM across MDCK monolayer in vitro. SNEDDS may be a potential effective delivery system for non-invasive protein drug delivery.

  10. Intranasal Delivery of Proteins and Peptides in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meredith, M Elizabeth; Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major impediment to the therapeutic delivery of peptides and proteins to the brain. Intranasal delivery often provides a non-invasive means to bypass the BBB. Advantages of using intranasal delivery include minimizing exposure to peripheral organs and tissues, thus reducing systemic side effects. It also allows substances that typically have rapid degradation in the blood time to exert their effect. Intranasal delivery provides the ability to target proteins and peptides to specific regions of the brain when administered with substrates like cyclodextrins. In this review, we examined the use of intranasal delivery of various proteins and peptides that have implications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, focusing especially on albumin, exendin/GLP-1, GALP, insulin, leptin, and PACAP. We have described their rationale for use, distribution in the brain after intranasal injection, how intranasal administration differed from other modes of delivery, and their use in clinical trials, if applicable. Intranasal delivery of drugs, peptides, and other proteins could be very useful in the future for the prevention or treatment of brain related diseases.

  11. Anticancer activity of stoppin based on a novel peptide delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Fang; Wei, Xue-Ni; Ye, Xiao-Lei; Weng, Guo-Bin; Chen, Yi-Chen; Zhao, Ya-Rong; Ji, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Stoppin (L1) is a newly identified anticancer peptide, which is a potent p53‑MDM2/MDMX inhibitor. Due to its limitation in cell delivery efficiency, a new peptide delivery system was developed based on a nucleic acid‑polypeptide‑liposome complex and its stability and effectiveness in vitro was investigated. The nucleic acid‑stoppin‑liposome complex was prepared and characterization of the complex was conducted. The stability of the complex was evaluated by enzyme digestion. Following transfection of the A549 cells with the complex, detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase activity was conducted to evaluate transfection efficiency. In addition, the anticancer activity of the complex was determined by 3‑(4,5‑dimethyl‑thiazolyl‑2)‑2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the particle size of the complex was 102±10 nm and the encapsulation rate was ~100% when the ratio of liposome, L1 and plasmid was: 4 µl:1 µg:2 µg. The enzyme digestion experiment demonstrated that the complex was resistant to pancreatic and DNA enzyme degradation, indicating that the complex had biological stability. Cell transfection demonstrated that it had a mutual promotion effect on delivery, which could be confirmed by GFP fluorescence and luciferase assay. The cell‑killing efficiency of this novel delivery system was three times higher than with stoppin alone at a low concentration. In conclusion, this novel stoppin peptide delivery system was stable. The nucleic acid‑peptide‑liposome complex can protect the internal component from the degradation of enzymes, promote entry of the peptide into the cells and enhance the anti‑tumor activity of stoppin. Therefore, it is a promising approach for peptide delivery, which can be characterized and visualized using plasmids with GFP or luciferase.

  12. Efficient delivery of genome-editing proteins using bioreducible lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Zuris, John A; Meng, Fantao; Rees, Holly; Sun, Shuo; Deng, Pu; Han, Yong; Gao, Xue; Pouli, Dimitra; Wu, Qi; Georgakoudi, Irene; Liu, David R; Xu, Qiaobing

    2016-03-15

    A central challenge to the development of protein-based therapeutics is the inefficiency of delivery of protein cargo across the mammalian cell membrane, including escape from endosomes. Here we report that combining bioreducible lipid nanoparticles with negatively supercharged Cre recombinase or anionic Cas9:single-guide (sg)RNA complexes drives the electrostatic assembly of nanoparticles that mediate potent protein delivery and genome editing. These bioreducible lipids efficiently deliver protein cargo into cells, facilitate the escape of protein from endosomes in response to the reductive intracellular environment, and direct protein to its intracellular target sites. The delivery of supercharged Cre protein and Cas9:sgRNA complexed with bioreducible lipids into cultured human cells enables gene recombination and genome editing with efficiencies greater than 70%. In addition, we demonstrate that these lipids are effective for functional protein delivery into mouse brain for gene recombination in vivo. Therefore, the integration of this bioreducible lipid platform with protein engineering has the potential to advance the therapeutic relevance of protein-based genome editing.

  13. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  14. Delivery of nucleic acids, proteins, and nanoparticles by arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides in rotifers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Liou, Ji-Sing; Chen, Yung-Jen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of short, membrane-permeable cationic peptides that represent a nonviral technology for delivering nanomaterials and macromolecules into live cells. In this study, two arginine-rich CPPs, HR9 and IR9, were found to be capable of entering rotifers. CPPs were able to efficiently deliver noncovalently associated with cargoes, including plasmid DNAs, red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), and semiconductor quantum dots, into rotifers. The functional reporter gene assay demonstrated that HR9-delivered plasmid DNAs containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein and RFP coding sequences could be actively expressed in rotifers. The 1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan assay further confirmed that CPP-mediated cargo delivery was not toxic to rotifers. Thus, these two CPPs hold a great potential for the delivery of exogenous genes, proteins, and nanoparticles in rotifers.

  15. The Yersinia pestis Ail protein mediates binding and Yop delivery to host cells required for plague virulence.

    PubMed

    Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2009-02-01

    Although adhesion to host cells is a critical step in the delivery of cytotoxic Yop proteins by Yersinia pestis, the mechanism has not been defined. To identify adhesins critical for Yop delivery, we initiated two transposon mutagenesis screens using the mariner transposon. To avoid redundant cell binding activities, we initiated the screen with a strain deleted for two known adhesins, pH 6 antigen and the autotransporter, YapC, as well as the Caf1 capsule, which is known to obscure some adhesins. The mutants that emerged contained insertions within the ail (attachment and invasion locus) gene of Y. pestis. A reconstructed mutant with a single deletion in the ail locus (y1324) was severely defective for delivery of Yops to HEp-2 human epithelial cells and significantly defective for delivery of Yops to THP-1 human monocytes. Specifically, the Yop delivery defect was apparent when cell rounding and translocation of an ELK-tagged YopE derivative into host cells were monitored. Although the ail mutant showed only a modest decrease in cell binding capacity in vitro, the KIM5 Deltaail mutant exhibited a >3,000-fold-increased 50% lethal dose in mice. Mice infected with the Deltaail mutant also had 1,000-fold fewer bacteria in their spleens, livers, and lungs 3 days after infection than did those infected with the parental strain, KIM5. Thus, the Ail protein is critical for both Y. pestis type III secretion in vitro and infection in mice.

  16. Secretory delivery of recombinant proteins in attenuated Salmonella strains: potential and limitations of Type I protein transporters.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Heinz P; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich

    2003-07-15

    Live attenuated Salmonella strains have been extensively explored as oral delivery systems for recombinant vaccine antigens and effector proteins with immunoadjuvant and immunomodulatory potential. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in human vaccination trials for various antigens. However, immunization efficiencies with live vaccines are generally significantly lower compared to those monitored in parenteral immunizations with the same vaccine antigen. This is, at least partly, due to the lack of secretory expression systems, enabling large-scale extracellular delivery of vaccine and effector proteins by these strains. Because of their low complexity and the terminal location of the secretion signal in the secreted protein, Type I (ATP-binding cassette) secretion systems appear to be particularly suited for development of such recombinant extracellular expression systems. So far, the Escherichia coli hemolysin system is the only Type I secretion system, which has been adapted to recombinant protein secretion in Salmonella. However, this system has a number of disadvantages, including low secretion capacity, complex genetic regulation, and structural restriction to the secreted protein, which eventually hinder high-level in vivo delivery of recombinant vaccines and effector proteins. Thus, the development of more efficient recombinant protein secretion systems, based on Type I exporters can help to improve efficacies of live recombinant Salmonella vaccines. Type I secretion systems, mediating secretion of bacterial surface layer proteins, such as RsaA in Caulobacter crescentus, are discussed as promising candidates for improved secretory delivery systems.

  17. BSA Nanoparticles for siRNA Delivery: Coating Effects on Nanoparticle Properties, Plasma Protein Adsorption, and In Vitro siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yogasundaram, Haran; Bahniuk, Markian Stephan; Singh, Harsh-Deep; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montezari; Uludağ, Hasan; Unsworth, Larry David

    2012-01-01

    Developing vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, like siRNA, is an area of active research. Nanoparticles composed of bovine serum albumin, stabilized via the adsorption of poly-L-lysine (PLL), have been shown to be potentially inert drug-delivery vehicles. With the primary goal of reducing nonspecific protein adsorption, the effect of using comb-type structures of poly(ethylene glycol) (1 kDa, PEG) units conjugated to PLL (4.2 and 24 kDa) on BSA-NP properties, apparent siRNA release rate, cell viability, and cell uptake were evaluated. PEGylated PLL coatings resulted in NPs with ζ-potentials close to neutral. Incubation with platelet-poor plasma showed the composition of the adsorbed proteome was similar for all systems. siRNA was effectively encapsulated and released in a sustained manner from all NPs. With 4.2 kDa PLL, cellular uptake was not affected by the presence of PEG, but PEG coating inhibited uptake with 24 kDa PLL NPs. Moreover, 24 kDa PLL systems were cytotoxic and this cytotoxicity was diminished upon PEG incorporation. The overall results identified a BSA-NP coating structure that provided effective siRNA encapsulation while reducing ζ-potential, protein adsorption, and cytotoxicity, necessary attributes for in vivo application of drug-delivery vehicles. PMID:22919392

  18. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  19. A bacterial type III secretion-based protein delivery tool for broad applications in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon J.; Schmutz, Christoph; Kasper, Christoph A.; Amstutz, Marlise; Schmidt, Alexander; Sauteur, Loïc; Vigano, M. Alessandra; Low, Shyan Huey; Affolter, Markus; Cornelis, Guy R.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    Methods enabling the delivery of proteins into eukaryotic cells are essential to address protein functions. Here we propose broad applications to cell biology for a protein delivery tool based on bacterial type III secretion (T3S). We show that bacterial, viral, and human proteins, fused to the N-terminal fragment of the Yersinia enterocolitica T3S substrate YopE, are effectively delivered into target cells in a fast and controllable manner via the injectisome of extracellular bacteria. This method enables functional interaction studies by the simultaneous injection of multiple proteins and allows the targeting of proteins to different subcellular locations by use of nanobody-fusion proteins. After delivery, proteins can be freed from the YopE fragment by a T3S-translocated viral protease or fusion to ubiquitin and cleavage by endogenous ubiquitin proteases. Finally, we show that this delivery tool is suitable to inject proteins in living animals and combine it with phosphoproteomics to characterize the systems-level impact of proapoptotic human truncated BID on the cellular network. PMID:26598622

  20. Elastic-contractile model proteins: Physical chemistry, protein function and drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    Urry, Dan W; Urry, Kelley D; Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michal

    2010-12-30

    This review presents the structure and physico-chemical properties of ECMPs, elastic-contractile model proteins using sparse design modifications of elastic (GVGVP)(n); it describes the capacity of ECMP to perform the energy conversions that sustain living organisms; it arrives at the hydration thermodynamics of ECMP in terms of the change in Gibbs free energy of hydrophobic association, ΔG(HA), and the apolar-polar repulsive free energy of hydration, ΔG(ap); it applies ΔG(HA), ΔG(ap), and the nature of elasticity to describe the function of basic diverse proteins, namely - the F₁-motor of ATP synthase, Complex III of mitochondria, the KscA potassium-channel, and the molecular chaperonin, GroEL/ES; it applies ΔG(HA) and ΔG(ap) to describe the function of ABC exporter proteins that confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) on micro-organisms and human carcinomas and suggests drug modifications with which to overcome MDR. Using ECMP, means are demonstrated, for quantifying drug hydrophobicity with which to combat MDR and for preparing ECMP drug delivery nanoparticles, ECMPddnp, decorated with synthetic antigen-binding fragments, Fab1 and Fab2, with which to target specific up-regulated receptors, characteristic of human carcinoma cells, for binding and localized drug release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bicistronic gene transfer tools for delivery of miRNAs and protein coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Michelle L; Chang, Henry C; Fekete, Donna M

    2013-09-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a category of small RNAs that modulate levels of proteins via post-transcriptional inhibition. Currently, a standard strategy to overexpress miRNAs is as mature miRNA duplexes, although this method is cumbersome if multiple miRNAs need to be delivered. Many of these miRNAs are found within introns and processed through the RNA polymerase II pathway. We have designed a vector to exploit this naturally-occurring intronic pathway to deliver the three members of the sensory-specific miR-183 family from an artificial intron. In one version of the vector, the downstream exon encodes the reporter (GFP) while another version encodes a fusion protein created between the transcription factor Atoh1 and the hemaglutinin epitope, to distinguish it from endogenous Atoh1. In vitro analysis shows that the miRNAs contained within the artificial intron are processed and bind to their targets with specificity. The genes downstream are successfully translated into protein and identifiable through immunofluorescence. More importantly, Atoh1 is proven functional through in vitro assays. These results suggest that this cassette allows expression of miRNAs and proteins simultaneously, which provides the opportunity for joint delivery of specific translational repressors (miRNA) and possibly transcriptional activators (transcription factors). This ability is attractive for future gene therapy use.

  2. Liposome-protein corona in a physiological environment: challenges and opportunities for targeted delivery of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    Active targeting that exploits the (over)expression of surface receptors in target cells by ligand incorporation is a central concept in nanomedicine research. Despite unprecedented efforts, no targeted liposome-based therapeutics is commercially available for clinical practice. What is inhibiting the efficient translation of targeted liposome technology from bench to bedside? After introduction in the bloodstream, the lipid surface is immediately modified by the adsorption of a "protein corona" and preserving the surface functionality appears to be challenging. On the other hand, a long-standing corona with receptor-binding sites could associate with the target cell long enough to activate the cell's uptake machinery, triggering liposome endocytosis and intracellular cargo delivery. This opens the intriguing possibility to manipulate the corona composition by liposome design. This review will focus on the emerging field of liposome-protein corona research from basic, descriptive research to readily applicable knowledge and technologies for implementation in drug improvement and development. From the clinical editor: This review is addressing the liposome protein corona research concerning the potential gains in drug improvement and for drug development.

  3. All-optical control of neuronal function via optical delivery of light-sensitive proteins and optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Alex; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    While pulsed laser beams have been used for stimulation of neurons, cellular specificity during optical stimulation is achieved by photo-sensitization of genetically-targeted cells by optogenetic means. However, till date, the process of optogenetic-sensitization primarily involves use of viral vectors. In rare occasions, electroporation has been used. Here, we report an all-optical method in which pulsed laser beam is used for delivery of genes, encoding optogenetic probes, to spatially-targeted cells, followed by optogenetic stimulation and optical detection of the activation process. Use of laser microbeam enabled highly precise spatially-patterned delivery of optogenes, as confirmed by expression of conjugated fluorescent protein. Light-activation of opsin-expressing cells was confirmed by calcium-imaging. The laser-assisted expression of optogenetic probes in spatially-targeted regions in combination with light-assisted activation and optical detection of neural activity will help in better understanding of the neuronal circuitry.

  4. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay.

  5. Efficient delivery of genome-editing proteins using bioreducible lipid nanoparticles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A central challenge to the development of protein-based therapeutics is the inefficiency of delivery of protein cargo across the mammalian cell membrane, including escape from endosomes. Here we report that combining bioreducible lipid nanoparticles with negatively supercharged Cre recombinase or an...

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli into a protein delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Analise Z; Spears, William E; Du, Juan; Tan, Kah Yong; Wagers, Amy J; Lesser, Cammie F

    2015-05-15

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications.

  7. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  8. Delivery of ribosome-inactivating protein toxin into cancer cells with shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Doukas, Apostolos G; Hamblin, Michael R

    2003-01-10

    We report on the use of shock waves delivered by a shock-tube to permeabilize cancer cells and potentiate the cytotoxicity of the type-1 ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. We studied human colorectal cancer HT29 and ovarian cancer OVCAR-5 cells, and used two different cytotoxicity assays, colony formation and loss of mitochondrial activity. A single shock wave and saporin (10(-9) M) produced significant toxicity not seen with either shock wave or drug alone. Increasing the number of shock waves up to five further increased cytotoxicity. Higher toxicity was seen with the clonogenic assay compared to MTT assay. Shock waves may have applications in promoting cytoplasmic delivery of toxins into cancer cells after intratumoral injection.

  9. GSH-Activated NIR Fluorescent Prodrug for Podophyllotoxin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajing; Zhu, Shaojia; Gu, Kaizhi; Guo, Zhiqian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Mingwei; Amin, Hesham M; Zhu, Weihong; Shi, Ping

    2017-09-06

    Theranostic prodrug therapy enables the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs with minimized adverse effects and real-time in situ monitoring of activation of the prodrugs. In this work, we report the synthesis and biological assessment of the near-infrared (NIR) prodrug DCM-S-PPT and its amphiphilic copolymer (mPEG-DSPE)-encapsulated nanoparticles. DCM-S-PPT is composed of podophyllotoxin (PPT) as the anticancer moiety and a dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran (DCM) derivative as the NIR fluorescent reporter, which are linked by a thiol-specific cleavable disulfide bond. In vitro experiments indicated that DCM-S-PPT has low cytotoxicity and that glutathione (GSH) can activate DCM-S-PPT resulting in PPT release and a concomitant significant enhancement in NIR fluorescence at 665 nm. After being intravenously injected into tumor-bearing nude mice, DCM-S-PPT exhibited excellent tumor-activated performance. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that mPEG-DSPE as a nanocarrier loaded with DCM-S-PPT (mPEG-DSPE/DCM-S-PPT) showed even greater tumor-targeting performance than DCM-S-PPT on account of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Its tumor-targeting ability and specific drug release in tumors make DCM-S-PPT a promising prodrug that could provide a significant strategy for theranostic drug delivery systems.

  10. Silk fibroin-based complex particles with bioactive encrustation for bone morphogenetic protein 2 delivery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pujiang; Abbah, Sunny A; Saran, Kushagra; Zhang, Yong; Li, Jun; Wong, Hee-Kit; Goh, James C H

    2013-12-09

    Application of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) currently faces its challenges, and its efficacy of delivery has to be improved. The proper dosage of the powerful bioactive molecule is still under discussion and needs to be investigated further. In this work, pure silk fibroin particles and particles with calcium carbonate encrustation (complex particles) are designed, developed, and functionalized by BMP-2. These are used to deliver the bioactive molecule to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to induce osteogenic differentiation. Results are compared with those of control groups of BMP-2 carriers under the same condition. Silk fibroin-based particles with size and component variations are prepared by self-assembly, desolvation, and soft template formation to improve BMP-2 loading efficiency. Results show that the particles significantly enhance osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, which is evident in the high ALP enzyme activity as well as the increased level of expression of osteogenic genes. Specifically, the combination of calcium compound and BMP-2 in the silk fibroin-calcium carbonate complex particles synergistically enhances osteogenesis. Release tests and mathematical modeling are applied to describe BMP-2 dissolution profiles, and the release mechanism is based on diffusion and polymer chain relaxation. In summary, the particles show high efficacies of BMP-2 delivery, and introduction of the complex particle can progressively enhance osteogenesis.

  11. Evaluation of biodegradable polyester-co-lactone microparticles for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Tawfeek, Hesham M; Khidr, Sayed H; Samy, Eman M; Ahmed, Sayed M; Gaskell, Elsie E; Hutcheon, Gillian A

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone) (PGA-co-PDL) was previously evaluated for the colloidal delivery of α-chymotrypsin. In this article, the effect of varying polymer molecular weight (MW) and chemistry on particle size and morphology; encapsulation efficiency; in vitro release; and the biological activity of α-chymotrypsin (α-CH) and lysozyme (LS) were investigated. Microparticles were prepared using emulsion solvent evaporation and evaluated by various methods. Altering the MW or monomer ratio of PGA-co-PDL did not significantly affect the encapsulation efficiency and overall poly(1,3-propanediol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone) (PPA-co-PDL) demonstrated the highest encapsulation efficiency. In vitro release varied between polymers, and the burst release for α-CH-loaded microparticles was lower when a higher MW PGA-co-PDL or more hydrophobic PPA-co-PDL was used. The results suggest that, although these co-polyesters could be useful for protein delivery, little difference was observed between the different PGA-co-PDL polymers and PPA-co-PDL generally provided a higher encapsulation and slower release of enzyme than the other polymers tested.

  12. Overview on zein protein: a promising pharmaceutical excipient in drug delivery systems and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Labib, Gihan

    2017-07-06

    Natural pharmaceutical excipients have been applied extensively in the past decades owing to their safety and biocompatibility. Zein, a natural protein of plant origin offers great benefit over other synthetic polymers used in controlled drug and biomedical delivery systems. It was used in a variety of medical fields including pharmaceutical and biomedical drug targeting, vaccine, tissue engineering, and gene delivery. Being biodegradable and biocompatible, the current review focuses on the history and the medical application of zein as an attractive still promising biopolymer. Areas covered: The current review gives a broadscope on zein as a still promising protein excipient in different fields. Zein- based drug and biomedical delivery systems are discussed with special focus on current and potential application in controlled drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. Expert opinion: Zein as a protein of natural origin can still be considered a promising polymer in the field of drug delivery systems as well as in tissue engineering. Although different researchers spotted light on zein application in different industrial fields extensively, the feasibility of its use in the field of drug delivery replenished by investigators in recent years has not yet been fully approached.

  13. A Solvent-Free Thermosponge Nanoparticle Platform for Efficient Delivery of Labile Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have gained attention recently for treatment of a myriad of human diseases due to their high potency and unique mechanisms of action. We present the development of a novel polymeric thermosponge nanoparticle for efficient delivery of labile proteins using a solvent-free polymer thermo-expansion mechanism with clinical potential, capable of effectively delivering a range of therapeutic proteins in a sustained manner with no loss of bioactivity, with improved biological half-lives and efficacy in vivo. PMID:25333768

  14. Tat-mediated protein delivery in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Delom, Frederic; Fessart, Delphine; Caruso, Marie-Elaine; Chevet, Eric . E-mail: eric.chevet@mcgill.ca

    2007-01-19

    The Tat protein from HIV-1 fused with heterologous proteins traverses biological membranes in a transcellular process called: protein transduction. This has already been successfully exploited in various biological models, but never in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. TAT-eGFP or GST-eGFP proteins were fed to C. elegans worms, which resulted in the specific localization of Tat-eGFP to epithelial intestinal cells. This system represents an efficient tool for transcellular transduction in C. elegans intestinal cells. Indeed, this approach avoids the use of tedious purification steps to purify the TAT fusion proteins and allows for rapid analyses of the transduced proteins. In addition, it may represent an efficient tool to functionally analyze the mechanisms of protein transduction as well as to complement RNAi/KO in the epithelial intestinal system. To sum up, the advantage of this technology is to combine the potential of bacterial expression system and the Tat-mediated transduction technique in living worm.

  15. Outer eggshell membrane as delivery vehicle for polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Fei; Du, Bingjian; Jiao, Tong; Zhang, Chunyue; Leng, Xiaojing

    2013-01-23

    This study investigates the features of a new type of delivery system prepared by combining a natural outer eggshell membrane (OESM) with emulsified microcapsules. The loading efficiency, controlled release properties, and forming mechanisms of the prepared system were studied. The polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E can be attached to highly cross-linked protein fiber networks of OESM. This attachment could be reinforced more than 2-fold using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The combined OESM/microcapsule delivery system significantly exhibited better controlled release properties than the microcapsules alone because of the steric blocking effect. Moreover, the OESM delivery system incorporated with microcapsules formed by pectin/protein as wall material showed more resistance against enzymatic attacks because of the formation of compact aggregates promoted by electrostatic effects.

  16. Past, Present, and Future Technologies for Oral Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, RAJESH; SINGH, SHAILESH; LILLARD, JAMES W.

    2015-01-01

    Biological drugs are usually complex proteins and cannot be orally delivered due to problems related to degradation in the acidic and protease-rich environment of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The high molecular weight of these drugs often results in poor absorption into the periphery when administered orally. The most common route of administration for these therapeutic proteins is injection. Most of these proteins have short serum half-lives and need to be administered frequently or in high doses to be effective. So, difficulties in the administration of protein-based drugs provides the motivation for developing drug delivery systems (DDSs) capable of maintaining therapeutic drug levels without side effects as well as traversing the deleterious mucosal environment. Employing a polymer as an entrapment matrix is a common feature among the different types of systems currently being pursued for protein delivery. Protein release from these matrices can occur through various mechanisms, such as diffusion through or erosion of the polymer matrix, and sometimes a combination of both. Encapsulation of proteins in liposomes has also been a widely investigated technology for protein delivery. All of these systems have merit and our worthy of pursuit. PMID:17918721

  17. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed. PMID:25787736

  18. Non-destructively shattered mesoporous silica for protein drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Chen, Baowei; Li, Xiaolin; Qi, Wen N.; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been extensively used for entrapping small chemical molecules and biomacromolecules. We hypothesize that the loading density of biomacromlecules such as proteins in mesoporous silicas could be limited due to mesopore disorderness and depth because of some pore volume inaccessible. We innovatively shattered mesoporous silicas resulting in reduced particle sizes and improved intramesoporous structures in aqueous solution by a powerful sonication, where the mesoporous structures were still well maintained. The sonication-shattered mesoporous silicas can allow protein loading densities to be increased by more than 170%, demonstrating that significantly more mesoporous room of the silicas could become accessible for biomacromolecule loading after the sonication-shattering.

  19. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Kara L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-04-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed.

  20. Silk-elastin-like protein biomaterials for the controlled delivery of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenwen; Rollett, Alexandra; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Genetically engineered biomaterials are useful for controlled delivery owing to their rational design, tunable structure-function, biocompatibility, degradability and target specificity. Silk-elastin-like proteins (SELPs), a family of genetically engineered recombinant protein polymers, possess these properties. Additionally, given the benefits of combining semicrystalline silk-blocks and elastomeric elastin-blocks, SELPs possess multi-stimuli responsive properties and tenability, thereby, becoming promising candidates for targeted cancer therapeutics delivery and controlled gene release. Areas covered An overview of SELP biomaterials for drug delivery and gene release is provided. Biosynthetic strategies used for SELP production, fundamental physicochemical properties, and self-assembly mechanisms are discussed. The review focuses on sequence-structure-function relationships, stimuli responsive features, and current and potential drug delivery applications. Expert opinion The tunable material properties allow SELPs to be pursued as promising biomaterials for nano-carriers and injectable drug release systems. Current applications of SELPs have focused on thermally-triggered biomaterial formats for the delivery of therapeutics, based on local hyperthermia in tumors or infections. Other prominent controlled release applications of SELPs as injectable hydrogels for gene release have also been pursued. Further biomedical applications that utilize other stimuli to trigger the reversible material responses of SELPs for targeted delivery, including pH, ionic strength, redox, enzymatic stimuli and electric field, are in progress. Exploiting these additional stimuli responsive features will provide a broader range of functional biomaterials for controlled therapeutics release and tissue regeneration. PMID:25476201

  1. Synthesis and application of photodegradable microspheres for spatiotemporal control of protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitt, Mark W.; Han, Bruce W.; Kloxin, April M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present a photodegradable microparticle system that can be employed to entrap and deliver bioactive proteins to cells during culture. By using a photosensitive delivery system, experimenters can achieve a wide variety of spatiotemporally regulated release profiles with a single microparticle formulation, thereby enabling one to probe many questions as to how protein presentation can be manipulated to regulate cell function. Photodegradable microparticles were synthesized via inverse suspension polymerization with a mean diameter of 22 μm, and degradation was demonstrated upon exposure to several irradiation conditions. The protein-loaded depots were incorporated into cell cultures and release of bioactive protein was quantified during the photodegradation process. This phototriggered release allowed for the delivery of TGF-β1 to stimulate PE25 cells and for the delivery of fluorescently labeled Annexin V to assay apoptotic 3T3 fibroblasts during culture. By incorporating these photoresponsive protein delivery depots into cell culture, new types of experiments are now possible to test hypotheses about how individual or multiple soluble factors might affect cell function when presented in a uniform, temporally varying, or gradient manner. PMID:22447635

  2. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  3. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B; Karmali, Priya P; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M

    2017-03-07

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4-6 h) that remains stable for up to 4-6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA-LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable.

  4. From Delivery to Adoption of Physical Activity Guidelines: Realist Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Liliana; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-10-08

    Evidence-based guidelines published by health authorities for the promotion of health-enhancing physical activity (PA), continue to be implemented unsuccessfully and demonstrate a gap between evidence and policies. This review synthesizes evidence on factors influencing delivery, adoption and implementation of PA promotion guidelines within different policy sectors (e.g., health, transport, urban planning, sport, education). Published literature was initially searched using PubMed, EBSCO, Google Scholar and continued through an iterative snowball technique. The literature review spanned the period 2002-2017. The realist synthesis approach was adopted to review the content of 39 included studies. An initial programme theory with a four-step chain from evidence emersion to implementation of guidelines was tested. The synthesis furthers our understanding of the link between PA guidelines delivery and the actions of professionals responsible for implementation within health services, school departments and municipalities. The main mechanisms identified for guidance implementation were scientific legitimation, enforcement, feasibility, familiarity with concepts and PA habits. Threats emerged to the successful implementation of PA guidelines at national/local jurisdictional levels. The way PA guidelines are developed may influence their adoption by policy-makers and professionals. Useful lessons emerged that may inform synergies between policymaking and professional practices, promoting win-win multisectoral strategies.

  5. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    PubMed Central

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  6. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cell-penetrating DNA-binding protein as a safe and efficient naked DNA delivery carrier in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Sung; Yang, Seung-Woo; Hong, Dong-Ki; Kim, Woo-Taek; Kim, Ho-Guen; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2010-01-29

    Non-viral gene delivery is a safe and suitable alternative to viral vector-mediated delivery to overcome the immunogenicity and tumorigenesis associated with viral vectors. Using the novel, human-origin Hph-1 protein transduction domain that can facilitate the transduction of protein into cells, we developed a new strategy to deliver naked DNA in vitro and in vivo. The new DNA delivery system contains Hph-1-GAL4 DNA-binding domain (DBD) fusion protein and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter plasmid that includes the five repeats of GAL4 upstream activating sequence (UAS). Hph-1-GAL4-DBD protein formed complex with plasmid DNA through the specific interaction between GAL4-DBD and UAS, and delivered into the cells via the Hph-1-PTD. The pEGFP DNA was successfully delivered by the Hph-1-GAL4 system, and the EGFP was effectively expressed in mammalian cells such as HeLa and Jurkat, as well as in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) plant cells. When 10 {mu}g of pEGFP DNA was intranasally administered to mice using Hph-1-GAL4 protein, a high level of EGFP expression was detected throughout the lung tissue for 7 days. These results suggest that an Hph-1-PTD-mediated DNA delivery strategy may be an useful non-viral DNA delivery system for gene therapy and DNA vaccines.

  8. Light-activated, in situ forming gel for sustained suprachoroidal delivery of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Puneet; Barros, Matthew; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-08-05

    after release from the gel. As the cross-linking duration was increased to 10 min, the gel/antibody was better confined at the injection site in excised rabbit eye suprachoroidal space. Delivery of Alexa Fluor 488 dye conjugated bevacizumab was sustained for at least 60 days in the suprachoroidal space of SD rats. PCM and HEMA gel sustained bevacizumab release for 4 months and maintained the stability and VEGF-binding activity of bevacizumab. Therefore, light-activated PCM and HEMA gel is suitable for in situ gel formation and sustained protein delivery in the suprachoroidal space.

  9. Light activated, In situ Forming Gel for Sustained Suprachoroidal Delivery of Bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Puneet; Barros, Matthew; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2014-01-01

    dichroism confirmed that secondary β-sheet structure of bevacizumab was maintained after release from the gel. As the cross-linking duration was increased to 10 minutes, the gel/antibody was better confined at the injection site in excised rabbit eye suprachoroidal space. Delivery of Alexa Fluor® 488 dye conjugated bevacizumab was sustained for at least 60 days in the suprachoroidal space of SD rats. Conclusion PCM and HEMA gel sustained bevacizumab release for 4 months and maintained the stability and VEGF-binding activity of bevacizumab. Light activated PCM and HEMA gel is suitable for in situ gel formation and sustained protein delivery in the suprachoroidal space. PMID:23734705

  10. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  11. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  12. The uptake machinery of clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins--a cell delivery system for fusion proteins and polypeptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Barth, Holger; Blöcker, Dagmar; Aktories, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin, Clostridum perfringens iota toxin, Clostridium difficile ADP-ribosyltransferase, and the Bacillus-produced vegetative insecticidal proteins, target the cytoskeleton by ADP-ribosylation of actin. All these toxins are binary in structure and consist of an enzyme component, possessing ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and a separated binding and translocation component, which is involved in the delivery of the enzyme component into the cell. The toxins are not only important virulence factors but also cell biological tools to study the function of the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, the binary toxins turned out to be effective transporter systems for the delivery of specific fusion toxins (e.g., Rho-ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme) into cells. The present review describes the biological functions of the toxins, focuses on recent studies on the uptake and delivery mechanism and discusses the usage as a drug delivery system.

  13. The augmentation of intracellular delivery of peptide therapeutics by artificial protein transduction domains.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Sugita, Toshiki; Mukai, Yohei; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs), such as HIV-derived Tat, have been successfully used as functional biomaterials for intracellular delivery of anti-cancer macromolecular drugs (protein, peptides, and oligonucleotides). Although there were therefore great expectations regarding the therapeutic potential of PTDs for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics, their clinical application so far has been extremely limited because of the relatively high concentrations required to mediate any effects on cancer cells in vitro or in vivo. In this context, improving the transduction efficiency of PTDs using phage display-based molecular evolution techniques may be useful for creating artificial PTDs with high efficiency and safety. Here, we report an evaluation of transduction efficiency and toxicity of such artificial PTDs (designated mT02 and mT03) compared with Tat. The internalization of mT02 was the most rapid and efficient by a mechanism different from the usual macropinocytosis. Furthermore, we found that artificial PTDs fused with survivin antagonistic peptide potentiate tumor cell-cytostatic activity. Thus, the results of this work provide new insights for designing new-generation peptide therapeutics for a wide variety of cancers as well as those expressing survivin.

  14. Poly(amidoamine) polymers: soluble linear amphiphilic drug-delivery systems for genes, proteins and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Marie W; Griffiths, Peter; Ferruti, Paolo; Richardson, Simon C W

    2011-07-01

    Polymer-drug and polymer-protein conjugates are emerging as a robust and well-characterized class of therapeutic entity. Although there are no low-molecular-weight soluble polymer conjugates in routine clinical use, there are many examples of routinely used high-molecular-weight drugs conjugated to soluble polymers (e.g., Oncospar). Advances in synthetic polymer chemistry have fostered the development of linear poly(amidoamine)s (PAA)s that impart both biodegradability, 'smart' (pH responsive) biological activity and biocompatibility. In their linear form, such as hyper-branched poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, linear PAAs can be used to deliver large therapeutic entities such as peptides, proteins and genes to either the cytosol or nucleus. Furthermore, these polymers offer great potential in vivo due to their ability to either target the liver or be directed away from the liver and enter tumor mass via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. PAAs also exhibit minimal toxicity (dependent upon backbone chemistry), relative to well-characterized polymers used for gene delivery. The propensity of PAAs to modulate intracellular trafficking resulting in their cytosolic translocation has also recently been quantified in vivo and is the primary focus of this article.

  15. Tumor-targeted Nanoparticle Delivery of HuR siRNA Inhibits Lung Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo By Disrupting the Oncogenic Activity of the RNA-binding Protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Babu, Anish; Amreddy, Narsireddy; Srivastava, Akhil; Chen, Allshine; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Kompella, Uday B; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2017-08-01

    Selective downregulation of the human antigen R (HuR) protein by siRNA may provide a powerful approach for treating lung cancer. To this end, we investigated the efficacy of transferrin receptor-targeted liposomal nanoparticle-based HuR siRNA (HuR-TfNP) therapy and compared with control siRNA (C)-TfNP therapy both, in vitro and in vivo using lung cancer models. In vitro studies showed HuR-TfNP, but not C-TfNP, efficiently downregulated HuR and HuR-regulated proteins in A549, and HCC827 lung cancer cells, resulting in reduced cell viability, inhibition of cell migration and invasion, and induction of G1 cell-cycle arrest culminating in apoptosis. However, HuR-TfNP activity in normal MRC-9 lung fibroblasts was negligible. In vivo biodistribution study demonstrated that fluorescently labeled HuR-siRNA or ICG dye-loaded TfNP localized in tumor tissues. Efficacy studies showed intratumoral or intravenous administration of HuR-TfNP significantly inhibited A549 (>55% inhibition) and HCC827 (>45% inhibition) subcutaneous tumor growth compared with C-TfNP. Furthermore, HuR-TfNP treatment reduced HuR, Ki67, and CD31 expression and increased caspase-9 and PARP cleavage and TUNEL-positive staining indicative of apoptotic cell death in tumor tissues compared with C-TfNP treatment. The antitumor activity of HuR-TfNP was also observed in an A549-luc lung metastatic model, as significantly fewer tumor nodules (9.5 ± 3.1; P < 0.001; 88% inhibition) were observed in HuR-TfNP-treated group compared with the C-TfNP-treated group (77.7 ± 20.1). Significant reduction in HuR, Ki67, and CD31 expression was also observed in the tumor tissues of HuR-TfNP-treatment compared with C-TfNP treatment. Our findings highlight HuR-TfNP as a promising nanotherapeutic system for lung cancer treatment. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(8); 1470-86. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  17. Energy and Protein Delivery in Overweight and Obese Children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Enid E; Ariagno, Katelyn A; Stenquist, Nicole; Anderson, Daniela; Muñoz, Eliana; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2017-06-01

    Early and optimal energy and protein delivery have been associated with improved clinical outcomes in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Overweight and obese children in the PICU may be at risk for suboptimal macronutrient delivery; we aimed to describe macronutrient delivery in this cohort. We performed a retrospective study of PICU patients ages 2-21 years, with body mass index (BMI) ≥85th percentile and >48 hours stay. Nutrition variables were extracted regarding nutrition screening and assessment, energy and protein prescription, and delivery. Data from 83 patient encounters for 52 eligible patients (52% male; median age 9.6 [5-15] years) were included. The study cohort had a longer median PICU length of stay (8 vs 5 days, P < .0001) and increased mortality rate (6/83 vs 182/5572, P = .045) than concurrent PICU patient encounters. Detailed nutrition assessment was documented for 60% (50/83) of patient encounters. Energy expenditure was estimated primarily by predictive equations. Stress factor >1.0 was applied in 44% (22/50). Median energy delivered as a percentage of estimated requirements by the Schofield equation was 34.6% on day 3. Median protein delivered as a percentage of recommended intake was 22.1% on day 3. The study cohort had suboptimal nutrition assessments and macronutrient delivery during their PICU course. Mortality and duration of PICU stay were greater when compared with the general PICU population. Nutrition assessment, indirect calorimetry-guided energy prescriptions, and optimizing the delivery of energy and protein must be emphasized in this cohort. The impact of these practices on clinical outcomes must be investigated.

  18. A modular DNA carrier protein based on the structure of diphtheria toxin mediates target cell-specific gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Uherek, C; Fominaya, J; Wels, W

    1998-04-10

    Modular fusion proteins that combine distinct functions required for cell type-specific uptake and intracellular delivery of DNA present an attractive approach for the development of self-assembling vectors for targeted gene delivery. Here, we describe a novel DNA carrier protein termed GD5 that mimics the structure of the bacterial diphtheria toxin (DT) and facilitates target cell-specific gene transfer via receptor-mediated endocytosis. GD5 carries at the N terminus the DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor Gal4, which is connected to a C-terminal antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated ErbB2 antigen via an internal DT translocation domain as an endosome escape activity. Bacterially expressed GD5 protein specifically bound to ErbB2-expressing cells and formed protein-DNA complexes with a luciferase reporter gene construct. These complexes, after compensation of excess negative charge with poly-L-lysine, served as a specific transfection vector for ErbB2-expressing cells. Inhibitors of endosomal acidification drastically reduced GD5-mediated transfection, indicating that the DT translocation domain of GD5, similar to the parental toxin, is strictly dependent on the transit through an acidic environment. Our results suggest that fusion proteins that employ the natural endosome escape mechanism of bacterial toxins might aid in the development of efficient nonviral vectors for applications in gene therapy.

  19. Allostery in BAX protein activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenyan; Zhang, Hansi; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-11-01

    BAX is a member of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family of proteins, which is involved in the regulation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In the process of apoptosis, BH3-only molecules activate cytosolic BAX. Activated BAX molecules insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane with their [Formula: see text]-helix and form oligomers that lead to membrane poration, resulting in the release of apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Recently, a novel interaction site for the binding of the BIM SAHB ligand to BAX was reported. BIM SAHB binding was shown to invoke the exposure of the 6A7 epitope (amino acids 13-19) and of the BH3 domain of BAX, followed by mobilization of the BAX [Formula: see text]-helix. However, the intramolecular pathway for signal transmission in BAX, from BIM SAHB binding to mobilization of the [Formula: see text]-helix largely remained elusive. For a molecular understanding of the activation of BAX, and thus the first steps in apoptosis, we performed microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations both of the BAX protein and of the BAX:BIM SAHB complex in aqueous solution. In agreement with experiment, the 6A7 and BH3 domains adopt a more solvent-exposed conformation within the BAX:BIM SAHB complex. BIM SAHB binding was found to stabilize the secondary structure of the [Formula: see text]9-helix. A force distribution analysis revealed a force network of residue-residue interactions responsible for signal transmission from the BIM SAHB binding site predominantly via the [Formula: see text]4- and [Formula: see text]6-helices to the [Formula: see text]9-helix on the opposite site of the protein.

  20. Superporous polyacrylate/chitosan IPN hydrogels for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Erce, Deniz; Demirtaş, T Tolga

    2011-11-01

    In this study, poly(acrylamide), poly(AAm), and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid), poly(AAm-co-AA) superporous hydrogels (SPHs) were synthesized by radical polymerization in the presence of gas blowing agent, sodium bicarbonate. In addition, ionically crosslinked chitosan (CH) superporous hydrogels were synthesized to form interpenetrating superporous hydrogels, i.e. poly(AAm)-CH and poly(AAm-co-AA)-CH SPH-IPNs. The hydrogels have a structure of interconnected pores with pore sizes of approximately 100-150 μm. Although the extent of swelling increased when AA were incorporated to the poly(AAm) structure, the time to reach the equilibrium swelling (~30 s) was not affected so much. In the presence of chitosan network mechanical properties significantly improved when compared with SPHs, however, equilibrium swelling time (~30 min) was prolonged significantly as due to the lower porosities and pore sizes of SPH-IPNs than that of SPHs. Model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was loaded into SPHs and SPH-IPNs by solvent sorption in very short time (<1 h) and very high capacities (~30-300 mg BSA/g dry gel) when compared to conventional hydrogels. BSA release profiles from SPHs and SPH-IPNs were characterized by an initial burst of protein during the first 20 min followed by a completed release within 1 h. However, total releasable amount of BSA from SPH-IPNs was lower than that of SPHs as due to the electrostatic interactions between chitosan and BSA.

  1. Liposomal Packaging Generates Wnt Protein with In Vivo Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ludan; Kim, Jae-Beom; ten Berge, Derk; Ponnusamy, Karthik; Carre, A. Lyonel; Dudek, Henryk; Zachlederova, Marie; McElhaney, Michael; Brunton, Shirley; Gunzner, Janet; Callow, Marinella; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike; Zhang, Xiaoyan M.; Helms, Jill A.; Nusse, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context. PMID:18698373

  2. Topical delivery of active principles: the field of dermatological research.

    PubMed

    Nino, Massimiliano; Calabrò, Gabriella; Santoianni, Pietro

    2010-01-15

    To be effective an active drug or principle must cross the stratum corneum barrier; this process can be influenced to obtain better functional and therapeutical effects. In spite of the wide variety of the methods studied in order to improve the transdermal transfer to obtain systemic effects, the applicability is limited in this field. Attention to the epidermal barrier and penetration of active principles has been reported mostly in studies concerning dermocosmetics. Studies regarding methods of penetration are gaining experimental and clinical interest. Cutaneous bioavailability of most commercially available dermatological formulations is low. Increase of intradermal delivery can relate to chemical, biochemical, or physical manipulations. Chemical enhancers have been adopted to: (a) increase the diffusibility of the substance across the barrier; (b) increase product solubility in the vehicle; (c) improve the partition coefficient. Moreover methods of interference with the biosynthesis of some lipids allow the modification of the structure of the barrier to increase the penetration. The main physical techniques that increase cutaneous penetration of substances are: iontophoresis (that increases the penetration of ionized substances), electroporation (that electrically induces penetration through the barrier), and sonophoresis, based on 20 to 25 KHz ultrasound that induces alterations of the horny barrier, allowing penetration of active principles. Recent development of these methods are here reported and underline the importance and role of vehicles and other factors that determine effects of partition and diffusion, crucial to absorption.

  3. Quantitative ToF-SIMS Studies of Protein Drug Release from Biodegradable Polymer Drug Delivery Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Sarah A.; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers are of interest in developing strategies to control protein drug delivery. The protein that was used in this study is Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) which is a protein involved in the re-epithelialization process. The protein is stabilized in the biodegradable polymer matrix during formulation and over the course of polymer degradation with the use of an ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) which will encapsulate the protein in an aqueous environment. The release kinetics of the protein from the surface of these materials requires precise timing which is a crucial factor in the efficacy of this drug delivery system. Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used in the same capacity to identify the molecular ion peak of the surfactant and polymer and use this to determine surface concentration. In the polymer matrix, the surfactant molecular ion peak was observed in the positive and negative mode at m/z 467 and 421, respectively. These peaks were determined to be [AOT + Na+] and [AOT−Na+]-. These methods are used to identify the surfactant and protein from the polymer matrix and are used to measure the rate of surface accumulation. The second step was to compare this accumulation rate with the release rate of the protein into an aqueous solution during the degradation of the biodegradable film. This rate is compared to that from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements using the protein autofluorescence from that released into aqueous solution. PMID:20016666

  4. Rationally designed particle preloading method to improve protein delivery performance of electrospun polyester nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Li, Ke; Chen, Sainan; Yao, Bing; Zhou, Yifa; Cui, Sisi; Hu, Junli; Liu, Yichun

    2016-10-15

    Particle preloading method by first loading proteins onto nano- or microparticles and then integrating these particles into electrospun polyester nanofibers has been widely used to encapsulate therapeutic proteins into polyester nanofibers. However, poor method design has resulted in unsatisfactory protein delivery performance. For example, the harsh conditions involved in preloading procedures damage the bioactivities of proteins, the improper integration leads to an uneven distribution of particles in nanofibers or insecure attachment of particles to nanofibers, producing uncontrolled protein release profiles. This study aimed to improve the protein delivery performance of polyester nanofibers by rationally designing a particle preloading method. Positively charged chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) were used as carriers to adsorb negatively charged proteins in mild conditions and as primary barriers for protein release. The polar CNPs were then homogeneously dispersed in a polar polyester solution and subjected to electrospinning. Microscope observations indicated that CNPs were homogeneously embedded within polyester nanofibers. In vitro release behaviour and cell studies showed that proteins retained their bioactivity and could release from polyester nanofibers in a sustained manner for more than 4 weeks without any initial burst. Epidermal growth factor encapsulated in polyester nanofibers enhanced diabetic wound healing in vivo, demonstrating an application potential in biomedicine. Other properties of the nanofibers, including composition, wettability, cytotoxicity, and cell adhesion and spreading, were examined in detail as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Food-grade protein-based nanoparticles and microparticles for bioactive delivery: fabrication, characterization, and utilization.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Joye, Iris J; McClements, David Julian

    2015-01-01

    Proteins can be used to fabricate nanoparticles and microparticles suitable for use as delivery systems for bioactive compounds in pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic, and other products. Food proteins originate from various animal or vegetal sources and exhibit a wide diversity of molecular and physicochemical characteristics, e.g., molecular weight, conformation, flexibility, polarity, charge, isoelectric point, solubility, and interactions. As a result, protein particles can be assembled using numerous different preparation methods, from one or more types of protein or from a combination of a protein and another type of biopolymer (usually a polysaccharide). The final characteristics of the particles produced are determined by the proteins and/or polysaccharides used, as well as the fabrication techniques employed. This chapter provides an overview of the functional properties of food proteins that can be used to assemble nanoparticles and microparticles, the fabrication techniques available to create those particles, the factors that influence their stability, and their potential applications within the food industry.

  6. Agroinfiltration as an Effective and Scalable Strategy of Gene Delivery for Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Dent, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Current human biologics are most commonly produced by mammalian cell culture-based fermentation technologies. However, its limited scalability and high cost prevent this platform from meeting the ever increasing global demand. Plants offer a novel alternative system for the production of pharmaceutical proteins that is more scalable, cost-effective, and safer than current expression paradigms. The recent development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed rapid and high-level transient expression of recombinant proteins, and in turn, provided a preferred plant based production platform. One of the remaining challenges for the commercial application of this platform was the lack of a scalable technology to deliver the transgene into plant cells. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of an effective and scalable technology for gene delivery in plants. Direct and indirect gene delivery strategies for plant cells are first presented, and the two major gene delivery technologies based on agroinfiltration are subsequently discussed. Furthermore, the advantages of syringe and vacuum infiltration as gene delivery methodologies are extensively discussed, in context of their applications and scalability for commercial production of human pharmaceutical proteins in plants. The important steps and critical parameters for the successful implementation of these strategies are also detailed in the review. Overall, agroinfiltration based on syringe and vacuum infiltration provides an efficient, robust and scalable gene-delivery technology for the transient expression of recombinant proteins in plants. The development of this technology will greatly facilitate the realization of plant transient expression systems as a premier platform for commercial production of pharmaceutical proteins.

  7. Controlled, sustained release of proteins via an injectable, mineral-coated microsphere delivery vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin-Ford, Travelle

    Hydroxyapatite interfaces have demonstrated strong protein binding and protein selection from a passing solution and can serve as a biocompatible carrier for controlled protein delivery. Hydroxyapatite is a major component of long bones and tooth enamel and is the most stable of all calcium phosphate isoforms in aqueous solutions at physiologic pH, providing a sensitive chromatographic mechanism for separating proteins. Here we describe an approach to create a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating through a biomimetic, heterogeneous nucleation from a modified simulated body fluid--supersaturated with calcium and phosphate ions on the surface of injectable polymer microspheres. We are able to bind and release bioactive growth factors into a variety of in vitro and in vivo conditions, demonstrating the functionality and advantage of the biomaterial. Creating a hydroxyapatite layer on the Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microsphere surface, avails the microsphere interior for another application that will not compete with protein binding and release. Encapsulating an imaging agent within the aqueous phase of the emulsion provides a visual reference for the injectable therapy upon microsphere fabrication. Another advantage of this system is that the mineral coating and subsequent protein binding is not compromised by the encapsulated imaging agent. This dual function delivery vehicle is not only advantageous for spatial tracking therapeutic applications, but also determining the longevity of the delivery vehicle once injected. In the broader sense, providing a mechanism to image and track our temporally controlled, sustained delivery system gives more evidence to support the effects of released protein on in vivo responses (bioactivity) and locate microspheres within different biological systems.

  8. Design and Characterization of Novel Recombinant Listeriolysin O–Protamine Fusion Proteins for Enhanced Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO–protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:25521817

  9. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  10. A genetic and structural analysis of the yeast Vps15 protein kinase: evidence for a direct role of Vps15p in vacuolar protein delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Herman, P K; Stack, J H; Emr, S D

    1991-01-01

    The yeast VPS15 gene encodes a novel protein kinase homolog that is required for the sorting of soluble hydrolases to the yeast vacuole. In this study, we extend our previous mutational analysis of the VPS15 gene and show that alterations of specific Gps15p residues, that are highly conserved among all protein kinase molecules, result in the biological inactivation of Vps15p. Furthermore, we demonstrate here that short C-terminal deletions of Vps15p result in a temperature-conditional defect in vacuolar protein sorting. Immediately following the temperature shift, soluble vacuolar hydrolases, such as carboxypeptidase Y and proteinase A, accumulate as Golgi-modified precursors within a saturable intracellular compartment distinct from the vacuole. This vacuolar protein sorting block is efficiently reversed when mutant cells are shifted back to the permissive temperature; the accumulated precursors are rapidly processed to their mature forms indicating that they have been delivered to the vacuole. This rapid and efficient reversal suggests that the accumulated vacuolar protein precursors were present within a normal transport intermediate in the vacuolar protein sorting pathway. In addition, this protein delivery block shows specificity for soluble vacuolar enzymes as the membrane protein, alkaline phosphatase, is efficiently delivered to the vacuole at the non-permissive temperature. Interestingly, the C-terminal Vps15p truncations are not phosphorylated in vivo suggesting that the phosphorylation of Vps15p may be critical for its biological activity at elevated temperatures. The rapid onset and high degree of specificity of the vacuolar protein delivery block in these mutants suggests that the primary role of Vps15p is to regulate the sorting of soluble hydrolases to the yeast vacuolar compartment. Images PMID:1756716

  11. Sequential delivery of synaptic GluA1- and GluA4-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs) by SAP97 anchored protein complexes in classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2014-04-11

    Multiple signaling pathways are involved in AMPAR trafficking to synapses during synaptic plasticity and learning. The mechanisms for how these pathways are coordinated in parallel but maintain their functional specificity involves subcellular compartmentalization of kinase function by scaffolding proteins, but how this is accomplished is not well understood. Here, we focused on characterizing the molecular machinery that functions in the sequential synaptic delivery of GluA1- and GluA4-containing AMPARs using an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning. We show that conditioning induces the interaction of selective protein complexes with the key structural protein SAP97, which tightly regulates the synaptic delivery of GluA1 and GluA4 AMPAR subunits. The results demonstrate that in the early stages of conditioning the initial activation of PKA stimulates the formation of a SAP97-AKAP/PKA-GluA1 protein complex leading to synaptic delivery of GluA1-containing AMPARs through a SAP97-PSD95 interaction. This is followed shortly thereafter by generation of a SAP97-KSR1/PKC-GluA4 complex for GluA4 AMPAR subunit delivery again through a SAP97-PSD95 interaction. These data suggest that SAP97 forms the molecular backbone of a protein scaffold critical for delivery of AMPARs to the PSD during conditioning. Together, the findings reveal a cooperative interaction of multiple scaffolding proteins for appropriately timed delivery of subunit-specific AMPARs to synapses and support a sequential two-stage model of AMPAR synaptic delivery during classical conditioning.

  12. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  13. Controlled protein delivery from electrospun non-wovens: novel combination of protein crystals and a biodegradable release matrix.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Sebastian; Li, Linhao; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-07-07

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) is an excellent polymer for electrospinning and matrix-controlled drug delivery combining optimal processability and good biocompatibility. Electrospinning of proteins has been shown to be challenging via the use of organic solvents, frequently resulting in protein unfolding or aggregation. Encapsulation of protein crystals represents an attractive but largely unexplored alternative to established protein encapsulation techniques because of increased thermodynamic stability and improved solvent resistance of the crystalline state. We herein explore the electrospinning of protein crystal suspensions and establish basic design principles for this novel type of protein delivery system. PCL was deployed as a matrix, and lysozyme was used as a crystallizing model protein. By rational combination of lysozyme crystals 0.7 or 2.1 μm in diameter and a PCL fiber diameter between 1.6 and 10 μm, release within the first 24 h could be varied between approximately 10 and 100%. Lysozyme loading of PCL microfibers between 0.5 and 5% was achieved without affecting processability. While relative release was unaffected by loading percentage, the amount of lysozyme released could be tailored. PCL was blended with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) to further modify the release rate. Under optimized conditions, an almost constant lysozyme release over 11 weeks was achieved.

  14. Enteral delivery of proteins stimulates protein synthesis in human duodenal mucosa in the fed state through a mammalian target of rapamycin-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Guérin, Charlène; Maurer, Brigitte; Lecleire, Stéphane; Lavoinne, Alain; Donnadieu, Nathalie; Cailleux, Anne-Françoise; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Glutamine modulates duodenal protein metabolism in fasted healthy humans, but its effects in a fed state remain unknown. We aimed to assess the effects of either glutamine or an isonitrogenous protein mixture on duodenal protein metabolism in humans in the fed state. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomly included in 2 groups. Each volunteer was studied on 2 occasions in a random order and received, during 5 h, either an enteral infusion of maltodextrins alone (0.25 g · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹; both groups) that mimicked a carbohydrate fed state or maltodextrins with glutamine (group 1) or an isonitrogenous (22.4 mg N · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) protein powder (group 2). Simultaneously, a continuous intravenous infusion of ¹³C-leucine and ²H₅-phenylalanine (both 9 μmol · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) was performed. Endoscopic duodenal biopsies were taken. Leucine and phenylalanine enrichments were assessed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in duodenal proteins and the intracellular free amino acids pool to calculate the mucosal fractional synthesis rate (FSR). Proteasome proteolytic activities and phosphokinase expression were assessed by using specific fluorogenic substrates and macroarrays, respectively. The FSR and proteasome activity were not different after the glutamine supply compared with after maltodextrins alone. In contrast, the FSR increased (1.7-fold increase; P < 0.05) after protein-powder delivery without modification of total proteasome activity. The protein powder increased insulinemia, PI3 kinase, and erk phosphorylation but did not affect the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal-integrating kinase 1 phosphorylation. A trend for an increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation was observed (P = 0.07). In the carbohydrate fed state, enteral proteins but not glutamine increased duodenal protein synthesis through an mTOR independent pathway in humans.

  15. Halloysite clay nanotubes for controlled delivery of chemically active agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullayev, Elshard

    In this work we explored the capabilities of halloysite nanotubes as capsules for encapsulation and controlled delivery of the chemically and biologically active substances. Halloysite is a two-layered aluminosilicate which has a predominantly hollow tubular structure in the submicron range and is chemically similar to kaolinite [1, 2]. In the first section of this work, we analyzed the structure of the halloysite nanotubes as well as its capability to encapsulate and deliver biologically and chemically active agents, similarities and differences between release characteristics of different agents and how these differences relate with their chemical structure. Models were used to describe the release characteristics of the active agents. Study of the interaction between loaded agents and halloysite nanotubes provides better understanding of the release characteristics of the loaded agents and how halloysite can be implemented for technological and medical applications. The second part of the work deals with self-healing coatings produced on the basis of halloysite nanotubes loaded with corrosion inhibitors. Self-healing coatings are one of the effective methods to protect metals from corrosion and deterioration. The difference between self-healing coatings and the usual coatings is the ability of the first to recover after the formation of the damages due to external or internal stresses. High efficiency of the self- healing coatings produced by halloysite nanotubes were demonstrated on 110 Copper alloys and 2024 aluminum alloys. Controlled delivery of the corrosion inhibitors with additional encapsulation of the halloysite nanotubes by synthesizing stoppers at tube endings was also demonstrated. Additional encapsulation of the halloysite nanotubes may be necessary when slow release of the loaded agents is required or rapid convection of the liquid in the surrounding environment takes place (since this may cause rapid release of the loaded agents without additional

  16. Oral Delivery of Bioencapsulated Proteins Across Blood–Brain and Blood–Retinal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Neha; Westerveld, Donevan R; Ayache, Alexandra C; Verma, Amrisha; Shil, Pollob; Prasad, Tuhina; Zhu, Ping; Chan, Sic L; Li, Qiuhong; Daniell, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Delivering neurotherapeutics to target brain-associated diseases is a major challenge. Therefore, we investigated oral delivery of green fluorescence protein (GFP) or myelin basic protein (MBP) fused with the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), expressed in chloroplasts (bioencapsulated within plant cells) to the brain and retinae of triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3×TgAD) mice, across the blood–brain barriers (BBB) and blood–retinal barriers (BRB). Human neuroblastoma cells internalized GFP when incubated with CTB-GFP but not with GFP alone. Oral delivery of CTB-MBP in healthy and 3×TgAD mice shows increased MBP levels in different regions of the brain, crossing intact BBB. Thioflavin S–stained amyloid plaque intensity was reduced up to 60% by CTB-MBP incubation with human AD and 3×TgAD mice brain sections ex vivo. Amyloid loads were reduced in vivo by 70% in hippocampus and cortex brain regions of 3×TgAD mice fed with bioencapsulated CTB-MBP, along with reduction in the ratio of insoluble amyloid β 42 (Aβ42) to soluble fractions. CTB-MBP oral delivery reduced Aβ42 accumulation in retinae and prevented loss of retinal ganglion cells in 3×TgAD mice. Lyophilization of leaves increased CTB-MBP concentration by 17-fold and stabilized it during long-term storage in capsules, facilitating low-cost oral delivery of therapeutic proteins across the BBB and BRB. PMID:24281246

  17. Protein transduction domain-mediated delivery of QBP1 suppresses polyglutamine-induced neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Popiel, H Akiko; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Toda, Tatsushi

    2007-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases share common features including abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins and their deposition as inclusion bodies in the brain. The polyQ diseases are caused by abnormal expansion of a polyQ stretch in each disease-causing protein, which triggers these proteins to form aggregates. We previously showed that genetic expression of the aggregate inhibitor peptide polyQ binding peptide 1 (QBP1) suppresses polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila. However, to establish a molecular therapy using QBP1, QBP1 needs to be delivered into cells by its administration. In this study, we employed protein transduction domains (PTDs) to enable the efficient intracellular delivery of QBP1. We show here that fusion with a PTD enables the efficient intracellular delivery of QBP1, and that PTD-QBP1 treatment suppressed polyQ-induced cytotoxicity in cultured cells. Most importantly, oral administration of PTD-QBP1 successfully suppressed polyQ-induced premature death as well as polyQ inclusion body formation in a Drosophila model of the polyQ diseases, demonstrating its therapeutic effect against polyQ-induced neurodegeneration in vivo. Our study indicates that PTD-mediated delivery of aggregate inhibitor peptides is a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins.

  18. Delivery of siRNA into breast cancer cells via phage fusion protein-targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A; Gillespie, James W; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Petrenko, Valery A

    2011-06-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers a unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF-7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. In this study, the authors report a novel approach for targeted intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intrathecal delivery of protein therapeutics to the brain: a critical reassessment.

    PubMed

    Calias, Pericles; Banks, William A; Begley, David; Scarpa, Maurizio; Dickson, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and brain tumors, are the world's leading causes of disability. Delivery of drugs to the CNS is complicated by the blood-brain barriers that protect the brain from the unregulated leakage and entry of substances, including proteins, from the blood. Yet proteins represent one of the most promising classes of therapeutics for the treatment of CNS diseases. Many strategies for overcoming these obstacles are in development, but the relatively straightforward approach of bypassing these barriers through direct intrathecal administration has been largely overlooked. Originally discounted because of its lack of usefulness for delivering small, lipid-soluble drugs to the brain, the intrathecal route has emerged as a useful, in some cases perhaps the ideal, route of administration for certain therapeutic protein and targeted disease combinations. Here, we review blood-brain barrier functions and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and their relevance to drug delivery via the intrathecal route, discuss animal and human studies that have investigated intrathecal delivery of protein therapeutics, and outline several characteristics of protein therapeutics that can allow them to be successfully delivered intrathecally.

  20. Degradable lipid nanoparticles with predictable in vivo siRNA delivery activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Kathryn A.; Dorkin, J. Robert; Vegas, Arturo J.; Chang, Philip H.; Veiseh, Omid; Matthews, Jonathan; Fenton, Owen S.; Zhang, Yunlong; Olejnik, Karsten T.; Yesilyurt, Volkan; Chen, Delai; Barros, Scott; Klebanov, Boris; Novobrantseva, Tatiana; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most significant challenges in the development of clinically viable delivery systems for RNA interference therapeutics is to understand how molecular structures influence delivery efficacy. Here, we have synthesized 1,400 degradable lipidoids and evaluate their transfection ability and structure-function activity. We show that lipidoid nanoparticles mediate potent gene knockdown in hepatocytes and immune cell populations on IV administration to mice (siRNA EC50 values as low as 0.01 mg kg-1). We identify four necessary and sufficient structural and pKa criteria that robustly predict the ability of nanoparticles to mediate greater than 95% protein silencing in vivo. Because these efficacy criteria can be dictated through chemical design, this discovery could eliminate our dependence on time-consuming and expensive cell culture assays and animal testing. Herein, we identify promising degradable lipidoids and describe new design criteria that reliably predict in vivo siRNA delivery efficacy without any prior biological testing.

  1. Heterologous Expression and Delivery of Biologically Active Exendin-4 by Lactobacillus paracasei L14.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhu; Yu, Rui; Zuo, Fanglei; Zhang, Bo; Peng, Deju; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is an excellent therapeutic peptide drug for type 2 diabetes due to longer lasting biological activity compared to GLP-1. This study explored the feasibility of using probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an oral vector for recombinant exendin-4 peptide delivery, an alternative to costly chemical synthesis and inconvenient administration by injection. L. paracasei transformed with a plasmid encoding the exendin-4 gene (L. paracasei L14/pMG76e-exendin-4) with a constitutive promotor was successfully constructed and showed efficient secretion of exendin-4. The secreted exendin-4 significantly enhanced insulin secretion of INS-1 β-cells, along with an increment in their proliferation and inhibition of their apoptosis, corresponding to the effect of GLP-1 on these cells. The transcription level of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 gene (PDX-1), a key transcription factor for cellular insulin synthesis and secretion, was upregulated by the treatment with secreted exendin-4, paralleling the upregulation of insulin gene expression. Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay showed a 34-fold increase in the transport of exendin-4 delivered by L. paracasei vs. that of free exendin-4 (control), suggesting effective facilitation of exendin-4 transport across the intestinal barrier by this delivery system. This study demonstrates that the probiotic Lactobacillus can be engineered to secrete bioactive exendin-4 and facilitate its transport through the intestinal barrier, providing a novel strategy for oral exendin-4 delivery using this lactic acid bacterium.

  2. Heterologous Expression and Delivery of Biologically Active Exendin-4 by Lactobacillus paracasei L14

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhu; Yu, Rui; Zuo, Fanglei; Zhang, Bo; Peng, Deju; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is an excellent therapeutic peptide drug for type 2 diabetes due to longer lasting biological activity compared to GLP-1. This study explored the feasibility of using probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an oral vector for recombinant exendin-4 peptide delivery, an alternative to costly chemical synthesis and inconvenient administration by injection. L. paracasei transformed with a plasmid encoding the exendin-4 gene (L. paracasei L14/pMG76e-exendin-4) with a constitutive promotor was successfully constructed and showed efficient secretion of exendin-4. The secreted exendin-4 significantly enhanced insulin secretion of INS-1 β-cells, along with an increment in their proliferation and inhibition of their apoptosis, corresponding to the effect of GLP-1 on these cells. The transcription level of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 gene (PDX-1), a key transcription factor for cellular insulin synthesis and secretion, was upregulated by the treatment with secreted exendin-4, paralleling the upregulation of insulin gene expression. Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay showed a 34-fold increase in the transport of exendin-4 delivered by L. paracasei vs. that of free exendin-4 (control), suggesting effective facilitation of exendin-4 transport across the intestinal barrier by this delivery system. This study demonstrates that the probiotic Lactobacillus can be engineered to secrete bioactive exendin-4 and facilitate its transport through the intestinal barrier, providing a novel strategy for oral exendin-4 delivery using this lactic acid bacterium. PMID:27764251

  3. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate.

  4. Generation and remote delivery of plasma activated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Rutherford, David; Mariotti, Davide; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Diver, Declan

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interactions with microdroplets offer new opportunities to deliver active chemical agents and nanoparticles to remote substrates downstream with many potential applications from cancer theranostics and wound healing in biomedicine, gentle food decontamination and seed germination in plasma agriculture to catalyst production and photonic structures fabrication, among others. We demonstrate plasma-liquid based pristine nanomaterials synthesis in flight and subsequent delivery up to 120mm from the atmospheric pressure plasma source. Monosized and non-aggregating metal nanoparticles are formed in the rf plasma in less than 100us, representing an increase in precursor reduction rate that is many (>4) orders of magnitude faster than that observed with standard colloidal chemistry or via high energy radiolytic techniques. Also the collection and purification limitations of the latter are avoided. Plasma activated liquid including OH radicals and H2O2 are transported over 120mm and have demonstrated high efficacy bacterial decontamination. These results will be compared with charge species and radical transport from the rf plasma without microdroplets. Reaction models based on high solvated surface electron concentrations will be presented. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  5. Near-infrared light activated delivery platform for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Gao, Yan; Hornicek, Francis; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian; Amiji, Mansoor; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-12-01

    Cancer treatment using conventional drug delivery platforms may lead to fatal damage to normal cells. Among various intelligent delivery platforms, photoresponsive delivery platforms are becoming popular, as light can be easily focused and tuned in terms of power intensity, wavelength, and irradiation time, allowing remote and precise control over therapeutic payload release both spatially and temporally. This unprecedented controlled delivery manner is important to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing side effects. However, most of the existing photoactive delivery platforms require UV/visible excitation to initiate their function, which suffers from phototoxicity and low level of tissue penetration limiting their practical applications in biomedicine. With the advanced optical property of converting near infrared (NIR) excitation to localized UV/visible emission, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have emerged as a promising photoactive delivery platform that provides practical applications for remote spatially and temporally controlled release of therapeutic payload molecules using low phototoxic and high tissue penetration NIR light as the excitation source. This article reviews the state-of-the-art design, synthesis and therapeutic molecular payload encapsulation strategies of UCNP-based photoactive delivery platforms for cancer therapy. Challenges and promises for engineering of advanced delivery platforms are also highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Vesicle Supra-Assembly Approach to Synthesize Amine-Functionalized Hollow Dendritic Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Meka, Anand Kumar; Abbaraju, Prasanna Lakshmi; Song, Hao; Xu, Chun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Hongwei; Yu, Meihua; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular delivery of proteins is a promising strategy of intervention in disease, which relies heavily on the development of efficient delivery platforms due to the cell membrane impermeability of native proteins, particularly for negatively charged large proteins. This work reports a vesicle supra-assembly approach to synthesize novel amine-functionalized hollow dendritic mesoporous silica nanospheres (A-HDMSN). An amine silica source is introduced into a water-oil reaction solution prior to the addition of conventional silica source tetraethylorthosilicate. This strategy favors the formation of composite vesicles as the building blocks which further assemble into the final product. The obtained A-HDMSN have a cavity core of ≈170 nm, large dendritic mesopores of 20.7 nm in the shell and high pore volume of 2.67 cm(3) g(-1) . Compared to the calcined counterpart without amine groups (C-HDMSN), A-HDMSN possess enhanced loading capacity to large negative proteins (IgG and β-galactosidase) and improved cellular uptake performance, contributed by the cationic groups. A-HDMSN enhance the intracellular uptake of β-galactosidase by up to 5-fold and 40-fold compared to C-HDMSN and free β-galactosidase, respectively. The active form of β-galactosidase delivered by A-HDMSN retains its intracellular catalytic functions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fluorinated ionic liquids for protein drug delivery systems: Investigating their impact on the structure and function of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Alves, Márcia; Vieira, Nicole S M; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Araújo, João M M; Pereiro, Ana B; Archer, Margarida

    2017-06-30

    Since the approval of recombinant human insulin by FDA in 1982, more than 200 proteins are currently available for pharmaceutical use to treat a wide range of diseases. However, innovation is still required to develop effective approaches for drug delivery. Our aim is to investigate the potential use of fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) as drug delivery systems (DDS) for therapeutic proteins. Some initial parameters need to be assessed before further studies can proceed. This work evaluates the impact of FILs on the stability, function, structure and aggregation state of lysozyme. Different techniques were used for this purpose, which included differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), spectrophotometric assays, circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM). Ionic liquids composed of cholinium-, imidazolium- or pyridinium- derivatives were combined with different anions and analysed at different concentrations in aqueous solutions (below and above the critical aggregation concentration, CAC). The results herein presented show that the addition of ionic liquids had no significant effect on the stability and hydrolytic activity of lysozyme. Moreover, a distinct behaviour was observed in DLS experiments for non-surfactant and surfactant ionic liquids, with the latter encapsulating the protein at concentrations above the CAC. These results encourage us to further study ionic liquids as promising tools for DDS of protein drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hybrid nanosystems based on natural polymers as protein carriers for respiratory delivery: Stability and toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Susana; Cordeiro, Clara; Seijo, Begoña; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Grenha, Ana

    2015-06-05

    Chitosan/carrageenan/tripolyphosphate nanoparticles were previously presented as holding potential for an application in transmucosal delivery of macromolecules, with tripolyphosphate demonstrating to contribute for both size reduction and stabilisation of the nanoparticles. This work was aimed at evaluating the capacity of the nanoparticles as protein carriers for pulmonary and nasal transmucosal delivery, further assessing their biocompatibility pattern regarding that application. Nanoparticles demonstrated stability in presence of lysozyme, while freeze-drying was shown to preserve their characteristics when glucose or sucrose were used as cryoprotectants. Bovine serum albumin was associated to the nanoparticles, which were successfully microencapsulated by spray-drying to meet the aerodynamic requirements inherent to pulmonary delivery. Finally, a satisfactory biocompatibility profile was demonstrated upon exposure of two respiratory cell lines (Calu-3 and A549 cells) to the carriers. A negligible effect on cell viability along with no alterations on transepithelial electrical resistance and no induction of inflammatory response were observed.

  9. Differential analysis of "protein corona" profile adsorbed onto different nonviral gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2011-12-15

    A shotgun proteomics approach was used to characterize and compare the proteins that lead to the formation of a rich "protein corona" adsorbed onto the surfaces of cationic liposomes (CLs), lipoplexes, and lipid/polycation/DNA (LPD) complexes, when they come into contact with plasma. After separation of the nanoparticle-protein complex from plasma, the protein mixture was digested, and peptides were analyzed by nanoliquid chromatography-Orbitrap LTQ-XL mass spectrometry. The number of proteins bound to lipoplexes was double that of those identified in the corona of CLs (208 vs 105), while 77 proteins were common to both coronas. The number of proteins bound to the surface of the LPD complexes (158, 133 of which are common to lipoplexes) is intermediate between those found in the protein corona of both CLs and lipoplexes. About half of them were found in the protein corona of CLs. By overlapping the three formulations, it can be seen that only 12 proteins are peculiar to LPD complexes. These results may help in designing gene delivery systems capable of binding the minimum possible quantity of proteins that influence transfection negatively, binding selectively proteins capable of helping in steering in vivo the vector toward the target, and obtaining more efficient and effective gene therapy.

  10. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Globular protein-coated Paclitaxel nanosuspensions: interaction mechanism, direct cytosolic delivery, and significant improvement in pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongji; Wu, Zhannan; He, Wei; Qin, Chao; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; Yin, Lifang

    2015-05-04

    , respectively, and prolonged T1/2 by 314-fold. As expected, PTX-NS had better in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity compared to PTX alone. Additionally, β-LG is cyto- and bio-compatible, and PTX-NS is not toxic to healthy tissues. In conclusion, the present study has suggested the high potency of globular proteins, such as β-LG, as novel biomaterials for nanosuspension platform to improve the drug delivery for disease treatment.

  12. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Chad A.; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Methods In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Results Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Conclusions Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations

  13. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Chad A; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations with additional cytokines involved in

  14. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  15. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39–like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  16. A novel method for the preparation of biodegradable microspheres for protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, R; Edirisinghe, M.J

    2006-01-01

    Microspheres are potential candidates for the protein drug delivery. In this work, we prepared polymer-coated starch/bovine serum albumin (BSA) microspheres using co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA). First, starch solution in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) was prepared and then an aqueous solution of BSA was added to it to make a starch–BSA solution. Subsequently, this solution was made to flow through the inner capillary, while the polymer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), flowed through the outer capillary. On collection, filtration and subsequent drying, near-monodisperse microspheres of 5–6 μm in size were obtained. The microspheres were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cumulative BSA release was investigated by UV spectroscopy. BSA structure and activity was preserved in the microspheres and its release in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was studied over a period of 8 days. There was an initial burst with 32 wt% of total BSA released in 2 h. Overall 75 wt% of BSA was released over a 7 day period. PMID:16849253

  17. Enzymatic biodegradation of hydrogels for protein delivery targeted to the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Knipe, Jennifer M; Chen, Frances; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2015-03-09

    Multiresponsive poly(methacrylic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels were synthesized with biodegradable oligopeptide crosslinks. The oligopeptide crosslinks were incorporated using EDC-NHS zero-length links between the carboxylic acid groups of the polymer and free primary amines on the peptide. The reaction of the peptide was confirmed by primary amine assay and IR spectroscopy. The microgels exhibited pH-responsive swelling as well as enzyme-catalyzed degradation targeted by trypsin present in the small intestine, as demonstrated upon incubation with gastrointestinal fluids from rats. Relative turbidity was used to evaluate enzyme-catalyzed degradation as a function of time, and initial trypsin concentration controlled both the degradation mechanism as well as the extent of degradation. Trypsin activity was effectively extinguished by incubation at 70 °C, and both the microgels and degradation products posed no cytotoxic effect toward two different cell lines. The microgels demonstrated pH-dependent loading of the protein insulin for oral delivery to the small intestine.

  18. Physical and chemical gels of lipid nanoparticles for controlled delivery of lipophilic drugs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couffin, Anne-Claude; Delmas, Thomas; Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Cheibani, Ismail; Bayma, Eric; Heinrich, Emilie; Escudé, Marie; Courant, Thomas; Hoang, Antoine; Auzély, Rachel; Texier, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    The controlled delivery of drugs and biologicals (proteins, antibodies, DNA and derivatives) is a growing need to take the full benefit of new therapeutic strategies. However these new molecules or biomolecules display solubility issues, or high degradation rates once injected. Therefore, both suitable delivery materials for their encapsulation and protection from the surrounding environment, and smart delivery devices (such as micro-needles or implanted pumps) are necessary to achieve controlled delivery of these precious therapeutic agents. We have developed bio-inspired gel materials, based on lipid nanoparticles which act as reservoirs for lipophilic drugs. The lipid nanoparticles, termed lipidots™, are biocompatible, colloidally stable, non-immunogenic, and obtained from a cheap and simple solvent-free process. The particles can be assembled to form physical or chemical gels, with tunable rheological properties. Physico-chemical studies have been carried out to determine the limits of the stability domains for colloidal and gel formulations (choice of surfactants for nanoparticle surface, and composition ratios of lipids, surfactants and co-surfactants). In particular, it is demonstrated that lipid nanoparticles keep their integrity in the gels. Gels of lipidots™ could therefore constitute biocompatible materials for the efficient encapsulation and tuned delivery of lipophilic drugs and biomolecules.

  19. Activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis by intracellular delivery of cytochrome c-based nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome c is an essential mediator of apoptosis when it is released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. This process normally takes place in response to DNA damage, but in many cancer cells (i.e., cancer stem cells) it is disabled due to various mechanisms. However, it has been demonstrated that the targeted delivery of Cytochrome c directly to the cytoplasm of cancer cells selective initiates apoptosis in many cancer cells. In this work we designed a novel nano-sized smart Cytochrome c drug delivery system to induce apoptosis in cancer cells upon delivery. Results Cytochrome c was precipitated with a solvent-displacement method to obtain protein nanoparticles. The size of the Cytochrome c nanoparticles obtained was 100-300 nm in diameter depending on the conditions used, indicating good potential to passively target tumors by the Enhanced Permeability and Retention effect. The surface of Cytochrome c nanoparticles was decorated with poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid-SH via the linker succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate to prevent premature dissolution during delivery. The linker connecting the polymer to the protein nanoparticle contained a disulfide bond thus allowing polymer shedding and subsequent Cytochrome c release under intracellular reducing conditions. A cell-free caspase-3 assay revealed more than 80% of relative caspase activation by Cytochrome c after nanoprecipitation and polymer modification when compared to native Cytochrome c. Incubation of HeLa cells with the Cytochrome c based-nanoparticles showed significant reduction in cell viability after 6 hours while native Cytochrome c showed none. Confocal microscopy confirmed the induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells when they were stained with 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide after incubation with the Cytochrome c-based nanoparticles. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the coating with a hydrophobic polymer stabilizes Cytochrome c nanoparticles allowing

  20. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  1. Oral films as breakthrough tools for oral delivery of proteins/peptides.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro M; Fonte, Pedro; Sousa, Flávia; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Sarmento, Bruno; Pintado, Manuela E

    2015-08-10

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides demonstrate unique, peerless, pharmacological characteristics such as high specificity to receptors and superior biological mimicking of physiological mechanisms, resulting in a better therapeutic index compared to conventional chemical-derived drugs. However, proteins also present inherent bioavailability limitations. Thus, this paper proposes several effective tools to improve protein/peptide drugs stability, permeability and pharmacokinetics with special emphasis on oral polymeric films as oral delivery platforms. Indeed, oral films present inherent characteristics that can greatly enhance biological performance of proteins and peptides and patient compliance along with other advantages that are critically discussed in this review. A rational choice of excipients addressed in and manufacture processes are also focused. In addition, possible toxicity issues to be overtaken and critical analysis regarding current market tendencies respecting oral films and protein/peptides along with future prospects are disclosed.

  2. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-02-22

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects.

  3. Protein-gold hybrid nanocubes for cell imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Han; Yang, Dongying; Zhao, Chen; Song, Zhuokun; Liu, Pengchang; Wang, Yu; Chen, Zhijun; Shen, Jiacong

    2015-03-04

    Multifunctional biocompatible nanomaterials containing both fluorescent and vehicle functions are highly favored in bioimaging, therapeutic, and drug delivery applications. Nevertheless, the rational design and synthesis of highly biocompatible multifunctional materials remain challenging. We present here the development of novel protein-gold hybrid nanocubes (PGHNs), which were assembled using gold nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin, and tryptophan as building blocks. The green-synthesized PGHNs in this study are blue-emitting under UV exposure and cube-shaped with a size of approximately 100 nm. These hybrid nanomaterials are highly biocompatible as shown by cytotoxicity experiments and can be readily internalized by different types of cells. Moreover, PGHNs can act as nanovehicles that successfully deliver dyes or drugs into the cells. The protein-metal hybrid nanocubes can serve as a new type of dual-purpose tool: a blue-emitting cell marker in bioimaging investigation and a nanocarrier in drug delivery studies.

  4. pH-responsive and enzymatically-responsive hydrogel microparticles for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins: Effects of protein size, crosslinking density, and hydrogel degradation on protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael Clinton; Guido, Joseph Frank; Gupta, Malvika; Zhang, Annie; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-01-10

    Two potential platform technologies for the oral delivery of protein therapeutics were synthesized and tested. pH-responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (P(IA-co-NVP)) hydrogel microparticles were tested in vitro with model proteins salmon calcitonin, urokinase, and rituximab to determine the effects of particle size, protein size, and crosslinking density on oral delivery capability. Particle size showed no significant effect on overall delivery potential but did improve percent release of encapsulated protein over the micro-scale particle size range studied. Protein size was shown to have a significant impact on the delivery capability of the P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel. We show that when using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles with 3 mol% tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate crosslinker, a small polypeptide (salmon calcitonin) loads and releases up to 45 μg/mg hydrogel while the mid-sized protein urokinase and large monoclonal antibody rituximab load and release only 19 and 24 μg/mg hydrogel, respectively. We further demonstrate that crosslinking density offers a simple method for tuning hydrogel properties to variously sized proteins. Using 5 mol% TEGDMA crosslinker offers optimal performance for the small peptide, salmon calcitonin, whereas lower crosslinking density of 1 mol% offers optimal performance for the much larger protein rituximab. Finally, an enzymatically-degradable hydrogels of P(MAA-co-NVP) crosslinked with the peptide sequence MMRRRKK were synthesized and tested in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. These hydrogels offer ideal loading and release behavior, showing no degradative release of encapsulated salmon calcitonin in gastric conditions while yielding rapid and complete release of encapsulated protein within 1h in intestinal conditions.

  5. Quantitative ToF-SIMS studies of protein drug release from biodegradable polymer drug delivery membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sarah A.; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2008-12-01

    Biodegradable polymers are of interest in developing strategies to control protein drug delivery. The protein that was used in this study is Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) which is a protein involved in the re-epithelialization process. The protein is stabilized in the biodegradable polymer matrix during formulation and over the course of polymer degradation with the use of an ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) which will encapsulate the protein in an aqueous environment. The release kinetics of the protein from the surface of these materials requires precise timing which is a crucial factor in the efficacy of this drug delivery system. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used in the same capacity to identify the molecular ion peak of the surfactant and polymer and use this to determine surface concentration. In the polymer matrix, the surfactant molecular ion peak was observed in the positive and negative mode at m/ z 467 and 421, respectively. These peaks were determined to be [AOT + Na +] and [AOT - Na +]. These methods are used to identify the surfactant and protein from the polymer matrix and are used to measure the rate of surface accumulation. The second step was to compare this accumulation rate with the release rate of the protein into an aqueous solution during the degradation of the biodegradable film. This rate is compared to that from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements using the protein autofluorescence from that released into aqueous solution [C.M. Mahoney, J. Yu, A. Fahey, J.A.J. Gardella, SIMS depth profiling of polymer blends with protein based drugs, Appl. Surf. Sci. 252 (2006), 6609-6614.].

  6. Delivery Systems for Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) for Repair of Battle Incurred Bone Injuries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    infections, congenital malformations that fail to heal are eligible for BMP treatment. I (my child/my ward) will be one of 50 patients to be treated with...Fusions in Dogs 6. Craniotomy Defects in Sheep t0 7. Craniotomy Defects in Monkeys 10 8. BMP Delivery System of Bone Matrix Non Collagenous 11 Proteins...effects. The most important and indispensptle substitutes for experiments in human beings are adult mongrel dogs, monkeys, and sheep . Experimental .S

  7. Ultrasonic-Activated Micellar Drug Delivery for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles and ultrasound in medicine continues to evolve. Great strides have been made in the areas of producing micelles, nanoemulsions and solid nanoparticles that can be used in drug delivery. An effective nanocarrier allows for the delivery of a high concentration of potent medications to targeted tissue while minimizing the side effect of the agent to the rest of the body. Polymeric micelles have been shown to encapsulate therapeutic agents and maintain their structural integrity at lower concentrations. Ultrasound is currently being used in drug delivery as well as diagnostics, and has many advantages that elevate its importance in drug delivery. The technique is non-invasive, thus no surgery is needed; the ultrasonic waves can be easily controlled by advanced electronic technology so that they can be focused on the desired target volume. Additionally, the physics of ultrasound are widely used and well understood; thus ultrasonic application can be tailored towards a particular drug delivery system. In this article, we review the recent progress made in research that utilizes both polymeric micelles and ultrasonic power in drug delivery. PMID:18506804

  8. Formation of multimeric antibodies for self-delivery of active monomers.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Yaron; Machluf, Yossy; Gefen, Tal; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Kotlyar, Alexander; Bram, Yaron; Shahar, Ehud; Reslane, Farah; Aizenshtein, Elina; Pitcovski, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Proteins and peptides have been used as drugs for almost a century. Technological advances in the past 30 years have enabled the production of pure, stable proteins in vast amounts. In contrast, administration of proteins based on their native active conformation (and thus necessitating the use of subcutaneous injections) has remained solely unchanged. The therapeutic anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a first line of the treatment for breast cancer. Chicken IgY is a commercially important polyclonal antibody (Ab). These Abs were examined for their ability to self-assemble and form ordered aggregates, by several biophysical methods. Atomic force microscopy analyses revealed the formation of multimeric nanostructures. The biological activity of multimeric IgG or IgY particles was retained and restored, in a dilution/time-dependent manner. IgG activity was confirmed by a binding assay using HER2 + human breast cancer cell line, SKBR3, while IgY activity was confirmed by ELISA assay using the VP2 antigen. Competition assay with native Herceptin antibodies demonstrated that the binding availability of the multimer formulation remained unaffected. Under long incubation periods, IgG multimers retained five times more activity than native IgG. In conclusion, the multimeric antibody formulations can serve as a storage depositories and sustained-release particles. These two important characteristics make this formulation promising for future novel administration protocols and altogether bring to light a different conceptual approach for the future use of therapeutic proteins as self-delivery entities rather than conjugated/encapsulated to other bio-compounds.

  9. Peptides and proteins used to enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to the brain: preclinical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Aguirre, Carolina; Morales, Francisco; Gallardo-Toledo, Eduardo; Guerrero, Simon; Giralt, Ernest; Araya, Eyleen; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2015-01-01

    An exciting and emerging field in nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the preclinical development of new strategies for the treatment and diagnosis of brain-related diseases such as neurodegeneration and cerebral tumors. The treatment of many brain-related disorders with AuNPs, which possess useful physical properties, is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The BBB highly regulates the substances that can permeate into the brain. Peptides and proteins may represent promising tools to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we summarize the potential applications of AuNPs to CNS disorders, discuss different strategies based on the use of peptides or proteins to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the brain, and examine the intranasal administration route, which bypasses the BBB. We also analyze the potential neurotoxicity of AuNPs and the perspectives and new challenges concerning the use of peptides and proteins to enhance the delivery of AuNPs to the brain. The majority of the work described in this review is in a preclinical stage of experimentation, or in select cases, in clinical trials in humans. We note that the use of AuNPs still requires substantial study before being translated into human applications. However, for further clinical research, the issues related to the potential use of AuNPs must be analyzed. PMID:26300639

  10. Macrophage exosomes as natural nanocarriers for protein delivery to inflamed brain.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongfen; Zhao, Yuling; Banks, William A; Bullock, Kristin M; Haney, Matthew; Batrakova, Elena; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2017-10-01

    Recent work has stimulated interest in the use of exosomes as nanocarriers for delivery of small drugs, RNAs, and proteins to the central nervous system (CNS). To overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB), exosomes were modified with brain homing peptides that target brain endothelium but likely to increase immune response. Here for the first time we demonstrate that there is no need for such modification to penetrate the BBB in mammals. The naïve macrophage (Mϕ) exosomes can utilize, 1) on the one hand, the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and, 2) on the other hand, the carbohydrate-binding C-type lectin receptors, to interact with brain microvessel endothelial cells comprising the BBB. Notably, upregulation of ICAM-1, a common process in inflammation, promotes Mϕ exosomes uptake in the BBB cells. We further demonstrate in vivo that naïve Mϕ exosomes, after intravenous (IV) administration, cross the BBB and deliver a cargo protein, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), to the brain. This delivery is enhanced in the presence of brain inflammation, a condition often present in CNS diseases. Taken together, the findings are of interest to basic science and possible use of Mϕ-derived exosomes as nanocarriers for brain delivery of therapeutic proteins to treat CNS diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Amphiphilic glycopolymer nanoparticles as vehicles for nasal delivery of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Guo, Qianqian; Wu, Zhongming; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Zhengpu; Li, Chaoxing; Zhang, Xinge

    2013-07-16

    Nasal drug delivery system has been a very promising route for delivery of proteins and peptides for the reason that it can avoid degradation in gastrointestinal tract and metabolism by liver enzymes. However, the bioavailability of proteins and peptides is still low due to the rapid clearance of mucociliary. Here, to prolong the residence time of drugs and improve their absorption, we prepared amphiphilic glycopolymer poly(2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate-random-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (p(LAMA-r-AAPBA), and the glycopolymer could assemble into the nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. Insulin, as a model drug, was efficiently encapsulated within the nanoparticles, and loading capacity was up to 12%. In vitro study revealed that the insulin release could be controlled by modifying the composition of glycopolymers. Cell viability showed that p(LAMA-r-AAPBA) nanoparticles had good cytocompatibility. Moreover, the mechanism of nanoparticle internalization into Calu-3 cells was a combination mechanism of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Importantly, there was a significant decrease in the blood glucose levels after the nasal administration of p(LAMA-r-AAPBA) nanoparticles to diabetic rats. Therefore, p(LAMA-r-AAPBA) glycopolymers have a potential application as a nasal delivery systems for proteins and peptides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting of gastrointestinal tract for amended delivery of protein/peptide therapeutics: strategies and industrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vivek K; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Singh, Yuvraj; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2014-12-28

    Delivery of proteins/peptides to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract via peroral/oral route involves tremendous challenges due to unfavorable environmental conditions like harsh pH, presence of proteolytic enzymes and absorption barriers. Detailed research is being conducted at the academic and industrial levels to diminish these troubles and various products are under clinical trials. Several approaches have been established to optimize oral delivery of proteins and peptides and can be broadly categorized into chemical and physical strategies. Chemical strategies include site specific mutagenesis, proteinylation, glycosylation, PEGylation and prodrug approaches, whereas physical strategies comprise formulation based approaches including application of absorption enhancers and metabolism modifiers along with delivering them via colloidal carrier systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles, and micro- and nano-emulsions. This review stands to accomplish the diverse aspects of oral delivery of proteins/peptides and summarizes the key concepts involved in targeting the biodrugs to specific sites of the GI tract such as the intestine and colon. Furthermore some light has also been shed on the current industrial practices followed in developing oral formulations of such bioactives.

  13. Peptides and proteins used to enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to the brain: preclinical approaches.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Aguirre, Carolina; Morales, Francisco; Gallardo-Toledo, Eduardo; Guerrero, Simon; Giralt, Ernest; Araya, Eyleen; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2015-01-01

    An exciting and emerging field in nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the preclinical development of new strategies for the treatment and diagnosis of brain-related diseases such as neurodegeneration and cerebral tumors. The treatment of many brain-related disorders with AuNPs, which possess useful physical properties, is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB highly regulates the substances that can permeate into the brain. Peptides and proteins may represent promising tools to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we summarize the potential applications of AuNPs to CNS disorders, discuss different strategies based on the use of peptides or proteins to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the brain, and examine the intranasal administration route, which bypasses the BBB. We also analyze the potential neurotoxicity of AuNPs and the perspectives and new challenges concerning the use of peptides and proteins to enhance the delivery of AuNPs to the brain. The majority of the work described in this review is in a preclinical stage of experimentation, or in select cases, in clinical trials in humans. We note that the use of AuNPs still requires substantial study before being translated into human applications. However, for further clinical research, the issues related to the potential use of AuNPs must be analyzed.

  14. Intracellular Protein Delivery and Gene Transfection by Electroporation Using a Microneedle Electrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-O; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    The impact of many biopharmaceuticals, including protein- and gene-based therapies, has been limited by the need for better methods of delivery into cells within tissues. Here, we present intracellular delivery of molecules and transfection with plasmid DNA by electroporation using a novel microneedle electrode array designed for targeted treatment of skin and other tissue surfaces. The microneedle array is molded out of polylactic acid. Electrodes and circuitry required for electroporation are applied to the microneedle array surface by a new metal-transfer micromolding method. The microneedle array maintains mechanical integrity after insertion into pig cadaver skin and is able to electroporate human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Quantitative measurements show that increasing electroporation pulse voltage increases uptake efficiency of calcein and bovine serum albumin, whereas increasing pulse length has lesser effects over the range studied. Uptake of molecules by up to 50 % of cells and transfection of 12 % of cells with a gene for green fluorescent protein is demonstrated at high cell viability. We conclude that the microneedle electrode array is able to electroporate cells, resulting in intracellular uptake of molecules, and has potential applications to improve intracellular delivery of proteins, DNA and other biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22328093

  15. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-11-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD.

  16. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD. PMID:24196104

  17. [Protein nutrition and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Navarro, M P

    1992-09-01

    The relationship between physical exercise and diet in order to optimize performance is getting growing interest. This review examines protein needs and protein intakes as well as the role of protein in the body and the metabolic changes occurring at the synthesis and catabolic levels during exercise. Protein synthesis in muscle or liver, amino acids oxidation, glucose production via gluconeogenesis from amino acids, etc., are modified, and consequently plasma and urinary nitrogen metabolites are affected. A brief comment on the advantages, disadvantages and forms of different protein supplements for sportsmen is given.

  18. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  19. Rice seed ER-derived protein body as an efficient delivery vehicle for oral tolerogenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hidenori; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirose, Sakiko; Yang, Lijun; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2010-08-01

    Mucosal delivery of peptide/protein therapeutics via the oral route is a desirable strategy in human immunotherapy. A key step for enhancing the bioavailability of orally administered therapeutics is to protect them from enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we generated transgenic rice seeds accumulating allergen-derived T cell epitopes, a model tolerogen for the control of pollen allergy, in either ER-derived protein body-I (PB-I) or protein storage vacuole protein body-II (PB-II). Compared with PB-II-localized or chemically synthesized forms, PB-I-localized T cell epitopes showed higher resistance to enzymatic digestion in simulated gastric fluid. Moreover, the dose of T cell epitope required for suppression of allergen-specific IgE in mice was about 20-fold lower when fed in PB-I localized form than when unprotected. These findings demonstrate the potential of bioencapsulation in PB-I for broad applications as a viable strategy to achieve efficient mucosal delivery of oral peptide/protein therapeutics.

  20. Multifunctional Delivery Systems for Advanced oral Uptake of Peptide/Protein Drugs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Sun Jin; Kwag, Dong Sup; Kim, Sol; Park, Jeyoung; Youn, Yu Seok; Bae, You Han; Lee, Eun Seong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in biotechnology and protein engineering have enabled the production of large quantities of proteins and peptides as important therapeutic agents. Various researchers have used biocompatible functional polymers to prepare oral dosage forms of proteins and peptides for chronic use and for easier administration to enhance patient compliance. However, there is a need to enhance their safety and effectiveness further. Most macromolecules undergo severe denaturation at low pH and enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. The macromolecules' large molecular size and low lipophilicity cause low permeation through the intestinal membrane. The major strategies that have been used to overcome these challenges (in oral drug carrier systems) can be classified as follows: enteric coating or encapsulation with pH-sensitive polymers or mucoadhesive polymers, co-administration of protease inhibitors, incorporation of absorption enhancers, modification of the physicochemical properties of the macromolecules, and site-specific delivery to the colon. This review attempts to summarize the various advanced oral delivery carriers, including nanoparticles, lipid carriers, such as liposomes, nano-aggregates using amphiphilic polymers, complex coacervation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, and inorganic porous particles. The particles were formulated and/or surface modified with functional polysaccharides or synthetic polymers to improve oral bioavailability of proteins and peptides. We also discuss formulation strategies to overcome barriers, therapeutic efficacies in vivo, and potential benefits and issues for successful oral dosage forms of the proteins and peptides.

  1. Inclusion bodies as potential vehicles for recombinant protein delivery into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liovic, Mirjana; Ozir, Mateja; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Peternel, Spela; Komel, Radovan; Zupancic, Tina

    2012-05-24

    We present the potential of inclusion bodies (IBs) as a protein delivery method for polymeric filamentous proteins. We used as cell factory a strain of E. coli, a conventional host organism, and keratin 14 (K14) as an example of a complex protein. Keratins build the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. In order to build filaments, monomeric K14 needs first to dimerize with its binding partner (keratin 5, K5), which is then followed by heterodimer assembly into filaments. K14 IBs were electroporated into SW13 cells grown in culture together with a "reporter" plasmid containing EYFP labeled keratin 5 (K5) cDNA. As SW13 cells do not normally express keratins, and keratin filaments are built exclusively of keratin heterodimers (i.e. K5/K14), the short filamentous structures we obtained in this study can only be the result of: a) if both IBs and plasmid DNA are transfected simultaneously into the cell(s); b) once inside the cells, K14 protein is being released from IBs; c) released K14 is functional, able to form heterodimers with EYFP-K5. Soluble IBs may be also developed for complex cytoskeletal proteins and used as nanoparticles for their delivery into epithelial cells.

  2. Inclusion bodies as potential vehicles for recombinant protein delivery into epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We present the potential of inclusion bodies (IBs) as a protein delivery method for polymeric filamentous proteins. We used as cell factory a strain of E. coli, a conventional host organism, and keratin 14 (K14) as an example of a complex protein. Keratins build the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. In order to build filaments, monomeric K14 needs first to dimerize with its binding partner (keratin 5, K5), which is then followed by heterodimer assembly into filaments. Results K14 IBs were electroporated into SW13 cells grown in culture together with a “reporter” plasmid containing EYFP labeled keratin 5 (K5) cDNA. As SW13 cells do not normally express keratins, and keratin filaments are built exclusively of keratin heterodimers (i.e. K5/K14), the short filamentous structures we obtained in this study can only be the result of: a) if both IBs and plasmid DNA are transfected simultaneously into the cell(s); b) once inside the cells, K14 protein is being released from IBs; c) released K14 is functional, able to form heterodimers with EYFP-K5. Conclusions Soluble IBs may be also developed for complex cytoskeletal proteins and used as nanoparticles for their delivery into epithelial cells. PMID:22624805

  3. PEG-Immobilized Keratin for Protein Drug Sequestration and pH-Mediated Delivery

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Roche C.; Rabbany, Sina Y.

    2016-01-01

    Protein drugs like growth factors are promising therapeutics for damaged-tissue repair. Their local delivery often requires biomaterial carriers for achieving the therapeutic dose range while extending efficacy. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and keratin were crosslinked and used as sponge-like scaffolds (KTN-PEG) to absorb test proteins with different isoelectric points (pI): albumin (~5), hemoglobin (~7), and lysozyme (~11). The protein release kinetics was influenced by charge at physiological pH 7.4. The keratin network, with pI 5.3, electrostatically attracted lysozyme and repulsed albumin generating the release rate profile: albumin > hemoglobin > lysozyme. However, under acidic conditions (pH 4), all proteins including keratins were positively charged and consequently intermolecular repulsion altered the release hierarchy, now determined by size (MW) diffusion: lysozyme (14 kDa) > hemoglobin (64 kDa) > albumin (66 kDa). Vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C), with properties comparable to lysozyme, was absorbed into the KTN-PEG scaffold. Endothelial cells cultured on this substrate had significantly larger numbers than on scaffolds without VEGF-C suggesting that the ionically bound and retained growth factor at neutral pH indirectly increased acute cell attachment and viability. PEG and keratin based sequestrations of proteins with basic pIs are therefore a feasible strategy with potential applications for selective biologics delivery. PMID:26904294

  4. Water-in-Oil Microemulsions for Protein Delivery: Loading Optimization and Stability.

    PubMed

    Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Vincenzetti, Silvia; Casettari, Luca; Lam, Jenny K W; Logrippo, Serena; Canala, Elisa; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Bonacucina, Giulia; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2017-01-01

    Microemulsions are attractive delivery systems for therapeutic proteins and peptides due to their ability to enhance bioavailability. Although different proteins and peptides have been successfully delivered through such ternary systems, no information can be found about protein loading and the formulation stability when such microemulsions are prepared with pharmaceuticallyapproved oils and surfactants. The aim of this work was to optimise a ternary system consisting of water/ ethyl oleate/Span® 80-Tween® 80 and to determine its protein loading capacity and stability, using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of biomolecule. The optimization was carried out using a Central Composite Design and all the prepared formulations were characterised through dynamic light scattering, rheology, optical and polarized microscopy. Subsequently, the maximum loading capacity was determined and the stability of the final microemulsion with the highest content of protein was followed over six months. To investigate the structural features of the protein, BSA was recovered from the microemulsion and analysed through fluorescence spectroscopy. After incorporation of the protein in the microemulsion, a decrease of its aqueous solubility was observed. However, the formulation remained stable over six months and the native-like state of the recovered protein was demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of preparing microemulsions with the highest content of protein and their long-term stability. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Comparative analysis of the methods of drug and protein delivery for the treatment of cancer, genetic diseases and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Roumiana

    2011-11-01

    The methods of protein and drug delivery for the treatment of cancer, genetic diseases and diagnostics were summarized. The potential of protein transduction is discussed and the recent developments in the field are reviewed. An overview is provided of the non-viral delivery methods such as liposomes, polymer-based delivery, cell-penetrating peptides, bacterial secretion, cells, virosomes, physical methods including electroporation, microinjection, osmotic lysis, nanoparticles, sonoporation to locally inject therapeutic molecules. The characteristic properties of non-viral vectors and their use for the delivery of therapeutic molecules for the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and to target tumors are also discussed. The potential of the transduced peptides and proteins was used as new therapeutic compounds against infectious diseases, to complement deficiencies in specific genes, to specifically kill tumour cells, for gene therapy. The protein delivery vectors can enhance the transfection at low concentrations and help to develop future gene delivery systems with reduced toxicity. Vitamin B12, folic acid, biotin, and riboflavin are essential in the treatment of cancer. Ultrasound has a potential in the delivery of therapeutic agents. The new developing technologies of drug delivery and targeting offer the possibility to improve the therapeutic possibilities of the existing drugs and to develop novel therapeutics.

  6. Lactococci and lactobacilli as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been safely consumed for centuries by humans in fermented foods. Thus, they are good candidates to develop novel oral vectors, constituting attractive alternatives to attenuated pathogens, for mucosal delivery strategies. Herein, this review summarizes our research, up until now, on the use of LAB as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines. Most of our work has been based on the model LAB Lactococcus lactis, for which we have developed efficient genetic tools, including expression signals and host strains, for the heterologous expression of therapeutic proteins such as antigens, cytokines and enzymes. Resulting recombinant lactococci strains have been tested successfully for their prophylactic and therapeutic effects in different animal models: i) against human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-induced tumors in mice, ii) to partially prevent a bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-allergic reaction in mice and iii) to regulate body weight and food consumption in obese mice. Strikingly, all of these tools have been successfully transposed to the Lactobacillus genus, in recent years, within our laboratory. Notably, anti-oxidative Lactobacillus casei strains were constructed and tested in two chemically-induced colitis models. In parallel, we also developed a strategy based on the use of L. lactis to deliver DNA at the mucosal level, and were able to show that L. lactis is able to modulate the host response through DNA delivery. Today, we consider that all of our consistent data, together with those obtained by other groups, demonstrate and reinforce the interest of using LAB, particularly lactococci and lactobacilli strains, to develop novel therapeutic protein mucosal delivery vectors which should be tested now in human clinical trials. PMID:21995317

  7. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    NAGANO, Kazuya; TSUTSUMI, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony–stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis–related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance–related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will

  8. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  9. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins, Drugs, and Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsoo Seth

    Biomaterials are used to help regenerate or replace the structure and function of damaged tissues. In order to elicit desired therapeutic responses in vivo, biomaterials are often functionalized with bioactive agents, such as growth factors, small molecule drugs, or even stem cells. Therefore, the strategies used to incorporate these bioactive agents in the microstructures and nanostructures of biomaterials can strongly influence the their therapeutic efficacy. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures with improved interaction with three types of therapeutic agents: bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) which promotes osteogenic differentiation and bone growth, anti-inflammatory drug naproxen which is used to treat osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, and neural stem cells that could differentiate into neurons to treat neurodegenerative diseases. For BMP-2 delivery, two specific systems were investigated with affinity for BMP-2: 1) heparin-binding nanofibers that display the natural ligand of the osteogenic protein, and 2) nanofibers that display a synthetic peptide ligand discovered in our laboratory through phage display to directly bind BMP-2. Both systems promoted enhanced osteoblast differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 cells and augmented bone regeneration in two in vivo models, a rat critical-size femur defect model and spinal arthrodesis model. The thesis also describes the use of PA nanofibers to improve the delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug naproxen. To promote a controlled release, naproxen was chemically conjugated to the nanofiber surface via an ester bond that would only be cleaved by esterases, which are enzymes found naturally in the body. In the absence of esterases, the naproxen remained conjugated to the nanofibers and was non-bioactive. On the other hand, in the presence of esterases, naproxen was slowly released and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, an enzyme responsible

  10. Soy lipophilic protein nanoparticles as a novel delivery vehicle for conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi-Ming; Zhu, Le-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Quan; He, Xiu-Ting; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Qi, Jun-Ru; Wang, Li-Juan; Yin, Shou-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Soy lipophilic protein nanoparticles (LPP), which present a novel delivery vehicle for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), were fabricated by ultrasonication of the soy lipophilic protein (LP), which exhibits unique characteristics including a high loading capacity, oxidation protection and a sustained releasing profile in vitro for CLA. The CLA-loaded LPP exhibited a mean diameter of 170 ± 0.63 nm and a loading capacity of 26.3 ± 0.40% (w/w). A coating of sodium caseinate (SC) on the surface improved the colloidal stability of the CLA-loaded LPP. This encapsulation conferred protection against the oxidation of CLA, by which the head space-oxygen consumption and hydrogen peroxide value were obviously decreased in comparison with the SC-encapsulated CLA and CLA alone. The delivery system enables a sustained releasing profile of CLA in a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These findings illustrate that the LPP could act as an effective delivery device for CLA, which could provide oxidation stability and a sustained release property.

  11. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape.

  12. Gene Delivery Mediated by Recombinant Silk Proteins Containing Cationic and Cell Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Hamasaki, Juliana; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-01

    Silk proteins are biodegradable and biocompatible, and can also be tailored to contain additional features via genetic engineering, suggesting utility for gene delivery. In the present study, novel silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered both with poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and RGD, to enhance cell-binding and transfection efficiency. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine-RGD block copolymers with pDNA were prepared, characterized and utilized for gene delivery to HeLa cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, zeta-potentialmeter, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Sizes and charges of the pDNA complexes were regulated by the polymer/nucleotide molar ratio. Samples with 30-lysine residues and 11 RGD sequences, prepared at the ratio of number of amines/phosphates from pDNA (N/P) of 2, had an average solution diameter of 186 nm and showed the highest transfection efficiency. The intracellular distribution of complexes of Cy5-labeled pDNA was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The Cy5-labeled pDNA was distributed near the cell membrane and around the nuclei, indicating that the pDNA was transferred near the nucleus. The results demonstrated the potential of bioengineered silk proteins with additional functional features as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:20457191

  13. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  14. Rational Design of Protein C Activators

    PubMed Central

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; Murphy, Mary; Pelc, Leslie; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico; Pozzi, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In addition to its procoagulant and proinflammatory functions mediated by cleavage of fibrinogen and PAR1, the trypsin-like protease thrombin activates the anticoagulant protein C in a reaction that requires the cofactor thrombomodulin and the endothelial protein C receptor. Once in the circulation, activated protein C functions as an anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and regenerative factor. Hence, availability of a protein C activator would afford a therapeutic for patients suffering from thrombotic disorders and a diagnostic tool for monitoring the level of protein C in plasma. Here, we present a fusion protein where thrombin and the EGF456 domain of thrombomodulin are connected through a peptide linker. The fusion protein recapitulates the functional and structural properties of the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex, prolongs the clotting time by generating pharmacological quantities of activated protein C and effectively diagnoses protein C deficiency in human plasma. Notably, these functions do not require exogenous thrombomodulin, unlike other anticoagulant thrombin derivatives engineered to date. These features make the fusion protein an innovative step toward the development of protein C activators of clinical and diagnostic relevance. PMID:28294177

  15. Intracellular protein delivery by hollow mesoporous silica capsules with a large surface hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Kiwon; Choi, Jong-Nam; Hwang, Yong-Kyung; Yun, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Won, Yong Sun; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kwon, Hyockman; Huh, Seong

    2012-03-01

    We prepared cell membrane-permeable hollow mesoporous silica capsules (HMSCs) by a simple new method. CTAB micellar assembly in cholesterol emulsion gave rise to a novel capsular morphology of the HMSC particles. The HMSCs consisted of mesostructured silica walls with a large surface hole (25-50 nm) and the average particle dimension was 100-300 nm. They exhibited high surface areas of up to 719.3 m2 g-1 and a mesoporous range of pores of 2.4-2.7 nm. The surface-functionalized HMSCs could also be prepared by a similar co-condensation method using tetraethoxysilane with various organoalkoxysilane precursors in the presence of cholesterol. These organically modified HMSCs could be further modified on demand. For example, a carboxy-functionalized HMSC could be surface-functionalized by a green fluorescent 5-aminofluorescein (AFL) through an amidation reaction to afford a fluorescent AFL-HMSC. The hollow capsular morphology of the HMSCs with a large surface hole enabled us to develop very efficient intracellular delivery systems for membrane-impermeable ions, molecules, and various functional proteins. Non-covalent sequestration and delivery of proteins as well as covalent linkage of fluorescent molecules on the silica surface are effective for this system. The highly negatively charged green fluorescent probe mag-fluo-4 could be intracellularly delivered into HeLa cells by HMSC without any difficulty. The HMSCs could also effectively transport large functional proteins such as antibodies into HeLa cells. The efficiency of protein delivery by HMSC seems to be 3-22-fold higher than that of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis.

  16. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cell extracellular vesicles: From active principle to next generation drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Crivelli, Barbara; Chlapanidas, Theodora; Perteghella, Sara; Lucarelli, Enrico; Pascucci, Luisa; Brini, Anna Teresa; Ferrero, Ivana; Marazzi, Mario; Pessina, Augusto; Torre, Maria Luisa

    2017-09-28

    It has been demonstrated that the biological effector of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) is their secretome, which is composed of a heterogeneous pool of bioactive molecules, partially enclosed in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Therefore, the MSC secretome (including EVs) has been recently proposed as possible alternative to MSC therapy. The secretome can be considered as a protein-based biotechnological product, it is probably safer compared with living/cycling cells, it presents virtually lower tumorigenic risk, and it can be handled, stored and sterilized as an Active Pharmaceutical/Principle Ingredient (API). EVs retain some structural and technological analogies with synthetic drug delivery systems (DDS), even if their potential clinical application is also limited by the absence of reproducible/scalable isolation methods and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant procedures. Notably, EVs secreted by MSCs preserve some of their parental cell features such as homing, immunomodulatory and regenerative potential. This review focuses on MSCs and their EVs as APIs, as well as DDS, considering their ability to reach inflamed and damaged tissues and to prolong the release of encapsulated drugs. Special attention is devoted to the illustration of innovative therapeutic approaches in which nanomedicine is successfully combined with stem cell therapy, thus creating a novel class of "next generation drug delivery systems." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Injectable hydrogels embedded with alginate microspheres for controlled delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Youjia; Wang, Jiulong; Wu, Jingjing; Zhang, Jun; Wan, Ying; Wu, Hua

    2016-03-23

    Some delivery carriers with injectable characteristics were built using the thermosensitive chitosan/dextran-polylactide/glycerophosphate hydrogel and selected alginate microspheres for the controllable release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). BMP-2 was first loaded into the microspheres with an average size of around 20 μm and the resulting microspheres were then embedded into the gel in order to achieve well-controlled BMP-2 release. The microsphere-embedded gels show their incipient gelation temperature at around 32 °C and pH at about 7.1. Some gels had their elastic modulus close to 1400 Pa and the ratio of elastic modulus to viscous modulus at around 34, revealing that they behaved like mechanically strong gels. Optimized microsphere-embedded gels were found to be able to administer the BMP-2 release without significant initial burst release in an approximately linear manner over a period of time longer than four weeks. The release rate and the released amount of BMP-2 from these gels could be regulated individually or cooperatively by the initial BMP-2 load and the dextran-polylactide content in the gels. Measurements of the BMP-2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity in C2C12 cells confirmed that C2C12 cells responded to BMP-2 in a dose-dependent way and the released BMP-2 from the microsphere-embedded gels well retained their bioactivity. In vivo assessment of some gels revealed that the released BMP-2 maintained its osteogenesis functions.

  18. A review of advanced oral drug delivery technologies facilitating the protection and absorption of protein and peptide molecules.

    PubMed

    Choonara, Bibi F; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-11-15

    The oral delivery of proteins and peptides is a dynamic research field despite the numerous challenges limiting their effective delivery. Successful oral delivery of proteins and peptides requires the accomplishment of three key tasks: protection of the macromolecules from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), permeation through the intestinal barrier and absorption of molecules into the systemic circulation. Currently, no clinically useful oral formulations have been developed but several attempts have been made to overcome the challenges of low oral bioavailability resulting from poor absorption, poor permeation and enzymatic degradation of the proteins and peptides in the GIT. Present strategies attempt to provide structural protection of the proteins and peptides and improved absorption through the use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers, novel polymeric delivery systems and chemical modification. However, each of these technologies has their limitations despite showing positive results. This review attempts to discuss the physical and chemical barriers of the GIT with particular emphasis on the current approaches employed to overcome these barriers, including the evaluation of other non-parenteral routes of protein and peptide delivery. In addition, this review assimilates oral formulation strategies under development and within the clinical trial stage in relation to their benefits and drawbacks with regard to facilitating optimal protection and absorption of proteins and peptides, as well as pertinent future challenges and opportunities governing oral drug delivery.

  19. Cytoplasmic Delivery of Liposomes into MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Cell-Specific Phage Fusion Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (Doxil) modified with a chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 breast cancer cells identified from a phage landscape library demonstrated a significantly enhanced association with target cells and an increased cytotoxicity. Based on some structural similarities between the N-terminus of the phage potein and known fusogenic peptides, we hypothesized that, in addition to the specific targeting, the phage protein may possess endosome-escaping potential and an increased cytotoxicity of drug-loaded phage protein-targeted liposomes may be explained by an advantageous combination of both, cell targeting and endosomal escape of drug-loaded nanocarrier. The use of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique allowed us to clearly demonstrate the pH-dependent membrane fusion activity of the phage protein. Endosomal escape and cytosolic delivery of phage-liposomes was visualized with fluorescence microscopy. Endosome acidification inhibition by bafilomycin A 1 resulted in decreased cytotoxicity of the phage-Doxil, while the endosome disruption by chloroquine had a negligible effect on efficacy of phage-Doxil, confirming its endosomal escape. Our results demonstrated an endosome-escaping property of the phage protein and provided an insight on mechanism of the enhanced cytotoxicity of phage-Doxil. PMID:20438086

  20. Soy protein/soy polysaccharide complex nanogels: folic acid loading, protection, and controlled delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuzhe; Yao, Ping

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we developed a facile approach to produce nanogels via self-assembly of folic acid, soy protein, and soy polysaccharide. High-pressure homogenization was introduced to break down the original aggregates of soy protein, which benefits the binding of soy protein with soy polysaccharide and folic acid at pH 4.0. After a heat treatment that causes the soy protein denaturation and gelation, folic acid-loaded soy protein/soy polysaccharide complex nanogels were fabricated. The nanogels have a polysaccharide surface that makes the nanogels dispersible in acidic conditions where folic acid is insoluble and soy protein forms precipitates after heating. More importantly, the protein and polysaccharide can inhibit the reactions between dissolved oxygen and folic acid during UV irradiation. After the preparation and storage of the nanogels in the presence of heat, oxygen, and light in acidic conditions, most of the folic acid molecules in the nanogels remain in their natural structure and can be released rapidly at neutral pH, that is, in the intestine. Because most food and beverages are acidic, the nanogels are a suitable delivery system of folic acid in food and beverages.

  1. A translocation signal for delivery of oomycete effector proteins into host plant cells.

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen C; Boevink, Petra C; Moleleki, Lucy; Avrova, Anna O; Morales, Juan G; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Armstrong, Miles R; Grouffaud, Severine; van West, Pieter; Chapman, Sean; Hein, Ingo; Toth, Ian K; Pritchard, Leighton; Birch, Paul R J

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial, oomycete and fungal plant pathogens establish disease by translocation of effector proteins into host cells, where they may directly manipulate host innate immunity. In bacteria, translocation is through the type III secretion system, but analogous processes for effector delivery are uncharacterized in fungi and oomycetes. Here we report functional analyses of two motifs, RXLR and EER, present in translocated oomycete effectors. We use the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-EER-containing protein Avr3a as a reporter for translocation because it triggers RXLR-EER-independent hypersensitive cell death following recognition within plant cells that contain the R3a resistance protein. We show that Avr3a, with or without RXLR-EER motifs, is secreted from P. infestans biotrophic structures called haustoria, demonstrating that these motifs are not required for targeting to haustoria or for secretion. However, following replacement of Avr3a RXLR-EER motifs with alanine residues, singly or in combination, or with residues KMIK-DDK--representing a change that conserves physicochemical properties of the protein--P. infestans fails to deliver Avr3a or an Avr3a-GUS fusion protein into plant cells, demonstrating that these motifs are required for translocation. We show that RXLR-EER-encoding genes are transcriptionally upregulated during infection. Bioinformatic analysis identifies 425 potential genes encoding secreted RXLR-EER class proteins in the P. infestans genome. Identification of this class of proteins provides unparalleled opportunities to determine how oomycetes manipulate hosts to establish infection.

  2. Comparison of different cationized proteins as biomaterials for nanoparticle-based ocular gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Giovanni K; Párraga, Jenny E; Seijo, Begoña; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Cationized polymers have been proposed as transfection agents for gene therapy. The present work aims to improve the understanding of the potential use of different cationized proteins (atelocollagen, albumin and gelatin) as nanoparticle components and to investigate the possibility of modulating the physicochemical properties of the resulting nanoparticle carriers by selecting specific protein characteristics in an attempt to improve current ocular gene-delivery approaches. The toxicity profiles, as well as internalization and transfection efficiency, of the developed nanoparticles can be modulated by modifying the molecular weight of the selected protein and the amine used for cationization. The most promising systems are nanoparticles based on intermediate molecular weight gelatin cationized with the endogenous amine spermine, which exhibit an adequate toxicological profile, as well as effective association and protection of pDNA or siRNA molecules, thereby resulting in higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than the other studied formulations.

  3. Improving protein delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 from bacterial inclusion bodies used as cell culture substrates.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Peebo, Karl; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Villaverde, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have recently been used to generate biocompatible cell culture interfaces, with diverse effects on cultured cells such as cell adhesion enhancement, stimulation of cell growth or induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Additionally, novel applications of IBs as sustained protein delivery systems with potential applications in regenerative medicine have been successfully explored. In this scenario, with IBs gaining significance in the biomedical field, the fine tuning of this functional biomaterial is crucial. In this work, the effect of temperature on fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) IB production and performance has been evaluated. FGF-2 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at 25 and 37 °C, producing IBs with differences in size, particle structure and biological activity. Cell culture topographies made with FGF-2 IBs biofabricated at 25 °C showed higher levels of biological activity as well as a looser supramolecular structure, enabling a higher protein release from the particles. In addition, the controlled use of FGF-2 protein particles enabled the generation of functional topographies with multiple biological activities being effective on diverse cell types. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation and characterization of protein-loaded N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles as nasal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Amidi, Maryam; Romeijn, Stefan G; Borchard, Gerrit; Junginger, Hans E; Hennink, Wim E; Jiskoot, Wim

    2006-03-10

    In this study, the potential of N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles as a carrier system for the nasal delivery of proteins was investigated. TMC nanoparticles were prepared by ionic crosslinking of TMC solution (with or without ovalbumin) with tripolyphosphate, at ambient temperature while stirring. The size, zeta-potential and morphology of the nanoparticles were investigated as a function of the preparation conditions. Protein loading, protein integrity and protein release were studied. The toxicity of the TMC nanoparticles was tested by ciliary beat frequency measurements of chicken embryo trachea and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. The in vivo uptake of FITC-albumin-loaded TMC nanoparticles by nasal epithelia tissue in rats was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The nanoparticles had an average size of about 350 nm and a positive zeta-potential. They showed a loading efficiency up to 95% and a loading capacity up to 50% (w/w). The integrity of the entrapped ovalbumin was preserved. Release studies showed that more than 70% of the protein remained associated with the TMC nanoparticles for at least 3 h on incubation in PBS (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. Cytotoxicity tests with Calu-3 cells showed no toxic effects of the nanoparticles, whereas a partially reversible cilio-inhibiting effect on the ciliary beat frequency of chicken trachea was observed. In vivo uptake studies indicated the transport of FITC-albumin-associated TMC nanoparticles across the nasal mucosa. In conclusion, TMC nanoparticles are a potential new delivery system for transport of proteins through the nasal mucosa.

  5. Polyethylene glycol-based protein nanocapsules for functional delivery of a differentiation transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anuradha; Liu, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Fan, Guoping; Tang, Yi

    2012-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) can direct cell fate by binding to DNA and regulating gene transcription. Controlling the intracellular levels of specific TFs can therefore enable reprogramming of cellular function and differentiation. Direct delivery of recombinant TFs to target cells can thus have widespread therapeutic value, but has remained challenging due to structural fragility of TFs and inefficient membrane transduction. Here we describe the functional delivery of TFs using degradable polymeric nanocapsules to drive cellular differentiation. The nanocapsules were synthesized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG)-based monomers and intracellularly-degradable crosslinkers. Physical properties and release kinetics of the nanocapsules were optimized through tuning of monomer and crosslinker ratios to achieve enhanced delivery of cargo destined for the nuclei. The nanocapsules did not display cytotoxicity in primary cell lines up to concentrations of 5 μm. A recombinant myogenic transcription factor, MyoD, was delivered to the nuclei of myoblast cells using degradable nanocapsules to induce myogenic differentiation. MyoD was confirmed to be delivered to the nuclei of myoblasts using confocal microscopy and was demonstrated to be active in transcription through a luciferase-based reporter assay. More importantly, delivered MyoD was able to drive myoblast differentiation as evidenced by the hallmark elongated and multinuclear morphology of myotubes. The activation of downstream cascade was also confirmed through immunostaining of late myogenic markers myogenin and My-HC. The efficiency of differentiation achieved via nanocapsule delivery is significantly higher than that of native MyoD, and is comparable to that of plasmid transfection. The encapsulated MyoD can also withstand prolonged protease treatment and remain functional. The ease of preparation, biocompatibility and effective cargo delivery make the polymeric nanocapsule a useful tool to deliver a variety of

  6. Cytochrome c Encapsulating Theranostic Nanoparticles: A Novel Bifunctional System for targeted delivery of therapeutic membrane-impermeable proteins to tumors and imaging of cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Santimukul; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Perez, J. Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The effective administration of therapeutic proteins has received increased attention for the treatment of various diseases. Encapsulation of these proteins in various matrices, as a method of protein structure and function preservation, is a widely used approach that results in maintenance of the protein’s function. However, targeted delivery and tracking of encapsulated therapeutic proteins to the affected cells is still a challenge. In an effort to advance the targeted delivery of a functional apoptosis-initiating protein (Cytochrome c) to cancer cells, we formulated theranostic polymeric nanoparticles for the simultaneous encapsulation of Cytochrome c and a near infrared dye to folate-expressing cancer cell cells. The polymeric nanoparticles were prepared using a novel water soluble hyperbranched polyhydroxyl polymer that allows for dual encapsulation of a hydrophilic protein and an amphiphilic fluorescent dye. Our protein therapeutic cargo is the endogenous protein Cytochrome c, which upon cytoplasmic release, initiates an apoptotic response leading to programmed cell death. Results indicate that encapsulation of Cytochrome c within the nanoparticle’s cavities preserved the protein’s enzymatic activity. The potential therapeutic property of these nanoparticles was demonstrated by the induction of apoptosis upon intracellular delivery. Furthermore, targeted delivery of Cytochrome c to folate-receptor-positive cancer cells was achieved via conjugation of folic acid to the nanoparticle’s surface, whereas the nanoparticle’s theranostic properties were conferred via the co-encapsulation of Cytochrome c and a fluorescent dye. Considering that these theranostic nanoparticles can carry an endogenous cellular apoptotic initiator (Cytochrome c) and a fluorescent tag (ICG) commonly used in the clinic, their use and potential translation into the clinic is anticipated, facilitating the monitoring of tumor regression. PMID:20536259

  7. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  8. Delivery of Proteins, Peptides or Cell-impermeable Small Molecules into Live Cells by Incubation with the Endosomolytic Reagent dfTAT.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Kristina; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-02

    Macromolecular delivery strategies typically utilize the endocytic pathway as a route of cellular entry. However, endosomal entrapment severely limits the efficiency with which macromolecules penetrate the cytosolic space of cells. Recently, we have circumvented this problem by identifying the reagent dfTAT, a disulfide bond dimer of the peptide TAT labeled with the fluorophore tetramethylrhodamine. We have generated a fluorescently labeled dimer of the prototypical cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT, dfTAT, which penetrates live cells and reaches the cytosolic space of cells with a particularly high efficiency. Cytosolic delivery of dfTAT is achieved in multiple cell lines, including primary cells. Moreover, delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation or gene expression. dfTAT can deliver small molecules, peptides, antibodies, biologically active enzymes and a transcription factor. In this report, we describe the protocols involved in dfTAT synthesis and cellular delivery. The manuscript describes how to control the amount of protein delivered to the cytosolic space of cells by varying the amount of protein administered extracellularly. Finally, the current limitations of this new technology and steps involved in validating delivery are discussed. The described protocols should be extremely useful for cell-based assays as well as for the ex vivo manipulation and reprogramming of cells.

  9. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  10. Low-activity waste feed delivery -- Minimum duration between successive batches

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.B.

    1998-08-25

    The purpose of this study is to develop a defensible basis for establishing what ``minimum duration`` will provide acceptable risk mitigation for low-activity waste feed delivery to the privatization vendors. The study establishes a probabilistic-based duration for staging of low-activity waste feed batches. A comparison is made of the durations with current feed delivery plans and potential privatization vendor facility throughput rates.

  11. Cbl proteins in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Tsygankov, Alexander; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Their functional responses have to be tightly controlled as any disturbance may lead to bleeding disorders or thrombosis. It is thus important to clearly identify and understand the signaling mechanisms involved in platelet function. An important role of c-Cbl and Cbl-b ubiquitin ligases in platelet functional responses and in hematological malignancies has been recently described. Cbl proteins perform negative and positive regulation of several signaling pathways in platelets. In this review, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in platelet functional responses.

  12. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  13. Protein-lipid nanohybrids as emerging platforms for drug and gene delivery: Challenges and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Mohamed; Medhat, Waseem; Hany, Mark; Saher, Nourhan; Fang, Jia-You; Elzoghby, Ahmed

    2017-03-30

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been long used to deliver a vast range of drugs and bioactives owing to their ability to demonstrate novel physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. An exponential growth has spurred in research and development of these nanocarriers which led to the evolution of a great number of diverse nanosystems including liposomes, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), micelles, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Among them, lipid-based nanocarriers have made the largest progress whether commercially or under development. Despite this progress, these lipid-based nanocarriers suffer from several limitations that led to the development of many protein-coated lipid nanocarriers. To less extent, protein-based nanocarriers suffer from limitations that led to the fabrication of some lipid bilayer enveloping protein nanocarriers. This review discusses in-depth some limitations associated with the lipid-based or protein-based nanocarriers and the fruitful outcomes brought by protein-lipid hybridization. Also discussed are the various hybridization techniques utilized to formulate these protein-lipid nanohybrids and the mechanisms involved in the drug loading process.

  14. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  15. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  16. LTP-triggered cholesterol redistribution activates Cdc42 and drives AMPA receptor synaptic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Anna; Norwood, Stephanie; Brouwers, Jos F.; Palomer, Ernest; Helms, J. Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking during synaptic plasticity requires the concerted action of multiple signaling pathways and the protein transport machinery. However, little is known about the contribution of lipid metabolism during these processes. In this paper, we addressed the question of the role of cholesterol in synaptic changes during long-term potentiation (LTP). We found that N-methyl-d-aspartate–type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) activation during LTP induction leads to a rapid and sustained loss or redistribution of intracellular cholesterol in the neuron. A reduction in cholesterol, in turn, leads to the activation of Cdc42 and the mobilization of GluA1-containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid–type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) from Rab11-recycling endosomes into the synaptic membrane, leading to synaptic potentiation. This process is accompanied by an increase of NMDAR function and an enhancement of LTP. These results imply that cholesterol acts as a sensor of NMDAR activation and as a trigger of downstream signaling to engage small GTPase (guanosine triphosphatase) activation and AMPAR synaptic delivery during LTP. PMID:25753037

  17. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Price, Daniel L.; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Szalay, Aladar A.; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Methods Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. Results GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. Conclusion The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25244076

  18. Delivery of Membrane Impermeable Cargo into CHO Cells by Peptide Nanoparticles Targeted by a Protein Corona

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Christian; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-01-01

    Nanocarriers can fulfill essential functions in the stabilization and delivery of drugs: they prevent solubility issues and degradation, reduce side effects and modify the pharmacokinetic profile. However, particle based pharmaceuticals are very complex and thus challenging to scale up. As formulation routines account for a large fraction of production costs, reducing complexity in the process of assembly, loading and functionalization of nanoparticles is very desirable. Unlike existing approaches with similar goals, our protocol is designed to minimize usage of material and time. Prerequisite to this elegant one-step procedure is the controlled phase-separation of a hydrophobic peptide to nanoparticles, inducing concurrent cargo-entrapment and association of a protein corona. We demonstrate the process by assembling Flutax-2 containing peptide nanoparticles functionalized with transferrin. Cellular uptake of the particles and cargo release depend on specific particle-cell interactions via transferrin receptor. These data indicate corona-mediated delivery of membrane impermeable cargo in vitro by a particulate delivery system entirely composed of amino acids. PMID:22226586

  19. Synthesis of protein-loaded hydrogel particles in an aqueous two-phase system for coincident antigen and CpG oligonucleotide delivery to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddhartha; Yap, Woon Teck; Irvine, Darrell J

    2005-01-01

    Materials that effectively deliver protein antigens together with activating ligands to antigen-presenting cells are sought for improved nonviral vaccines. To this end, we synthesized protein-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel particles by cross-linking PEG within the polymer-rich phase of an emulsion formed by a poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer in saturated aqueous salt solution. These particles (500-nm diameter) contained high levels of encapsulated protein (approximately 75% of dry mass), which was selectively released by proteolytic enzymes normally present in the phagosomal/endosomal compartments of dendritic cells (DCs). For co-delivery of cellular activation signals, gel particles were surface-modified by sequential adsorption of poly(l-arginine) and CpG oligonucleotides. DCs pulsed with protein-loaded particles activated naïve T cells in vitro approximately 10-fold more efficiently than DCs incubated with soluble protein. This organic solvent-free strategy for protein encapsulation within submicron-sized hydrophilic particles is attractive for macromolecule delivery to a variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells.

  20. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    PubMed

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging.

  1. Lipid-based colloidal carriers for peptide and protein delivery – liposomes versus lipid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Susana; Sarmento, Bruno; Ferreira, Domingos C; Souto, Eliana B

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of lipid-based colloidal carriers and their pharmaceutical implications in the delivery of peptides and proteins for oral and parenteral administration. There are several examples of biomacromolecules used nowadays in the therapeutics, which are promising candidates to be delivered by means of liposomes and lipid nanoparticles, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Several production procedures can be applied to achieve a high association efficiency between the bioactives and the carrier, depending on the physicochemical properties of both, as well as on the production procedure applied. Generally, this can lead to improved bioavailability, or in case of oral administration a more consistent temporal profile of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Advantages and drawbacks of such colloidal carriers are also pointed out. This article describes strategies used for formulation of peptides and proteins, methods used for assessment of association efficiency and practical considerations regarding the toxicological concerns. PMID:18203427

  2. Nanoporous membrane based on block copolymer thin film for protein drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-03-01

    We studied long term and controlled release of protein drugs by using nanoporous membranes with various pore sizes. Nanoporous membrane consists of the separation layer prepared by polystyrene-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) copolymer thin film and conventional microfiltration membrane as a support. We demonstrate a long-term constant in vitro release of bovine serum albumin (BSA)and human growth hormone ) (hGH) without their denaturation up to 2 months. A nearly constant serum concentration of hGH was maintained up to 3 weeks in SD rats. The long-term constant delivery based on this membrane for protein drugs within the therapeutic range can be highly appreciated for the patients with hormone- deficiency.

  3. Design and characterization of calcium alginate microparticles coated with polycations as protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zarate, J; Virdis, L; Orive, G; Igartua, M; Hernández, R M; Pedraz, J L

    2011-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded calcium alginate microparticles (MPs) produced in this study by a w/o emulsification and external gelation method exhibited spherical and fairly smooth and porous morphology with 1.052 ± 0.057 µm modal particle size. The high permeability of the calcium alginate hydrogel lead to a potent burst effect and too fast protein release. To overcome these problems, MPs were coated with polycations, such as chitosan, poly-L-lysine and DEAE-dextran. Our results demonstrated that coated MPs showed slower release and were able to significantly reduce the release of BSA in the first hour. Therefore, this method can be applied to prepare coated alginate MPs which could be an optimal system for the controlled release of biotherapeutic molecules. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to optimize delivery properties which could provide a sustained release of proteins.

  4. Lipid-based colloidal carriers for peptide and protein delivery--liposomes versus lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana; Sarmento, Bruno; Ferreira, Domingos C; Souto, Eliana B

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of lipid-based colloidal carriers and their pharmaceutical implications in the delivery of peptides and proteins for oral and parenteral administration. There are several examples of biomacromolecules used nowadays in the therapeutics, which are promising candidates to be delivered by means of liposomes and lipid nanoparticles, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Several production procedures can be applied to achieve a high association efficiency between the bioactives and the carrier, depending on the physicochemical properties of both, as well as on the production procedure applied. Generally, this can lead to improved bioavailability, or in case of oral administration a more consistent temporal profile of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Advantages and drawbacks of such colloidal carriers are also pointed out. This article describes strategies used for formulation of peptides and proteins, methods used for assessment of association efficiency and practical considerations regarding the toxicological concerns.

  5. The use of colloidal microgels for the controlled delivery of proteins and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Victoria J.; Snowden, Martin J.; Mitchell, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Colloidal microgels may be used for the absorption and controlled release of confirmationally sensitive molecules such as proteins and peptides. These monodisperse microgels are easily prepared in a single pot reaction from e.g. Nisopropylacrylamide, butyl acrylate and methacrylic acid in the presence of a cross-linking agent and a suitable free radical initiator. The resultant materials display dramatic conformational changes in aqueous dispersion in response to changes in e.g. environmental pH. Colloidal microgels are capable of absorbing a range of different proteins and peptides at one pH, affording them protection by changing the conformation of the microgel following a pH change. A further change in environmental pH will allow the microgel to adopt a more extended confirmation and therefore allow the release of the encapsulated material. In the case of e.g. insulin this would offer the possibility of an oral delivery route. At the pH of stomach the microgel adopts a compact conformation, "protecting" the protein from denaturation. As the pH increases passing into the GI tract, the microgel changes its conformation to a more expanded form and thereby allows the protein to be released. Colloidal microgels offer an opportunity for the controlled release of conformationally sensitive protein and peptide molecules via an oral route.

  6. Improving Efficacy, Oral Bioavailability, and Delivery of Paclitaxel Using Protein-Grafted Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Kulhari, Hitesh; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Rachamalla, Shyam S; Adams, David J; Bansal, Vipul; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-11-07

    Oral delivery of anticancer drugs remains challenging despite the most convenient route of drug administration. Hydrophobicity and nonspecific toxicities of anticancer agents are major impediments in the development of oral formulation. In this study, we developed wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-conjugated, solid lipid nanoparticles to improve the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX). This study was focused to improve the PTX loading in biocompatible lipid matrix with high bioconjugation efficiency. WGA-conjugated, PTX-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (LPSN) exhibited enhanced anticancer activity against A549 lung cancer cells after internalization through lectin receptors than free PTX. Biodistribution studies in rats revealed that LPSN significantly improved the oral bioavailability and lung targetability of PTX, which could be due to cumulative bioadhesive property of the nanocarrier system and the targeting ligand WGA.

  7. Preparation of phytantriol cubosomes by solvent precursor dilution for the delivery of protein vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, S B; Assmus, D; Boehnke, A; Hanley, T; Boyd, B J; Rades, T; Hook, S

    2011-09-01

    Different delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of peptide/protein-based vaccines are currently under investigation. In this study, the preparation and physicochemical characterisation of cubosomes, a novel lipid-based particulate system currently being explored for vaccine delivery, was investigated. Cubosomes were prepared from a liquid precursor mixture containing phytantriol or glycerylmonooleate (GMO), F127 for particle stabilisation, and a hydrotrope (ethanol or polyethylene glycol (PEG(200)) or propylene glycol (PG)). Several liquid precursors were prepared, and the effect of varying the concentrations of F127 and the hydrotrope on cubosome formation was investigated. Formulations were prepared by fragmentation for comparison. The model protein ovalbumin (Ova) was also entrapped within selected formulations. Submicron-sized particles (180-300 nm) were formed spontaneously upon dilution of the liquid precursors, circumventing the need for the preformed cubic phase used in traditional fragmentation-based methods. The nanostructure of the phytantriol dispersions was determined to be cubic phase using SAXS whilst GMO dispersions had a reverse hexagonal nanostructure coexisting with cubic phase. The greatest entrapment of Ova was within phytantriol cubosomes prepared from liquid precursors. Release of Ova from the various formulations was sustained; however, release was significantly faster and the extent of release was greater from fragmented dispersions compared to liquid precursor formulations. Taken together, these results suggest that phytantriol cubosomes can be prepared using liquid precursors and that it is a suitable alternative to GMO. Furthermore, the high entrapment and the slow release of Ova in vitro highlight the potential of phytantriol cubosomes prepared using liquid precursors as a novel vaccine delivery system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Breadboard activities for advanced protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The proposed work entails the design, assembly, testing, and delivery of a turn-key system for the semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature. The system will utilize optical scintillation as a means of detecting and monitoring nucleation and crystallite growth during temperature lowering (or raising, with retrograde solubility systems). The deliverables of this contract are: (1) turn-key scintillation system for the semi-automatic determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature, (2) instructions and software package for the operation of the scintillation system, and (3) one semi-annual and one final report including the test results obtained for ovostatin with the above scintillation system.

  9. Impact of Absorption and Transport on Intelligent Therapeutics and Nano-scale Delivery of Protein Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peppas, Nicholas A.; Carr, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    The combination of materials design and advances in nanotechnology has led to the development of new therapeutic protein delivery systems. The pulmonary, nasal, buccal and other routes have been investigated as delivery options for protein therapy, but none result in improved patient compliances and patient quality of life as the oral route. For the oral administration of these new systems, an understanding of protein transport is essential because of the dynamic nature of the gastrointestinal tract and the barriers to transport that exist. Models have been developed to describe the transport between the gastrointestinal lumen and the bloodstream, and laboratory techniques like cell culture provide a means to investigate the absorption and transport of many therapeutic agents. Biomaterials, including stimuli-sensitive complexation hydrogels, have been investigated as promising carriers for oral delivery. However, the need to develop models that accurately predict protein blood concentration as a function of the material structure and properties still exists. PMID:20161384

  10. Biodegradable Magnetic Silica@Iron Oxide Nanovectors with Ultra-Large Mesopores for High Protein Loading, Magnetothermal Release, and Delivery.

    PubMed

    Omar, Haneen; Croissant, Jonas G; Alamoudi, Kholod; Alsaiari, Shahad; Alradwan, Ibrahim; Majrashi, Majed A; Anjum, Dalaver H; Martins, Patricia; Moosa, Basem; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Khashab, Niveen M

    2016-11-29

    The delivery of large cargos of diameter above 15nm for biomedical applications has proved challenging since it requires biocompatible, stably-loaded, and biodegradable nanomaterials. In this study, we describe the design of biodegradable silica-iron oxide hybrid nanovectors with large mesopores for large protein delivery in cancer cells. The mesopores of the nanomaterials spanned from 20 to 60nm in diameter and post-functionalization allowed the electrostatic immobilization of large proteins (e.g. mTFP-Ferritin, ~534kDa). Half of the content of the nanovectors was based with iron oxide nanophases which allowed the rapid biodegradation of the carrier in fetal bovine serum and a magnetic responsiveness. The nanovectors released large protein cargos in aqueous solution under acidic pH or magnetic stimuli. The delivery of large proteins was then autonomously achieved in cancer cells via the silica-iron oxide nanovectors, which is thus a promising for biomedical applications.

  11. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    SciTech Connect

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Cationized Immunoglobulin G: Enhanced Delivery Compared to Native Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triguero, Domingo; Buciak, Jody B.; Yang, Jing; Pardridge, William M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to >10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 ± 0.37 μ M; Bmax, 1.4 ± 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  13. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: enhanced delivery compared to native protein.

    PubMed Central

    Triguero, D; Buciak, J B; Yang, J; Pardridge, W M

    1989-01-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB. Images PMID:2734318

  14. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients.

  15. Transcript-activated collagen matrix as sustained mRNA delivery system for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Emrich, Daniela; Erben, Reinhold; Schüler, Christiane; Altpeter, Philipp; Ferizi, Mehrije; Hasenpusch, Günther; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-10-10

    Transcript therapies using chemically modified messenger RNAs (cmRNAs) are emerging as safe and promising alternatives for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, their applications have been limited due to transient translation and relatively low stability of cmRNAs compared to DNA. Here we show that vacuum-dried cmRNA-loaded collagen sponges, termed transcript activated matrices (TAMs), can serve as depots for sustained delivery of cmRNA. TAMs provide steady state protein production for up to six days, and substantial residual expression until 11days post transfection. Another advantage of this technology was nearly 100% transfection efficiency as well as low toxicity in vitro. TAMs were stable for at least 6months at room temperature. Human BMP-2-encoding TAMs induced osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and bone regeneration in a non-critical rat femoral bone defect model in vivo. In summary, TAMs are a promising tool for bone regeneration and potentially also for other applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  16. Buccal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Smart, John D

    2005-05-01

    Buccal formulations have been developed to allow prolonged localised therapy and enhanced systemic delivery. The buccal mucosa, however, while avoiding first-pass effects, is a formidable barrier to drug absorption, especially for biopharmaceutical products (proteins and oligonucleotides) arising from the recent advances in genomics and proteomics. The buccal route is typically used for extended drug delivery, so formulations that can be attached to the buccal mucosa are favoured. The bioadhesive polymers used in buccal drug delivery to retain a formulation are typically hydrophilic macro-molecules containing numerous hydrogen bonding groups. Newer second-generation bioadhesives have been developed and these include modified or new polymers that allow enhanced adhesion and/or drug delivery, in addition to site-specific ligands such as lectins. Over the last 20 years a wide range of formulations has been developed for buccal drug delivery (tablet, patch, liquids and semisolids) but comparatively few have found their way onto the market. Currently, this route is restricted to the delivery of a limited number of small lipophilic molecules that readily cross the buccal mucosa. However, this route could become a significant means for the delivery of a range of active agents in the coming years, if the barriers to buccal drug delivery are overcome. In particular, patient acceptability and the successful systemic delivery of large molecules (proteins, oligonucleotides and polysaccharides) via this route remains both a significant opportunity and challenge, and new/improved technologies may be required to address these.

  17. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  18. Processive degradation of unstructured protein by Escherichia coli Lon occurs via the slow, sequential delivery of multiple scissile sites followed by rapid and synchronized peptide bond cleavage events.

    PubMed

    Mikita, Natalie; Cheng, Iteen; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Huang, Jonathan; Lee, Irene

    2013-08-20

    Processive protein degradation is a common feature found in ATP-dependent proteases. This study utilized a physiological substrate of Escherichia coli Lon protease known as the lambda N protein (λN) to initiate the first kinetic analysis of the proteolytic mechanism of this enzyme. To this end, experiments were designed to determine the timing of three selected scissile sites in λN approaching the proteolytic site of ELon and their subsequent cleavages to gain insight into the mechanism by which ATP-dependent proteases attain processivity in protein degradation. The kinetic profile of peptide bond cleavage at different regions of λN was first detected by the iTRAQ/mass spectrometry technique. Fluorogenic λN constructs were then generated as reporter substrates for transient kinetic characterization of the ATP- versus AMPPNP-dependent peptide bond cleavage and the delivery of the scissile sites near the amino- versus carboxyl-terminal of the λN protein to the proteolytic site of ELon. Collectively, our results support a mechanism by which the cleavage of multiple peptide bonds awaits the "almost complete" delivery of all the scissile sites in λN to the proteolytic site in an ATP-dependent manner. Comparing the time courses of delivery to the active site of the selected scissile sites further implicates the existence of a preferred directionality in the final stage of substrate delivery, which begins at the carboxyl-terminal. The subsequent cleavage of the scissile sites in λN, however, appears to lack a specific directionality and occurs at a much faster rate than the substrate delivery step.

  19. Consuming viscous prey: a novel protein-secreting delivery system in neotropical snail-eating snakes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficient venom delivery systems are known to occur only in varanoid lizards and advanced colubroidean snakes among squamate reptiles. Although components of these venomous systems might have been present in a common ancestor, the two lineages independently evolved strikingly different venom gland systems. In snakes, venom is produced exclusively by serous glands in the upper jaw. Within the colubroidean radiation, lower jaw seromucous infralabial glands are known only in two distinct lineages–the basal pareatids and the more advanced Neotropical dipsadines known as “goo-eating snakes”. Goo-eaters are a highly diversified, ecologically specialized clade that feeds exclusively on invertebrates (e.g., gastropod molluscs and annelids). Their evolutionary success has been attributed to their peculiar feeding strategies, which remain surprisingly poorly understood. More specifically, it has long been thought that the more derived Dipsadini genera Dipsas and Sibynomorphus use glandular toxins secreted by their infralabial glands to extract snails from their shells. Results Here, we report the presence in the tribe Dipsadini of a novel lower jaw protein-secreting delivery system effected by a gland that is not functionally related to adjacent teeth, but rather opens loosely on the oral epithelium near the tip of the mandible, suggesting that its secretion is not injected into the prey as a form of envenomation but rather helps control the mucus and assists in the ingestion of their highly viscous preys. A similar protein-secreting system is also present in the goo-eating genus Geophis and may share the same adaptive purpose as that hypothesized for Dipsadini. Our phylogenetic hypothesis suggests that the acquisition of a seromucous infralabial gland represents a uniquely derived trait of the goo-eating clade that evolved independently twice within the group as a functionally complex protein-secreting delivery system. Conclusions The acquisition by snail

  20. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies. PMID:24730624

  1. The periciliary ring in polarized epithelial cells is a hot spot for delivery of the apical protein gp135.

    PubMed

    Stoops, Emily H; Hull, Michael; Olesen, Christina; Mistry, Kavita; Harder, Jennifer L; Rivera-Molina, Felix; Toomre, Derek; Caplan, Michael J

    2015-10-26

    In polarized epithelial cells, newly synthesized cell surface proteins travel in carrier vesicles from the trans Golgi network to the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Despite extensive research on polarized trafficking, the sites of protein delivery are not fully characterized. Here we use the SNAP tag system to examine the site of delivery of the apical glycoprotein gp135. We show that a cohort of gp135 is delivered to a ring surrounding the base of the primary cilium, followed by microtubule-dependent radial movement away from the cilium. Delivery to the periciliary ring was specific to newly synthesized and not recycling protein. A subset of this newly delivered protein traverses the basolateral membrane en route to the apical membrane. Crumbs3a, another apical protein, was not delivered to the periciliary region, instead making its initial apical appearance in a pattern that resembled its steady-state distribution. Our results demonstrate a surprising "hot spot" for gp135 protein delivery at the base of the primary cilium and suggest the existence of a novel microtubule-based directed movement of a subset of apical surface proteins. © 2015 Stoops et al.

  2. The periciliary ring in polarized epithelial cells is a hot spot for delivery of the apical protein gp135

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, Emily H.; Hull, Michael; Olesen, Christina; Mistry, Kavita; Harder, Jennifer L.; Rivera-Molina, Felix; Toomre, Derek

    2015-01-01

    In polarized epithelial cells, newly synthesized cell surface proteins travel in carrier vesicles from the trans Golgi network to the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Despite extensive research on polarized trafficking, the sites of protein delivery are not fully characterized. Here we use the SNAP tag system to examine the site of delivery of the apical glycoprotein gp135. We show that a cohort of gp135 is delivered to a ring surrounding the base of the primary cilium, followed by microtubule-dependent radial movement away from the cilium. Delivery to the periciliary ring was specific to newly synthesized and not recycling protein. A subset of this newly delivered protein traverses the basolateral membrane en route to the apical membrane. Crumbs3a, another apical protein, was not delivered to the periciliary region, instead making its initial apical appearance in a pattern that resembled its steady-state distribution. Our results demonstrate a surprising “hot spot” for gp135 protein delivery at the base of the primary cilium and suggest the existence of a novel microtubule-based directed movement of a subset of apical surface proteins. PMID:26504168

  3. Drug Delivery to Extravascular Tissue by Ultrasound-activated Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, Klazina; Harteveld, Miranda; de Jong, Nico; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2007-05-01

    Drugs will be delivered to tissue more efficiently if the vascular endothelial permeability is increased. Although recent studies have established that the permeability of single-cell membranes is increased by ultrasound in combination with contrast agents, it is not known whether this combination can also increase the permeability of an endothelial layer. To investigate endothelial layer permeability, we treated monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with ultrasound and the contrast agent BR14. Endothelial layer permeability was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the transendothelial transport of fluorescein. Ultrasound in combination with BR14 significantly decreased TEER to 68.0 ± 3.1% of initial values and temporally increased endothelial permeability for fluorescein by 38.1 ± 16.4 %. After treatment, no cell loss or damage was observed. In conclusion, ultrasound in combination with BR14 increased the endothelial layer permeability. This feature may be used for future ultrasound-guided drug delivery systems.

  4. Effective delivery of recombinant proteins to rod photoreceptors via lipid nanovesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Dal Cortivo, Giuditta; Pontelli, Valeria; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Buffelli, Mario; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-06-12

    The potential of liposomes to deliver functional proteins in retinal photoreceptors and modulate their physiological response was investigated by two experimental approaches. First, we treated isolated mouse retinas with liposomes encapsulating either recoverin, an important endogenous protein operating in visual phototransduction, or antibodies against recoverin. We then intravitrally injected in vivo liposomes encapsulating either rhodamin B or recoverin and we investigated the distribution in retina sections by confocal microscopy. The content of liposomes was found to be released in higher amount in the photoreceptor layer than in the other regions of the retina and the functional effects of the release were in line with the current model of phototransduction. Our study sets the basis for quantitative investigations aimed at assessing the potential of intraocular protein delivery via biocompatible nanovesicles, with promising implications for the treatment of retinal diseases affecting the photoreceptor layer. - Highlights: • Recombinant proteins encapsulated in nano-sized liposomes injected intravitreally reach retinal photoreceptors. • The phototransduction cascade in rods is modulated by the liposome content. • Mathematical modeling predicts the alteration of the photoresponses following liposome fusion.

  5. Protein delivery of a Ni catalyst to photosystem I for light-driven hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Silver, Sunshine C; Niklas, Jens; Du, Pingwu; Poluektov, Oleg G; Tiede, David M; Utschig, Lisa M

    2013-09-11

    The direct conversion of sunlight into fuel is a promising means for the production of storable renewable energy. Herein, we use Nature's specialized photosynthetic machinery found in the Photosystem I (PSI) protein to drive solar fuel production from a nickel diphosphine molecular catalyst. Upon exposure to visible light, a self-assembled PSI-[Ni(P2(Ph)N2(Ph))2](BF4)2 hybrid generates H2 at a rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than rates reported for photosensitizer/[Ni(P2(Ph)N2(Ph))2](BF4)2 systems. The protein environment enables photocatalysis at pH 6.3 in completely aqueous conditions. In addition, we have developed a strategy for incorporating the Ni molecular catalyst with the native acceptor protein of PSI, flavodoxin. Photocatalysis experiments with this modified flavodoxin demonstrate a new mechanism for biohybrid creation that involves protein-directed delivery of a molecular catalyst to the reducing side of Photosystem I for light-driven catalysis. This work further establishes strategies for constructing functional, inexpensive, earth-abundant solar fuel-producing PSI hybrids that use light to rapidly produce hydrogen directly from water.

  6. Hyaline cartilage regeneration by combined therapy of microfracture and long-term bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee Seok; La, Wan-Geun; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Hak-Jun; Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2011-07-01

    Microfracture of cartilage induces migration of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. However, this treatment often results in fibrocartilage regeneration. Growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 induce the differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which can be used for hyaline cartilage regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture results in regeneration of high-quality hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery of BMP-2 or no BMP-2 delivery. Heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) and normal fibrin were used as carriers for the long- and short-term delivery of BMP-2, respectively. Rabbit articular cartilage defects were treated with microfracture combined with one of the following: no treatment, fibrin, short-term delivery of BMP-2, HCF, or long-term delivery of BMP-2. Eight weeks after treatment, histological analysis revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group (microfracture + HCF + BMP-2) showed the most staining with alcian blue. A biochemical assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis all revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group had the highest glucosaminoglycan content as well as the highest expression level of collagen type II. Taken together, the long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture resulted in regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery or no BMP-2 delivery. Therefore, this method could be more convenient for hyaline cartilage regeneration than autologous chondrocyte implantation due to its less invasive nature and lack of cell implantation.

  7. PLGA-Mesoporous Silicon Microspheres for the in Vivo Controlled Temporospatial Delivery of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Pandolfi, Laura; Taraballi, Francesca; De Rosa, Enrica; Yazdi, Iman K; Liu, Xeuwu; Ferrari, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-08-05

    In regenerative medicine, the temporospatially controlled delivery of growth factors (GFs) is crucial to trigger the desired healing mechanisms in the target tissues. The uncontrolled release of GFs has been demonstrated to cause severe side effects in the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to optimize a translational approach for the fine temporal and spatial control over the release of proteins, in vivo. Hence, we proposed a newly developed multiscale composite microsphere based on a core consisting of the nanostructured silicon multistage vector (MSV) and a poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) outer shell. Both of the two components of the resulting composite microspheres (PLGA-MSV) can be independently tailored to achieve multiple release kinetics contributing to the control of the release profile of a reporter protein in vitro. The influence of MSV shape (hemispherical or discoidal) and size (1, 3, or 7 μm) on PLGA-MSV's morphology and size distribution was investigated. Second, the copolymer ratio of the PLGA used to fabricate the outer shell of PLGA-MSV was varied. The composites were fully characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ζ potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry, and their release kinetics over 30 days. PLGA-MSV's biocompatibility was assessed in vitro with J774 macrophages. Finally, the formulation of PLGA-MSV was selected, which concurrently provided the most consistent microsphere size and allowed for a zero-order release kinetic. The selected PLGA-MSVs were injected in a subcutaneous model in mice, and the in vivo release of the reporter protein was followed over 2 weeks by intravital microscopy, to assess if the zero-order release was preserved. PLGA-MSV was able to retain the payload over 2 weeks, avoiding the initial burst release typical of most drug delivery systems. Finally, histological evaluation assessed the

  8. Development of a probiotic delivery system from agrowastes, soy protein isolate, and microbial transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Yew, Sok-Eng; Lim, Ting-Jin; Lew, Lee-Ching; Bhat, Rajeev; Mat-Easa, Azhar; Liong, Min-Tze

    2011-04-01

    Probiotic delivery system was developed via the use of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) cross-linked soy protein isolate (SPI) incorporated with agrowastes such as banana peel (BE), banana pulp (BU), and pomelo rind (PR). Inoculums of Lactobacillus bulgaricus FTDC 1511 were added to the cross-linked protein matrix. The incorporation of agrowastes had significantly (P<0.05) reduced the strength, pH value, and the lightness of the SPI gel carriers, while sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles revealed that the occurring cross-links within the SPI gel carriers were attributed to the addition of MTG. Scanning electron microscope micrographs illustrated that SPI carriers containing agrowastes have exhibited a less-dense protein matrix. All the SPI carriers possessed maximum swelling ratio at 4 to 4.5 within 15 min in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), whereas the maximum swelling ratios of SPI/BE, SPI/BU, and SPI/PR were higher compared to that of control in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Additionally, SPI carriers in SGF medium did not show degradation of structure, whereas a major collapse of network was observed in SIF medium, indicating controlled-release in the intestines. The addition of agrowastes into SPI carriers led to a significantly (P<0.0001) lower release of L. bulgaricus FTDC 1511 in SGF medium and a higher release in SIF medium, compared to that of the control. SPI carriers containing agrowastes may be useful transports for living probiotic cells through the stomach prior to delivery in the lower intestines.   Agrowastes could be utilized as a new probiotic carrier for enhanced gastrointestinal transit and during storage. This also reduces the amount of agrowastes accumulated.

  9. Efficient induction of antimicrobial activity with vancomycin nanoparticle-loaded poly(trimethylene carbonate) localized drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Liang, Ruo-jia; Xu, Jiao-jiao; Shen, Li-feng; Gao, Jian-qing; Wang, Xu-ping; Wang, Na-ni; Shou, Dan; Hu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Surgery and the local placement of an antibiotic are the predominant therapies to treat chronic osteomyelitis. Vancomycin-loaded N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (VCM/TMC NPs) as a potential drug delivery system have high intracellular penetration and effective intracellular antibacterial activity. This study investigated the effects of a biocompatible material, poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC), to increase the sustained effectiveness of an intracellular antibiotic and its potential application in antibiotic delivery. VCM/TMC NP-PTMC was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine the morphology, stability and chemical interaction of the drug with the polymer. Further, the biodegradation, antibacterial activity, protein adsorption, cell proliferation and drug release characteristics were evaluated. In addition, a Staphylococcus aureus-induced osteomyelitis rabbit model was used to investigate the antibiotic activity and bone repair capability of VCM/TMC NP-PTMC. The results showed that the composite beads of VCM/TMC NPs followed a sustained and slow release pattern and had excellent antibacterial activity and a higher protein adsorption and cell proliferation rate than the VCM-PTMC in vitro. Furthermore, VCM/TMC NP-PTMC inhibits bacteria and promotes bone repair in vivo. Thus, VCM/TMC NP-PTMC might be beneficial in periodontal management to reduce the bacterial load at the infection site and promote bone repair. PMID:28243084

  10. [Expression, purification of tetanus toxin C fragment/cardiotrophin-1 recombinant fusion protein, target delivery to CNS and neurotrophy biology ability].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Jian; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Yue; Zhang, Zheng-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Expression, purification of tetanus toxin C fragment/cardiotrophin-1 recombinant fusion protein (CT-1/TTC) in BL21 (DE3) E. coli, examined whether tetanus toxin C fragment mediate the cardiotrophin-1 target delivery to the central nervous system and the cardiotrophin-1 has the neurotrophic ability. Induction by IPTG, the fusion protein was expressed and then purified by GST affinity agarose. The interest protein was viewed by SDS-PAGE, further characterized by Western Blot Rat sciatic nerve transected model was selected. Using drug by nerve-regeneration-chamber and intramuscular injection. Execute these animals one week after the operation. The L4-L6 segments of the spinal cord were harvested after transaortic perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde. The freeze sections of spinal tissues were stained with immunohistochemistry method. And select the new born SD rat sciatic nerve transected model, using CT-1/TTC fusion protein by muscle injection. Execute these animals one week after the operation. The L4-L6 segments of the spinal cord were harvested after transaortic perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde. The freeze sections of spinal tissues were stained by Nissl's staining. After induction, the fusion protein was about 15% of the total protein and the soluble part was predominant. Purified by GST fusion protein column, the interest protein's concentration is 2.7 g/L. The CT-1/TTC fusion protein was found in lumbar intumescentia by immunohistochemistry method. And after sciatic nerve transected, the numbers of cornu anterius medullae spinalis motoneurons in L4-L6 segments, compared to CT-1/TTC protein grope, have a lower survival rate. The recombinant CT-1/TTC protein can be expressed and purified in BL21 (DE3) E. coli. This fusion protein has two biological activities of targeting delivery to central nervous system and protecting the cornu anterius medullae spinalis motoneurons.

  11. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof. © 2014 UICC.

  12. The association between myometrial electrical activity and time to delivery in threatened preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Amir; Hiersch, Liran; Ashwal, Eran; Yogev, Yariv; Hadar, Eran

    2016-09-01

    To assess the association between myometrial electrical activity and time-to-delivery in preterm labor using uterine electromyography. Myometrial electrical activity was measured via the electrical uterine monitor (EUM) device. Data was prospectively collected among women admitted due to suspected preterm labor, prior to 34 weeks of gestation. EUM-Index was defined as the mean electrical activity of the uterine muscle over a period of 10 minutes measured in units of microjoule (μJ, microwatt second). The association between the EUM-Index at admission to time-to-delivery and delivery prior to 34 weeks of gestation was calculated. Overall, 45 women were included in the study. EUM-Index combined with cervical dilatation, demonstrated significant correlation to time-to-delivery (R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.005), which was strengthened for women presenting prior to 28 weeks of gestation. EUM-Index above the median (>3.05 MJ) was significantly associated with a shorter latency period for delivery (36.0 ± 19.4 vs. 50.2 ± 25.9 days, p = 0.04). For delivery prior to 34 weeks, the EUM-Index showed an AUC = 0.65 (95% CI 0.48-0.82), and a cutoff of 2.5 MJ provided 91.7% sensitivity and 93.3% negative predictive value. EUM-Index at time of admission due to suspected preterm labor is inversely correlated with time-to-delivery and may effectively rule out preterm delivery prior to 34 weeks.

  13. Microencapsulation of protein drugs for drug delivery: strategy, preparation, and applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guanghui

    2014-11-10

    Bio-degradable poly(lactide) (PLA)/poly(lactide-glycolide) (PLGA) and chitosan microspheres (or microcapsules) have important applications in Drug Delivery Systems (DDS) of protein/peptide drugs. By encapsulating protein/peptide drugs in the microspheres, the serum drug concentration can be maintained at a higher constant value for a prolonged time, or injection formulation can be changed to orally or mucosally administered formulation. PLA/PLGA and chitosan are most often used in injection formulation and oral formulation. However, in the preparation and applications of PLA/PLGA and chitosan microspheres containing protein/peptide drugs, the problems of broad size distribution and poor reproducibility of microspheres, and deactivation of protein during the preparation, storage and release, are still big challenges. In this article, the techniques for control of the diameter of microspheres and microcapsules will be introduced at first, then the strategies about how to maintain the bioactivity of protein drugs during preparation and drug release will be reviewed and developed in our research group. The membrane emulsification techniques including direct membrane emulsification and rapid membrane emulsification processes were developed to prepare uniform-sized microspheres, the diameter of microspheres can be controlled from submicron to 100μm by these two processes, and the reproducibility of products can be guaranteed. Furthermore, compared with conventional stirring method, the big advantages of membrane emulsification process were that the uniform microspheres with much higher encapsulation efficiency can be obtained, and the release behavior can be adjusted by selecting microsphere size. Mild membrane emulsification condition also can prevent the deactivation of proteins, which frequently occurred under high shear force in mechanical stirring, sonification, and homogenization methods. The strategies for maintaining the bioactivity of protein drug were

  14. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. •T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. •The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments C–C lyase activity. •Δ5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of Δ4- and Δ5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17α-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carbon–carbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional “Compound I” rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17’s physiological Δ4- and Δ5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing

  15. Increased flexibility decreases antifreeze protein activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti N; Graether, Steffen P

    2010-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins protect several cold-blooded organisms from subzero environments by preventing death from freezing. The Type I antifreeze protein (AFP) isoform from Pseudopleuronectes americanus, named HPLC6, is a 37-residue protein that is a single α-helix. Mutational analysis of the protein showed that its alanine-rich face is important for binding to and inhibiting the growth of macromolecular ice. Almost all structural studies of HPLC6 involve the use of chemically synthesized protein as it requires a native N-terminal aspartate and an amidated C-terminus for full activity. Here, we examine the role of C-terminal amide and C-terminal arginine side chain in the activity, structure, and dynamics of nonamidated Arg37 HPLC6, nonamidated HPLC6 Ala37, amidated HPLC6 Ala37, and fully native HPLC6 using a recombinant bacterial system. The thermal hysteresis (TH) activities of the nonamidated mutants are 35% lower compared with amidated proteins, but analysis of the NMR data and circular dichroism spectra shows that they are all still α-helical. Relaxation data from the two nonamidated mutants indicate that the C-terminal residues are considerably more flexible than the rest of the protein because of the loss of the amide group, whereas the amidated Ala37 mutant has a C-terminus that is as rigid as the wild-type protein and has high TH activity. We propose that an increase in flexibility of the AFP causes it to lose activity because its dynamic nature prevents it from binding strongly to the ice surface. Copyright © 2010 The Protein Society.

  16. Particle designs for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of protein drugs by biopolymers: a case study on insulin.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui-Peng; Tey, Beng-Ti; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2014-07-28

    Natural biopolymers have attracted considerable interest for the development of delivery systems for protein drugs owing to their biocompatibility, non-toxicity, renewability and mild processing conditions. This paper offers an overview of the current status and future perspectives of particle designs using biopolymers for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of a model protein drug--insulin. We first describe the design criteria for polymeric encapsulation and subsequently classify the basic principles of particle fabrication as well as the existing particle designs for oral insulin encapsulation. The performances of these existing particle designs in terms of insulin stability and in vitro release behavior in acidic and alkaline media, as well as their in vivo performance are compared and reviewed. This review forms the basis for future works on the optimization of particle design and material formulation for the development of an improved oral delivery system for protein drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  18. Encapsulation of active ingredients in polysaccharide-protein complex coacervates.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nirmala; Sarmah, Mandip; Khatun, Bably; Maji, Tarun K

    2017-01-01

    Polysaccharide-protein complex coacervates are amongst the leading pair of biopolymer systems that has been used over the past decades for encapsulation of numerous active ingredients. Complex coacervation of polysaccharides and proteins has received increasing research interest for the practical application in encapsulation industry since the pioneering work of complex coacervation by Bungenburg de Jong and co-workers on the system of gelatin-acacia, a protein-polysaccharide system. Because of the versatility and numerous potential applications of these systems essentially in the fields of food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and agriculture, there has been intense interest in recent years for both fundamental and applied studies. Precisely, the designing of the micronscale and nanoscale capsules for encapsulation and control over their properties for practical applications garners renewed interest. This review discusses on the overview of polysaccharide-protein complex coacervates and their use for the encapsulation of diverse active ingredients, designing and controlling of the capsules for delivery systems and developments in the area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Promotion of the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles combined with polypropylene electret.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ye; Wang, Xinxia; Lu, Ying; Zhang, He; Yu, Yuan; Chen, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Zhiguo; Cui, Lili; Gao, Jing; Zhong, Yanqiang

    We recently reported that electret, which was prepared by a corona charging system with polypropylene film, could enhance the transdermal delivery of several drugs of low molecular weight. The aim of this study was to investigate whether electret could enhance the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (TMC NPs) prepared by an ionic gelation method. A series of experiments were performed, including in vitro skin permeation assays and anti-inflammatory effects, to evaluate the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by TMC NPs in the presence of electret. The results showed that in the presence of electret, the transdermal delivery of protein drugs in TMC NPs was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by in vitro permeation studies and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Notably, superoxide dismutase-loaded TMC NPs combined with electret exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the edema of the mouse ear. TMC NPs combined with electret represent a novel platform for the transdermal delivery of protein drugs.

  20. Promotion of the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles combined with polypropylene electret

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ye; Wang, Xinxia; Lu, Ying; Zhang, He; Yu, Yuan; Chen, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Zhiguo; Cui, Lili; Gao, Jing; Zhong, Yanqiang

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that electret, which was prepared by a corona charging system with polypropylene film, could enhance the transdermal delivery of several drugs of low molecular weight. The aim of this study was to investigate whether electret could enhance the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (TMC NPs) prepared by an ionic gelation method. A series of experiments were performed, including in vitro skin permeation assays and anti-inflammatory effects, to evaluate the transdermal delivery of protein drugs by TMC NPs in the presence of electret. The results showed that in the presence of electret, the transdermal delivery of protein drugs in TMC NPs was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by in vitro permeation studies and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Notably, superoxide dismutase-loaded TMC NPs combined with electret exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the edema of the mouse ear. TMC NPs combined with electret represent a novel platform for the transdermal delivery of protein drugs. PMID:27822034

  1. Milling solid proteins to enhance activity after melt-encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Parker W; Maia, João; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2017-09-20

    Polymeric systems for the immobilization and delivery of proteins have been extensively used for therapeutic and catalytic applications. While most devices have been created via solution based methods, hot melt extrusion (HME) has emerged as an alternative due to the high encapsulation efficiencies and solvent-free nature of the process. HME requires high temperatures and mechanical stresses that can result in protein aggregation and denaturation, but additives and chemical modifications have been explored to mitigate these effects. This study explores the use of solid-state ball milling to decrease protein particle size before encapsulation within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) via HME. The impact of milling on particle dispersion, retained enzymatic activity, secondary structure stability, and release was explored for lysozyme, glucose oxidase, and the virus-like particle derived from Qβ to fully understand the impact of milling on protein systems with different sizes and complexities. The results of this study describe the utility of milling to further increase the stability of protein/polymer systems prepared via HME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Challenging delivery of VLHL NS plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by osmotic pumps in diabetic mouse: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    ALZET(®) osmotic pumps are implantable devices used in animals for the continuous infusion of drugs or proteins at controlled rates from 1 day to 4 weeks. Pumps have been used successfully in a number of studies on the effects of controlled delivery of a wide range of experimental agents, independent of their properties. In the present study, use of these pumps was made in mice with diabetic nephropathy. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mediates diabetic nephropathy, which is characterized by the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney. Disproportionate PAI-1 inactivates tissue plasminogen activator, which is one of the proteolytic enzymes in a cascade responsible for ECM remodeling in the kidney. The decrease of PAI-1 in the kidney has been shown to arrest the progression of nephropathy in experimental animals. This was achieved using inactive PAI-1R which increased the clearance of wild-type PAI-1 in order to protect net proteolytic activity and ECM clearance. However, this protein has a brief half-life in vivo, therefore, high and frequent doses are required. Thus, VLHL NS PAI-1 protein with a long half-life of over 700 h (Gln197Cys, Gly355Cys) inactivated by single point mutation (Arg369Ala) was used. Following the sacrifice of animals the tips of the flow moderators of the osmotic pumps in the treated animals were found to be clogged. In addition, from each pump from the treatment group, but not controls, we collected 50-150 μl of clear liquid containing VLHL NS PAI-1, cellular and serum proteins suggesting early pump sealing by cellular material. In conclusion, despite encouraging results obtained for the PAI-1R protein, the method of VLHL PAI-1 delivery should be ameliorated.

  3. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel (`nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination.

  4. Protein transduction domain-containing microemulsions as cutaneous delivery systems for an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Dominique; McCall, Melissa; Zheng, Haian; Lopes, Luciana B

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we developed cationic microemulsions containing a protein transduction domain (penetratin) for optimizing paclitaxel localization within the skin. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing a surfactant blend (BRIJ:ethanol:propylene glycol 2:1:1, w/w/w) with monocaprylin (oil phase) at 1.3:1 ratio, and adding water at 30% (ME-30), 43% (ME-43), and 50% (ME-50). Electrical conductivity and viscosity measurements indicated that ME-30 is most likely a bicontinuous system, whereas ME-43 and ME-50 are water continuous. Their irritation potential, studied in bioengineered skin equivalents, decreased as aqueous content increased. Because ME-50 was not stable in the presence of paclitaxel (0.5%), ME-43 was selected for penetratin incorporation (0.4%). The microemulsion containing penetratin (ME-P) displayed zeta potential of +5.2 mV, and promoted a 1.8-fold increase in paclitaxel cutaneous (but not transdermal) delivery compared with the plain ME-43, whereas the enhancement promoted by another cationic microemulsion containing phytosphingosine was 1.3-fold. Compared with myvacet oil, ME-P promoted a larger increase on transepidermal water loss (twofold) than the plain or the phytosphingosine-containing microemulsions (1.5-fold), suggesting that penetratin addition increases the barrier-disrupting and penetration-enhancing effects of microemulsions. The ratio Δcutaneous/Δtransdermal delivery promoted by ME-P was the highest among the formulations, suggesting its potential for drug localization within cutaneous tumor lesions.

  5. pH and reduction dual-bioresponsive polymersomes for efficient intracellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinchao; Wu, Liangliang; Meng, Fenghua; Wang, Zhongjuan; Deng, Chao; Liu, Haiyan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2012-01-31

    , flow cytometry assays showed that CC-loaded PEG-SS-PDEA (9.2 k) polymersomes induced markedly enhanced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells as compared to free CC and CC-loaded PEG-PDEA (8.9 k) polymersomes (reduction-insensitive control). These dual-bioresponsive polymersomes have appeared to be highly promising for intracellular delivery of protein drugs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  7. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  8. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  9. Whey protein mucoadhesive properties for oral drug delivery: Mucin-whey protein interaction and mucoadhesive bond strength.

    PubMed

    Hsein, Hassana; Garrait, Ghislain; Beyssac, Eric; Hoffart, Valérie

    2015-12-01

    Whey protein is a natural polymer recently used as an excipient in buccoadhesive tablets but its mucoadhesive properties were barely studied. In this work, we characterize mucoadhesion of whey protein in order to determine the mechanisms and optimal conditions for use as excipient in oral drug delivery. Thus, native and denatured whey protein (NWP and DWP) were investigated and the effect of concentration and pH were also studied. Many methods of characterization were selected to allow the study of chemical and physical interactions with mucin and then the results were bound with an ex vivo experiments. Turbidity of WP-mucin mixture increased at acidic pH 1.2 till 4.5 indicating interaction with mucin but not at pH 6.8. No interaction with mucin was also found by ITC method at pH 6.8 for native and denatured whey protein used at 1% (w/w). Forces of bioadhesion evaluated by viscosity measurements were the best for high concentrated (10.8%) DWP solutions at pH 6.8 and were low at pH 1.2 for NWP and DWP solutions. Addition of chemical blockers indicated that hydrogen bondings and disulfide bridges were the main mechanisms of interactions with mucin. Reticulation of DWP with calcium ions to obtain microparticles (MP) did not influence the ability of interaction with mucin as shown by FTIR analysis. These results correlated with ex vivo study on rat tissue demonstrating important adhesion (75%) of WP MP on the intestine and null on the stomach after 2h of deposit.

  10. MiniTn7-transposon delivery vectors for inducible or constitutive fluorescent protein expression in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; Gisler, Pascal; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the generation and function of two sets of bacterial plasmids that harbor fluorescent genes encoding either blue, cyan, yellow or red fluorescent proteins. In the first set, protein expression is controlled by the strong and constitutive nptII promoter whereas in the second set, the strong tac promoter was chosen that underlies LacIq regulation. Furthermore, the plasmids are mobilizable, contain Tn7 transposons and a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. Using Escherichia coli S17-1 as donor strain, the plasmids allow fast and convenient Tn7-transposon delivery into many enterobacterial hosts, such as the here-used E. coli O157:H7. This procedure omits the need of preparing competent recipient cells and antibiotic resistances are only transiently conferred to the recipients. As the fluorescence proteins show little to no overlap in fluorescence emission, the constructs are well suited for the study of multicolored synthetic bacterial communities during biofilm production or in host colonization studies, e.g. of plant surfaces. Furthermore, tac promoter-reporter constructs allow the generation of so-called reproductive success reporters, which allow to estimate past doublings of bacterial individuals after introduction into environments, emphasizing the role of individual cells during colonization. PMID:27445318

  11. Development of phosphorylated glucomannan-coated chitosan nanoparticles as nanocarriers for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Cuña, M; Alonso-Sandel, M; Remuñán-López, C; Pivel, J P; Alonso-Lebrero, J L; Alonso, M J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a new nanoparticle carrier, adapted for the oral administration of proteins and their delivery to the immune system. Chitosan and phosphorylated glucomannan were chosen as major constituents of the nanoparticles. Chitosan nanoparticles were formed by ionic gelation and then coated with glucomannan. Two different protocols were adopted for the formation of the glucomannan coating: protocol I, in which chitosan nanoparticles were isolated before their coating; protocol II, in which chitosan nanoparticles were not isolated, but coated with glucomannan in the presence of free chitosan. The results showed that, under the selected formulation conditions, the sizes of the nanoparticles ranged between 170 and 300 nm and their zeta potential values were inverted from positive to negative by the glucomannan coating. The nanoparticles prepared by the two protocols could be freeze-dried, in the presence or absence of cryoprotective agents, preserving their original characteristics. The results of the stability study evidenced the positive role of the glucomannan coating in preventing the aggregation of the nanoparticles in buffered media. Finally, the association of the inmunomodulatory protein complex P1 to the chitosan-glucomannan nanoparticles was investigated. The results showed that the association was not dependent on the chitosan: sodium tripoliphosphate ratio, but it was significantly affected by the presence of sodium phosphate in the protein structure.

  12. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  13. Polyelectrolyte complexes as prospective carriers for the oral delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bourganis, Vassilis; Karamanidou, Theodora; Kammona, Olga; Kiparissides, Costas

    2017-02-01

    The oral administration of protein therapeutics is hindered by the multitude of barriers confronted by these molecules along the gastrointestinal tract (i.e., acidic environment, proteolytic degradation, mucosal barrier, etc.). Their unique properties (e.g., high molecular weight, hydrophilicity, charge, etc.) and labile structure are mainly responsible for their instability in the harsh conditions along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and dictate the employment of alternative routes for their administration (e.g., parenteral). The association of proteins with colloidal carriers represents an interesting approach to overcome the aforementioned issues. However, certain requirements, such as stability in the GIT, stimuli-responsiveness, protection of the encapsulated biomolecule from enzymatic degradation and permeability of the mucosa, have to be met in order to efficiently deliver the sensitive payload to the intended site of action, thus resulting in enhanced bioavailability. The formation of colloidal polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) seems to be a promising strategy towards this direction, and the present review aims to provide an insight into PECs (e.g., preparation methods, characteristics) along with their advantages and drawbacks as drug delivery vehicles for the oral administration of protein-based therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dopamine-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for protein delivery to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song Yi; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2017-03-15

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-dopamine (PLGA-D)-based nanoparticles (NPs) were developed for the delivery of protein to macrophages. PLGA-D was synthesized via amide bond formation between the amine group of D and the carboxylic acid group of PLGA. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, model protein) was encapsulated in PLGA NPs and PLGA-D NPs, which had an approximately 200nm mean diameter, <0.2 polydispersity index, and negative zeta potential value. There was no increment in the mean diameters of BSA-loaded NPs after 24h of incubation in biological fluid-simulated media (i.e., aqueous buffer and serum media). The primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of BSA released from the NPs were studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectrophotometry; the structural stability of BSA was preserved during its encapsulation in the NPs and release from the NPs. PLGA/BSA NPs and PLGA-D/BSA NPs did not induce serious cytotoxicity in RAW 264.7 cells (mouse macrophage cell line) in an established concentration range. In RAW 264.7 cells, the intracellular accumulation of PLGA-D NPs was 2-fold higher than that of PLGA NPs. All of these findings indicated that PLGA-D NPs are a promising system for delivering proteins to macrophages.

  15. Targeted delivery of tumor antigens to activated dendritic cells via CD11c molecules induces potent antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huafeng; Wang, Suhui; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Guo, Huaizu; Kou, Geng; He, Jinqiu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2009-07-15

    CD11c is an antigen receptor predominantly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), to which antigen targeting has been shown to induce robust antigen-specific immune responses. To facilitate targeted delivery of tumor antigens to DCs, we generated fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of human HER or its rat homologue neu, fused to the single-chain fragment variable specific for CD11c (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu). Induction of cellular and humoral immune responses and antitumoral activity of the fusion proteins admixed with DC-activating CpG oligonucleotides (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu(CpG)) were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) protected mice from subsequent challenge with HER2-positive, but not HER2-negative, murine breast tumor cells, accompanied by induction of strong HER2-specific T-cell and antibody responses. In a therapeutic setting, injection of scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) caused rejection of established HER2-positive tumors. Importantly, antitumoral activity of such a fusion protein vaccine could be reproduced in immunotolerant BALB-neuT mice, where scFv(CD11c)-neu(CpG) vaccination significantly protected against a subsequent challenge with neu-expressing murine breast tumor cells and markedly delayed the onset of spontaneous mammary carcinomas. CD11c-targeted protein vaccines for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs induce potent immune responses and antitumoral activities and provide a rationale for further development of this approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Development of a disposable infusion system for the delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T; Beebe, David J

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the development and optimization of a low flow open-loop infusion device for continuous delivery of protein therapeutics. Specifically, a non-electronic polymer device is actuated with responsive hydrogels to infuse at 2 microL/hr for 12 hours. Hydrogel actuators transduce a chemical signal (change in pH of the local environment) into a mechanical response (swelling) generating the pressure to drive the infusion. The hydrogel actuators are separated from the drug reservoir by an elastomeric impermeable membrane. As the hydrogel actuators expand, the expansion deflects the flexible membrane down and reduces the volume of the drug reservoir causing the infusion of drug through the needle that is the only outlet for the reservoir.

  17. The impact of nanoparticle protein corona on cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity and target drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Parodi, Alessandro; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In a perfect sequence of events, nanoparticles (NPs) are injected into the bloodstream where they circulate until they reach the target tissue. The ligand on the NP surface recognizes its specific receptor expressed on the target tissue and the drug is released in a controlled manner. However, once injected in a physiological environment, NPs interact with biological components and are surrounded by a protein corona (PC). This can trigger an immune response and affect NP toxicity and targeting capabilities. In this review, we provide a survey of recent findings on the NP–PC interactions and discuss how the PC can be used to modulate both cytotoxicity and the immune response as well as to improve the efficacy of targeted delivery of nanocarriers. PMID:26653875

  18. Polysaccharide nanoparticles for protein and Peptide delivery: exploring less-known materials.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Marlise A; Grenha, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Finding adequate carriers for protein and peptide delivery has become an urgent need, owing to the growing number of macromolecules identified as having therapeutic potential. Nanoparticles have emerged in the field as very promising vehicles and much work has been directed to testing the capacity of different materials to compose the matrix of these carriers. Natural materials and, specifically, polysaccharides have been taking the forefront of the challenge, because of several favoring properties that include the higher propensity to exhibit biodegradability and biocompatibility, and also the high structural flexibility. The majority of works found in the literature regarding polysaccharide nanoparticles uses very popular materials like chitosan or hyaluronic acid. This review is aimed at describing and exploring the potential of polysaccharides that are not so well known or that are less explored. For those, the main properties will be described, together with an overview of the reported applications as nanoparticle matrix materials.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of P(MAA-g-EG) Nanospheres for Protein Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2002-04-01

    Novel complexation hydrogel nanospheres of poly(methacrylic acid-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol)) (P(MAA-g-EG)) were prepared by dispersion polymerization to be used for protein delivery applications. Polymerization was conducted in solvents such as deionized water, ethanol/water, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, and acetic acid solutions. When polymerizing in deionized water we produced nanospheres without agglomeration. Photon correlation spectroscopy studies revealed that the nanospheres possessed a narrow particle size distribution and the size was inversely proportional to the concentration of poly(ethylene glycol) incorporated in the monomer mixture. These nanospheres exhibited pH-sensitivity comparable to that encountered in hydrogel films with the same composition. The composition of the nanospheres was investigated by transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The comparison between hydrogel films and nanospheres with the same monomer composition revealed that nanospheres possessed similar spectral characteristics than hydrogel films prepared by the same techniques. These nanospheres could be used for calcitonin release under physiological conditions.

  20. The impact of nanoparticle protein corona on cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity and target drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Parodi, Alessandro; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In a perfect sequence of events, nanoparticles (NPs) are injected into the bloodstream where they circulate until they reach the target tissue. The ligand on the NP surface recognizes its specific receptor expressed on the target tissue and the drug is released in a controlled manner. However, once injected in a physiological environment, NPs interact with biological components and are surrounded by a protein corona (PC). This can trigger an immune response and affect NP toxicity and targeting capabilities. In this review, we provide a survey of recent findings on the NP-PC interactions and discuss how the PC can be used to modulate both cytotoxicity and the immune response as well as to improve the efficacy of targeted delivery of nanocarriers.

  1. Preparation and Delivery of Protein Microcrystals in Lipidic Cubic Phase for Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are essential components of cellular membranes and primary drug targets. Rational drug design relies on precise structural information, typically obtained by crystallography; however MPs are difficult to crystallize. Recent progress in MP structural determination has benefited greatly from the development of lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization methods, which typically yield well-diffracting, but often small crystals that suffer from radiation damage during traditional crystallographic data collection at synchrotron sources. The development of new-generation X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources that produce extremely bright femtosecond pulses has enabled room temperature data collection from microcrystals with no or negligible radiation damage. Our recent efforts in combining LCP technology with serial femtosecond crystallography (LCP-SFX) have resulted in high-resolution structures of several human G protein-coupled receptors, which represent a notoriously difficult target for structure determination. In the LCP-SFX technique, LCP is recruited as a matrix for both growth and delivery of MP microcrystals to the intersection of the injector stream with an XFEL beam for crystallographic data collection. It has been demonstrated that LCP-SFX can substantially improve the diffraction resolution when only sub-10 µm crystals are available, or when the use of smaller crystals at room temperature can overcome various problems associated with larger cryocooled crystals, such as accumulation of defects, high mosaicity and cryocooling artifacts. Future advancements in X-ray sources and detector technologies should make serial crystallography highly attractive and practicable for implementation not only at XFELs, but also at more accessible synchrotron beamlines. Here we present detailed visual protocols for the preparation, characterization and delivery of microcrystals in LCP for serial crystallography experiments. These protocols include

  2. Novel xylan-controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins to inflamed colon by the human anaerobic commensal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) are important immunoregulatory and epithelial growth factors. They are also potential therapeutic proteins for inflammatory bowel disease. However, owing to protein instability in the upper gastrointestinal tract, it is difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of these proteins in the injured colon when given orally. Furthermore, the short half-life necessitates repeated dosage with large amounts of the growth factor, which may have dangerous side effects, hence the importance of temporal and spatial control of growth factor delivery. Methods The human commensal gut bacterium, Bacteroides ovatus, was genetically engineered to produce human KGF-2 or TGF-β 1 (BO-KGF or BO-TGF) in a regulated manner in response to the dietary polysaccharide, xylan. The successful application of BO-KGF or BO-TGF in the prevention of dextran sodium sulphate induced murine colitis is presented here. Results This novel drug delivery system had a significant prophylactic effect, limiting the development of intestinal inflammation both clinically and histopathologically. The ability to regulate heterologous protein production by B ovatus using xylan is both unique and an important safety feature of this drug delivery system. Conclusions The use of genetically engineered B ovatus for the controlled and localised delivery of epithelial growth promoting and immunomodulatory proteins has potential clinical applications for the treatment of various diseases targeting the colon. PMID:23676805

  3. Transdermal delivery of a approximately 13 kDa protein--an in vivo comparison of physical enhancement methods.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Sahitya; Li, Guohua; Badkar, Advait; Banga, Ajay K

    2010-02-01

    The availability of several enhancement techniques has made it possible to study delivery of macromolecules through skin. This study was conducted to evaluate the transdermal delivery of a ~13 kDa protein using iontophoresis, sonophoresis, and microneedles alone or in combination. In vivo delivery experiments were carried out using hairless rats with daniplestim (DP) as the model protein (molecular weight: 12.760 kDa; isoelectric point, 6.2). Delivery enhancement abilities of the above techniques were evaluated at two different drug concentrations in the patch: 2 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL. At a drug loading concentration of 2 mg/mL maximum delivery was seen with the combination of microneedles and iontophoresis. At 5 mg/mL, sonophoresis alone gave a C(max) of 8.22 +/- 5.9 ng/mL and a combination of sonophoresis and iontophoresis gave a C(max) of 4.9 +/- 1.8 ng/mL. The results of this study suggest that combination of microneedles and iontophoresis was the most effective approach in delivering a 13 kDa protein through the skin.

  4. Inclusion complex from cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid and pseudo protein as biodegradable nano-delivery vehicle for gambogic acid.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying; Shan, Shuo; He, Mingyu; Chu, Chih-Chang

    2017-08-30

    β-Cyclodextrin can form inclusion complex with a series of guest molecules including phenyl moieties, and has gained considerable popularity in the study of supramolecular nanostructure. In this study, a biodegradable nanocomplex (HA(CD)-4Phe4 nanocomplex) was developed from β-cyclodextrin grafted hyaluronic acid (HA) and phenylalanine based poly(ester amide). The phenylalanine based poly(ester amide) is a biodegradable pseudo protein which provides the encapsulation capacity for gambogic acid (GA), a naturally-derived chemotherapeutic which has been effectively employed to treat multidrug resistant tumor. The therapeutic potency of free GA is limited due to its poor solubility in water and the lack of tumor-selective toxicity. The nanocomplex carrier enhanced the solubility and availability of GA in aqueous media, and the HA component enabled the targeted delivery to tumor cells with overexpression of CD44 receptors. In the presence of hyaluronidase, the release of GA from the nanocomplex was significantly accelerated, due to the enzymatic biodegradation of the carrier. Compared to free GA, GA-loaded nanocomplex exhibited improved cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-435/MDR multidrug resistant melanoma cells, and induced enhanced level of apoptosis and mitochondrial depolarization, at low concentration of GA (1-2µM). The nanocomplex enhanced the therapeutic potency of GA, especially when diluted in physiological environment. In addition, suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity was also detected in MDA-MB-435/MDR cells treated by GA-loaded nanocomplex, which demonstrated its potency in the inhibition of tumor metastasis. The in vitro data suggested that HA(CD)-4Phe4 nanocomplex could provide a promising alternative in the treatment of multidrug resistant tumor cells. Gambogic acid (GA), naturally derived from genus Garcinia trees, exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against multiple types of tumors with resistance to traditional chemotherapeutics. Unfortunately

  5. Macrophages offer a paradigm switch for CNS delivery of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klyachko, Natalia L; Haney, Matthew J; Zhao, Yuling; Manickam, Devika S; Mahajan, Vivek; Suresh, Poornima; Hingtgen, Shawn D; Mosley, R Lee; Gendelman, Howard E; Kabanov, Alexander V; Batrakova, Elena V

    2013-01-01

    Aims Active targeted transport of the nanoformulated redox enzyme, catalase, in macrophages attenuates oxidative stress and as such increases survival of dopaminergic neurons in animal models of Parkinson’s disease. Optimization of the drug formulation is crucial for the successful delivery in living cells. We demonstrated earlier that packaging of catalase into a polyion complex micelle (‘nanozyme’) with a synthetic polyelectrolyte block copolymer protected the enzyme against degradation in macrophages and improved therapeutic outcomes. We now report the manufacture of nanozymes with superior structure and therapeutic indices. Methods Synthesis, characterization and therapeutic efficacy of optimal cell-based nanoformulations are evaluated. Results A formulation design for drug carriers typically works to avoid entrapment in monocytes and macrophages focusing on small-sized nanoparticles with a polyethylene glycol corona (to provide a stealth effect). By contrast, the best nanozymes for delivery in macrophages reported in this study have a relatively large size (~200 nm), which resulted in improved loading capacity and release from macrophages. Furthermore, the cross-linking of nanozymes with the excess of a nonbiodegradable linker ensured their low cytotoxicity, and efficient catalase protection in cell carriers. Finally, the ‘alternatively activated’ macrophage phenotype (M2) utilized in these studies did not promote further inflammation in the brain, resulting in a subtle but statistically significant effect on neuronal regeneration and repair in vivo. Conclusion The optimized cross-linked nanozyme loaded into macrophages reduced neuroinflammatory responses and increased neuronal survival in mice. Importantly, the approach for nanoformulation design for cell-mediated delivery is different from the common requirements for injectable formulations. PMID:24237263

  6. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized emulsions: Effect of polymer type and pH on release and topical delivery of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Johann; Otto, Anja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-06-01

    Emulsions are widely used as topical formulations in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. They are thermodynamically unstable and require emulsifiers for stabilization. Studies have indicated that emulsifiers could affect topical delivery of actives, and this study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of different polymers, applied as emulsifiers, as well as the effects of pH on the release and topical delivery of the active. O/w emulsions were prepared by the layer-by-layer technique, with whey protein forming the first layer around the oil droplets, while either chitosan or carrageenan was subsequently adsorbed to the protein at the interface. Additionally, the emulsions were prepared at three different pH values to introduce different charges to the polymers. The active ingredient, salicylic acid, was incorporated into the oil phase of the emulsions. Physical characterization of the resulting formulations, i.e., droplet size, zeta potential, stability, and turbidity in the water phase, was performed. Release studies were conducted, after which skin absorption studies were performed on the five most stable emulsions, by using Franz type diffusion cells and utilizing human, abdominal skin membranes. It was found that an increase in emulsion droplet charge could negatively affect the release of salicylic acid from these formulations. Contrary, positively charged emulsion droplets were found to enhance dermal and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from emulsions. It was hypothesized that electrostatic complex formation between the emulsifier and salicylic acid could affect its release, whereas electrostatic interaction between the emulsion droplets and skin could influence dermal/transdermal delivery of the active.

  7. Delivery of a Peptide Radiopharmaceutical to Brain with an IgG-Avidin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Boado, Ruben J.; Pardridge, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic engineering, host cell expression, purity, identity, and in vivo brain drug targeting properties are described for a new IgG-fusion protein, designated the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. Avidin (AV) is fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the genetically engineered chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the mouse transferrin receptor (TfR). The TfRMAb binds the endogenous TfR on the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which triggers transport into brain from blood. The cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein is produced in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, which are grown in serum free medium under conditions of biotin starvation. Following affinity purification, the purity and identity of the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein was verified by electrophoresis and Western blotting. The affinity of the cTfRMAb for the murine TfR is high, KI = 4.6±0.5 nM, despite fusion of avidin to the antibody heavy chain. The model peptide radiopharmaceutical used in this study is the Aβ1-40 amyloid peptide of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which in a brain-penetrating form could be used to image the amyloid plaque in brain in AD. The BBB transport and brain uptake of the [125I]-Aβ1-40 peptide was measured in mice injected intravenously (IV) with the peptide either free or conjugated to the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. The brain uptake of the free Aβ1-40 peptide was very low, 0.1 % of injected dose (ID)/gram brain following IV injection, and is comparable to the brain uptake of a brain blood volume marker. However, the brain uptake of the Aβ1-40 peptide was high, 2.1 ± 0.2 % ID/gram brain, following attachment of the biotinylated peptide to the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. Capillary depletion analysis showed the peptide penetrated the brain parenchyma from blood. The cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug delivery system that can target to mouse brain mono-biotinylated peptide or antisense radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:21707084

  8. Efficient therapeutic delivery by a novel cell-permeant peptide derived from KDM4A protein for antitumor and antifibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiao; Qin, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Xue-Li; Wang, Jun; Zou, Li-Li; Wu, Jiang-Feng; Li, Jun-Ming; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) based delivery have provided immense potential for the therapeutic applications, however, most of nonhuman originated CPPs carry the risk of possible cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, thus may restricting to be used. Here, we describe a novel human-derived CPP, denoted hPP10, and hPP10 has cell-penetrating properties evaluated by CellPPD web server, as well as In-Vitro and In-Vivo analysis. In vitro studies showed that hPP10-FITC was able to penetrate into various cells including primary cultured cells, likely through an endocytosis pathway. And functionalized macromolecules, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), tumor-specific apoptosis inducer Apoptin as well as biological active enzyme GCLC (Glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit) can be delivered by hPP10 in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that hPP10 provide a novel and versatile tool to deliver exogenous proteins or drugs for clinical applications as well as reprogrammed cell-based therapy. PMID:27081693

  9. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  10. Nitroxide delivery system for Nrf2 activation and skin protection.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehuda Greenwald, Maya; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Soroka, Yoram; Sasson, Shmuel Ben; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet; Bitton, Ronit; Kohen, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic nitroxides are a large group of compounds composed of diverse stable radicals also known as synthetic antioxidants. Although nitroxides are valuable for use in several skin conditions, in in vivo conditions they have several drawbacks, such as nonspecific dispersion in normal tissue, preferential renal clearance and rapid reduction of the nitroxide to the corresponding hydroxylamine. However, these drawbacks can be easily addressed by encapsulating the nitroxides within microemulsions. This approach would allow nitroxide activity and therefore their valuable effects (e.g. activation of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway) to continue. In this work, nitroxides were encapsulated in a microemulsion composed of biocompatible ingredients. The nanometric size and shape of the vehicle microemulsion and nitroxide microemulsion displayed high similarity, indicating that the stability of the microemulsions was preserved. Our studies demonstrated that nitroxide microemulsions were more potent inducers of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway than the free nitroxides, causing the activation of phase II enzymes. Moreover, microemulsions containing nitroxides significantly reduced UVB-induced cytotoxicity in the skin. Understanding the mechanism of this improved activity may expand the usage of many other Nrf2 modulating molecules in encapsulated form, as a skin protection strategy against oxidative stress-related conditions.

  11. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  12. Technical baseline description of high-level waste andlow-activity waste feed mobilization and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, I.G.

    1997-06-01

    This document is a compilation of information related to the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) feed staging, mobilization, and transfer/delivery issues. Information relevant to current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) inventories and activities designed to feed the Phase I Privatization effort at the Hanford Site is included. Discussions on the higher level Phase II activities are offered for a perspective on the interfaces.

  13. Protein encapsulated magnetic carriers for micro/nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y.; Kaminski, M. D.; Mertz, C. J.; Finck, M. R.; Guy, S. G.; Chen, H.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2005-01-01

    Novel methods for drug delivery may be based on nanotechnology using non-invasive magnetic guidance of drug loaded magnetic carriers to the targeted site and thereafter released by external ultrasound energy. The key building block of this system is to successfully synthesize biodegradable, magnetic drug carriers. Magnetic carriers using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) as matrix materials were loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by a double-emulsion technique. BSA-loaded magnetic microspheres were characterized for size, morphology, surface charge, and magnetization. The BSA encapsulation efficiency was determined by recovering albumin from the microspheres using dimethyl sulfoxide and 0.05N NaOH/0.5% SDS then quantifying with the Micro-BCA protein assay. BSA release profiles were also determined by the Micro-BCA protein assay. The microspheres had drug encapsulation efficiencies up to 90% depending on synthesis parameters. Particles were spherical with a smooth or porous surface having a size range less than 5 {mu}m. The surface charge (expressed as zeta potential) was near neutral, optimal for prolonged intravascular survival. The magnetization of these BSA loaded magnetic carriers was 2 to 6 emu/g, depending on the specific magnetic materials used during synthesis.

  14. Development of a Gastric Absorptive, Immediate Responsive, Oral Protein-Loaded Versatile Polymeric Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kondiah, Pierre P D; Choonara, Yahya E; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Marimuthu, Thashree; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2017-02-15

    A multifunctional platform to deliver three diverse proteins of insulin, interferon beta (INF-β) and erythropoietin (EPO), using a novel copolymeric microparticulate system of TMC-PEGDMA-MAA, was synthesised as an intelligent pH-responsive 2-fold gastric and intestinal absorptive system. Physiochemical and physicomechanical studies proved the degree of crystallinity that supported the controlled protein delivery of the microparticulate system. The copolymer was tableted before undertaking in vitro and in vivo analysis. After 2.5 h in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), insulin showed a fractional release of 3.2% in comparison to simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), in which a maximum of 83% of insulin was released. Similarly, INF-β and EPO released 3 and 9.7% in SGF and a maximum of 74 and 81.3% in SIF, respectively. In vivo studies demonstrated a significant decrease in blood glucose by 54.19% within 4 h post-dosing, and the comparator formulation provided 74.6% decrease in blood glucose within the same time period. INF-β peak bioavailable dose in serum was calculated to be 1.3% in comparison to an SC formulation having a peak concentration of 0.9%, demonstrating steady-state release for 24 h. EPO-loaded copolymeric microparticles had a 1.6% peak bioavailable concentration, in comparison to the 6.34% peak concentration after 8 h from the SC comparator formulation.

  15. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-05

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92 mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery.

  16. Image-guided convection-enhanced delivery of GDNF protein into monkey putamen.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Francisco; Krauze, Michal T; Valles, Francisco; Hadaczek, Piotr; Bringas, John; Sharma, Nitasha; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed an MRI-based method that enables tracking of parenchymal infusions of therapeutic agents by inclusion of a contrast reagent in the infusate. We show that both liposomal Gadoteridol (GDL) and free Gadoteridol (Gd) can be used for MRI-monitored infusions into the non-human primate (NHP) putamen to predict the distribution of GDNF protein after convection-enhanced delivery (CED). GDNF and both MRI tracers showed good co-distribution within the putamen and other brain regions. Although the CED infusion technique can distribute GDNF protein over large brain regions, continuous administration of GDNF could cause undesired effects that could counteract the benefits of CED as demonstrated in this study when large volumes of GDNF were delivered that lead to GDNF leakage into CSF. These limitations can be addressed by employing an intermittent CED schedule that permits consistent target coverage without GDNF leakage into CSF or white matter. We present an approach intracranial GDNF infusions that can be optimized by means of real-time monitoring via MRI. Adoption of this new standard, along with advanced, reflux-resistant cannulae, may permit reconsideration of direct GDNF infusion into parenchyma as a clinical strategy, since previous clinical studies involving chronic infusion of recombinant glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to the putamen for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have yielded mixed results, a state of affairs that may in part be attributed to suboptimal infusion parameters.

  17. Application of elastin-mimetic recombinant proteins in chemotherapeutics delivery, cellular engineering, and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-01-01

    With the remarkable increase in the fields of biomedical engineering and regenerative medicine, biomaterial design has become an indispensable approach for developing the biocompatible carriers for drug or gene cargo and extracellular matrix (ECM) for cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. Native ECM materials derived from animal tissues were believed to be the best choices for tissue engineering. However, possible pathogen contamination by cellular remnants from foreign animal tissues is an unavoidable issue that has limited the use of native ECM for human benefit. Some synthetic polymers have been used as alternative materials for manufacturing native ECM because of the biodegradability and ease of large-scale production of the polymers. However, the inherent polydispersity of the polymers causes batch-to-batch variation in polymer composition and possible cytotoxic interactions between chemical matrices and neighboring cells or tissues have not yet been fully resolved. Elastin-like proteins (ELPs) are genetically engineered biopolymers modeled after the naturally occurring tropoelastin and have emerged as promising materials for biomedical applications because they are biocompatible, non-immunogenic and biodegradable, and their composition, mechanical stiffness and even fate within the cell can be controlled at the gene level. This commentary highlights the recent progresses in the development of the ELP-based recombinant proteins that are being increasingly used for the delivery of chemotherapeutics and to provide a cell-friendly ECM environment.

  18. Application of elastin-mimetic recombinant proteins in chemotherapeutics delivery, cellular engineering, and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-01-01

    With the remarkable increase in the fields of biomedical engineering and regenerative medicine, biomaterial design has become an indispensable approach for developing the biocompatible carriers for drug or gene cargo and extracellular matrix (ECM) for cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. Native ECM materials derived from animal tissues were believed to be the best choices for tissue engineering. However, possible pathogen contamination by cellular remnants from foreign animal tissues is an unavoidable issue that has limited the use of native ECM for human benefit. Some synthetic polymers have been used as alternative materials for manufacturing native ECM because of the biodegradability and ease of large-scale production of the polymers. However, the inherent polydispersity of the polymers causes batch-to-batch variation in polymer composition and possible cytotoxic interactions between chemical matrices and neighboring cells or tissues have not yet been fully resolved. Elastin-like proteins (ELPs) are genetically engineered biopolymers modeled after the naturally occurring tropoelastin and have emerged as promising materials for biomedical applications because they are biocompatible, non-immunogenic and biodegradable, and their composition, mechanical stiffness and even fate within the cell can be controlled at the gene level. This commentary highlights the recent progresses in the development of the ELP-based recombinant proteins that are being increasingly used for the delivery of chemotherapeutics and to provide a cell-friendly ECM environment. PMID:23475122

  19. Protective effect of post-ischaemic viral delivery of heat shock proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Badin, Romina A; Modo, Michael; Cheetham, Mike; Thomas, David L; Gadian, David G; Latchman, David S; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, transport and degradation and, in addition, they can promote cell survival both in vitro and in vivo after a range of stresses. Although some in vivo studies have suggested that HSP27 and HSP70 can be neuroprotective, current evidence is limited, particularly when HSPs have been delivered after an insult. The effect of overexpressing HSPs after transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats was investigated by delivering an attenuated herpes simplex viral vector (HSV-1) engineered to express HSP27 or HSP70 30 mins after tissue reperfusion. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to determine lesion size and cerebral blood flow at six different time points up to 1 month after stroke. Animals underwent two sensorimotor tests at the same time points to assess the relationship between lesion size and function. Results indicate that post-ischaemic viral delivery of HSP27, but not of HSP70, caused a statistically significant reduction in lesion size and induced a significant behavioural improvement compared with controls. This is the first evidence of effective post-ischaemic gene therapy with a viral vector expressing HSP27 in an experimental model of stroke. PMID:18781161

  20. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  1. Nanoparticle formation by using shellac and chitosan for a protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kraisit, Pakorn; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Luangtana-anan, Manee

    2013-01-01

    The potential of using two natural polymers (chitosan and shellac) for the formation of nanoparticles by the process of ionic cross-linking to encapsulate bovine serum albumin, a model protein was investigated. Depending on the concentrations of chitosan, shellac and bovine serum albumin, three physical states - nanoparticle, aggregation, and solution could be observed as a result of the electrostatic force. The formation of nanoparticles was due to the balance between the repulsion force and attractive force while the imbalance between both forces resulted in the formation of aggregation and solution. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were applied to prove the nanoparticle formation. The particle size was characterized by the light scattering technique and was found in the range between 100 and 300 nm. The morphology of the particles, detected by transmission electron microscopy was spherical shape. The result showed that the zeta potential of the nanoparticles possessed positive charges. The concentrations of chitosan, shellac and bovine serum albumin had an influence on the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles such as the particle size, the zeta potential, the encapsulation, the loading efficiencies and the cumulative release. Therefore, chitosan and shellac could be used to form nanoparticles for protein delivery by the ionic cross-linking method.

  2. CW/pulsed NIR irradiation of gold nanorods: effect on transdermal protein delivery mediated by photothermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hengmin; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Niidome, Yasuro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki; Niidome, Takuro

    2013-10-28

    Transdermal delivery is a useful and attractive method for drug delivery, even though the stratum corneum is a major barrier of protein translocation into the skin. To achieve protein delivery through the stratum corneum, we first cast gold nanorods, acting as a heating device in response to near-infrared light irradiation, onto the skin surface. After applying an aqueous solution of ovalbumin to the skin, the skin was irradiated by near-infrared laser light. Irradiation of the skin using a continuous-wave laser increased the skin temperature resulting in an efficient translocation of ovalbumin into the skin. Furthermore, migration of inflammation cells and induction heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were observed. Irradiation of the skin using a pulsed laser caused an enhanced permeability of the stratum corneum without an increase in skin temperature, migration of inflammation cells, or HSP70 induction. This effect is due to the pulsed-laser irradiation increasing the temperature of a limited part of the skin surface. Thus, the physiological response of skin is dependent on the type of laser light used. It is anticipated that this phenomenon will find wide application in such applications as, for example, general transdermal protein delivery and transdermal vaccination.

  3. Active scaffolds for on-demand drug and cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuanhe; Kim, Jaeyun; Cezar, Christine A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Kangwon; Bouhadir, Kamal; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Porous biomaterials have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. The release of biological agents from conventional porous scaffolds is typically governed by molecular diffusion, material degradation, and cell migration, which do not allow for dynamic external regulation. We present a new active porous scaffold that can be remotely controlled by a magnetic field to deliver various biological agents on demand. The active porous scaffold, in the form of a macroporous ferrogel, gives a large deformation and volume change of over 70% under a moderate magnetic field. The deformation and volume variation allows a new mechanism to trigger and enhance the release of various drugs including mitoxantrone, plasmid DNA, and a chemokine from the scaffold. The porous scaffold can also act as a depot of various cells, whose release can be controlled by external magnetic fields. PMID:21149682

  4. Delivery of active agents from chewing gum for improved remineralization.

    PubMed

    Dodds, M W J; Chidichimo, D; Haas, M S

    2012-09-01

    Most surrogate measures of caries were developed to test products containing fluoride, typically at relatively high and closely controlled oral concentrations. However, since the primary mechanism for the remineralization of early enamel caries lesions by chewing gum is through stimulation of saliva, delivering Ca and Pi to the demineralized enamel lesion, established methods may lack the sensitivity to detect the additional benefit of an active agent without the strong remineralizing potential of fluoride. Issues related to the release of active agents from the gum matrix, dilution in the saliva, and limited oral retention time, along with taste, safety, regulatory, and cost concerns, impose further limitations. This paper reviews the efficacy of some active agents used in chewing gum for improved remineralization and includes results from in situ testing of calcium-containing gums, including calcium lactate, tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, calcium citrate/encapsulated phosphate, and a calcium lactate/sodium phosphate blend. Despite promising in vitro data from these agents, they did not provide consistently superior results from in situ testing. There is a need to develop better predictive in vitro models for chewing gum, as well as improved sensitivity of in situ models to discriminate relatively small amounts of remineralization against a background of high biological variability.

  5. Petunia nectar proteins have ribonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Hillwig, Melissa S.; Liu, Xiaoteng; Liu, Guangyu; Thornburg, Robert W.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2010-01-01

    Plants requiring an insect pollinator often produce nectar as a reward for the pollinator's visitations. This rich secretion needs mechanisms to inhibit microbial growth. In Nicotiana spp. nectar, anti-microbial activity is due to the production of hydrogen peroxide. In a close relative, Petunia hybrida, limited production of hydrogen peroxide was found; yet petunia nectar still has anti-bacterial properties, suggesting that a different mechanism may exist for this inhibition. The nectar proteins of petunia plants were compared with those of ornamental tobacco and significant differences were found in protein profiles and function between these two closely related species. Among those proteins, RNase activities unique to petunia nectar were identified. The genes corresponding to four RNase T2 proteins from Petunia hybrida that show unique expression patterns in different plant tissues were cloned. Two of these enzymes, RNase Phy3 and RNase Phy4 are unique among the T2 family and contain characteristics similar to both S- and S-like RNases. Analysis of amino acid patterns suggest that these proteins are an intermediate between S- and S-like RNases, and support the hypothesis that S-RNases evolved from defence RNases expressed in floral parts. This is the first report of RNase activities in nectar. PMID:20460362

  6. Hydrogel Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Enhances Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Yang, Shu-Rui; Brey, Eric M.; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of bone tissue engineering for repairing bone defects has gradually shown some satisfactory progress. One of the concerns raising scientific attention is the poor supply of growth factors. A number of growth factor delivery approaches have been developed for promoting bone formation. However, there is no systematic comparison of those approaches on efficiency of neobone formation. In this study, the approaches using periosteum, direct supply of growth factors, or gene transfection of growth factors were evaluated to determine the osteogenic capacity on the repair of bone defect. Methods: In total, 42 male 21-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g were used as the bone defect model to evaluate the bone repair efficiency. Various tissue engineered constructs of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLLA) copolymer hydrogel with periosteum, with external supply of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), or with BMP2-transfected bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were filled in a 7-mm bone defect region. Animals were euthanized at 3 months, and the hydrogel constructs were harvested. The evaluation with histological staining and radiography analysis were performed for the volume of new bone formation. Results: The PEG-PLLA scaffold with BMMSCs promotes bone regeneration with the addition of periosteum. The group with BMP2-transfected BMMSCs demonstrated the largest volume of new bone among all the testing groups. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study provide the evidence that the combination of PEG-PLLA hydrogels with BMMSCs and sustained delivery of BMP2 resulted in the maximal bone regeneration. PMID:27622106

  7. GDNF fusion protein for targeted-drug delivery across the human blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-06-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophin that could be developed as a neurotherapeutic for Parkinson's disease, stroke, and motor neuron disease. However, GDNF does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Human GDNF was re-engineered by fusion of the mature GDNF protein to the carboxyl terminus of the chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein is bi-functional, and both binds the HIR, to trigger receptor-mediated transport across the BBB, and binds the GDNF receptor (GFR)-alpha1, to activate GDNF neuroprotection pathways behind the BBB. COS cells were dual transfected with the heavy chain (HC) and light chain fusion protein expression plasmids, and the HC of the fusion protein was immunoreactive with antibodies to both human IgG and GDNF. The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein bound with high affinity to the extracellular domain of both the HIR, ED(50) = 0.87 +/- 0.13 nM, and the GFRalpha1, ED(50) = 1.68 +/- 0.17 nM. The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein activated luciferase gene expression in human neural SK-N-MC cells dual transfected with the c-ret kinase and a luciferase reporter gene under the influence of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, and the ED(50), 1.68 +/- 0.45 nM, was identical to the ED(50) in the GFRalpha1 binding assay. The fusion protein was active in vivo in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model, where the stroke volume was reduced 77% (P < 0.001). In conclusion, these studies describe the re-engineering of GDNF, to make this neurotrophin transportable across the human BBB.

  8. Delivery of a protein transduction domain-mediated Prdx6 protein ameliorates oxidative stress-induced injury in human and mouse neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shatrunjai P.; Chhunchha, Bhavana; Fatma, Nigar; Kubo, Eri; Singh, Sanjay P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress or reduced expression of naturally occurring antioxidants during aging has been identified as a major culprit in neuronal cell/tissue degeneration. Peroxiredoxin (Prdx) 6, a protective protein with GSH peroxidase and acidic calcium-independent phospholipase A2 activities, acts as a rheostat in regulating cellular physiology by clearing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby optimizing gene regulation. We found that under stress, the neuronal cells displayed reduced expression of Prdx6 protein and mRNA with increased levels of ROS, and the cells subsequently underwent apoptosis. Using Prdx6 fused to TAT transduction domain, we showed evidence that Prdx6 was internalized in human brain cortical neuronal cells, HCN-2, and mouse hippocampal cells, HT22. The cells transduced with Prdx6 conferred resistance against the oxidative stress inducers paraquat, H2O2, and glutamate. Furthermore, Prdx6 delivery ameliorated damage to neuronal cells by optimizing ROS levels and overstimulation of NF-κB. Intriguingly, transduction of Prdx6 increased the expression of endogenous Prdx6, suggesting that protection against oxidative stress was mediated by both extrinsic and intrinsic Prdx6. The results demonstrate that Prdx6 expression is critical to protecting oxidative stress-evoked neuronal cell death. We propose that local or systemic application of Prdx6 can be an effective means of delaying/postponing neuronal degeneration. PMID:26447207

  9. Online Delivery as a Course Adjunct Promotes Active Learning and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J. Scott; Harrison, Marissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Chickering and Gamson's notable summary of the best practices of undergraduate teaching include promoting active learning, cooperation, and student-faculty contact. The present study hypothesized that online delivery of lecture prior to course meetings allows more in-class time to achieve these goals. Students in a control group received a…

  10. Online Delivery as a Course Adjunct Promotes Active Learning and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J. Scott; Harrison, Marissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Chickering and Gamson's notable summary of the best practices of undergraduate teaching include promoting active learning, cooperation, and student-faculty contact. The present study hypothesized that online delivery of lecture prior to course meetings allows more in-class time to achieve these goals. Students in a control group received a…

  11. Physical Activity Program Delivery by Professionals versus Volunteers: the TEAM Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Cynthia M.; Pruitt, Leslie A.; Buman, Matthew P.; King, Abby C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors. Design A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003–2008. Setting/participants: Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Intervention Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition. Main Outcome Measures: Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the CHAMPS Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery. Results At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content. Conclusions This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings. PMID:21553972

  12. Development and evaluation of mucoadhesive nanoparticles based on thiolated Eudragit for oral delivery of protein drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhijie; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Feng; Li, Meimei; Tang, Xing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop pH-sensitive Eudragit L100-cysteine/reduced glutathione (Eul-cys/GSH) nanoparticles (NPs), which provided the mucoadhesion and protection for protein drugs against enzymatic degradation. Insulin was chosen as a model biomolecule for testing this system. The Eul-cys conjugate, which was obtained by grafting cysteine onto the carboxy group of Eudragit L100, was analyzed by HNMR and SEM, and the swelling degree (SD), cation binding, and enzymatic inhibition were also determined. The results obtained showed that the Eul-cys conjugate represent a pH-sensitive delivery system which effectively protected the insulin from being degraded by the proteases, and this is related to the mechanism of Ca2+ binding. Insulin-loaded Eul-cys/GSH NPs were prepared by a diffusion method involving an electrostatic interaction between the network structure of the polymer and the embedded proteins, including insulin and GSH. TEM images indicated that Eul-cys/GSH existed as smooth and spherical NPs in aqueous solution with particle sizes of 260 ± 20 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) findings showed the presence of amorphous insulin in thiolated NPs and higher free thiol oxidation than the result obtained by Ellman's reagent method. In addition, thiolated NPs showed excellent binding efficiency to the mucin in rat intestine, indicating that Eul-cys/GSH NPs have great potential to be applied as safe carriers for the oral administration of protein drugs.

  13. Intracellular and transdermal protein delivery mediated by non-covalent interactions with a synthetic guanidine-rich molecular carrier.

    PubMed

    Im, Jungkyun; Das, Sanket; Jeong, Dongjun; Kim, Chang-Jin; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Ki Hean; Chung, Sung-Kee

    2017-08-07

    The impermeability of the cell plasma membrane is one of the major barriers for protein transduction into mammalian cells, and it also limits the use of proteins as therapeutic agents. Protein transduction has usually been achieved based on certain invasive processes or cell penetrating peptides (CPP). Herein we report our study in which a synthetic guanidine-rich molecular carrier is used as a delivery vector for intracellular and transdermal delivery of proteins. First a sorbitol-based molecular carrier having 8 guanidine units (Sor-G8) was synthesized, and then was simply mixed with a cargo protein of varying sizes to form the non-covalent complex of carrier-cargo proteins. These ionic complexes were shown to have efficient cellular uptake properties. The optimum conditions including the molar ratio between cargo protein and carrier, and the treatment time have been defined. Several protein cargoes were successfully examined with differing sizes and molecular weights: green fluorescent protein (MW 27kDa), albumin (66kDa), concanavalin A (102kDa), and immunoglobulin G (150kDa). These non-covalent complexes were also found to have excellent transdermal penetration ability into the mouse skin. The skin penetration depth was studied histologically by light microscopy as well as two-photon microscopy thus generating a depth profile. These complexes were largely found in the epidermis and dermis layers, i.e. down to ca. 100μm depth of the mouse skin. Our synthetic Sor-G8 carrier was found to be substantially more efficient that Arg8 in both the intracellular transduction and the transdermal delivery of proteins. The mechanism of the cellular uptake of the complex was briefly studied, and the results suggested macropinocytosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intramuscular delivery of a naked DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin and pancreatic regenerating III protein ameliorates type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Rui; Xie, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Hong-Jie; Su, Yu-Yong; Lu, Jing-Li; Li, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Xiang, Ming

    2011-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of β cells. Up to now, there is still no cure for this devastating disease and alternative approach should be developed. To explore a novel gene therapy strategy combining immunotherapy and β cell regeneration, we constructed a non-viral plasmid encoding proinsulin (PI) and pancreatic regenerating (Reg) III protein (pReg/PI). Therapeutic potentials of this plasmid for T1DM were investigated. Intramuscular delivery of pReg/PI resulted in a significant reduction in hyperglycemia and diabetes incidence, with an increased insulin contents in the serum of T1DM mice model induced by STZ. Treatment with pReg/PI also restored the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines and expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells, which may attribute to the establishment of self-immune tolerance. Additionally, in comparison to the mice treated with empty vector pBudCE4.1 (pBud), attenuated insulitis and apoptosis achieved by inhibiting activation of NF-κB in the pancreas of pReg/PI treated mice were observed. In summary, these results indicate that intramuscular delivery of pReg/PI distinctly ameliorated STZ-induced T1DM by reconstructing the immunological self-tolerance and promoting the regeneration of β cells, which might be served as a promising candidate for the gene therapy of T1DM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood-brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders.

  16. Activating PKC-β1 at the blood-brain barrier reverses induction of P-glycoprotein activity by dioxin and restores drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Hawkins, Brian T; Miller, David S

    2011-06-01

    Upregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein expression causes central nervous system (CNS) pharmacoresistance. However, activation of BBB protein kinase C-β1 (PKC-β1) rapidly reduces basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. We tested whether PKC-β1 activation would reverse CNS drug resistance caused by dioxin acting through aryl hydrocarbon receptor. A selective PKC-β1 agonist abolished the increase in P-glycoprotein activity induced by dioxin in isolated rat brain capillaries and reversed the effect of dioxin on brain uptake of verapamil in dioxin-dosed rats. Thus, targeting BBB PKC-β1 may be an effective strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, even in drug-resistant individuals.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and safety evaluation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for protein delivery into macrophages.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Anne-Sophie; Kell, Arnold J; Barnes, Michael; Stals, Sandra; Gonçalves, David; Girard, Denis; Lavigne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Following infection, HIV establishes reservoirs within tissues that are inaccessible to optimal levels of antiviral drugs or within cells where HIV lies latent, thus escaping the action of anti-HIV drugs. Macrophages are a persistent reservoir for HIV and may contribute to the rebound viremia observed after antiretroviral treatment is stopped. In this study, we further investigate the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based nanocarriers as a new strategy to enhance penetration of therapeutic molecules into macrophages. We have prepared stable PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated their capacity to transport an active molecule into the human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a proof-of-concept compound. Intracellular localization of fluorescent BSA molecules encapsulated into PLGA NPs was monitored in live cells using confocal microscopy, and cellular uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. In vitro and in vivo toxicological studies were performed to further determine the safety profile of PLGA NPs including inflammatory effects. The size of the PLGA NPs carrying BSA (PLGA-BSA) in culture medium containing 10% serum was ~126 nm in diameter, and they were negatively charged at their surface (zeta potential =-5.6 mV). Our confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry data showed that these PLGA-BSA NPs are rapidly and efficiently taken up by THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) at low doses. We found that PLGA-BSA NPs increased cellular uptake and internalization of the protein in vitro. PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for THP-1 MDM cells, did not modulate neutrophil apoptosis in vitro, and did not show inflammatory effect in vivo in the murine air pouch model of acute inflammation. In contrast to BSA alone, BSA encapsulated into PLGA NPs increased leukocyte infiltration in vivo, suggesting the in vivo enhanced delivery and protection of the protein by the polymer nanocarrier. We demonstrated that PLGA

  18. Preparation, characterization, and safety evaluation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for protein delivery into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Anne-Sophie; Kell, Arnold J; Barnes, Michael; Stals, Sandra; Gonçalves, David; Girard, Denis; Lavigne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Following infection, HIV establishes reservoirs within tissues that are inaccessible to optimal levels of antiviral drugs or within cells where HIV lies latent, thus escaping the action of anti-HIV drugs. Macrophages are a persistent reservoir for HIV and may contribute to the rebound viremia observed after antiretroviral treatment is stopped. In this study, we further investigate the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based nanocarriers as a new strategy to enhance penetration of therapeutic molecules into macrophages. We have prepared stable PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated their capacity to transport an active molecule into the human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a proof-of-concept compound. Intracellular localization of fluorescent BSA molecules encapsulated into PLGA NPs was monitored in live cells using confocal microscopy, and cellular uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. In vitro and in vivo toxicological studies were performed to further determine the safety profile of PLGA NPs including inflammatory effects. The size of the PLGA NPs carrying BSA (PLGA-BSA) in culture medium containing 10% serum was ~126 nm in diameter, and they were negatively charged at their surface (zeta potential =−5.6 mV). Our confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry data showed that these PLGA-BSA NPs are rapidly and efficiently taken up by THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) at low doses. We found that PLGA-BSA NPs increased cellular uptake and internalization of the protein in vitro. PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for THP-1 MDM cells, did not modulate neutrophil apoptosis in vitro, and did not show inflammatory effect in vivo in the murine air pouch model of acute inflammation. In contrast to BSA alone, BSA encapsulated into PLGA NPs increased leukocyte infiltration in vivo, suggesting the in vivo enhanced delivery and protection of the protein by the polymer nanocarrier. We demonstrated that PLGA

  19. Targeted delivery of siRNA into breast cancer cells via phage fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Deepa; Gillespie, James W; Petrenko, Vasily A; Ebner, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Petrenko, Valery A

    2013-02-04

    Nucleic acids, including antisense oligonucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), aptamers, and rybozymes, emerged as versatile therapeutics due to their ability to interfere in a well-planned manner with the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. However, a systemic use of NAs is hindered by their instability in physiological liquids and inability of intracellular accumulation in the site of action. We first evaluated the potential of cancer specific phage fusion proteins as targeting ligands that provide encapsulation, protection, and navigation of siRNA to the target cell. The tumor-specific proteins were isolated from phages that were affinity selected from a landscape phage library against target breast cancer cells. It was found that fusion phage coat protein fpVIII displaying cancer-targeting peptides can effectively encapsulate siRNAs and deliver them into the cells leading to specific silencing of the model gene GAPDH. Complexes of siRNA and phage protein form nanoparticles (nanophages), which were characterized by atomic force microscopy and ELISA, and their stability was demonstrated by resistance of encapsulated siRNA to degradation by serum nucleases. The phage protein/siRNA complexes can make a new type of highly selective, stable, active, and physiologically acceptable cancer nanomedicine.

  20. The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) protein

    PubMed Central

    Sicard, Adrien; Hernould, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) gene from tomato regulates the processes of flower and ovule development. 1 IMA encodes a Mini Zinc Finger (MIF) protein that is characterized by a very short sequence containing an unusual zinc-finger domain. IMA acts as a repressor of WUSCHEL expression which controls the meristem organizing centre and the determinacy of the nucellus during ovule development. IMA inhibits cell proliferation during floral termination, controls the number of carpels during floral development and participates in the initiation of ovule primordia by activating D-type gene expression. In addition IMA is involved in a multiple hormonal signalling pathway like its Arabidopsis homolog MIF1.2 We thus propose that IMA, as a representative of this new family of zinc finger proteins, is an important effector in the regulatory pathway controlling meristem activity linking cell division, differentiation and hormonal control of development. PMID:19704478

  1. A new targeted drug delivery method using ultrasound and acoustically active lipospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortencarier, Michaelann; Bloch, Susannah; Dayton, Paul; Ferrara, Kathy; Matsunaga, Terry; Labell, Rachel; Schumann, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    The goal is to create a strategy for localized drug delivery using engineered delivery vehicles and ultrasound energy. These drug delivery vehicles, referred to as acoustically active lipospheres (AALs), consist of small gas bubbles surrounded by thick oil shells (where drugs can be carried) and are enclosed by an outermost lipid layer. Ultrasound radiation force can be used to displace these vehicles near the blood vessel wall, after which a higher intensity pulse can fragment the vehicle and transfer its contents to the endothelium. Blood velocity ranges from 1 to 10 mm/s in the microvasculature. Therefore, agents in capillaries insonified by a transducer with a 1 mm focal beam width for 0.1 to 1 seconds can be displaced of 1 to 2 mm. Delivery vehicles containing various fluorescent dyes within the oil layer are exposed to ultrasound in cell chambers or flowing vessels. Fluorescence intensity increases more than 10-fold with application of radiation force and fragmentation, both over no exposure and over fragmentation pulses alone (both P<0.001). This implies radiation force is necessary to bring AALs into proximity of the cell monolayer before their destruction in order for drug delivery to occur.

  2. Plasmid DNA delivery into MDA-MB-453 cells mediated by recombinant Her-NLS fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajan, Sivakumar; Xavier, Jennifer; Rao, N Madhusudhana; Gopal, Vijaya

    2010-10-05

    A major rate-limiting step in nonviral gene delivery is the entry of nucleic acids across various membrane barriers and eventually into the nucleus where it must be transcribed. Cell-penetrating peptides and proteins are employed to generate formulations that overcome these challenges to facilitate DNA delivery into cells efficiently. However, these are limited by their inability to deliver nucleic acids selectively due to lack of specificity because they deliver to both cancer and normal cells. In this study, through modular design, we generated a recombinant fusion protein designated as Her-nuclear localization sequence (Her-NLS), where heregulin-α (Her), a targeting moiety, was cloned in frame with cationic NLS peptide to obtain a cell-specific targeting biomolecule for nucleic acid delivery. The heregulin-α(1) isoform possesses the epidermal growth factor-like domain and binds to HER2/3 heterodimers which are overexpressed in certain breast cancers. Purified recombinant Her-NLS fusion protein binds plasmid DNA and specifically transfects MDA-MB-453 cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptors HER2/3 in vitro. The approach described would also permit replacement of heregulin ligand with other targeting moieties that would be suited to cell-specific nucleic acid delivery mediated via receptor-ligand interactions.

  3. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  4. Properties of Native High-Density Lipoproteins Inspire Synthesis of Actively Targeted In Vivo siRNA Delivery Vehicles.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kaylin M; Plebanek, Michael P; Thaxton, C Shad

    2016-11-15

    Efficient systemic administration of therapeutic short interfering RNA (siRNA) is challenging. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are natural in vivo RNA delivery vehicles. Specifically, native HDLs: 1) Load single-stranded RNA; 2) Are anionic, which requires charge reconciliation between the RNA and HDL, and 3) Actively target scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) to deliver RNA. Emphasizing these particular parameters, we employed templated lipoprotein particles (TLP), mimics of spherical HDLs, and self-assembled them with single-stranded complements of, presumably, any highly unmodified siRNA duplex pair after formulation with a cationic lipid. Resulting siRNA templated lipoprotein particles (siRNA-TLP) are anionic and tunable with regard to RNA assembly and function. Data demonstrate that the siRNA-TLPs actively target SR-B1 to potently reduce androgen receptor (AR) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) proteins in multiple cancer cell lines. Systemic administration of siRNA-TLPs demonstrated no off-target toxicity and significantly reduced the growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Thus, native HDLs inspired the synthesis of a hybrid siRNA delivery vehicle that can modularly load single-stranded RNA complements after charge reconciliation with a cationic lipid, and that function due to active targeting of SR-B1.

  5. Factors that influence route of delivery--active versus traditional labor management.

    PubMed

    Peaceman, A M; Lopez-Zeno, J A; Minogue, J P; Socol, M L

    1993-10-01

    Our purpose was to compare maternal and fetal factors that influence the route of delivery with active management of labor and a traditional labor management protocol. Data were collected prospectively on 346 consecutive patients receiving active management of labor and 354 patients who were managed traditionally. Within each group demographic and labor characteristics of patients undergoing cesarean section were compared with those of patients having vaginal deliveries by means of the Student t test, chi 2 analysis, and stepwise logistic regression. With both active management of labor and traditional labor management success in achieving vaginal delivery was related to the station of the fetal vertex at admission, the need for oxytocin augmentation of labor, the uterine response to oxytocin, the use of epidural anesthesia, and the development of chorioamnionitis. By means of multiple logistic regression analysis maternal age, height, payor status, and birth weight were also identified as risk factors for cesarean section with traditional labor management but not with active management of labor. Differences were identified in risk factors for cesarean section between active management and traditional labor management. Active management of labor may diminish or eliminate some patient characteristics as risk factors for cesarean birth.

  6. Coated whey protein/alginate microparticles as oral controlled delivery systems for probiotic yeast.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Géraldine; Hoffart, Valérie; Beyssac, Eric; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Alric, Monique; Subirade, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Viable Saccharomyces boulardii, used as a biotherapeutic agent, was encapsulated in food-grade whey protein isolate (WP) and alginate (ALG) microparticles, in order to protect and vehicle them in gastrointestinal environment. Yeast-loaded microparticles with a WP/ALG ratio of 62/38 were produced with high encapsulation efficiency (95%) using an extrusion/cold gelation method and coated with ALG or WP by a simple immersion method. Swelling, yeast survival, WP loss and yeast release in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, pH 1.2 and 7.5) with and without their respective digestive enzymes (pepsin and pancreatin) were investigated. In SGF, ALG network shrinkage limited enzyme diffusion into the WP/ALG matrix. Coated and uncoated WP/ALG microparticles were resistant in SGF even with pepsin. Survival of yeast cells in microparticles was 40% compared to 10% for free yeast cells and was improved to 60% by coating. In SIF, yeast cell release followed coated microparticle swelling with a desirable delay. Coated WP/ALG microparticles appear to have potential as oral delivery systems for Saccharomyces boulardii or as encapsulation means for probiotic cells in pharmaceutical or food processing applications.

  7. Stimulation of bone healing by sustained bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) delivery.

    PubMed

    Faßbender, Mirja; Minkwitz, Susann; Strobel, Catrin; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2014-05-14

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein2 (BMP-2) incorporated in a polymeric implant coating on bone healing. In vitro analysis revealed a sustained, but incomplete BMP-2 release until Day 42. For the in vivo study, the rat tibia osteotomy was stabilized either with control or BMP-2 coated wires, and the healing progress was followed by micro computed tomography (µCT), biomechanical testing and histology at Days 10, 28, 42 and 84. MicroCT showed an accelerated formation of mineralized callus, as well as remodeling and an increase of mineralized/total callus volume (p=0.021) at Day 42 in the BMP-2 group compared to the control. Histology revealed an increased callus mineralization at Days 42 and 84 (p=0.006) with reduced cartilage at Day 84 (p=0.004) in the BMP-2 group. Biomechanical stiffness was significantly higher in the BMP-2 group (p=0.045) at Day 42. In summary, bone healing was enhanced after sustained BMP-2 application compared to the control. Using the same drug delivery system, but a burst release of BMP-2, a previous published study showed a similar positive effect on bone healing. Distinct differences in the healing outcome might be explained due to the different BMP release kinetics and dosages. However, further studies are necessary to adapt the optimal release profiles to physiological mechanisms.

  8. Preparation and characterization of elastin-like polypeptide scaffolds for local delivery of antibiotics and proteins.

    PubMed

    Amruthwar, Shruti S; Janorkar, Amol V

    2012-12-01

    Tissue engineering applications could benefit from simultaneous release of growth factors, signaling molecules, and antibiotics to obtain optimal healing of tissues. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are genetically engineered polymers that possess good biocompatibility, are biodegradable, and exhibit mechanical properties similar to natural elastin. In addition, ELPs exhibit a characteristic inverse phase transition temperature (T(t)). This T(t) behavior is widely exploited in hyperthermia mediated drug delivery. The objectives of this research were to prepare ELP hydrogel scaffolds using a novel ultrasonication method and to investigate the release of a model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) and a commonly used antibiotic in periodontal therapy (doxycycline) from the scaffolds at two different temperatures (25 °C T(t)). Both BSA and doxycycline showed a gradual time dependent release and showed a trend of higher release fractions with higher loading doses. Based on the comparison between the release profiles at the two selected temperatures, the release was higher at 37 °C compared to that at 25 °C for both the loading concentrations of doxycycline (0.05 and 0.1 % v/v) and only one of the loading concentrations of BSA (0.5 % v/v) studied, while the release was higher at 25 °C compared to that at 37 °C only for the other loading concentration of BSA (1 % v/v) studied. These results suggested that the drug molecular weight and loading concentration were significant factors that affected the release kinetics. The experiments in this study demonstrated that the ELP hydrogel scaffolds can successfully release proteins and antibiotics critical to tissue engineering.

  9. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  10. Activated protein C: biased for translation

    PubMed Central

    Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Mosnier, Laurent O.

    2015-01-01

    The homeostatic blood protease, activated protein C (APC), can function as (1) an antithrombotic on the basis of inactivation of clotting factors Va and VIIIa; (2) a cytoprotective on the basis of endothelial barrier stabilization and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions; and (3) a regenerative on the basis of stimulation of neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Pharmacologic therapies using recombinant human and murine APCs indicate that APC provides effective acute or chronic therapies for a strikingly diverse range of preclinical injury models. APC reduces the damage caused by the following: ischemia/reperfusion in brain, heart, and kidney; pulmonary, kidney, and gastrointestinal inflammation; sepsis; Ebola virus; diabetes; and total lethal body radiation. For these beneficial effects, APC alters cell signaling networks and gene expression profiles by activating protease-activated receptors 1 and 3. APC’s activation of these G protein–coupled receptors differs completely from thrombin’s activation mechanism due to biased signaling via either G proteins or β-arrestin-2. To reduce APC-associated bleeding risk, APC variants were engineered to lack >90% anticoagulant activity but retain normal cell signaling. Such a neuroprotective variant, 3K3A-APC (Lys191-193Ala), has advanced to clinical trials for ischemic stroke. A rich data set of preclinical knowledge provides a solid foundation for potential translation of APC variants to future novel therapies. PMID:25824691

  11. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C.; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S.

    2013-01-01

    The erythroid related disorders (ERDs) represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these