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Sample records for protein features involved

  1. Structural features of protein folding nuclei.

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Kondratova, M S

    2008-03-05

    A crucial event of protein folding is the formation of a folding nucleus. We demonstrate the presence of a considerable coincidence between the location of folding nuclei and the location of so-called "root structural motifs", which have unique overall folds and handedness. In the case of proteins with a single root structural motif, the involvement in the formation of a folding nucleus is in average significantly higher for amino acids residues that are in root structural motifs, compared to residues in other parts of the protein. The tests carried out revealed that the observed difference is statistically reliable. Thus, a structural feature that corresponds to the protein folding nucleus is now found.

  2. Linguistic feature analysis for protein interaction extraction

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The rapid growth of the amount of publicly available reports on biomedical experimental results has recently caused a boost of text mining approaches for protein interaction extraction. Most approaches rely implicitly or explicitly on linguistic, i.e., lexical and syntactic, data extracted from text. However, only few attempts have been made to evaluate the contribution of the different feature types. In this work, we contribute to this evaluation by studying the relative importance of deep syntactic features, i.e., grammatical relations, shallow syntactic features (part-of-speech information) and lexical features. For this purpose, we use a recently proposed approach that uses support vector machines with structured kernels. Results Our results reveal that the contribution of the different feature types varies for the different data sets on which the experiments were conducted. The smaller the training corpus compared to the test data, the more important the role of grammatical relations becomes. Moreover, deep syntactic information based classifiers prove to be more robust on heterogeneous texts where no or only limited common vocabulary is shared. Conclusion Our findings suggest that grammatical relations play an important role in the interaction extraction task. Moreover, the net advantage of adding lexical and shallow syntactic features is small related to the number of added features. This implies that efficient classifiers can be built by using only a small fraction of the features that are typically being used in recent approaches. PMID:19909518

  3. Effective Moment Feature Vectors for Protein Domain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Chin, Francis Yuk-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Imaging processing techniques have been shown to be useful in studying protein domain structures. The idea is to represent the pairwise distances of any two residues of the structure in a 2D distance matrix (DM). Features and/or submatrices are extracted from this DM to represent a domain. Existing approaches, however, may involve a large number of features (100–400) or complicated mathematical operations. Finding fewer but more effective features is always desirable. In this paper, based on some key observations on DMs, we are able to decompose a DM image into four basic binary images, each representing the structural characteristics of a fundamental secondary structure element (SSE) or a motif in the domain. Using the concept of moments in image processing, we further derive 45 structural features based on the four binary images. Together with 4 features extracted from the basic images, we represent the structure of a domain using 49 features. We show that our feature vectors can represent domain structures effectively in terms of the following. (1) We show a higher accuracy for domain classification. (2) We show a clear and consistent distribution of domains using our proposed structural vector space. (3) We are able to cluster the domains according to our moment features and demonstrate a relationship between structural variation and functional diversity. PMID:24391828

  4. Evaporative cooling feature selection for genotypic data involving interactions

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, B.A.; Reif, D.M.; White, B.C.; Crowe, J.E.; Moore, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: The development of genome-wide capabilities for genotyping has led to the practical problem of identifying the minimum subset of genetic variants relevant to the classification of a phenotype. This challenge is especially difficult in the presence of attribute interactions, noise and small sample size. Methods: Analogous to the physical mechanism of evaporation, we introduce an evaporative cooling (EC) feature selection algorithm that seeks to obtain a subset of attributes with the optimum information temperature (i.e. the least noise). EC uses an attribute quality measure analogous to thermodynamic free energy that combines Relief-F and mutual information to evaporate (i.e. remove) noise features, leaving behind a subset of attributes that contain DNA sequence variations associated with a given phenotype. Results: EC is able to identify functional sequence variations that involve interactions (epistasis) between other sequence variations that influence their association with the phenotype. This ability is demonstrated on simulated genotypic data with attribute interactions and on real genotypic data from individuals who experienced adverse events following smallpox vaccination. The EC formalism allows us to combine information entropy, energy and temperature into a single information free energy attribute quality measure that balances interaction and main effects. Availability: Open source software, written in Java, is freely available upon request. Contact: brett.mckinney@gmail.com PMID:17586549

  5. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  6. Singular Features of Trypanosomatids' Phosphotransferases Involved in Cell Energy Management

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Claudio A.; Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Miranda, Mariana R.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are responsible for economically important veterinary affections and severe human diseases. In Africa, Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness or African trypanosomiasis, while in America, Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These parasites have complex life cycles which involve a wide variety of environments with very different compositions, physicochemical properties, and availability of metabolites. As the environment changes there is a need to maintain the nucleoside homeostasis, requiring a quick and regulated response. Most of the enzymes required for energy management are phosphotransferases. These enzymes present a nitrogenous group or a phosphate as acceptors, and the most clear examples are arginine kinase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and adenylate kinase. Trypanosoma and Leishmania have the largest number of phosphotransferase isoforms ever found in a single cell; some of them are absent in mammals, suggesting that these enzymes are required in many cellular compartments associated to different biological processes. The presence of such number of phosphotransferases support the hypothesis of the existence of an intracellular enzymatic phosphotransfer network that communicates the spatially separated intracellular ATP consumption and production processes. All these unique features make phosphotransferases a promising start point for rational drug design for the treatment of human trypanosomiasis. PMID:21603267

  7. Integrated visual analysis of protein structures, sequences, and feature data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular mechanisms that give rise to a protein's function, biologists often need to (i) find and access all related atomic-resolution 3D structures, and (ii) map sequence-based features (e.g., domains, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, post-translational modifications) onto these structures. Results To streamline these processes we recently developed Aquaria, a resource offering unprecedented access to protein structure information based on an all-against-all comparison of SwissProt and PDB sequences. In this work, we provide a requirements analysis for several frequently occuring tasks in molecular biology and describe how design choices in Aquaria meet these requirements. Finally, we show how the interface can be used to explore features of a protein and gain biologically meaningful insights in two case studies conducted by domain experts. Conclusions The user interface design of Aquaria enables biologists to gain unprecedented access to molecular structures and simplifies the generation of insight. The tasks involved in mapping sequence features onto structures can be conducted easier and faster using Aquaria. PMID:26329268

  8. Universal features of fluctuations in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Erman, Burak

    2016-06-01

    Using data from 2000 non-homologous protein crystal structures, we show that the distribution of residue B factors of proteins collapses onto a single master curve. We show by maximum entropy arguments that this curve is a Gamma function whose order and dispersion are obtained from experimental data. The distribution for any given specific protein can be generated from the master curve by a linear transformation. Any perturbation of the B factor distribution of a protein, imposed at constant energy, causes a decrease in the entropy of the protein relative to that of the reference state. Proteins 2016; 84:721-725. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Prediction of DNA-binding proteins from relational features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of protein-DNA binding has an essential role in the biological processing of genetic information. We use relational machine learning to predict DNA-binding propensity of proteins from their structures. Automatically discovered structural features are able to capture some characteristic spatial configurations of amino acids in proteins. Results Prediction based only on structural relational features already achieves competitive results to existing methods based on physicochemical properties on several protein datasets. Predictive performance is further improved when structural features are combined with physicochemical features. Moreover, the structural features provide some insights not revealed by physicochemical features. Our method is able to detect common spatial substructures. We demonstrate this in experiments with zinc finger proteins. Conclusions We introduced a novel approach for DNA-binding propensity prediction using relational machine learning which could potentially be used also for protein function prediction in general. PMID:23146001

  10. A Novel Feature Extraction Method with Feature Selection to Identify Golgi-Resident Protein Types from Imbalanced Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi Apparatus (GA) is a major collection and dispatch station for numerous proteins destined for secretion, plasma membranes and lysosomes. The dysfunction of GA proteins can result in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, accurate identification of protein subGolgi localizations may assist in drug development and understanding the mechanisms of the GA involved in various cellular processes. In this paper, a new computational method is proposed for identifying cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Based on the concept of Common Spatial Patterns (CSP), a novel feature extraction technique is developed to extract evolutionary information from protein sequences. To deal with the imbalanced benchmark dataset, the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique (SMOTE) is adopted. A feature selection method called Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) is employed to search the optimal features from the CSP based features and g-gap dipeptide composition. Based on the optimal features, a Random Forest (RF) module is used to distinguish cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Through the jackknife cross-validation, the proposed method achieves a promising performance with a sensitivity of 0.889, a specificity of 0.880, an accuracy of 0.885, and a Matthew’s Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.765, which remarkably outperforms previous methods. Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves a significantly improved performance. These results highlight the promising performance of the proposed method to identify Golgi-resident protein types. Furthermore, the CSP based feature extraction method may provide guidelines for protein function predictions. PMID:26861308

  11. A Novel Feature Extraction Method with Feature Selection to Identify Golgi-Resident Protein Types from Imbalanced Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2016-02-06

    The Golgi Apparatus (GA) is a major collection and dispatch station for numerous proteins destined for secretion, plasma membranes and lysosomes. The dysfunction of GA proteins can result in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, accurate identification of protein subGolgi localizations may assist in drug development and understanding the mechanisms of the GA involved in various cellular processes. In this paper, a new computational method is proposed for identifying cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Based on the concept of Common Spatial Patterns (CSP), a novel feature extraction technique is developed to extract evolutionary information from protein sequences. To deal with the imbalanced benchmark dataset, the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique (SMOTE) is adopted. A feature selection method called Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) is employed to search the optimal features from the CSP based features and g-gap dipeptide composition. Based on the optimal features, a Random Forest (RF) module is used to distinguish cis-Golgi proteins from trans-Golgi proteins. Through the jackknife cross-validation, the proposed method achieves a promising performance with a sensitivity of 0.889, a specificity of 0.880, an accuracy of 0.885, and a Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.765, which remarkably outperforms previous methods. Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves a significantly improved performance. These results highlight the promising performance of the proposed method to identify Golgi-resident protein types. Furthermore, the CSP based feature extraction method may provide guidelines for protein function predictions.

  12. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-08-05

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability.

  13. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  14. Feature Fusion Based SVM Classifier for Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Julia; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Islam, Md Khaled Ben; Hasan, Md Al Mehedi

    2016-12-18

    For the importance of protein subcellular localization in different branches of life science and drug discovery, researchers have focused their attentions on protein subcellular localization prediction. Effective representation of features from protein sequences plays a most vital role in protein subcellular localization prediction specially in case of machine learning techniques. Single feature representation-like pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), physiochemical property models (PPM), and amino acid index distribution (AAID) contains insufficient information from protein sequences. To deal with such problems, we have proposed two feature fusion representations, AAIDPAAC and PPMPAAC, to work with Support Vector Machine classifiers, which fused PseAAC with PPM and AAID accordingly. We have evaluated the performance for both single and fused feature representation of a Gram-negative bacterial dataset. We have got at least 3% more actual accuracy by AAIDPAAC and 2% more locative accuracy by PPMPAAC than single feature representation.

  15. Visual Features Involving Motion Seen from Airport Control Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion

    2010-01-01

    Visual motion cues are used by tower controllers to support both visual and anticipated separation. Some of these cues are tabulated as part of the overall set of visual features used in towers to separate aircraft. An initial analyses of one motion cue, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers detect and use it for spacing aircraft on or near the surface. Understanding cues like it will help determine if they can be safely used in a remote/virtual tower in which their presentation may be visually degraded.

  16. Cytosolic events involved in chloroplast protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Jung, Chanjin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-02-01

    Chloroplasts are unique organelles that are responsible for photosynthesis. Although chloroplasts contain their own genome, the majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome. These proteins are transported to the chloroplasts after translation in the cytosol. Chloroplasts contain three membrane systems (outer/inner envelope and thylakoid membranes) that subdivide the interior into three soluble compartments known as the intermembrane space, stroma, and thylakoid lumen. Several targeting mechanisms are required to deliver proteins to the correct chloroplast membrane or soluble compartment. These mechanisms have been extensively studied using purified chloroplasts in vitro. Prior to targeting these proteins to the various compartments of the chloroplast, they must be correctly sorted in the cytosol. To date, it is not clear how these proteins are sorted in the cytosol and then targeted to the chloroplasts. Recently, the cytosolic carrier protein AKR2 and its associated cofactor Hsp17.8 for outer envelope membrane proteins of chloroplasts were identified. Additionally, a mechanism for controlling unimported plastid precursors in the cytosol has been discovered. This review will mainly focus on recent findings concerning the possible cytosolic events that occur prior to protein targeting to the chloroplasts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Leukemic involvement is a common feature in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ana; Salaverria, Itziar; Bosch, Francesc; Villamor, Neus; Rozman, María; Beà, Silvia; Giné, Eva; López-Guillermo, Armando; Campo, Elías; Montserrat, Emili

    2007-06-15

    The reported incidence of peripheral blood involvement in patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) ranges from 13% to 77%. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence and the biologic and clinical significance of leukemic involvement in a series of patients with MCL. Leukemic expression was assessed by conventional morphology and flow cytometry (FC) in 48 patients. In addition, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed in 27 patients. At diagnosis, 44 patients (92%) had evidence of leukemic expression by FC, including 8 patients (17%) without morphologically apparent leukemic involvement. Moreover, a lymphocyte count > or =5 x 10(9)/L was observed in 25 cases (52%). The most frequent imbalances detected by CGH were gains of 3q, 7p, 8q, 9q, 12q, and 13q, and losses of 13q, 1p, 9p, 11q, 10p, 17p, 6q, 8p, and 9q. Using a cutoff of 5 x 10(9)/L lymphocytes, cases with lymphocytosis more frequently presented with gains of 3q (P = .02), losses of 10p (P = .05), a low response rate (P = .04), and a short survival (P = .05). Leukemic expression at diagnosis detected by FC was found to be highly frequent in this series of patients with MCL. Although morphologically apparent leukemic expression was not associated with specific chromosomal alterations detected by CGH, a lymphocyte count > or =5 x 10(9)/L was correlated with particular genetic abnormalities and a poor outcome. Copyright 2007 American Cancer Society.

  18. Van der Waals Interactions Involving Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Charles M.; Neal, Brian L.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models. with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth.

  19. Van der Waals interactions involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, C M; Neal, B L; Lenhoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models, with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:8789115

  20. Protein fold classification with genetic algorithms and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Liu, Chunmei; Burge, Legand; Mahmood, Mohammad; Southerland, William; Gloster, Clay

    2009-10-01

    Protein fold classification is a key step to predicting protein tertiary structures. This paper proposes a novel approach based on genetic algorithms and feature selection to classifying protein folds. Our dataset is divided into a training dataset and a test dataset. Each individual for the genetic algorithms represents a selection function of the feature vectors of the training dataset. A support vector machine is applied to each individual to evaluate the fitness value (fold classification rate) of each individual. The aim of the genetic algorithms is to search for the best individual that produces the highest fold classification rate. The best individual is then applied to the feature vectors of the test dataset and a support vector machine is built to classify protein folds based on selected features. Our experimental results on Ding and Dubchak's benchmark dataset of 27-class folds show that our approach achieves an accuracy of 71.28%, which outperforms current state-of-the-art protein fold predictors.

  1. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, C Zuhal; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22%). In our experience, MR imaging may detect

  2. Using genetic algorithms to select most predictive protein features.

    PubMed

    Kernytsky, Andrew; Rost, Burkhard

    2009-04-01

    Many important characteristics of proteins such as biochemical activity and subcellular localization present a challenge to machine-learning methods: it is often difficult to encode the appropriate input features at the residue level for the purpose of making a prediction for the entire protein. The problem is usually that the biophysics of the connection between a machine-learning method's input (sequence feature) and its output (observed phenomenon to be predicted) remains unknown; in other words, we may only know that a certain protein is an enzyme (output) without knowing which region may contain the active site residues (input). The goal then becomes to dissect a protein into a vast set of sequence-derived features and to correlate those features with the desired output. We introduce a framework that begins with a set of global sequence features and then vastly expands the feature space by generically encoding the coexistence of residue-based features. It is this combination of individual features, that is the step from the fractions of serine and buried (input space 20 + 2) to the fraction of buried serine (input space 20 * 2) that implicitly shifts the search space from global feature inputs to features that can capture very local evidence such as a the individual residues of a catalytic triad. The vast feature space created is explored by a genetic algorithm (GA) paired with neural networks and support vector machines. We find that the GA is critical for selecting combinations of features that are neither too general resulting in poor performance, nor too specific, leading to overtraining. The final framework manages to effectively sample a feature space that is far too large for exhaustive enumeration. We demonstrate the power of the concept by applying it to prediction of protein enzymatic activity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Geometrical features of hydrogen bonded complexes involving sterically hindered pyridines.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Daria V; Ip, Brenda; Gurinov, Andrey A; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Shenderovich, Ilja G; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2006-09-21

    The ability of strongly sterically hindered pyridines to form hydrogen bonded complexes was inspected using low-temperature 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy in a liquefied Freon mixture. The proton acceptors were 2,6-di(tert-butyl)-4-methyl- and 2,6-di(tert-butyl)-4-diethylaminopyridine; the proton donors were hydrogen tetrafluoroborate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. The presence of the tert-butyl groups in the ortho positions dramatically perturbed the geometry of the forming hydrogen bonds. As revealed by experiment, the studied crowded pyridines could form hydrogen bonded complexes with proton donors exclusively through their protonation. Even the strongest small proton acceptor, anion F-, could not be received by the protonated base. Instead, the simplest hydrogen bonded complex involved the [FHF]- anion. This complex was characterized by the shortest possible N...F distance of about 2.8 A. Because the ortho tert-butyl groups did not prevent the hydrogen bond interaction between the protonated center and the anion completely, an increase of the pyridine basicity caused a further shortening of the N-H distance and a weakening of the hydrogen bond to the counterion.

  4. Predicting protein subcellular locations with feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yudong; He, Jianfeng; Li, Xinlei; Feng, Kaiyan; Lu, Lin; Feng, Kairui; Kong, Xiangyin; Lu, Wencong

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a strategy to predict the subcellular locations of proteins by combining various feature selection methods. Firstly, proteins are coded by amino-acid composition and physicochemical properties, then these features are arranged by Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance method and further filtered by feature selection procedure. Nearest Neighbor Algorithm is used as a prediction model to predict the protein subcellular locations, and gains a correct prediction rate of 70.63%, evaluated by Jackknife cross-validation. Results of feature selection also enable us to identify the most important protein properties. The prediction software is available for public access on the website http://chemdata.shu.edu.cn/sub22/, which may play a important complementary role to a series of web-server predictors summarized recently in a review by Chou and Shen (Chou, K.C., Shen, H.B. Natural Science, 2009, 2, 63-92, http://www.scirp.org/journal/NS/).

  5. Linking structural features of protein complexes and biological function

    PubMed Central

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Breen, Edmond J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interaction (PPI) establishes the central basis for complex cellular networks in a biological cell. Association of proteins with other proteins occurs at varying affinities, yet with a high degree of specificity. PPIs lead to diverse functionality such as catalysis, regulation, signaling, immunity, and inhibition, playing a crucial role in functional genomics. The molecular principle of such interactions is often elusive in nature. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of known protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is essential for the characterization of structural interface features to determine structure–function relationship. Thus, we analyzed a nonredundant dataset of 278 heterodimer protein complexes, categorized into major functional classes, for distinguishing features. Interestingly, our analysis has identified five key features (interface area, interface polar residue abundance, hydrogen bonds, solvation free energy gain from interface formation, and binding energy) that are discriminatory among the functional classes using Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant correlations between these PPI interface features amongst functional categories are also documented. Salt bridges correlate with interface area in regulator-inhibitors (r = 0.75). These representative features have implications for the prediction of potential function of novel protein complexes. The results provide molecular insights for better understanding of PPIs and their relation to biological functions. PMID:26131659

  6. Sturgeon Osteocalcin Shares Structural Features with Matrix Gla Protein

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Carla S. B.; Simes, Dina C.; Williamson, Matthew K.; Cavaco, Sofia; Laizé, Vincent; Price, Paul A.; Cancela, M. Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are considered evolutionarily related because they share key structural features, although they have been described to exert different functions. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of both OC and MGP from the Adriatic sturgeon, a ray-finned fish characterized by a slow evolution and the retention of many ancestral features. Sturgeon MGP shows a primary structure, post-translation modifications, and patterns of mRNA/protein distribution and accumulation typical of known MGPs, and it contains seven possible Gla residues that would make the sturgeon protein the most γ-carboxylated among known MGPs. In contrast, sturgeon OC was found to present a hybrid structure. Indeed, although exhibiting protein domains typical of known OCs, it also contains structural features usually found in MGPs (e.g. a putative phosphorylated propeptide). Moreover, patterns of OC gene expression and protein accumulation overlap with those reported for MGP; OC was detected in bone cells and mineralized structures but also in soft and cartilaginous tissues. We propose that, in a context of a reduced rate of evolution, sturgeon OC has retained structural features of the ancestral protein that emerged millions of years ago from the duplication of an ancient MGP gene and may exhibit intermediate functional features. PMID:23884418

  7. Proteins involved in meiotic recombination: a role in male infertility?

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Matthew L; Hassold, Terry J; Carrell, Douglas T

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination results in the formation of crossovers, by which genetic information is exchanged between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis. Recombination is a complex process involving many proteins. Alterations in the genes involved in recombination may result in infertility. Molecular studies have improved our understanding of the roles and mechanisms of the proteins and protein complexes involved in recombination, some of which have function in mitotic cells as well as meiotic cells. Human gene sequencing studies have been performed for some of these genes and have provided further information on the phenotypes observed in some infertile individuals. However, further studies are needed to help elucidate the particular role(s) of a given protein and to increase our understanding of these protein systems. This review will focus on our current understanding of proteins involved in meiotic recombination from a genomic perspective, summarizing our current understanding of known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that may affect male fertility by altering meiotic recombination.

  8. Improving enzyme regulatory protein classification by means of SVM-RFE feature selection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Fernández-Blanco, Enrique; Dave, Kirtan; Pedreira, Nieves; Gestal, Marcos; Dorado, Julián; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2014-05-01

    Enzyme regulation proteins are very important due to their involvement in many biological processes that sustain life. The complexity of these proteins, the impossibility of identifying direct quantification molecular properties associated with the regulation of enzymatic activities, and their structural diversity creates the necessity for new theoretical methods that can predict the enzyme regulatory function of new proteins. The current work presents the first classification model that predicts protein enzyme regulators using the Markov mean properties. These protein descriptors encode the topological information of the amino acid into contact networks based on amino acid distances and physicochemical properties. MInD-Prot software calculated these molecular descriptors for 2415 protein chains (350 enzyme regulators) using five atom physicochemical properties (Mulliken electronegativity, Kang-Jhon polarizability, vdW area, atom contribution to P) and the protein 3D regions. The best classification models to predict enzyme regulators have been obtained with machine learning algorithms from Weka using 18 features. K* has been demonstrated to be the most accurate algorithm for this protein function classification. Wrapper Subset Evaluator and SVM-RFE approaches were used to perform a feature subset selection with the best results obtained from SVM-RFE. Classification performance employing all the available features can be reached using only the 8 most relevant features selected by SVM-RFE. Thus, the current work has demonstrated the possibility of predicting new molecular targets involved in enzyme regulation using fast theoretical algorithms.

  9. A Prediction Model for Membrane Proteins Using Moments Based Features

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Ahmad Hassan; Khan, Sher Afzal; Jamil, Hamza; Rasool, Nouman; Khan, Yaser Daanial

    2016-01-01

    The most expedient unit of the human body is its cell. Encapsulated within the cell are many infinitesimal entities and molecules which are protected by a cell membrane. The proteins that are associated with this lipid based bilayer cell membrane are known as membrane proteins and are considered to play a significant role. These membrane proteins exhibit their effect in cellular activities inside and outside of the cell. According to the scientists in pharmaceutical organizations, these membrane proteins perform key task in drug interactions. In this study, a technique is presented that is based on various computationally intelligent methods used for the prediction of membrane protein without the experimental use of mass spectrometry. Statistical moments were used to extract features and furthermore a Multilayer Neural Network was trained using backpropagation for the prediction of membrane proteins. Results show that the proposed technique performs better than existing methodologies. PMID:26966690

  10. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  11. Involvement of PCH family proteins in cytokinesis and actin distribution.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-04-15

    Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) proteins constitute an extensive protein family whose members have been found in diverse eukaryotic organisms. These proteins are characterized by the presence of several conserved sequence and structural motifs. Recent studies in yeast and mammalian cultured cells have implicated these proteins in actin-based processes, in particular, cytokinesis. Here we review the recent findings on the in vivo localization, function, and binding partners of PCH family members. We also provide new microscopy data regarding the in vivo dynamics of a budding yeast PCH protein involved in cytokinesis.

  12. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  13. Molecular Simulation Studies of Proteins Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carloni, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes two recent computational studies related to proteins involved in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The first focuses on the interplay between dopamine and α-synuclein (AS), which plays a central role in PD (unpublished results). The second deals with the protein DJ-1, whose mutations are present in patients suffering from familiar PD [1]. Computational methods are used to investigate the relationship between such mutations and the protein oligomeric state, which may be important for the progression of the disease.

  14. ProFET: Feature engineering captures high-level protein functions.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Dan; Linial, Michal

    2015-11-01

    The amount of sequenced genomes and proteins is growing at an unprecedented pace. Unfortunately, manual curation and functional knowledge lag behind. Homologous inference often fails at labeling proteins with diverse functions and broad classes. Thus, identifying high-level protein functionality remains challenging. We hypothesize that a universal feature engineering approach can yield classification of high-level functions and unified properties when combined with machine learning approaches, without requiring external databases or alignment. In this study, we present a novel bioinformatics toolkit called ProFET (Protein Feature Engineering Toolkit). ProFET extracts hundreds of features covering the elementary biophysical and sequence derived attributes. Most features capture statistically informative patterns. In addition, different representations of sequences and the amino acids alphabet provide a compact, compressed set of features. The results from ProFET were incorporated in data analysis pipelines, implemented in python and adapted for multi-genome scale analysis. ProFET was applied on 17 established and novel protein benchmark datasets involving classification for a variety of binary and multi-class tasks. The results show state of the art performance. The extracted features' show excellent biological interpretability. The success of ProFET applies to a wide range of high-level functions such as subcellular localization, structural classes and proteins with unique functional properties (e.g. neuropeptide precursors, thermophilic and nucleic acid binding). ProFET allows easy, universal discovery of new target proteins, as well as understanding the features underlying different high-level protein functions. ProFET source code and the datasets used are freely available at https://github.com/ddofer/ProFET. michall@cc.huji.ac.il Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  15. Intrinsic disorder in proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Nikolas; Alhothali, Marwa; Alfonso, Maria Harreguy; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-04-01

    Five structurally and functionally different proteins, an enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a TAR-DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43), an RNA-binding protein FUS, a cofilin-binding protein C9orf72, and polypeptides generated as a result of its intronic hexanucleotide expansions, and to lesser degree actin-binding profilin-1 (PFN1), are considered to be the major drivers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the features common to these proteins is the presence of significant levels of intrinsic disorder. The goal of this study is to consider these neurodegeneration-related proteins from the intrinsic disorder perspective. To this end, we employed a broad set of computational tools for intrinsic disorder analysis and conducted intensive literature search to gain information on the structural peculiarities of SOD1, TDP-43, FUS, C9orf72, and PFN1 and their intrinsic disorder predispositions, and the roles of intrinsic disorder in their normal and pathological functions.

  16. Extracting features from protein sequences to improve deep extreme learning machine for protein fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wisam; Abadeh, Mohammad Saniee

    2017-03-27

    Protein fold recognition is an important problem in bioinformatics to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. One of the most challenging tasks in protein fold recognition problem is the extraction of efficient features from the amino-acid sequences to obtain better classifiers. In this paper, we have proposed six descriptors to extract features from protein sequences. These descriptors are applied in the first stage of a three-stage framework PCA-DELM-LDA to extract feature vectors from the amino-acid sequences. Principal Component Analysis PCA has been implemented to reduce the number of extracted features. The extracted feature vectors have been used with original features to improve the performance of the Deep Extreme Learning Machine DELM in the second stage. Four new features have been extracted from the second stage and used in the third stage by Linear Discriminant Analysis LDA to classify the instances into 27 folds. The proposed framework is implemented on the independent and combined feature sets in SCOP datasets. The experimental results show that extracted feature vectors in the first stage could improve the performance of DELM in extracting new useful features in second stage.

  17. Key proteins involved in insulin vesicle exocytosis and secretion

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian-Yin; Yu, Cui; Zhang, Yao; Ling, Liefeng; Wang, Lizhuo; Gao, Jia-Lin

    2017-01-01

    In vivo insulin secretion is predominantly affected by blood glucose concentration, blood concentration of amino acids, gastrointestinal hormones and free nerve functional status, in addition to other factors. Insulin is one of the most important hormones in the body, and its secretion is precisely controlled by nutrients, neurotransmitters and hormones. The insulin exocytosis process is similar to the neurotransmitter release mechanism. There are various types of proteins and lipids that participate in the insulin secretory vesicle fusion process, such as soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein, Ras-related proteins and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Notably, the SNARE protein is the molecular basis of exocytotic activity. In the current review, the role of the vesicle membrane proteins (synaptobrevins, vesicle associated membrane proteins and target membrane proteins) and auxiliary proteins (Rab proteins and Munc-18 proteins) in vesicle fusion activity were summarized. A summary of these key proteins involved in insulin granule secretion will facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:28357064

  18. Weighted feature value based Drug Target Protein prediction.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Bo-ra; Jung, Hwiesung; Jang, Woo-Hyuk; Jung, Suk Hoon; Han, Dong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Drug discovery is a long process in which only a few successful new therapeutic discoveries are made and identification of drug target candidate proteins requires considerable time and efforts. However, the accumulation of information on drugs has made it possible to devise new computational methods for classifying drug target candidates. In this paper, we devise a Drug Target Protein (DT-P) classification method by the summation of weighted features which is extracted from known DT-P. The method is validated using Bayesian decision theory and SVM, and it was revealed to achieve high specificity of 89.5% with 88% accuracy.

  19. SCRATCH: a protein structure and structural feature prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J.; Randall, A. Z.; Sweredoski, M. J.; Baldi, P.

    2005-01-01

    SCRATCH is a server for predicting protein tertiary structure and structural features. The SCRATCH software suite includes predictors for secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, disordered regions, domains, disulfide bridges, single mutation stability, residue contacts versus average, individual residue contacts and tertiary structure. The user simply provides an amino acid sequence and selects the desired predictions, then submits to the server. Results are emailed to the user. The server is available at . PMID:15980571

  20. Borderline personality disorder features and history of childhood maltreatment in mothers involved with child protective services.

    PubMed

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Ansell, Emily; Axelrod, Seth

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the history of childhood maltreatment and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) symptoms in mothers whose children were removed from the home by Child Protective Services (CPS) to identify potential targets for future intervention efforts. Forty-one mothers of children removed from the home due to abuse and/or neglect and 58 community-control mothers without CPS involvement were assessed for history of childhood maltreatment, alcohol and drug use, and BPD features. CPS-involved mothers scored significantly higher on measures of childhood maltreatment history and BPD features than did control mothers. The highest BPD scores were associated with the most severe histories of mothers' childhood maltreatment. In total, 50% of CPS-involved mothers reported elevated BPD features, compared with 15% of control mothers. Further, 19% of CPS-involved mothers had self-reported scores consistent with a BPD diagnosis, compared with 4% of control mothers. BPD features rather than maltreatment history per se predicted maternal involvement with CPS, controlling for alcohol and drug use predictors. The present data suggest that evidence-based treatments to address BPD symptoms may be indicated for some CPS-involved parents.

  1. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  2. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites by means of ensemble learning and weighted feature descriptor.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiuquan; Sun, Shiwei; Hu, Changlin; Li, Xinrui; Xia, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    Reliable prediction of protein-protein interaction sites is an important goal in the field of bioinformatics. Many computational methods have been explored for the large-scale prediction of protein-protein interaction sites based on various data types, including protein sequence, structural and genomic data. Although much progress has been achieved in recent years, the problem has not yet been satisfactorily solved. In this work, we presented an efficient approach that uses ensemble learning algorithm with weighted feature descriptor (EL-WFD) to predict protein-protein interaction sites. Moreover, weighted feature descriptor was designed to describe the distance influence of neighboring residues on interaction sites. The results on two dataset (Hetero and Homo), show that the proposed method yields a satisfactory accuracy with 83.8 % recall and 96.3 % precision on the Hetero dataset and 84.2 % recall and 96.3 % precision on the Homo dataset, respectively. In both datasets, our method tend to obtain high Mathews correlation coefficient compared with state-of-the-art technique random forest method. The experimental results show that the EL-WFD method is quite effective in predicting protein-protein interaction sites. The novel weighted feature descriptor was proved to be promising in discovering interaction sites. Overall, the proposed method can be considered as a new powerful tool for predicting protein-protein interaction sites with excellence performance.

  3. Exploiting genomic data to identify proteins involved in abalone reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Porras, Omar; Botwright, Natasha A; McWilliam, Sean M; Cook, Mathew T; Harris, James O; Wijffels, Gene; Colgrave, Michelle L

    2014-08-28

    Aside from their critical role in reproduction, abalone gonads serve as an indicator of sexual maturity and energy balance, two key considerations for effective abalone culture. Temperate abalone farmers face issues with tank restocking with highly marketable abalone owing to inefficient spawning induction methods. The identification of key proteins in sexually mature abalone will serve as the foundation for a greater understanding of reproductive biology. Addressing this knowledge gap is the first step towards improving abalone aquaculture methods. Proteomic profiling of female and male gonads of greenlip abalone, Haliotis laevigata, was undertaken using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Owing to the incomplete nature of abalone protein databases, in addition to searching against two publicly available databases, a custom database comprising genomic data was used. Overall, 162 and 110 proteins were identified in females and males respectively with 40 proteins common to both sexes. For proteins involved in sexual maturation, sperm and egg structure, motility, acrosomal reaction and fertilization, 23 were identified only in females, 18 only in males and 6 were common. Gene ontology analysis revealed clear differences between the female and male protein profiles reflecting a higher rate of protein synthesis in the ovary and higher metabolic activity in the testis. A comprehensive mass spectrometry-based analysis was performed to profile the abalone gonad proteome providing the foundation for future studies of reproduction in abalone. Key proteins involved in both reproduction and energy balance were identified. Genomic resources were utilised to build a database of molluscan proteins yielding >60% more protein identifications than in a standard workflow employing public protein databases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  5. Proteins involved in vesicular transport and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Waters, M G; Griff, I C; Rothman, J E

    1991-08-01

    In the past year, new information about proteins involved in vesicular transport has been plentiful. Particularly noteworthy are the complementary findings that Sec17p is required for vesicle consumption in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport in yeast and that an analogous activity in mammalian cells, termed SNAP, is required for transport from the cis to the medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus.

  6. Efficient Feature Selection and Classification of Protein Sequence Data in Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Ibrahima; Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Md Said, Abas

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics has been an emerging area of research for the last three decades. The ultimate aims of bioinformatics were to store and manage the biological data, and develop and analyze computational tools to enhance their understanding. The size of data accumulated under various sequencing projects is increasing exponentially, which presents difficulties for the experimental methods. To reduce the gap between newly sequenced protein and proteins with known functions, many computational techniques involving classification and clustering algorithms were proposed in the past. The classification of protein sequences into existing superfamilies is helpful in predicting the structure and function of large amount of newly discovered proteins. The existing classification results are unsatisfactory due to a huge size of features obtained through various feature encoding methods. In this work, a statistical metric-based feature selection technique has been proposed in order to reduce the size of the extracted feature vector. The proposed method of protein classification shows significant improvement in terms of performance measure metrics: accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, recall, F-measure, and so forth. PMID:25045727

  7. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Li-Lien; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-11-20

    Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions.

  8. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic analysis of proteins involved in spermiogenesis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejiang; Shen, Jian; Xia, Zhengrong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Chun; Xing, Jun; Chen, Ling; Chen, Wen; Lin, Min; Huo, Ran; Su, Bing; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2010-03-05

    Spermiogenesis is a unique process in mammals during which haploid round spermatids mature into spermatozoa in the testis. Its successful completion is necessary for fertilization and its malfunction is an important cause of male infertility. Here, we report the high-confidence identification of 2116 proteins in mouse haploid germ cells undergoing spermiogenesis: 299 of these were testis-specific and 155 were novel. Analysis of these proteins showed many proteins possibly functioning in unique processes of spermiogenesis. Of the 84 proteins annotated to be involved in vesicle-related events, VAMP4 was shown to be important for acrosome biogenesis by in vivo knockdown experiments. Knockdown of VAMP4 caused defects of acrosomal vesicle fusion and significantly increased head abnormalities in spermatids from testis and sperm from the cauda epididymis. Analysis of chromosomal distribution of the haploid genes showed underrepresentation on the X chromosome and overrepresentation on chromosome 11, which were due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and expansion of testis-expressed gene families, respectively. Comparison with transcriptional data showed translational regulation during spermiogenesis. This characterization of proteins involved in spermiogenesis provides an inventory of proteins useful for understanding the mechanisms of male infertility and may provide candidates for drug targets for male contraception and male infertility.

  10. Clinicopathological Features Analysis of 86 Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma Patients with Adnexal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jing; Cheng, Min; Song, Yan; Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Bin; Wu, Lingying

    2017-06-20

    To investigate the clinicopathological features of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma(EEA)with adnexal involvement.Methods The clinicopathological data of 86 EEA patients who underwent surgical treatment at our center from January 2000 to December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively.The clinicopathological features were compared between patients with occult adnexal involvement and those with gross adnexal involvement.Results A total of 86 EEA patients with adnexal involvement(mean age:58.1 years)were included in this study,accounting for 5.4%(86/1592)of the EEA patients during the same period.Among these 86 patients,there were 13 premenopausal patients(15.1%)including 2 premenopausal patients aged under 40 years.Gross adnexal involvement was found in 47 patients(54.7%),while occult adnexal involvement was found in 39 patients(45.3%)in pathology evaluation.Ovarian metastasis was found in 34 patients(39.5%),followed by both ovarian and tubal metastasis in 19 patients(22.1%)and tubal metastasis in 33 patients(38.4%).The expressionss of estrogen receptor(χ(2)=8.086,P=0.042)and progesterone receptor(PR)(χ(2)=9.149,P=0.026)were significantly different between gross adnexal involvement group and occult adnexal involvement group,whereas no significant difference was found in other clinicopathological features(all P>0.05).The non-conditional Logistic regression analysis showed that,compared with PR no-expression group,the rate of occult microscopic adnexal involvement in PR low-expression group was 6.375 times of that of the gross adnexal involvement(P=0.005,95%CI:1.768-22.976),and the rate of occult microscopic adnexal involvement in the PR high-expression group was 3.719 times of that of gross adnexal involvement(P=0.048,95%CI:1.009-13.702). Conclusion PR expression level is remarkably lower in EEA patients with gross adnexal involvement than those with occult adenxal involvement.

  11. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events.

  12. NEDD8 protein is involved in ubiquitinated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Dil Kuazi, Afroz; Kito, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhito; Shin, Ryong-Woon; Kamitani, Tetsu; Ueda, Norifumi

    2003-02-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is considered to play a pathological role in several degenerative diseases that involve ubiquitinated inclusion bodies. In recent years, several ubiquitin-like proteins have been isolated, but it is uncertain whether their roles are associated with protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. NEDD8 (neural precursor cell-expressed and developmentally down-regulated gene), which consists of 81 amino acid residues, possesses the highest sequence similarity to ubiquitin. Recent studies have indicated that NEDD8 is covalently ligated to cullin family proteins, which are components of certain ubiquitin E3 ligases, by a pathway analogous to that of ubiquitin. Thus, by focusing on the structural and functional association between NEDD8 and ubiquitin, it would be of interest to know whether the NEDD8 system is involved in pathological disorders of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This study has examined the immunohistochemical distribution of NEDD8 protein by using a highly purified antibody in normal tissues and in tissues known to contain ubiquitinated inclusions. NEDD8 protein expression was widely observed in most types of tissues. Furthermore, accumulation of the NEDD8 protein was commonly observed in ubiquitinated inclusion bodies, including Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease, Mallory bodies in alcoholic liver disease, and Rosenthal fibres in astrocytoma. Two of ten cases of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease showed intense staining for NEDD8 as well as for ubiquitin. These findings suggest the possibility that the NEDD8 system is involved in the metabolism of these inclusion bodies via the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  13. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  14. First identification of proteins involved in motility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Indikova, Ivana; Vronka, Martin; Szostak, Michael P

    2014-10-17

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, the most pathogenic mycoplasma in poultry, is able to glide over solid surfaces. Although this gliding motility was first observed in 1968, no specific protein has yet been shown to be involved in gliding. We examined M. gallisepticum strains and clonal variants for motility and found that the cytadherence proteins GapA and CrmA were required for gliding. Loss of GapA or CrmA resulted in the loss of motility and hemadsorption and led to drastic changes in the characteristic flask-shape of the cells. To identify further genes involved in motility, a transposon mutant library of M. gallisepticum was generated and screened for motility-deficient mutants, using a screening assay based on colony morphology. Motility-deficient mutants had transposon insertions in gapA and the neighbouring downstream gene crmA. In addition, insertions were seen in gene mgc2, immediately upstream of gapA, in two motility-deficient mutants. In contrast to the GapA/CrmA mutants, the mgc2 motility mutants still possessed the ability to hemadsorb. Complementation of these mutants with a mgc2-hexahistidine fusion gene restored the motile phenotype. This is the first report assigning specific M. gallisepticum proteins to involvement in gliding motility.

  15. Proteomic detection of proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Reema; Deobald, Lee A; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and a time-course cell lysis method were used to study proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism in pure bacterial cultures and environmental samples. The bacterial cultures used included Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, Dechloromonas hortensis, Pseudomonas chloritidismutans ASK-1, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The environmental samples included an anaerobic sludge enrichment culture from a sewage treatment plant, a sample of a biomass-covered activated carbon matrix from a bioreactor used for treating perchlorate-contaminated drinking water, and a waste water effluent sample from a paper mill. The approach focused on detection of perchlorate (and chlorate) reductase and chlorite dismutase proteins, which are the two central enzymes in the perchlorate (or chlorate) reduction pathways. In addition, acetate-metabolizing enzymes in pure bacterial samples and housekeeping proteins from perchlorate (or chlorate)-reducing microorganisms in environmental samples were also identified.

  16. Predicted structures of two proteins involved in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H X; Wang, G

    2001-01-01

    Structures of 79 proteins involved in human diseases were predicted by sequence alignments with structural templates. The predicted structures for ALDP and CSA, proteins responsible for adrenoleukodystrophy and the Cockayne syndrome, respectively, were analyzed to elucidate the molecular basis of disease mutations. In particular we positioned residue P484 of ALDP in the homodimer interface. This positioning is consistent with a recent experimental finding that the mutation P484R significantly decreases the self-interaction of ALDP and suggests that the disease mechanism of this mutation lies in the impaired ALDP dimerization. We identified two new WD repeats in CSA and suggest that one of these forms part of the interaction surface with other proteins.

  17. Clinical features and early treatment response of central nervous system involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Frandsen, Thomas L; Harila-Saari, Arja; Heyman, Mats; Jonsson, Olafur G; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Lausen, Birgitte; Vaitkevičienė, Goda; Asberg, Ann; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2014-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a therapeutic challenge. To explore leukemia characteristics of patients with CNS involvement at ALL diagnosis, we analyzed clinical features and early treatment response of 744 patients on Nordic-Baltic trials. CNS status was classified as CNS1 (no CSF blasts), CNS2 (<5 leukocytes/µl CSF with blasts), CNS3 (≥5 leukocytes/µl with blasts or signs of CNS involvement), TLP+ (traumatic lumbar puncture with blasts), and TLP- (TLP with no blasts). Patients with CNS involvement had higher leukocyte count compared with patients with CNS1 (P < 0.002). Patients with CNS3 more often had T-ALL (P < 0.001) and t(9;22)(q34;q11)[BCR-ABL1] (P < 0.004) compared with patients with CNS1. Among patients with CNS involvement headache (17%) and vomiting (14%) were most common symptoms. Symptoms or clinical findings were present among 27 of 54 patients with CNS3 versus only 7 of 39 patients with CNS2 and 15 of 75 patients with TLP+ (P < 0.001). The majority of patients with CNS involvement received additional induction therapy. The post induction bone marrow residual disease level did not differ between patients with CNS involvement and patients with CNS1 (P > 0.15). The 12-year event-free survival for patients with leukemic mass on neuroimaging did not differ from patients with negative or no scan (0.50 vs. 0.60; P = 0.7) or between patients with symptoms or signs suggestive of CNS leukemia and patients without such characteristics (0.50 vs. 0.61; P = 0.2). CNS involvement at diagnosis is associated with adverse prognostic features but does not indicate a less chemosensitive leukemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bap, a Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Solano, Cristina; Valle, Jaione; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2001-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation is needed to understand the molecular basis of strain variation and the pathogenic mechanisms implicated in chronic staphylococcal infections. A biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus isolate was used to generate biofilm-negative transposon (Tn917) insertion mutants. Two mutants were found with a significant decrease in attachment to inert surfaces (early adherence), intercellular adhesion, and biofilm formation. The transposon was inserted at the same locus in both mutants. This locus (bap [for biofilm associated protein]) encodes a novel cell wall associated protein of 2,276 amino acids (Bap), which shows global organizational similarities to surface proteins of gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) and gram-positive (Enteroccocus faecalis) microorganisms. Bap's core region represents 52% of the protein and consists of 13 successive nearly identical repeats, each containing 86 amino acids. bap was present in a small fraction of bovine mastitis isolates (5% of the 350 S. aureus isolates tested), but it was absent from the 75 clinical human S. aureus isolates analyzed. All staphylococcal isolates harboring bap were highly adherent and strong biofilm producers. In a mouse infection model bap was involved in pathogenesis, causing a persistent infection. PMID:11292810

  19. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  20. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  1. Hepatic involvement in HELLP syndrome: an update with emphasis on imaging features.

    PubMed

    Perronne, Laetitia; Dohan, Anthony; Bazeries, Paul; Guerrache, Youcef; Fohlen, Audrey; Rousset, Pascal; Aubé, Christophe; Laurent, Valérie; Morel, Olivier; Boudiaf, Mourad; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    HELLP syndrome, which consists of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count is an unusual complication of pregnancy that is observed in only 10% to 15% of women with preeclampsia. Hepatic involvement in HELLP syndrome may present with various imaging features depending on the specific condition that includes nonspecific abnormalities such as perihepatic free fluid, hepatic steatosis, liver enlargement, and periportal halo that may precede more severe conditions such as hepatic hematoma and hepatic rupture with hemoperitoneum. Maternal clinical symptoms may be nonspecific and easily mistaken for a variety of other conditions that should be recognized. Because hepatic hematoma occurring in association with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication, prompt depiction is critical and may help reduce morbidity and mortality. This review provides an update on demographics, risk factors, pathophysiology, and clinical features of hepatic complications due to HELLP syndrome along with a special emphasis on the imaging features of these uncommon conditions.

  2. Analysis of proteins involved in biodegradation of crop biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kamau; Trotman, Audrey

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of crop biomass for re-use in crop production is part of the bioregenerative life support concept proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long duration, manned space exploration. The current research was conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the use of electrophoretic analysis as a means of rapidly assaying for constitutive and induced proteins associated with the bacterial degradation of crop residue. The proteins involved in crop biomass biodegradation are either constitutive or induced. As a result, effluent and cultures were examined to investigate the potential of using electrophoretic techniques as a means of monitoring the biodegradation process. Protein concentration for optimum banding patterns was determined using the Bio-Rad Protein Assay kit. Four bacterial soil isolates were obtained from the G.W. Carver research Farm at Tuskegee University and used in the decomposition of components of plant biomass. The culture, WDSt3A was inoculated into 500 mL of either Tryptic Soy Broth or Nutrient Broth. Incubation, with shaking of each flask was for 96 hours at 30 C. The cultures consistently gave unique banding patterns under denaturing protein electrophoresis conditions, The associated extracellular enzymes also yielded characteristic banding patterns over a 14-day period, when native electrophoresis techniques were used to examine effluent from batch culture bioreactors. The current study evaluated sample preparation and staining protocols to determine the ease of use, reproducibility and reliability, as well as the potential for automation.

  3. Analysis of proteins involved in biodegradation of crop biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kamau; Trotman, Audrey

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of crop biomass for re-use in crop production is part of the bioregenerative life support concept proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long duration, manned space exploration. The current research was conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the use of electrophoretic analysis as a means of rapidly assaying for constitutive and induced proteins associated with the bacterial degradation of crop residue. The proteins involved in crop biomass biodegradation are either constitutive or induced. As a result, effluent and cultures were examined to investigate the potential of using electrophoretic techniques as a means of monitoring the biodegradation process. Protein concentration for optimum banding patterns was determined using the Bio-Rad Protein Assay kit. Four bacterial soil isolates were obtained from the G.W. Carver research Farm at Tuskegee University and used in the decomposition of components of plant biomass. The culture, WDSt3A was inoculated into 500 mL of either Tryptic Soy Broth or Nutrient Broth. Incubation, with shaking of each flask was for 96 hours at 30 C. The cultures consistently gave unique banding patterns under denaturing protein electrophoresis conditions, The associated extracellular enzymes also yielded characteristic banding patterns over a 14-day period, when native electrophoresis techniques were used to examine effluent from batch culture bioreactors. The current study evaluated sample preparation and staining protocols to determine the ease of use, reproducibility and reliability, as well as the potential for automation.

  4. Important amino acid residues involved in folding and binding of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulandaisamy, A; Lathi, V; ViswaPoorani, K; Yugandhar, K; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions perform diverse functions in living organism. The integrative analysis of binding and stabilizing residues will provide insights on the functions of protein-protein complexes. In this work, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 261 protein-protein complexes and identified binding site residues, stabilizing residues and common to both binding and stabilizing, termed as "key residues". We found that 6.1% of residues are involved in binding and 6.8% of residues are important for folding and stability. Among them, only 2% are involved in both folding and binding, which shows the importance and specific roles played by these residues. The key residues have been analyzed based on protein function, binding affinity, rigid and flexible complexes, amino acid preference and structure based parameters. We found that high affinity complexes have more key residues than low affinity complexes. In addition, key residues are enriched with the combination of specific hydrophobic and charged/polar residues. Atomic contacts between interacting proteins have distinct preferences of polar-polar, nonpolar-nonpolar and polar-nonpolar contacts in different functional classes of protein-protein complexes. Further, the influence of sequence and structural parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, solvent accessibility, secondary structure, long-range order and conservation score has been discussed. The analysis can be used to comprehend the interplay between stability and binding in protein-protein complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of microRNAs involved in immune system diseases through network based features.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that modulate the expression of several genes at post-transcriptional level and play a vital role in disease pathogenesis. Recent research shows that a range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and its deregulation results in immune mediated diseases such as cancer, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Computational discovery of these immune miRNAs using a set of specific features is highly desirable. In the current investigation, we present a SVM based classification system which uses a set of novel network based topological and motif features in addition to the baseline sequential and structural features to predict immune specific miRNAs from other non-immune miRNAs. The classifier was trained and tested on a balanced set of equal number of positive and negative examples to show the discriminative power of our network features. Experimental results show that our approach achieves an accuracy of 90.2% and outperforms the classification accuracy of 63.2% reported using the traditional miRNA sequential and structural features. The proposed classifier was further validated with two immune disease sub-class datasets related to multiple sclerosis microarray data and psoriasis RNA-seq data with higher accuracy. These results indicate that our classifier which uses network and motif features along with sequential and structural features will lead to significant improvement in classifying immune miRNAs and hence can be applied to identify other specific classes of miRNAs as an extensible miRNA classification system.

  6. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  7. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karina Baptista

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction. PMID:28085928

  8. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-06-07

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier.

  9. Identification of an additional protein involved in mannan biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Davis, Jonathan; Dupree, Paul; Keegstra, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Galactomannans comprise a β-1,4-mannan backbone substituted with α-1,6-galactosyl residues. Genes encoding the enzymes that are primarily responsible for backbone synthesis and side-chain addition of galactomannans were previously identified and characterized. To identify additional genes involved in galactomannan biosynthesis, we previously performed deep EST profiling of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seed endosperm, which accumulates large quantities of galactomannans as a reserve carbohydrate during seed development. One of the candidate genes encodes a protein that is likely to be a glycosyltransferase. Because this protein is involved in mannan biosynthesis, we named it ‘mannan synthesis-related’ (MSR). Here, we report the characterization of a fenugreek MSR gene (TfMSR) and its two Arabidopsis homologs, AtMSR1 and AtMSR2. TfMSR was highly and specifically expressed in the endosperm. TfMSR, AtMSR1 and AtMSR2 proteins were all determined to be localized to the Golgi by fluorescence confocal microscopy. The level of mannosyl residues in stem glucomannans decreased by approximately 40% for Arabidopsis msr1 single T-DNA insertion mutants and by more than 50% for msr1 msr2 double mutants, but remained unchanged for msr2 single mutants. In addition, in vitro mannan synthase activity from the stems of msr1 single and msr1 msr2 double mutants also decreased. Expression of AtMSR1 or AtMSR2 in the msr1 msr2 double mutant completely or partially restored mannosyl levels. From these results, we conclude that the MSR protein is important for mannan biosynthesis, and offer some ideas about its role. PMID:22966747

  10. Genes and proteins involved in bacterial magnetic particle formation.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Okamura, Yoshiko

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize intracellular magnetosomes that impart a cellular swimming behaviour referred to as magnetotaxis. The magnetic structures aligned in chains are postulated to function as biological compass needles allowing the bacterium to migrate along redox gradients through the Earth's geomagnetic field lines. Despite the discovery of this unique group of microorganisms 28 years ago, the mechanisms of magnetic crystal biomineralization have yet to be fully elucidated. This review describes the current knowledge of the genes and proteins involved in magnetite formation in magnetic bacteria and the biotechnological applications of biomagnetites in the interdisciplinary fields of nanobiotechnology, medicine and environmental management.

  11. HPV involvement in OSCC: Correlation of PCR results with light microscopic features

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Rajbir Kaur; Sengupta, Shamindra; Sircar, Keya; Sharma, Bhudev; Singh, Sanjeet; Rastogi, Varun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study evaluated pathognomic histopathological features with the help of light microscopy for detecting the integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) (type 16 and 18) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Forty-five histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC were evaluated for the presence of E6/E7 protein of HPV (16 + 18) with the help of nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Both HPV-positive and -negative cases were evaluated for four histological features: Koilocytes, dyskeratosis, invasion, and alteration of collagen. Results: Fischer's exact test showed significant difference (P < 0.01%) for the presence of koilocytes and dyskeratosis, whereas no difference was observed for invasion and alteration in collagen between HPV-positive and -negative OSCC. Conclusion: The presence of koilocytes and dyskeratosis at light microscopic level can be used as a marker for the presence of HPV (type 16 and 18) in OSCC. PMID:24250078

  12. Hairy cell leukemia: Uncommon clinical features, unusual sites of involvement and some rare associations.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Unusual clinical manifestations and associations with auto-immunity or other systemic disorders are uncommon clinical features of hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The exact prevalence of these rare associations is difficult to determine as they are mostly published as anecdotal case reports and generally not included in larger published series. This chapter deals with uncommon clinical manifestations and rare sites of involvement in HCL. It also summarizes the association with systemic hemato-oncological disorders as well as second malignancies, based on review of the relevant literature and from personal experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PredictProtein--an open resource for online prediction of protein structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Yachdav, Guy; Kloppmann, Edda; Kajan, Laszlo; Hecht, Maximilian; Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Peter; Schafferhans, Andrea; Roos, Manfred; Bernhofer, Michael; Richter, Lothar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Bromberg, Yana; Schneider, Reinhard; Vriend, Gerrit; Sander, Chris; Ben-Tal, Nir; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-07-01

    PredictProtein is a meta-service for sequence analysis that has been predicting structural and functional features of proteins since 1992. Queried with a protein sequence it returns: multiple sequence alignments, predicted aspects of structure (secondary structure, solvent accessibility, transmembrane helices (TMSEG) and strands, coiled-coil regions, disulfide bonds and disordered regions) and function. The service incorporates analysis methods for the identification of functional regions (ConSurf), homology-based inference of Gene Ontology terms (metastudent), comprehensive subcellular localization prediction (LocTree3), protein-protein binding sites (ISIS2), protein-polynucleotide binding sites (SomeNA) and predictions of the effect of point mutations (non-synonymous SNPs) on protein function (SNAP2). Our goal has always been to develop a system optimized to meet the demands of experimentalists not highly experienced in bioinformatics. To this end, the PredictProtein results are presented as both text and a series of intuitive, interactive and visually appealing figures. The web server and sources are available at http://ppopen.rostlab.org. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Identification of target proteins involved in cochlear otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Céline; Doherty, Joni K; Fayad, Jose N; Cordero, Ana; Linthicum, Fred H

    2015-06-01

    Investigation of differential protein expression will provide clues to pathophysiology in otosclerosis. Otosclerosis is a bone remodeling disorder limited to the endochondral layer of the otic capsule within the temporal bone. Some authors have suggested an inflammatory etiology for otosclerosis resulting from persistent measles virus infection involving the otic capsule. Despite numerous genetic studies, implication of candidate genes in the otosclerotic process remains elusive. We employed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis on formalin-fixed celloidin-embedded temporal bone tissues for postmortem investigation of otosclerosis. Proteomic analysis was performed using human temporal bones from a patient with severe otosclerosis and a control temporal bone. Sections were dissected under microscopy to remove otosclerotic lesions and normal otic capsule for proteomic analysis. Tandem 2D chromatography mass spectrometry was employed. Data analysis and peptide matching to FASTA human databases was done using SEQUEST and proteome discoverer software. TGFβ1 was identified in otosclerosis but not in the normal control temporal bone specimen. Aside from TGFβ1, many proteins and predicted cDNA-encoded proteins were observed, with implications in cell death and/or proliferation pathways, suggesting a possible role in otosclerotic bone remodeling. Immunostaining using TGFβ1 monoclonal revealed marked staining of the spongiotic otosclerotic lesions. Mechanisms involved in cochlear extension of otosclerosis are still unclear, but the implication of TGFβ1 is supported by the present proteomic data and immunostaining results. The established role of TGFβ1 in the chondrogenesis process supports the theory of a reaction targeting the globulae interossei within the otic capsule.

  15. Life under tension: Computational studies of proteins involved in mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos Manuel

    cadherins. Simulations also revealed how calcium ions control cadherin's shape and the availability of key residues involved in cell-cell adhesion, suggesting a conceptual framework for interpreting mutations in cadherin calcium binding motifs causing hereditary deafness. Overall, simulations provided a unique nanoscopic view of the dynamics and function of some of the proteins involved in mechanotransduction.

  16. Possible involvement of poly(A) in protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, A; Favreau, M

    1983-01-01

    The experiments of this paper have re-evaluated the possibility that poly(A) is involved in protein synthesis by testing whether purified poly(A) might competitively inhibit in vitro protein synthesis in rabbit reticulocyte extracts. We have found that poly(A) inhibits the rate of translation of many different poly(A)+ mRNAs and that comparable inhibition is not observed with other ribopolymers. Inhibition by poly(A) preferentially affects the translation of adenylated mRNAs and can be overcome by increased mRNA concentrations or by translating mRNPs instead of mRNA. The extent of inhibition is dependent on the size of the competitor poly(A) as well as on the translation activity which a lysate has for poly(A)+ RNA. In light of our results and numerous experiments in the literature, we propose that poly(A) has a function in protein synthesis and that any role in the determination of mRNA stability is indirect. Images PMID:6137807

  17. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laddomada, Federica; Miyachiro, Mayara M; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-04-28

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the "divisome") and/or cell wall elongation (the "elongasome"), in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies.

  18. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laddomada, Federica; Miyachiro, Mayara M.; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome”) and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”), in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies. PMID:27136593

  19. Enteral delivery of proteins enhances the expression of proteins involved in the cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis in human duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Goichon, Alexis; Bertrand, Julien; Chan, Philippe; Lecleire, Stéphane; Coquard, Aude; Cailleux, Anne-Françoise; Vaudry, David; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2015-08-01

    Amino acids are well known to be key effectors of gut protein turnover. We recently reported that enteral delivery of proteins markedly stimulated global duodenal protein synthesis in carbohydrate-fed healthy humans, but specifically affected proteins remain unknown. We aimed to assess the influence of an enteral protein supply on the duodenal mucosal proteome in carbohydrate-fed humans. Six healthy volunteers received for 5 h, on 2 occasions and in random order, either an enteral infusion of maltodextrins alone (0.25 g · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) mimicking the fed state or maltodextrins with a protein powder (0.14 g proteins · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹). Endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were then collected and frozen until analysis. A 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics analysis was then performed, and differentially expressed proteins (at least ±1.5-fold change; Student's t test, P < 0.05) were identified by mass spectrometry. Protein expression changes were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Thirty-two protein spots were differentially expressed after protein delivery compared with maltodextrins alone: 28 and 4 spots were up- or downregulated, respectively. Among the 22 identified proteins, 11 upregulated proteins were involved either in the cytoskeleton (ezrin, moesin, plastin 1, lamin B1, vimentin, and β-actin) or in protein biosynthesis (glutamyl-prolyl-transfer RNA synthetase, glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase, elongation factor 2, elongation factor 1δ, and eukaryotic translation and initiation factor 3 subunit f). Enteral delivery of proteins altered the duodenal mucosal proteome and mainly stimulated the expression of proteins involved in cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis. These results suggest that protein supply may affect intestinal morphology by stimulating actin cytoskeleton remodeling. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Transient protein-protein interface prediction: datasets, features, algorithms, and the RAD-T predictor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which underly most biological processes, are a prime target for therapeutic development. Immense progress has been made towards computational prediction of PPIs using methods such as protein docking and sequence analysis. However, docking generally requires high resolution structures of both of the binding partners and sequence analysis requires that a significant number of recurrent patterns exist for the identification of a potential binding site. Researchers have turned to machine learning to overcome some of the other methods’ restrictions by generalising interface sites with sets of descriptive features. Best practices for dataset generation, features, and learning algorithms have not yet been identified or agreed upon, and an analysis of the overall efficacy of machine learning based PPI predictors is due, in order to highlight potential areas for improvement. Results The presence of unknown interaction sites as a result of limited knowledge about protein interactions in the testing set dramatically reduces prediction accuracy. Greater accuracy in labelling the data by enforcing higher interface site rates per domain resulted in an average 44% improvement across multiple machine learning algorithms. A set of 10 biologically unrelated proteins that were consistently predicted on with high accuracy emerged through our analysis. We identify seven features with the most predictive power over multiple datasets and machine learning algorithms. Through our analysis, we created a new predictor, RAD-T, that outperforms existing non-structurally specializing machine learning protein interface predictors, with an average 59% increase in MCC score on a dataset with a high number of interactions. Conclusion Current methods of evaluating machine-learning based PPI predictors tend to undervalue their performance, which may be artificially decreased by the presence of un-identified interaction sites. Changes to

  1. Magnifying Endoscopic Features of Follicular Lymphoma Involving the Stomach: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Katsuyoshi; Kawano, Seiji; Fujii, Nobuharu; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Yoshino, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with follicular lymphoma involving the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, bone, and lymph nodes. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple depressed lesions in the stomach. Examination with magnifying endoscopy showed branched abnormal vessels along with gastric pits, which were irregularly shaped but were preserved. The second case was a 45-year-old man diagnosed with stage II1 follicular lymphoma with duodenal, ileal, and colorectal involvement, as well as lymphadenopathy of the mesenteric lymph nodes. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed six years after the diagnosis revealed multiple erosions in the gastric body and angle. Magnifying endoscopic observation with narrow-band imaging showed that the gastric pits were only partially preserved and were destroyed in most of the stomach. Branched abnormal vessels were also seen. Pathological features were consistent with follicular lymphoma in both cases. The structural differences reported between the two cases appear to reflect distinct pathologies. Disappearance of gastric pits in the latter case seems to result from loss of epithelial cells, probably due to chronic inflammation. In both cases, branched abnormal vasculature was observed. These two cases suggest that magnified observations of abnormal branched microvasculature may facilitate endoscopic detection and recognition of the extent of gastric involvement in patients with follicular lymphoma. PMID:27747111

  2. Lupine protein hydrolysates inhibit enzymes involved in the inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Millán-Linares, María del Carmen; Yust, María del Mar; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2014-05-15

    Lupine protein hydrolysates (LPHs) were obtained from a lupine protein isolate (LPI) by enzymatic hydrolysis using two proteases, Izyme AL and Alcalase 2.4 L, and their potential anti-inflammatory capacities were studied by determining their in vitro inhibition of the following enzymes that are involved in the inflammatory process: phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), thrombin, and transglutaminase (TG). The strongest inhibitory activities toward PLA2 and TG were found in the hydrolysates obtained by hydrolysis with Izyme and subsequently with Alcalase, with more than 70% inhibition obtained in some cases. All of the hydrolysates tested inhibited more than 60% of the COX-2 activity. In no case did the percentage of thrombin activity inhibition exceed 40%. The best inhibitory activities were found in the LPH obtained after 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase and in the LPH obtained after 60 min of hydrolysis with Izyme followed by 15 min of hydrolysis with Alcalase. Enzyme kinetic analyses were conducted to determine the Km and Vmax parameters of these two hydrolysates using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Both hydrolysates competitively inhibited the thrombin and PLA2 activities. In the case of COX-2 and TG, the inhibition appeared to be the mixed type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Arabinogalactan proteins are involved in root hair development in barley

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek; Szarejko, Iwona; Melzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are involved in a range of plant processes, including cell differentiation and expansion. Here, barley root hair mutants and their wild-type parent cultivars were used, as a model system, to reveal the role of AGPs in root hair development. The treatment of roots with different concentrations of βGlcY (a reagent which binds to all classes of AGPs) inhibited or totally suppressed the development of root hairs in all of the cultivars. Three groups of AGP (recognized by the monoclonal antibodies LM2, LM14, and MAC207) were diversely localized in trichoblasts and atrichoblasts of root hair-producing plants. The relevant epitopes were present in wild-type trichoblast cell walls and cytoplasm, whereas in wild-type atrichoblasts and in all epidermal cells of a root hairless mutant, they were only present in the cytoplasm. In all of cultivars the higher expression of LM2, LM14, and MAC207 was observed in trichoblasts at an early stage of development. Additionally, the LM2 epitope was detected on the surface of primordia and root hair tubes in plants able to generate root hairs. The major conclusion was that the AGPs recognized by LM2, LM14, and MAC207 are involved in the differentiation of barley root epidermal cells, thereby implying a requirement for these AGPs for root hair development in barley. PMID:25465033

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia fusion proteins deregulate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Meani, Natalia; Gelmetti, Vania; Fantozzi, Anna; Fagioli, Marta; Orleth, Annette; Riganelli, Daniela; Sebastiani, Carla; Cappelli, Enrico; Casciari, Cristina; Sciurpi, Maria Teresa; Mariano, Angela Rosa; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Luzi, Lucilla; Muller, Heiko; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Frosina, Guido; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) are genetically heterogeneous and characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that produce fusion proteins with aberrant transcriptional regulatory activities. Expression of AML fusion proteins in transgenic mice increases the risk of myeloid leukemias, suggesting that they induce a preleukemic state. The underlying molecular and biological mechanisms are, however, unknown. To address this issue, we performed a systematic analysis of fusion protein transcriptional targets. We expressed AML1/ETO, PML/RAR, and PLZF/RAR in U937 hemopoietic precursor cells and measured global gene expression using oligonucleotide chips. We identified 1,555 genes regulated concordantly by at least two fusion proteins that were further validated in patient samples and finally classified according to available functional information. Strikingly, we found that AML fusion proteins induce genes involved in the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and repress DNA repair genes, mainly of the base excision repair pathway. Functional studies confirmed that ectopic expression of fusion proteins constitutively activates pathways leading to increased stem cell renewal (e.g., the Jagged1/Notch pathway) and provokes accumulation of DNA damage. We propose that expansion of the stem cell compartment and induction of a mutator phenotype are relevant features underlying the leukemic potential of AML-associated fusion proteins. PMID:14660751

  5. Endoscopic features and prognoses of mantle cell lymphoma with gastrointestinal involvement

    PubMed Central

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Shinagawa, Katsuji; Morito, Toshiaki; Yoshino, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the endoscopic manifestations and prognoses of gastrointestinal (GI) mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). METHODS: A database search at the Department of Pathology of Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences revealed 57 MCL patients with GI involvement. Clinical records were available for 35 of the 57 patients from 21 institutions, and those 35 patients were enrolled in this study. We summarized the gross types of endoscopic features, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS) of those patients. RESULTS: Of the 35 patients, GI involvement in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum was found in 2 (5.7%), 26 (74.3%), and 12 (34.3%) patients, respectively. Twenty-one of the 35 patients underwent colonoscopy; among them, GI involvement in the ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum was found in 10 (47.6%), 3 (14.3%), 12 (57.1%), and 10 (47.6%), respectively. Various lesions, such as superficial, protruded, fold thickening, or ulcerative, were found in the stomach, whereas multiple lymphomatous polyposis (MLP) was dominant from the duodenum to the rectum. Twelve patients were treated with a hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, and they had better OS (3-year rate, 88.3% vs 46.4%, P < 0.01) and better EFS (3-year rate, 66.7% vs 33.8%, P < 0.05) than the remaining 23 patients who were not treated with this regimen. CONCLUSION: MLP was a representative form of intestinal involvement, whereas a variety of lesions were found in the stomach. The hyper-CVAD/MA regimen may improve survival in these patients. PMID:20872966

  6. Morphological and immunophenotypical features of hairy cell leukaemia involving lymph nodes and extranodal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Jacqueline M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Morgan, Elizabeth A

    2017-07-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a rare B cell neoplasm that mainly affects bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and spleen. Involvement of lymph nodes and extranodal structures is considered infrequent. Herein we describe our institutional experience of nodal (n = 10) and extranodal (n = 3) HCL during a 30-year period. Ten patients had prior evidence of HCL within the BM or PB at a median 35.8 months before nodal/extranodal diagnosis (range: <1-175 months), and HCL was diagnosed concurrently within the bone marrow of one additional patient. Nodal involvement showed distinct architectural patterns, including diffuse (62% of cases), sinusoidal (25%) and nodular (13%). Extranodal involvement was characterized as diffuse infiltration through underlying structures in all cases. Morphological features ranged from classic 'fried-egg' cytology to a plasmacytoid appearance. Nodal/extranodal disease showed an overlapping immunophenotypical profile with other small B cell lymphomas, including expression of cyclin D1 (70%), CD43 (55%), CD10 (38%) and CD5 (8%). Rates of both CD43 and CD10 reactivity were higher than described previously in leukaemic HCL, suggesting that expression may be enriched in cases with extramedullary extension. Although uncommon, HCL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of small B cell neoplasms involving nodal/extranodal sites, given the therapeutic implications. In particular, recent discoveries including detection of the BRAF(V)(600E) mutation in nearly all cases of HCL and the availability of an antibody to CD103 for use in paraffin-embedded tissues will facilitate the distinction of HCL from other small B cell lymphomas in the nodal/extranodal setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Clinical features and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: involvement of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Michelangelo; Orsucci, Daniele; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Calsolaro, Valeria; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder which results in the irreversible loss of cortical neurons, particularly in the associative neocortex and hippocampus. AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly people. Apart from the neuronal loss, the pathological hallmarks are extracellular senile plaques containing the peptide beta-amyloid (AP) and neurofibrillary tangles. The Af cascade hypothesis remains the main pathogenetic model, as suggested by familiar AD, mainly associated to mutation in amyloid precursor protein and presenilin genes. The remaining 95% of AD patients are mostly sporadic late-onset cases, with a complex aetiology due to interactions between environmental conditions and genetic features of the individual. Mitochondria play a central role in the bioenergetics of the cell and apoptotic cell death. Morphological, biochemical and genetic abnormalities of the mitochondria in several AD tissues have been reported. Impaired mitochondrial respiration, particularly COX deficiency, has been observed in brain, platelets and fibroblasts of AD patients. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could cause energy failure and increased oxidative stress. No causative mutations in the mtDNA have been detected and studies on mtDNA polymorphisms are controversial, but the "mitochondrial cascade hypothesis" here revised, could explain many of the biochemical, genetic and pathological features of sporadic AD.

  8. What induces pocket openings on protein surface patches involved in protein-protein interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrisch, Susanne; Helms, Volkhard

    2009-02-01

    We previously showed for the proteins BCL-XL, IL-2, and MDM2 that transient pockets at their protein-protein binding interfaces can be identified by applying the PASS algorithm to molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. We now investigated which aspects of the natural conformational dynamics of proteins induce the formation of such pockets. The pocket detection protocol was applied to three different conformational ensembles for the same proteins that were extracted from MD simulations of the inhibitor bound crystal conformation in water and the free crystal/NMR structure in water and in methanol. Additional MD simulations studied the impact of backbone mobility. The more efficient CONCOORD or normal mode analysis (NMA) techniques gave significantly smaller pockets than MD simulations, whereas tCONCOORD generated pockets comparable to those observed in MD simulations for two of the three systems. Our findings emphasize the influence of solvent polarity and backbone rearrangements on the formation of pockets on protein surfaces and should be helpful in future generation of transient pockets as putative ligand binding sites at protein-protein interfaces.

  9. GALT protein database: querying structural and functional features of GALT enzyme.

    PubMed

    d'Acierno, Antonio; Facchiano, Angelo; Marabotti, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the impact of variations on protein structure can enhance the comprehension of the mechanisms of genetic diseases related to that protein. Here, we present a new version of GALT Protein Database, a Web-accessible data repository for the storage and interrogation of structural effects of variations of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the impairment of which leads to classic Galactosemia, a rare genetic disease. This new version of this database now contains the models of 201 missense variants of GALT enzyme, including heterozygous variants, and it allows users not only to retrieve information about the missense variations affecting this protein, but also to investigate their impact on substrate binding, intersubunit interactions, stability, and other structural features. In addition, it allows the interactive visualization of the models of variants collected into the database. We have developed additional tools to improve the use of the database by nonspecialized users. This Web-accessible database (http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/GALT/GALT2.0) represents a model of tools potentially suitable for application to other proteins that are involved in human pathologies and that are subjected to genetic variations.

  10. Clinical features of the stomatognathic involvement in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison with temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Daniele; Bazzichi, Laura; Bosco, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Several studies have reported an involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of fibromyalgia (FM) similar to that which characterizes temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical features of stomatognathic dysfunction in patients with FM and TMD. Ninety-three FM patients underwent an assessment according to the RDC/TMD guidelines. Prevalence of the different RDC/TMD diagnoses and some clinical parameters of FM patients were compared with those of 181 patients affected by TMD. Seventy-four (79.6%) FM patients presented at least one RDC/TMD diagnosis and showed lower mean maximum voluntary and passive mouth opening values than TMD patients. Moreover, 34 FM patients presented with trigger and/or tender points. Results of the present study confirm the high rate of involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of FM and support the need for a careful multidisciplinary approach to patients with TMD, including the rheumatologist.

  11. Features, processing states and heterologous protein interactions in the modulation of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein function

    PubMed Central

    Mirambeau, Gilles; Lyonnais, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Nucleocapsid (NC) is central to retroviral replication. Nucleic acid chaperoning is a key function for NC through the action of its conserved basic amino acids and zinc-finger structures. NC manipulates genomic RNA from its packaging in the producer cell to reverse transcription into the infected host cell. This chaperone function, in conjunction with NCs aggregating properties, is up-modulated by successive NC processing events, from the Gag precursor to the fully mature protein, resulting in the condensation of the nucleocapsid within the capsid shell. Reverse transcription also depends on NC processing, whereas this process provokes NC dissociation from double-stranded DNA, leading to a preintegration complex (PIC), competent for host chromosomal integration. In addition NC interacts with cellular proteins, some of which are involved in viral budding, and also with several viral proteins. All of these properties are reviewed here, focusing on HIV-1 as a paradigmatic reference and highlighting the plasticity of the nucleocapsid architecture. PMID:21045549

  12. Features of Protein-Protein Interactions that Translate into Potent Inhibitors: Topology, Surface Area and Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew C.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) control the assembly of multi-protein complexes and, thus, these contacts have enormous potential as drug targets. However, the field has produced a mix of both exciting success stories and frustrating challenges. Here, we review known examples and explore how the physical features of a PPI, such as its affinity, hotspots, off-rates, buried surface area and topology, may influence the chances of success in finding inhibitors. This analysis suggests that concise, tight binding PPIs are most amenable to inhibition. However, it is also clear that emerging technical methods are expanding the repertoire of “druggable” protein contacts and increasing the odds against difficult targets. In particular, natural product-like compound libraries, high throughput screens specifically designed for PPIs and approaches that favor discovery of allosteric inhibitors appear to be attractive routes. The first group of PPI inhibitors has entered clinical trials, further motivating the need to understand the challenges and opportunities in pursuing these types of targets. PMID:22831787

  13. Clinical features and types of articular involvement in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Salim; Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Akker, Mustafa; Ak, Recep

    2015-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory arthritis which causes joint destruction. There are some epidemiologic data about PsA; however, there are no sufficient data from Turkey. Herein, we evaluated the frequency of PsA in the Thrace region of Turkey according to hospital-based data. In addition, we evaluated clinical features and types of joint involvement in PsA patients. We included 172 PsA patients fulfilling CASPAR criteria admitted to the Division of Rheumatology, Trakya University Medical Faculty, between 2003 and 2012. Data from Turkish Statistical Institution was used to calculate the incidence and prevalence of PsA. Patients' demographic features, durations of psoriasis and PsA, number of tender and swollen joints, treatment modalities, laboratory data, and X-ray film findings were recorded from hospital files. The annual incidence of PsA was 2.8/100,000. The mean annual incidence was 3.47/100,000 in females and 2.15/100,000 in males. The overall prevalence of PsA in our region was 27.9/100,000 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 23.7-32.1) in individuals >16 years. The prevalence of PsA was higher in females than in males (34.7/100,000 vs. 21.5/100,000). Polyarthritis was present in 67 (38.9 %), oligoarthritis in 47 (27.3 %), spondyloarthritis in 39 (22.6 %), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) arthritis in 19 (11.0 %) patients. The duration of psoriasis was significantly longer in polyarticular PsA patients than in DIP and oligoarticular groups (p values = 0.016 and 0.018, respectively). The number of swollen joints correlated with age (r = 0.21, p = 0.006), duration of psoriasis (r = 0.20, p = 0.01), number of tender joints (r = 0.92, p ≤ 0.001), ESR (r = 0.24, p = 0.001), and CRP (r = 0.17, p = 0.026). The frequency of PsA in Thrace region is similar to that in low-frequency regions. The most frequent type of involvement was polyarticular, and it correlated with the duration of psoriasis

  14. Predicting protein amidation sites by orchestrating amino acid sequence features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shuqiu; Yu, Hua; Gong, Xiujun

    2017-08-01

    Amidation is the fourth major category of post-translational modifications, which plays an important role in physiological and pathological processes. Identifying amidation sites can help us understanding the amidation and recognizing the original reason of many kinds of diseases. But the traditional experimental methods for predicting amidation sites are often time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we propose a computational method for predicting amidation sites by orchestrating amino acid sequence features. Three kinds of feature extraction methods are used to build a feature vector enabling to capture not only the physicochemical properties but also position related information of the amino acids. An extremely randomized trees algorithm is applied to choose the optimal features to remove redundancy and dependence among components of the feature vector by a supervised fashion. Finally the support vector machine classifier is used to label the amidation sites. When tested on an independent data set, it shows that the proposed method performs better than all the previous ones with the prediction accuracy of 0.962 at the Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.89 and area under curve of 0.964.

  15. Host membrane proteins involved in the replication of tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Miyashita, Shuhei; Katoh, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication complexes composed of viral replication proteins and negative-strand RNA templates. These replication proteins are programmed to exhibit RNA polymerase and other replication-related activities only in replication complexes to avoid inducing double-stranded RNA-mediated host defenses. Host membrane components (e.g. proteins and lipids) should play important roles in the activation of replication proteins. Two host membrane proteins are components of the replication complex and activate the replication proteins of tobamoviruses. Interaction analyses using deletion mutants constructed based on structural information suggest a conformational change in replication proteins during the formation of a protein complex with RNA 5'-capping activity.

  16. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features*

    PubMed Central

    Schons, Karen Regina Rosso; Beber, André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to March 2013. Cutaneous severity was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) was used to evaluate patient's nails. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was established according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR). RESULTS: The prevalence of NP was 46.1%. These patients had a median [interquartilic range (IQR)] NAPSI of 1 (0-15). A total of 63.3% of patients reported aesthetic discomfort or functional impairment related to their nails. Onycholysis was the most common feature (80%). When compared with patients without nail involvement, patients with NP had lower mean age at psoriasis onset [21 (18-41) vs. 43 (30-56) years, p=0,001]; longer disease duration [15.5 (10-24) vs. 6 (2-12) years, p=0.001]; higher PASI [9.2 (5-17) vs. 3.7 (2-10), p=0.044], higher frequency of psoriatic arthritis (43.3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.002) and more often reported family history of psoriasis (40% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Onycholysis was the most frequent finding and most patients feel uncomfortable with the psoriatic nail changes that they experience. PMID:26131859

  17. Cochlear involvement in Familial Mediterranean Fever: a new feature of an old disease.

    PubMed

    Koybasi, Serap; Atasoy, Halil İbrahim; Bicer, Yusuf Ozgur; Tug, Esra

    2012-02-01

    In this study we first aimed to assess the cochlear functions in children with Familial Mediterranean Fever. The second aim was to investigate the correlation between the hearing levels and some clinical features of Familial Mediterranean Fever including the duration of the disease, age at onset, genetic analysis and colchicine use. Thirty-four children with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 27 age matched children were included in the study. Following otologic examination, all children underwent audiometric evaluation, including Pure Tone Average measurements and Distortion Product Otoaoustic Emission testing. Audiological results of the two groups were compared and correlation between the audiologic status and clinical parameters of the disease like the duration of disease, age at onset, mutations and colchicine treatment were studied. Pure tone audiometry hearing levels were within normal levels in both groups. Hearing thresholds of Familial Mediterranean Fever patients were found to be increased at frequencies 8000, 10,000, 12,500 and 16,000 (p<0.05). In otoacoustic emission evaluation, distortion products and signal-noise ratio of FMF children were lower in the tested frequencies, from 1400 Hz to 4000 Hz (p<0.05). Interaction of the disease duration and age of disease onset was found to predict hearing levels, distortion products and signal-noise ratios of children with Familial Mediterranean Fever (F value=2.034; p=0.033). To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating cochlear involvement in children with Familial Mediterranean Fever which showed increased hearing thresholds at higher frequencies in audiometry together with decreased distortion products and signal-noise ratios demonstrated by distortion product otoacoustic emission testing. Similar studies must be carried out on adult patients to see if a clinical hearing impairment develops. The possible mechanisms that cause cochlear involvement and the effect of colchicine treatment on cochlear

  18. What are the structural features that drive partitioning of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems?

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Wang, Kui; Zaslavsky, Boris Yu; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-01-01

    Protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) represents a convenient, inexpensive, and easy to scale-up protein separation technique. Since partition behavior of a protein dramatically depends on an ATPS composition, it would be highly beneficial to have reliable means for (even qualitative) prediction of partitioning of a target protein under different conditions. Our aim was to understand which structural features of proteins contribute to partitioning of a query protein in a given ATPS. We undertook a systematic empirical analysis of relations between 57 numerical structural descriptors derived from the corresponding amino acid sequences and crystal structures of 10 well-characterized proteins and the partition behavior of these proteins in 29 different ATPSs. This analysis revealed that just a few structural characteristics of proteins can accurately determine behavior of these proteins in a given ATPS. However, partition behavior of proteins in different ATPSs relies on different structural features. In other words, we could not find a unique set of protein structural features derived from their crystal structures that could be used for the description of the protein partition behavior of all proteins in all ATPSs analyzed in this study. We likely need to gain better insight into relationships between protein-solvent interactions and protein structure peculiarities, in particular given limitations of the used here crystal structures, to be able to construct a model that accurately predicts protein partition behavior across all ATPSs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oligophrenin-1 encodes a rhoGAP protein involved in X-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Billuart, P; Bienvenu, T; Ronce, N; des Portes, V; Vinet, M C; Zemni, R; Roest Crollius, H; Carrié, A; Fauchereau, F; Cherry, M; Briault, S; Hamel, B; Fryns, J P; Beldjord, C; Kahn, A; Moraine, C; Chelly, J

    1998-04-30

    Primary or nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) is a heterogeneous condition in which affected patients do not have any distinctive clinical or biochemical features in common apart from cognitive impairment. Although it is present in approximately 0.15-0.3% of males, most of the genetic defects associated with MRX, which may involve more than ten different genes, remain unknown. Here we report the characterization of a new gene on the long arm of the X-chromosome (position Xq12) and the identification in unrelated individuals of different mutations that are predicted to cause a loss of function. This gene is highly expressed in fetal brain and encodes a protein of relative molecular mass 91K, named oligophrenin-1, which contains a domain typical of a Rho-GTPase-activating protein (rhoGAP). By enhancing their GTPase activity, GAP proteins inactivate small Rho and Ras proteins, so inactivation of rhoGAP proteins might cause constitutive activation of their GTPase targets. Such activation is known to affect cell migration and outgrowth of axons and dendrites in vivo. Our results demonstrate an association between cognitive impairment and a defect in a signalling pathway that depends on a Ras-like GTPase.

  20. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-11-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein-protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures.

  1. MSACompro: improving multiple protein sequence alignment by predicted structural features.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) is an essential tool in protein structure modeling, gene and protein function prediction, DNA motif recognition, phylogenetic analysis, and many other bioinformatics tasks. Therefore, improving the accuracy of multiple sequence alignment is an important long-term objective in bioinformatics. We designed and developed a new method MSACompro to incorporate predicted secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, and residue-residue contact information into the currently most accurate posterior probability-based MSA methods to improve the accuracy of multiple sequence alignments. Different from the multiple sequence alignment methods that use the tertiary structure information of some sequences, our method uses the structural information purely predicted from sequences. In this chapter, we first introduce some background and related techniques in the field of multiple sequence alignment. Then, we describe the detailed algorithm of MSACompro. Finally, we show that integrating predicted protein structural information improved the multiple sequence alignment accuracy.

  2. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  3. Novel identification of matrix proteins involved in calcitic biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Rose-Martel, Megan; Smiley, Sandy; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2015-02-26

    Calcitic biomineralization is essential for otoconia formation in vertebrates. This process is characterized by protein-crystal interactions that modulate crystal growth on an extracellular matrix. An excellent model for the study of calcitic biomineralization is the avian eggshell, the fastest known biomineralization process. The objective of this study is to identify and characterize matrix proteins associated with the eggshell mammillary cones, which are hypothesized to regulate the earliest stage of eggshell calcification. Mammillary cones were isolated from 2 models, fertilized and unfertilized, and the released proteins were identified by RP-nanoLC and ES-MS/MS proteomics. Proteomics analysis identified 49 proteins associated with the eggshell membrane fibers and, importantly, 18 mammillary cone-specific proteins with an additional 18 proteins identified as enriched in the mammillary cones. Among the most promising candidates for modulating protein-crystal interactions were extracellular matrix proteins, including ABI family member 3 (NESH) binding protein (ABI3BP), tiarin-like, hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 3 (HAPLN3), collagen alpha-1(X), collagen alpha-1(II) and fibronectin, in addition to the calcium binding proteins calumenin, EGF-like repeats and discoidin 1-like domains 3 (EDIL3), nucleobindin-2 and SPARC. In conclusion, we identified several cone-resident proteins that are candidates to regulate initiation of eggshell calcification. Further study of these proteins will determine their roles in modulating calcitic biomineralization and lead to insight into the process of otoconia formation/regeneration. Biomineralization is essential for the development of hard tissues in vertebrates, which includes both calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate structures. Calcitic mineralization by calcium carbonate is an important process in the formation of otoconia, which are gravity receptor organs located in the inner ear and are responsible for balance

  4. Hierarchical learning architecture with automatic feature selection for multiclass protein fold classification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuen-Der; Lin, Chin-Teng; Pal, Nikhil Ranjan

    2003-12-01

    The structure classification of proteins plays a very important role in bioinformatics, since the relationships and characteristics among those known proteins can be exploited to predict the structure of new proteins. The success of a classification system depends heavily on two things: the tools being used and the features considered. For the bioinformatics applications, the role of appropriate features has not been paid adequate importance. In this investigation we use three novel ideas for multiclass protein fold classification. First, we use the gating neural network, where each input node is associated with a gate. This network can select important features in an online manner when the learning goes on. At the beginning of the training, all gates are almost closed, i.e., no feature is allowed to enter the network. Through the training, gates corresponding to good features are completely opened while gates corresponding to bad features are closed more tightly, and some gates may be partially open. The second novel idea is to use a hierarchical learning architecture (HLA). The classifier in the first level of HLA classifies the protein features into four major classes: all alpha, all beta, alpha + beta, and alpha/beta. And in the next level we have another set of classifiers, which further classifies the protein features into 27 folds. The third novel idea is to induce the indirect coding features from the amino-acid composition sequence of proteins based on the N-gram concept. This provides us with more representative and discriminative new local features of protein sequences for multiclass protein fold classification. The proposed HLA with new indirect coding features increases the protein fold classification accuracy by about 12%. Moreover, the gating neural network is found to reduce the number of features drastically. Using only half of the original features selected by the gating neural network can reach comparable test accuracy as that using all the

  5. Combining PSSM and physicochemical feature for protein structure prediction with support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, I.; Haryanto, T.; Hasibuan, L. S.; Agmalaro, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Protein is one of the giant biomolecules that act as the main component of the organism. Protein is formed from building blocks namely amino acids. Hierarchically, the structure of protein is divided into four levels: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure. Protein secondary structure is formed by amino acid sequences that would form three-dimensional structures and have information about the tertiary structure and function of proteins. This study used 277,389 protein residue data from enzyme categories. Position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profile and physicochemical are used for features. This study developed support vector machine models to predict the protein secondary structure by recognizing patterns of amino acid sequences. The Q3 results showed that the best scores obtained are 93.16% from the dataset that has 260 features with the radial kernel. Combining PSSM and physicochemical feature additions can be used for prediction.

  6. BLProt: prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hazrati, Mehrnaz Khodam; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Martinetz, Thomas

    2011-08-17

    Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence. In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated. BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. The BLProt software is available at http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/bioluminescent%20protein/BLProt.

  7. Accelerated protein evolution and origins of human-specific features: Foxp2 as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Webb, David M; Podlaha, Ondrej

    2002-12-01

    Genes responsible for human-specific phenotypes may have been under altered selective pressures in human evolution and thus exhibit changes in substitution rate and pattern at the protein sequence level. Using comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee, and mouse protein sequences, we identified two genes (PRM2 and FOXP2) with significantly enhanced evolutionary rates in the hominid lineage. PRM2 is a histone-like protein essential to spermatogenesis and was previously reported to be a likely target of sexual selection in humans and chimpanzees. FOXP2 is a transcription factor involved in speech and language development. Human FOXP2 experienced a >60-fold increase in substitution rate and incorporated two fixed amino acid changes in a broadly defined transcription suppression domain. A survey of a diverse group of placental mammals reveals the uniqueness of the human FOXP2 sequence and a population genetic analysis indicates possible adaptive selection behind the accelerated evolution. Taken together, our results suggest an important role that FOXP2 may have played in the origin of human speech and demonstrate a strategy for identifying candidate genes underlying the emergences of human-specific features.

  8. Involvement of the Transmembrane Protein p23 in Biosynthetic Protein Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Manuel; Pepperkok, Rainer; Emery, Gregory; Kellner, Roland; Stang, Espen; Parton, Robert G.; Gruenberg, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Here, we report the localization and characterization of BHKp23, a member of the p24 family of transmembrane proteins, in mammalian cells. We find that p23 is a major component of tubulovesicular membranes at the cis side of the Golgi complex (estimated density: 12,500 copies/μm2 membrane surface area, or ≈30% of the total protein). Our data indicate that BHKp23-containing membranes are part of the cis-Golgi network/intermediate compartment . Using the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus as a transmembrane cargo molecule, we find that p23 membranes are an obligatory station in forward biosynthetic membrane transport, but that p23 itself is absent from transport vesicles that carry the G protein to and beyond the Golgi complex. Our data show that p23 is not present to any significant extent in coat protein (COP) I-coated vesicles generated in vitro and does not colocalize with COP I buds and vesicles. Moreover, we find that p23 cytoplasmic domain is not involved in COP I membrane recruitment. Our data demonstrate that microinjected antibodies against the cytoplasmic tail of p23 inhibit G protein transport from the cis-Golgi network/ intermediate compartment to the cell surface, suggesting that p23 function is required for the transport of transmembrane cargo molecules. These observations together with the fact that p23 is a highly abundant component in the intermediate compartment, lead us to propose that p23 contributes to membrane structure, and that this contribution is necessary for efficient segregation and transport. PMID:9382861

  9. Classification of protein-protein interaction full-text documents using text and citation network features.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Abi-Haidar, Alaa; Kaur, Jasleen; Hamed, Ahmed Abdeen; Rocha, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    We participated (as Team 9) in the Article Classification Task of the Biocreative II.5 Challenge: binary classification of full-text documents relevant for protein-protein interaction. We used two distinct classifiers for the online and offline challenges: 1) the lightweight Variable Trigonometric Threshold (VTT) linear classifier we successfully introduced in BioCreative 2 for binary classification of abstracts and 2) a novel Naive Bayes classifier using features from the citation network of the relevant literature. We supplemented the supplied training data with full-text documents from the MIPS database. The lightweight VTT classifier was very competitive in this new full-text scenario: it was a top-performing submission in this task, taking into account the rank product of the Area Under the interpolated precision and recall Curve, Accuracy, Balanced F-Score, and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient performance measures. The novel citation network classifier for the biomedical text mining domain, while not a top performing classifier in the challenge, performed above the central tendency of all submissions, and therefore indicates a promising new avenue to investigate further in bibliome informatics.

  10. The VHL short variant involves in protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Yang, Haixia; Zuo, Feifei; Chen, Liang

    2016-09-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is the most important and frequently mutated gene in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In contrast to its long counterpart, the internal translational variant of VHL protein (VHLs) is evolutionarily conserved. Herein we present evidence that VHLs associates with ribosome complex via interaction with the large subunit 6 (RPL6). Manipulation of VHLs expression significantly alters protein synthesis, cell size and mitochondrial mass. VHLs deficiency leads to remarkable sensitivity to drug treatments eliciting nascent protein mis-folding and translational errors. The ubiquitination of nascent peptides are dramatically increased upon the ectopic over-expression of VHLs, which simultaneously co-localizes with proteasome and thus may facilitate the ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. In summary, VHLs contributes to protein quality control in addition to its canonical function in maintaining homeostasis of hypoxia-induced factors alpha subunit (HIFα) in response to environmental oxygen supply.

  11. Feature analysis for classification of trace fluorescent labeled protein crystallization images.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Madhav; Dinc, Imren; Sigdel, Madhu S; Dinc, Semih; Pusey, Marc L; Aygun, Ramazan S

    2017-01-01

    Large number of features are extracted from protein crystallization trial images to improve the accuracy of classifiers for predicting the presence of crystals or phases of the crystallization process. The excessive number of features and computationally intensive image processing methods to extract these features make utilization of automated classification tools on stand-alone computing systems inconvenient due to the required time to complete the classification tasks. Combinations of image feature sets, feature reduction and classification techniques for crystallization images benefiting from trace fluorescence labeling are investigated. Features are categorized into intensity, graph, histogram, texture, shape adaptive, and region features (using binarized images generated by Otsu's, green percentile, and morphological thresholding). The effects of normalization, feature reduction with principle components analysis (PCA), and feature selection using random forest classifier are also analyzed. The time required to extract feature categories is computed and an estimated time of extraction is provided for feature category combinations. We have conducted around 8624 experiments (different combinations of feature categories, binarization methods, feature reduction/selection, normalization, and crystal categories). The best experimental results are obtained using combinations of intensity features, region features using Otsu's thresholding, region features using green percentile G90 thresholding, region features using green percentile G99 thresholding, graph features, and histogram features. Using this feature set combination, 96% accuracy (without misclassifying crystals as non-crystals) was achieved for the first level of classification to determine presence of crystals. Since missing a crystal is not desired, our algorithm is adjusted to achieve a high sensitivity rate. In the second level classification, 74.2% accuracy for (5-class) crystal sub

  12. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  13. Therapeutic approaches against common structural features of toxic oligomers shared by multiple amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L; Kayed, Rakez

    2014-04-15

    Impaired proteostasis is one of the main features of all amyloid diseases, which are associated with the formation of insoluble aggregates from amyloidogenic proteins. The aggregation process can be caused by overproduction or poor clearance of these proteins. However, numerous reports suggest that amyloid oligomers are the most toxic species, rather than insoluble fibrillar material, in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Prion diseases, among others. Although the exact protein that aggregates varies between amyloid disorders, they all share common structural features that can be used as therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on therapeutic approaches against shared features of toxic oligomeric structures and future directions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differentiation of HL60 cells: involvement of protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Spearman, T.N.; Fontana, J.A.; Butcher, F.R.; Durham, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The addition of retinoic acid (RA) to the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL60 in culture results in the cessation of growth and the acquisition of a more mature phenotype. Previous work in these laboratories has demonstrated a concomitant increase in the activity of calcium-dependent, phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase (PK-C). HL60 cells were incubated with /sup 32/P-P/sub i/ in the absence and presence of RA, homogenized, and aliquots subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. A comparison of autoradiograms made from these gels revealed several phosphoproteins whose radiolabeling was affected by RA. The radiolabeling of one particular phosphoprotein (49kd, pI 4.8) was found to be increased prior to phenotypic evidence of differentiation. It was demonstrated via incubating HL60 cytosol with /sup 32/P -ATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ in the absence and presence of phosphatidylserine and resolving the labeled proteins as above that this protein is phosphorylated by PK-C. The labeling of this protein was also increased by RA in other leukemic cell lines which showed phenotypic evidence of differentiation while no effect was seen in HL60 sublines resistant to RA or in mature neutrophils (the end product of myeloid differentiation). These results suggest that this protein may be an important intermediate in myeloid differentiation.

  15. A rapid method for characterization of protein relatedness using feature vectors.

    PubMed

    Carr, Kareem; Murray, Eleanor; Armah, Ebenezer; He, Rong L; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2010-03-05

    We propose a feature vector approach to characterize the variation in large data sets of biological sequences. Each candidate sequence produces a single feature vector constructed with the number and location of amino acids or nucleic acids in the sequence. The feature vector characterizes the distance between the actual sequence and a model of a theoretical sequence based on the binomial and uniform distributions. This method is distinctive in that it does not rely on sequence alignment for determining protein relatedness, allowing the user to visualize the relationships within a set of proteins without making a priori assumptions about those proteins. We apply our method to two large families of proteins: protein kinase C, and globins, including hemoglobins and myoglobins. We interpret the high-dimensional feature vectors using principal components analysis and agglomerative hierarchical clustering. We find that the feature vector retains much of the information about the original sequence. By using principal component analysis to extract information from collections of feature vectors, we are able to quickly identify the nature of variation in a collection of proteins. Where collections are phylogenetically or functionally related, this is easily detected. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering provides a means of constructing cladograms from the feature vector output.

  16. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  17. RNA Binding Proteins Posttranscriptionally Regulate Genes Involved In Oncogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Cloning and characterization of HuR, a ubiquitously expressed Elav-like protein . J Biol Chem 1996, 271(14):8144-8151. 21. Meisner NC, Hackermuller J...Hauptmann S: Expression of the ELAV-like protein HuR is associated with higher tumor grade and increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human breast...SH3 domain, ankyrin repeat and pH domain 3 tumor microarray reveals 47 annotated genes up regulated in the HA-HuR overexpressing tumors as compared to

  18. Involvement of Retinoblastoma Protein and HBP1 in Histone H10 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lemercier, Claudie; Duncliffe, Kym; Boibessot, Isabelle; Zhang, Hui; Verdel, André; Angelov, Dimitar; Khochbin, Saadi

    2000-01-01

    The histone H10-encoding gene is expressed in vertebrates in differentiating cells during the arrest of proliferation. In the H10 promoter, a specific regulatory element, which we named the H4 box, exhibits features which implicate a role in mediating H10 gene expression in response to both differentiation and cell cycle control signals. For instance, within the linker histone gene family, the H4 box is found only in the promoters of differentiation-associated subtypes, suggesting that it is specifically involved in differentiation-dependent expression of these genes. In addition, an element nearly identical to the H4 box is conserved in the promoters of histone H4-encoding genes and is known to be involved in their cell cycle-dependent expression. The transcription factors interacting with the H10 H4 box were therefore expected to link differentiation-dependent expression of H10 to the cell cycle control machinery. The aim of this work was to identify such transcription factors and to obtain information concerning the regulatory pathway involved. Interestingly, our cloning strategy led to the isolation of a retinoblastoma protein (RB) partner known as HBP1. HBP1, a high-mobility group box transcription factor, interacted specifically with the H10 H4 box and moreover was expressed in a differentiation-dependent manner. We also showed that the HBP1-encoding gene is able to produce different forms of HBP1. Finally, we demonstrated that both HBP1 and RB were involved in the activation of H10 gene expression. We therefore propose that HBP1 mediates a link between the cell cycle control machinery and cell differentiation signals. Through modulating the expression of specific chromatin-associated proteins such as histone H10, HBP1 plays a vital role in chromatin remodeling events during the arrest of cell proliferation in differentiating cells. PMID:10958660

  19. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  20. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features.

  1. An automated approach to network features of protein structure ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Bhat, Chanda R; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2013-01-01

    Network theory applied to protein structures provides insights into numerous problems of biological relevance. The explosion in structural data available from PDB and simulations establishes a need to introduce a standalone-efficient program that assembles network concepts/parameters under one hood in an automated manner. Herein, we discuss the development/application of an exhaustive, user-friendly, standalone program package named PSN-Ensemble, which can handle structural ensembles generated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation/NMR studies or from multiple X-ray structures. The novelty in network construction lies in the explicit consideration of side-chain interactions among amino acids. The program evaluates network parameters dealing with topological organization and long-range allosteric communication. The introduction of a flexible weighing scheme in terms of residue pairwise cross-correlation/interaction energy in PSN-Ensemble brings in dynamical/chemical knowledge into the network representation. Also, the results are mapped on a graphical display of the structure, allowing an easy access of network analysis to a general biological community. The potential of PSN-Ensemble toward examining structural ensemble is exemplified using MD trajectories of an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UbcH5b). Furthermore, insights derived from network parameters evaluated using PSN-Ensemble for single-static structures of active/inactive states of β2-adrenergic receptor and the ternary tRNA complexes of tyrosyl tRNA synthetases (from organisms across kingdoms) are discussed. PSN-Ensemble is freely available from http://vishgraph.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/PSN-Ensemble/psn_index.html. PMID:23934896

  2. Protein functional features are reflected in the patterns of mRNA translation speed.

    PubMed

    López, Daniel; Pazos, Florencio

    2015-07-09

    The degeneracy of the genetic code makes it possible for the same amino acid string to be coded by different messenger RNA (mRNA) sequences. These "synonymous mRNAs" may differ largely in a number of aspects related to their overall translational efficiency, such as secondary structure content and availability of the encoded transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Consequently, they may render different yields of the translated polypeptides. These mRNA features related to translation efficiency are also playing a role locally, resulting in a non-uniform translation speed along the mRNA, which has been previously related to some protein structural features and also used to explain some dramatic effects of "silent" single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs). In this work we perform the first large scale analysis of the relationship between three experimental proxies of mRNA local translation efficiency and the local features of the corresponding encoded proteins. We found that a number of protein functional and structural features are reflected in the patterns of ribosome occupancy, secondary structure and tRNA availability along the mRNA. One or more of these proxies of translation speed have distinctive patterns around the mRNA regions coding for certain protein local features. In some cases the three patterns follow a similar trend. We also show specific examples where these patterns of translation speed point to the protein's important structural and functional features. This support the idea that the genome not only codes the protein functional features as sequences of amino acids, but also as subtle patterns of mRNA properties which, probably through local effects on the translation speed, have some consequence on the final polypeptide. These results open the possibility of predicting a protein's functional regions based on a single genomic sequence, and have implications for heterologous protein expression and fine-tuning protein function.

  3. A Method of Protein Model Classification and Retrieval Using Bag-of-Visual-Features

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ziping; Kang, Baosheng; Lu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel visual method for protein model classification and retrieval. Different from the conventional methods, the key idea of the proposed method is to extract image features of proteins and measure the visual similarity between proteins. Firstly, the multiview images are captured by vertices and planes of a given octahedron surrounding the protein. Secondly, the local features are extracted from each image of the different views by the SURF algorithm and are vector quantized into visual words using a visual codebook. Finally, KLD is employed to calculate the similarity distance between two feature vectors. Experimental results show that the proposed method has encouraging performances for protein retrieval and categorization as shown in the comparison with other methods. PMID:25258644

  4. PREAL: prediction of allergenic protein by maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) feature selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessment of potential allergenicity of protein is necessary whenever transgenic proteins are introduced into the food chain. Bioinformatics approaches in allergen prediction have evolved appreciably in recent years to increase sophistication and performance. However, what are the critical features for protein's allergenicity have been not fully investigated yet. Results We presented a more comprehensive model in 128 features space for allergenic proteins prediction by integrating various properties of proteins, such as biochemical and physicochemical properties, sequential features and subcellular locations. The overall accuracy in the cross-validation reached 93.42% to 100% with our new method. Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) method and Incremental Feature Selection (IFS) procedure were applied to obtain which features are essential for allergenicity. Results of the performance comparisons showed the superior of our method to the existing methods used widely. More importantly, it was observed that the features of subcellular locations and amino acid composition played major roles in determining the allergenicity of proteins, particularly extracellular/cell surface and vacuole of the subcellular locations for wheat and soybean. To facilitate the allergen prediction, we implemented our computational method in a web application, which can be available at http://gmobl.sjtu.edu.cn/PREAL/index.php. Conclusions Our new approach could improve the accuracy of allergen prediction. And the findings may provide novel insights for the mechanism of allergies. PMID:24565053

  5. Structural features that predict real-value fluctuations of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-05-01

    It is crucial to consider dynamics for understanding the biological function of proteins. We used a large number of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of nonhomologous proteins as references and examined static structural features of proteins that are most relevant to fluctuations. We examined correlation of individual structural features with fluctuations and further investigated effective combinations of features for predicting the real value of residue fluctuations using the support vector regression (SVR). It was found that some structural features have higher correlation than crystallographic B-factors with fluctuations observed in MD trajectories. Moreover, SVR that uses combinations of static structural features showed accurate prediction of fluctuations with an average Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.669 and a root mean square error of 1.04 Å. This correlation coefficient is higher than the one observed in predictions by the Gaussian network model (GNM). An advantage of the developed method over the GNMs is that the former predicts the real value of fluctuation. The results help improve our understanding of relationships between protein structure and fluctuation. Furthermore, the developed method provides a convienient practial way to predict fluctuations of proteins using easily computed static structural features of proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Predicting Subcellular Localization of Apoptosis Proteins Combining GO Features of Homologous Proteins and Distance Weighted KNN Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qiuwen; Wang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis proteins play a key role in maintaining the stability of organism; the functions of apoptosis proteins are related to their subcellular locations which are used to understand the mechanism of programmed cell death. In this paper, we utilize GO annotation information of apoptosis proteins and their homologous proteins retrieved from GOA database to formulate feature vectors and then combine the distance weighted KNN classification algorithm with them to solve the data imbalance problem existing in CL317 data set to predict subcellular locations of apoptosis proteins. It is found that the number of homologous proteins can affect the overall prediction accuracy. Under the optimal number of homologous proteins, the overall prediction accuracy of our method on CL317 data set reaches 96.8% by Jackknife test. Compared with other existing methods, it shows that our proposed method is very effective and better than others for predicting subcellular localization of apoptosis proteins. PMID:27213149

  7. Reversible vasoconstriction syndrome involving the basilar artery in an adolescent: imaging and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Rivkin, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is characterized by recurrent episodes of "thunderclap headache" and by transient, multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral vasculature. Here we present an adolescent boy whose clinical features fit the diagnostic criteria and whose neurovascular imaging revealed reversible vasoconstriction of the basilar artery alone. A previously healthy 14-year-old boy presented with repeated severe sudden thunderclap headaches following exercise. These symptoms were accompanied by isolated basilar artery stenosis. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is a condition with several clinical triggers. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood. This patient adds to a broadening spectrum of clinical features of this disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Presenting features and imaging in childhood acute myeloid leukemia with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Susanna; Palomäki, Maarit; Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Hasle, Henrik; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Heyman, Mats; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2017-02-24

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can manifest as leukemic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid, a solid CNS tumor, or as neurological symptoms. We evaluated the presenting symptoms and neuroimaging findings in 33 of 34 children with AML and CNS involvement at diagnosis in the period 2000-2012 in Sweden, Finland, and Denmark. Imaging was performed in 22 patients, of whom 16 had CNS-related symptoms. Seven patients, including all but two with facial palsy, had mastoid cell opacification, considered an incidental finding. The frequent involvement of the mastoid bone with facial palsy warrants evaluation in larger series. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs. -host disease

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, G.B.; Sullivan, K.M.; Plumley, T.F.

    1984-03-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder.

  10. Prediction of protein secondary structure using probability based features and a hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Ghanty, Pradip; Pal, Nikhil R; Mudi, Rajani K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose some co-occurrence probability-based features for prediction of protein secondary structure. The features are extracted using occurrence/nonoccurrence of secondary structures in the protein sequences. We explore two types of features: position-specific (based on position of amino acid on fragments of protein sequences) as well as position-independent (independent of amino acid position on fragments of protein sequences). We use a hybrid system, NEUROSVM, consisting of neural networks and support vector machines for classification of secondary structures. We propose two schemes NSVMps and NSVM for protein secondary structure prediction. The NSVMps uses position-specific probability-based features and NEUROSVM classifier whereas NSVM uses the same classifier with position-independent probability-based features. The proposed method falls in the single-sequence category of methods because it does not use any sequence profile information such as position specific scoring matrices (PSSM) derived from PSI-BLAST. Two widely used datasets RS126 and CB513 are used in the experiments. The results obtained using the proposed features and NEUROSVM classifier are better than most of the existing single-sequence prediction methods. Most importantly, the results using NSVMps that are obtained using lower dimensional features, are comparable to those by other existing methods. The NSVMps and NSVM are finally tested on target proteins of the critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). A larger dataset is used to compare the performance of the proposed methods with that of two recent single-sequence prediction methods. We also investigate the impact of presence of different amino acid residues (in protein sequences) that are responsible for the formation of different secondary structures.

  11. Prediction of subcellular location apoptosis proteins with ensemble classifier and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quan; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Tong-Liang

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis proteins have a central role in the development and the homeostasis of an organism. These proteins are very important for understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. The function of an apoptosis protein is closely related to its subcellular location. It is crucial to develop powerful tools to predict apoptosis protein locations for rapidly increasing gap between the number of known structural proteins and the number of known sequences in protein databank. In this study, amino acids pair compositions with different spaces are used to construct feature sets for representing sample of protein feature selection approach based on binary particle swarm optimization, which is applied to extract effective feature. Ensemble classifier is used as prediction engine, of which the basic classifier is the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor. Each basic classifier is trained with different feature sets. Two datasets often used in prior works are selected to validate the performance of proposed approach. The results obtained by jackknife test are quite encouraging, indicating that the proposed method might become a potentially useful tool for subcellular location of apoptosis protein, or at least can play a complimentary role to the existing methods in the relevant areas. The supplement information and software written in Matlab are available by contacting the corresponding author.

  12. Thoracic involvement in Behçet's disease: pathologic, clinical, and imaging features.

    PubMed

    Tunaci, A; Berkmen, Y M; Gökmen, E

    1995-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a rare form of vasculitis of obscure etiology. Any large or small artery, vein, or organ may be involved in an unpredictable combination. Intrathoracic manifestations of Behçet's disease consist mainly of thromboembolism of the superior vena cava and/or other mediastinal veins; aneurysms of the aorta and pulmonary arteries; pulmonary infarct and hemorrhage; pleural effusion; and, rarely, myocardial or pericardial involvement, cor pulmonale, and mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy. Chest radiography is the best diagnostic method for evaluating thoracic involvement in Behçet's disease. Because aneurysms may develop at the arterial puncture sites and veins may be quickly thrombosed after injection of contrast material, angiography and venography should be avoided whenever possible. Although no comparative studies are available, CT and MR angiography appear to be imaging techniques of choice for evaluating vascular involvement. Pulmonary parenchymal alterations depicted on CT scan have not been fully explored.

  13. A feature analysis of lower solubility proteins in three eukaryotic systems.

    PubMed

    Albu, Razvan F; Chan, Gerard T; Zhu, Mang; Wong, Eric T C; Taghizadeh, Farnaz; Hu, Xiaoke; Mehran, Arya E; Johnson, James D; Gsponer, Jörg; Mayor, Thibault

    2015-04-06

    Because misfolded and damaged proteins can form potentially harmful aggregates, all living organisms have evolved a wide variety of quality control mechanisms. However, the timely clearance of aggregation-prone species may not always be achieved, potentially leading to the accumulation of low solubility proteins. At the same time, promiscuity, which can be a driving force for aggregation, is also important to the functionality of certain proteins which have a large number of interaction partners. Considerable efforts have been made towards characterizing why some proteins appear to be more aggregation-prone than others. In this study, we analyze the features of proteins which precipitate following centrifugation in unstressed yeast cells, human SH-SY5Y cells and mouse brain tissue. By normalizing for protein abundance, we devised an approach whereby lower solubility proteins are reliably identified. Our findings indicate that these tend to be longer, low abundance proteins, which contain fewer hydrophobic amino acids. Furthermore, low solubility proteins also contain more low complexity and disordered regions. Overall, we observed an increase in features that link low solubility proteins to functional aggregates. Our results indicate that lower solubility proteins from three biologically distinct model systems share several common traits, shedding light on potentially universal solubility determinants. We set up a novel approach to identify lower solubility proteins in unstressed cells by comparing precipitated proteins with those that remain soluble after centrifugation. By analyzing three eukaryotic model systems in parallel, we were able to identify traits which cross the species barrier, as well as species-specific characteristics. Notably, our analyses revealed a number of primary and secondary structural features that set apart lower solubility proteins, a number of which connected them to a greater potential for promiscuity. This article is part of a Special

  14. Centrophilin: a novel mitotic spindle protein involved in microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A novel protein has been identified which may serve a key function in nucleating spindle microtubule growth in mitosis. This protein, called centrophilin, is sequentially relocated from the centromeres to the centrosomes to the midbody in a manner dependent on the mitotic phase. Centrophilin was initially detected by immunofluorescence with a monoclonal, primate-specific antibody (2D3) raised against kinetochore- enriched chromosome extract from HeLa cells (Valdivia, M. M., and B. R. Brinkley. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:1124-1134). Centrophilin forms prominent crescents at the poles of the metaphase spindle, gradually diminishes during anaphase, and bands the equatorial ends of midbody microtubules in telophase. The formation and breakdown of the spindle and midbody correlates in time and space with the aggregation and disaggregation of centrophilin foci. Immunogold EM reveals that centrophilin is a major component of pericentriolar material in metaphase. During recovery from microtubule inhibition, centrophilin foci act as nucleation sites for the assembly of spindle tubules. The 2D3 probe recognizes two high molecular mass polypeptides, 180 and 210 kD, on immunoblots of whole HeLa cell extract. Taken together, these data and the available literature on microtubule dynamics point inevitably to a singular model for control of spindle tubule turnover. PMID:1991791

  15. Characterization and Modulation of Proteins Involved in SM Vesication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    lines such as HaCaT involve a number of undefined changes that occur over time in culture. We also found that NcoI cells , KC immortalized with HPV16 E6/7... lines such as HaCaT cells , we immortalized cells with a defined and physiologically relevant agent 21, HPV16 E6/7 (above), and utilized at passage 30...the retroviral vector, LXSN (Fig. 2A; Clontech). Following transient transfection of an amphotropic retrovirus packaging cell line (φNX; Gary Nolan

  16. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae draft genomes comparison reveal strain-specific features involved in adaptation and virulence to Actinidia species.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, Simone; Ferrante, Patrizia; Petriccione, Milena; Firrao, Giuseppe; Scortichini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A recent re-emerging bacterial canker disease incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is causing severe economic losses to Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa cultivations in southern Europe, New Zealand, Chile and South Korea. Little is known about the genetic features of this pathovar. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from two Psa strains causing outbreaks of bacterial canker on the A. deliciosa cv. Hayward in Japan (J-Psa, type-strain of the pathovar) and in Italy (I-Psa) in 1984 and 1992, respectively as well as from a Psa strain (I2-Psa) isolated at the beginning of the recent epidemic on A. chinensis cv. Hort16A in Italy. All strains were isolated from typical leaf spot symptoms. The phylogenetic relationships revealed that Psa is more closely related to P. s. pv. theae than to P. avellanae within genomospecies 8. Comparative genomic analyses revealed both relevant intrapathovar variations and putative pathovar-specific genomic regions in Psa. The genomic sequences of J-Psa and I-Psa were very similar. Conversely, the I2-Psa genome encodes four additional effector protein genes, lacks a 50 kb plasmid and the phaseolotoxin gene cluster, argK-tox but has acquired a 160 kb plasmid and putative prophage sequences. Several lines of evidence from the analysis of the genome sequences support the hypothesis that this strain did not evolve from the Psa population that caused the epidemics in 1984-1992 in Japan and Italy but rather is the product of a recent independent evolution of the pathovar actinidiae for infecting Actinidia spp. All Psa strains share the genetic potential for copper resistance, antibiotic detoxification, high affinity iron acquisition and detoxification of nitric oxide of plant origin. Similar to other sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads associated with woody plant species, the Psa strains isolated from leaves also display a set of genes involved in the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds.

  17. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Draft Genomes Comparison Reveal Strain-Specific Features Involved in Adaptation and Virulence to Actinidia Species

    PubMed Central

    Marcelletti, Simone; Ferrante, Patrizia; Petriccione, Milena; Firrao, Giuseppe; Scortichini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A recent re-emerging bacterial canker disease incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is causing severe economic losses to Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa cultivations in southern Europe, New Zealand, Chile and South Korea. Little is known about the genetic features of this pathovar. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from two Psa strains causing outbreaks of bacterial canker on the A. deliciosa cv. Hayward in Japan (J-Psa, type-strain of the pathovar) and in Italy (I-Psa) in 1984 and 1992, respectively as well as from a Psa strain (I2-Psa) isolated at the beginning of the recent epidemic on A. chinensis cv. Hort16A in Italy. All strains were isolated from typical leaf spot symptoms. The phylogenetic relationships revealed that Psa is more closely related to P. s. pv. theae than to P. avellanae within genomospecies 8. Comparative genomic analyses revealed both relevant intrapathovar variations and putative pathovar-specific genomic regions in Psa. The genomic sequences of J-Psa and I-Psa were very similar. Conversely, the I2-Psa genome encodes four additional effector protein genes, lacks a 50 kb plasmid and the phaseolotoxin gene cluster, argK-tox but has acquired a 160 kb plasmid and putative prophage sequences. Several lines of evidence from the analysis of the genome sequences support the hypothesis that this strain did not evolve from the Psa population that caused the epidemics in 1984–1992 in Japan and Italy but rather is the product of a recent independent evolution of the pathovar actinidiae for infecting Actinidia spp. All Psa strains share the genetic potential for copper resistance, antibiotic detoxification, high affinity iron acquisition and detoxification of nitric oxide of plant origin. Similar to other sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads associated with woody plant species, the Psa strains isolated from leaves also display a set of genes involved in the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds. PMID

  18. Evaluation of correlation between CT image features and ERCC1 protein expression in assessing lung cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Sun, Shenshen; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) usually have favorable prognosis. However, high percentage of NSCLC patients have cancer relapse after surgery. Accurately predicting cancer prognosis is important to optimally treat and manage the patients to minimize the risk of cancer relapse. Studies have shown that an excision repair crosscomplementing 1 (ERCC1) gene was a potentially useful genetic biomarker to predict prognosis of NSCLC patients. Meanwhile, studies also found that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was highly associated with lung cancer prognosis. In this study, we investigated and evaluated the correlations between COPD image features and ERCC1 gene expression. A database involving 106 NSCLC patients was used. Each patient had a thoracic CT examination and ERCC1 genetic test. We applied a computer-aided detection scheme to segment and quantify COPD image features. A logistic regression method and a multilayer perceptron network were applied to analyze the correlation between the computed COPD image features and ERCC1 protein expression. A multilayer perceptron network (MPN) was also developed to test performance of using COPD-related image features to predict ERCC1 protein expression. A nine feature based logistic regression analysis showed the average COPD feature values in the low and high ERCC1 protein expression groups are significantly different (p < 0.01). Using a five-fold cross validation method, the MPN yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC = 0.669±0.053) in classifying between the low and high ERCC1 expression cases. The study indicates that CT phenotype features are associated with the genetic tests, which may provide supplementary information to help improve accuracy in assessing prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  19. Sturgeon osteocalcin shares structural features with matrix Gla protein: evolutionary relationship and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carla S B; Simes, Dina C; Williamson, Matthew K; Cavaco, Sofia; Laizé, Vincent; Price, Paul A; Cancela, M Leonor

    2013-09-27

    Osteocalcin (OC) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are considered evolutionarily related because they share key structural features, although they have been described to exert different functions. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of both OC and MGP from the Adriatic sturgeon, a ray-finned fish characterized by a slow evolution and the retention of many ancestral features. Sturgeon MGP shows a primary structure, post-translation modifications, and patterns of mRNA/protein distribution and accumulation typical of known MGPs, and it contains seven possible Gla residues that would make the sturgeon protein the most γ-carboxylated among known MGPs. In contrast, sturgeon OC was found to present a hybrid structure. Indeed, although exhibiting protein domains typical of known OCs, it also contains structural features usually found in MGPs (e.g. a putative phosphorylated propeptide). Moreover, patterns of OC gene expression and protein accumulation overlap with those reported for MGP; OC was detected in bone cells and mineralized structures but also in soft and cartilaginous tissues. We propose that, in a context of a reduced rate of evolution, sturgeon OC has retained structural features of the ancestral protein that emerged millions of years ago from the duplication of an ancient MGP gene and may exhibit intermediate functional features.

  20. Involvement of Drosophila uncoupling protein 5 in metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blanco, Adolfo; Fridell, Yih-Woei C; Helfand, Stephen L

    2006-03-01

    A novel uncoupling protein, UCP5, has recently been characterized as a functional mitochondrial uncoupler in Drosophila. Here we demonstrate that UCP5 knockout (UCP5KO) flies are highly sensitive to starvation stress, a phenotype that can be reversed by ectopic neuronal expression of UCP5. UCP5KO flies live longer than controls on low-calorie diets, have a decreased level of fertility, and gain less weight than controls on high-calorie diets. However, isolated mitochondria from UCP5KO flies display the same respiration patterns as controls. Furthermore, total ATP levels in both UCP5KO and control flies are comparable. UCP5KO flies have a lower body composition of sugars, and during starvation stress their triglyceride reserves are depleted more rapidly than controls. Taken together, these data indicate that UCP5 is important to maintain metabolic homeostasis in the fly. We hypothesize that UCP5 influences hormonal control of metabolism.

  1. BLProt: prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence. Results In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated. Conclusion BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. The BLProt software is available at http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/bioluminescent%20protein/BLProt PMID:21849049

  2. Apolipoprotein A-IV: a protein intimately involved in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Kohan, Alison B.; Lo, Chun-Min; Liu, Min; Howles, Philip; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the physiological roles of apoA-IV in metabolism, and to underscore the potential for apoA-IV to be a focus for new therapies aimed at the treatment of diabetes and obesity-related disorders. ApoA-IV is primarily synthesized by the small intestine, attached to chylomicrons by enterocytes, and secreted into intestinal lymph during fat absorption. In circulation, apoA-IV is associated with HDL and chylomicron remnants, but a large portion is lipoprotein free. Due to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and because it can mediate reverse-cholesterol transport, proposed functions of circulating apoA-IV have been related to protection from cardiovascular disease. This review, however, focuses primarily on several properties of apoA-IV that impact other metabolic functions related to food intake, obesity, and diabetes. In addition to participating in triglyceride absorption, apoA-IV can act as an acute satiation factor through both peripheral and central routes of action. It also modulates glucose homeostasis through incretin-like effects on insulin secretion, and by moderating hepatic glucose production. While apoA-IV receptors remain to be conclusively identified, the latter modes of action suggest that this protein holds therapeutic promise for treating metabolic disease. PMID:25640749

  3. A Vicilin-Like Seed Storage Protein, PAP85, Is Involved in Tobacco Mosaic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-En; Yeh, Kuo-Chen; Wu, Shu-Hsing; Wang, Hsiang-Iu

    2013-01-01

    One striking feature of viruses with RNA genomes is the modification of the host membrane structure during early infection. This process requires both virus- and host-encoded proteins; however, the host factors involved and their role in this process remain largely unknown. On infection with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, the filamentous and tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) converts to aggregations at the early stage and returns to filamentous at the late infectious stage, termed the ER transition. Also, membrane- or vesicle-packaged viral replication complexes (VRCs) are induced early during infection. We used microarray assays to screen the Arabidopsis thaliana gene(s) responding to infection with TMV in the initial infection stage and identified an Arabidopsis gene, PAP85 (annotated as a vicilin-like seed storage protein), with upregulated expression during 0.5 to 6 h of TMV infection. TMV accumulation was reduced in pap85-RNA interference (RNAi) Arabidopsis and restored to wild-type levels when PAP85 was overexpressed in pap85-RNAi Arabidopsis. We did not observe the ER transition in TMV-infected PAP85-knockdown Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, TMV accumulation was reduced in PAP85-knockdown protoplasts. VRC accumulation was reduced, but not significantly (P = 0.06), in PAP85-knockdown protoplasts. Coexpression of PAP85 and the TMV main replicase (P126), but not their expression alone in Arabidopsis protoplasts, could induce ER aggregations. PMID:23576511

  4. Papillary thyroid carcinoma involving cervical neck lymph nodes: correlations with lymphangiogenesis and ultrasound features.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjung; Park, Kyung Joo; Ryu, Seungho; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Yun, Jisup; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Chun, Mison

    2012-01-01

    Stratification of risk factors for cervical lymph node metastasis (LNM) in thyroid papillary carcinoma is important for providing standards for post-operative adjuvant radio-iodine therapy and for patient prognosis. We investigated pathological factors based on the lymphatic vessel system and radiological features associated with tumor with cervical neck LNM. Among patients who had undergone thyroidectomy confirmed to be papillary thyroid carcinoma, we selected 126 age-sex matched paired patients without cervical LNM (group 1) and with LNM (group 2) to evaluate risk factors. Pathological factors evaluated were size, multiplicity, and extra thyroid extension state, based on the pathological reports using stored data. The lymphatic vessel density (LVD) of each tumor was evaluated by staining for VEGFR-3 and D2-40 and correlated with cervical LNM state. Malignant ultrasound features were evaluated to compare the differences between these two groups. Larger tumor size, multiplicity, extrathyroid extension were more common in group 2 (p<0.05). The median percentage of VEGFR-3 for group 1 was 20 (range 0-30) and D2-40 was 13 (range 7-23) while for group 2, VEGFR-3 was 80 (70-90) and D2-40 was 78 (54-114). LVD measured by intratumoral D2-40 staining was 20.6% and 79.4% for group 1 and group 2, respectively. Intra-tumoral lymphatics measured by D2-40 stain had a strong correlation with cervical LNM (Odds 1.230, CI 1.01.-1.499 p value 0.040). Ultrasound (US) features had no significant differences between the two groups although calcifications tended to be higher in group 2 (84% vs. 76% p=0.264). Lymphatic vessel density and nodule echogenicity were not associated with LNM. Intratumoral lymphangiogenesis was most strongly associated with LNM and thus, could be a useful predictive marker for cervical LNM.

  5. Identification of protein features encoded by alternative exons using Exon Ontology.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Aubé, Fabien; Dulaurier, Louis; Benoit-Pilven, Clara; Rey, Amandine; Poret, Arnaud; Chautard, Emilie; Mortada, Hussein; Desmet, François-Olivier; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Moreno-Garcia, Maira Alejandra; Goillot, Evelyne; Janczarski, Stéphane; Mortreux, Franck; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Auboeuf, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Transcriptomic genome-wide analyses demonstrate massive variation of alternative splicing in many physiological and pathological situations. One major challenge is now to establish the biological contribution of alternative splicing variation in physiological- or pathological-associated cellular phenotypes. Toward this end, we developed a computational approach, named "Exon Ontology," based on terms corresponding to well-characterized protein features organized in an ontology tree. Exon Ontology is conceptually similar to Gene Ontology-based approaches but focuses on exon-encoded protein features instead of gene level functional annotations. Exon Ontology describes the protein features encoded by a selected list of exons and looks for potential Exon Ontology term enrichment. By applying this strategy to exons that are differentially spliced between epithelial and mesenchymal cells and after extensive experimental validation, we demonstrate that Exon Ontology provides support to discover specific protein features regulated by alternative splicing. We also show that Exon Ontology helps to unravel biological processes that depend on suites of coregulated alternative exons, as we uncovered a role of epithelial cell-enriched splicing factors in the AKT signaling pathway and of mesenchymal cell-enriched splicing factors in driving splicing events impacting on autophagy. Freely available on the web, Exon Ontology is the first computational resource that allows getting a quick insight into the protein features encoded by alternative exons and investigating whether coregulated exons contain the same biological information. © 2017 Tranchevent et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. The Werner Syndrome Protein Is Involved in RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Machwe, Amrita; May, Alfred; Gray, Matthew D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, George M.; Nehlin, Jan O.; Brosh, Robert; Orren, David K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    1999-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human progeroid syndrome characterized by the early onset of a large number of clinical features associated with the normal aging process. The complex molecular and cellular phenotypes of WS involve characteristic features of genomic instability and accelerated replicative senescence. The gene involved (WRN) was recently cloned, and its gene product (WRNp) was biochemically characterized as a helicase. Helicases play important roles in a variety of DNA transactions, including DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. We have assessed the role of the WRN gene in transcription by analyzing the efficiency of basal transcription in WS lymphoblastoid cell lines that carry homozygous WRN mutations. Transcription was measured in permeabilized cells by [3H]UTP incorporation and in vitro by using a plasmid template containing the RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II)–dependent adenovirus major late promoter. With both of these approaches, we find that the transcription efficiency in different WS cell lines is reduced to 40–60% of the transcription in cells from normal individuals. This defect can be complemented by the addition of normal cell extracts to the chromatin of WS cells. Addition of purified wild-type WRNp but not mutated WRNp to the in vitro transcription assay markedly stimulates RNA pol II–dependent transcription carried out by nuclear extracts. A nonhelicase domain (a direct repeat of 27 amino acids) also appears to have a role in transcription enhancement, as revealed by a yeast hybrid–protein reporter assay. This is further supported by the lack of stimulation of transcription when mutant WRNp lacking this domain was added to the in vitro assay. We have thus used several approaches to show a role for WRNp in RNA pol II transcription, possibly as a transcriptional activator. A deficit in either global or regional transcription in WS cells may be a primary molecular defect responsible for the WS clinical phenotype

  7. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  8. Proliferative and necrotising otitis externa in a cat without pinnal involvement: video-otoscopic features.

    PubMed

    Borio, Stefano; Massari, Federico; Abramo, Francesca; Colombo, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Proliferative and necrotising otitis externa is a rare and recently described disease affecting the ear canals and concave pinnae of kittens. This article describes a case of proliferative and necrotising otits externa in a young adult cat. In this case, the lesions did not affected the pinnae, but both ear canals were severely involved. Video-otoscopy revealed a digitally proliferative lesion, growing at 360° all around the ear canals for their entire length, without involvement of the middle ear. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis, and the cat responded completely to a once-daily application of 0.1% tacrolimus ointment diluted in mineral oil in the ear canals. Video-otoscopy findings, not described previously, were very peculiar and may help clinicians to diagnose this rare disease.

  9. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  10. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes. PMID:26104144

  11. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes.

  12. A feature-based approach to modeling protein–protein interaction hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-01-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to π–related interactions, especially π · · · π interactions. PMID:19273533

  13. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  14. Intelligent computational model for classification of sub-Golgi protein using oversampling and fisher feature selection methods.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal; Javed, Faisal; Hayat, Maqsood

    2017-05-01

    Golgi is one of the core proteins of a cell, constitutes in both plants and animals, which is involved in protein synthesis. Golgi is responsible for receiving and processing the macromolecules and trafficking of newly processed protein to its intended destination. Dysfunction in Golgi protein is expected to cause many neurodegenerative and inherited diseases that may be cured well if they are detected effectively and timely. Golgi protein is categorized into two parts cis-Golgi and trans-Golgi. The identification of Golgi protein via direct method is very hard due to limited available recognized structures. Therefore, the researchers divert their attention toward the sequences from structures. However, owing to technological advancement, exploration of huge amount of sequences was reported in the databases. So recognition of large amount of unprocessed data using conventional methods is very difficult. Therefore, the concept of intelligence was incorporated with computational model. Intelligence based computational model obtained reasonable results, but the gap of improvement is still under consideration. In this regard, an intelligent automatic recognition model is developed in order to enhance the true classification rate of sub-Golgi proteins. In this approach, discrete and evolutionary feature extraction methods are applied on the benchmark Golgi protein datasets to excerpt salient, propound and variant numerical descriptors. After that, an oversampling technique Syntactic Minority over Sampling Technique is employed to balance the data. Hybrid spaces are also generated with combination of these feature spaces. Further, Fisher feature selection method is utilized to reduce the extra noisy and redundant features from feature vector. Finally, k-nearest neighbor algorithm is used as learning hypothesis. Three distinct cross validation tests are used to examine the stability and efficiency of the proposed model. The predicted outcomes of proposed model are better

  15. Features of an interactive writing discourse: conversational involvement, conventional knowledge, and internalization in "Morning Message".

    PubMed

    Mariage, T V

    2001-01-01

    This study describes how meaning potentials were constructed in the literacy event known as Morning Message. Morning Message provided teachers and students with opportunities to construct a written text around the experiences of one student. This discourse of writing allowed for the examination of how meaning was orchestrated and scaffolded between the teacher and her students. Three findings are discussed, including the function of a series of conversational involvement moves utilized by the teacher, the specific writing conventions and metamessages afforded in the Morning Message dialogue, and an examination of how the social dialogues of Morning Message may have come to guide independent action as internalized processes on several transfer measures.

  16. P-proteins in Arabidopsis are heteromeric structures involved in rapid sieve tube sealing

    PubMed Central

    Jekat, Stephan B.; Ernst, Antonia M.; von Bohl, Andreas; Zielonka, Sascia; Twyman, Richard M.; Noll, Gundula A.; Prüfer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Structural phloem proteins (P-proteins) are characteristic components of the sieve elements in all dicotyledonous and many monocotyledonous angiosperms. Tobacco P-proteins were recently confirmed to be encoded by the widespread sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, and tobacco SEO proteins were shown to be directly involved in sieve tube sealing thus preventing the loss of photosynthate. Analysis of the two Arabidopsis SEO proteins (AtSEOa and AtSEOb) indicated that the corresponding P-protein subunits do not act in a redundant manner. However, there are still pending questions regarding the interaction properties and specific functions of AtSEOa and AtSEOb as well as the general function of structural P-proteins in Arabidopsis. In this study, we characterized the Arabidopsis P-proteins in more detail. We used in planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the predicted heteromeric interactions between AtSEOa and AtSEOb. Arabidopsis mutants depleted for one or both AtSEO proteins lacked the typical P-protein structures normally found in sieve elements, underlining the identity of AtSEO proteins as P-proteins and furthermore providing the means to determine the role of Arabidopsis P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore developed an assay based on phloem exudation. Mutants with reduced AtSEO expression levels lost twice as much photosynthate following injury as comparable wild-type plants, confirming that Arabidopsis P-proteins are indeed involved in sieve tube sealing. PMID:23840197

  17. P-proteins in Arabidopsis are heteromeric structures involved in rapid sieve tube sealing.

    PubMed

    Jekat, Stephan B; Ernst, Antonia M; von Bohl, Andreas; Zielonka, Sascia; Twyman, Richard M; Noll, Gundula A; Prüfer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Structural phloem proteins (P-proteins) are characteristic components of the sieve elements in all dicotyledonous and many monocotyledonous angiosperms. Tobacco P-proteins were recently confirmed to be encoded by the widespread sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, and tobacco SEO proteins were shown to be directly involved in sieve tube sealing thus preventing the loss of photosynthate. Analysis of the two Arabidopsis SEO proteins (AtSEOa and AtSEOb) indicated that the corresponding P-protein subunits do not act in a redundant manner. However, there are still pending questions regarding the interaction properties and specific functions of AtSEOa and AtSEOb as well as the general function of structural P-proteins in Arabidopsis. In this study, we characterized the Arabidopsis P-proteins in more detail. We used in planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the predicted heteromeric interactions between AtSEOa and AtSEOb. Arabidopsis mutants depleted for one or both AtSEO proteins lacked the typical P-protein structures normally found in sieve elements, underlining the identity of AtSEO proteins as P-proteins and furthermore providing the means to determine the role of Arabidopsis P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore developed an assay based on phloem exudation. Mutants with reduced AtSEO expression levels lost twice as much photosynthate following injury as comparable wild-type plants, confirming that Arabidopsis P-proteins are indeed involved in sieve tube sealing.

  18. Large-scale identification of human protein function using topological features of interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanchao; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Wenqian; Huang, Menghua; Wu, Na; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2016-11-01

    The annotation of protein function is a vital step to elucidate the essence of life at a molecular level, and it is also meritorious in biomedical and pharmaceutical industry. Developments of sequencing technology result in constant expansion of the gap between the number of the known sequences and their functions. Therefore, it is indispensable to develop a computational method for the annotation of protein function. Herein, a novel method is proposed to identify protein function based on the weighted human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. The network topology features with local and global information are presented to characterise proteins. The minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm is used to select 227 optimized feature subsets and support vector machine technique is utilized to build the prediction models. The performance of current method is assessed through 10-fold cross-validation test, and the range of accuracies is from 67.63% to 100%. Comparing with other annotation methods, the proposed way possesses a 50% improvement in the predictive accuracy. Generally, such network topology features provide insights into the relationship between protein functions and network architectures. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors.

  19. Site selectivity for protein tyrosine nitration: insights from features of structure and topological network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shangli; Lian, Baofeng; Liang, Juan; Shi, Ting; Xie, Lu; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2013-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a covalent post-translational modification, which regulates protein functions such as hindering tyrosine phosphorylation and affecting essential signal transductions in cells. Based on up-to-date proteomics data, tyrosine nitration appears to be a highly selective process since not all tyrosine residues in proteins or all proteins are nitrated in vivo. Quite a few investigations included the protein structural information from the RCSB PDB database, where near 100,000 high-quality three-dimensional structures are available. In this work, we analyzed the local protein structures and amino acid topological networks of the nitrated and non-nitrated tyrosine sites in nitrated proteins, including neighboring atomic distribution, amino acid pair (AAP) and amino acid triangle (AAT). It has been found that aromatic and aliphatic residues, particularly with large volume, aromatic, aliphatic, or acidic side chains, are disfavored for the nitration. After integrating these structural features and topological network features with traditional sequence features, the predictive model achieves a sensitivity of 63.30% and a specificity of 92.24%, resulting in a much better accuracy compared to the previous models with only protein sequence information. Our investigation implies that the site selectivity may stem from a more open, hydrophilic and high-pH chemical environment around the tyrosine residue.

  20. Large-scale identification of human protein function using topological features of interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanchao; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Wenqian; Huang, Menghua; Wu, Na; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    The annotation of protein function is a vital step to elucidate the essence of life at a molecular level, and it is also meritorious in biomedical and pharmaceutical industry. Developments of sequencing technology result in constant expansion of the gap between the number of the known sequences and their functions. Therefore, it is indispensable to develop a computational method for the annotation of protein function. Herein, a novel method is proposed to identify protein function based on the weighted human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. The network topology features with local and global information are presented to characterise proteins. The minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm is used to select 227 optimized feature subsets and support vector machine technique is utilized to build the prediction models. The performance of current method is assessed through 10-fold cross-validation test, and the range of accuracies is from 67.63% to 100%. Comparing with other annotation methods, the proposed way possesses a 50% improvement in the predictive accuracy. Generally, such network topology features provide insights into the relationship between protein functions and network architectures. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors. PMID:27849060

  1. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using a random forest model with hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces provides crucial information for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. Existing machine learning methods generally judge whether a given residue is likely to be a hot spot by extracting features only from the target residue. However, hot spots usually form a small cluster of residues which are tightly packed together at the center of protein interface. With this in mind, we present a novel method to extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatially neighboring residues, i.e. the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). We provide a novel random forest (RF) model to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. Our method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.482 in Alanine Scanning Energetics Database, and ACC of 77.6% and MCC of 0.429 in Binding Interface Database. In a comparison study, performance of our RF model exceeds other existing methods, such as Robetta, FOLDEF, KFC, KFC2, MINERVA and HotPoint. Of our hybrid features, three physicochemical features of target residues (mass, polarizability and isoelectric point), the relative side-chain accessible surface area and the average depth index of mirror-contact residues are found to be the main discriminative features in hot spots prediction. We also confirm that hot spots tend to form large contact surface areas between two interacting proteins. Source data and code are available at: http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/HotSpot.

  2. FALDO: a semantic standard for describing the location of nucleotide and protein feature annotation

    DOE PAGES

    Bolleman, Jerven T.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Strozzi, Francesco; ...

    2016-06-13

    Nucleotide and protein sequence feature annotations are essential to understand biology on the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic level. Using Semantic Web technologies to query biological annotations, there was no standard that described this potentially complex location information as subject-predicate-object triples. In this paper, we have developed an ontology, the Feature Annotation Location Description Ontology (FALDO), to describe the positions of annotated features on linear and circular sequences. FALDO can be used to describe nucleotide features in sequence records, protein annotations, and glycan binding sites, among other features in coordinate systems of the aforementioned “omics” areas. Using the same data formatmore » to represent sequence positions that are independent of file formats allows us to integrate sequence data from multiple sources and data types. The genome browser JBrowse is used to demonstrate accessing multiple SPARQL endpoints to display genomic feature annotations, as well as protein annotations from UniProt mapped to genomic locations. Our ontology allows users to uniformly describe – and potentially merge – sequence annotations from multiple sources. Finally, data sources using FALDO can prospectively be retrieved using federalised SPARQL queries against public SPARQL endpoints and/or local private triple stores.« less

  3. FALDO: a semantic standard for describing the location of nucleotide and protein feature annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolleman, Jerven T.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Strozzi, Francesco; Baran, Joachim; Dumontier, Michel; Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Buels, Robert; Hoehndorf, Robert; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Katayama, Toshiaki; Cock, Peter J. A.

    2016-06-13

    Nucleotide and protein sequence feature annotations are essential to understand biology on the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic level. Using Semantic Web technologies to query biological annotations, there was no standard that described this potentially complex location information as subject-predicate-object triples. In this paper, we have developed an ontology, the Feature Annotation Location Description Ontology (FALDO), to describe the positions of annotated features on linear and circular sequences. FALDO can be used to describe nucleotide features in sequence records, protein annotations, and glycan binding sites, among other features in coordinate systems of the aforementioned “omics” areas. Using the same data format to represent sequence positions that are independent of file formats allows us to integrate sequence data from multiple sources and data types. The genome browser JBrowse is used to demonstrate accessing multiple SPARQL endpoints to display genomic feature annotations, as well as protein annotations from UniProt mapped to genomic locations. Our ontology allows users to uniformly describe – and potentially merge – sequence annotations from multiple sources. Finally, data sources using FALDO can prospectively be retrieved using federalised SPARQL queries against public SPARQL endpoints and/or local private triple stores.

  4. Cardiac involvement as the main presenting feature in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Neil; Millar, Auleen; Pendleton, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis is usually characterised by asthma, allergic rhinitis and peripheral eosinophilia. Presentations can vary greatly especially when there is cardiac involvement as demonstrated in these two case reports. Patient A initially presented to casualty with severe sinus pain and was diagnosed with severe sinonasal polyposis. After routine nasal polypectomy he had a cardiac arrest and was transferred to intensive care. Patient B presented to his general practitioner with a 4-week history of breathlessness, joint pain and a rash resulting in admission to hospital. Both patients had significant eosinophilia on routine bloods. High-sensitivity troponin T levels were raised in both; however, patient B's was significantly higher. Patient A had a large pericardial effusion on echo, the aspirate of which revealed numerous eosinophils. Patient B's echo was normal. Patient A's cardiac MRI was normal while Patient B's revealed myocarditis. Both were successfully treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. PMID:23853013

  5. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Bergeron, Sadie A; Tabor, Kathryn M; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-04-20

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3' untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models.

  6. Structural feature extraction protocol for classifying reversible membrane binding protein domains.

    PubMed

    Källberg, Morten; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Machine learning based classification protocols for automated function annotation of protein structures have in many instances proven superior to simpler sequence based procedures. Here we present an automated method for extracting features from protein structures by construction of surface patches to be used in such protocols. The utility of the developed patch-growing procedure is exemplified by its ability to identify reversible membrane binding domains from the C1, C2, and PH families.

  7. Bead Based Proteome Enrichment Enhances Features of the Protein Elution Plate (PEP) for Functional Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Davies, Michael; Roy, Swapan; Kuruc, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    A novel functional proteomics technology called PEP(Protein Elution Plate) was developed to separate complex proteomes from natural sources and analyze protein functions systematically. The technology takes advantage of the powerful resolution of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D Gels). The modification of electrophoretic conditions in combination with a high-resolution protein elution plate supports the recovery of functionally active proteins. As 2DE(2-Dimensional Electrophoresis) resolution can be limited by protein load, we investigated the use of bead based enrichment technologies, called AlbuVoid™ and KinaSorb™ to determine their effect on the proteomic features which can be generated from the PEP platform. Using a variety of substrates and enzyme activity assays, we report on the benefits of combining bead based enrichment to improve the signal report and the features generated for Hexokinase, Protein Kinase, Protease, and Alkaline Phosphatase activities. As a result, the PEP technology allows systematic analysis of large enzyme families and can build a comprehensive picture of protein function from a complex proteome, providing biological insights that could otherwise not be observed if only protein abundances were analyzed. PMID:28248280

  8. FASTERp: A Feature Array Search Tool for Estimating Resemblance of Protein Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, Derek; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2014-03-14

    Metagenome sequencing efforts have provided a large pool of billions of genes for identifying enzymes with desirable biochemical traits. However, homology search with billions of genes in a rapidly growing database has become increasingly computationally impractical. Here we present our pilot efforts to develop a novel alignment-free algorithm for homology search. Specifically, we represent individual proteins as feature vectors that denote the presence or absence of short kmers in the protein sequence. Similarity between feature vectors is then computed using the Tanimoto score, a distance metric that can be rapidly computed on bit string representations of feature vectors. Preliminary results indicate good correlation with optimal alignment algorithms (Spearman r of 0.87, ~;;1,000,000 proteins from Pfam), as well as with heuristic algorithms such as BLAST (Spearman r of 0.86, ~;;1,000,000 proteins). Furthermore, a prototype of FASTERp implemented in Python runs approximately four times faster than BLAST on a small scale dataset (~;;1000 proteins). We are optimizing and scaling to improve FASTERp to enable rapid homology searches against billion-protein databases, thereby enabling more comprehensive gene annotation efforts.

  9. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  10. Transcriptional coexpression network reveals the involvement of varying stem cell features with different dysregulations in different gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kalamohan, Kalaivani; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Bhaskar Rao, Divya; Barnabas, Georgina D; Ponnaiyan, Srigayatri; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2014-10-01

    Despite the advancements in the cancer therapeutics, gastric cancer ranks as the second most common cancers with high global mortality rate. Integrative functional genomic investigation is a powerful approach to understand the major dysregulations and to identify the potential targets toward the development of targeted therapeutics for various cancers. Intestinal and diffuse type gastric tumors remain the major subtypes and the molecular determinants and drivers of these distinct subtypes remain unidentified. In this investigation, by exploring the network of gene coexpression association in gastric tumors, mRNA expressions of 20,318 genes across 200 gastric tumors were categorized into 21 modules. The genes and the hub genes of the modules show gastric cancer subtype specific expression. The expression patterns of the modules were correlated with intestinal and diffuse subtypes as well as with the differentiation status of gastric tumors. Among these, G1 module has been identified as a major driving force of diffuse type gastric tumors with the features of (i) enriched mesenchymal, mesenchymal stem cell like, and mesenchymal derived multiple lineages, (ii) elevated OCT1 mediated transcription, (iii) involvement of Notch activation, and (iv) reduced polycomb mediated epigenetic repression. G13 module has been identified as key factor in intestinal type gastric tumors and found to have the characteristic features of (i) involvement of embryonic stem cell like properties, (ii) Wnt, MYC and E2F mediated transcription programs, and (iii) involvement of polycomb mediated repression. Thus the differential transcription programs, differential epigenetic regulation and varying stem cell features involved in two major subtypes of gastric cancer were delineated by exploring the gene coexpression network. The identified subtype specific dysregulations could be optimally employed in developing subtype specific therapeutic targeting strategies for gastric cancer.

  11. Dominant-negative mutants of a yeast G-protein beta subunit identify two functional regions involved in pheromone signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Hougan, L; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    1992-01-01

    The STE4 gene, which encodes the beta subunit of the mating response G-protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was subjected to a saturation mutagenesis using 'doped' oligodeoxynucleotides. We employed a genetic screen to select dominant-negative STE4 mutants, which when overexpressed from the GAL1 promoter, interfered with the signalling function of the wild type protein. The identified inhibitory amino acid alterations define two small regions that are crucially involved in transmitting the mating signal from G beta to downstream components of the signalling pathway. These results underline the positive signalling role of yeast G beta and assign for the first time the positive signalling function of a G-protein beta subunit to specific structural features. Images PMID:1464310

  12. Unusual features of protein interaction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virions.

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaya, A G; Sharova, N K

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of HIV-1 virions with ionic and nonionic detergents (NP 40, octylglucoside, Na deoxycholate) resulted in an effect unusual for enveloped viruses: instead of solubilization of glycoproteins, the core protein p24 was solubilized while envelope glycoproteins with other structural proteins were found in subviral particles. These data are consistent with a model of HIV structural organization in which glycoproteins are included in the matrix formed by the protein p 17 and suggest that p24 is neither involved in the matrix nor closely bound to any viral proteins.

  13. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content.

  14. A high content in lipid-modified peripheral proteins and integral receptor kinases features in the arabidopsis plasma membrane proteome.

    PubMed

    Marmagne, Anne; Ferro, Myriam; Meinnel, Thierry; Bruley, Christophe; Kuhn, Lauriane; Garin, Jérome; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène; Ephritikhine, Geneviève

    2007-11-01

    The proteomics of plasma membrane has brought to date only scarce and partial information on the actual protein repertoire. In this work, the plant plasma membrane proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. A highly purified plasma membrane fraction was washed by NaCl and Na2CO3 salts, and the insoluble fractions were further analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS. With 446 proteins identified, we hereby describe the largest plasma membrane proteome diversity reported so far. Half of the proteins were predicted to display transmembrane domains and/or to be anchored to the membrane, validating a posteriori the pertinence of the approach. A fine analysis highlighted two main specific and novel features. First, the main functional category is represented by a majority of as yet unreported signaling proteins, including 11% receptor-like kinases. Second, 16% of the identified proteins are predicted to be lipid-modified, specifically involving double lipid linkage through N-terminal myristoylation, S-palmitoylation, C-terminal prenylation, or glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. Thus, our approach led for the first time to the identification of a large number of peripheral proteins as part of the plasma membrane and allowed the functionality of the plasma membrane in the cell context to be reconsidered.

  15. Do mammographic tumor features in breast cancer relate to breast density and invasiveness, tumor size, and axillary lymph node involvement?

    PubMed

    Sartor, Hanna; Borgquist, Signe; Hartman, Linda; Olsson, Åsa; Jawdat, Faith; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-05-01

    Breast density and mammographic tumor features of breast cancer may carry prognostic information. The potential benefit of using the combined information obtained from breast density, mammographic tumor features, and pathological tumor characteristics has not been extensively studied. To investigate how mammographic tumor features relate to breast density and pathological tumor characteristics. This retrospective study was carried out within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study: a population-based cohort study recruiting 17,035 women during 1991-1996. A total of 826 incident breast cancers were identified during follow-up. Mammography images were collected and analyzed according to breast density and tumor features at diagnosis. Pathological data were retrieved from medical reports. Mammographic tumor features in relation to invasiveness, tumor size, and axillary lymph node involvement were analyzed using logistic regression yielding odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and adjusted for age at diagnosis, mode of detection, and breast density. Tumors presenting as an ill-defined mass or calcifications were more common in dense breasts than tumors presenting as a distinct mass or with spiculated appearance. Invasive cancer was more common in tumors with spiculated appearance than tumors presenting as a distinct mass (adjusted OR, 5.68 [1.81-17.84]). Among invasive tumors, an ill-defined mass was more often large (>20 mm) compared with a distinct mass, (adjusted OR, 3.16 [1.80-5.55]). Tumors presenting as an ill-defined mass or calcifications were more common in dense breasts. Spiculated appearance was related to invasiveness, and ill-defined mass to larger tumor size, regardless of mode of detection and breast density. The potential role of mammographic tumor features in clinical decision-making warrants further investigation. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. An Ensemble Method with Hybrid Features to Identify Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic composite of secreted proteins that play important roles in numerous biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Furthermore, various diseases are caused by the dysfunction of ECM proteins. Therefore, identifying these important ECM proteins may assist in understanding related biological processes and drug development. In view of the serious imbalance in the training dataset, a Random Forest-based ensemble method with hybrid features is developed in this paper to identify ECM proteins. Hybrid features are employed by incorporating sequence composition, physicochemical properties, evolutionary and structural information. The Information Gain Ratio and Incremental Feature Selection (IGR-IFS) methods are adopted to select the optimal features. Finally, the resulting predictor termed IECMP (Identify ECM Proteins) achieves an balanced accuracy of 86.4% using the 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, which is much higher than results obtained by other methods (ECMPRED: 71.0%, ECMPP: 77.8%). Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves significantly improved performance over ECMPP and ECMPRED. These results indicate that IECMP is an effective method for ECM protein prediction, which has a more balanced prediction capability for positive and negative samples. It is anticipated that the proposed method will provide significant information to fully decipher the molecular mechanisms of ECM-related biological processes and discover candidate drug targets. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for ECM protein identification that is freely accessible at http://iecmp.weka.cc. PMID:25680094

  17. Prediction of Protein Structural Class Based on Gapped-Dipeptides and a Recursive Feature Selection Approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Yongjie; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-12-24

    The prior knowledge of protein structural class may offer useful clues on understanding its functionality as well as its tertiary structure. Though various significant efforts have been made to find a fast and effective computational approach to address this problem, it is still a challenging topic in the field of bioinformatics. The position-specific score matrix (PSSM) profile has been shown to provide a useful source of information for improving the prediction performance of protein structural class. However, this information has not been adequately explored. To this end, in this study, we present a feature extraction technique which is based on gapped-dipeptides composition computed directly from PSSM. Then, a careful feature selection technique is performed based on support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE). These optimal features are selected to construct a final predictor. The results of jackknife tests on four working datasets show that our method obtains satisfactory prediction accuracies by extracting features solely based on PSSM and could serve as a very promising tool to predict protein structural class.

  18. Protein subcellular localization of fluorescence imagery using spatial and transform domain features.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad; Khan, Asifullah; Majid, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Subcellular localization of proteins is one of the most significant characteristics of living cells. Prediction of protein subcellular locations is crucial to the understanding of various protein functions. Therefore, an accurate, computationally efficient and reliable prediction system is required. In this article, the predictions of various Support Vector Machine (SVM) models have been combined through majority voting. The proposed ensemble SVM-SubLoc has achieved the highest success rates of 99.7% using hybrid features of Haralick textures and local binary patterns (HarLBP), 99.4% using hybrid features of Haralick textures and Local Ternary Patterns (HarLTP). In addition, SVM-SubLoc has yielded 99.0% accuracy using only local ternary patterns (LTPs) based features. The dimensionality of HarLBP feature vector is 581 compared with 78 and 52 for HarLTP and LTPs, respectively. Hence, SVM-SubLoc in conjunction with LTPs is fast, sufficiently accurate and simple predictive system. The proposed SVM-SubLoc approach thus provides superior prediction performance using the reduced feature space compared with existing approaches. A web server accompanying the proposed prediction scheme is available at http://111.68.99.218/ SVM-SubLoc asif@pieas.edu.pk; khan.asifullah@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. [Experience in simulating the structural and dynamic features of small proteins using table supercomputers].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'ev, M S; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Khechinashvili, N N; Samchenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the structural and dynamic features of peptides and small proteins have been presented that were carried out by quantum chemical and molecular dynamics methods in high-performance graphic stations, "table supercomputers", using distributed calculations by the CUDA technology.

  20. Involvement of Iron-Containing Proteins in Genome Integrity in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes numerous iron-containing proteins such as iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster proteins and hemoproteins. These proteins generally utilize iron as a cofactor, and they perform critical roles in photosynthesis, genome stability, electron transfer, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to maintain iron homeostasis for the assembly of functional iron-containing proteins, thereby ensuring genome stability, cell development, and plant growth. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron-containing proteins and their functions involved in genome stability has expanded enormously. In this review, I provide the current perspectives on iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis, followed by a summary of iron-containing protein functions involved in genome stability maintenance and a discussion of their possible molecular mechanisms. PMID:27330736

  1. The anterior temporal lobes are critically involved in acquiring new conceptual knowledge: evidence for impaired feature integration in semantic dementia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul; Evans, Gemma A L; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from multiple neuroscience techniques indicates that regions within the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) are a critical node in the neural network for representing conceptual knowledge, yet their function remains elusive. The hub-and-spoke model holds that ATL regions act as a transmodal conceptual hub, distilling the various sensory-motor features of objects and words into integrated, coherent conceptual representations. Single-cell recordings in monkeys suggest that the ATLs are critically involved in visual associative learning; however, investigations of this region in humans have focused on existing knowledge rather than learning. We studied acquisition of new concepts in semantic dementia patients, who have cortical damage centred on the ventrolateral aspects of the ATLs. Patients learned to assign abstract visual stimuli to two categories. The categories conformed to a family resemblance structure in which no individual stimulus features were fully diagnostic; thus the task required participants to form representations that integrate multiple features into a single concept. Patients were unable to do this, instead responding only on the basis of individual features. The study reveals that integrating disparate sources of information into novel coherent concepts is a critical computational function of the ATLs. This explains the central role of this region in conceptual representation and the catastrophic breakdown of concepts in semantic dementia.

  2. Compositional features are potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression of tumor suppressor genes in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Khoshnevisan, Atefeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2014-12-15

    Different mechanisms regulate the expression level of tissue specific genes in human. Here we report some compositional features such as codon usage bias, amino acid usage bias, codon frequency, and base composition which may be potentially related to mRNA amount of tissue specific tumor suppressor genes. Our findings support the possibility that structural elements in gene and protein may play an important role in the regulation of tumor suppressor genes, development, and tumorigenesis. The data presented here can open broad vistas in the understanding and treatment of a variety of human malignancies.

  3. Predicting bacteriophage proteins located in host cell with feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Feng-Biao; Huang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage is a virus that can infect a bacterium. The fate of an infected bacterium is determined by the bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell. Thus, reliably identifying bacteriophage proteins located in the host cell is extremely important to understand their functions and discover potential anti-bacterial drugs. Thus, in this paper, a computational method was developed to recognize bacteriophage proteins located in host cells based only on their amino acid sequences. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was proposed to optimize the feature set. Using a jackknife cross-validation, our method can discriminate between bacteriophage proteins located in a host cell and the bacteriophage proteins not located in a host cell with a maximum overall accuracy of 84.2%, and can further classify bacteriophage proteins located in host cell cytoplasm and in host cell membranes with a maximum overall accuracy of 92.4%. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the method, we built a web server called PHPred (〈http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PHPred〉). We believe that the PHPred will become a powerful tool to study bacteriophage proteins located in host cells and to guide related drug discovery.

  4. Features analysis for identification of date and party hubs in protein interaction network of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mirzarezaee, Mitra; Araabi, Babak N; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2010-12-19

    It has been understood that biological networks have modular organizations which are the sources of their observed complexity. Analysis of networks and motifs has shown that two types of hubs, party hubs and date hubs, are responsible for this complexity. Party hubs are local coordinators because of their high co-expressions with their partners, whereas date hubs display low co-expressions and are assumed as global connectors. However there is no mutual agreement on these concepts in related literature with different studies reporting their results on different data sets. We investigated whether there is a relation between the biological features of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae's proteins and their roles as non-hubs, intermediately connected, party hubs, and date hubs. We propose a classifier that separates these four classes. We extracted different biological characteristics including amino acid sequences, domain contents, repeated domains, functional categories, biological processes, cellular compartments, disordered regions, and position specific scoring matrix from various sources. Several classifiers are examined and the best feature-sets based on average correct classification rate and correlation coefficients of the results are selected. We show that fusion of five feature-sets including domains, Position Specific Scoring Matrix-400, cellular compartments level one, and composition pairs with two and one gaps provide the best discrimination with an average correct classification rate of 77%. We study a variety of known biological feature-sets of the proteins and show that there is a relation between domains, Position Specific Scoring Matrix-400, cellular compartments level one, composition pairs with two and one gaps of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae's proteins, and their roles in the protein interaction network as non-hubs, intermediately connected, party hubs and date hubs. This study also confirms the possibility of predicting non-hubs, party hubs and date hubs

  5. Involvement of Synaptonemal Complex Proteins in Sex Chromosome Segregation during Marsupial Male Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jesús; Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; de la Fuente, Roberto; Suja, José Ángel; Prieto, Ignacio; Barbero, José Luis; Rufas, Julio S; Berríos, Soledad; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl

    2006-01-01

    Marsupial sex chromosomes break the rule that recombination during first meiotic prophase is necessary to ensure reductional segregation during first meiotic division. It is widely accepted that in marsupials X and Y chromosomes do not share homologous regions, and during male first meiotic prophase the synaptonemal complex is absent between them. Although these sex chromosomes do not recombine, they segregate reductionally in anaphase I. We have investigated the nature of sex chromosome association in spermatocytes of the marsupial Thylamys elegans, in order to discern the mechanisms involved in ensuring their proper segregation. We focused on the localization of the axial/lateral element protein SCP3 and the cohesin subunit STAG3. Our results show that X and Y chromosomes never appear as univalents in metaphase I, but they remain associated until they orientate and segregate to opposite poles. However, they must not be tied by a chiasma since their separation precedes the release of the sister chromatid cohesion. Instead, we show they are associated by the dense plate, a SCP3-rich structure that is organized during the first meiotic prophase and that is still present at metaphase I. Surprisingly, the dense plate incorporates SCP1, the main protein of the central element of the synaptonemal complex, from diplotene until telophase I. Once sex chromosomes are under spindle tension, they move to opposite poles losing contact with the dense plate and undergoing early segregation. Thus, the segregation of the achiasmatic T. elegans sex chromosomes seems to be ensured by the presence in metaphase I of a synaptonemal complex-derived structure. This feature, unique among vertebrates, indicates that synaptonemal complex elements may play a role in chromosome segregation. PMID:16934004

  6. Distilling the essential features of a protein surface for improving protein-ligand docking, scoring, and virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodszky, Maria I.; Sanschagrin, Paul C.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Korde, Rajesh S.

    2002-12-01

    For the successful identification and docking of new ligands to a protein target by virtual screening, the essential features of the protein and ligand surfaces must be captured and distilled in an efficient representation. Since the running time for docking increases exponentially with the number of points representing the protein and each ligand candidate, it is important to place these points where the best interactions can be made between the protein and the ligand. This definition of favorable points of interaction can also guide protein structure-based ligand design, which typically focuses on which chemical groups provide the most energetically favorable contacts. In this paper, we present an alternative method of protein template and ligand interaction point design that identifies the most favorable points for making hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions by using a knowledge base. The knowledge-based protein and ligand representations have been incorporated in version 2.0 of SLIDE and resulted in dockings closer to the crystal structure orientations when screening a set of 57 known thrombin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) ligands against the apo structures of these proteins. There was also improved scoring enrichment of the dockings, meaning better differentiation between the chemically diverse known ligands and a ˜15,000-molecule dataset of randomly-chosen small organic molecules. This approach for identifying the most important points of interaction between proteins and their ligands can equally well be used in other docking and design techniques. While much recent effort has focused on improving scoring functions for protein-ligand docking, our results indicate that improving the representation of the chemistry of proteins and their ligands is another avenue that can lead to significant improvements in the identification, docking, and scoring of ligands.

  7. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  8. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, Paolo; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  9. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants.

  10. Self protein-protein interactions are involved in TPPP/p25 mediated microtubule bundling

    PubMed Central

    DeBonis, Salvatore; Neumann, Emmanuelle; Skoufias, Dimitrios A.

    2015-01-01

    TPPP/p25 is a microtubule-associated protein, detected in protein inclusions associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion analysis data show that TPPP/p25 has two microtubule binding sites, both located in intrinsically disordered domains, one at the N-terminal and the other in the C-terminal domain. In copolymerization assays the full-length protein exhibits microtubule stimulation and bundling activity. In contrast, at the same ratio relative to tubulin, truncated forms of TPPP/p25 exhibit either lower or no microtubule stimulation and no bundling activity, suggesting a cooperative phenomenon which is enhanced by the presence of the two binding sites. The binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminally truncated proteins to taxol-stabilized microtubules are similar to the full-length protein. However, the C-terminally truncated TPPP/p25 shows a lower Bmax for microtubule binding, suggesting that it may bind to a site of tubulin that is masked in microtubules. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays in cells expressing combinations of various TPPP/p25 fragments, but not that of the central folded domain, resulted in the generation of a fluorescence signal colocalized with perinuclear microtubule bundles insensitive to microtubule inhibitors. The data suggest that the central folded domain of TPPP/p25 following binding to microtubules can drive s homotypic protein-protein interactions leading to bundled microtubules. PMID:26289831

  11. Inherited diseases involving g proteins and g protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen M; Weinstein, Lee S

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins couple seven-transmembrane receptors for diverse extracellular signals to effectors that generate intracellular signals altering cell function. Mutations in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the G protein-coupling receptors to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase cause developmental abnormalities of bone, as well as hormone resistance (pseudohypoparathyroidism caused by loss-of-function mutations) and hormone hypersecretion (McCune-Albright syndrome caused by gain-of-function mutations). Loss- and gain-of-function mutations in genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified as the cause of an increasing number of retinal, endocrine, metabolic, and developmental disorders. GPCRs comprise an evolutionarily conserved gene superfamily ( 1 ). By coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins, GPCRs transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals including monoamine, amino acid, and nucleoside neurotransmitters, as well as photons, chemical odorants, divalent cations, hormones, lipids, peptides and proteins. Following a brief overview of G protein-coupled signal transduction, we review the growing body of evidence that mutations in genes encoding GPCRs and G proteins are an important cause of human disease.

  12. Exocyst Sec10 is involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2012-01-01

    Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane consists of three main subunits: Sec61α, -β, and -γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others have shown that the highly conserved eight-protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We have also shown that the exocyst is involved in basolateral, not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery has been reported. Furthermore, we have shown that the exocyst is necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and (35)S-methionine for protein detection were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P(32)-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced exocyst recruitment to endoplasmic reticulum membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus protein translation, compared to apical hemagglutinin of influenza virus protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Neuron membrane trafficking and protein kinases involved in autism and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Minami, Akari; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Matsuda, Satoru

    2015-01-30

    A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT). AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Łukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane. PMID:24781695

  15. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Antonia M; Jekat, Stephan B; Zielonka, Sascia; Müller, Boje; Neumann, Ulla; Rüping, Boris; Twyman, Richard M; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2012-07-10

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family originally was delimited to genes encoding structural components of forisomes, which are specialized crystalloid phloem proteins found solely in the Fabaceae. More recently, SEO genes discovered in various non-Fabaceae plants were proposed to encode the common phloem proteins (P-proteins) that plug sieve plates after wounding. We carried out a comprehensive characterization of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SEO genes (NtSEO). Reporter genes controlled by the NtSEO promoters were expressed specifically in immature sieve elements, and GFP-SEO fusion proteins formed parietal agglomerates in intact sieve elements as well as sieve plate plugs after wounding. NtSEO proteins with and without fluorescent protein tags formed agglomerates similar in structure to native P-protein bodies when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and the analysis of these protein complexes by electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural features resembling those of native P-proteins. NtSEO-RNA interference lines were essentially devoid of P-protein structures and lost photoassimilates more rapidly after injury than control plants, thus confirming the role of P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore provide direct evidence that SEO genes in tobacco encode P-protein subunits that affect translocation. We also found that peptides recently identified in fascicular phloem P-protein plugs from squash (Cucurbita maxima) represent cucurbit members of the SEO family. Our results therefore suggest a common evolutionary origin for P-proteins found in the sieve elements of all dicotyledonous plants and demonstrate the exceptional status of extrafascicular P-proteins in cucurbits.

  16. Defense-related proteins involved in sugarcane responses to biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thais P; Dias, Renata O; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2017-02-20

    Sugarcane is one of the most important agricultural crops in the world. However, pathogen infection and herbivore attack cause constant losses in yield. Plants respond to pathogen infection by inducing the expression of several protein types, such as glucanases, chitinases, thaumatins, peptidase inhibitors, defensins, catalases and glycoproteins. Proteins induced by pathogenesis are directly or indirectly involved in plant defense, leading to pathogen death or inducing other plant defense responses. Several of these proteins are induced in sugarcane by different pathogens or insects and have antifungal or insecticidal activity. In this review, defense-related proteins in sugarcane are described, with their putative mechanisms of action, pathogen targets and biotechnological perspectives.

  17. Association of ADAM12-S protein with radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis and bone and cartilage markers.

    PubMed

    Kerna, I; Kisand, K; Laitinen, P; Tamm, A E; Kumm, J; Lintrop, M; Tamm, A O

    2012-02-01

    ADAM12 (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) is one of the candidate genes demonstrating susceptibility to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between ADAM12-S protein and radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and its correlation to several bone and cartilage biomarkers. The ADAM12-S protein was measured in 276 subjects (60% women, aged 32-60 years), including 181 individuals with and 95 without radiographic KOA features. The radiographs were obtained from both tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) joints. The serum levels of ADAM12-S protein were measured by DELFIA1/AutoDELFIA research kit. The ADAM12-S protein was found in detectable ranges in 43 subjects (16 men), without statistical difference between the two genders. In the whole group, the ADAM12-S was related to radiographic KOA grades in TF (P = 0.004) as well in PF joint (P = 0.003). We also found a correlation between ADAM12-S protein and osteophytes in TF and/or PF joints (P = 0.003). No correlations were found between serum levels of S-CTx-I (C-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen) or S-PINP (type I procollagen N-terminal propeptide) and ADAM12-S. Similarly, in the whole group, the ADAM12-S protein was not correlated with U-CTx-II (urinary C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen); however, in the female group, trend to positive correlation between the investigated biomarkers (P = 0.019) was observed. The ADAM12-S protein could be elevated in some KOA cases, and this elevation correlates with the grades of the disease, mostly owning to development of osteophytes. This finding suggests the possible involvement of the ADAM12-S protein in the pathogenesis of KOA.

  18. The Deceptively Simple N170 Reflects Network Information Processing Mechanisms Involving Visual Feature Coding and Transfer Across Hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Robin A. A.; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Gross, Joachim; Panzeri, Stefano; van Rijsbergen, Nicola J.; Rousselet, Guillaume A.; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    A key to understanding visual cognition is to determine “where”, “when”, and “how” brain responses reflect the processing of the specific visual features that modulate categorization behavior—the “what”. The N170 is the earliest Event-Related Potential (ERP) that preferentially responds to faces. Here, we demonstrate that a paradigmatic shift is necessary to interpret the N170 as the product of an information processing network that dynamically codes and transfers face features across hemispheres, rather than as a local stimulus-driven event. Reverse-correlation methods coupled with information-theoretic analyses revealed that visibility of the eyes influences face detection behavior. The N170 initially reflects coding of the behaviorally relevant eye contralateral to the sensor, followed by a causal communication of the other eye from the other hemisphere. These findings demonstrate that the deceptively simple N170 ERP hides a complex network information processing mechanism involving initial coding and subsequent cross-hemispheric transfer of visual features. PMID:27550865

  19. Protein single-model quality assessment by feature-based probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-04-04

    Protein quality assessment (QA) has played an important role in protein structure prediction. We developed a novel single-model quality assessment method-Qprob. Qprob calculates the absolute error for each protein feature value against the true quality scores (i.e. GDT-TS scores) of protein structural models, and uses them to estimate its probability density distribution for quality assessment. Qprob has been blindly tested on the 11th Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP11) as MULTICOM-NOVEL server. The official CASP result shows that Qprob ranks as one of the top single-model QA methods. In addition, Qprob makes contributions to our protein tertiary structure predictor MULTICOM, which is officially ranked 3rd out of 143 predictors. The good performance shows that Qprob is good at assessing the quality of models of hard targets. These results demonstrate that this new probability density distribution based method is effective for protein single-model quality assessment and is useful for protein structure prediction. The webserver of Qprob is available at: http://calla.rnet.missouri.edu/qprob/. The software is now freely available in the web server of Qprob.

  20. Simple Topological Features Reflect Dynamics and Modularity in Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pritykin, Yuri; Singh, Mona

    2013-01-01

    The availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction networks for numerous organisms provides an opportunity to comprehensively analyze whether simple properties of proteins are predictive of the roles they play in the functional organization of the cell. We begin by re-examining an influential but controversial characterization of the dynamic modularity of the S. cerevisiae interactome that incorporated gene expression data into network analysis. We analyse the protein-protein interaction networks of five organisms, S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana, and E. coli, and confirm significant and consistent functional and structural differences between hub proteins that are co-expressed with their interacting partners and those that are not, and support the view that the former tend to be intramodular whereas the latter tend to be intermodular. However, we also demonstrate that in each of these organisms, simple topological measures are significantly correlated with the average co-expression of a hub with its partners, independent of any classification, and therefore also reflect protein intra- and inter- modularity. Further, cross-interactomic analysis demonstrates that these simple topological characteristics of hub proteins tend to be conserved across organisms. Overall, we give evidence that purely topological features of static interaction networks reflect aspects of the dynamics and modularity of interactomes as well as previous measures incorporating expression data, and are a powerful means for understanding the dynamic roles of hubs in interactomes. PMID:24130468

  1. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  2. Structural Features of Ion Transport and Allosteric Regulation in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Tal, Inbal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) proteins extrude Ca2+ from the cell to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since NCX proteins contribute to numerous physiological and pathophysiological events, their pharmacological targeting has been desired for a long time. This intervention remains challenging owing to our poor understanding of the underlying structure-dynamic mechanisms. Recent structural studies have shed light on the structure-function relationships underlying the ion-transport and allosteric regulation of NCX. The crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) along with molecular dynamics simulations and ion flux analyses, have assigned the ion binding sites for 3Na+ and 1Ca2+, which are being transported in separate steps. In contrast with NCX_Mj, eukaryotic NCXs contain the regulatory Ca2+-binding domains, CBD1 and CBD2, which affect the membrane embedded ion-transport domains over a distance of ~80 Å. The Ca2+-dependent regulation is ortholog, isoform, and splice-variant dependent to meet physiological requirements, exhibiting either a positive, negative, or no response to regulatory Ca2+. The crystal structures of the two-domain (CBD12) tandem have revealed a common mechanism involving a Ca2+-driven tethering of CBDs in diverse NCX variants. However, dissociation kinetics of occluded Ca2+ (entrapped at the two-domain interface) depends on the alternative-splicing segment (at CBD2), thereby representing splicing-dependent dynamic coupling of CBDs. The HDX-MS, SAXS, NMR, FRET, equilibrium 45Ca2+ binding and stopped-flow techniques provided insights into the dynamic mechanisms of CBDs. Ca2+ binding to CBD1 results in a population shift, where more constraint conformational states become highly populated without global conformational changes in the alignment of CBDs. This mechanism is common among NCXs. Recent HDX-MS studies have demonstrated that the apo CBD1 and CBD2 are stabilized by interacting with each other, while Ca2+ binding to CBD1 rigidifies local backbone

  3. Autophagy-linked FYVE protein (Alfy) promotes autophagic removal of misfolded proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Han, Huihui; Wei, Wanyi; Duan, Weisong; Guo, Yansu; Li, Yi; Wang, Jie; Bi, Yue; Li, Chunyan

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy-linked FYVE (Alfy) is a protein implicated in the selective degradation of aggregated proteins. In our present study, we found that Alfy was recruited into the aggregated G93A-SOD1 in transgenic mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We demonstrated that Alfy overexpression could decrease the expression of mutant proteins via the autophagosome-lysosome pathway, and thereby, the toxicity of mutant proteins was reduced. The clearance of the mutant proteins in NSC34 cells was significantly inhibited in an Alfy knockdown cellular model. We therefore deduced that Alfy translocalization likely is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. Alfy may be developed into a useful target for ALS therapy.

  4. Exocyst Sec10 is Involved in Basolateral Protein Translation and Translocation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly-made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane, consists of three main subunits, Sec61α, β, and γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others showed that the highly-conserved eight protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We also showed that the exocyst was involved in basolateral, and not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery was reported. Furthermore, we showed that the exocyst was necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. Methods GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic ER microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and 35S-methionine for protein detection, were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P32-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate the Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Results Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced recruitment to ER membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral VSVG protein translation, compared to apical HA protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. Conclusion These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. PMID:23037926

  5. Computer-based comparison of structural features of envelope protein of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus with the homologous proteins of two closest viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was prediction of epitopes and medically important structural properties of protein E of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) and comparing these features with two closely relates viruses, i.e. Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by bioinformatics tools. Prediction of evolutionary distance, localization, sequence of signal peptides, C, N O glycosylation sites, transmembrane helices (TMHs), cysteine bond positions and B cell and T cell epitopes of E proteins were performed. 2D-MH, Virus-PLoc, Signal-CF, EnsembleGly, MemBrain, DiANNA, BCPREDS and MHCPred servers were applied for the prediction. According to the results, the evolutionary distance of E protein of AHFV and two other viruses was almost equal. In all three proteins of study, residues 1-35 were predicted as signal sequences and one asparagine was predicted to be glycosylated. Results of prediction of transmembrane helices showed one TMH at position 444-467 and the other one at position 476-490. Twelve cysteines were potentially involved to form six disulfide bridges in the proteins. Four parts were predicted as B cell epitopes in E protein of AHFV. One epitope was conserved between three proteins of study. The only conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding epitope between three viruses was for DRB0401 allele. As there are not much experimental data available about AHFV, computer-aided study and comparison of E protein of this virus with two closely related flaviviruses can help in better understanding of medical properties of the virus.

  6. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  7. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  8. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  9. Determining the subcellular location of new proteins from microscope images using local features

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Joshua D.; Naik, Armaghan W.; Osuna-Highley, Elvira; Glory-Afshar, Estelle; Fuhrman, Margaret; Simha, Ramanuja; Jarvik, Jonathan W.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Evaluation of previous systems for automated determination of subcellular location from microscope images has been done using datasets in which each location class consisted of multiple images of the same representative protein. Here, we frame a more challenging and useful problem where previously unseen proteins are to be classified. Results: Using CD-tagging, we generated two new image datasets for evaluation of this problem, which contain several different proteins for each location class. Evaluation of previous methods on these new datasets showed that it is much harder to train a classifier that generalizes across different proteins than one that simply recognizes a protein it was trained on. We therefore developed and evaluated additional approaches, incorporating novel modifications of local features techniques. These extended the notion of local features to exploit both the protein image and any reference markers that were imaged in parallel. With these, we obtained a large accuracy improvement in our new datasets over existing methods. Additionally, these features help achieve classification improvements for other previously studied datasets. Availability: The datasets are available for download at http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/data/. The software was written in Python and C++ and is available under an open-source license at http://murphylab.web.cmu.edu/software/. The code is split into a library, which can be easily reused for other data and a small driver script for reproducing all results presented here. A step-by-step tutorial on applying the methods to new datasets is also available at that address. Contact: murphy@cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23836142

  10. Clotting protein - An extracellular matrix (ECM) protein involved in crustacean hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2017-09-21

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells in crustaceans are organized in lobule-like structures surrounded by different types of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in a Hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Here we show that the clotting protein (CP) is part of the ECM in HPT and is secreted during HPT cell culture. The formation of a filamentous network of CP was observed in HPT cell culture. A high amount of CP protein was detected at the surfaces of undifferentiated cells (round-shaped) compared with migrating cells (spindle shaped). Co-localization of the CP protein and TGase activity was observed on the cell surface and filamentous network between cells. A role for CP together with collagen was revealed in a 3D culture in which a collagen-I matrix was immobilized with CP or supplemented with CP. The results showed possible functions of CP, collagen, TGase and cytokine Ast1 in the regulation of HPT progenitor cell behavior. This is the first study to provide insight into the role of CP, which probably not only participates in clot formation but also functions as an ECM component protein controlling hematopoietic stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Kernel-based feature selection techniques for transport proteins based on star graph topological indices.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Gestal, Marcos; Pedreira-Souto, Nieves; Postelnicu, Lucian; Dorado, Julián; Munteanu, Cristian Robert

    2013-01-01

    The transport of the molecules inside cells is a very important topic, especially in Drug Metabolism. The experimental testing of the new proteins for the transporter molecular function is expensive and inefficient due to the large amount of new peptides. Therefore, there is a need for cheap and fast theoretical models to predict the transporter proteins. In the current work, the primary structure of a protein is represented as a molecular Star graph, characterized by a series of topological indices. The dataset was made up of 2,503 protein chains, out of which 413 have transporter molecular function and 2,090 have no transporter function. These indices were used as input to several classification techniques to find the best Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) model that can evaluate the transporter function of a new protein chain. Among several feature selection techniques, the Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination allows us to obtain a classification model based on 20 attributes with a true positive rate of 83% and a false positive rate of 16.7%.

  12. FRG1P-mediated aggregation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; Sterrenburg, Ellen; de Graaf, Natascha; Dauwerse, Hans G; Frants, Rune R; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2007-02-01

    FRG1 is considered a candidate gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) based on its location at chromosome 4qter and its upregulation in FSHD muscle. The FRG1 protein (FRG1P) localizes to nucleoli, Cajal bodies (and speckles), and has been suggested to be a component of the human spliceosome but its exact function is unknown. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing high levels of FRG1P in skeletal muscle were described to present with muscular dystrophy. Moreover, upregulation of FRG1P was demonstrated to correlate with missplicing of specific pre-mRNAs. In this study, we have combined colocalization studies with yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that associate with FRG1P. We demonstrate that artificially induced nucleolar aggregates of VSV-FRG1P specifically sequester proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing. In addition, we have identified SMN, PABPN1, and FAM71B, a novel speckle and Cajal body protein, as binding partners of FRG1P. All these proteins are, or seem to be, involved in RNA biogenesis. Our data confirm the presence of FRG1P in protein complexes containing human spliceosomes and support a potential role of FRG1P in either splicing or another step in nuclear RNA biogenesis. Intriguingly, among FRG1P-associated proteins are SMN and PABPN1, both being involved in neuromuscular disorders, possibly through RNA biogenesis-related processes.

  13. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  14. Pressure-temperature folding landscape in proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Yraima; Foguel, Debora; Silva, Jerson L

    2013-12-15

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a valuable tool to study processes such as protein folding, protein hydration and protein-protein interactions. HHP is a nondestructive technique because it reversibly affects internal cavities excluded from the solvent present in the hydrophobic core of proteins. HHP allows the solvation of buried amino acid side chains, thus shifting the equilibrium towards states of the studied molecule or molecular ensemble that occupy smaller volumes. HHP has long been used to dissociate multimeric proteins and protein aggregates and allows investigation of intermediate folding states, some of which are formed by proteins involved in human degenerative diseases, such as spongiform encephalopathies and Parkinson's disease, as well as cancer. When coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopic methods such as infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy, HHP treatment facilitates the understanding of protein folding and misfolding processes; the latter is related to protein aggregation into amyloid or amorphous species. In this review, we will address how HHP provides information about intermediate folding states and the aggregation processes of p53, which is related to cancer, and prion proteins, transthyretin and α-synuclein, which are related to human degenerative diseases.

  15. Application of intelligent techniques for classification of bacteria using protein sequence-derived features.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit Kumar; Ravi, Vadlamani; Murty, U S N; Sengupta, Neelava; Karuna, Batepatti

    2013-07-01

    Standard molecular experimental methodologies and mathematical procedures often fail to answer many phylogeny and classification related issues. Modern artificial intelligent-based techniques, such as radial basis function, genetic algorithm, artificial neural network, and support vector machines are of ample potential in this regard. Reliance on a large number of essential parameters will aid in enhanced robustness, reliability, and better accuracy as opposed to single molecular parameter. This study was conducted with dataset of computed protein physicochemical properties belonging to 20 different bacterial genera. A total of 57 sequential and structural parameters derived from protein sequences were considered for the initial classification. Feature selection based techniques were employed to find out the most important features influencing the dataset. Various amino acids, hydrophobicity, relative sulfur percentage, and codon number were selected as important parameters during the study. Comparative analyses were performed applying RapidMiner data mining platform. Support vector machine proved to be the best method with maximum accuracy of more than 91%.

  16. Polymorphisms and features of cytomegalovirus UL144 and UL146 in congenitally infected neonates with hepatic involvement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gangqiang; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Sisi; Hu, Yingying; Li, Baoqing; Sun, Xiangwei; Mao, Chenchen; Xu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yiping; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a significant agent of hepatic involvement in neonates. In this study, we investigated the polymorphisms and features of the viral genes UL144 and UL146 as well as their significance to congenital hepatic involvement. In 79 neonates with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and hepatic involvement, full length UL144 and UL146 were successfully amplified in 73.42% and 60.76% of cases, respectively. Sequencing indicated that both genes were hypervariable. Notably, UL144 genotype B was highly associated with aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.028) and lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.046). Similarly, UL146 genotype G1 and G13 were significantly associated with CMV IgM (P = 0.026), CMV IgG (P = 0.034), alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.019), and aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.032). In conclusion, dominant UL144 (genotype B) and UL146 (genotype G1 and G13) genotypes are associated with elevated levels of enzymes and CMV IgM and IgG of cytomegalovirus infection.

  17. Polymorphisms and features of cytomegalovirus UL144 and UL146 in congenitally infected neonates with hepatic involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Sisi; Hu, Yingying; Li, Baoqing; Sun, Xiangwei; Mao, Chenchen; Xu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yiping; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a significant agent of hepatic involvement in neonates. In this study, we investigated the polymorphisms and features of the viral genes UL144 and UL146 as well as their significance to congenital hepatic involvement. In 79 neonates with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and hepatic involvement, full length UL144 and UL146 were successfully amplified in 73.42% and 60.76% of cases, respectively. Sequencing indicated that both genes were hypervariable. Notably, UL144 genotype B was highly associated with aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.028) and lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.046). Similarly, UL146 genotype G1 and G13 were significantly associated with CMV IgM (P = 0.026), CMV IgG (P = 0.034), alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.019), and aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.032). In conclusion, dominant UL144 (genotype B) and UL146 (genotype G1 and G13) genotypes are associated with elevated levels of enzymes and CMV IgM and IgG of cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:28222150

  18. Purification of recombinant BtpA and Ycf3, proteins involved in membrane protein biogenesis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tatjana M E; Gloddek, Kirsten; Schluesener, Daniela; Kruip, Jochen

    2003-03-25

    The gene products Ycf3 (hypothetical chloroplast open reading frame) and BtpA (biogenesis of thylakoid protein) are thought to be involved in the biogenesis of the membrane protein complex photosystem I (PSI) from Synechocystis PCC 6803. PSI consists of 12 different subunits and binds more than 100 cofactors, making it a model protein to study different aspects of membrane protein biogenesis. For a detailed biophysical characterization of Ycf3 and BtpA pure proteins must be available in sufficient quantities. Therefore we cloned the corresponding genes into expression vectors. To facilitate purification we created His-tagged versions of Ycf3 and BtpA in addition to the unmodified forms. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) yielded His-tagged proteins which were used for the production of antibodies. Purification strategies for non-tagged proteins could also be established: Ycf3 could be purified in soluble form using a two-step purification in which ammonium sulfate precipitation was combined with anion-exchange chromatography (IEC). BtpA had to be purified from inclusion bodies by two-consecutive IEC steps under denaturing conditions. An optimized refolding protocol was established that yielded pure BtpA. In all cases, MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) was used to confirm protein identity. Initially, size exclusion chromatography and CD-spectroscopy were used for biophysical characterization of the proteins. Both Ycf3 and BtpA show homo-oligomerization in vitro. In summary, purification protocols for Ycf3 and BtpA have been designed that yield pure proteins which can be used to probe the molecular function of these proteins for membrane protein biogenesis.

  19. Group G streptococcal M protein exhibits structural features analogous to those of class I M protein of group A streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C M; Kimura, A; Bisno, A L

    1992-01-01

    We have previously studied a collection of group G streptococcal strains isolated from bacteremic human infections and demonstrated that such strains resist phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes but are type specifically opsonized by homologous antiserum. We have now performed Southern hybridization analysis on genomic DNA from eight blood isolates. All eight isolates showed DNA homology to a group A emm24 gene probe. The M-protein gene of one of the isolates, strain 1750, has now been isolated. This gene (emmG1) encodes a polypeptide of 67 kDa (MG1) which is reactive with antibodies to the partially purified M protein of the parent strain. The predicted amino acid structure of MG1 demonstrates significant identity with the carboxy terminus (C, D, and anchor domains) of M6 and M24 but only limited identity with the amino terminus (variable portion) of these group A M proteins. Southern hybridization of genomic DNA of the eight group G blood isolates with an emmG1 gene probe indicated there were at least four emm alleles associated with these strains. These studies indicate that M proteins of group G streptococci, like those of group A, are genetically heterogeneous. Moreover, MG1 appears to conform to the recently proposed class I structure of M-protein molecules and thus shares certain distinct structural features with the M proteins of well-established rheumatogenic group A streptococcal serotypes. Further comparison of the structures of group G and group A M proteins of throat and skin isolates may cast light on those configurations of the M protein molecules which are and are not critical for the expression of rheumatogenicity. Images PMID:1500178

  20. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model. PMID:27763556

  1. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-10-18

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains-In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model.

  2. The surprising features of the TEAD4-Vgll1 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Mesrouze, Yannick; Hau, Jean Christophe; Erdmann, Dirk; Zimmermann, Catherine; Fontana, Patrizia; Schmelzle, Tobias; Chène, Patrick

    2014-03-03

    The Hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size in animals, is altered in various human cancers. The TEAD transcription factors, the most downstream elements in this pathway, are regulated by different cofactors, such as the Vgll (vestigial-like) proteins. Having studied the interaction between Vgll1-derived peptides and human TEAD4, we show that, although it lacks a key secondary structure element required for tight binding by two other TEAD cofactors (YAP and TAZ), Vgll1-derived peptides bind to TEAD with nanomolar affinity. We identify a β-strand:loop:α-helix motif as the minimal Vgll binding site. Finally, we reveal an unexpected difference between mouse and human Vgll1-derived peptides. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Involvement of a small GTP binding protein in HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Audoly, Gilles; Popoff, Michel R; Gluschankof, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that actin binding to HIV-1 encoded proteins, or even actin dynamics themselves, might play a key role in virus budding and/or release from the infected cell. A crucial step in the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton is the engagement of various different GTP binding proteins. We have thus studied the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the final steps of the HIV-1 viral replication cycle. Results Our results demonstrate that virus production is abolished when cellular GTP binding proteins involved in actin polymerisation are inhibited with specific toxins. Conclusion We propose a new HIV budding working model whereby Gag interactions with pre-existing endosomal cellular tracks as well as with a yet non identified element of the actin polymerisation pathway are required in order to allow HIV-1 to be released from the infected cell. PMID:16080789

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin "Shatangju" fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca(2+) signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca(2+) signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin “Shatangju” fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca2+ signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca2+ signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism. PMID:27303420

  6. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  7. Aberrant expression of DNA damage response proteins is associated with breast cancer subtype and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulnur; Himmetoglu, Cigdem; Jimenez, Rafael E.; Geyer, Susan M.; Wang, Wenle P.; Costinean, Stefan; Pilarski, Robert T.; Morrison, Carl; Suren, Dinc; Liu, Jianhua; Chen, Jingchun; Kamal, Jyoti; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Landmark studies of the status of DNA damage checkpoints and associated repair functions in preneoplastic and neoplastic cells has focused attention on importance of these pathways in cancer development, and inhibitors of repair pathways are in clinical trials for treatment of triple negative breast cancer. Cancer heterogeneity suggests that specific cancer subtypes will have distinct mechanisms of DNA damage survival, dependent on biological context. In this study, status of DNA damage response (DDR)-associated proteins was examined in breast cancer subtypes in association with clinical features; 479 breast cancers were examined for expression of DDR proteins γH2AX, BRCA1, pChk2, and p53, DNA damage-sensitive tumor suppressors Fhit and Wwox, and Wwox-interacting proteins Ap2α, Ap2γ, ErbB4, and correlations among proteins, tumor subtypes, and clinical features were assessed. In a multivariable model, triple negative cancers showed significantly reduced Fhit and Wwox, increased p53 and Ap2γ protein expression, and were significantly more likely than other subtype tumors to exhibit aberrant expression of two or more DDR-associated proteins. Disease-free survival was associated with subtype, Fhit and membrane ErbB4 expression level and aberrant expression of multiple DDR-associated proteins. These results suggest that definition of specific DNA repair and checkpoint defects in subgroups of triple negative cancer might identify new treatment targets. Expression of Wwox and its interactor, ErbB4, was highly significantly reduced in metastatic tissues vs. matched primary tissues, suggesting that Wwox signal pathway loss contributes to lymph node metastasis, perhaps by allowing survival of tumor cells that have detached from basement membranes, as proposed for the role of Wwox in ovarian cancer spread. PMID:21069451

  8. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L.; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G.; Souza, Ana O.; Gaspari, Priscyla M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis—isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle—were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  9. A human skeletal muscle interactome centered on proteins involved in muscular dystrophies: LGMD interactome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of the skeletal muscle and the identification of numerous human disease-causing mutations in its constitutive proteins make it an interesting tissue for proteomic studies aimed at understanding functional relationships of interacting proteins in both health and diseases. Method We undertook a large-scale study using two-hybrid screens and a human skeletal-muscle cDNA library to establish a proteome-scale map of protein-protein interactions centered on proteins involved in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD). LGMD is a group of more than 20 different neuromuscular disorders that principally affect the proximal pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. Results and conclusion The interaction network we unraveled incorporates 1018 proteins connected by 1492 direct binary interactions and includes 1420 novel protein-protein interactions. Computational, experimental and literature-based analyses were performed to assess the overall quality of this network. Interestingly, LGMD proteins were shown to be highly interconnected, in particular indirectly through sarcomeric proteins. In-depth mining of the LGMD-centered interactome identified new candidate genes for orphan LGMDs and other neuromuscular disorders. The data also suggest the existence of functional links between LGMD2B/dysferlin and gene regulation, between LGMD2C/γ-sarcoglycan and energy control and between LGMD2G/telethonin and maintenance of genome integrity. This dataset represents a valuable resource for future functional investigations. PMID:23414517

  10. Pin1: Intimate involvement with the regulatory protein kinase networks in the global phosphorylation landscape.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H; Brandl, Christopher J; Gyenis, Laszlo

    2015-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a universal regulatory mechanism that involves an extensive network of protein kinases. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 added an additional layer of complexity to these regulatory networks. We have evaluated interactions between Pin1 and the regulatory kinome and proline-dependent phosphoproteome taking into consideration findings from targeted studies as well as data that has emerged from systematic phosphoproteomic workflows and from curated protein interaction databases. The relationship between Pin1 and the regulatory protein kinase networks is not restricted simply to the recognition of proteins that are substrates for proline-directed kinases. In this respect, Pin1 itself is phosphorylated in cells by protein kinases that modulate its functional properties. Furthermore, the phosphorylation-dependent targets of Pin1 include a number of protein kinases as well as other enzymes such as phosphatases and regulatory subunits of kinases that modulate the actions of protein kinases. As a result of its interactions with numerous protein kinases and their substrates, as well as itself being a target for phosphorylation, Pin1 has an intricate relationship with the regulatory protein kinase and phosphoproteomic networks that orchestrate complex cellular processes and respond to environmental cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A protein involved in the assembly of an extracellular calcium storage matrix.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-04-23

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBank data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate.

  12. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in recognition of beta-integrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Qing-Hui; Huang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that beta-integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of beta-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was examined. The results showed that envelope proteins VP26, VP31, VP37, VP90 and nucleocapsid protein VP136 interacted with LvInt. RGD-, YGL- and LDV-related peptide functioned as motifs of WSSV proteins binding with beta-integrin. The beta-integrin ligand of RGDT had better blocking effect compared with that of YGL- and LDV-related peptides. In vivo assay indicated that RGD-, LDV- and YGL-related peptides could partially block WSSV infection. These data collectively indicate that multiple proteins were involved in recognition of beta-integrin. Identification of proteins in WSSV that are associated with beta-integrin will assist development of new agents for effective control of the white spot syndrome.

  13. Sequential Sonographic Features of Primary Invasive Aspergillosis Involving Only the Thyroid Gland: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ho; Kim, Jee Young; Park, Woo Chan; Kim, Mee Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with palpitation and neck swelling. Initial sonography showed an ill-defined hypoechoic lesion in the right thyroid gland, mentioning subacute thyroiditis. The patient received conservative care for one week. However, her neck swelling worsened and she complained of dyspnea. Follow up sonography showed marked enlargement of both thyroid glands. Irregular infiltration of hypoechoic lesions was detected along the subcapsular region of both thyroid glands. She underwent immediate intubation to secure the airway and total thyroidectomy. Histopathological staining revealed features of fungal thyroiditis with fungal hyphae characteristic of Aspergillus. There was no abnormality in the lung or paranasal sinuses. In this report, we describe the sequential sonographic findings of invasive aspergillosis in the thyroid gland presenting as progressive enlargement without other organ involvement. PMID:27110341

  14. Not all mitochondrial carrier proteins support permeability transition pore formation: no involvement of uncoupling protein 1.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Paul G; Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio J; Brand, Martin D

    2009-12-15

    The mPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore) is a non-specific channel that is formed in the mitochondrial inner membrane in response to several stimuli, including elevated levels of matrix calcium. The pore is proposed to be composed of the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), voltage-dependent anion channel and cyclophilin D. Knockout studies, however, have demonstrated that ANT is not essential for permeability transition, which has led to the proposal that other members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family may be able to play a similar function to ANT in pore formation. To investigate this possibility, we have studied the permeability transition properties of BAT (brown adipose tissue) mitochondria in which levels of the mitochondrial carrier protein, UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1), can exceed those of ANT. Using an improved spectroscopic assay, we have quantified mPTP formation in de-energized mitochondria from wild-type and Ucp1KO (Ucp1-knockout) mice and assessed the dependence of pore formation on UCP1. When correctly normalized for differences in mitochondrial morphology, we find that calcium-induced mPTP activity is the same in both types of mitochondria, with similar sensitivity to GDP (approximately 50% inhibited), although the portion sensitive to cyclosporin A is higher in mitochondria lacking UCP1 (approximately 80% inhibited, compared with approximately 60% in mitochondria containing UCP1). We conclude that UCP1 is not a component of the cyclosporin A-sensitive mPTP in BAT and that playing a role in mPTP formation is not a general characteristic of the mitochondrial carrier protein family but is, more likely, restricted to specific members including ANT.

  15. Protein-protein interactions involved in the recognition of p27 by E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kui; Belunis, Charles; Chu, Wei; Weber, David; Podlaski, Frank; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Reed, Steven I; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2003-01-01

    The p27(Kip1) protein is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, the level of which is decreased in many common human cancers as a result of enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation. The multiprotein complex SCF(Skp2) has been identified as the ubiquitin ligase that targets p27, but the functional interactions within this complex are not well understood. One component, the F-box protein Skp2, binds p27 when the latter is phosphorylated on Thr(187), thus providing substrate specificity for the ligase. Recently, we and others have shown that the small cell cycle regulatory protein Cks1 plays a critical role in p27 ubiquitination by increasing the binding affinity of Skp2 for p27. Here we report the development of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay that allows the quantification of the molecular interactions between human recombinant Skp2, Cks1 and a p27-derived peptide phosphorylated on Thr(187). Using this assay, we have determined the dissociation constant of the Skp2-Cks1 complex (K(d) 140 +/- 14 nM) and have shown that Skp2 binds phosphorylated p27 peptide with high affinity only in the presence of Cks1 (K(d) 37 +/- 2 nM). Cks1 does not bind directly to the p27 phosphopeptide or to Skp1, which confirms its suggested role as an allosteric effector of Skp2. PMID:12529174

  16. HOPS: a novel cAMP-dependent shuttling protein involved in protein synthesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Castelli, Marilena; Bartoli, Daniela; Pieroni, Stefania; Pettirossi, Valentina; Piobbico, Danilo; Viola-Magni, Mariapia; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2005-07-15

    The liver has the ability to autonomously regulate growth and mass. Following partial hepatectomy, hormones, growth factors, cytokines and their coupled signal transduction pathways have been implicated in hepatocyte proliferation. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the proliferative response, we studied liver regeneration by characterization of novel genes that are activated in residual hepatocytes. A regenerating liver cDNA library screening was performed with cDNA-subtracted probes derived from regenerating and normal liver. Here, we describe the biology of Hops (for hepatocyte odd protein shuttling). HOPS is a novel shuttling protein that contains an ubiquitin-like domain, a putative NES and a proline-rich region. HOPS is rapidly exported from the nucleus and is overexpressed during liver regeneration. Evidence shows that cAMP governs HOPS export in hepatocytes of normal and regenerating liver and is mediated via CRM-1. We demonstrate that HOPS binds to elongation factor eEF-1A and interferes in protein synthesis. HOPS overexpression in H-35-hepatoma and 3T3-NIH cells strongly reduces proliferation.

  17. Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new

  18. Semi-isometric registration of line features for flexible fitting of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Abeysinghe, S.; Baker, M. L.; Chiu, W.; Ju, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a registration problem that is motivated by a practical biology problem - fitting protein structures to low-resolution density maps. We consider registration between two sets of lines features (e.g., helices in the proteins) that have undergone not a single, but multiple isometric transformations (e.g., hinge-motions). The problem is further complicated by the presence of symmetry in each set. We formulate the problem as a clique-finding problem in a product graph, and propose a heuristic solution that includes a fast clique-finding algorithm unique to the structure of this graph. When tested on a suite of real protein structures, the algorithm achieved high accuracy even for very large inputs containing hundreds of helices. PMID:21124809

  19. Disseminated Cytomegalovirus Infection and Protein Losing Enteropathy as Presenting Feature of Pediatric Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Safak; Akbulut, Ulas Emre

    2015-01-01

    We report a pediatric patient admitted with abdominal pain, diffuse lower extremity edema and watery diarrhea for two months. Laboratory findings including complete blood count, serum albumin, lipid and immunoglobulin levels were compatible with protein losing enteropathy. Colonoscopic examination revealed diffuse ulcers with smooth raised edge (like "punched out holes") in the colon and terminal ileum. Histopathological examination showed active colitis, ulcerations and inclusion bodies. Immunostaining for cytomegalovirus was positive. Despite supportive management, antiviral therapy, the clinical condition of the patient worsened and developed disseminated cytomegalovirus infection and the patient died. Protein losing enteropathy and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection a presenting of feature in steroid-naive patient with inflammatory bowel disease is very rare. Hypogammaglobulinemia associated with protein losing enteropathy in Crohn's disease may predispose the cytomegalovirus infection in previously healthy children. PMID:25866735

  20. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server. PMID:27660761

  1. Features of whey protein concentrate supplementation in children with rapidly progressive HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Y F; Sgarbieri, V C; da Silva, M N; Toro, A A D C; Vilela, M M S

    2006-02-01

    HIV infection is associated with subnormal GSH levels. An increase in glutathione levels has been observed in HIV-infected adults under oral whey protein supplementation. We studied the features associated with a whey protein concentrate supplementation in children with rapidly progressive AIDS. A prospective double-blind clinical trial was carried out for 4 months with 18 vertically HIV-infected children (1.98-6.37 years), under antiretroviral therapy, who had received whey protein, maltodextrin (placebo) or none. Erythrocyte glutathione concentration, T lymphocyte counts (CD4+ and CD8+) and occurrence of associated co-infections were evaluated. Wilcoxon's and Fischer's Exact tests were used to assess differences between whey protein-supplemented and control (placebo and non-supplemented) groups. A significant median increase of 16.14 mg/dl (p = 0.018) in erythrocyte glutathione levels was observed in the whey protein-supplemented group; the TCD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio showed a non significant increase and lower occurrence of associated co-infections was also observed. In conclusion, whey protein concentrate supplementation can stimulate glutathione synthesis and, possibly, decrease the occurrence of associated co-infections.

  2. The TSG101 protein binds to connexins and is involved in connexin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, Tanja Schlueter, Sharazad; Urschel, Stephanie; Kussmann, Petra; Sonntag, Stephan; Hoeher, Thorsten; Kreuzberg, Maria M.; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Willecke, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Gap junctions mediate electrical and metabolic communication between cells in almost all tissues and are proposed to play important roles in cellular growth control, differentiation and embryonic development. Gap junctional communication and channel assembly were suggested to be regulated by interaction of connexins with different proteins including kinases and phosphatases. Here, we identified the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) protein to bind to the carboxyterminal tail of connexin45 in a yeast two-hybrid protein interaction screen. Glutathione S-transferase pull down experiments and immunoprecipitation revealed that not only connexin45 but also connexin30.2, -36, and -43 carboxyterminal regions were associated with TSG101 protein in pull down analyses and that connexin31, -43 and -45 co-precipitate with endogenous TSG101 protein in lysates from HM1 embryonic stem cells. TSG101 has been shown to be involved in cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation and turnover of endocytosed proteins. Thus, we decided to study the functional role of this interaction. SiRNA mediated knock down of TSG101 in HM1 embryonic stem cells led to increased levels of connexin43 and -45, prolonged half life of these connexins and increased transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Our results suggest that TSG101 is involved in the degradation of connexins via interaction with connexin proteins.

  3. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  4. Olive seed protein bodies store degrading enzymes involved in mobilization of oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Rejón, Juan David; Alché, Juan de Dios; Castro, Antonio Jesús; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The major seed storage reserves in oilseeds are accumulated in protein bodies and oil bodies, and serve as an energy, carbon, and nitrogen source during germination. Here, the spatio-temporal relationships between protein bodies and several key enzymes (phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase) involved in storage lipid mobilization in cotyledon cells was analysed during in vitro seed germination. Enzyme activities were assayed in-gel and their cellular localization were determined using microscopy techniques. At seed maturity, phospholipase A and triacylglycerol lipase activities were found exclusively in protein bodies. However, after seed imbibition, these activities were shifted to the cytoplasm and the surface of the oil bodies. The activity of neutral lipases was detected by using α-naphthyl palmitate and it was associated mainly with protein bodies during the whole course of germination. This pattern of distribution was highly similar to the localization of neutral lipids, which progressively appeared in protein bodies. Lipoxygenase activity was found in both the protein bodies and on the surface of the oil bodies during the initial phase of seed germination. The association of lipoxygenase with oil bodies was temporally correlated with the appearance of phospholipase A and lipase activities on the surface of oil bodies. It is concluded that protein bodies not only serve as simple storage structures, but are also dynamic and multifunctional organelles directly involved in storage lipid mobilization during olive seed germination.

  5. Characterization of a DNA binding protein of bacteriophage PRD1 involved in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pakula, T M; Caldentey, J; Serrano, M; Gutierrez, C; Hermoso, J M; Salas, M; Bamford, D H

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli phage PRD1 protein P12, involved in PRD1 DNA replication in vivo, has been highly purified from E. coli cells harbouring a gene XII-containing plasmid. Protein P12 binds to single-stranded DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and nuclease protection experiments. Binding of protein P12 to single-stranded DNA increases about 14% the contour length of the DNA as revealed by electron microscopy. Binding to single-stranded DNA seems to be cooperative, and it is not sequence specific. Protein P12 also binds to double-stranded DNA although with an affinity 10 times lower than to single-stranded DNA. Using the in vitro phage phi 29 DNA replication system, it is shown that protein P12 stimulates the overall phi 29 DNA replication. Images PMID:2251117

  6. Phylogenomic analysis of the Chlamydomonas genome unmasks proteins potentially involved in photosynthetic function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Karpowicz, Steven J.; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Hamel, Blaise; Dent, Rachel; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean; Wollman, Francis-André; Li, Huiying; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, has been exploited as a reference organism for identifying proteins and activities associated with the photosynthetic apparatus and the functioning of chloroplasts. Recently, the full genome sequence of Chlamydomonas was generated and a set of gene models, representing all genes on the genome, was developed. Using these gene models, and gene models developed for the genomes of other organisms, a phylogenomic, comparative analysis was performed to identify proteins encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome which were likely involved in chloroplast functions (or specifically associated with the green algal lineage); this set of proteins has been designated the GreenCut. Further analyses of those GreenCut proteins with uncharacterized functions and the generation of mutant strains aberrant for these proteins are beginning to unmask new layers of functionality/regulation that are integrated into the workings of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:20490922

  7. Structural features and chaperone activity of the NudC protein family

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Jańczyk, Paweł. Ł.; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, Todd P.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2011-01-01

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member the nud gene family, involved in maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates, NudC, NudC-like (NudCL) and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity, but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein, and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics centers, i.e. NudCL and mouse NudCL2. All proteins share the same core CS-domain characteristic for proteins acting either as co-chaperones of Hsp90, or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled-coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins are able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies of cellular functions of the NudC family. PMID:21530541

  8. Structural Features and Chaperone Activity of the NudC Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Janczyk, Pawe; #322; #321; .; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-05-25

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the nud gene family that is involved in the maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF, whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates: NudC, NudC-like (NudCL), and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by structural genomics centers (i.e., NudCL and mouse NudCL2). All proteins share the same core CS domain characteristic of proteins acting either as cochaperones of Hsp90 or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit the aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins is able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies on the cellular functions of the NudC family.

  9. A Cellulose Synthase-Like Protein Involved in Hyphal Tip Growth and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbin; Chater, Keith F.; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like proteins, responsible for synthesizing β-glucan-containing polysaccharides, play a fundamental role in cellular architectures, such as plant cell and tissue morphogenesis, bacterial biofilm formation, and fruiting-body development. However, the roles of the proteins involved in the developmental process are not well understood. Here, we report that a cellulose synthase-like protein (CslASc) in Streptomyces has a function in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation. The cslASc replacement mutant showed pleiotropic defects, including the severe delay of aerial-hyphal formation and altered cell wall morphology. Calcofluor white fluorescence analysis demonstrated that polysaccharide synthesis at hyphal tips was dependent on CslASc. cslASc was constitutively transcribed, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein-CslASc fusion protein was mostly located at the hyphal tips. An extract enriched in morphogenetic chaplin proteins promoted formation of aerial hyphae by the mutant. Furthermore, a two-hybrid experiment indicated that the glycosyltransferase domain of CslASc interacted with the tropomyosin-like polarity-determining DivIVA protein, suggesting that the tip-located DivIVA governed tip recruitment of the CslASc membrane protein. These results imply that the cellulose synthase-like protein couples extracellular and cytoskeletal components functioning in tip growth and cell development. PMID:18487344

  10. Involvement of a tissue-specific RNA recognition motif protein in Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Cooper, M T; Pype, S; Stolow, D T

    1997-01-01

    RNA binding proteins mediate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression via their roles in nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. Many of the proteins involved in these processes have a common RNA binding domain, the RNA recognition motif (RRM). We have characterized the Testis-specific RRM protein gene (Tsr), which plays an important role in spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Disruption of Tsr led to a dramatic reduction in male fertility due to the production of spermatids with abnormalities in mitochondrial morphogenesis. Tsr is located on the third chromosome at 87F, adjacent to the nuclear pre-mRNA binding protein gene Hrb87F. A 1.7-kb Tsr transcript was expressed exclusively in the male germ line. It encoded a protein containing two RRMs similar to those found in HRB87F as well as a unique C-terminal domain. TSR protein was located in the cytoplasm of spermatocytes and young spermatids but was absent from mature sperm. The cellular proteins expressed in premeiotic primary spermatocytes from Tsr mutant and wild-type males were assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Lack of TSR resulted in the premature expression of a few proteins prior to meiosis; this was abolished by a transgenic copy of Tsr. These data demonstrate that TSR negatively regulated the expression of some testis proteins and, in combination with its expression pattern and subcellular localization, suggest that TSR regulates the stability or translatability of some mRNAs during spermatogenesis. PMID:9111341

  11. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  12. 3DSwap: curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Shameer, Khader; Shingate, Prashant N; Manjunath, S C P; Karthika, M; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is a unique protein structural phenomenon where two or more protein chains in a protein oligomer share a common structural segment between individual chains. This phenomenon is observed in an array of protein structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics analyses to develop an integrated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping. The hallmark of 3D domain swapping is the presence of distinct structural segments such as the hinge and swapped regions. We have curated the literature to delineate the boundaries of these regions. In addition, we have defined several new concepts like 'secondary major interface' to represent the interface properties arising as a result of 3D domain swapping, and a new quantitative measure for the 'extent of swapping' in structures. The catalog of proteins reported in 3DSwap knowledgebase has been generated using an integrated structural bioinformatics workflow of database searches, literature curation, by structure visualization and sequence-structure-function analyses. The current version of the 3DSwap knowledgebase reports 293 protein structures, the analysis of such a compendium of protein structures will further the understanding molecular factors driving 3D domain swapping.

  13. Modeling-Dependent Protein Characterization of the Rice Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Superfamily Reveals Distinct Functional and Structural Features

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Gao, Dongying; Edwards, Vincent; Gachomo, Emma W.; Margam, Venu M.; Seufferheld, Manfredo J.

    2010-01-01

    The completion of the rice genome sequence has made it possible to identify and characterize new genes and to perform comparative genomics studies across taxa. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily encoding for NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes is found in all major plant and animal taxa. However, the characterization of plant ALDHs has lagged behind their animal- and prokaryotic-ALDH homologs. In plants, ALDHs are involved in abiotic stress tolerance, male sterility restoration, embryo development and seed viability and maturation. However, there is still no structural property-dependent functional characterization of ALDH protein superfamily in plants. In this paper, we identify members of the rice ALDH gene superfamily and use the evolutionary nesting events of retrotransposons and protein-modeling–based structural reconstitution to report the genetic and molecular and structural features of each member of the rice ALDH superfamily in abiotic/biotic stress responses and developmental processes. Our results indicate that rice-ALDHs are the most expanded plant ALDHs ever characterized. This work represents the first report of specific structural features mediating functionality of the whole families of ALDHs in an organism ever characterized. PMID:20634950

  14. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  15. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  16. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  17. Expression of proteins involved in host plant defense against greenbug infestation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), has been recognized as a major pest of small grains, including sorghum and wheat. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in host plant defense against greenbug aphids, a proteomic analysis of greenbug-induced proteins in the seedlings of sorghum...

  18. A novel family of mammalian transmembrane proteins involved in cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Acevedo, Kevin M; Valdes, Victor Julián; Asanov, Alexander; Vaca, Luis

    2017-08-07

    Cholesterol is an essential compound in mammalian cells because it is involved in a wide range of functions, including as a key component of membranes, precursor of important molecules such as hormones, bile acids and vitamin D. The cholesterol transport across the circulatory system is a well-known process in contrast to the intracellular cholesterol transport, which is poorly understood. Recently in our laboratory, we identified a novel protein in C. elegans involved in dietary cholesterol uptake, which we have named ChUP-1. Insillicoanalysis identified two putative orthologue candidate proteins in mammals. The proteins SIDT1 and SIDT2 share identity and conserved cholesterol binding (CRAC) domains with C. elegans ChUP-1. Both mammalian proteins are annotated as RNA transporters in databases. In the present study, we show evidence indicating that SIDT1 and SIDT2 not only do not transport RNA, but they are involved in cholesterol transport. Furthermore, we show that single point mutations directed to disrupt the CRAC domains of both proteins prevent FRET between SIDT1 and SIDT2 and the cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) and alter cholesterol transport.

  19. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, Novel Proteins Involved in Developmental Genome Remodelling in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C.; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization. PMID:25397898

  20. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, novel proteins involved in developmental genome remodelling in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization.

  1. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness.

  2. Robust feature generation for protein subchloroplast location prediction with a weighted GO transfer model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomei; Wu, Xindong; Wu, Gongqing

    2014-04-21

    Chloroplasts are crucial organelles of green plants and eukaryotic algae since they conduct photosynthesis. Predicting the subchloroplast location of a protein can provide important insights for understanding its biological functions. The performance of subchloroplast location prediction algorithms often depends on deriving predictive and succinct features from genomic and proteomic data. In this work, a novel weighted Gene Ontology (GO) transfer model is proposed to generate discriminating features from sequence data and GO Categories. This model contains two components. First, we transfer the GO terms of the homologous protein, and then assign the bit-score as weights to GO features. Second, we employ term-selection methods to determine weights for GO terms. This model is capable of improving prediction accuracy due to the tolerance of the noise derived from homolog knowledge transfer. The proposed weighted GO transfer method based on bit-score and a logarithmic transformation of CHI-square (WS-LCHI) performs better than the baseline models, and also outperforms the four off-the-shelf subchloroplast prediction methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Lo, Allan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM) model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways yield a significant

  4. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  5. Recognition of nontrivial remote homology relationships involving proteins of Helicobacter pylori: implications for function recognition.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explains techniques for recognition of nontrivial remote homology relationships involving proteins of Helicobacter pylori and their implications for function recognition. Using the remote homology detection method, employing multiple-profile representations for every protein domain family, remotely related domain family information has been assigned for the 122, 77, and 95 protein sequences of 26695, and J99, and HPAG1 strains of H. pylori, respectively. Relationships for some of the H. pylori protein sequences with Pfam domain families are reported for the first time. In publicly available domain databases such as Pfam, for some of the H. pylori protein sequences functional domain information is associated only with part(s) of the proteins. In the current study other parts of such proteins have been shown to be remotely related to known domain families, raising the possibility of identifying functions for parts of the proteins that do not yet have domains assigned. Further, homologues of enzymes that potentially catalyze step(s) in various metabolic processes in H. pylori have been identified for the first time.

  6. Structure of astrotactin-2: a conserved vertebrate-specific and perforin-like membrane protein involved in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Tao; Harlos, Karl; Gilbert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate-specific proteins astrotactin-1 and 2 (ASTN-1 and ASTN-2) are integral membrane perforin-like proteins known to play critical roles in neurodevelopment, while ASTN-2 has been linked to the planar cell polarity pathway in hair cells. Genetic variations associated with them are linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders and other neurological pathologies, including an advanced onset of Alzheimer's disease. Here we present the structure of the majority endosomal region of ASTN-2, showing it to consist of a unique combination of polypeptide folds: a perforin-like domain, a minimal epidermal growth factor-like module, a unique form of fibronectin type III domain and an annexin-like domain. The perforin-like domain differs from that of other members of the membrane attack complex-perforin (MACPF) protein family in ways that suggest ASTN-2 does not form pores. Structural and biophysical data show that ASTN-2 (but not ASTN-1) binds inositol triphosphates, suggesting a mechanism for membrane recognition or secondary messenger regulation of its activity. The annexin-like domain is closest in fold to repeat three of human annexin V and similarly binds calcium, and yet shares no sequence homology with it. Overall, our structure provides the first atomic-resolution description of a MACPF protein involved in development, while highlighting distinctive features of ASTN-2 responsible for its activity. PMID:27249642

  7. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  8. Mammary collective cell migration involves transient loss of epithelial features and individual cell migration within the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Andrew J; Huebner, Robert J; Palsdottir, Hildur; Lee, Jessie K; Perez, Melissa J; Jorgens, Danielle M; Tauscher, Andrew N; Cheung, Kevin J; Werb, Zena; Auer, Manfred

    2012-06-01

    Normal mammary morphogenesis involves transitions between simple and multilayered epithelial organizations. We used electron microscopy and molecular markers to determine whether intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity were maintained in the multilayered epithelium. We found that multilayered elongating ducts had polarized apical and basal tissue surfaces both in three-dimensional culture and in vivo. However, individual cells were only polarized on surfaces in contact with the lumen or extracellular matrix. The basolateral marker scribble and the apical marker atypical protein kinase C zeta localized to all interior cell membranes, whereas PAR3 displayed a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that the apico-basal polarity was incomplete. Despite membrane localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin, we did not observe a defined zonula adherens connecting interior cells. Instead, interior cells were connected through desmosomes and exhibited complex interdigitating membrane protrusions. Single-cell labeling revealed that individual cells were both protrusive and migratory within the epithelial multilayer. Inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) further reduced intercellular adhesion on apical and lateral surfaces but did not disrupt basal tissue organization. Following morphogenesis, segregated membrane domains were re-established and junctional complexes re-formed. We observed similar epithelial organization during mammary morphogenesis in organotypic culture and in vivo. We conclude that mammary epithelial morphogenesis involves a reversible, spatially limited, reduction in polarity and intercellular junctions and active individualistic cell migration. Our data suggest that reductions in polarity and adhesion during breast cancer progression might reflect partial recapitulation of a normal developmental program.

  9. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Proteins Involved in Seed Imbibition under Salt Stress in Rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Enshun; Chen, Mingming; He, Hui; Zhan, Chengfang; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Zhoufei

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of salinity tolerance during seed germination is very important for direct seeding in rice. In this study, the salt-tolerant japonica landrace Jiucaiqing was used to determine the regulators that are involved in seed imbibition under salt stress. Briefly, the comparative proteomic analysis was conducted between dry (0 h) and imbibed (24 h) seeds with 150 mM NaCl. Under salt stress, the uptake of water increased rapidly before 24 h imbibition (Phase I), followed by a plateau of seed imbibition from 24 to 96 h imbibition (Phase II). We identified 14 proteins involved in seed imbibition, in which the majority of these proteins were involved in energy supply and storage protein. The early imbibition process was mediated by protein catabolism; the most of proteins were down-regulated after 24 h imbibition. Eleven genes in salt stress treated seeds were expressed early during the seed imbibition in comparison to control seeds. By comparison, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (BPM), glutelin (GLU2.2 and GLU2.3), glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase large subunit (GAS8), and cupin domain containing protein (CDP3.1 and CDP3.2) were near the regions of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed dormancy, seed reserve utilization, and seed germination in Jiucaiqing. In particular, CDP3.1 was co-located in the region of qIR-3 for imbibition rate, and qGP-3 for germination percentage. The role of CDP3.1 was verified in enhancing seed germination under salt stress using T-DNA mutant. The identified proteins might be applicable for the improvement of seed germination under salt stress in rice.

  10. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Proteins Involved in Seed Imbibition under Salt Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Enshun; Chen, Mingming; He, Hui; Zhan, Chengfang; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Zhoufei

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of salinity tolerance during seed germination is very important for direct seeding in rice. In this study, the salt-tolerant japonica landrace Jiucaiqing was used to determine the regulators that are involved in seed imbibition under salt stress. Briefly, the comparative proteomic analysis was conducted between dry (0 h) and imbibed (24 h) seeds with 150 mM NaCl. Under salt stress, the uptake of water increased rapidly before 24 h imbibition (Phase I), followed by a plateau of seed imbibition from 24 to 96 h imbibition (Phase II). We identified 14 proteins involved in seed imbibition, in which the majority of these proteins were involved in energy supply and storage protein. The early imbibition process was mediated by protein catabolism; the most of proteins were down-regulated after 24 h imbibition. Eleven genes in salt stress treated seeds were expressed early during the seed imbibition in comparison to control seeds. By comparison, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (BPM), glutelin (GLU2.2 and GLU2.3), glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase large subunit (GAS8), and cupin domain containing protein (CDP3.1 and CDP3.2) were near the regions of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed dormancy, seed reserve utilization, and seed germination in Jiucaiqing. In particular, CDP3.1 was co-located in the region of qIR-3 for imbibition rate, and qGP-3 for germination percentage. The role of CDP3.1 was verified in enhancing seed germination under salt stress using T-DNA mutant. The identified proteins might be applicable for the improvement of seed germination under salt stress in rice. PMID:28105039

  11. Paraoxonase 1 and dietary hyperhomocysteinemia modulate the expression of mouse proteins involved in liver homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy), a product of methionine metabolism, is elevated by the consumption of a high-methionine diet that can cause fatty liver disease. Paraoxonase 1 (Pon1), a hydrolase expressed mainly in the liver and carried in the circulation on high-density lipoprotein, participates in Hcy metabolism. Low Pon1 activity is linked to fatty liver disease. We hypothesize that hyperhomocysteinemia and low Pon1 induce changes in gene expression that could impair liver homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the liver proteome of Pon1(-/-) and Pon1(+/+) mice fed a high methionine diet (1% methionine in the drinking water) for 8 weeks using 2D IEF/SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We identified seven liver proteins whose expression was significantly altered in Pon1(-/-) mice. In animals fed with a control diet, the expression of three liver proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism (ApoE), iron metabolism (Ftl), and regulation of nitric oxide generation (Ddah1) was up-regulated by the Pon1(-/-) genotype. In mice fed with a high-methionine diet, expression of four liver proteins was up-regulated and of three proteins was down-regulated by the Pon1(-/-) genotype. The up-regulated proteins are involved in lipoprotein metabolism (ApoE), energy metabolism (Atp5h), oxidative stress response (Prdx2), and nitric oxide regulation (Ddah1). The down-regulated proteins are involved in energy metabolism (Gamt), iron metabolism (Ftl), and catechol metabolism (Comt). Expression of one protein (Ftl) was up-regulated both by the Pon1(-/-) genotype and a high-methionine diet. Our findings suggest that Pon1 interacts with diverse cellular processes - from lipoprotein metabolism, nitric oxide regulation, and energy metabolism to iron transport and antioxidant defenses - that are essential for normal liver homeostasis and modulation of these interactions by a high-methionine diet may contribute to fatty liver disease.

  12. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  13. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  14. Yeast prions and human prion-like proteins: sequence features and prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Cascarina, Sean M; Ross, Eric D

    2014-06-01

    Prions are self-propagating infectious protein isoforms. A growing number of prions have been identified in yeast, each resulting from the conversion of soluble proteins into an insoluble amyloid form. These yeast prions have served as a powerful model system for studying the causes and consequences of prion aggregation. Remarkably, a number of human proteins containing prion-like domains, defined as domains with compositional similarity to yeast prion domains, have recently been linked to various human degenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This suggests that the lessons learned from yeast prions may help in understanding these human diseases. In this review, we examine what has been learned about the amino acid sequence basis for prion aggregation in yeast, and how this information has been used to develop methods to predict aggregation propensity. We then discuss how this information is being applied to understand human disease, and the challenges involved in applying yeast prediction methods to higher organisms.

  15. Extensive Evolution of Cereal Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Translates into Unique Structural Features, Activation Mechanisms, and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    De Zaeytijd, Jeroen; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a class of cytotoxic enzymes that can depurinate rRNAs thereby inhibiting protein translation. Although these proteins have also been detected in bacteria, fungi, and even some insects, they are especially prevalent in the plant kingdom. This review focuses on the RIPs from cereals. Studies on the taxonomical distribution and evolution of plant RIPs suggest that cereal RIPs have evolved at an enhanced rate giving rise to a large and heterogeneous RIP gene family. Furthermore, several cereal RIP genes are characterized by a unique domain architecture and the lack of a signal peptide. This advanced evolution of cereal RIPs translates into distinct structures, activation mechanisms, and physiological roles. Several cereal RIPs are characterized by activation mechanisms that include the proteolytic removal of internal peptides from the N-glycosidase domain, a feature not documented for non-cereal RIPs. Besides their role in defense against pathogenic fungi or herbivorous insects, cereal RIPs are also involved in endogenous functions such as adaptation to abiotic stress, storage, induction of senescence, and reprogramming of the translational machinery. The unique properties of cereal RIPs are discussed in this review paper. PMID:28353660

  16. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a Dual Functional Protein Involved in the Immune Response of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-01-01

    Insect gut immunity is the first line of defense against oral infection. Although a few immune-related molecules in insect intestine has been identified by genomics or proteomics approach with comparison to well-studied tissues, such as hemolymph or fat body, our knowledge about the molecular mechanism underlying the gut immunity which would involve a variety of unidentified molecules is still limited. To uncover additional molecules that might take part in pathogen recognition, signal transduction or immune regulation in insect intestine, a T7 phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut is constructed. By use of different ligands for biopanning, Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been selected. BmTCTP is produced in intestinal epithelial cells and released into the gut lumen. The protein level of BmTCTP increases at the early time points during oral microbial infection and declines afterwards. In vitro binding assay confirms its activity as a multi-ligand binding molecule and it can further function as an opsonin that promotes the phagocytosis of microorganisms. Moreover, it can induce the production of anti-microbial peptide via a signaling pathway in which ERK is required and a dynamic tyrosine phosphorylation of certain cytoplasmic membrane protein. Taken together, our results characterize BmTCTP as a dual-functional protein involved in both the cellular and the humoral immune response of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. PMID:23894441

  17. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  18. Silkmapin of Hyriopsis cumingii, a novel silk-like shell matrix protein involved in nacre formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Bai, Zhiyi; Wang, Guiling; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-25

    Understanding the role of matrix proteins in nacre formation and biomineralization in mollusks is important for the pearl industry. In this study, the gene encoding the novel Hyriopsis cumingii shell matrix protein silkmapin was characterized. The gene encodes a protein of 30.89kDa in which Gly accounts for 34.41% of the amino acid content, and the C-terminal region binds Ca(2+). Secondary structure prediction indicated a predominantly β-fold and a structure typical of filamentous proteins. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed that silkmapin was expressed in epithelial cells at the edge and pallial of mantle tissue, indicated that silkmapin play roles in the shell nacreous and prismatic layer formation. Further real-time PCR results indicated an involvement in pearl formation via nucleation of calcium carbonate prior to formation of the nacre.

  19. Preliminary Characterization of MEDLE-2, a Protein Potentially Involved in the Invasion of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoling; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Na; Su, Jiayuan; Jia, Ruilian; Jiang, Jianlin; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are important causes of diarrhea in humans, ruminants, and other mammals. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that genetically related and host-adapted Cryptosporidium species have different numbers of subtelomeric genes encoding the Cryptosporidium-specific MEDLE family of secreted proteins, which could contribute to differences in host specificity. In this study, a Cryptosporidium parvum-specific member of the protein family MEDLE-2 encoded by cgd5_4590 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Immunofluorescent staining with antibodies generated from the recombinant protein showed the expression of the protein in sporozoites and development stages. In vitro neutralization assay with the antibodies partially blocked the invasion of sporozoites. These results support the potential involvement of MEDLE-2 in the invasion of host cells. PMID:28912761

  20. Drosophila Orb2 targets genes involved in neuronal growth, synapse formation, and protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Mastushita-Sakai, Tomoko; White-Grindley, Erica; Samuelson, Jessica; Seidel, Chris; Si, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    In the study of long-term memory, how memory persists is a fundamental and unresolved question. What are the molecular components of the long-lasting memory trace? Previous studies in Aplysia and Drosophila have found that a neuronal variant of a RNA-binding protein with a self-perpetuating prion-like property, cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, is required for the persistence of long-term synaptic facilitation in the snail and long-term memory in the fly. In this study, we have identified the mRNA targets of the Drosophila neuronal cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, Orb2. These Orb2 targets include genes involved in neuronal growth, synapse formation, and intriguingly, protein turnover. These targets suggest that the persistent form of the memory trace might be comprised of molecules that maintain a sustained, permissive environment for synaptic growth in an activated synapse. PMID:20547833

  1. DNABP: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Based on Feature Selection Using a Random Forest and Predicting Binding Residues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are fundamentally important in cellular processes. Several computational-based methods have been developed to improve the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in previous years. However, insufficient work has been done on the prediction of DNA-binding proteins from protein sequence information. In this paper, a novel predictor, DNABP (DNA-binding proteins), was designed to predict DNA-binding proteins using the random forest (RF) classifier with a hybrid feature. The hybrid feature contains two types of novel sequence features, which reflect information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the binding propensity of DNA-binding residues and non-binding propensities of non-binding residues. The comparisons with each feature demonstrated that these two novel features contributed most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, to improve the prediction performance of the DNABP model, feature selection using the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was carried out during the model construction. The results showed that the DNABP model could achieve 86.90% accuracy, 83.76% sensitivity, 90.03% specificity and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.727. High prediction accuracy and performance comparisons with previous research suggested that DNABP could be a useful approach to identify DNA-binding proteins from sequence information. The DNABP web server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABP/. PMID:27907159

  2. Identification and characterization of proteins involved in rice urea and arginine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Qiu; Werner, Andrea K; Dahncke, Kathleen; Romeis, Tina; Liu, Lai-Hua; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2010-09-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) production relies strongly on nitrogen (N) fertilization with urea, but the proteins involved in rice urea metabolism have not yet been characterized. Coding sequences for rice arginase, urease, and the urease accessory proteins D (UreD), F (UreF), and G (UreG) involved in urease activation were identified and cloned. The functionality of urease and the urease accessory proteins was demonstrated by complementing corresponding Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants and by multiple transient coexpression of the rice proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. Secondary structure models of rice (plant) UreD and UreF proteins revealed a possible functional conservation to bacterial orthologs, especially for UreF. Using amino-terminally StrepII-tagged urease accessory proteins, an interaction between rice UreD and urease could be shown. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic urease activation complexes seem conserved despite limited protein sequence conservation for UreF and UreD. In plant metabolism, urea is generated by the arginase reaction. Rice arginase was transiently expressed as a carboxyl-terminally StrepII-tagged fusion protein in N. benthamiana, purified, and biochemically characterized (K(m) = 67 mm, k(cat) = 490 s(-1)). The activity depended on the presence of manganese (K(d) = 1.3 microm). In physiological experiments, urease and arginase activities were not influenced by the external N source, but sole urea nutrition imbalanced the plant amino acid profile, leading to the accumulation of asparagine and glutamine in the roots. Our data indicate that reduced plant performance with urea as N source is not a direct result of insufficient urea metabolism but may in part be caused by an imbalance of N distribution.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Proteins Involved in Rice Urea and Arginine Catabolism1[W

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Feng-Qiu; Werner, Andrea K.; Dahncke, Kathleen; Romeis, Tina; Liu, Lai-Hua; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) production relies strongly on nitrogen (N) fertilization with urea, but the proteins involved in rice urea metabolism have not yet been characterized. Coding sequences for rice arginase, urease, and the urease accessory proteins D (UreD), F (UreF), and G (UreG) involved in urease activation were identified and cloned. The functionality of urease and the urease accessory proteins was demonstrated by complementing corresponding Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants and by multiple transient coexpression of the rice proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. Secondary structure models of rice (plant) UreD and UreF proteins revealed a possible functional conservation to bacterial orthologs, especially for UreF. Using amino-terminally StrepII-tagged urease accessory proteins, an interaction between rice UreD and urease could be shown. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic urease activation complexes seem conserved despite limited protein sequence conservation for UreF and UreD. In plant metabolism, urea is generated by the arginase reaction. Rice arginase was transiently expressed as a carboxyl-terminally StrepII-tagged fusion protein in N. benthamiana, purified, and biochemically characterized (Km = 67 mm, kcat = 490 s−1). The activity depended on the presence of manganese (Kd = 1.3 μm). In physiological experiments, urease and arginase activities were not influenced by the external N source, but sole urea nutrition imbalanced the plant amino acid profile, leading to the accumulation of asparagine and glutamine in the roots. Our data indicate that reduced plant performance with urea as N source is not a direct result of insufficient urea metabolism but may in part be caused by an imbalance of N distribution. PMID:20631318

  4. Protein Sequence Comparison Based on Physicochemical Properties and the Position-Feature Energy Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lulu; Zhang, Yusen; Gutman, Ivan; Shi, Yongtang; Dehmer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We develop a novel position-feature-based model for protein sequences by employing physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids and the measure of graph energy. The method puts the emphasis on sequence order information and describes local dynamic distributions of sequences, from which one can get a characteristic B-vector. Afterwards, we apply the relative entropy to the sequences representing B-vectors to measure their similarity/dissimilarity. The numerical results obtained in this study show that the proposed methods leads to meaningful results compared with competitors such as Clustal W. PMID:28393857

  5. Protein Sequence Comparison Based on Physicochemical Properties and the Position-Feature Energy Matrix.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lulu; Zhang, Yusen; Gutman, Ivan; Shi, Yongtang; Dehmer, Matthias

    2017-04-10

    We develop a novel position-feature-based model for protein sequences by employing physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids and the measure of graph energy. The method puts the emphasis on sequence order information and describes local dynamic distributions of sequences, from which one can get a characteristic B-vector. Afterwards, we apply the relative entropy to the sequences representing B-vectors to measure their similarity/dissimilarity. The numerical results obtained in this study show that the proposed methods leads to meaningful results compared with competitors such as Clustal W.

  6. Gene expression profiling to identify eggshell proteins involved in physical defense of the chicken egg

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As uricoletic animals, chickens produce cleidoic eggs, which are self-contained bacteria-resistant biological packages for extra-uterine development of the chick embryo. The eggshell constitutes a natural physical barrier against bacterial penetration if it forms correctly and remains intact. The eggshell's remarkable mechanical properties are due to interactions among mineral components and the organic matrix proteins. The purpose of our study was to identify novel eggshell proteins by examining the transcriptome of the uterus during calcification of the eggshell. An extensive bioinformatic analysis on genes over-expressed in the uterus allowed us to identify novel eggshell proteins that contribute to the egg's natural defenses. Results Our 14 K Del-Mar Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for transcriptional profiling in the hen's uterus during eggshell deposition. A total of 605 transcripts were over-expressed in the uterus compared with the magnum or white isthmus across a wide range of abundance (1.1- to 79.4-fold difference). The 605 highly-expressed uterine transcripts correspond to 469 unique genes, which encode 437 different proteins. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was used for interpretation of protein function. The most over-represented GO terms are related to genes encoding ion transport proteins, which provide eggshell mineral precursors. Signal peptide sequence was found for 54 putative proteins secreted by the uterus during eggshell formation. Many functional proteins are involved in calcium binding or biomineralization--prerequisites for interacting with the mineral phase during eggshell fabrication. While another large group of proteins could be involved in proper folding of the eggshell matrix. Many secreted uterine proteins possess antibacterial properties, which would protect the egg against microbial invasion. A final group includes proteases and protease inhibitors that regulate protein activity in the acellular uterine fluid

  7. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  8. Identification of glandular (preputial and clitoral) proteins in house rat (Rattus rattus) involved in pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Archunan, G; Kamalakkannan, S; Achiraman, S; Rajkumar, R

    2004-10-01

    Proteins (18-20 kDa) belonging to lipocalin family have been reported to act as carriers for ligands binding to pheromones in mouse urine, pig saliva, hamster vaginal fluid and human sweat, that are involved in pheromonal communication. As the preputial gland is a major pheromonal source, the present study was aimed to detect the specific protein bands (around 18-20 kDa) in the preputial and clitoral glands of the house rat, R. rattus. The amount of protein was higher in preputial gland of the male than that of female (clitoral) gland. A 20 kDa protein was noted in male and female glands; however, the intensity of the band was much higher in male than in female. In addition, 70, 60, 35 kDa bands, identified in male preputial gland, were absent in females. The presence of higher concentration of glandular proteins in the male preputial gland suggests that male rats may depend more on these glandular proteins for the maintenance of reproductive and dominance behaviours. The results further suggest that these glandular proteins (20 kDa) may act as a carrier for ligand binding.

  9. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  10. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth.

    PubMed

    Melan, M A; Cosgrove, D J

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins involved in adaptation to oxacillin identified using a novel cell shaving approach.

    PubMed

    Solis, Nestor; Parker, Benjamin L; Kwong, Stephen M; Robinson, Gareth; Firth, Neville; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-06-06

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for a variety of infections, and some strains are resistant to virtually all classes of antibiotics. Cell shaving proteomics using a novel probability scoring algorithm to compare the surfaceomes of the methicillin-resistant, laboratory-adapted S. aureus COL strain with a COL strain in vitro adapted to high levels of oxacillin (APT). APT displayed altered cell morphology compared with COL and increased aggregation in biofilm assays. Increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics was observed, but adaptation to oxacillin did not confer multidrug resistance. Analysis of the S. aureus COL and APT surfaceomes identified 150 proteins at a threshold determined by the scoring algorithm. Proteins unique to APT included the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) domain-containing MsrR and SACOL2302. Quantitative RT-PCR showed increased expression of sacol2302 in APT grown with oxacillin (>6-fold compared with COL). Overexpression of sacol2302 in COL to levels consistent with APT (+ oxacillin) did not influence biofilm formation or β-lactam resistance. Proteomics using iTRAQ and LC-MS/MS identified 1323 proteins (∼50% of the theoretical S. aureus proteome), and cluster analysis demonstrated elevated APT abundances of LCP proteins, capsule and peptidoglycan biosynthesis proteins, and proteins involved in wall remodelling. Adaptation to oxacillin also induced urease proteins, which maintained culture pH compared to COL. These results show that S. aureus modifies surface architecture in response to antibiotic adaptation.

  12. UBX domain-containing proteins are involved in lipid homeostasis and stress responses in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liu, Zhe; Liang, Chen; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2017-09-01

    Ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) domain-containing proteins constitute a family of proteins and are substrate adaptors of AAA ATPase Cdc48. UBX proteins can bind to the N-terminal region of Cdc48 to perform endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD). In this study, we identified two UBX domain-containing proteins, Ubx1 and Ubx2, in Pichia pastoris and found that the two proteins could recover the growth defect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in ubx2Δ. Our results revealed that Ubx1 and Ubx2 play critical roles in synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by affecting Spt23. In addition, the results demonstrated that both Ubx1 and Ubx2 are involved in lipid droplet formation and protein degradation. Deletion of UBX1 led to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and disruption of UBX2 impaired cell viability under osmotic stress. The phenotypes of ubx1Δ+UBX2, ubx2Δ+UBX1 and ubx1Δubx2Δ and RNA-seq data suggested that Ubx1 and Ubx2 play different roles in cell functions, and the roles of Ubx1 may be more numerous than Ubx2. In summary, our findings provide new insights into the relationship between lipid homeostasis and cell functions in the oil-producing organism P. pastoris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteins involved in pRb and p53 pathways are differentially expressed in thin and thick superficial spreading melanomas.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Bianca Costa Soares; Fugimori, Melissa Lissae; Ribeiro, Karina de Cássia Braga; Duprat Neto, João Pedreira; Neves, Rogério Izar; Landman, Gilles

    2009-06-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Malignant transformation of epidermal melanocytes is a multifactorial process involving cell cycle and death control pathways. The purpose of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of cell-cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins in cutaneous superficial spreading melanomas using the tissue microarray technique to further understand tumor development. A total of 20 samples of in-situ melanomas and 44 melanomas proteins: p16INK4 (p16), cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), retinoblastoma protein, tumor suppressor protein p53, and p21 cell cycle regulator (p21) using a streptavidine-biotin-peroxidase technique for immunohistochemistry. Thick melanomas (>1.0 mm) and metastases lost p16 expression in 100% of the cases and in-situ and thin melanomas (protein p53, and p21. Primary tumors, when compared with metastases, had higher cytoplasmatic Cdk4 expression. None of the studied proteins influenced overall or disease-free survival. Our results suggest that loss of p16 expression was a constant feature in primary and metastatic melanomas. Cyclin D1 expression seems to be related to initial phases of melanoma development. An increase in p21 expression could represent a cell cycle control in proliferating cells with reduced p16 and/or increased nuclear Cdk4 expression.

  14. Identification of Bovine Sperm Surface Proteins Involved in Carbohydrate-mediated Fertilization Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glycan-protein interactions play a key role in mammalian fertilization, but data on the composition and identities of protein complexes involved in fertilization events are scarce, with the added complication that the glycans in such interactions tend to differ among species. In this study we have used a bovine model to detect, characterize and identify sperm lectins relevant in fertilization. Given the complexity of the sperm-toward-egg journey, two important aspects of the process, both primarily mediated by protein-sugar interactions, have been addressed: (1) formation of the sperm reservoir in the oviductal epithelium, and (2) gamete recognition (oocyte-sperm interaction). Using whole sperm cells and a novel affinity capture method, several groups of proteins with different glycan specificities, including 58 hitherto unreported as lectins, have been identified in sperm surface, underscoring both the efficacy of our selective approach and the complex composition and function of sperm. Based on these results and previous data, we suggest that sperm surface proteins play significant roles in fertilization events such as membrane remodeling, transport, protection and function, thus supporting the hypothesis that rather than a simple lock-and-key model, mammalian fertilization relies on a complex interactome involving multiple ligands/receptors and recognition/binding events. PMID:27094474

  15. LanCL proteins are not Involved in Lanthionine Synthesis in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang; Zeng, Min; Dutta, Debapriya; Koh, Tong Hee; Chen, Jie; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2017-01-01

    LanC-like (LanCL) proteins are mammalian homologs of bacterial LanC enzymes, which catalyze the addition of the thiol of Cys to dehydrated Ser residues during the biosynthesis of lanthipeptides, a class of natural products formed by post-translational modification of precursor peptides. The functions of LanCL proteins are currently unclear. A recent proposal suggested that LanCL1 catalyzes the addition of the Cys of glutathione to protein- or peptide-bound dehydroalanine (Dha) to form lanthionine, analogous to the reaction catalyzed by LanC in bacteria. Lanthionine has been detected in human brain as the downstream metabolite lanthionine ketimine (LK), which has been shown to have neuroprotective effects. In this study, we tested the proposal that LanCL1 is involved in lanthionine biosynthesis by constructing LanCL1 knock-out mice and measuring LK concentrations in their brains using a mass spectrometric detection method developed for this purpose. To investigate whether other LanCL proteins (LanCL2/3) may confer a compensatory effect, triple knock-out (TKO) mice were also generated and tested. Very similar concentrations of LK (0.5–2.5 nmol/g tissue) were found in LanCL1 knock-out, TKO and wild type (WT) mouse brains, suggesting that LanCL proteins are not involved in lanthionine biosynthesis. PMID:28106097

  16. Endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor isoforms involved in different intracellular protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, V; Bugler, B; Maret, A; Potier, M; Prats, H

    1997-01-01

    Four forms of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) result from an alternative initiation of translation involving one AUG (155-amino acid form) and three CUGs (210-, 201- and 196-amino acid forms). These different forms of bFGF show different intracellular biological activities. To identify their intracellular targets, the 210- and 155-amino acid forms of bFGF were independently transfected into CHO cells and their correct subcellular localizations were verified, the 155-amino acid bFGF form being essentially cytoplasmic whereas the 210-amino acid protein was nuclear. The radiation fragmentation method was used to determine the target size of the different bFGF isoforms in the transfected CHO cells and to show that the 210- and 155-amino acids bFGF isoforms were included in protein complexes of 320 and 130 kDa respectively. Similar results were obtained using the SK-Hep1 cell line, which naturally expressed all forms of bFGF. Co-immunoprecipitation assays using different chimaeric bFGF-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase proteins showed that different cellular proteins are associated with different parts of the bFGF molecule. We conclude that bFGF isoforms are involved in different molecular complexes in the cytosol and nucleus, which would reflect different functions for these proteins. PMID:9337877

  17. LanCL proteins are not Involved in Lanthionine Synthesis in Mammals.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Zeng, Min; Dutta, Debapriya; Koh, Tong Hee; Chen, Jie; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2017-01-20

    LanC-like (LanCL) proteins are mammalian homologs of bacterial LanC enzymes, which catalyze the addition of the thiol of Cys to dehydrated Ser residues during the biosynthesis of lanthipeptides, a class of natural products formed by post-translational modification of precursor peptides. The functions of LanCL proteins are currently unclear. A recent proposal suggested that LanCL1 catalyzes the addition of the Cys of glutathione to protein- or peptide-bound dehydroalanine (Dha) to form lanthionine, analogous to the reaction catalyzed by LanC in bacteria. Lanthionine has been detected in human brain as the downstream metabolite lanthionine ketimine (LK), which has been shown to have neuroprotective effects. In this study, we tested the proposal that LanCL1 is involved in lanthionine biosynthesis by constructing LanCL1 knock-out mice and measuring LK concentrations in their brains using a mass spectrometric detection method developed for this purpose. To investigate whether other LanCL proteins (LanCL2/3) may confer a compensatory effect, triple knock-out (TKO) mice were also generated and tested. Very similar concentrations of LK (0.5-2.5 nmol/g tissue) were found in LanCL1 knock-out, TKO and wild type (WT) mouse brains, suggesting that LanCL proteins are not involved in lanthionine biosynthesis.

  18. SCIMP, a transmembrane adaptor protein involved in major histocompatibility complex class II signaling.

    PubMed

    Draber, Peter; Vonkova, Ivana; Stepanek, Ondrej; Hrdinka, Matous; Kucova, Marketa; Skopcova, Tereza; Otahal, Pavel; Angelisova, Pavla; Horejsi, Vaclav; Yeung, Mandy; Weiss, Arthur; Brdicka, Tomas

    2011-11-01

    Formation of the immunological synapse between an antigen-presenting cell (APC) and a T cell leads to signal generation in both cells involved. In T cells, the lipid raft-associated transmembrane adaptor protein LAT plays a central role. Its phosphorylation is a crucial step in signal propagation, including the calcium response and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and largely depends on its association with the SLP76 adaptor protein. Here we report the discovery of a new palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor protein, termed SCIMP. SCIMP is expressed in B cells and other professional APCs and is localized in the immunological synapse due to its association with tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. In B cells, it is constitutively associated with Lyn kinase and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated after major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC-II) stimulation. When phosphorylated, SCIMP binds to the SLP65 adaptor protein and also to the inhibitory kinase Csk. While the association with SLP65 initiates the downstream signaling cascades, Csk binding functions as a negative regulatory loop. The results suggest that SCIMP is involved in signal transduction after MHC-II stimulation and therefore serves as a regulator of antigen presentation and other APC functions.

  19. Short-Time Glassy-like Dynamics Observed in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Potential Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Godfrin, Doug; Liu, Yun

    Structures in concentrated protein solutions caused by the combination of short-range attraction (SA) and long-range repulsion (LR) have been extensively studied due to their importance in understanding therapeutic protein formulations and the phase behavior in general. Despite extensive studies of kinetically arrested states in colloidal systems with short-range attraction, less is understood for the effect of an additional longer-range repulsion on model colloidal systems with a SA interaction. Highly purified lysozyme is used a model experimental system due to its stable globular structure and SALR interactions at low ionic strength that can be quantitatively modeled. The fluid microstructure and protein short time self diffusion are measured across a broad range of conditions by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE), respectively. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even with an increase of zero shear viscosity by almost four orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. However, dynamic measurements demonstrate a sub-diffusive regime at relatively short time scales for concentrated samples at low temperature. The formation of a heterogeneous density distribution is shown to produce localized regions of high density that reduce protein motion, giving it a glassy-like behavior at the short time scale. This heterogeneity occurs at the length scale associated with the intermediate range order driven by the competing potential features, distinguishable from heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  20. Investigating DNA-, RNA-, and protein-based features as a means to discriminate pathogenic synonymous variants.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Mark; Folkman, Lukas; Yang, Yuedong; Zhang, Ping; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Liu, Yunlong; Stantic, Bela; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-10-01

    Synonymous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), although they do not alter the encoded protein sequences, have been implicated in many genetic diseases. Experimental studies indicate that synonymous SNVs can lead to changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA, thereby affecting translational efficiency, cotranslational protein folding as well as the binding of DNA-/RNA-binding proteins. However, the importance of these various features in disease phenotypes is not clearly understood. Here, we have built a support vector machine (SVM) model (termed DDIG-SN) as a means to discriminate disease-causing synonymous variants. The model was trained and evaluated on nearly 900 disease-causing variants. The method achieves robust performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.84 and 0.85 for protein-stratified 10-fold cross-validation and independent testing, respectively. We were able to show that the disease-causing effects in the immediate proximity to exon-intron junctions (1-3 bp) are driven by the loss of splicing motif strength, whereas the gain of splicing motif strength is the primary cause in regions further away from the splice site (4-69 bp). The method is available as a part of the DDIG server at http://sparks-lab.org/ddig. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Common features in structures and sequences of sandwich-like proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kister, Alexander E.; Finkelstein, Alexei V.; Gelfand, Israel M.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this work is to define the structural and sequence features common to sandwich-like proteins (SPs), a group of very different proteins now comprising 69 superfamilies in 38 protein folds. Analysis of the arrangements of strands within main sandwich sheets revealed a rigorously defined constraint on the supersecondary substructure that holds true for 94% of known SP structures. The invariant substructure consists of two interlocked pairs of neighboring β-strands. It is even more typical for centers of SP than the well-known “Greek key” strands arrangement for their edges. As homology among these proteins is not usually detectable even with the most powerful sequence-comparing algorithms, we employed a structure-based approach to sequence alignment. Within the interlocked strands we found 12 positions with fixed structural roles in SP. A residue at any of these positions possesses similar structural properties with residues in the same position of other SPs. The 12 positions lie at the center of the interface between the β-sheets and form the common geometrical core of SPs. Of the 12 positions, 8 are occupied by only four hydrophobic residues in 80% of all SPs. PMID:12384574

  2. Insights into structural features determining odorant affinities to honey bee odorant binding protein 14.

    PubMed

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Pechlaner, Maria; Oostenbrink, Chris; Kotlowski, Caroline; Araman, Can; Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Pelosi, Paolo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Nowak, Christoph; Larisika, Melanie

    2014-04-18

    Molecular interactions between odorants and odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are of major importance for understanding the principles of selectivity of OBPs towards the wide range of semiochemicals. It is largely unknown on a structural basis, how an OBP binds and discriminates between odorant molecules. Here we examine this aspect in greater detail by comparing the C-minus OBP14 of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) to a mutant form of the protein that comprises the third disulfide bond lacking in C-minus OBPs. Affinities of structurally analogous odorants featuring an aromatic phenol group with different side chains were assessed based on changes of the thermal stability of the protein upon odorant binding monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Our results indicate a tendency that odorants show higher affinity to the wild-type OBP suggesting that the introduced rigidity in the mutant protein has a negative effect on odorant binding. Furthermore, we show that OBP14 stability is very sensitive to the position and type of functional groups in the odorant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of genes involved in radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by integrating gene ontology and protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Qu, Song; Li, Ling; Su, Fang; Li, Ye; Huang, Shi-Ting; Li, Dan-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Radioresistance remains one of the important factors in relapse and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Thus, it is imperative to identify genes involved in radioresistance and explore the underlying biological processes in the development of radioresistance. In this study, we used cDNA microarrays to select differential genes between radioresistant CNE-2R and parental CNE-2 cell lines. One hundred and eighty-three significantly differentially expressed genes (p<0.05) were identified, of which 138 genes were upregulated and 45 genes were downregulated in CNE-2R. We further employed publicly available bioinformatics related software, such as GOEAST and STRING to examine the relationship among differentially expressed genes. The results show that these genes were involved in type I interferon-mediated signaling pathway biological processes; the nodes tended to have high connectivity with the EGFR pathway, IFN-related pathways, NF-κB. The node STAT1 has high connectivity with other nodes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Finally, the reliability of microarray data was validated for selected genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results were consistent with the microarray data. Our study suggests that microarrays combined with gene ontology and protein interaction networks have great value in the identification of genes of radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; genes involved in several biological processes and protein interaction networks may be relevant to NPC radioresistance; in particular, the verified genes CCL5, STAT1-α, STAT2 and GSTP1 may become potential biomarkers for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy.

  4. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  5. African swine fever virus proteins involved in evading host defence systems.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Linda K; Abrams, Charles C; Bowick, Gavin; Goatley, Lynnette C; Kay-Jackson, Pen C; Chapman, Dave; Liverani, Elisabetta; Nix, Rebecca; Silk, Rhiannon; Zhang, Fuquan

    2004-08-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) can cause an acutely fatal haemorrhagic fever in domestic pigs although in its natural hosts, warthogs, bushpigs and the soft tick vector, Ornithodoros moubata, ASFV causes inapparent persistent infections. The virus is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus which has a tropism for macrophages. As it is the only member of the Asfarviridae family, ASFV encodes many novel genes not encoded by other virus families. The ability of the virus to persist in its natural hosts and in domestic pigs, which recover from infection with less virulent isolates, shows that the virus has effective mechanisms to evade host defence systems. This review focuses on recent progress made in understanding the function of ASFV-encoded proteins, which are involved in modulating the host response to infection. Growing evidence suggests that a major strategy used by the virus is to modulate signalling pathways in infected macrophages, thus interfering with the expression of a large number of immunomodulatory genes. One potent immunomodulatory protein, A238L, inhibits both activation of the host NFkappaB transcription factor and inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity. Calcineurin-dependent pathways, including activation of the NFAT transcription factor, are therefore inhibited. Another ASFV-encoded protein, CD2v, resembles the host CD2 protein, which is expressed on T cells and NK cells. This virus protein causes the adsorption of red blood cells around virus-infected cells and extracellular virus particles. Expression of the CD2v protein aids virus dissemination in pigs and the protein also has a role in impairing bystander lymphocyte function. This may be mediated either by a direct interaction of CD2v extracellular domain with ligands on lymphocytes or by an indirect mechanism involving interaction of the CD2v cytoplasmic tail with host proteins involved in signalling or trafficking pathways. Two ASFV proteins, an IAP and a Bcl2 homologue

  6. A retroviral-derived peptide phosphorylates protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmu involving phospholipase C and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Day, Noorbibi K; Hitchcock, Remi; Brown, Pam G; Lerner, Danica L; Rucker, Rajivi P; Cianciolo, George J; Good, Robert A; Haraguchi, Soichi

    2003-05-01

    CKS-17, a synthetic peptide representing a unique amino acid motif which is highly conserved in retroviral transmembrane proteins and other immunoregulatory proteins, induces selective immunomodulatory functions, both in vitro and in vivo, and activates intracellular signaling molecules such as cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In the present study, using Jurkat T-cells, we report that CKS-17 phosphorylates protein kinase D (PKD)/protein kinase C (PKC) mu. Total cell extracts from CKS-17-stimulated Jurkat cells were immunoblotted with an anti-phospho-PKCmu antibody. The results show that CKS-17 significantly phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with the PKC inhibitors GF 109203X and Ro 31-8220, which do not act directly on PKD/PKCmu, attenuates CKS-17-induced phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu. In contrast, the selective protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 does not reverse the action of CKS-17. Furthermore, a phospholipase C (PLC) selective inhibitor, U-73122, completely blocks the phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu by CKS-17 while a negative control U-73343 does not. In addition, substitution of lysine for arginine residues in the CKS-17 sequence completely abrogates the ability of CKS-17 to phosphorylate PKD/PKCmu. These results clearly indicate that CKS-17 phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu through a PLC- and PKC-dependent mechanism and that arginine residues play an essential role in this activity of CKS-17, presenting a novel modality of the retroviral peptide CKS-17 and molecular interaction of this compound with target cells.

  7. Identification and characterization of plastid-type proteins from sequence-attributed features using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kaundal, Rakesh; Sahu, Sitanshu S; Verma, Ruchi; Weirick, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Plastids are an important component of plant cells, being the site of manufacture and storage of chemical compounds used by the cell, and contain pigments such as those used in photosynthesis, starch synthesis/storage, cell color etc. They are essential organelles of the plant cell, also present in algae. Recent advances in genomic technology and sequencing efforts is generating a huge amount of DNA sequence data every day. The predicted proteome of these genomes needs annotation at a faster pace. In view of this, one such annotation need is to develop an automated system that can distinguish between plastid and non-plastid proteins accurately, and further classify plastid-types based on their functionality. We compared the amino acid compositions of plastid proteins with those of non-plastid ones and found significant differences, which were used as a basis to develop various feature-based prediction models using similarity-search and machine learning. In this study, we developed separate Support Vector Machine (SVM) trained classifiers for characterizing the plastids in two steps: first distinguishing the plastid vs. non-plastid proteins, and then classifying the identified plastids into their various types based on their function (chloroplast, chromoplast, etioplast, and amyloplast). Five diverse protein features: amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, the pseudo amino acid composition, N(terminal)-Center-C(terminal) composition and the protein physicochemical properties are used to develop SVM models. Overall, the dipeptide composition-based module shows the best performance with an accuracy of 86.80% and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.74 in phase-I and 78.60% with a MCC of 0.44 in phase-II. On independent test data, this model also performs better with an overall accuracy of 76.58% and 74.97% in phase-I and phase-II, respectively. The similarity-based PSI-BLAST module shows very low performance with about 50% prediction accuracy for

  8. Identification and characterization of plastid-type proteins from sequence-attributed features using machine learning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plastids are an important component of plant cells, being the site of manufacture and storage of chemical compounds used by the cell, and contain pigments such as those used in photosynthesis, starch synthesis/storage, cell color etc. They are essential organelles of the plant cell, also present in algae. Recent advances in genomic technology and sequencing efforts is generating a huge amount of DNA sequence data every day. The predicted proteome of these genomes needs annotation at a faster pace. In view of this, one such annotation need is to develop an automated system that can distinguish between plastid and non-plastid proteins accurately, and further classify plastid-types based on their functionality. We compared the amino acid compositions of plastid proteins with those of non-plastid ones and found significant differences, which were used as a basis to develop various feature-based prediction models using similarity-search and machine learning. Results In this study, we developed separate Support Vector Machine (SVM) trained classifiers for characterizing the plastids in two steps: first distinguishing the plastid vs. non-plastid proteins, and then classifying the identified plastids into their various types based on their function (chloroplast, chromoplast, etioplast, and amyloplast). Five diverse protein features: amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, the pseudo amino acid composition, Nterminal-Center-Cterminal composition and the protein physicochemical properties are used to develop SVM models. Overall, the dipeptide composition-based module shows the best performance with an accuracy of 86.80% and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.74 in phase-I and 78.60% with a MCC of 0.44 in phase-II. On independent test data, this model also performs better with an overall accuracy of 76.58% and 74.97% in phase-I and phase-II, respectively. The similarity-based PSI-BLAST module shows very low performance with about 50% prediction

  9. Origin and spread of photosynthesis based upon conserved sequence features in key bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-11-01

    The origin of photosynthesis and how this capability has spread to other bacterial phyla remain important unresolved questions. I describe here a number of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in key proteins involved in bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis that provide important insights in these regards. The proteins BchL and BchX, which are essential for Bchl biosynthesis, are derived by gene duplication in a common ancestor of all phototrophs. More ancient gene duplication gave rise to the BchX-BchL proteins and the NifH protein of the nitrogenase complex. The sequence alignment of NifH-BchX-BchL proteins contain two CSIs that are uniquely shared by all NifH and BchX homologs, but not by any BchL homologs. These CSIs and phylogenetic analysis of NifH-BchX-BchL protein sequences strongly suggest that the BchX homologs are ancestral to BchL and that the Bchl-based anoxygenic photosynthesis originated prior to the chlorophyll (Chl)-based photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Another CSI in the BchX-BchL sequence alignment that is uniquely shared by all BchX homologs and the BchL sequences from Heliobacteriaceae, but absent in all other BchL homologs, suggests that the BchL homologs from Heliobacteriaceae are primitive in comparison to all other photosynthetic lineages. Several other identified CSIs in the BchN homologs are commonly shared by all proteobacterial homologs and a clade consisting of the marine unicellular Cyanobacteria (Clade C). These CSIs in conjunction with the results of phylogenetic analyses and pair-wise sequence similarity on the BchL, BchN, and BchB proteins, where the homologs from Clade C Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria exhibited close relationship, provide strong evidence that these two groups have incurred lateral gene transfers. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses and several CSIs in the BchL-N-B proteins that are uniquely shared by all Chlorobi and Chloroflexi homologs provide evidence that the genes for these proteins have also been

  10. Comparative structural analysis of haemagglutinin proteins from type A influenza viruses: conserved and variable features.

    PubMed

    Righetto, Irene; Milani, Adelaide; Cattoli, Giovanni; Filippini, Francesco

    2014-12-10

    Genome variation is very high in influenza A viruses. However, viral evolution and spreading is strongly influenced by immunogenic features and capacity to bind host cells, depending in turn on the two major capsidic proteins. Therefore, such viruses are classified based on haemagglutinin and neuraminidase types, e.g. H5N1. Current analyses of viral evolution are based on serological and primary sequence comparison; however, comparative structural analysis of capsidic proteins can provide functional insights on surface regions possibly crucial to antigenicity and cell binding. We performed extensive structural comparison of influenza virus haemagglutinins and of their domains and subregions to investigate type- and/or domain-specific variation. We found that structural closeness and primary sequence similarity are not always tightly related; moreover, type-specific features could be inferred when comparing surface properties of haemagglutinin subregions, monomers and trimers, in terms of electrostatics and hydropathy. Focusing on H5N1, we found that variation at the receptor binding domain surface intriguingly relates to branching of still circulating clades from those ones that are no longer circulating. Evidence from this work suggests that integrating phylogenetic and serological analyses by extensive structural comparison can help in understanding the 'functional evolution' of viral surface determinants. In particular, variation in electrostatic and hydropathy patches can provide molecular evolution markers: intriguing surface charge redistribution characterizing the haemagglutinin receptor binding domains from circulating H5N1 clades 2 and 7 might have contributed to antigenic escape hence to their evolutionary success and spreading.

  11. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E.; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  12. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters.

  13. A Bacillus thuringiensis S-Layer Protein Involved in Toxicity against Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Guadalupe; Miranda-Rios, Juan; de la Riva, Gustavo; Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-01-01

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis as a biopesticide is a viable alternative for insect control since the insecticidal Cry proteins produced by these bacteria are highly specific; harmless to humans, vertebrates, and plants; and completely biodegradable. In addition to Cry proteins, B. thuringiensis produces a number of extracellular compounds, including S-layer proteins (SLP), that contribute to virulence. The S layer is an ordered structure representing a proteinaceous paracrystalline array which completely covers the surfaces of many pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we report the identification of an S-layer protein by the screening of B. thuringiensis strains for activity against the coleopteran pest Epilachna varivestis (Mexican bean beetle; Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We screened two B. thuringiensis strain collections containing unidentified Cry proteins and also strains isolated from dead insects. Some of the B. thuringiensis strains assayed against E. varivestis showed moderate toxicity. However, a B. thuringiensis strain (GP1) that was isolated from a dead insect showed a remarkably high insecticidal activity. The parasporal crystal produced by the GP1 strain was purified and shown to have insecticidal activity against E. varivestis but not against the lepidopteran Manduca sexta or Spodoptera frugiperda or against the dipteran Aedes aegypti. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and sequenced. It corresponded to an S-layer protein highly similar to previously described SLP in Bacillus anthracis (EA1) and Bacillus licheniformis (OlpA). The phylogenetic relationships among SLP from different bacteria showed that these proteins from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, B. anthracis, B. licheniformis, and B. thuringiensis are arranged in the same main group, suggesting similar origins. This is the first report that demonstrates that an S-layer protein is directly involved in toxicity to a coleopteran pest. PMID:16391064

  14. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock.

  15. Absence of Aquaporin-4 in Skeletal Muscle Alters Proteins Involved in Bioenergetic Pathways and Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers, whose expression is altered in several forms of muscular dystrophies. However, little is known concerning the physiological role of AQP4 in skeletal muscle and its functional and structural interaction with skeletal muscle proteome. Using AQP4-null mice, we analyzed the effect of the absence of AQP4 on the morphology and protein composition of sarcolemma as well as on the whole skeletal muscle proteome. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the absence of AQP4 did not perturb the expression and cellular localization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex proteins, aside from those belonging to the extracellular matrix, and no alteration was found in sarcolemma integrity by dye extravasation assay. With the use of a 2DE-approach (BN/SDS-PAGE), protein maps revealed that in quadriceps, out of 300 Coomassie-blue detected and matched spots, 19 proteins exhibited changed expression in AQP4−/− compared to WT mice. In particular, comparison of the protein profiles revealed 12 up- and 7 down-regulated protein spots in AQP4−/− muscle. Protein identification by MS revealed that the perturbed expression pattern belongs to proteins involved in energy metabolism (i.e. GAPDH, creatine kinase), as well as in Ca2+ handling (i.e. parvalbumin, SERCA1). Western blot analysis, performed on some significantly changed proteins, validated the 2D results. Together these findings suggest AQP4 as a novel determinant in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism and better define the role of this water channel in skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:21552523

  16. Absence of aquaporin-4 in skeletal muscle alters proteins involved in bioenergetic pathways and calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2011-04-28

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers, whose expression is altered in several forms of muscular dystrophies. However, little is known concerning the physiological role of AQP4 in skeletal muscle and its functional and structural interaction with skeletal muscle proteome. Using AQP4-null mice, we analyzed the effect of the absence of AQP4 on the morphology and protein composition of sarcolemma as well as on the whole skeletal muscle proteome. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the absence of AQP4 did not perturb the expression and cellular localization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex proteins, aside from those belonging to the extracellular matrix, and no alteration was found in sarcolemma integrity by dye extravasation assay. With the use of a 2DE-approach (BN/SDS-PAGE), protein maps revealed that in quadriceps, out of 300 Coomassie-blue detected and matched spots, 19 proteins exhibited changed expression in AQP4(-/-) compared to WT mice. In particular, comparison of the protein profiles revealed 12 up- and 7 down-regulated protein spots in AQP4-/- muscle. Protein identification by MS revealed that the perturbed expression pattern belongs to proteins involved in energy metabolism (i.e. GAPDH, creatine kinase), as well as in Ca(2+) handling (i.e. parvalbumin, SERCA1). Western blot analysis, performed on some significantly changed proteins, validated the 2D results. Together these findings suggest AQP4 as a novel determinant in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism and better define the role of this water channel in skeletal muscle physiology.

  17. Lacrimal gland PKC isoforms are differentially involved in agonist-induced protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Zoukhri, D; Hodges, R R; Sergheraert, C; Toker, A; Dartt, D A

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized and N-myristoylated peptides derived from the pseudosubstrate sequences of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon [Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28), Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153), and Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164)], three isoforms present in rat lacrimal gland, and a peptide derived from the sequence of the endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase A [Myr-PKI-(17-25)]. Lacrimal gland acini were preincubated for 60 min with the myristoylated peptides (10(-10) to 3 x 10(-7) M), then protein secretion was stimulated with a phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (10(-6) M); vasoactive intestinal peptide (10(-8) M); a cholinergic agonist, carbachol (10(-5) M); or an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (10(-4) M), for 20 min. In intact lacrimal gland acini, Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) inhibited phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate-induced protein secretion. This effect was not reproduced by the acetylated peptide or by the myristoylated PKI, which inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced protein secretion, a response mediated by protein kinase A. Carbachol-induced protein secretion was inhibited by all three peptides. In contrast, phenylephrine-induced protein secretion was inhibited only by Myr-PKC-epsilon-(149-164), whereas Myr-PKC-alpha-(15-28) and Myr-PKC-delta-(142-153) had a stimulatory effect. None of these myristoylated peptides affected the calcium increase evoked by cholinergic or alpha 1-adrenergic agonists. We concluded that phorbol ester- and receptor-induced protein secretion involve different PKC isoforms in lacrimal gland.

  18. TargetCrys: protein crystallization prediction by fusing multi-view features with two-layered SVM.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Han, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The accurate prediction of whether a protein will crystallize plays a crucial role in improving the success rate of protein crystallization projects. A common critical problem in the development of machine-learning-based protein crystallization predictors is how to effectively utilize protein features extracted from different views. In this study, we aimed to improve the efficiency of fusing multi-view protein features by proposing a new two-layered SVM (2L-SVM) which switches the feature-level fusion problem to a decision-level fusion problem: the SVMs in the 1st layer of the 2L-SVM are trained on each of the multi-view feature sets; then, the outputs of the 1st layer SVMs, which are the "intermediate" decisions made based on the respective feature sets, are further ensembled by a 2nd layer SVM. Based on the proposed 2L-SVM, we implemented a sequence-based protein crystallization predictor called TargetCrys. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed 2L-SVM for fusing multi-view features. We also compared TargetCrys with existing sequence-based protein crystallization predictors and demonstrated that the proposed TargetCrys outperformed most of the existing predictors and is competitive with the state-of-the-art predictors. The TargetCrys webserver and datasets used in this study are freely available for academic use at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetCrys .

  19. Bioinformatic characterization of type-specific sequence and structural features in auxiliary activity family 9 proteins.

    PubMed

    Moses, Vuyani; Hatherley, Rowan; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Due to the impending depletion of fossil fuels, it has become important to identify alternative energy sources. The biofuel industry has proven to be a promising alternative. However, owing to the complex nature of plant biomass, hence the degradation, biofuel production remains a challenge. The copper-dependent Auxiliary Activity family 9 (AA9) proteins have been found to act synergistically with other cellulose-degrading enzymes resulting in an increased rate of cellulose breakdown. AA9 proteins are lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) enzymes, otherwise known as polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs). They are further classified as Type 1, 2 or 3 PMOs, depending on the different cleavage products formed. As AA9 proteins are known to exhibit low sequence conservation, the analysis of unique features of AA9 domains of these enzymes should provide insights for the better understanding of how different AA9 PMO types function. Bioinformatics approaches were used to identify features specific to the catalytic AA9 domains of each type of AA9 PMO. Sequence analysis showed the N terminus to be highly variable with type-specific inserts evident in this region. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to cluster AA9 domains based on their types. Motif analysis enabled the identification of sub-groups within each AA9 PMO type with the majority of these motifs occurring within the highly variable N terminus of AA9 domains. AA9 domain structures were manually docked to crystalline cellulose and used to analyze both the type-specific inserts and motifs at a structural level. The results indicated that these regions influence the AA9 domain active site topology and may contribute to the regioselectivity displayed by different AA9 PMO types. Physicochemical property analysis was performed and detected significant differences in aromaticity, isoelectric point and instability index between certain AA9 PMO types. In this study, a type-specific characterisation of AA9 domains was

  20. A deep learning framework for modeling structural features of RNA-binding protein targets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Zhou, Jingtian; Hu, Hailin; Gong, Haipeng; Chen, Ligong; Cheng, Chao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-02-29

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the post-transcriptional control of RNAs. Identifying RBP binding sites and characterizing RBP binding preferences are key steps toward understanding the basic mechanisms of the post-transcriptional gene regulation. Though numerous computational methods have been developed for modeling RBP binding preferences, discovering a complete structural representation of the RBP targets by integrating their available structural features in all three dimensions is still a challenging task. In this paper, we develop a general and flexible deep learning framework for modeling structural binding preferences and predicting binding sites of RBPs, which takes (predicted) RNA tertiary structural information into account for the first time. Our framework constructs a unified representation that characterizes the structural specificities of RBP targets in all three dimensions, which can be further used to predict novel candidate binding sites and discover potential binding motifs. Through testing on the real CLIP-seq datasets, we have demonstrated that our deep learning framework can automatically extract effective hidden structural features from the encoded raw sequence and structural profiles, and predict accurate RBP binding sites. In addition, we have conducted the first study to show that integrating the additional RNA tertiary structural features can improve the model performance in predicting RBP binding sites, especially for the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which also provides a new evidence to support the view that RBPs may own specific tertiary structural binding preferences. In particular, the tests on the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) segments yield satisfiable results with experimental support from the literature and further demonstrate the necessity of incorporating RNA tertiary structural information into the prediction model. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/thucombio/deepnet-rbp.

  1. A deep learning framework for modeling structural features of RNA-binding protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sai; Zhou, Jingtian; Hu, Hailin; Gong, Haipeng; Chen, Ligong; Cheng, Chao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the post-transcriptional control of RNAs. Identifying RBP binding sites and characterizing RBP binding preferences are key steps toward understanding the basic mechanisms of the post-transcriptional gene regulation. Though numerous computational methods have been developed for modeling RBP binding preferences, discovering a complete structural representation of the RBP targets by integrating their available structural features in all three dimensions is still a challenging task. In this paper, we develop a general and flexible deep learning framework for modeling structural binding preferences and predicting binding sites of RBPs, which takes (predicted) RNA tertiary structural information into account for the first time. Our framework constructs a unified representation that characterizes the structural specificities of RBP targets in all three dimensions, which can be further used to predict novel candidate binding sites and discover potential binding motifs. Through testing on the real CLIP-seq datasets, we have demonstrated that our deep learning framework can automatically extract effective hidden structural features from the encoded raw sequence and structural profiles, and predict accurate RBP binding sites. In addition, we have conducted the first study to show that integrating the additional RNA tertiary structural features can improve the model performance in predicting RBP binding sites, especially for the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which also provides a new evidence to support the view that RBPs may own specific tertiary structural binding preferences. In particular, the tests on the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) segments yield satisfiable results with experimental support from the literature and further demonstrate the necessity of incorporating RNA tertiary structural information into the prediction model. The source code of our approach can be found in https

  2. Protein receptor for activated C kinase 1 is involved in morphine reward in mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Su, L; Xie, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z

    2009-07-07

    Opiate addiction is associated with upregulation of cAMP signaling in the brain. cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), a nuclear transcription factor, is a downstream component of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway, which has been shown to regulate different physiological and psychological responses of drug addiction. RACK1, the protein receptor for activated C kinase 1, is a multifunctional scaffolding protein known to be a key regulator of various signaling cascades in the CNS. RACK1 functions specifically in integrin mediated activation of ERK cascade and targets active ERK. We examined if RACK1 is involved in the mechanism of drug addiction by regulating CREB in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Several expressions were observed. Chronic administration of morphine made the expression of RACK1 and CREB mRNA increase in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was strongly positive in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus of morphine-treated mice brain, especially the pyramidal neurons in the DG of the hippocampus. Using the small interfering RNA technology, we determined that the expression of CREB mRNA was decreased in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of morphine-treated mice. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was negative in CA1, CA3 and DG of hippocampus. These findings suggest that morphine reward can influence the expression of RACK1 in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex through regulating CREB transcription.

  3. Proteomic analysis of male 4C germ cell proteins involved in mouse meiosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejiang; Zhang, Ping; Qi, Yujuan; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2011-01-01

    Male meiosis is a specialized type of cell division that gives rise to sperm. Errors in this process can result in the generation of aneuploid gametes, which are associated with birth defects and infertility in humans. Until now, there has been a lack of a large-scale identification of proteins involved in male meiosis in mammals. In this study, we report the high-confidence identification of 3625 proteins in mouse male germ cells with 4C DNA content undergoing meiosis I. Of these, 397 were found to be testis specific. Bioinformatics analysis of the proteome led to the identification of 28 proteins known to be essential for male meiosis in mice. We also found 172 proteins that had yeast orthologs known to be essential for meiosis. Chromosome distribution analysis of the proteome showed underrepresentation of the identified proteins on the X chromosome, which may be due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Characterization of the proteome of 4C germ cells from mouse testis provides an inventory of proteins, which is useful for understanding meiosis and the mechanisms of male infertility.

  4. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: New anti-obesity targets?

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 700-706] PMID:23261055

  5. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: new anti-obesity targets?

    PubMed

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  6. Protein-ligand binding region prediction (PLB-SAVE) based on geometric features and CUDA acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ying-Tsang; Wang, Hsin-Wei; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tzou, Wen-Shoung; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Chang, Hao-Teng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are key processes in triggering and controlling biological functions within cells. Prediction of protein binding regions on the protein surface assists in understanding the mechanisms and principles of molecular recognition. In silico geometrical shape analysis plays a primary step in analyzing the spatial characteristics of protein binding regions and facilitates applications of bioinformatics in drug discovery and design. Here, we describe the novel software, PLB-SAVE, which uses parallel processing technology and is ideally suited to extract the geometrical construct of solid angles from surface atoms. Representative clusters and corresponding anchors were identified from all surface elements and were assigned according to the ranking of their solid angles. In addition, cavity depth indicators were obtained by proportional transformation of solid angles and cavity volumes were calculated by scanning multiple directional vectors within each selected cavity. Both depth and volume characteristics were combined with various weighting coefficients to rank predicted potential binding regions. Two test datasets from LigASite, each containing 388 bound and unbound structures, were used to predict binding regions using PLB-SAVE and two well-known prediction systems, SiteHound and MetaPocket2.0 (MPK2). PLB-SAVE outperformed the other programs with accuracy rates of 94.3% for unbound proteins and 95.5% for bound proteins via a tenfold cross-validation process. Additionally, because the parallel processing architecture was designed to enhance the computational efficiency, we obtained an average of 160-fold increase in computational time. In silico binding region prediction is considered the initial stage in structure-based drug design. To improve the efficacy of biological experiments for drug development, we developed PLB-SAVE, which uses only geometrical features of proteins and achieves a good overall performance for protein-ligand binding

  7. Protein-ligand binding region prediction (PLB-SAVE) based on geometric features and CUDA acceleration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-ligand interactions are key processes in triggering and controlling biological functions within cells. Prediction of protein binding regions on the protein surface assists in understanding the mechanisms and principles of molecular recognition. In silico geometrical shape analysis plays a primary step in analyzing the spatial characteristics of protein binding regions and facilitates applications of bioinformatics in drug discovery and design. Here, we describe the novel software, PLB-SAVE, which uses parallel processing technology and is ideally suited to extract the geometrical construct of solid angles from surface atoms. Representative clusters and corresponding anchors were identified from all surface elements and were assigned according to the ranking of their solid angles. In addition, cavity depth indicators were obtained by proportional transformation of solid angles and cavity volumes were calculated by scanning multiple directional vectors within each selected cavity. Both depth and volume characteristics were combined with various weighting coefficients to rank predicted potential binding regions. Results Two test datasets from LigASite, each containing 388 bound and unbound structures, were used to predict binding regions using PLB-SAVE and two well-known prediction systems, SiteHound and MetaPocket2.0 (MPK2). PLB-SAVE outperformed the other programs with accuracy rates of 94.3% for unbound proteins and 95.5% for bound proteins via a tenfold cross-validation process. Additionally, because the parallel processing architecture was designed to enhance the computational efficiency, we obtained an average of 160-fold increase in computational time. Conclusions In silico binding region prediction is considered the initial stage in structure-based drug design. To improve the efficacy of biological experiments for drug development, we developed PLB-SAVE, which uses only geometrical features of proteins and achieves a good overall performance

  8. The Abi Proteins and Their Involvement in Bacteriocin Self-Immunity ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kjos, Morten; Snipen, Lars; Salehian, Zhian; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2010-01-01

    The Abi protein family consists of putative membrane-bound metalloproteases. While they are involved in membrane anchoring of proteins in eukaryotes, little is known about their function in prokaryotes. In some known bacteriocin loci, Abi genes have been found downstream of bacteriocin structural genes (e.g., pln locus from Lactobacillus plantarum and sag locus from Streptococcus pyogenes), where they probably are involved in self-immunity. By modifying the profile hidden Markov model used to select Abi proteins in the Pfam protein family database, we show that this family is larger than presently recognized. Using bacteriocin-associated Abi genes as a means to search for novel bacteriocins in sequenced genomes, seven new bacteriocin-like loci were identified in Gram-positive bacteria. One such locus, from Lactobacillus sakei 23K, was selected for further experimental study, and it was confirmed that the bacteriocin-like genes (skkAB) exhibited antimicrobial activity when expressed in a heterologous host and that the associated Abi gene (skkI) conferred immunity against the cognate bacteriocin. Similar investigation of the Abi gene plnI and the Abi-like gene plnL from L. plantarum also confirmed their involvement in immunity to their cognate bacteriocins (PlnEF and PlnJK, respectively). Interestingly, the immunity genes from these three systems conferred a high degree of cross-immunity against each other's bacteriocins, suggesting the recognition of a common receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the conserved motifs constituting the putative proteolytic active site of the Abi proteins are essential for the immunity function of SkkI, and to our knowledge, this represents a new concept in self-immunity. PMID:20154137

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia and bleomycin hydrolase modulate the expression of mouse brain proteins involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH) participates in Hcy metabolism and is also linked to AD. The inactivation of the Blmh gene in mice causes accumulation of Hcy-thiolactone in the brain and increases susceptibility to Hcy-thiolactone-induced seizures. To gain insight into brain-related Blmh function, we used two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry to examine brain proteomes of Blmh-/- mice and their Blmh+/+ littermates fed with a hyperhomocysteinemic high-Met or a control diet. We found that: (1) proteins involved in brain-specific function (Ncald, Nrgn, Stmn1, Stmn2), antioxidant defenses (Aop1), cell cycle (RhoGDI1, Ran), and cytoskeleton assembly (Tbcb, CapZa2) were differentially expressed in brains of Blmh-null mice; (2) hyperhomocysteinemia amplified effects of the Blmh-/- genotype on brain protein expression; (3) proteins involved in brain-specific function (Pebp1), antioxidant defenses (Sod1, Prdx2, DJ-1), energy metabolism (Atp5d, Ak1, Pgam-B), and iron metabolism (Fth) showed differential expression in Blmh-null brains only in hyperhomocysteinemic animals; (4) most proteins regulated by the Blmh-/- genotype were also regulated by high-Met diet, albeit in the opposite direction; and (5) the differentially expressed proteins play important roles in neural development, learning, plasticity, and aging and are linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Taken together, our findings suggest that Blmh interacts with diverse cellular processes from energy metabolism and anti-oxidative defenses to cell cycle, cytoskeleton dynamics, and synaptic plasticity essential for normal brain homeostasis and that modulation of these interactions by hyperhomocysteinemia underlies the involvement of Hcy in AD.

  10. Identification of proteins involved in Hg-Se antagonism in water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes).

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Pablo; Hanley, Traci; Figueroa, Julio A Landero

    2014-03-01

    Different studies have established the presence of a proteinaceus complex involved in Hg-Se agonism/antagonism in plants. In order to identify proteins involved in this mechanism, water hyacinth plants were divided into groups and supplemented with Hg, Se and a Hg-Se mixture. Proteins involved were identified through a screening separation by SEC-ICPMS followed by SAX-ICPMS and then peptide mapping of selected fractions by nanoLC-ESI-ITMS(2). Determination of total metal concentration showed that Se inhibits Hg translocation from roots to aerial compartments of the plant and that Se and Hg are antagonists to each other in terms of plant toxicity. In roots, stems and leaves Se was distributed mainly in two molecular mass fractions <670 kDa and ∼40 kDa, however, the proportion between these two fractions was inverted when Hg was co-administered. Hg throughout the plant was distributed in high and medium molecular mass compounds. Hg associated with molecules, ranging from <1.5 kDa to 15 kDa, was found in the root extract of Hg(ii) supplemented plants, but was absent in the root extract of Se(iv) and Hg(ii) supplemented plants. SAX showed that Hg and Se were mostly not associated with the same entity, since the complete overlapping of Hg and Se signals in all the peaks of SEC chromatograms was not observed. Changes in Se and Hg levels in water hyacinth were more evident in leaves in contrast to other compartments. Several proteins, possibly associated with either Se or Hg, were identified in roots, stems and leaves. Most of the identified proteins were associated with Hg and located in leaves, and these are associated specifically with chloroplast and mitochondria proteins, related to essential mechanisms in plants such as photosynthesis, carbon fixation and the electron transport chain.

  11. The abi proteins and their involvement in bacteriocin self-immunity.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Snipen, Lars; Salehian, Zhian; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2010-04-01

    The Abi protein family consists of putative membrane-bound metalloproteases. While they are involved in membrane anchoring of proteins in eukaryotes, little is known about their function in prokaryotes. In some known bacteriocin loci, Abi genes have been found downstream of bacteriocin structural genes (e.g., pln locus from Lactobacillus plantarum and sag locus from Streptococcus pyogenes), where they probably are involved in self-immunity. By modifying the profile hidden Markov model used to select Abi proteins in the Pfam protein family database, we show that this family is larger than presently recognized. Using bacteriocin-associated Abi genes as a means to search for novel bacteriocins in sequenced genomes, seven new bacteriocin-like loci were identified in Gram-positive bacteria. One such locus, from Lactobacillus sakei 23K, was selected for further experimental study, and it was confirmed that the bacteriocin-like genes (skkAB) exhibited antimicrobial activity when expressed in a heterologous host and that the associated Abi gene (skkI) conferred immunity against the cognate bacteriocin. Similar investigation of the Abi gene plnI and the Abi-like gene plnL from L. plantarum also confirmed their involvement in immunity to their cognate bacteriocins (PlnEF and PlnJK, respectively). Interestingly, the immunity genes from these three systems conferred a high degree of cross-immunity against each other's bacteriocins, suggesting the recognition of a common receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the conserved motifs constituting the putative proteolytic active site of the Abi proteins are essential for the immunity function of SkkI, and to our knowledge, this represents a new concept in self-immunity.

  12. Diverse C-terminal sequences involved in Flavobacterium johnsoniae protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Surashree S; Zhu, Yongtao; Brendel, Colton J; McBride, Mark J

    2017-04-10

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae and many related bacteria secrete proteins across the outer membrane using the type IX secretion system (T9SS). Proteins secreted by T9SSs have amino-terminal signal peptides for export across the cytoplasmic membrane by the Sec system and carboxy-terminal domains (CTDs) targeting them for secretion across the outer membrane by the T9SS. Most but not all T9SS CTDs belong to family TIGR04183 (type-A CTDs). We functionally characterized diverse CTDs for secretion by the F. johnsoniae T9SS. Attachment of the CTDs from F. johnsoniae RemA, AmyB, and ChiA to the foreign protein sfGFP that had a signal peptide at the amino terminus resulted in secretion across the outer membrane. In each case approximately 80 to 100 amino acids from the extreme carboxy-termini was needed for efficient secretion. Several type-A CTDs from distantly related members of the phylum Bacteroidetes functioned in F. johnsoniae, supporting secretion of sfGFP by the F. johnsoniae T9SS. F. johnsoniae SprB requires the T9SS for secretion but lacks a type-A CTD. It has a conserved C-terminal domain belonging to family TIGR04131, which we refer to as a type-B CTD. The CTD of SprB was required for its secretion, but attachment of C-terminal regions of SprB of up to 1182 amino acids to sfGFP failed to result in secretion. Additional features outside of the C-terminal region of SprB may be required for its secretion.Importance Type IX protein secretion systems (T9SSs) are common in but limited to members of the phylum Bacteroidetes Most proteins that are secreted by T9SSs have conserved carboxy-terminal domains that belong to either protein domain family TIGR04183 (type-A CTDs) or TIGR04131 (type-B CTDs). Here we identify features of T9SS CTDs of F. johnsoniae that are required for protein secretion and demonstrate that type-A CTDs from distantly related members of the phylum function with the F. johnsoniae T9SS to secrete the foreign protein sfGFP. In contrast, type-B CTDs failed

  13. Sequence-Based Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins Using Random Forest with Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of RNA-binding proteins is one of the most challenging problems in computation biology. Although some studies have investigated this problem, the accuracy of prediction is still not sufficient. In this study, a highly accurate method was developed to predict RNA-binding proteins from amino acid sequences using random forests with the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method, followed by incremental feature selection (IFS). We incorporated features of conjoint triad features and three novel features: binding propensity (BP), nonbinding propensity (NBP), and evolutionary information combined with physicochemical properties (EIPP). The results showed that these novel features have important roles in improving the performance of the predictor. Using the mRMR-IFS method, our predictor achieved the best performance (86.62% accuracy and 0.737 Matthews correlation coefficient). High prediction accuracy and successful prediction performance suggested that our method can be a useful approach to identify RNA-binding proteins from sequence information. PMID:26543860

  14. The molecular features of uncoupling protein 1 support a conventional mitochondrial carrier-like mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Paul G.; Lee, Yang; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2017-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is an integral membrane protein found in the mitochondrial inner membrane of brown adipose tissue, and facilitates the process of non-shivering thermogenesis in mammals. Its activation by fatty acids, which overcomes its inhibition by purine nucleotides, leads to an increase in the proton conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane, short-circuiting the mitochondrion to produce heat rather than ATP. Despite 40 years of intense research, the underlying molecular mechanism of UCP1 is still under debate. The protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family of transporters, which have recently been shown to utilise a domain-based alternating-access mechanism, cycling between a cytoplasmic and matrix state to transport metabolites across the inner membrane. Here, we review the protein properties of UCP1 and compare them to those of mitochondrial carriers. UCP1 has the same structural fold as other mitochondrial carriers and, in contrast to past claims, is a monomer, binding one purine nucleotide and three cardiolipin molecules tightly. The protein has a single substrate binding site, which is similar to those of the dicarboxylate and oxoglutarate carriers, but also contains a proton binding site and several hydrophobic residues. As found in other mitochondrial carriers, UCP1 has two conserved salt bridge networks on either side of the central cavity, which regulate access to the substrate binding site in an alternating way. The conserved domain structures and mobile inter-domain interfaces are consistent with an alternating access mechanism too. In conclusion, UCP1 has retained all of the key features of mitochondrial carriers, indicating that it operates by a conventional carrier-like mechanism. PMID:28057583

  15. The molecular features of uncoupling protein 1 support a conventional mitochondrial carrier-like mechanism.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Paul G; Lee, Yang; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2017-03-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is an integral membrane protein found in the mitochondrial inner membrane of brown adipose tissue, and facilitates the process of non-shivering thermogenesis in mammals. Its activation by fatty acids, which overcomes its inhibition by purine nucleotides, leads to an increase in the proton conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane, short-circuiting the mitochondrion to produce heat rather than ATP. Despite 40 years of intense research, the underlying molecular mechanism of UCP1 is still under debate. The protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family of transporters, which have recently been shown to utilise a domain-based alternating-access mechanism, cycling between a cytoplasmic and matrix state to transport metabolites across the inner membrane. Here, we review the protein properties of UCP1 and compare them to those of mitochondrial carriers. UCP1 has the same structural fold as other mitochondrial carriers and, in contrast to past claims, is a monomer, binding one purine nucleotide and three cardiolipin molecules tightly. The protein has a single substrate binding site, which is similar to those of the dicarboxylate and oxoglutarate carriers, but also contains a proton binding site and several hydrophobic residues. As found in other mitochondrial carriers, UCP1 has two conserved salt bridge networks on either side of the central cavity, which regulate access to the substrate binding site in an alternating way. The conserved domain structures and mobile inter-domain interfaces are consistent with an alternating access mechanism too. In conclusion, UCP1 has retained all of the key features of mitochondrial carriers, indicating that it operates by a conventional carrier-like mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Medical research Council. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The SERRATE protein is involved in alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Stepien, Agata; Kierzkowski, Daniel; Kalak, Malgorzata; Bajczyk, Mateusz; McNicol, Jim; Simpson, Craig G.; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Brown, John W. S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    How alternative splicing (AS) is regulated in plants has not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that the nuclear cap-binding protein complex (AtCBC) is involved in AS in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that both subunits of AtCBC (AtCBP20 and AtCBP80) interact with SERRATE (AtSE), a protein involved in the microRNA biogenesis pathway. Moreover, using a high-resolution reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction AS system we have found that AtSE influences AS in a similar way to the cap-binding complex (CBC), preferentially affecting selection of 5′ splice site of first introns. The AtSE protein acts in cooperation with AtCBC: many changes observed in the mutant lacking the correct SERRATE activity were common to those observed in the cbp mutants. Interestingly, significant changes in AS of some genes were also observed in other mutants of plant microRNA biogenesis pathway, hyl1-2 and dcl1-7, but a majority of them did not correspond to the changes observed in the se-1 mutant. Thus, the role of SERRATE in AS regulation is distinct from that of HYL1 and DCL1, and is similar to the regulation of AS in which CBC is involved. PMID:24137006

  17. Involvement of dietary bioactive proteins and peptides in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Siniscalco, Dario; Antonucci, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous, severe neurodevelopmental pathologies. These enigmatic conditions have their origins in the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors. Dysfunctions in social interactions and communication skills, restricted interests, repetitive and stereotypic verbal and non-verbal behaviours are the main core symptoms. Several biochemical processes are associated with ASDs: oxidative stress; endoplasmic reticulum stress; decreased methylation capacity; limited production of glutathione; mitochondrial dysfunction; intestinal impaired permeability and dysbiosis; increased toxic metal burden; immune dysregulation. Current available treatments for ASDs can be divided into behavioural, nutritional and medical approaches, although no defined standard approach exists. Dietary bioactive proteins and peptides show potential for application as health-promoting agents. Nowadays, increasing studies highlight a key role of bioactive proteins and peptides in ASDs. This review will focus on the state-of-the-art regarding the involvement of dietary bioactive proteins and peptides in ASDs. Identification of novel therapeutic targets for ASD management will be also discussed.

  18. Crystal structure of a bicupin protein HutD involved in histidine utilization in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Gerth, M L; Liu, Y; Jiao, W; Zhang, X-X; Baker, E N; Lott, J S; Rainey, P B; Johnston, J M

    2017-08-01

    Cupins form one of the most functionally diverse superfamilies of proteins, with members performing a wide range of catalytic, non-catalytic, and regulatory functions. HutD is a predicted bicupin protein that is involved in histidine utilization (Hut) in Pseudomonas species. Previous genetic analyses have suggested that it limits the upper level of Hut pathway expression, but its mechanism of action is unknown. Here, we have determined the structure of PfluHutD at 1.74 Å resolution in several crystallization conditions, and identified N-formyl-l-glutamate (FG, a Hut pathway intermediate) as a potential ligand in vivo. Proteins 2017; 85:1580-1588. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The ESCRT-II proteins are involved in shaping the sarcoplasmic reticulum in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christophe; Largeau, Céline; Michelet, Xavier; Fourrage, Cécile; Maniere, Xavier; Matic, Ivan; Legouis, Renaud; Culetto, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum is a network of tubules and cisternae localized in close association with the contractile apparatus, and regulates Ca(2+)dynamics within striated muscle cell. The sarcoplasmic reticulum maintains its shape and organization despite repeated muscle cell contractions, through mechanisms which are still under investigation. The ESCRT complexes are essential to organize membrane subdomains and modify membrane topology in multiple cellular processes. Here, we report for the first time that ESCRT-II proteins play a role in the maintenance of sarcoplasmic reticulum integrity inC. elegans ESCRT-II proteins colocalize with the sarcoplasmic reticulum marker ryanodine receptor UNC-68. The localization at the sarcoplasmic reticulum of ESCRT-II and UNC-68 are mutually dependent. Furthermore, the characterization of ESCRT-II mutants revealed a fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum network, associated with an alteration of Ca(2+)dynamics. Our data provide evidence that ESCRT-II proteins are involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum shaping.

  20. Two Neuronal G Proteins Are Involved in Chemosensation of the Caenorhabditis Elegans Dauer-Inducing Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Zwaal, R. R.; Mendel, J. E.; Sternberg, P. W.; Plasterk, RHA.

    1997-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans uses chemosensation to determine its course of development. Young larvae can arrest as dauer larvae in response to increasing population density, which they measure by a nematode-excreted pheromone, and decreasing food supply. Dauer larvae can resume development in response to a decrease in pheromone and increase in food concentration. We show here that two novel G protein alpha subunits (GPA-2 and GPA-3) show promoter activity in subsets of chemosensory neurons and are involved in the decision to form dauer larvae primarily through the response to dauer pheromone. Dominant activating mutations in these G proteins result in constitutive, pheromone-independent dauer formation, whereas inactivation results in reduced sensitivity to pheromone, and, under certain conditions, an alteration in the response to food. Interactions between gpa-2, gpa-3 and other genes controlling dauer formation suggest that these G proteins may act in parallel to regulate the neuronal decision making that precedes dauer formation. PMID:9055081

  1. CUP-1 Is a Novel Protein Involved in Dietary Cholesterol Uptake in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Victor J.; Athie, Alejandro; Salinas, Laura S.; Navarro, Rosa E.; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Sterols transport and distribution are essential processes in all multicellular organisms. Survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans depends on dietary absorption of sterols present in the environment. However the general mechanisms associated to sterol uptake in nematodes are poorly understood. In the present work we provide evidence showing that a previously uncharacterized transmembrane protein, designated Cholesterol Uptake Protein-1 (CUP-1), is involved in dietary cholesterol uptake in C. elegans. Animals lacking CUP-1 showed hypersensitivity to cholesterol limitation and were unable to uptake cholesterol. A CUP-1-GFP fusion protein colocalized with cholesterol-rich vesicles, endosomes and lysosomes as well as the plasma membrane. Additionally, by FRET imaging, a direct interaction was found between the cholesterol analog DHE and the transmembrane “cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus” (CRAC) motif present in C. elegans CUP-1. In-silico analysis identified two mammalian homologues of CUP-1. Most interestingly, CRAC motifs are conserved in mammalian CUP-1 homologous. Our results suggest a role of CUP-1 in cholesterol uptake in C. elegans and open up the possibility for the existence of a new class of proteins involved in sterol absorption in mammals. PMID:22479487

  2. Mild copper deficiency alters gene expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Coudray, Charles; Schneider, Susanne; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Mazur, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Iron and copper homeostasis share common proteins and are therefore closely linked to each other. For example, copper-containing proteins like ceruloplasmin and hephaestin oxidize Fe(2+) during cellular export processes for transport in the circulation bound to transferrin. Indeed, copper deficiency provokes iron metabolism disorders leading to anemia and liver iron accumulation. The aim of the present work was to understand the cross-talk between copper status and iron metabolism. For this purpose we have established dietary copper deficiency in C57BL6 male mice during twelve weeks. Hematological parameters, copper and iron status were evaluated. cDNA microarray studies were performed to investigate gene expression profiles of proteins involved in iron metabolism in the liver, duodenum and spleen. Our results showed that copper deficiency induces microcytic and hypochromic anemia as well as liver iron overload. Gene expression profiles, however, indicate that hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression neither compensates for hepatic iron overload nor the anemia observed in this mouse model. Instead, major modifications of gene expression occurred in the spleen. We observed increased mRNA levels of the transferrin receptors 1 and 2 and of several proteins involved in the heme biosynthesis pathway (ferrochelatase, UroD, UroS,...). These results suggest that copper-deficient mice respond to the deficiency induced anemia by an adaptation leading to an increase in erythrocyte synthesis.

  3. Propionibacterium freudenreichii Surface Protein SlpB Is Involved in Adhesion to Intestinal HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Fillipe L. R.; Rabah, Houem; Huang, Song; Gaucher, Floriane; Deplanche, Martine; Dutertre, Stéphanie; Jardin, Julien; Le Loir, Yves; Azevedo, Vasco; Jan, Gwénaël

    2017-01-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a beneficial bacterium traditionally used as a cheese ripening starter and more recently for its probiotic abilities based on the release of beneficial metabolites. In addition to these metabolites (short-chain fatty acids, vitamins, and bifidogenic factor), P. freudenreichii revealed an immunomodulatory effect confirmed in vivo by the ability to protect mice from induced acute colitis. This effect is, however, highly strain-dependent. Local action of metabolites and of immunomodulatory molecules is favored by the ability of probiotics to adhere to the host cells. This property depends on key surface compounds, still poorly characterized in propionibacteria. In the present study, we showed different adhesion rates to cultured human intestinal cells, among strains of P. freudenreichii. The most adhesive one was P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA 129, which is known to expose surface-layer proteins. We evidenced here the involvement of these proteins in adhesion to cultured human colon cells. We then aimed at deciphering the mechanisms involved in adhesion. Adhesion was inhibited by antibodies raised against SlpB, one of the surface-layer proteins in P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA 129. Inactivation of the corresponding gene suppressed adhesion, further evidencing the key role of slpB product in cell adhesion. This work confirms the various functions fulfilled by surface-layer proteins, including probiotic/host interactions. It opens new perspectives for the understanding of probiotic determinants in propionibacteria, and for the selection of the most efficient strains within the P. freudenreichii species. PMID:28642747

  4. Involvement of F-BOX proteins in progression and development of human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shahab; Bhat, Ajaz A; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Mir, Fayaz; Kulinski, Michal; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-02-01

    The Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) is a core regulator with various protein components (ubiquitin-activating E1 enzymes, ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes, ubiquitin-protein E3 ligases, and the 26S proteasome) which work together in a coordinated fashion to ensure the appropriate and efficient proteolysis of target substrates. E3 ubiquitin ligases are essential components of the UPS machinery, working with E1 and E2 enzymes to bind substrates and assist the transport of ubiquitin molecules onto the target protein. As the UPS controls the degradation of several oncogenes and tumor suppressors, dysregulation of this pathway leads to several human malignancies. A major category of E3 Ub ligases, the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-box) complex, is composed of four principal components: Skp1, Cul1/Cdc53, Roc1/Rbx1/Hrt1, and an F-box protein (FBP). FBPs are the substrate recognition components of SCF complexes and function as adaptors that bring substrates into physical proximity with the rest of the SCF. Besides acting as a component of SCF complexes, FBPs are involved in DNA replication, transcription, cell differentiation and cell death. This review will highlight the recent literature on three well characterized FBPs SKP2, Fbw7, and beta-TRCP. In particular, we will focus on the involvement of these deregulated FBPs in the progression and development of various human cancers. We will also highlight some novel substrates recently identified for these FBPs.

  5. NAP-1, Nucleosome assembly protein 1, a histone chaperone involved in Drosophila telomeres.

    PubMed

    López-Panadès, Elisenda; Casacuberta, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Telomere elongation is a function that all eukaryote cells must accomplish in order to guarantee, first, the stability of the end of the chromosomes and second, to protect the genetic information from the inevitable terminal erosion. The targeted transposition of the telomere transposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE perform this function in Drosophila, while the telomerase mechanism elongates the telomeres in most eukaryotes. In order to integrate telomere maintenance together with cell cycle and metabolism, different components of the cell interact, regulate, and control the proteins involved in telomere elongation. Different partners of the telomerase mechanism have already been described, but in contrast, very few proteins have been related with assisting the telomere transposons of Drosophila. Here, we describe for the first time, the implication of NAP-1 (Nucleosome assembly protein 1), a histone chaperone that has been involved in nuclear transport, transcription regulation, and chromatin remodeling, in telomere biology. We find that Nap-1 and HeT-A Gag, one of the major components of the Drosophila telomeres, are part of the same protein complex. We also demonstrate that their close interaction is necessary to guarantee telomere stability in dividing cells. We further show that NAP-1 regulates the transcription of the HeT-A retrotransposon, pointing to a positive regulatory role of NAP-1 in telomere expression. All these results facilitate the understanding of the transposon telomere maintenance mechanism, as well as the integration of telomere biology with the rest of the cell metabolism.

  6. An RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in tunicamycin-induced apoptosis and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Reiko; Bando, Yoshio; Suyama, Eigo; Katayama, Taiichi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Baba, Tadashi; Tohyama, Masaya; Taira, Kazunari

    2004-01-01

    Various types of stress, such as disruption of calcium homeostasis, inhibition of protein glycosylation and reduction of disulfide bonds, result in accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The initial cellular response involves removal of such proteins by the ER, but excessive and/or long-term stress results in apoptosis. In this study, we used a randomized ribozyme library and ER stress-mediated apoptosis (tunicamycin-induced apoptosis) in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells as a selective phenotype to identify factors involved in this process. We identified a double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) as one of the participants in this process. The level of nuclear PKR was elevated, but the level of cytoplasmic PKR barely changed in tunicamycin-treated SK-N-SH cells. Furthermore, tunicamycin also raised levels of phosphorylated PKR in the nucleus. We also detected the accumulation of phosphorylated PKR in the nuclei of autopsied brain tissues in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, PKR might play a role in ER stress-induced apoptosis and in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:14765129

  7. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  8. Involvement of the pepper antimicrobial protein CaAMP1 gene in broad spectrum disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, In Sun; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2008-10-01

    Pathogen-inducible antimicrobial defense-related proteins have emerged as key antibiotic peptides and enzymes involved in disease resistance in plants. A novel antimicrobial protein gene, CaAMP1 (for Capsicum annuum ANTIMICROBIAL PROTEIN1), was isolated from pepper (C. annuum) leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria. Expression of the CaAMP1 gene was strongly induced in pepper leaves not only during pathogen infection but also after exposure to abiotic elicitors. The purified recombinant CaAMP1 protein possessed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. CaAMP1:smGFP fusion protein was localized mainly in the external and intercellular regions of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. The virus-induced gene silencing technique and gain-of-function transgenic plants were used to determine the CaAMP1 gene function in plant defense. Silencing of CaAMP1 led to enhanced susceptibility to X. campestris pv vesicatoria and Colletotrichum coccodes infection, accompanied by reduced PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) gene expression. In contrast, overexpression of CaAMP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) conferred broad-spectrum resistance to the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, and the fungal necrotrophic pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae and Alternaria brassicicola. CaAMP1 overexpression induced the salicylic acid pathway-dependent genes PR1 and PR5 but not the jasmonic acid-dependent defense gene PDF1.2 during P. syringae pv tomato infection. Together, these results suggest that the antimicrobial CaAMP1 protein is involved in broad-spectrum resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogen infection.

  9. MATI, a Novel Protein Involved in the Regulation of Herbivore-Associated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, M Estrella; Martinez, Manuel; Arnaiz, Ana; Ortego, Félix; Grbic, Vojislava; Diaz, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The defense response of the plants against herbivores relies on a complex network of interconnected signaling pathways. In this work, we characterized a new key player in the response of Arabidopsis against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, the MATI (Mite Attack Triggered Immunity) gene. This gene was differentially induced in resistant Bla-2 strain relative to susceptible Kon Arabidopsis accessions after mite attack, suggesting a potential role in the control of spider mites. To study the MATI gene function, it has been performed a deep molecular characterization of the gene combined with feeding bioassays using modified Arabidopsis lines and phytophagous arthropods. The MATI gene belongs to a new gene family that had not been previously characterized. Biotic assays showed that it confers a high tolerance not only to T. urticae, but also to the chewing lepidopteran Spodoptera exigua. Biochemical analyses suggest that MATI encodes a protein involved in the accumulation of reducing agents upon herbivore attack to control plant redox homeostasis avoiding oxidative damage and cell death. Besides, molecular analyses demonstrated that MATI is involved in the modulation of different hormonal signaling pathways, affecting the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis and signaling of the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid hormones. The fact that MATI is also involved in defense through the modulation of the levels of photosynthetic pigments highlights the potential of MATI proteins to be exploited as biotechnological tools for pest control.

  10. MATI, a Novel Protein Involved in the Regulation of Herbivore-Associated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, M. Estrella; Martinez, Manuel; Arnaiz, Ana; Ortego, Félix; Grbic, Vojislava; Diaz, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The defense response of the plants against herbivores relies on a complex network of interconnected signaling pathways. In this work, we characterized a new key player in the response of Arabidopsis against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, the MATI (Mite Attack Triggered Immunity) gene. This gene was differentially induced in resistant Bla-2 strain relative to susceptible Kon Arabidopsis accessions after mite attack, suggesting a potential role in the control of spider mites. To study the MATI gene function, it has been performed a deep molecular characterization of the gene combined with feeding bioassays using modified Arabidopsis lines and phytophagous arthropods. The MATI gene belongs to a new gene family that had not been previously characterized. Biotic assays showed that it confers a high tolerance not only to T. urticae, but also to the chewing lepidopteran Spodoptera exigua. Biochemical analyses suggest that MATI encodes a protein involved in the accumulation of reducing agents upon herbivore attack to control plant redox homeostasis avoiding oxidative damage and cell death. Besides, molecular analyses demonstrated that MATI is involved in the modulation of different hormonal signaling pathways, affecting the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis and signaling of the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid hormones. The fact that MATI is also involved in defense through the modulation of the levels of photosynthetic pigments highlights the potential of MATI proteins to be exploited as biotechnological tools for pest control. PMID:28649257

  11. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-07-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  12. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  13. Distinct features of cap binding by eIF4E1b proteins.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-30

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m(7)GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α+β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N(7) of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N(7) position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A Novel RNA-Binding Protein Involves ABA Signaling by Post-transcriptionally Repressing ABI2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianwen; Chen, Yihan; Qian, Luofeng; Mu, Rong; Yuan, Xi; Fang, Huimin; Huang, Xi; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Hongsheng; Huang, Ji

    2017-01-01

    The Stress Associated RNA-binding protein 1 (SRP1) repressed by ABA, salt and cold encodes a C2C2-type zinc finger protein in Arabidopsis. The knock-out mutation in srp1 reduced the sensitivity of seed to ABA and salt stress during germination and post-germinative growth stages. In contrast, SRP1-overexpressing seedlings were more sensitive to ABA and salt compared to wild type plants. In the presence of ABA, the transcript levels of ABA signaling and germination-related genes including ABI3. ABI5. EM1 and EM6 were less induced in srp1 compared to WT. Interestingly, expression of ABI2 encoding a protein phosphatase 2C protein were significantly up-regulated in srp1 mutants. By in vitro analysis, SRP1 was identified as a novel RNA-binding protein directly binding to 3′UTR of ABI2 mRNA. Moreover, transient expression assay proved the function of SRP1 in reducing the activity of luciferase whose coding sequence was fused with the ABI2 3’UTR. Together, it is suggested that SRP1 is involved in the ABA signaling by post-transcriptionally repressing ABI2 expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:28174577

  15. New Proteins Involved in Sulfur Trafficking in the Cytoplasm of Allochromatium vinosum*

    PubMed Central

    Stockdreher, Yvonne; Sturm, Marga; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dobler, Nadine; Zigann, Renate; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The formation of periplasmic sulfur globules is an intermediate step during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in various sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. The mechanism of how this sulfur is activated and crosses the cytoplasmic membrane for further oxidation to sulfite by the dissimilatory reductase DsrAB is incompletely understood, but it has been well documented that the pathway involves sulfur trafficking mediated by sulfur-carrying proteins. So far sulfur transfer from DsrEFH to DsrC has been established. Persulfurated DsrC very probably serves as a direct substrate for DsrAB. Here, we introduce further important players in oxidative sulfur metabolism; the proteins Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 are strictly conserved in the Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, and Acidithiobacillaceae families of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and are linked to genes encoding complexes involved in sulfur oxidation (Dsr or Hdr) in the latter two. Here we show via relative quantitative real-time PCR and microarray analysis an increase of mRNA levels under sulfur-oxidizing conditions for rhd_2599, tusA, and dsrE2 in Allochromatium vinosum. Transcriptomic patterns for the three genes match those of major genes for the sulfur-oxidizing machinery rather than those involved in biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. TusA appears to be one of the major proteins in A. vinosum. A rhd_2599-tusA-dsrE2-deficient mutant strain, although not viable in liquid culture, was clearly sulfur oxidation negative upon growth on solid media containing sulfide. Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 bind sulfur atoms via conserved cysteine residues, and experimental evidence is provided for the transfer of sulfur between these proteins as well as to DsrEFH and DsrC. PMID:24648525

  16. New proteins involved in sulfur trafficking in the cytoplasm of Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Stockdreher, Yvonne; Sturm, Marga; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dobler, Nadine; Zigann, Renate; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-05-02

    The formation of periplasmic sulfur globules is an intermediate step during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in various sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. The mechanism of how this sulfur is activated and crosses the cytoplasmic membrane for further oxidation to sulfite by the dissimilatory reductase DsrAB is incompletely understood, but it has been well documented that the pathway involves sulfur trafficking mediated by sulfur-carrying proteins. So far sulfur transfer from DsrEFH to DsrC has been established. Persulfurated DsrC very probably serves as a direct substrate for DsrAB. Here, we introduce further important players in oxidative sulfur metabolism; the proteins Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 are strictly conserved in the Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, and Acidithiobacillaceae families of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and are linked to genes encoding complexes involved in sulfur oxidation (Dsr or Hdr) in the latter two. Here we show via relative quantitative real-time PCR and microarray analysis an increase of mRNA levels under sulfur-oxidizing conditions for rhd_2599, tusA, and dsrE2 in Allochromatium vinosum. Transcriptomic patterns for the three genes match those of major genes for the sulfur-oxidizing machinery rather than those involved in biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. TusA appears to be one of the major proteins in A. vinosum. A rhd_2599-tusA-dsrE2-deficient mutant strain, although not viable in liquid culture, was clearly sulfur oxidation negative upon growth on solid media containing sulfide. Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 bind sulfur atoms via conserved cysteine residues, and experimental evidence is provided for the transfer of sulfur between these proteins as well as to DsrEFH and DsrC.

  17. Unique features of different members of the human guanylate-binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Tripal, Philipp; Bauer, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Mörtinger, Thomas; Hohenadl, Christine; Cornali, Emmanuelle; Thurau, Mathias; Stürzl, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are the most abundant cellular proteins expressed in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), with seven highly homologous members in humans, termed HuGBP-1 to HuGBP-7. To date, differential features that may indicate differential functions of these proteins have not been described. Here, we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of the different HuGBPs in endothelial cells (EC). IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced the expression of HuGBP-1, HuGBP-2, and HuGBP-3 at similar high levels. In contrast, expression of HuGBP-4 and HuGBP-5 was robustly induced only by IFN-gamma and not by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. Expression of HuGBP-6 and HuGBP-7 was not detected in EC under the various conditions examined. Investigating subcellular localization of the EC-expressed HuGBPs, HuGBP-1, HuGBP-3, and HuGBP-5 were exclusively detected in the cytoplasm, whereas HuGBP-2 and HuGBP-4 displayed a nucleocytoplasmic distribution. Treatment of the cells with IFN-gamma and aluminum fluoride caused rapid enrichment of HuGBP-1 and HuGBP-2 in the Golgi apparatus, as demonstrated by time-lapse microscopy and fluorescence analyses of GFP-tagged HuGBPs. HuGBP-3 and HuGBP-4 were never detected in the Golgi apparatus, whereas HuGBP-5 was constitutively enriched in this cytosolic compartment, irrespective of stimulation. These results assign a characteristic pattern of expression and subcellular localization to each of the HuGBPs, indicating for the first time that these proteins may have different cellular functions.

  18. Identification of an Atypical Membrane Protein Involved in the Formation of Protein Disulfide Bonds in Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhay K.; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria nearly three billion years ago provided abundant reducing power and facilitated the elaboration of numerous oxygen-dependent reactions in our biosphere. Cyanobacteria contain an internal thylakoid membrane system, the site of photosynthesis, and a typical Gram-negative envelope membrane system. Like other organisms, the extracytoplasmic space in cyanobacteria houses numerous cysteine-containing proteins. However, the existence of a biochemical system for disulfide bond formation in cyanobacteria remains to be determined. Extracytoplasmic disulfide bond formation in non-photosynthetic organisms is catalyzed by coordinated interaction between two proteins, a disulfide carrier and a disulfide generator. Here we describe a novel gene, SyndsbAB, required for disulfide bond formation in the extracytoplasmic space of cyanobacteria. The SynDsbAB orthologs are present in most cyanobacteria and chloroplasts of higher plants with fully sequenced genomes. The SynDsbAB protein contains two distinct catalytic domains that display significant similarity to proteins involved in disulfide bond formation in Escherichia coli and eukaryotes. Importantly, SyndsbAB complements E. coli strains defective in disulfide bond formation. In addition, the activity of E. coli alkaline phosphatase localized to the periplasm of Synechocystis 6803 is dependent on the function of SynDsbAB. Deletion of SyndsbAB in Synechocystis 6803 causes significant growth impairment under photoautotrophic conditions and results in hyper-sensitivity to dithiothreitol, a reductant, whereas diamide, an oxidant had no effect on the growth of the mutant strains. We conclude that SynDsbAB is a critical protein for disulfide bond formation in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms and required for their optimal photoautotrophic growth. PMID:18413314

  19. CLIMP-63 is a gentamicin-binding protein that is involved in drug-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, T; Wang, Q; David, L L; Steyger, P S

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity is a major clinical problem. To understand how aminoglycosides, including gentamicin, induce cytotoxicity in the kidney proximal tubule and the inner ear, we identified gentamicin-binding proteins (GBPs) from mouse kidney cells by pulling down GBPs with gentamicin–agarose conjugates and mass spectrometric analysis. Among several GBPs specific to kidney proximal tubule cells, cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein of 63 kDa (CLIMP-63) was the only protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, and was co-localized with gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR) conjugate after cells were treated with GTTR for 1 h. In western blots, kidney proximal tubule cells and cochlear cells, but not kidney distal tubule cells, exhibited a dithiothreitol (DTT)-resistant dimer band of CLIMP-63. Gentamicin treatment increased the presence of DTT-resistant CLIMP-63 dimers in both kidney proximal (KPT11) and distal (KDT3) tubule cells. Transfection of wild-type and mutant CLIMP-63 into 293T cells showed that the gentamicin-dependent dimerization requires CLIMP-63 palmitoylation. CLIMP-63 siRNA transfection enhanced cellular resistance to gentamicin-induced toxicity, which involves apoptosis, in KPT11 cells. Thus, the dimerization of CLIMP-63 is likely an early step in aminoglycoside-induced cytotoxicity in the kidney and cochlea. Gentamicin also enhanced the binding between CLIMP-63 and 14-3-3 proteins, and we also identified that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in gentamicin-induced cytotoxicity, likely by binding to CLIMP-63. PMID:21368867

  20. Involvement of HxuC Outer Membrane Protein in Utilization of Hemoglobin by Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Leslie D.; Love, Robert P.; Guinn, Sarah E.; Gilep, Andrei; Usanov, Sergei; Estabrook, Ronald W.; Hrkal, Zbynek; Hansen, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae can utilize different protein-bound forms of heme for growth in vitro. A previous study from this laboratory indicated that nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) strain N182 expressed three outer membrane proteins, designated HgbA, HgbB, and HgbC, that bound hemoglobin or hemoglobin-haptoglobin and were encoded by open reading frames (ORFs) that contained a CCAA nucleotide repeat. Testing of mutants expressing the HgbA, HgbB, and HgbC proteins individually revealed that expression of any one of these proteins was sufficient to allow wild-type growth with hemoglobin. In contrast, mutants that expressed only HgbA or HgbC grew significantly better with hemoglobin-haptoglobin than did a mutant expressing only HgbB. Construction of an isogenic hgbA hgbB hgbC mutant revealed that the absence of these three gene products did not affect the ability of NTHI N182 to utilize hemoglobin as a source of heme, although this mutant was severely impaired in its ability to utilize hemoglobin-haptoglobin. The introduction of a tonB mutation into this triple mutant eliminated its ability to utilize hemoglobin, indicating that the pathway for hemoglobin utilization in the absence of HgbA, HgbB, and HgbC involved a TonB-dependent process. Inactivation in this triple mutant of the hxuC gene, which encodes a predicted TonB-dependent outer membrane protein previously shown to be involved in the utilization of free heme, resulted in loss of the ability to utilize hemoglobin. The results of this study reinforce the redundant nature of the heme acquisition systems expressed by H. influenzae. PMID:11254593

  1. Analytical techniques and computer algorithms combined for the rapid characterization of structural peptide and protein features.

    PubMed

    Caporale, C

    1998-11-01

    The most recent algorithms based on the use of modern analytical techniques for the assessment of structural peptide and protein features have been reviewed. No algorithm devoted to the realization of predictive models or statistical analysis has been discussed, but only methods furnishing information on the real structure of the molecules. In particular, the procedures designed for handling sequence and mass spectrometric data obtained from the analysis of unfractionated digestion mixtures allow the user to get rapid information on the structure of the target polypeptide. Two classes of methods are illustrated: the first regards the determination of the amino acid sequence, whereas the second used its knowledge to supply data on the localization, function and three-dimensional structure of disulphides.

  2. Accurate Prediction of One-Dimensional Protein Structure Features Using SPINE-X.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of protein secondary structure and other one-dimensional structure features is essential for accurate sequence alignment, three-dimensional structure modeling, and function prediction. SPINE-X is a software package to predict secondary structure as well as accessible surface area and dihedral angles ϕ and ψ. For secondary structure SPINE-X achieves an accuracy of between 81 and 84 % depending on the dataset and choice of tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient for accessible surface area prediction is 0.75 and the mean absolute error from the ϕ and ψ dihedral angles are 20(∘) and 33(∘), respectively. The source code and a Linux executables for SPINE-X are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com .

  3. Identification of ICIS-1, a new protein involved in cilia stability.

    PubMed

    Ponsard, Cecile; Skowron-Zwarg, Marie; Seltzer, Virginie; Perret, Eric; Gallinger, Julia; Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Caruso, Nathalie; Middendorp, Sandrine; Tournier, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    Cilia are specialized organelles that exert critical functions in numerous organisms, including that of cell motility, fluid transport and protozoan locomotion. Ciliary architecture and function strictly depend on basal body formation, migration and axoneme elongation. Numerous ultrastructural studies have been undertaken in different species to elucidate the process of ciliogenesis. Recent analyses have led to identification of genes specifically expressed in ciliated organisms, but most proteins involved in ciliogenesis remain uncharacterized. Using human nasal epithelial cells capable of ciliary differentiation in vitro, differential display was carried out to identify new proteins associated with ciliogenesis. We isolated a new gene, ICIS-1 (Involved in CIlia Stability-1), upregulated during mucociliary differentiation. This gene is localized within the TGF-beta1 promoter and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Functional analyses of gene expression inhibition by RNA interference in Paramecium tetraurelia indicated that the ICIS-1 homologue interfered with cilia stability or formation. These findings demonstrate that ICIS-1 is a new protein associated with ciliated cells and potentially related to cilia stability.

  4. Raf kinase inhibitory protein suppresses a metastasis signalling cascade involving LIN28 and let-7

    PubMed Central

    Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Yun, Jieun; Eves, Eva M; Newman, Martin; Erkeland, Stefan J; Hammond, Scott M; Minn, Andy J; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) negatively regulates the MAP kinase (MAPK), G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2, and NF-κB signalling cascades. RKIP has been implicated as a metastasis suppressor for prostate cancer, but the mechanism is not known. Here, we show that RKIP inhibits invasion by metastatic breast cancer cells and represses breast tumour cell intravasation and bone metastasis in an orthotopic murine model. The mechanism involves inhibition of MAPK, leading to decreased transcription of LIN28 by Myc. Suppression of LIN28 enables enhanced let-7 processing in breast cancer cells. Elevated let-7 expression inhibits HMGA2, a chromatin remodelling protein that activates pro-invasive and pro-metastatic genes, including Snail. LIN28 depletion and let-7 expression suppress bone metastasis, and LIN28 restores bone metastasis in mice bearing RKIP-expressing breast tumour cells. These results indicate that RKIP suppresses invasion and metastasis in part through a signalling cascade involving MAPK, Myc, LIN28, let-7, and downstream let-7 targets. RKIP regulation of two pluripotent stem cell genes, Myc and LIN28, highlights the importance of RKIP as a key metastasis suppressor and potential therapeutic agent. PMID:19153603

  5. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  6. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-01-01

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M3) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M3 mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M3 locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M3 and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm. PMID:26540044

  7. A Phytophthora sojae G-protein alpha subunit is involved in chemotaxis to soybean isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Wang, Yonglin; Zheng, Xiaobo; Dou, Daolong; Zhang, Zhengguang; Govers, Francine; Wang, Yuanchao

    2008-12-01

    For the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae, chemotaxis of zoospores to isoflavones is believed to be critical for recognition of the host and for initiating infection. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this chemotaxis are largely unknown. To investigate the role of G-protein and calcium signaling in chemotaxis, we analyzed the expression of several genes known to be involved in these pathways and selected one that was specifically expressed in sporangia and zoospores but not in mycelium. This gene, named PsGPA1, is a single-copy gene in P. sojae and encodes a G-protein alpha subunit that shares 96% identity in amino acid sequence with that of Phytophthora infestans. To elucidate the function, expression of PsGPA1 was silenced by introducing antisense constructs into P. sojae. PsGPA1 silencing did not disturb hyphal growth or sporulation but severely affected zoospore behavior, including chemotaxis to the soybean isoflavone daidzein. Zoospore encystment and cyst germination were also altered, resulting in the inability of the PsGPA1-silenced mutants to infect soybean. In addition, the expressions of a calmodulin gene, PsCAM1, and two calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase genes, PsCMK3 and PsCMK4, were increased in the mutant zoospores, suggesting that PsGPA1 negatively regulates the calcium signaling pathways that are likely involved in zoospore chemotaxis.

  8. Automatic segmentation and 3D feature extraction of protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Moreira, António H. J.; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Oliveira, João; Dias, Nuno; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-03-01

    In the last years, it has become increasingly clear that neurodegenerative diseases involve protein aggregation, a process often used as disease progression readout and to develop therapeutic strategies. This work presents an image processing tool to automatic segment, classify and quantify these aggregates and the whole 3D body of the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans. A total of 150 data set images, containing different slices, were captured with a confocal microscope from animals of distinct genetic conditions. Because of the animals' transparency, most of the slices pixels appeared dark, hampering their body volume direct reconstruction. Therefore, for each data set, all slices were stacked in one single 2D image in order to determine a volume approximation. The gradient of this image was input to an anisotropic diffusion algorithm that uses the Tukey's biweight as edge-stopping function. The image histogram median of this outcome was used to dynamically determine a thresholding level, which allows the determination of a smoothed exterior contour of the worm and the medial axis of the worm body from thinning its skeleton. Based on this exterior contour diameter and the medial animal axis, random 3D points were then calculated to produce a volume mesh approximation. The protein aggregations were subsequently segmented based on an iso-value and blended with the resulting volume mesh. The results obtained were consistent with qualitative observations in literature, allowing non-biased, reliable and high throughput protein aggregates quantification. This may lead to a significant improvement on neurodegenerative diseases treatment planning and interventions prevention.

  9. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fangrui; Tan, Aidi; Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  10. The protein-retaining effects of growth hormone during fasting involve inhibition of muscle-protein breakdown.

    PubMed

    Nørrelund, H; Nair, K S; Jørgensen, J O; Christiansen, J S; Møller, N

    2001-01-01

    The metabolic response to fasting involves a series of hormonal and metabolic adaptations leading to protein conservation. An increase in the serum level of growth hormone (GH) during fasting has been well substantiated. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that GH may be a principal mediator of protein conservation during fasting and to assess the underlying mechanisms. Eight normal subjects were examined on four occasions: 1) in the basal postabsorptive state (basal), 2) after 40 h of fasting (fast), 3) after 40 h of fasting with somatostatin suppression of GH (fast-GH), and 4) after 40 h of fasting with suppression of GH and exogenous GH replacement (fast+GH). The two somatostatin experiments were identical in terms of hormone replacement (except for GH), meaning that somatostatin, insulin, glucagon and GH were administered for 28 h; during the last 4 h, substrate metabolism was investigated. Compared with the GH administration protocol, IGF-I and free IGF-I decreased 35 and 70%, respectively, during fasting without GH. Urinary urea excretion and serum urea increased when participants fasted without GH (urea excretion: basal 392 +/- 44, fast 440 +/- 32, fast-GH 609 +/- 76, and fast+GH 408 +/- 36 mmol/24 h, P < 0.05; serum urea: basal 4.6 +/- 0.1, fast 6.2 +/- 0.1, fast-GH 7.0 +/- 0.2, and fast+GH 4.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/1, P < 0.01). There was a net release of phenylalanine across the forearm, and the negative phenylalanine balance was higher during fasting with GH suppression (balance: basal 9 +/- 3, fast 15 +/- 6, fast-GH 17 +/- 4, and fast+GH 11 +/- 5 nmol/min, P < 0.05). Muscle-protein breakdown was increased among participants who fasted without GH (phenylalanine rate of appearance: basal 17 +/- 4, fast 26 +/- 9, fast-GH 33 +/- 7, fast+GH 25 +/- 6 nmol/min, P < 0.05). Levels of free fatty acids and oxidation of lipid decreased during fasting without GH (P < 0.01). In summary, we find that suppression of GH during fasting leads to a 50% increase in

  11. Many Local Pattern Texture Features: Which Is Better for Image-Based Multilabel Human Protein Subcellular Localization Classification?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying-Ying; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Human protein subcellular location prediction can provide critical knowledge for understanding a protein's function. Since significant progress has been made on digital microscopy, automated image-based protein subcellular location classification is urgently needed. In this paper, we aim to investigate more representative image features that can be effectively used for dealing with the multilabel subcellular image samples. We prepared a large multilabel immunohistochemistry (IHC) image benchmark from the Human Protein Atlas database and tested the performance of different local texture features, including completed local binary pattern, local tetra pattern, and the standard local binary pattern feature. According to our experimental results from binary relevance multilabel machine learning models, the completed local binary pattern, and local tetra pattern are more discriminative for describing IHC images when compared to the traditional local binary pattern descriptor. The combination of these two novel local pattern features and the conventional global texture features is also studied. The enhanced performance of final binary relevance classification model trained on the combined feature space demonstrates that different features are complementary to each other and thus capable of improving the accuracy of classification. PMID:25050396

  12. Involvement of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehyde-protein adducts in autoimmunity mediated by trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2007-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation, a major contributor to cellular damage, is also implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (AD). The focus of this study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes in autoimmunity induced and/or exacerbated by chemical exposure. Previous studies showed that trichloroethene (TCE) is capable of inducing/accelerating autoimmunity. To test whether TCE-induced lipid peroxidation might be involved in the induction/exacerbation of autoimmune responses, groups of autoimmune-prone female MRL +/+ mice were treated with TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day) for 6 or 12 wk. Significant increases of the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA)- and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adducts were found in the livers of TCE-treated mice at both 6 and 12 wk, but the response was greater at 12 wk. Further characterization of these adducts in liver microsomes showed increased formation of MDA-protein adducts with molecular masses of 86, 65, 56, 44, and 32 kD, and of HNE-protein adducts with molecular masses of 87, 79, 46, and 17 kD in TCE-treated mice. In addition, significant induction of anti-MDA- and anti-HNE-protein adduct-specific antibodies was observed in the sera of TCE-treated mice, and showed a pattern similar to MDA- or HNE-protein adducts. The increases in anti-MDA- and anti-HNE-protein adduct antibodies were associated with significant elevation in serum anti-nuclear-, anti-ssDNA- and anti-dsDNA-antibodies at 6 wk and, to a greater extent, at 12 wk. These studies suggest that TCE-induced lipid peroxidation is associated with induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice, and thus may play an important role in disease pathogenesis. Further interventional studies are needed to establish a causal relationship between lipid peroxidation and TCE-induced autoimmune response.

  13. Identification of phosphorylated proteins involved in the oncogenesis of prostate cancer via Pin1-proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Kanji; Nishi, Mayuko; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Miyagi, Yohei; Aoki, Ichiro; Hirano, Hisashi; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Ryo, Akihide

    2012-05-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulates a subset of phosphorylated proteins by catalyzing the cis-trans isomerization of their specific phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs. Although Pin1 has been shown to be involved in cell transformation and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype in prostate cancer, its specific substrates during these processes have not yet been determined. Cancer-specific phosphorylated proteins were isolated from two human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, LNCaP) and the Dunning rat prostate cancer cell lines by GST-pull down analysis with recombinant GST-Pin1 protein. These proteins were then identified by the LC-MS/MS analysis using a Q-Tof micro mass spectrometer and processed for further functional analysis. We newly identified five prostate cancer-specific Pin1 binding proteins (PINBPs) in this screen. Among these, TRK-fused gene (TFG) was found to be preferentially up-regulated in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. The targeted inhibition of TFG by specific siRNA resulted in the reduced cell proliferation and the induction of premature senescence in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We further found that TFG can facilitate the cell signaling mediated by NF-kappaB and androgen receptor (AR). Tissue micro-dissection based quantitative RT-PCR analysis of prostate cancer tissues following radical prostatectomy further revealed that TFG expression is closely associated with both a higher probability and shorter period of tumor recurrence following surgery. Pin1-based proteomics analysis is a useful tool for the identification of prostate cancer-specific phosphorylated proteins. TFG could be a potential diagnostic and/or prognostic marker and therapeutic target in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evolution and diversity of periplasmic proteins involved in copper homeostasis in gamma proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Different systems contributing to copper homeostasis in bacteria have been described in recent years involving periplasmic and transport proteins that provide resistance via metal efflux to the extracellular media (CopA/Cue, Cus, Cut, and Pco). The participation of these proteins in the assembly of membrane, periplasmic and secreted cuproproteins has also been postulated. The integration and interrelation of these systems and their apparent redundancies are less clear since they have been studied in alternative systems. Based on the idea that cellular copper is not free but rather it is transferred via protein-protein interactions, we hypothesized that systems would coevolve and be constituted by set numbers of essential components. Results By the use of a phylogenomic approach we identified the distribution of 14 proteins previously characterized as members of homeostasis systems in the genomes of 268 gamma proteobacteria. Only 3% of the genomes presented the complete systems and 5% of them, all intracellular parasites, lacked the 14 genes. Surprisingly, copper homeostatic pathways did not behave as evolutionary units with particular species assembling different combinations of basic functions. The most frequent functions, and probably because of its distribution the most vital, were copper extrusion from the cytoplasm to the periplasm performed by CopA and copper export from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space performed by CusC, which along with the remaining 12 proteins, assemble in nine different functional repertoires. Conclusions These observations suggest complex evolutionary dynamics and still unexplored interactions to achieve copper homeostasis, challenging some of the molecular transport mechanism proposed for these systems. PMID:23122209

  15. The Arabidopsis PLAT domain protein1 is critically involved in abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; van der Graaff, Eric; Albacete, Alfonso; Eom, Seung Hee; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Böhm, Hannah; Janschek, Ursula; Rim, Yeonggil; Ali, Walid Wahid; Kim, Soo Young; Roitsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, for only a relatively low percentage of the encoded proteins experimental evidence concerning their function is available. Plant proteins that harbour a single PLAT (Polycystin, Lipoxygenase, Alpha-toxin and Triacylglycerol lipase) domain and belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicots. However, the function of PLAT-plant-stress proteins is still poorly understood. Therefore, we have assessed the function of the uncharacterised Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress family members through a combination of functional genetic and physiological approaches. PLAT1 overexpression conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance, including cold, drought and salt stress, while loss-of-function resulted in opposite effects on abiotic stress tolerance. Strikingly, PLAT1 promoted growth under non-stressed conditions. Abiotic stress treatments induced PLAT1 expression and caused expansion of its expression domain. The ABF/ABRE transcription factors, which are positive mediators of abscisic acid signalling, activate PLAT1 promoter activity in transactivation assays and directly bind to the ABRE elements located in this promoter in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This suggests that PLAT1 represents a novel downstream target of the abscisic acid signalling pathway. Thus, we showed that PLAT1 critically functions as positive regulator of abiotic stress tolerance, but also is involved in regulating plant growth, and thereby assigned a function to this previously uncharacterised PLAT domain protein. The functional data obtained for PLAT1 support that PLAT-plant-stress proteins in general could be promising targets for improving abiotic stress tolerance without yield penalty.

  16. Conformational features of tau fibrils from Alzheimer's disease brain are faithfully propagated by unmodified recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Olga A; March, Zachary M; Robinson, Anne S; Colby, David W

    2013-10-08

    Fibrils composed of tau protein are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we show that when recombinant tau protein is seeded with paired helical filaments (PHFs) isolated from AD brain, the amyloid formed shares many of the structural features of AD PHFs. In contrast, tau amyloids formed with heparin as an inducing agent-a common biochemical model of tau misfolding-are structurally distinct from brain-derived PHFs. Using ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and chemical denaturation, we found that AD seeded recombinant tau fibrils were not significantly different than tau fibrils isolated from AD brain tissue. Tau fibrils produced by incubating recombinant tau with heparin had significantly narrower fibrils with a longer periodicity, higher chemical stability, and distinct secondary structure compared to AD PHFs. The addition of heparin to the reaction of recombinant tau and AD PHFs also corrupted the templating process, resulting in a mixture of fibril conformations. Our results suggest that AD-isolated PHFs act as a conformational template for the formation of recombinant tau fibrils. Therefore, the use of AD PHFs as seeds to stimulate recombinant tau amyloid formation produces synthetic tau fibers that closely resemble those associated with AD pathology and provides a biochemical model of tau misfolding that may be of improved utility for structural studies and drug screening. These results also demonstrate that post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation are not a prerequisite for the propagation of the tau fibril conformation found in AD.

  17. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  18. Structural–Functional Features of the Thyrotropin Receptor: A Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor at Work

    PubMed Central

    Kleinau, Gunnar; Worth, Catherine L.; Kreuchwig, Annika; Biebermann, Heike; Marcinkowski, Patrick; Scheerer, Patrick; Krause, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, a sub-group of class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). TSHR and its endogenous ligand thyrotropin (TSH) are of essential importance for growth and function of the thyroid gland and proper function of the TSH/TSHR system is pivotal for production and release of thyroid hormones. This receptor is also important with respect to pathophysiology, such as autoimmune (including ophthalmopathy) or non-autoimmune thyroid dysfunctions and cancer development. Pharmacological interventions directly targeting the TSHR should provide benefits to disease treatment compared to currently available therapies of dysfunctions associated with the TSHR or the thyroid gland. Upon TSHR activation, the molecular events conveying conformational changes from the extra- to the intracellular side of the cell across the membrane comprise reception, conversion, and amplification of the signal. These steps are highly dependent on structural features of this receptor and its intermolecular interaction partners, e.g., TSH, antibodies, small molecules, G-proteins, or arrestin. For better understanding of signal transduction, pathogenic mechanisms such as autoantibody action and mutational modifications or for developing new pharmacological strategies, it is essential to combine available structural data with functional information to generate homology models of the entire receptor. Although so far these insights are fragmental, in the past few decades essential contributions have been made to investigate in-depth the involved determinants, such as by structure determination via X-ray crystallography. This review summarizes available knowledge (as of December 2016) concerning the TSHR protein structure, associated functional aspects, and based on these insights we suggest several receptor complex models. Moreover, distinct TSHR properties will be highlighted in comparison to other class A GPCRs to

  19. Text as data: using text-based features for proteins representation and for computational prediction of their characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shatkay, Hagit; Brady, Scott; Wong, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The current era of large-scale biology is characterized by a fast-paced growth in the number of sequenced genomes and, consequently, by a multitude of identified proteins whose function has yet to be determined. Simultaneously, any known or postulated information concerning genes and proteins is part of the ever-growing published scientific literature, which is expanding at a rate of over a million new publications per year. Computational tools that attempt to automatically predict and annotate protein characteristics, such as function and localization patterns, are being developed along with systems that aim to support the process via text mining. Most work on protein characterization focuses on features derived directly from protein sequence data. Protein-related work that does aim to utilize the literature typically concentrates on extracting specific facts (e.g., protein interactions) from text. In the past few years we have taken a different route, treating the literature as a source of text-based features, which can be employed just as sequence-based protein-features were used in earlier work, for predicting protein subcellular location and possibly also function. We discuss here in detail the overall approach, along with results from work we have done in this area demonstrating the value of this method and its potential use. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines.

  1. Sorcin, a calcium binding protein involved in the multidrug resistance mechanisms in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Colotti, Gianni; Poser, Elena; Fiorillo, Annarita; Genovese, Ilaria; Chiarini, Valerio; Ilari, Andrea

    2014-09-05

    Sorcin is a penta-EF hand calcium binding protein, which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in cells. Sorcin regulates calcium channels and exchangers located at the plasma membrane and at the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR), and allows high levels of calcium in the ER to be maintained, preventing ER stress and possibly, the unfolded protein response. Sorcin is highly expressed in the heart and in the brain, and overexpressed in many cancer cells. Sorcin gene is in the same amplicon as other genes involved in the resistance to chemotherapeutics in cancer cells (multi-drug resistance, MDR) such as ABCB4 and ABCB1; its overexpression results in increased drug resistance to a number of chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of sorcin expression by sorcin-targeting RNA interference leads to reversal of drug resistance. Sorcin is increasingly considered a useful marker of MDR and may represent a therapeutic target for reversing tumor multidrug resistance.

  2. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-δ in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong J; Jung, Jong P; Park, Soon E; Lee, Minhyun; Kwon, Byungsuk; Cho, Hong R

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-δ function in ALI using PKC-δ knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-δ KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-δ inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-δ-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-δ inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-δ inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils.

  3. The H-NS protein is involved in the biogenesis of flagella in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, P; Terao, E; Lee, E H; Lejeune, P; Colson, C; Danchin, A; Collatz, E

    1994-01-01

    The function of the flagellum-chemotaxis regulon requires the expression of many genes and is positively regulated by the cyclic AMP-catabolite activator protein (cAMP-CAP) complex. In this paper, we show that motile behavior was affected in Escherichia coli hns mutants. The loss of motility resulted from a complete lack of flagella. A decrease in the level of transcription of the flhD and fliA genes, which are both required for the synthesis of flagella, was observed in the presence of an hns mutation. Furthermore, the Fla- phenotype was not reversed to the wild type in the presence of a cfs mutation which renders the flagellum synthesis independent of the cAMP-CAP complex. These results suggest that the H-NS protein acts as a positive regulator of genes involved in the biogenesis of flagella by a mechanism independent of the cAMP-CAP pathway. Images PMID:8071234

  4. Vps41, a protein involved in lysosomal trafficking, interacts with caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Pan, Xiao; He, Liangqiang; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Min; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a member of the cysteine-aspartic acid protease (caspase) family which plays a central role in apoptosis and development. We screened caspase-8 interacting proteins from mouse T-cell lymphoma and 7.5-day embryo cDNA libraries by yeast two-hybrid system and obtained eleven positive clones, including Vacuolar protein sorting 41 (Vps41), a protein involved in trafficking of proteins from the late Golgi to the vacuole. The interaction of Vps41 with caspase-8 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and co-localization studies in HEK293T cells. Co-IP experiments also showed that Vps41 binds to the p18 subunit of caspase-8 through its WD40 region and RING-finger motif. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of Vps41 promotes Fas-induced apoptosis in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. The cleavage of caspase-3, a caspase-8 downstream effector, was increased when cells were transfected with Vps41-overexpressing plasmid. Together, these results suggest a novel interaction of caspase-8 with Vps41 and provide a potential role of Vps41 beyond lysosomal trafficking.

  5. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  6. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  7. Analysis of outer membrane vesicle protein involved in biofilm formation of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Woo, Timothy; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hojo, Fuhito; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kato, Shuichi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2011-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in humans. Infection with H. pylori is closely associated with gastritis and peptic ulcers and is a risk factor for gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori forms biofilms on glass surfaces at the air-liquid interface in in-vitro batch cultures. We previously reported that strain TK1402 showed a strong biofilm-forming ability in vitro. We also suggested the outer membrane vesicles (OMV) produced by strain TK1402 might be related to its biofilm forming ability. In the present study, we analyzed the protein profile of the OMV produced by strain TK1402 and found a unique 22-kDa protein in TK1402 OMV cultured for 2-3 days. In addition, this protein could not be detected in the OMVs produced by other H. pylori strains. These results suggest that the 22-kDa protein is involved in effective biofilm formation by strain TK1402. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. XAB2, a novel tetratricopeptide repeat protein involved in transcription-coupled DNA repair and transcription.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Y; Asahina, H; Citterio, E; Rademakers, S; Vermeulen, W; Kamiuchi, S; Yeo, J P; Khaw, M C; Saijo, M; Kodo, N; Matsuda, T; Hoeijmakers, J H; Tanaka, K

    2000-11-10

    Nucleotide excision repair is a highly versatile DNA repair system responsible for elimination of a wide variety of lesions from the genome. It is comprised of two subpathways: transcription-coupled repair that accomplishes efficient removal of damage blocking transcription and global genome repair. Recently, the basic mechanism of global genome repair has emerged from biochemical studies. However, little is known about transcription-coupled repair in eukaryotes. Here we report the identification of a novel protein designated XAB2 (XPA-binding protein 2) that was identified by virtue of its ability to interact with XPA, a factor central to both nucleotide excision repair subpathways. The XAB2 protein of 855 amino acids consists mainly of 15 tetratricopeptide repeats. In addition to interacting with XPA, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that a fraction of XAB2 is able to interact with the transcription-coupled repair-specific proteins CSA and CSB as well as RNA polymerase II. Furthermore, antibodies against XAB2 inhibited both transcription-coupled repair and transcription in vivo but not global genome repair when microinjected into living fibroblasts. These results indicate that XAB2 is a novel component involved in transcription-coupled repair and transcription.

  9. Astroglial and neuronal proteins in cerebrospinal fluid as markers of CNS involvement in Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, L; Hagberg, L; Karlsson, J E; Rosengren, L E

    1999-03-01

    Is Lyme neuroborreliosis, even in its early phase, a parenchymatous disorder in the central nervous system (CNS), and not merely a meningitic process? We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of four nerve and glial cell marker proteins in Lyme neuroborreliosis patients with pretreatment durations of 7-240 days. All 23 patients had meningoradiculitis, and six had objective signs of encephalopathy. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp) pretreatment levels in CSF, and the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL) levels were related to clinical outcome and declined significantly after treatment (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). NFL was detectable in 11 out of 22 patients, and pre- and post-treatment NFL levels were associated with the duration of neurological symptoms within 100 days prior to treatment. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) concentrations also decreased after therapy (P < 0.001), while CSF levels of glial S-100 protein remained unchanged. The pretreatment duration of disease was related to postinfectious sequelae. GFAp, NSE and NFL levels in CSF are unspecific indicators of astroglial and neuronal involvement in CNS disease. The findings in the present study are in agreement with the hypothesis that early and late stages of Lyme neuroborreliosis damage the CNS parenchyma. Copyright 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  11. The Arabidopsis CLASP gene encodes a microtubule-associated protein involved in cell expansion and division.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, J Christian; Shoji, Tsubasa; Kotzer, Amanda M; Pighin, Jamie A; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2007-09-01

    Controlling microtubule dynamics and spatial organization is a fundamental requirement of eukaryotic cell function. Members of the ORBIT/MAST/CLASP family of microtubule-associated proteins associate with the plus ends of microtubules, where they promote the addition of tubulin subunits into attached kinetochore fibers during mitosis and stabilize microtubules in the vicinity of the plasma membrane during interphase. To date, nothing is known about their function in plants. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CLASP protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is involved in both cell division and cell expansion. Green fluorescent protein-CLASP localizes along the full length of microtubules and shows enrichment at growing plus ends. Our analysis suggests that CLASP promotes microtubule stability. clasp-1 T-DNA insertion mutants are hypersensitive to microtubule-destabilizing drugs and exhibit more sparsely populated, yet well ordered, root cortical microtubule arrays. Overexpression of CLASP promotes microtubule bundles that are resistant to depolymerization with oryzalin. Furthermore, clasp-1 mutants have aberrant microtubule preprophase bands, mitotic spindles, and phragmoplasts, indicating a role for At CLASP in stabilizing mitotic arrays. clasp-1 plants are dwarf, have significantly reduced cell numbers in the root division zone, and have defects in directional cell expansion. We discuss possible mechanisms of CLASP function in higher plants.

  12. Intrahippocampal infusion of spermidine improves memory persistence: Involvement of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Signor, Cristiane; Temp, Fernanda R; Mello, Carlos F; Oliveira, Mauro S; Girardi, Bruna A; Gais, Mayara A; Funck, Vinicius R; Rubin, Maribel A

    2016-05-01

    Spermidine (SPD) is an endogenous aliphatic amine that modulates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors and improves memory. Recent evidence suggests that systemic SPD improves the persistence of the long term memory of fear. However, the role of hippocampal polyamines and its binding sites in the persistence of fear memory is to be determined, as well as its putative underlying mechanisms. This study investigated whether the intrahippocampal (i.h.) infusion of spermidine or arcaine, modulators of polyamine binding site at GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, alters the persistence of the memory of contextual fear conditioning task in rats. We also investigated whether protein synthesis and cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) play a role in SPD-induced improvement of the fear memory persistence. While 12h post-training infusion of spermidine facilitated, arcaine and the inhibitor of protein synthesis (anisomycin) impaired the memory of fear assessed 7days after training. The infusion of arcaine, anisomycin or a selective PKA inhibitor (H-89), at doses that have no effect on memory per se, prevented the SPD-induced improvement of memory persistence. H-89 prevented the stimulatory effect of SPD on phospho-PKA/total-PKA ratio. These results suggests that the improvement of fear memory persistence induced by spermidine involves GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, PKA pathway and protein synthesis in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuronal and microglial involvement in beta-amyloid protein deposition in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Cras, P.; Kawai, M.; Siedlak, S.; Mulvihill, P.; Gambetti, P.; Lowery, D.; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P.; Greenberg, B.; Perry, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to localize amyloid precursor protein (APP) and to determine how APP might be released and proteolyzed to yield the beta-amyloid protein deposits found in senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. We found that antibodies to recombinantly expressed APP labeled many normal neurons and neurites. In addition, dystrophic neurites in different types of senile plaques and degenerating neurons in the temporal cortex and hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease patients were immunostained. We also detected small clusters of dystrophic APP immunoreactive neurites that were not associated with beta-amyloid protein deposits. Microglia was involved in different types of senile plaques and often were associated closely with APP immunoreactive neurites and neurons. The greatest concurrence of APP immunoreactivity and reactive microglia was seen in the subiculum and area CA1, regions with a high density of congophilic plaques and subject to intense Alzheimer's pathology. Our findings suggest that neuronally derived APP is the source for senile plaque beta-amyloid protein, while microglia may act as processing cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2117395

  14. Identification of proteins involved in desiccation tolerance in the red seaweed Pyropia orbicularis (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    López-Cristoffanini, Camilo; Zapata, Javier; Gaillard, Fanny; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto

    2015-12-01

    Extreme reduction in cellular water content leads to desiccation, which, if persistent, affects the physiology of organisms, mainly through oxidative stress. Some organisms are highly tolerant to desiccation, including resurrection plants and certain intertidal seaweeds. One such species is Pyropia orbicularis, a rhodophycean that colonizes upper intertidal zones along the Chilean coast. Despite long, daily periods of air exposure due to tides, this alga is highly tolerant to desiccation. The present study examined the proteome of P. orbicularis by 2DE and LC-MS/MS analyses to determine the proteins associated with desiccation tolerance (DT). The results showed that, under natural conditions, there were significant changes in the protein profile during low tide as compared to naturally hydrated plants at high tide. These changes were mainly in newly appeared proteins spots such as chaperones, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase, among others. Previously undescribed proteins under desiccation conditions included phycobiliproteins, glyoxalase I, and phosphomannomutase. These changes evidenced that several physiological responses involved in DT are activated during low tide, including decreased photosynthetic activity, increased antioxidant capacity, and the preservation of cell physiology by regulating water content, cell wall structure, and cell volume. Similar responses have been observed in resurrection plants and bryophytes exposed to desiccation. Therefore, the coordinated activation of different desiccation tolerance pathways in P. orbicularis could explain the successful biological performance of this seaweed in the upper intertidal rocky zones.

  15. Mechanisms of malarial anaemia: potential involvement of the Plasmodium falciparum low molecular weight rhoptry-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Awah, Nancy W; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Berzins, Klavs; Gysin, Jürg

    2009-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the tropics. Anaemia is a constant feature of the disease. Pregnant women mostly primigravidae and children below the age of 5 years are the most afflicted. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and incompletely understood. Among several factors, the destruction of erythrocytes (RBCs) is the most frequently observed cause of severe malarial anaemia and the removal of non-parasitized RBCs (nEs) is thought to be the most important, accounting for approximately 90% of the reduction in haematocrit in acute malaria. Previous studies demonstrated that the tagging of nEs with the parasite antigen RAP-2 (rhoptry-associated protein-2; also designated RSP-2) due to either failed or aborted invasion by merozoites resulted in the destruction of these cells. In this study we further investigated the mechanisms mediating the destruction of nEs in the development of severe malarial anaemia and the possible involvement of RAP-2/RSP-2 and other members of the low molecular weight rhoptry complex (RAP-1: rhoptry-associated protein-1 and RAP-3: rhoptry-associated protein-3). Antibodies to the rhoptry-associated proteins were found to recognise the surface of nEs in a parasitaemia-dependent manner after merozoite release in P. falciparumin vitro cultures. These cells, as well as erythroblasts co-cultured with infected RBCs (IEs), could then be destroyed by either phagocytosis or lysis after complement activation. The ability of anti-rhoptry antibodies to mediate the destruction of RAP-2/RSP-2-tagged erythroblasts in the presence of effector cells was also investigated. Data obtained suggest that mouse monoclonal antibodies to the low molecular weight RAP proteins mediate the death of RAP-2/RSP-2-tagged erythroblasts on interaction with adherent monocytes. The mechanism of cell death is not yet fully known, but seems to involve primarily apoptosis. The above observations suggest that the antibody response

  16. Structural and Functional Features of a Developmentally Regulated Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Krasity, Benjamin C.; Troll, Joshua V.; Lehnert, Erik M.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding proteins (LBPs) occur mainly in extracellular fluids and promote LPS delivery to specific host cell receptors. The function of LBPs has been studied principally in the context of host defense; the possible role of LBPs in nonpathogenic host-microbe interactions has not been well characterized. Using the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri model, we analyzed the structure and function of an LBP family protein, E. scolopes LBP1 (EsLBP1), and provide evidence for its role in triggering a symbiont-induced host developmental program. Previous studies showed that, during initial host colonization, the LPS of V. fischeri synergizes with peptidoglycan (PGN) monomer to induce morphogenesis of epithelial tissues of the host animal. Computationally modeled EsLBP1 shares some but not all structural features of mammalian LBPs that are thought important for LPS binding. Similar to human LBP, recombinant EsLBP1 expressed in insect cells bound V. fischeri LPS and Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with nanomolar or greater affinity but bound Francisella tularensis LPS only weakly and did not bind PGN monomer. Unlike human LBP, EsLBP1 did not bind N. meningitidis LOS:CD14 complexes. The eslbp1 transcript was upregulated ~22-fold by V. fischeri at 24 h postinoculation. Surprisingly, this upregulation was not induced by exposure to LPS but, rather, to the PGN monomer alone. Hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) localized eslbp1 transcript and protein in crypt epithelia, where V. fischeri induces morphogenesis. The data presented here provide a window into the evolution of LBPs and the scope of their roles in animal symbioses. PMID:26463160

  17. The involvement of a protein kinase in phototaxis and gravitaxis of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Häder, Donat-P; Richter, Peter R; Lebert, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows positive phototaxis at low-light intensities (<10 W/m(2)) and a negative one at higher irradiances (>10 W/m(2)). Phototaxis is based on blue light-activated adenylyl cyclases, which produce cAMP upon irradiation. In the absence of light the cells swim upward in the water column (negative gravitaxis). The results of sounding rocket campaigns and of a large number of ground experiments led to the following model of signal perception and transduction in gravitaxis of E. gracilis: The body of the cell is heavier than the surrounding medium, sediments and thereby exerts a force onto the lower membrane. Upon deviation from a vertical swimming path mechano-sensitive ion channels are activated. Calcium is gated inwards which leads to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration and causes a change of the membrane potential. After influx, calcium activates one of several calmodulins found in Euglena, which in turn activates an adenylyl cyclase (different from the one involved in phototaxis) to produce cAMP from ATP. One further element in the sensory transduction chain of both phototaxis and gravitaxis is a specific protein kinase A. We found five different protein kinases A in E. gracilis. The blockage of only one of these (PK.4, accession No. EU935859) by means of RNAi inhibited both phototaxis and gravitaxis, while inhibition of the other four affected neither phototaxis nor gravitaxis. It is assumed that cAMP directly activates this protein kinase A which may in turn phosphorylate a protein involved in the flagellar beating mechanism.

  18. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlin; Zhao, Guifang; Gao, Xiaocai

    2013-02-20

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23425632

  20. Mouse neuron navigator 1, a novel microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, María José; Alcántara, Soledad; Mascaró, Cristina; Pérez-Brangulí, Francesc; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Maes, Tamara; Soriano, Eduardo; Buesa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The development of the nervous system (NS) requires the coordinated migration of multiple waves of neurons and subsequent processes of neurite maturation, both involving selective guidance mechanisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unc-53 codes for a new multidomain protein involved in the directional migration of a subset of cells. We describe here the first functional characterization of the mouse homologue, mouse Neuron navigator 1 (mNAV1), whose expression is largely restricted to the NS during development. EGFP-mNAV1 associates with microtubules (MTs) plus ends present in the growth cone through a new microtubule-binding (MTB) domain. Moreover, its overexpression in transfected cells leads to MT bundling. The abolition of mNAV1 causes loss of directionality in the leading processes of pontine-migrating cells, providing evidence for a role of mNAV1 in mediating Netrin-1-induced directional migration.

  1. Involvement of protein kinase C in the delayed cytoprotection following sublethal ischaemia in rabbit myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, G. F.; Goma, F. M.; Yellon, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit hearts were preconditioned with four 5 min coronary artery occlusions 24 h before 30 min coronary occlusion with 120 min reperfusion. Preconditioning significantly reduced the percentage of myocardium infarcting within the risk zone from 49.1 +/- 4.3% to 31.8 +/- 3.5% (P < 0.05). When the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, chelerythrine, was administered just before preconditioning, the delayed protection against infarction 24 h later was abolished. We conclude that the delayed cytoprotective response associated with ischaemic preconditioning of myocardium is likely to involve the early activation of one or more PKC subtypes. PMID:7545515

  2. High C-Reactive Protein Predicts Delirium Incidence, Duration, and Feature Severity After Major Noncardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M; Dillon, Simon T; Inouye, Sharon K; Ngo, Long H; Fong, Tamara G; Jones, Richard N; Travison, Thomas G; Schmitt, Eva M; Alsop, David C; Freedman, Steven D; Arnold, Steven E; Metzger, Eran D; Libermann, Towia A; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2017-08-01

    To examine associations between the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) measured preoperatively and on postoperative day 2 (POD2) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. Prospective cohort study. Two academic medical centers. Adults aged 70 and older undergoing major noncardiac surgery (N = 560). Plasma CRP was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Delirium was assessed from Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) interviews and chart review. Delirium duration was measured according to number of hospital days with delirium. Delirium feature severity was defined as the sum of CAM-Severity (CAM-S) scores on all postoperative hospital days. Generalized linear models were used to examine independent associations between CRP (preoperatively and POD2 separately) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity; prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS, >5 days); and discharge disposition. Postoperative delirium occurred in 24% of participants, 12% had 2 or more delirium days, and the mean ± standard deviation sum CAM-S was 9.3 ± 11.4. After adjusting for age, sex, surgery type, anesthesia route, medical comorbidities, and postoperative infectious complications, participants with preoperative CRP of 3 mg/L or greater had a risk of delirium that was 1.5 times as great (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-2.1) as that of those with CRP less than 3 mg/L, 0.4 more delirium days (P < .001), more-severe delirium (3.6 CAM-S points higher, P < .001), and a risk of prolonged LOS that was 1.4 times as great (95% CI = 1.1-1.8). Using POD2 CRP, participants in the highest quartile (≥235.73 mg/L) were 1.5 times as likely to develop delirium (95% CI = 1.0-2.4) as those in the lowest quartile (≤127.53 mg/L), had 0.2 more delirium days (P < .05), and had more severe delirium (4.5 CAM-S points higher, P < .001). High preoperative and POD2 CRP were independently associated with delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. CRP may be useful to

  3. Increase in proteins involved in mitochondrial fission, mitophagy, proteolysis and antioxidant response in type I endometrial cancer as an adaptive response to respiratory complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Cormio, Gennaro; Pesce, Vito; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola

    2017-09-09

    Pathogenic mtDNA mutations associated with alterations of respiratory complex I, mitochondrial proliferation (oncocytic-like phenotype) and increase in antioxidant response were previously reported in type I endometrial carcinoma (EC). To evaluate whether in the presence of pathogenic mtDNA mutations other mitochondrial adaptive processes are triggered by cancer cells, the expression level of proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, proteolysis and apoptosis were evaluated in type I ECs harboring pathogenic mtDNA mutations and complex I deficiency. An increase in the fission protein Drp1, in the mitophagy protein BNIP3, in the mitochondrial protease CLPP, in the antioxidant and anti-apoptotic protein ALR and in Bcl-2 as well as a decrease in the fusion protein Mfn2 were found in cancer compared to matched non malignant tissue. Moreover, the level of these proteins was measured in type I EC, in hyperplastic (the premalignant form) and in non malignant tissues to verify whether the altered expression of these proteins is a common feature of endometrial cancer and of hyperplastic tissue. This analysis confirmed in type I EC samples, but not in hyperplasia, an alteration of the expression level of these proteins. These results suggest that in this cancer mitochondrial fission, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic response may be activated, as well as the discharge of damaged mitochondrial proteins as adaptation processes to mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. STAT5 proteins are involved in down-regulation of iron regulatory protein 1 gene expression by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Starzynski, Rafal Radoslaw; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia; Muzeau, Françoise; Tyrolczyk, Zofia; Smuda, Ewa; Drapier, Jean-Claude; Beaumont, Carole; Lipinski, Pawel

    2006-12-01

    RNA-binding activity of IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) is regulated by the insertion/extrusion of a [4Fe-4S] cluster into/from the IRP1 molecule. NO (nitic oxide), whose ability to activate IRP1 by removing its [4Fe-4S] cluster is well known, has also been shown to down-regulate expression of the IRP1 gene. In the present study, we examine whether this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Analysis of the mouse IRP1 promoter sequence revealed two conserved putative binding sites for transcription factor(s) regulated by NO and/or changes in intracellular iron level: Sp1 (promoter-selective transcription factor 1) and MTF1 (metal transcription factor 1), plus GAS (interferon-gamma-activated sequence), a binding site for STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins. In order to define the functional activity of these sequences, reporter constructs were generated through the insertion of overlapping fragments of the mouse IRP1 promoter upstream of the luciferase gene. Transient expression assays following transfection of HuH7 cells with these plasmids revealed that while both the Sp1 and GAS sequences are involved in basal transcriptional activity of the IRP1 promoter, the role of the latter is predominant. Analysis of protein binding to these sequences in EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) using nuclear extracts from mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated to synthesize NO showed a significant decrease in the formation of Sp1-DNA and STAT-DNA complexes, compared with controls. We have also demonstrated that the GAS sequence is involved in NO-dependent down-regulation of IRP1 transcription. Further analysis revealed that levels of STAT5a and STAT5b in the nucleus and cytosol of NO-producing macrophages are substantially lower than in control cells. These findings provide evidence that STAT5 proteins play a role in NO-mediated down-regulation of IRP1 gene expression.

  5. Characterization of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Involved in Tubercidin Resistance in Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Coelho, Adriano Cappellazzo; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Sanchez, Eduardo Milton Ramos; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Cotrim, Paulo Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Background Tubercidin (TUB) is a toxic adenosine analog with potential antiparasitic activity against Leishmania, with mechanism of action and resistance that are not completely understood. For understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying the potential metabolic pathways affected by this drug, we employed in this study an overexpression/selection approach using TUB for the identification of potential targets, as well as, drug resistance genes in L. major. Although, TUB is toxic to the mammalian host, these findings can provide evidences for a rational drug design based on purine pathway against leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal findings After transfection of a cosmid genomic library into L. major Friedlin (LmjF) parasites and application of the overexpression/selection method, we identified two cosmids (cosTUB1 and cosTU2) containing two different loci capable of conferring significant levels of TUB resistance. In the cosTUB1 contained a gene encoding NUPM1-like protein, which has been previously described as associated with TUB resistance in L. amazonensis. In the cosTUB2 we identified and characterized a gene encoding a 63 kDa protein that we denoted as tubercidin-resistance protein (TRP). Functional analysis revealed that the transfectants were less susceptible to TUB than LmjF parasites or those transfected with the control vector. In addition, the trp mRNA and protein levels in cosTUB2 transfectants were higher than LmjF. TRP immunolocalization revealed that it was co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a cellular compartment with many functions. In silico predictions indicated that TRP contains only a hypothetical transmembrane domain. Thus, it is likely that TRP is a lumen protein involved in multidrug efflux transport that may be involved in the purine metabolic pathway. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated for the first time that TRP is associated with TUB resistance in Leishmania. The next challenge is to determine how

  6. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca2+ sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca2+ signals. Ca2+-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal and overview of Ca2+ signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca2+ signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to improve stress-tolerance of

  7. Spa2p Interacts with Cell Polarity Proteins and Signaling Components Involved in Yeast Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Santos, Beatriz; Fortin, Nathalie; Costigan, Christine; Snyder, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The yeast protein Spa2p localizes to growth sites and is important for polarized morphogenesis during budding, mating, and pseudohyphal growth. To better understand the role of Spa2p in polarized growth, we analyzed regions of the protein important for its function and proteins that interact with Spa2p. Spa2p interacts with Pea2p and Bud6p (Aip3p) as determined by the two-hybrid system; all of these proteins exhibit similar localization patterns, and spa2Δ, pea2Δ, and bud6Δ mutants display similar phenotypes, suggesting that these three proteins are involved in the same biological processes. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that Spa2p and Pea2p are tightly associated with each other in vivo. Velocity sedimentation experiments suggest that a significant portion of Spa2p, Pea2p, and Bud6p cosediment, raising the possibility that these proteins form a large, 12S multiprotein complex. Bud6p has been shown previously to interact with actin, suggesting that the 12S complex functions to regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Deletion analysis revealed that multiple regions of Spa2p are involved in its localization to growth sites. One of the regions involved in Spa2p stability and localization interacts with Pea2p; this region contains a conserved domain, SHD-II. Although a portion of Spa2p is sufficient for localization of itself and Pea2p to growth sites, only the full-length protein is capable of complementing spa2 mutant defects, suggesting that other regions are required for Spa2p function. By using the two-hybrid system, Spa2p and Bud6p were also found to interact with components of two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways important for polarized cell growth. Spa2p interacts with Ste11p (MAPK kinase [MEK] kinase) and Ste7p (MEK) of the mating signaling pathway as well as with the MEKs Mkk1p and Mkk2p of the Slt2p (Mpk1p) MAPK pathway; for both Mkk1p and Ste7p, the Spa2p-interacting region was mapped to the N-terminal putative regulatory domain

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sensory box protein involved in aerobic and anoxic growth.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, A; Kurowski, J; Yan, T; Klingeman, D M; Joachimiak, M P; Zhou, J; Naranjo, B; Gralnick, J A; Fields, M W

    2011-07-01

    Although little is known of potential function for conserved signaling proteins, it is hypothesized that such proteins play important roles to coordinate cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In order to elucidate the function of a putative sensory box protein (PAS domains) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, the physiological role of SO3389 was characterized. The predicted open reading frame (ORF) encodes a putative sensory box protein that has PAS, GGDEF, and EAL domains, and an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed (ΔSO3389) with approximately 95% of the ORF deleted. Under aerated conditions, wild-type and mutant cultures had similar growth rates, but the mutant culture had a lower growth rate under static, aerobic conditions. Oxygen consumption rates were lower for mutant cultures (1.5-fold), and wild-type cultures also maintained lower dissolved oxygen concentrations under aerated growth conditions. When transferred to anoxic conditions, the mutant did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as electron acceptors. Biochemical assays demonstrated the expression of different c-type cytochromes as well as decreased fumarate reductase activity in the mutant transferred to anoxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic studies showed the inability of the mutant to up-express and down-express genes, including c-type cytochromes (e.g., SO4047/SO4048, SO3285/SO3286), reductases (e.g., SO0768, SO1427), and potential regulators (e.g., SO1329). The complemented strain was able to grow when transferred from aerobic to anoxic growth conditions with the tested electron acceptors. The modeled structure for the SO3389 PAS domains was highly similar to the crystal structures of FAD-binding PAS domains that are known O2/redox sensors. Based on physiological, genomic, and bioinformatic results, we suggest that the sensory box protein, SO3389, is an O2/redox sensor that is involved in optimization of aerobic growth and transitions to anoxia in S

  9. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion

    PubMed Central

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis. PMID:27909410

  10. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion.

    PubMed

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis.

  11. IGF-1 modulates gene expression of proteins involved in inflammation, cytoskeleton, and liver architecture.

    PubMed

    Lara-Diaz, V J; Castilla-Cortazar, I; Martín-Estal, I; García-Magariño, M; Aguirre, G A; Puche, J E; de la Garza, R G; Morales, L A; Muñoz, U

    2017-05-01

    Even though the liver synthesizes most of circulating IGF-1, it lacks its receptor under physiological conditions. However, according to previous studies, a damaged liver expresses the receptor. For this reason, herein, we examine hepatic histology and expression of genes encoding proteins of the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, and cell-cell molecules and inflammation-related proteins. A partial IGF-1 deficiency murine model was used to investigate IGF-1's effects on liver by comparing wild-type controls, heterozygous igf1(+/-), and heterozygous mice treated with IGF-1 for 10 days. Histology, microarray for mRNA gene expression, RT-qPCR, and lipid peroxidation were assessed. Microarray analyses revealed significant underexpression of igf1 in heterozygous mice compared to control mice, restoring normal liver expression after treatment, which then normalized its circulating levels. IGF-1 receptor mRNA was overexpressed in Hz mice liver, while treated mice displayed a similar expression to that of the controls. Heterozygous mice showed overexpression of several genes encoding proteins related to inflammatory and acute-phase proteins and underexpression or overexpression of genes which coded for extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton, and cell junction components. Histology revealed an altered hepatic architecture. In addition, liver oxidative damage was found increased in the heterozygous group. The mere IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated with relevant alterations of the hepatic architecture and expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton, hepatocyte polarity, cell junctions, and extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, it induces hepatic expression of the IGF-1 receptor and elevated acute-phase and inflammation mediators, which all resulted in liver oxidative damage.

  12. Central nervous system involvement in mantle cell lymphoma: clinical features, prognostic factors and outcomes from the European Mantle Cell Lymphoma Network.

    PubMed

    Cheah, C Y; George, A; Giné, E; Chiappella, A; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Jurczak, W; Krawczyk, K; Mocikova, H; Klener, P; Salek, D; Walewski, J; Szymczyk, M; Smolej, L; Auer, R L; Ritchie, D S; Arcaini, L; Williams, M E; Dreyling, M; Seymour, J F

    2013-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is uncommon, and the manifestations and natural history are not well described. We present the data on 57 patients with MCL who developed CNS involvement, from a database of 1396 consecutively treated patients at 14 institutions. The crude incidence of CNS involvement was 4.1%, with 0.9% having CNS involvement at diagnosis. Blastoid histology, B-symptoms, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, Eastern Cooperative Group performance status ≥2 and a high Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score were enriched in the cohort with CNS involvement, and the presence of ≥1 of these features defined a high-risk subset (an actuarial risk of CNS involvement 15% at 5 years) in a single-institution subset. The median time to CNS relapse was 15.2 months, and the median survival from time of CNS diagnosis was 3.7 months. The white blood cell count at diagnosis <10.9 × 10⁹/l, treatment of CNS involvement with high-dose anti-metabolites, consolidation with stem cell transplant and achievement of complete response were all associated with improved survival. In MCL, CNS involvement is uncommon, although some features may predict risk. Once manifest outlook is poor; however, some patients who receive intensive therapy survive longer than 12 months.

  13. Quantitative LC-MS/MS Analysis of Proteins Involved in Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Rieko; Nakamura, Yasushi; Takami, Tomonori; Sanke, Tokio; Tozuka, Zenzaburo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods for the analysis of proteins involved in metastasis of breast cancer for diagnosis and determining disease prognosis, as well as to further our understand of metastatic mechanisms. We have previously demonstrated that the protein type XIV collagen may be specifically expressed in metastatic tissues by two dimensional LC-MS/MS. In this study, we developed quantitative LC-MS/MS methods for type XIV collagen. Type XIV collagen was quantified by analyzing 2 peptides generated by digesting type XIV collagen using stable isotope-labeled peptides. The individual concentrations were equivalent between 2 different peptides of type XIV collagen by evaluation of imprecise transitions and using the best transition for the peptide concentration. The results indicated that type XIV collagen is highly expressed in metastatic tissues of patients with massive lymph node involvement compared to non-metastatic tissues. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Further studies on type XIV collagen are desired to verify its role as a prognostic factor and diagnosis marker for metastasis. PMID:26176947

  14. CUTI-1: A Novel Tetraspan Protein Involved in C. elegans CUTicle Formation and Epithelial Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Julie-Anne; Behm, Carolyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The nematode cuticle is a tough extracellular matrix composed primarily of cross-linked collagens and non-collagenous cuticulins. It is required for nematode motility and protection from the external environment. Little is known about how the complex process of cuticle formation has been adapted to the specialized requirements of the nematode cuticle, which is structurally and compositionally unique from other organisms. The C. elegans gene cuti-1 (CUTicle and epithelial Integrity) encodes a nematode-specific protein. We have shown that CUTI-1 is expressed in the epithelia and in seam cells. Within these tissues the expression of cuti-1 mRNA cycles throughout development in line with the molting cycle, a process that involves synthesis of a new cuticle. In addition, knockdown of cuti-1 by RNA interference (RNAi) results in worms that display post-embryonic phenotypes related to cuticle dysfunction and defects in epithelial integrity. This is one of the first reports of a nematode-specific protein involved in extracellular matrix formation. It provides further insight into how novel ways have evolved to regulate the formation of the cuticle, which is the primary protective barrier and skeletal component of nematodes. PMID:19357781

  15. Bicalutamide failure in prostate cancer treatment: involvement of Multi Drug Resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo; Berardi, Francesco; Contino, Marialessandra; Inglese, Carmela; Niso, Mauro; Ancona, Patrizia; Albo, Giancarlo; Pagliarulo, Arcangelo; Perrone, Roberto

    2008-12-28

    Prolonged bicalutamide treatment induced pathology regression although relapses with a more aggressive form of prostate cancer have been observed. This failure could be due to androgen receptor mutation. In the present work we hypothesized an alternative mechanism responsible for bicalutamide failure involving activity of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) pumps such as P-glycoprotein, Breast Cancer Receptor Protein (BCRP), and Multi Resistant Proteins (MRPs) that extrude the androgen antagonist from the cell membrane. As experimental models androgen-dependent (LnCap) and androgen-independent (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines have been employed. Bicalutamide has been tested in the cell lines mentioned above in the absence and in the presence of MC18, our potent P-glycoprotein/BCRP/MRP1 inhibitor. The results displayed that bicalutamide antiproliferative effect at 72 h was ameliorated in LnCap cells (EC(50) from 51.9+/-6.1 microM to 17.8+/-2.6 microM in the absence and in the presence of MC18, respectively) and restored in PC-3 cells (EC(50) from 150+/-2.4 microM to 60+/-3.5 microM in the absence and in the presence of MC18, respectively). Moreover, we established the contribution of each transporter employing stable transfected cells (MDCK) overexpressing P-glycoprotein or BCRP or MRP1 pump. The results displayed that P-glycoprotein and BCRP were involved in bicalutamide efflux while MRP1 was unable to bind the antiandrogen drug.

  16. CUTI-1: A novel tetraspan protein involved in C. elegans CUTicle formation and epithelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Julie-Anne; Behm, Carolyn A

    2009-01-01

    The nematode cuticle is a tough extracellular matrix composed primarily of cross-linked collagens and non-collagenous cuticulins. It is required for nematode motility and protection from the external environment. Little is known about how the complex process of cuticle formation has been adapted to the specialized requirements of the nematode cuticle, which is structurally and compositionally unique from other organisms. The C. elegans gene cuti-1 (CUTicle and epithelial Integrity) encodes a nematode-specific protein. We have shown that CUTI-1 is expressed in the epithelia and in seam cells. Within these tissues the expression of cuti-1 mRNA cycles throughout development in line with the molting cycle, a process that involves synthesis of a new cuticle. In addition, knockdown of cuti-1 by RNA interference (RNAi) results in worms that display post-embryonic phenotypes related to cuticle dysfunction and defects in epithelial integrity. This is one of the first reports of a nematode-specific protein involved in extracellular matrix formation. It provides further insight into how novel ways have evolved to regulate the formation of the cuticle, which is the primary protective barrier and skeletal component of nematodes.

  17. Identification of a novel thylakoid protein gene involved in cold acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhi; Gao, Hong; Yin, Chuntao; Xu, Xudong

    2012-09-01

    In cyanobacteria, genes involved in cold acclimation can be upregulated in response to cold stress with or without light. By inactivating 17 such genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, slr0815 (ccr2) was identified to be a novel gene required for survival at 15 °C. It was upregulated by cold stress in the light. Upon exposure to low temperature, a ccr2-null mutant showed greatly reduced photosynthetic and respiratory activities within 12 h relative to the wild-type. At 48 h, the photosystem (PS)II-mediated electron transport in the mutant was reduced to less than one-third of the wild-type level, and the duration of electron transfer from the Q(B) binding site of PSII to PSI was increased to about eight times the wild-type level, whereas the PSI-mediated electron transport remained unchanged. Using an antibody against GFP, a Ccr2-GFP fusion protein was localized to the thylakoid membrane rather than the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. Homologues to Ccr2 can be found in most cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants with sequenced genomes. Ccr2 is probably representative of a group of novel thylakoid proteins involved in acclimation to cold or other stresses.

  18. The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein gene, FLA3, is involved in microspore development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yu, Miao; Geng, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Jie

    2010-11-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins are widely distributed in plant tissues and cells, and may function in the growth and development of higher plants. To our knowledge, there is currently no direct evidence concerning the involvement of fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLA) in sexual reproduction in Arabidopsis. In this study, Arabidopsis FLA3 was found to be specifically expressed in pollen grains and tubes. Subcellular localization showed that FLA3 anchors tightly to the plasma membrane, and its glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor may affect its localization. FLA3-RNA interference transgenic plants had approximately 50% abnormal pollen grains (including shrunken and wrinkled phenotypes) which lacked viability. Cytological observations revealed that pollen abortion occurred during the transition from uninucleate microspores to bicellular pollens, with abnormal cellulose distribution seen by calcofluor white staining. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the basic structure of the exine layer in aberrant pollen was normal, but the intine layer appeared to have some abnormalities. Taken together, these results suggest that FLA3 is involved in microspore development and may affect pollen intine formation, possibly by participating in cellulose deposition. In FLA3-overexpressing transgenic plants, defective elongation of the stamen filament and reduced female fertility led to short siliques with low seed set, which suggested that ectopic expression of FLA3 in tissues may reduce or disrupt cell growth and then result in defects throughout the plant. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Identification of proteins involved in the adhesionof Candida species to different medical devices.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Beltrán, Arianna; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2017-04-07

    Adhesion is the first step for Candida species to form biofilms on medical devices implanted in the human host. Both the physicochemical nature of the biomaterial and cell wall proteins (CWP) of the pathogen play a determinant role in the process. While it is true that some CWP have been identified in vitro, little is known about the CWP of pathogenic species of Candida involved in adhesion. On this background, we considered it important to investigate the potential role of CWP of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei and C. parapsilosis in adhesion to different medical devices. Our results indicate that the four species strongly adher to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) devices, followed by polyurethane and finally by silicone. It was interesting to identify fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (Fba1) and enolase 1 (Eno1) as the CWP involved in adhesion of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei to PVC devices whereas phosphoglycerate kinase (Pgk) and Eno1 allow C. parapsilosis to adher to silicone-made implants. Results presented here suggest that these CWP participate in the initial event of adhesion and are probably followed by other proteins that covalently bind to the biomaterial thus providing conditions for biofilm formation and eventually the onset of infection.

  20. Statistical analysis of crystallization database links protein physico-chemical features with crystallization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J; Bruno, Andrew E; Luft, Joseph R; Snell, Edward H; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis.

  1. Statistical Analysis of Crystallization Database Links Protein Physico-Chemical Features with Crystallization Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J.; Bruno, Andrew E.; Luft, Joseph R.; Snell, Edward H.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  2. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    PubMed

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  3. A novel pax-like protein involved in transcriptional activation of cyst wall protein genes in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Bo-Chi; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2010-10-15

    Giardia lamblia differentiates into infectious cysts to survive outside of the host. It is of interest to identify factors involved in up-regulation of cyst wall proteins (CWPs) during this differentiation. Pax proteins are important regulators of development and cell differentiation in Drosophila and vertebrates. No member of this gene family has been reported to date in yeast, plants, or protozoan parasites. We have identified a pax-like gene (pax1) encoding a putative paired domain in the G. lamblia genome. Epitope-tagged Pax1 localized to nuclei during both vegetative growth and encystation. Recombinant Pax1 specifically bound to the AT-rich initiator elements of the encystation-induced cwp1 to -3 and myb2 genes. Interestingly, overexpression of Pax1 increased cwp1 to -3 and myb2 gene expression and cyst formation. Deletion of the C-terminal paired domain or mutation of the basic amino acids of the paired domain resulted in a decrease of the transactivation function of Pax1. Our results indicate that the Pax family has been conserved during evolution, and Pax1 could up-regulate the key encystation-induced genes to regulate differentiation of the protozoan eukaryote, G. lamblia.

  4. Immunological features of the non-structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Rascón-Castelo, Edgar; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Mateu, Enric; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-02-24

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is currently one of the most important viruses affecting the swine industry worldwide. Despite the large number of papers published each year, the participation of non-structural proteins (nsps) in the immune response is not completely clear. nsps have been involved in the host innate immune response, specifically, nsp1α/β, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp11 have been associated with the immunomodulation capability of the virus. To date, only participation by nsp1, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp7 in the humoral immune response has been reported, with the role of other nsps being overlooked. Furthermore, nsp1, nsp2, nsp5, nsp7 nsp9, nsp10, nsp11 have been implicated in the induction of IFN-γ and probably in the development of the cell-mediated immune response. This review discusses recent reports involving the participation of nsps in the modulation of the innate immune response and their role in the induction of both the humoral and cellular immune responses.

  5. Immunological Features of the Non-Structural Proteins of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rascón-Castelo, Edgar; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Mateu, Enric; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is currently one of the most important viruses affecting the swine industry worldwide. Despite the large number of papers published each year, the participation of non-structural proteins (nsps) in the immune response is not completely clear. nsps have been involved in the host innate immune response, specifically, nsp1α/β, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp11 have been associated with the immunomodulation capability of the virus. To date, only participation by nsp1, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp7 in the humoral immune response has been reported, with the role of other nsps being overlooked. Furthermore, nsp1, nsp2, nsp5, nsp7 nsp9, nsp10, nsp11 have been implicated in the induction of IFN-γ and probably in the development of the cell-mediated immune response. This review discusses recent reports involving the participation of nsps in the modulation of the innate immune response and their role in the induction of both the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:25719944

  6. Structural and mechanistic features of protein O glycosylation linked to CD8+ T-cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Van Dyken, Steven J; Green, Ryan S; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-02-01

    CD8+ T-cell apoptosis is essential for the contraction phase of the immune response, yet the initiating signals and precise pathways involved are unresolved. The ST3Gal-I sialyltransferase is a candidate mechanistic component and catalyzes sialic acid addition to core 1 O-glycans during protein O glycosylation. ST3Gal-I inactivation or enzymatic removal of its product renders CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, susceptible to apoptosis by differential cross-linking of O-glycoproteins in the absence of interleukin-2 and T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. This results in caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and phosphatidylserine externalization prior to cell death. We further show that ST3Gal-I function is regulated by a posttranscriptional mechanism operating distal to Golgi core 2 O glycosylation and is invariably linked to CD8+ T-cell contraction following viral (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus) infection and bacterial (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) antigen immunization. The mechanism does not involve the ST3Gal-I substrate CD43 or core 2 O-glycan induction and overcomes the ability of Bcl-2 to inhibit the contraction phase in vivo. Loss of ST3Gal-I function further reduces Bim-deficient CD8+ T-cell accumulation without diminishing apoptotic sensitivity. We propose that an endogenous lectin activates an apoptotic pathway constructed in CD8+ T cells following TCR stimulation and enables contraction upon attenuation of immune signaling.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Proteins Involved in Infection of the Tick Vector, Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Kocan, Katherine M.; Bonzón-Kulichenko, Elena; Alberdi, Pilar; Blouin, Edmour F.; Weisheit, Sabine; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Vancová, Marie; Bílý, Tomáš; Meyer, Damien F.; Sterba, Jan; Contreras, Marinela; Rudenko, Nataliia; Grubhoffer, Libor; Vázquez, Jesús; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen transmitted by Ixodes scapularis that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, a high throughput quantitative proteomics approach was used to characterize A. phagocytophilum proteome during rickettsial multiplication and identify proteins involved in infection of the tick vector, I. scapularis. The first step in this research was focused on tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and sampled at two time points containing 10–15% and 65–71% infected cells, respectively to identify key bacterial proteins over-represented in high percentage infected cells. The second step was focused on adult female tick guts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum to compare in vitro results with those occurring during bacterial infection in vivo. The results showed differences in the proteome of A. phagocytophilum in infected ticks with higher impact on protein synthesis and processing than on bacterial replication in tick salivary glands. These results correlated well with the developmental cycle of A. phagocytophilum, in which cells convert from an intracellular reticulated, replicative form to the nondividing infectious dense-core form. The analysis of A. phagocytophilum differentially represented proteins identified stress response (GroEL, HSP70) and surface (MSP4) proteins that were over-represented in high percentage infected tick cells and salivary glands when compared to low percentage infected cells and guts, respectively. The results demonstrated that MSP4, GroEL and HSP70 interact and bind to tick cells, thus playing a role in rickettsia-tick interactions. The most important finding of these studies is the increase in the level of certain bacterial stress response and surface proteins in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells and salivary glands with functional implication in tick-pathogen interactions. These results gave a new dimension to the role of these stress response and surface

  8. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  9. Identification of a Drug Targeting an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Involved in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neira, José L.; Bintz, Jennifer; Arruebo, María; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bonacci, Thomas; Vega, Sonia; Lanas, Angel; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Iovanna, Juan L.; Abián, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are prevalent in eukaryotes, performing signaling and regulatory functions. Often associated with human diseases, they constitute drug-development targets. NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP, over-expressed and involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development. By screening 1120 FDA-approved compounds, fifteen candidates were selected, and their interactions with NUPR1 were characterized by experimental and simulation techniques. The protein remained disordered upon binding to all fifteen candidates. These compounds were tested in PDAC-derived cell-based assays, and all induced cell-growth arrest and senescence, reduced cell migration, and decreased chemoresistance, mimicking NUPR1-deficiency. The most effective compound completely arrested tumor development in vivo on xenografted PDAC-derived cells in mice. Besides reporting the discovery of a compound targeting an intact IDP and specifically active against PDAC, our study proves the possibility to target the ‘fuzzy’ interface of a protein that remains disordered upon binding to its natural biological partners or to selected drugs. PMID:28054562