Science.gov

Sample records for protein features involved

  1. Protein sequence classification using feature hashing.

    PubMed

    Caragea, Cornelia; Silvescu, Adrian; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2012-06-21

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have resulted in an exponential increase in the rate at which protein sequence data are being acquired. The k-gram feature representation, commonly used for protein sequence classification, usually results in prohibitively high dimensional input spaces, for large values of k. Applying data mining algorithms to these input spaces may be intractable due to the large number of dimensions. Hence, using dimensionality reduction techniques can be crucial for the performance and the complexity of the learning algorithms. In this paper, we study the applicability of feature hashing to protein sequence classification, where the original high-dimensional space is "reduced" by hashing the features into a low-dimensional space, using a hash function, i.e., by mapping features into hash keys, where multiple features can be mapped (at random) to the same hash key, and "aggregating" their counts. We compare feature hashing with the "bag of k-grams" approach. Our results show that feature hashing is an effective approach to reducing dimensionality on protein sequence classification tasks.

  2. Mitral valve involvement as a predominant feature of cardiac amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Girish; Williams, James; Slinn, Simon; Campbell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic amyloidosis carries poor prognosis with a median survival of 5 months.1 The authors report an unusual presentation of cardiac amyloidosis in the form of predominant mitral regurgitation. The patient responded very well to medical therapy with subsequent improvement of mitral valve dysfunction. The authors would like to highlight this multisystem involvement and the presence of a complex overlap of systemic features. PMID:22767536

  3. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  4. Autophagy and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Celina; Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Colombo, María Isabel

    2015-11-14

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that, as a basic mechanism it delivers cytoplasmic components to the lysosomes in order to maintain adequate energy levels and cellular homeostasis. This complex cellular process is activated by low cellular nutrient levels and other stress situations such as low ATP levels, the accumulation of damaged proteins or organelles, or pathogen invasion. Autophagy as a multistep process involves vesicular transport events leading to tethering and fusion of autophagic vesicles with several intracellular compartments. This review summarizes our current understanding of the autophagic pathway with emphasis in the trafficking machinery (i.e. Rabs GTPases and SNAP receptors (SNAREs)) involved in specific steps of the pathway.

  5. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  6. Integrated visual analysis of protein structures, sequences, and feature data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular mechanisms that give rise to a protein's function, biologists often need to (i) find and access all related atomic-resolution 3D structures, and (ii) map sequence-based features (e.g., domains, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, post-translational modifications) onto these structures. Results To streamline these processes we recently developed Aquaria, a resource offering unprecedented access to protein structure information based on an all-against-all comparison of SwissProt and PDB sequences. In this work, we provide a requirements analysis for several frequently occuring tasks in molecular biology and describe how design choices in Aquaria meet these requirements. Finally, we show how the interface can be used to explore features of a protein and gain biologically meaningful insights in two case studies conducted by domain experts. Conclusions The user interface design of Aquaria enables biologists to gain unprecedented access to molecular structures and simplifies the generation of insight. The tasks involved in mapping sequence features onto structures can be conducted easier and faster using Aquaria. PMID:26329268

  7. Comparative genomics and evolution of proteins involved in RNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V.; Aravind, L.

    2002-01-01

    RNA metabolism, broadly defined as the compendium of all processes that involve RNA, including transcription, processing and modification of transcripts, translation, RNA degradation and its regulation, is the central and most evolutionarily conserved part of cell physiology. A comprehensive, genome-wide census of all enzymatic and non-enzymatic protein domains involved in RNA metabolism was conducted by using sequence profile analysis and structural comparisons. Proteins related to RNA metabolism comprise from 3 to 11% of the complete protein repertoire in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, with the greatest fraction seen in parasitic bacteria with small genomes. Approximately one-half of protein domains involved in RNA metabolism are present in most, if not all, species from all three primary kingdoms and are traceable to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). The principal features of LUCA’s RNA metabolism system were reconstructed by parsimony-based evolutionary analysis of all relevant groups of orthologous proteins. This reconstruction shows that LUCA possessed not only the basal translation system, but also the principal forms of RNA modification, such as methylation, pseudouridylation and thiouridylation, as well as simple mechanisms for polyadenylation and RNA degradation. Some of these ancient domains form paralogous groups whose evolution can be traced back in time beyond LUCA, towards low-specificity proteins, which probably functioned as cofactors for ribozymes within the RNA world framework. The main lineage-specific innovations of RNA metabolism systems were identified. The most notable phase of innovation in RNA metabolism coincides with the advent of eukaryotes and was brought about by the merge of the archaeal and bacterial systems via mitochondrial endosymbiosis, but also involved emergence of several new, eukaryote-specific RNA-binding domains. Subsequent, vast expansions of these domains mark the origin of alternative splicing in animals

  8. Atypical MRI features involving the brain in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Muhammad; Kumar, Manoj; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu; Vanhemert, Rudy; Angtuaco, Edgardo

    2009-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism characterized by inability of the liver to excrete copper into the bile, with excessive deposition of copper primarily in the liver and in the brain. The lentiform nuclei are involved, most often followed by involvement of the thalami, the pons, midbrain, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, and the cerebellar nuclei. Predominant involvement of the thalami and brainstem with no significant involvement of the lentiform nuclei is not common. We present a case of Wilson's disease with minimal involvement of the lentiform nuclei, with marked lesions involving the thalami, midbrain, and pons.

  9. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  10. Van der Waals Interactions Involving Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Charles M.; Neal, Brian L.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models. with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth.

  11. [CT imaging features of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Brillet, P Y; Mama, N; Nunes, H; Uzunhan, Y; Abbad, S; Brauner, M W

    2009-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders correspond to a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormal immune system activity leading to connective tissue alterations in multiple parts of the body. In adults, connective tissue disorders include rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Broncho-pulmonary involvement may be variable with involvement of all anatomical components of the lung. Involvement of other intrathoracic structures (pleura, respiratory muscles, heart, rib cage) is frequent. The most specific manifestations include interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. During follow-up, progressive respiratory diseases may occur due to the treatment, infections, pulmonary embolism or neoplasms.

  12. Visual Features Involving Motion Seen from Airport Control Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion

    2010-01-01

    Visual motion cues are used by tower controllers to support both visual and anticipated separation. Some of these cues are tabulated as part of the overall set of visual features used in towers to separate aircraft. An initial analyses of one motion cue, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers detect and use it for spacing aircraft on or near the surface. Understanding cues like it will help determine if they can be safely used in a remote/virtual tower in which their presentation may be visually degraded.

  13. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  14. A Prediction Model for Membrane Proteins Using Moments Based Features.

    PubMed

    Butt, Ahmad Hassan; Khan, Sher Afzal; Jamil, Hamza; Rasool, Nouman; Khan, Yaser Daanial

    2016-01-01

    The most expedient unit of the human body is its cell. Encapsulated within the cell are many infinitesimal entities and molecules which are protected by a cell membrane. The proteins that are associated with this lipid based bilayer cell membrane are known as membrane proteins and are considered to play a significant role. These membrane proteins exhibit their effect in cellular activities inside and outside of the cell. According to the scientists in pharmaceutical organizations, these membrane proteins perform key task in drug interactions. In this study, a technique is presented that is based on various computationally intelligent methods used for the prediction of membrane protein without the experimental use of mass spectrometry. Statistical moments were used to extract features and furthermore a Multilayer Neural Network was trained using backpropagation for the prediction of membrane proteins. Results show that the proposed technique performs better than existing methodologies.

  15. A Prediction Model for Membrane Proteins Using Moments Based Features

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Ahmad Hassan; Khan, Sher Afzal; Jamil, Hamza; Rasool, Nouman; Khan, Yaser Daanial

    2016-01-01

    The most expedient unit of the human body is its cell. Encapsulated within the cell are many infinitesimal entities and molecules which are protected by a cell membrane. The proteins that are associated with this lipid based bilayer cell membrane are known as membrane proteins and are considered to play a significant role. These membrane proteins exhibit their effect in cellular activities inside and outside of the cell. According to the scientists in pharmaceutical organizations, these membrane proteins perform key task in drug interactions. In this study, a technique is presented that is based on various computationally intelligent methods used for the prediction of membrane protein without the experimental use of mass spectrometry. Statistical moments were used to extract features and furthermore a Multilayer Neural Network was trained using backpropagation for the prediction of membrane proteins. Results show that the proposed technique performs better than existing methodologies. PMID:26966690

  16. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  17. Heat capacity and entropy changes in processes involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sturtevant, J M

    1977-01-01

    Six possible sources of the large heat capacity and entropy changes frequently observed for processes involving proteins are identified. Of these the conformational, hydrophobic, and vibrational effects seem likely to be of greatest importance. A method is proposed for estimating the magnitudes of the hydrophobic and vibrational contributions. Application of this method to several protein processes appears to achieve significant clarification of previously confusing and apparently contradictory data. PMID:196283

  18. Joint probabilistic-logical refinement of multiple protein feature predictors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational methods for the prediction of protein features from sequence are a long-standing focus of bioinformatics. A key observation is that several protein features are closely inter-related, that is, they are conditioned on each other. Researchers invested a lot of effort into designing predictors that exploit this fact. Most existing methods leverage inter-feature constraints by including known (or predicted) correlated features as inputs to the predictor, thus conditioning the result. Results By including correlated features as inputs, existing methods only rely on one side of the relation: the output feature is conditioned on the known input features. Here we show how to jointly improve the outputs of multiple correlated predictors by means of a probabilistic-logical consistency layer. The logical layer enforces a set of weighted first-order rules encoding biological constraints between the features, and improves the raw predictions so that they least violate the constraints. In particular, we show how to integrate three stand-alone predictors of correlated features: subcellular localization (Loctree [J Mol Biol 348:85–100, 2005]), disulfide bonding state (Disulfind [Nucleic Acids Res 34:W177–W181, 2006]), and metal bonding state (MetalDetector [Bioinformatics 24:2094–2095, 2008]), in a way that takes into account the respective strengths and weaknesses, and does not require any change to the predictors themselves. We also compare our methodology against two alternative refinement pipelines based on state-of-the-art sequential prediction methods. Conclusions The proposed framework is able to improve the performance of the underlying predictors by removing rule violations. We show that different predictors offer complementary advantages, and our method is able to integrate them using non-trivial constraints, generating more consistent predictions. In addition, our framework is fully general, and could in principle be applied to a vast

  19. Emerging features of ER resident J-proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Masaru; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    J-proteins are co-chaperone components of the HSP70 system. J-proteins stimulate Hsp70ATPase activity, which is responsible for stabilizing the interaction of Hsp70 with client proteins. J-proteins are localized in various intracellular compartments including the cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Five types of ER resident J-proteins (ERdjs) have been found in plants (P58, ERdj2, ERdj2A, ERdj3B and ERdj7). Rice OsERdj3A is located in the vacuole and protein storage vacuoles (PSV, PB-II) under conditions of ER stress. J-proteins that are localized to the vacuole or lysosome are not found in mammals and yeast, suggesting that the presence of OsERdj3A in the vacuole is plant-specific and one of the features unique to plant ERdjs. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge and recent research advancements regarding plant ERdjs, and compare mammalian and yeast ERdjs with plant ERdjs. PMID:25763480

  20. Identification of DNA-binding and protein-binding proteins using enhanced graph wavelet features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Zhou, Weiqiang; Dai, Dao-Qing; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between biomolecules play an essential role in various biological processes. For predicting DNA-binding or protein-binding proteins, many machine-learning-based techniques have used various types of features to represent the interface of the complexes, but they only deal with the properties of a single atom in the interface and do not take into account the information of neighborhood atoms directly. This paper proposes a new feature representation method for biomolecular interfaces based on the theory of graph wavelet. The enhanced graph wavelet features (EGWF) provides an effective way to characterize interface feature through adding physicochemical features and exploiting a graph wavelet formulation. Particularly, graph wavelet condenses the information around the center atom, and thus enhances the discrimination of features of biomolecule binding proteins in the feature space. Experiment results show that EGWF performs effectively for predicting DNA-binding and protein-binding proteins in terms of Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) score and the area value under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). PMID:24334394

  1. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  2. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  3. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events. PMID:27669825

  4. Efficient Feature Selection and Classification of Protein Sequence Data in Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Ibrahima; Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Md Said, Abas

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics has been an emerging area of research for the last three decades. The ultimate aims of bioinformatics were to store and manage the biological data, and develop and analyze computational tools to enhance their understanding. The size of data accumulated under various sequencing projects is increasing exponentially, which presents difficulties for the experimental methods. To reduce the gap between newly sequenced protein and proteins with known functions, many computational techniques involving classification and clustering algorithms were proposed in the past. The classification of protein sequences into existing superfamilies is helpful in predicting the structure and function of large amount of newly discovered proteins. The existing classification results are unsatisfactory due to a huge size of features obtained through various feature encoding methods. In this work, a statistical metric-based feature selection technique has been proposed in order to reduce the size of the extracted feature vector. The proposed method of protein classification shows significant improvement in terms of performance measure metrics: accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, recall, F-measure, and so forth. PMID:25045727

  5. Efficient feature selection and classification of protein sequence data in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Faye, Ibrahima; Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Said, Abas Md

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics has been an emerging area of research for the last three decades. The ultimate aims of bioinformatics were to store and manage the biological data, and develop and analyze computational tools to enhance their understanding. The size of data accumulated under various sequencing projects is increasing exponentially, which presents difficulties for the experimental methods. To reduce the gap between newly sequenced protein and proteins with known functions, many computational techniques involving classification and clustering algorithms were proposed in the past. The classification of protein sequences into existing superfamilies is helpful in predicting the structure and function of large amount of newly discovered proteins. The existing classification results are unsatisfactory due to a huge size of features obtained through various feature encoding methods. In this work, a statistical metric-based feature selection technique has been proposed in order to reduce the size of the extracted feature vector. The proposed method of protein classification shows significant improvement in terms of performance measure metrics: accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, recall, F-measure, and so forth.

  6. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  7. Protein functionalized micro hydrogel features for cell-surface interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Nixon, Alan J; Kim, Il; Kameoka, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Cross-linked hydrogel features have been patterned using subtractive lift-off of polymerized hydrogel film. Projection lithography and oxygen plasma etch was used to pattern parylene C polymer film. Molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer was obtained in solution-phase and acrylamide based hydrogel was polymerized using free-radical polymerization on this substrate. Parylene C film was mechanically lifted-off to remove the blanket hydrogel film and micro hydrogel features (muhf) were obtained attached to the predefined patterns in the range from 1 to 60 mum. The muhf were functionalized with aldehyde functional groups, and proteins were coupled to them using Schiff base chemistry followed by reductive amination. Interaction of mesenchymal stem cells with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) functionalized muhf was studied, and TGF-beta1 was found to retain its tumor suppression activity. PMID:18259869

  8. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  9. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  10. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  11. Bap, a Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Solano, Cristina; Valle, Jaione; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2001-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation is needed to understand the molecular basis of strain variation and the pathogenic mechanisms implicated in chronic staphylococcal infections. A biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus isolate was used to generate biofilm-negative transposon (Tn917) insertion mutants. Two mutants were found with a significant decrease in attachment to inert surfaces (early adherence), intercellular adhesion, and biofilm formation. The transposon was inserted at the same locus in both mutants. This locus (bap [for biofilm associated protein]) encodes a novel cell wall associated protein of 2,276 amino acids (Bap), which shows global organizational similarities to surface proteins of gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) and gram-positive (Enteroccocus faecalis) microorganisms. Bap's core region represents 52% of the protein and consists of 13 successive nearly identical repeats, each containing 86 amino acids. bap was present in a small fraction of bovine mastitis isolates (5% of the 350 S. aureus isolates tested), but it was absent from the 75 clinical human S. aureus isolates analyzed. All staphylococcal isolates harboring bap were highly adherent and strong biofilm producers. In a mouse infection model bap was involved in pathogenesis, causing a persistent infection. PMID:11292810

  12. Identification of a novel LEA protein involved in freezing tolerance in wheat.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Tsuda, Sakae; Imai, Ryozo

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a family of hyper-hydrophilic proteins that accumulate in response to cellular dehydration. Originally identified as plant proteins associated with seed desiccation tolerance, LEA proteins have been identified in a wide range of organisms such as invertebrates and microorganisms. LEA proteins are thought to protect proteins and biomembranes under water-deficit conditions. Here, we characterized WCI16, a wheat (Triticum aestivum) protein that belongs to a class of plant proteins of unknown function, and provide evidence that WCI16 shares common features with LEA proteins. WCI16 was induced during cold acclimation in winter wheat. Based on its amino acid sequence, WCI16 is highly hydrophilic, like LEA proteins, despite having no significant sequence similarity to any of the known classes of LEA proteins. Recombinant WCI16 protein was soluble after boiling, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that the structure of WCI16 is random and has no hydrophobic regions. WCI16 exhibited in vitro cryoprotection of the freeze-labile enzyme l-lactate dehydrogenase as well as double-stranded DNA binding activity, suggesting that WCI16 may protect both proteins and DNA during environmental stresses. The biological relevance of these activities was supported by the subcellular localization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused WCI16 protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Heterologous expression of WCI16 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants conferred enhanced freezing tolerance. Taken together, our results indicate that WCI16 represents a novel class of LEA proteins and is involved in freezing tolerance.

  13. Analysis of proteins involved in biodegradation of crop biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kamau; Trotman, Audrey

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of crop biomass for re-use in crop production is part of the bioregenerative life support concept proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long duration, manned space exploration. The current research was conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the use of electrophoretic analysis as a means of rapidly assaying for constitutive and induced proteins associated with the bacterial degradation of crop residue. The proteins involved in crop biomass biodegradation are either constitutive or induced. As a result, effluent and cultures were examined to investigate the potential of using electrophoretic techniques as a means of monitoring the biodegradation process. Protein concentration for optimum banding patterns was determined using the Bio-Rad Protein Assay kit. Four bacterial soil isolates were obtained from the G.W. Carver research Farm at Tuskegee University and used in the decomposition of components of plant biomass. The culture, WDSt3A was inoculated into 500 mL of either Tryptic Soy Broth or Nutrient Broth. Incubation, with shaking of each flask was for 96 hours at 30 C. The cultures consistently gave unique banding patterns under denaturing protein electrophoresis conditions, The associated extracellular enzymes also yielded characteristic banding patterns over a 14-day period, when native electrophoresis techniques were used to examine effluent from batch culture bioreactors. The current study evaluated sample preparation and staining protocols to determine the ease of use, reproducibility and reliability, as well as the potential for automation.

  14. Clinicopathological features of lymphosarcoma involving the thoracic cavity in the horse.

    PubMed

    Mair, T S; Lane, J G; Lucke, V M

    1985-11-01

    The clinical and post mortem features of 11 cases of lymphosarcoma involving the thoracic cavity are reviewed. The clinical findings included inappetence, weight loss, pectoral oedema, dyspnoea, pleural effusion and distension of the jugular veins. Dysphagia was present in three cases. At post mortem examination lesions were found in the abdomen as well as the chest in eight cases; clinical signs of abdominal disease were present in two cases. The features of nine other similar cases recorded in the literature are reviewed. PMID:3841057

  15. Hepatic involvement in HELLP syndrome: an update with emphasis on imaging features.

    PubMed

    Perronne, Laetitia; Dohan, Anthony; Bazeries, Paul; Guerrache, Youcef; Fohlen, Audrey; Rousset, Pascal; Aubé, Christophe; Laurent, Valérie; Morel, Olivier; Boudiaf, Mourad; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    HELLP syndrome, which consists of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count is an unusual complication of pregnancy that is observed in only 10% to 15% of women with preeclampsia. Hepatic involvement in HELLP syndrome may present with various imaging features depending on the specific condition that includes nonspecific abnormalities such as perihepatic free fluid, hepatic steatosis, liver enlargement, and periportal halo that may precede more severe conditions such as hepatic hematoma and hepatic rupture with hemoperitoneum. Maternal clinical symptoms may be nonspecific and easily mistaken for a variety of other conditions that should be recognized. Because hepatic hematoma occurring in association with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome is a potentially life-threatening complication, prompt depiction is critical and may help reduce morbidity and mortality. This review provides an update on demographics, risk factors, pathophysiology, and clinical features of hepatic complications due to HELLP syndrome along with a special emphasis on the imaging features of these uncommon conditions. PMID:26099472

  16. Translocator Protein 2 Is Involved in Cholesterol Redistribution during Erythropoiesis*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Rone, Malena B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa cholesterol- and drug-binding protein conserved from bacteria to humans. While surveying for Tspo-like genes, we identified its paralogous gene, Tspo2, encoding an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins that arose by gene duplications before the divergence of avians and mammals. Comparative analysis of Tspo1 and Tspo2 functions suggested that Tspo2 has become subfunctionalized, typical of duplicated genes, characterized by the loss of diagnostic drug ligand-binding but retention of cholesterol-binding properties, hematopoietic tissue- and erythroid cell-specific distribution, and subcellular endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear membrane localization. Expression of Tspo2 in erythroblasts is strongly correlated with the down-regulation of the enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Overexpression of TSPO2 in erythroid cells resulted in the redistribution of intracellular free cholesterol, an essential step in nucleus expulsion during erythrocyte maturation. Taken together, these data identify the TSPO2 family of proteins as mediators of cholesterol redistribution-dependent erythroblast maturation during mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:19729679

  17. Protein-Protein and Peptide-Protein Interactions of NudE-Like 1 (Ndel1): A Protein Involved in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M A F; Felicori, L F; Fresqui, M A C; Yonamine, C M

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating chronic mental disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, which susceptibility may involve an impaired neural migration during the neurodevelopmental process. Several candidate risk genes potentially associated with SCZ were related to the formation of protein complexes that ultimately mediate alterations in the neuroplasticity. The most studied SCZ risk gene is the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, which functions seem to depend on the binding with cytoskeleton proteins, as the Nuclear-distribution gene E homolog like-1 (Ndel1) protein among others. Interestingly, Ndel1 is the only binding partner of DISC1 proteins with oligopeptidase activity, besides playing roles in multiple processes, including cytoskeletal organization, cell signaling, neuron migration, and neurite outgrowth. It is still not clear if the protein-protein interaction between Ndel1 and DISC1 is enough to explain all cellular functions attributed to these proteins, but there are several lines of evidence suggesting the importance of the catalytic activity of Ndel1 for the neurite outgrowth and neuron migration during embryogenesis. Recent works of the group have demonstrated the modulation of Ndel1 activity by DISC1, which is hypothetically impaired in SCZ patients. In fact, more recently, we also showed a lower Ndel1 activity in the plasma of SCZ patients compared to control health subjects, but the physiopathological significance of this feature is still unknown. Here we discuss Ndel1 ligands involved in protein-protein complex formations related to neurodevelopmental diseases, as (1) lissencephaly or Miller-Dieker Syndrome (MDS), which is characterized by the typical craniofacial features and abnormal smooth cerebral surface, and as (2) SCZ, since they both seem to be determined by defects in neuronal migration. Although impaired lissencephaly protein Lis1 complex formation with Ndel1 is the leading cause of lissencephaly, this

  18. Protein-Protein and Peptide-Protein Interactions of NudE-Like 1 (Ndel1): A Protein Involved in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M A F; Felicori, L F; Fresqui, M A C; Yonamine, C M

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating chronic mental disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, which susceptibility may involve an impaired neural migration during the neurodevelopmental process. Several candidate risk genes potentially associated with SCZ were related to the formation of protein complexes that ultimately mediate alterations in the neuroplasticity. The most studied SCZ risk gene is the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, which functions seem to depend on the binding with cytoskeleton proteins, as the Nuclear-distribution gene E homolog like-1 (Ndel1) protein among others. Interestingly, Ndel1 is the only binding partner of DISC1 proteins with oligopeptidase activity, besides playing roles in multiple processes, including cytoskeletal organization, cell signaling, neuron migration, and neurite outgrowth. It is still not clear if the protein-protein interaction between Ndel1 and DISC1 is enough to explain all cellular functions attributed to these proteins, but there are several lines of evidence suggesting the importance of the catalytic activity of Ndel1 for the neurite outgrowth and neuron migration during embryogenesis. Recent works of the group have demonstrated the modulation of Ndel1 activity by DISC1, which is hypothetically impaired in SCZ patients. In fact, more recently, we also showed a lower Ndel1 activity in the plasma of SCZ patients compared to control health subjects, but the physiopathological significance of this feature is still unknown. Here we discuss Ndel1 ligands involved in protein-protein complex formations related to neurodevelopmental diseases, as (1) lissencephaly or Miller-Dieker Syndrome (MDS), which is characterized by the typical craniofacial features and abnormal smooth cerebral surface, and as (2) SCZ, since they both seem to be determined by defects in neuronal migration. Although impaired lissencephaly protein Lis1 complex formation with Ndel1 is the leading cause of lissencephaly, this

  19. Myelin basic protein domains involved in the interaction with actin.

    PubMed

    Roth, G A; Gonzalez, M D; Monferran, C G; De Santis, M L; Cumar, F A

    1993-11-01

    A fluorescence assay was used to measure the interaction of myelin basic protein (MBP) with monomeric actin labeled with a fluorescent compound (IAEDANS). The complex actin-IAEDANS increase the fluorescence in presence of MBP. The enhancement of the fluorescence has a sigmoidal dependence on the concentration of MBP and the fluorescence maximum is reached at a MBP:actin molar ratio of 1:20. The fluorescence maximum in absence of Ca2+ and ATP is 4 times lower than that in their presence although it is reached at the same MBP:actin molar ratio. Similar behavior is observed when synapsin replaces MBP, while acetylated MBP and bovine serum albumin fail to induce any fluorescence change. To define possible interacting domains on MBP involved in the actin-MBP interaction, experiments were performed using MBP-derived peptides obtained under controlled proteolysis of the whole molecule. The fluorescence changes induced by the different peptides depend on their location in the native protein and can not be explained simply by a difference in the net charge of the peptides. The results suggest that two sites are involved in the interaction. A Ca2+/ATP-dependent site located in the amino-terminal region (peptide 1-44) and a Ca2+/ATP-independent one near the carboxyl terminus of the MBP molecule. The actin-MBP interaction was also observed using immunoblot and ELISA techniques.

  20. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laddomada, Federica; Miyachiro, Mayara M.; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome”) and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”), in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies. PMID:27136593

  1. Life under tension: Computational studies of proteins involved in mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos Manuel

    cadherins. Simulations also revealed how calcium ions control cadherin's shape and the availability of key residues involved in cell-cell adhesion, suggesting a conceptual framework for interpreting mutations in cadherin calcium binding motifs causing hereditary deafness. Overall, simulations provided a unique nanoscopic view of the dynamics and function of some of the proteins involved in mechanotransduction.

  2. Adenanthin targets proteins involved in the regulation of disulphide bonds.

    PubMed

    Muchowicz, Angelika; Firczuk, Małgorzata; Chlebowska, Justyna; Nowis, Dominika; Stachura, Joanna; Barankiewicz, Joanna; Trzeciecka, Anna; Kłossowski, Szymon; Ostaszewski, Ryszard; Zagożdżon, Radosław; Pu, Jian-Xin; Sun, Han-Dong; Golab, Jakub

    2014-05-15

    Adenanthin has been recently shown to inhibit the enzymatic activities of peroxiredoxins (Prdx) I and II through its functional α,β-unsaturated ketone group serving as a Michael acceptor. A similar group is found in SK053, a compound recently developed by our group to target the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (Trx-TrxR) system. This work provides evidence that next to Prdx I and II adenanthin targets additional proteins including thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system as well as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) that contain a characteristic structural motif, referred to as a thioredoxin fold. Adenanthin inhibits the activity of Trx-TR system and PDI in vitro in the insulin reduction assay and decreases the activity of Trx in cultured cells. Moreover, we identified Trx-1 as an adenanthin binding protein in cells incubated with biotinylated adenanthin as an affinity probe. The results of our studies indicate that adenanthin is a mechanism-selective, rather than an enzyme-specific inhibitor of enzymes containing readily accessible, nucleophilic cysteines. This observation might be of importance in considering potential therapeutic applications of adenanthin to include a range of diseases, where aberrant activity of Prdx, Trx-TrxR and PDI is involved in their pathogenesis. PMID:24630929

  3. Immunocytochemical identification of proteins involved in dopamine release from the somatodendritic compartment of nigral dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Witkovsky, Paul; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the somatodendritic compartment of nigral dopaminergic neurons by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, with the aim of identifying proteins that participate in dopamine packaging and release. Nigral dopaminergic neurons were identified by location, cellular features and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Immunoreactive puncta of vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 and proton ATPase, both involved in the packaging of dopamine for release, were located primarily in dopaminergic cell bodies, but were absent in distal dopaminergic dendrites. Many presynaptic proteins associated with transmitter release at fast synapses were absent in nigral dopaminergic neurons, including synaptotagmin 1, syntaxin1, synaptic vesicle proteins 2a and 2b, synaptophysin and synaptobrevin 1 (VAMP 1). On the other hand, syntaxin 3, synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP 2) and SNAP-25-immunoreactivities were found in dopaminergic somata and dendrites Our data imply that the storage and exocytosis of dopamine from the somatodendritic compartment of nigral dopaminergic neurons is mechanistically distinct from transmitter release at axon terminals utilizing amino acid neurotransmitters. PMID:19682556

  4. Arabinogalactan proteins are involved in root hair development in barley

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek; Szarejko, Iwona; Melzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are involved in a range of plant processes, including cell differentiation and expansion. Here, barley root hair mutants and their wild-type parent cultivars were used, as a model system, to reveal the role of AGPs in root hair development. The treatment of roots with different concentrations of βGlcY (a reagent which binds to all classes of AGPs) inhibited or totally suppressed the development of root hairs in all of the cultivars. Three groups of AGP (recognized by the monoclonal antibodies LM2, LM14, and MAC207) were diversely localized in trichoblasts and atrichoblasts of root hair-producing plants. The relevant epitopes were present in wild-type trichoblast cell walls and cytoplasm, whereas in wild-type atrichoblasts and in all epidermal cells of a root hairless mutant, they were only present in the cytoplasm. In all of cultivars the higher expression of LM2, LM14, and MAC207 was observed in trichoblasts at an early stage of development. Additionally, the LM2 epitope was detected on the surface of primordia and root hair tubes in plants able to generate root hairs. The major conclusion was that the AGPs recognized by LM2, LM14, and MAC207 are involved in the differentiation of barley root epidermal cells, thereby implying a requirement for these AGPs for root hair development in barley. PMID:25465033

  5. Arabinogalactan proteins are involved in root hair development in barley.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek; Szarejko, Iwona; Melzer, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are involved in a range of plant processes, including cell differentiation and expansion. Here, barley root hair mutants and their wild-type parent cultivars were used, as a model system, to reveal the role of AGPs in root hair development. The treatment of roots with different concentrations of βGlcY (a reagent which binds to all classes of AGPs) inhibited or totally suppressed the development of root hairs in all of the cultivars. Three groups of AGP (recognized by the monoclonal antibodies LM2, LM14, and MAC207) were diversely localized in trichoblasts and atrichoblasts of root hair-producing plants. The relevant epitopes were present in wild-type trichoblast cell walls and cytoplasm, whereas in wild-type atrichoblasts and in all epidermal cells of a root hairless mutant, they were only present in the cytoplasm. In all of cultivars the higher expression of LM2, LM14, and MAC207 was observed in trichoblasts at an early stage of development. Additionally, the LM2 epitope was detected on the surface of primordia and root hair tubes in plants able to generate root hairs. The major conclusion was that the AGPs recognized by LM2, LM14, and MAC207 are involved in the differentiation of barley root epidermal cells, thereby implying a requirement for these AGPs for root hair development in barley. PMID:25465033

  6. Magnifying Endoscopic Features of Follicular Lymphoma Involving the Stomach: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Katsuyoshi; Kawano, Seiji; Fujii, Nobuharu; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Yoshino, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with follicular lymphoma involving the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, bone, and lymph nodes. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple depressed lesions in the stomach. Examination with magnifying endoscopy showed branched abnormal vessels along with gastric pits, which were irregularly shaped but were preserved. The second case was a 45-year-old man diagnosed with stage II1 follicular lymphoma with duodenal, ileal, and colorectal involvement, as well as lymphadenopathy of the mesenteric lymph nodes. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed six years after the diagnosis revealed multiple erosions in the gastric body and angle. Magnifying endoscopic observation with narrow-band imaging showed that the gastric pits were only partially preserved and were destroyed in most of the stomach. Branched abnormal vessels were also seen. Pathological features were consistent with follicular lymphoma in both cases. The structural differences reported between the two cases appear to reflect distinct pathologies. Disappearance of gastric pits in the latter case seems to result from loss of epithelial cells, probably due to chronic inflammation. In both cases, branched abnormal vasculature was observed. These two cases suggest that magnified observations of abnormal branched microvasculature may facilitate endoscopic detection and recognition of the extent of gastric involvement in patients with follicular lymphoma. PMID:27747111

  7. Cloning and subcellular location of an Arabidopsis receptor-like protein that shares common features with protein-sorting receptors of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S U; Bar-Peled, M; Raikhel, N V

    1997-01-01

    Many receptors involved in clathrin-mediated protein transport through the endocytic and secretory pathways of yeast and animal cells share common features. They are all type I integral membrane proteins containing cysteine-rich lumenal domains and cytoplasmic tails with tyrosine-containing sorting signals. The cysteine-rich domains are thought to be involved in ligand binding, whereas the cytoplasmic tyrosine motifs interact with clathrin-associated adaptor proteins during protein sorting along these pathways. In addition, tyrosine-containing signals are required for the retention and recycling of some of these membrane proteins to the trans-Golgi network. Here we report the characterization of an approximately 80-kD epidermal growth factor receptor-like type I integral membrane protein containing all of these functional motifs from Arabidopsis thaliana (called AtELP for A. thaliana Epidermal growth factor receptor-Like Protein). Biochemical analysis indicates that AtELP is a membrane protein found at high levels in the roots of both monocots and dicots. Subcellular fractionation studies indicate that the AtELP protein is present in two membrane fractions corresponding to a novel, undefined compartment and a fraction enriched in vesicles containing clathrin and its associated adaptor proteins. AtELP may therefore serve as a marker for compartments involved in intracellular protein trafficking in the plant cell. PMID:9159954

  8. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, David; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarna

    2015-01-01

    Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN) complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  9. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, David; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarna

    2015-01-01

    Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN) complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis. PMID:25898402

  10. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, David; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarna

    2015-01-01

    Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN) complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis. PMID:25898402

  11. Channel-interacting PDZ protein, 'CIPP', interacts with proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Emanuele; Landi, Elena; Barilari, Manuela; Serresi, Michela; Salvadori, Piero; Bachi, Angela; Dente, Luciana

    2009-04-15

    Neuronal CIPP (channel-interacting PDZ protein) is a multivalent PDZ protein that interacts with specific channels and receptors highly expressed in the brain. It is composed of four PDZ domains that behave as a scaffold to clusterize functionally connected proteins. In the present study, we selected a set of potential CIPP interactors that are involved directly or indirectly in mechanisms of cytoskeletal remodelling and membrane protrusion formation. For some of these, we first proved the direct binding to specific CIPP PDZ domains considered as autonomous elements, and then confirmed the interaction with the whole protein. In particular, the small G-protein effector IRSp53 (insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate protein p53) specifically interacts with the second PDZ domain of CIPP and, when co-transfected in cultured mammalian cells with a tagged full-length CIPP, it induces a marked reorganization of CIPP cytoplasmic localization. Large punctate structures are generated as a consequence of CIPP binding to the IRSp53 C-terminus. Analysis of the puncta nature, using various endocytic markers, revealed that they are not related to cytoplasmic vesicles, but rather represent multi-protein assemblies, where CIPP can tether other potential interactors.

  12. The Unfolded Protein Response in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii Features Translational and Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Bradley R.; Tampaki, Zoi; Kim, Kami

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important regulatory network that responds to perturbations in protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In mammalian cells, the UPR features translational and transcriptional mechanisms of gene expression aimed at restoring proteostatic control. A central feature of the UPR is phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2) by PERK (EIF2AK3/PEK), which reduces the influx of nascent proteins into the ER by lowering global protein synthesis, coincident with preferential translation of key transcription activators of genes that function to expand the processing capacity of this secretory organelle. Upon ER stress, the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to induce phosphorylation of Toxoplasma eIF2α and lower translation initiation. To characterize the nature of the ensuing UPR in this parasite, we carried out microarray analyses to measure the changes in the transcriptome and in translational control during ER stress. We determined that a collection of transcripts linked with the secretory process are induced in response to ER stress, supporting the idea that a transcriptional induction phase of the UPR occurs in Toxoplasma. Furthermore, we determined that about 500 gene transcripts showed enhanced association with translating ribosomes during ER stress. Many of these target genes are suggested to be involved in gene expression, including JmjC5, which continues to be actively translated during ER stress. This study indicates that Toxoplasma triggers a UPR during ER stress that features both translational and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, which is likely to be important for parasite invasion and development. PMID:23666622

  13. Clinical features of the stomatognathic involvement in fibromyalgia syndrome: a comparison with temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Daniele; Bazzichi, Laura; Bosco, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Several studies have reported an involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of fibromyalgia (FM) similar to that which characterizes temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical features of stomatognathic dysfunction in patients with FM and TMD. Ninety-three FM patients underwent an assessment according to the RDC/TMD guidelines. Prevalence of the different RDC/TMD diagnoses and some clinical parameters of FM patients were compared with those of 181 patients affected by TMD. Seventy-four (79.6%) FM patients presented at least one RDC/TMD diagnosis and showed lower mean maximum voluntary and passive mouth opening values than TMD patients. Moreover, 34 FM patients presented with trigger and/or tender points. Results of the present study confirm the high rate of involvement of the stomatognathic system in the course of FM and support the need for a careful multidisciplinary approach to patients with TMD, including the rheumatologist.

  14. Protein Expression of STRO-1 Cells in Response to Different Topographic Features.

    PubMed

    Kantawong, Fahsai; Robertson, Mary E; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O C; Burchmore, Richard J; Dalby, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Human skeletal stem cells (STRO-1 positive) display distinct responses to different topographical features. On a flat surface, skeletal cells spread, and in vitro, they typically display a polarized, fibroblast-like morphology. However, on microgrooved surfaces, these cells prefer to stretch along the grooves forming a similar morphology to in vivo, bipolarized fibroblasts. In contrast, on nanopits, these cells display a polygonal and osteoblastic phenotype. We have examined mechanotransduction events of STRO-1 positive in response to fibroblastic, microgrooved and osteogenic, controlled disorder nanopit, topographies using proteomics after 3 days in culture. Protein expression profiles were analyzed by difference gel electrophoresis to identify proteins that showed modulation of expression in response to different topographic features to assess early decision events in these cells on these discrete topographies. After only 72 hours in culture, STRO-1 positive displayed differential regulations of families of proteins involved in cell migration and proliferation. The current study indicated that osteogenic decision specific events had already occurred. Runx2 was localized in nuclei of the skeletal stem cells on the osteogenic nanopits; however, few signaling pathway changes were observed. This study demonstrated that micro- and nanotopographies activated skeletal stem cells at different times and with distinct mechanotransduction profiles.

  15. Protein Expression of STRO-1 Cells in Response to Different Topographic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kantawong, Fahsai; Robertson, Mary E.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Human skeletal stem cells (STRO-1 positive) display distinct responses to different topographical features. On a flat surface, skeletal cells spread, and in vitro, they typically display a polarized, fibroblast-like morphology. However, on microgrooved surfaces, these cells prefer to stretch along the grooves forming a similar morphology to in vivo, bipolarized fibroblasts. In contrast, on nanopits, these cells display a polygonal and osteoblastic phenotype. We have examined mechanotransduction events of STRO-1 positive in response to fibroblastic, microgrooved and osteogenic, controlled disorder nanopit, topographies using proteomics after 3 days in culture. Protein expression profiles were analyzed by difference gel electrophoresis to identify proteins that showed modulation of expression in response to different topographic features to assess early decision events in these cells on these discrete topographies. After only 72 hours in culture, STRO-1 positive displayed differential regulations of families of proteins involved in cell migration and proliferation. The current study indicated that osteogenic decision specific events had already occurred. Runx2 was localized in nuclei of the skeletal stem cells on the osteogenic nanopits; however, few signaling pathway changes were observed. This study demonstrated that micro- and nanotopographies activated skeletal stem cells at different times and with distinct mechanotransduction profiles. PMID:21772957

  16. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  17. Microdeletions of 3p21.31 characterized by developmental delay, distinctive features, elevated serum creatine kinase levels, and white matter involvement.

    PubMed

    Eto, Kaoru; Sakai, Norio; Shimada, Shino; Shioda, Mutsuki; Ishigaki, Keiko; Hamada, Yusuke; Shinpo, Michiko; Azuma, Junji; Tominaga, Koji; Shimojima, Keiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Interstitial deletions of chromosome 3 are rare, and only one patient with a microdeletion of 3p21.31 has been reported to date. We identified two additional cases of patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31. The characteristic clinical features of developmental delay and distinctive facial features (including arched eyebrows, hypertelorism, epicanthus, and micrognathia) were seen both in the previously reported patient and in the two newly identified patients. In these two new cases, additional features, including elevated serum creatine kinase levels and characteristic neuroradiological features with white matter involvement, were seen. These features had not been described in the previous case in which the patient was examined during infancy, suggesting an age-dependent mechanism. The shortest region of overlap among the three deletions narrowed down the candidate genes that may be responsible for the common neurological features to the bassoon (presynaptic cytomatrix protein) gene (BSN), which has an important function in neuronal synapses. In this study, we confirmed common phenotypic features in the patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31 and identified additional features that have not been reported previously. Because the constellation of such characteristic features is quite unique, clinical manifestations of the patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31 would be clinically recognizable as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  18. Protein modifications involved in neurotransmitter and gasotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Nilkantha; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modifications of intracellular proteins, such as phosphorylation, are generally thought to occur as secondary or tertiary responses to neurotransmitters, following the intermediation of membrane receptors and second messengers such as cyclic AMP. By contrast, the gasotransmitter nitric oxide directly S-nitrosylates cysteine residues in diverse intracellular proteins. Recently, hydrogen sulfide has been acknowledged as a gaso-transmitter, which analogously sulfhydrates cysteine residues in proteins. Cysteine residues are also modified by palmitoylation in response to neurotransmitter signaling, possibly in reciprocity with S-nitrosylation. Neurotransmission also elicits sumoylation and acetylation of lysine residues within diverse proteins. This review addresses how these recently appreciated protein modifications impact our thinking about ways in which neurotransmission regulates intracellular protein disposition. PMID:20843563

  19. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  20. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  1. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features*

    PubMed Central

    Schons, Karen Regina Rosso; Beber, André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to March 2013. Cutaneous severity was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) was used to evaluate patient's nails. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was established according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR). RESULTS: The prevalence of NP was 46.1%. These patients had a median [interquartilic range (IQR)] NAPSI of 1 (0-15). A total of 63.3% of patients reported aesthetic discomfort or functional impairment related to their nails. Onycholysis was the most common feature (80%). When compared with patients without nail involvement, patients with NP had lower mean age at psoriasis onset [21 (18-41) vs. 43 (30-56) years, p=0,001]; longer disease duration [15.5 (10-24) vs. 6 (2-12) years, p=0.001]; higher PASI [9.2 (5-17) vs. 3.7 (2-10), p=0.044], higher frequency of psoriatic arthritis (43.3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.002) and more often reported family history of psoriasis (40% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Onycholysis was the most frequent finding and most patients feel uncomfortable with the psoriatic nail changes that they experience. PMID:26131859

  2. Tubulin-G protein interactions involve microtubule polymerization domains

    SciTech Connect

    Nan Wang; Rasenick, M.M. )

    1991-11-12

    It has been suggested that elements of the cytoskeleton contribute to the signal transduction process and that they do so in association with one or more members of the signal-transducing G protein family. Relatively high-affinity binding between dimeric tubulin and the {alpha} subunits of G{sub s} and G{sub i1} has also been reported. Tubulin molecules, which exist in solution as {alpha}{beta} dimers, have binding domains for microtubule-associated proteins as well as for other tubulin dimers. This study represents an attempt to ascertain whether the association between G proteins and tubulin occurs at one of these sites. Removal of the binding site for MAP2 and tau from tubulin by subtilisin proteolysis did not influence the association of tubulin with G protein, as demonstrated in overlay studies with ({sup 125}I)tubulin. However, ring structures formed from subtilisin-treated tubulin were incapable of effecting such inhibition. Stable G protein-tubulin complexes were formed, and these were separated from free tubulin by Octyl-Sepharose chromatography. Using this methodology, it was demonstrated that assembled microtubules bound G protein quite weakly compared with tubulin dimers. The {alpha} subunit of G{sub i1} and, to a lesser extent, that of G{sub o} were demonstrated to inhibit microtubule polymerization. In aggregate, these data suggest that dimeric tubulin binds to the {alpha} subunits of G protein at the sites where it binds to other tubulin dimers during microtubule polymerization. Interaction with signal-transducing G proteins, thus, might represent a role for tubulin dimers which is independent of microtubule formation.

  3. Improving Classification of Protein Interaction Articles Using Context Similarity-Based Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifei; Sun, Yuxing; Han, Bing-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction article classification is a text classification task in the biological domain to determine which articles describe protein-protein interactions. Since the feature space in text classification is high-dimensional, feature selection is widely used for reducing the dimensionality of features to speed up computation without sacrificing classification performance. Many existing feature selection methods are based on the statistical measure of document frequency and term frequency. One potential drawback of these methods is that they treat features separately. Hence, first we design a similarity measure between the context information to take word cooccurrences and phrase chunks around the features into account. Then we introduce the similarity of context information to the importance measure of the features to substitute the document and term frequency. Hence we propose new context similarity-based feature selection methods. Their performance is evaluated on two protein interaction article collections and compared against the frequency-based methods. The experimental results reveal that the context similarity-based methods perform better in terms of the F1 measure and the dimension reduction rate. Benefiting from the context information surrounding the features, the proposed methods can select distinctive features effectively for protein interaction article classification. PMID:26339638

  4. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  5. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  6. Proteins Involved in Platelet Signaling Are Differentially Regulated in Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Parguiña, Andrés; Grigorian-Shamajian, Lilian; Agra, Rosa M.; Teijeira-Fernández, Elvis; Rosa, Isaac; Alonso, Jana; Viñuela-Roldán, Juan E.; Seoane, Ana; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; García, Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Background Platelets play a fundamental role in pathological events underlying acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Because platelets do not have a nucleus, proteomics constitutes an optimal approach to follow platelet molecular events associated with the onset of the acute episode. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed the first high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteome analysis of circulating platelets from patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS). Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and validations were by western blotting. Forty protein features (corresponding to 22 unique genes) were found to be differentially regulated between NSTE-ACS patients and matched controls with chronic ischemic cardiopathy. The number of differences decreased at day 5 (28) and 6 months after the acute event (5). Interestingly, a systems biology approach demonstrated that 16 of the 22 differentially regulated proteins identified are interconnected as part of a common network related to cell assembly and organization and cell morphology, processes very related to platelet activation. Indeed, 14 of those proteins are either signaling or cytoskeletal, and nine of them are known to participate in platelet activation by αIIbβ3 and/or GPVI receptors. Several of the proteins identified participate in platelet activation through post-translational modifications, as shown here for ILK, Src and Talin. Interestingly, the platelet-secreted glycoprotein SPARC was down-regulated in NSTE-ACS patients compared to stable controls, which is consistent with a secretion process from activated platelets. Conclusions/Significance The present study provides novel information on platelet proteome changes associated with platelet activation in NSTE-ACS, highlighting the presence of proteins involved in platelet signaling. This investigation paves the way for future studies in the search for novel platelet-related biomarkers and drug targets in ACS. PMID

  7. A protein export pathway involving Escherichia coli porins.

    PubMed

    Prehna, Gerd; Zhang, Guijin; Gong, Xiandi; Duszyk, Marek; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Weiner, Joel H; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2012-07-01

    Escherichia coli export the protein YebF into the extracellular medium by a two-step process. However, as no general outer membrane protein secretion system common to all E. coli strains has been reported, the mechanism of export has remained unclear. Herein, we identify the outer membrane proteins OmpF, OmpC, and OmpX as central to the YebF export mechanism using both genetic and planar lipid bilayer experiments. The nuclear magnetic resonance structural ensemble of YebF reveals a cystatin-like fold consisting of a structured core and an extended dynamic surface in a state of conformational exchange. This surface, conserved throughout YebF orthologs of Enterobacteriaceae, may facilitate the porin-mediated transport of YebF as amino acid substitutions of dynamic residues reduced secretion to the extracellular medium. Our results demonstrate that OmpF and OmpC not only operate to import ions and protein toxins but may also contribute to the export of the YebF protein family.

  8. The special features of protein adsorption isotherms on silica adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukhrai, E. S.; Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption isotherms of hemoglobin, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase on silochrome and mesoporous and biporous silicas were comparatively studied. Adsorption developed in two stages, including fast "reversible" protein adsorption (equilibrium was reached in t ≤ 1-2 h) and a "slow stage" of irreversible binding in t ≫ 24 h (multipoint adsorption). The corresponding equilibrium constants were determined. The mechanism of unlimited linear association of peroxidase in the adsorption layer on the surface of silochrome was established.

  9. Classification of protein-protein interaction full-text documents using text and citation network features.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Abi-Haidar, Alaa; Kaur, Jasleen; Hamed, Ahmed Abdeen; Rocha, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    We participated (as Team 9) in the Article Classification Task of the Biocreative II.5 Challenge: binary classification of full-text documents relevant for protein-protein interaction. We used two distinct classifiers for the online and offline challenges: 1) the lightweight Variable Trigonometric Threshold (VTT) linear classifier we successfully introduced in BioCreative 2 for binary classification of abstracts and 2) a novel Naive Bayes classifier using features from the citation network of the relevant literature. We supplemented the supplied training data with full-text documents from the MIPS database. The lightweight VTT classifier was very competitive in this new full-text scenario: it was a top-performing submission in this task, taking into account the rank product of the Area Under the interpolated precision and recall Curve, Accuracy, Balanced F-Score, and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient performance measures. The novel citation network classifier for the biomedical text mining domain, while not a top performing classifier in the challenge, performed above the central tendency of all submissions, and therefore indicates a promising new avenue to investigate further in bibliome informatics.

  10. Classification of protein-protein interaction full-text documents using text and citation network features.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Abi-Haidar, Alaa; Kaur, Jasleen; Hamed, Ahmed Abdeen; Rocha, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    We participated (as Team 9) in the Article Classification Task of the Biocreative II.5 Challenge: binary classification of full-text documents relevant for protein-protein interaction. We used two distinct classifiers for the online and offline challenges: 1) the lightweight Variable Trigonometric Threshold (VTT) linear classifier we successfully introduced in BioCreative 2 for binary classification of abstracts and 2) a novel Naive Bayes classifier using features from the citation network of the relevant literature. We supplemented the supplied training data with full-text documents from the MIPS database. The lightweight VTT classifier was very competitive in this new full-text scenario: it was a top-performing submission in this task, taking into account the rank product of the Area Under the interpolated precision and recall Curve, Accuracy, Balanced F-Score, and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient performance measures. The novel citation network classifier for the biomedical text mining domain, while not a top performing classifier in the challenge, performed above the central tendency of all submissions, and therefore indicates a promising new avenue to investigate further in bibliome informatics. PMID:20671313

  11. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes c (Cyt c) are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt) in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i) heme translocation and delivery, (ii) apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii) apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24455431

  12. Photoregulated gene expression may involve ubiquitous DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, U; Cashmore, A R

    1990-01-01

    Several promoter elements have previously been shown to influence the expression of the cab-E gene in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Here we demonstrate, by electrophoretic mobility shift and methylation interference assays, that a complex pattern of protein-DNA interactions characterizes this promoter. Among the multiple proteins identified, we focused on five different factors which either occupied important regulatory elements and/or were present in relatively large amounts in nuclear extracts. All of these proteins were distinguished on the basis of their recognition sequence and other biochemical parameters. One, GBF, interacted with a single sequence within the cab-E promoter homologous to the G-box found in many photoregulated and other plant promoters. A second factor, GA-1, bound to the GATA element which is located between the CAAT and TATA boxes of the cab-E and all other LHCII Type I CAB promoters. GA-1 also interacted in vitro with the I-boxes of the Arabidopsis rbcS-1A promoter and the as-2 site of the CaMV 35S promoter. Two other factors, GC-1 and AT-1, bound to multiple recognition sites localized within the GC-rich and AT-rich elements, respectively. GT-1, a protein which interacts with promoters of other light-regulated genes, bound to seven distinct sites distributed throughout the cab-E promoter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig.5 Fig.6 Fig.7 PMID:2209551

  13. Interactions of Dnd proteins involved in bacterial DNA phosphorothioate modification

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Gong; Yu, Hao; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioation (PT) is the first discovered physiological DNA backbone modification, in which a non-bridging oxygen atom of the phosphodiester bond is replaced with a sulfur atom in Rp (rectus for plane) configuration. PT modification is governed by a highly conserved gene cluster dndA/iscS-dndBCDE that is widespread across bacterial and archaeal species. However, little is known about how these proteins coordinately react with each other to perform oxygen–sulfur swap. We here demonstrated that IscS, DndC, DndD and DndE form a protein complex of which the molecular ratio for four proteins in the complex is approximate 1:1:1:1. DndB here displayed little or weak affinity to the complex and the constructs harboring dndACDE can confer the host in vivo PT modification. Using co-purification and pull down strategy, we demonstrated that the four proteins assemble into a pipeline in collinear to its gene organization, namely, IscS binding to DndC, DndC binding to DndD, and DndD binding to DndE. Moreover, weak interactions between DndE and IscS, DndE and DndC were also identified. PMID:26539172

  14. Physical Features of Intracellular Proteins that Moonlight on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Amblee, Vaishak; Jeffery, Constance J.

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins comprise a subset of multifunctional proteins that perform two or more biochemical functions that are not due to gene fusions, multiple splice variants, proteolytic fragments, or promiscuous enzyme activities. The project described herein focuses on a sub-set of moonlighting proteins that have a canonical biochemical function inside the cell and perform a second biochemical function on the cell surface in at least one species. The goal of this project is to consider the biophysical features of these moonlighting proteins to determine whether they have shared characteristics or defining features that might suggest why these particular proteins were adopted for a second function on the cell surface, or if these proteins resemble typical intracellular proteins. The latter might suggest that many other normally intracellular proteins found on the cell surface might also be moonlighting in this fashion. We have identified 30 types of proteins that have different functions inside the cell and on the cell surface. Some of these proteins are found to moonlight on the surface of multiple species, sometimes with different extracellular functions in different species, so there are a total of 98 proteins in the study set. Although a variety of intracellular proteins (enzymes, chaperones, etc.) are observed to be re-used on the cell surface, for the most part, these proteins were found to have physical characteristics typical of intracellular proteins. Many other intracellular proteins have also been found on the surface of bacterial pathogens and other organisms in proteomics experiments. It is quite possible that many of those proteins also have a moonlighting function on the cell surface. The increasing number and variety of known moonlighting proteins suggest that there may be more moonlighting proteins than previously thought, and moonlighting might be a common feature of many more proteins. PMID:26110848

  15. Therapeutic approaches against common structural features of toxic oligomers shared by multiple amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L; Kayed, Rakez

    2014-04-15

    Impaired proteostasis is one of the main features of all amyloid diseases, which are associated with the formation of insoluble aggregates from amyloidogenic proteins. The aggregation process can be caused by overproduction or poor clearance of these proteins. However, numerous reports suggest that amyloid oligomers are the most toxic species, rather than insoluble fibrillar material, in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Prion diseases, among others. Although the exact protein that aggregates varies between amyloid disorders, they all share common structural features that can be used as therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on therapeutic approaches against shared features of toxic oligomeric structures and future directions.

  16. Quantitative characterization of protein-protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nina A; Vasil'eva, Inna A; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Antson, Alfred A; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-07-13

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein-protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process.

  17. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  18. The Involvement of Transport Proteins in Transcriptional and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Västermark, Åke; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Transport proteins have sometimes gained secondary regulatory functions that influence gene expression and metabolism. These functions allow communication with the external world via mechanistically distinctive signal transduction pathways. In this brief review we focus on three transport systems in Escherichia coli that control and coordinate carbon, exogenous hexose-phosphate and phosphorous metabolism. The transport proteins that play central roles in these processes are (1) the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphotransferase system, PTS, (2) the glucose-6-phosphate receptor, UhpC, and (3) the phosphate-specific transporter, PstSABC, respectively. While the PTS participates in multiple complex regulatory processes, three of which are discussed here, UhpC and the Pst transporters exemplify differing strategies. PMID:24513656

  19. Are odorant-binding proteins involved in odorant discrimination?

    PubMed

    Steinbrecht, R A

    1996-12-01

    Pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of nine moth species belonging to six families and three superfamilies of Lepidoptera were immunolabelled with an antiserum against the pheromone-binding protein of Antheraea polyphemus. Strong immunolabelling of the sensillum lymph was observed in all long sensilla trichodea of A. polyphemus, A. pernyi (Saturniidae), Bombyx mori (Bombycidae) and Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Very weak labelling was found with all sensilla trichodea of Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lasiocampidae) and Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae). In three noctuid species, some long sensilla trichodea were labelled strongly, some only weakly and some were not labelled at all. The fraction of long sensilla trichodea that were strongly labelled was large in Helicoverpa armigera, but small in Spodoptera littoralis and Autographa gamma. The observed cross-reactivity was not correlated with taxonomic relatedness of the species but rather with chemical relatedness of the pheromones used by these species, as a high labelling density was consistently observed in sensilla tuned to pheromones with an alcyl chain of 16 carbon atoms. The highly divergent specificity of pheromone-receptor cells in Noctuidae appears to be mirrored by a similar diversity of the pheromone-binding proteins in the sensilla trichodea. These data support the notion that pheromone-binding proteins participate in odorant discrimination.

  20. Are odorant-binding proteins involved in odorant discrimination?

    PubMed

    Steinbrecht, R A

    1996-12-01

    Pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of nine moth species belonging to six families and three superfamilies of Lepidoptera were immunolabelled with an antiserum against the pheromone-binding protein of Antheraea polyphemus. Strong immunolabelling of the sensillum lymph was observed in all long sensilla trichodea of A. polyphemus, A. pernyi (Saturniidae), Bombyx mori (Bombycidae) and Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Very weak labelling was found with all sensilla trichodea of Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lasiocampidae) and Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae). In three noctuid species, some long sensilla trichodea were labelled strongly, some only weakly and some were not labelled at all. The fraction of long sensilla trichodea that were strongly labelled was large in Helicoverpa armigera, but small in Spodoptera littoralis and Autographa gamma. The observed cross-reactivity was not correlated with taxonomic relatedness of the species but rather with chemical relatedness of the pheromones used by these species, as a high labelling density was consistently observed in sensilla tuned to pheromones with an alcyl chain of 16 carbon atoms. The highly divergent specificity of pheromone-receptor cells in Noctuidae appears to be mirrored by a similar diversity of the pheromone-binding proteins in the sensilla trichodea. These data support the notion that pheromone-binding proteins participate in odorant discrimination. PMID:8985600

  1. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  2. Protein Kinase C (PkcA) of Aspergillus nidulans Is Involved in Penicillin Production

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Martina; Spröte, Petra; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2006-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is catalyzed by three enzymes that are encoded by the acvA, ipnA, and aatA genes. A variety of cis-acting DNA elements and regulatory factors form a complex regulatory network controlling these β-lactam biosynthesis genes. Regulators involved include the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF and AnBH1. AnBH1 acts as a repressor of the penicillin biosynthesis gene aatA. Until now, however, little information has been available on the signal transduction cascades leading to the transcription factors. Here we show that inhibition of protein kinase C (Pkc) activity in A. nidulans led to cytoplasmic localization of an AnBH1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein. Computer analysis of the genome and screening of an A. nidulans gene library revealed that the fungus possesses two putative Pkc-encoding genes, which we designated pkcA and pkcB. Only PkcA showed all the characteristic features of fungal Pkc's. Production of pkcA antisense RNA in A. nidulans led to reduced growth and conidiation in Aspergillus minimal medium, while in fermentation medium it led to enhanced expression of an aatAp-lacZ gene fusion, reduced pencillin production, and predominantly cytoplasmic localization of AnBH1. These data agree with the finding that inhibition of Pkc activity prevented nuclear localization of AnBH1-EGFP. As a result, repression of aatA expression was relieved. The involvement of Pkc in penicillin biosynthesis is also interesting in light of the fact that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pkc plays a major role in maintaining cell integrity. PMID:16598003

  3. Protein kinase C (PkcA) of Aspergillus nidulans is involved in penicillin production.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martina; Spröte, Petra; Brakhage, Axel A

    2006-04-01

    The biosynthesis of the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is catalyzed by three enzymes that are encoded by the acvA, ipnA, and aatA genes. A variety of cis-acting DNA elements and regulatory factors form a complex regulatory network controlling these beta-lactam biosynthesis genes. Regulators involved include the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF and AnBH1. AnBH1 acts as a repressor of the penicillin biosynthesis gene aatA. Until now, however, little information has been available on the signal transduction cascades leading to the transcription factors. Here we show that inhibition of protein kinase C (Pkc) activity in A. nidulans led to cytoplasmic localization of an AnBH1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein. Computer analysis of the genome and screening of an A. nidulans gene library revealed that the fungus possesses two putative Pkc-encoding genes, which we designated pkcA and pkcB. Only PkcA showed all the characteristic features of fungal Pkc's. Production of pkcA antisense RNA in A. nidulans led to reduced growth and conidiation in Aspergillus minimal medium, while in fermentation medium it led to enhanced expression of an aatAp-lacZ gene fusion, reduced pencillin production, and predominantly cytoplasmic localization of AnBH1. These data agree with the finding that inhibition of Pkc activity prevented nuclear localization of AnBH1-EGFP. As a result, repression of aatA expression was relieved. The involvement of Pkc in penicillin biosynthesis is also interesting in light of the fact that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pkc plays a major role in maintaining cell integrity.

  4. A Method of Protein Model Classification and Retrieval Using Bag-of-Visual-Features

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ziping; Kang, Baosheng; Lu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel visual method for protein model classification and retrieval. Different from the conventional methods, the key idea of the proposed method is to extract image features of proteins and measure the visual similarity between proteins. Firstly, the multiview images are captured by vertices and planes of a given octahedron surrounding the protein. Secondly, the local features are extracted from each image of the different views by the SURF algorithm and are vector quantized into visual words using a visual codebook. Finally, KLD is employed to calculate the similarity distance between two feature vectors. Experimental results show that the proposed method has encouraging performances for protein retrieval and categorization as shown in the comparison with other methods. PMID:25258644

  5. An automated approach to network features of protein structure ensembles.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Bhat, Chanda R; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2013-10-01

    Network theory applied to protein structures provides insights into numerous problems of biological relevance. The explosion in structural data available from PDB and simulations establishes a need to introduce a standalone-efficient program that assembles network concepts/parameters under one hood in an automated manner. Herein, we discuss the development/application of an exhaustive, user-friendly, standalone program package named PSN-Ensemble, which can handle structural ensembles generated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation/NMR studies or from multiple X-ray structures. The novelty in network construction lies in the explicit consideration of side-chain interactions among amino acids. The program evaluates network parameters dealing with topological organization and long-range allosteric communication. The introduction of a flexible weighing scheme in terms of residue pairwise cross-correlation/interaction energy in PSN-Ensemble brings in dynamical/chemical knowledge into the network representation. Also, the results are mapped on a graphical display of the structure, allowing an easy access of network analysis to a general biological community. The potential of PSN-Ensemble toward examining structural ensemble is exemplified using MD trajectories of an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UbcH5b). Furthermore, insights derived from network parameters evaluated using PSN-Ensemble for single-static structures of active/inactive states of β2-adrenergic receptor and the ternary tRNA complexes of tyrosyl tRNA synthetases (from organisms across kingdoms) are discussed. PSN-Ensemble is freely available from http://vishgraph.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/PSN-Ensemble/psn_index.html.

  6. Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Draft Genomes Comparison Reveal Strain-Specific Features Involved in Adaptation and Virulence to Actinidia Species

    PubMed Central

    Marcelletti, Simone; Ferrante, Patrizia; Petriccione, Milena; Firrao, Giuseppe; Scortichini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A recent re-emerging bacterial canker disease incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is causing severe economic losses to Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa cultivations in southern Europe, New Zealand, Chile and South Korea. Little is known about the genetic features of this pathovar. We generated genome-wide Illumina sequence data from two Psa strains causing outbreaks of bacterial canker on the A. deliciosa cv. Hayward in Japan (J-Psa, type-strain of the pathovar) and in Italy (I-Psa) in 1984 and 1992, respectively as well as from a Psa strain (I2-Psa) isolated at the beginning of the recent epidemic on A. chinensis cv. Hort16A in Italy. All strains were isolated from typical leaf spot symptoms. The phylogenetic relationships revealed that Psa is more closely related to P. s. pv. theae than to P. avellanae within genomospecies 8. Comparative genomic analyses revealed both relevant intrapathovar variations and putative pathovar-specific genomic regions in Psa. The genomic sequences of J-Psa and I-Psa were very similar. Conversely, the I2-Psa genome encodes four additional effector protein genes, lacks a 50 kb plasmid and the phaseolotoxin gene cluster, argK-tox but has acquired a 160 kb plasmid and putative prophage sequences. Several lines of evidence from the analysis of the genome sequences support the hypothesis that this strain did not evolve from the Psa population that caused the epidemics in 1984–1992 in Japan and Italy but rather is the product of a recent independent evolution of the pathovar actinidiae for infecting Actinidia spp. All Psa strains share the genetic potential for copper resistance, antibiotic detoxification, high affinity iron acquisition and detoxification of nitric oxide of plant origin. Similar to other sequenced phytopathogenic pseudomonads associated with woody plant species, the Psa strains isolated from leaves also display a set of genes involved in the catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds. PMID

  7. Comparative Large Scale Characterization of Plant versus Mammal Proteins Reveals Similar and Idiosyncratic N-α-Acetylation Features*

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenut, Willy V.; Sumpton, David; Martinez, Aude; Lilla, Sergio; Espagne, Christelle; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal modifications play a major role in the fate of proteins in terms of activity, stability, or subcellular compartmentalization. Such modifications remain poorly described and badly characterized in proteomic studies, and only a few comparison studies among organisms have been made available so far. Recent advances in the field now allow the enrichment and selection of N-terminal peptides in the course of proteome-wide mass spectrometry analyses. These targeted approaches unravel as a result the extent and nature of the protein N-terminal modifications. Here, we aimed at studying such modifications in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to compare these results with those obtained from a human sample analyzed in parallel. We applied large scale analysis to compile robust conclusions on both data sets. Our data show strong convergence of the characterized modifications especially for protein N-terminal methionine excision, co-translational N-α-acetylation, or N-myristoylation between animal and plant kingdoms. Because of the convergence of both the substrates and the N-α-acetylation machinery, it was possible to identify the N-acetyltransferases involved in such modifications for a small number of model plants. Finally, a high proportion of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins feature post-translational N-α-acetylation of the mature protein after removal of the transit peptide. Unlike animals, plants feature in a dedicated pathway for post-translational acetylation of organelle-targeted proteins. The corresponding machinery is yet to be discovered. PMID:22223895

  8. Apolipoprotein A-IV: a protein intimately involved in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Kohan, Alison B.; Lo, Chun-Min; Liu, Min; Howles, Philip; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the physiological roles of apoA-IV in metabolism, and to underscore the potential for apoA-IV to be a focus for new therapies aimed at the treatment of diabetes and obesity-related disorders. ApoA-IV is primarily synthesized by the small intestine, attached to chylomicrons by enterocytes, and secreted into intestinal lymph during fat absorption. In circulation, apoA-IV is associated with HDL and chylomicron remnants, but a large portion is lipoprotein free. Due to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and because it can mediate reverse-cholesterol transport, proposed functions of circulating apoA-IV have been related to protection from cardiovascular disease. This review, however, focuses primarily on several properties of apoA-IV that impact other metabolic functions related to food intake, obesity, and diabetes. In addition to participating in triglyceride absorption, apoA-IV can act as an acute satiation factor through both peripheral and central routes of action. It also modulates glucose homeostasis through incretin-like effects on insulin secretion, and by moderating hepatic glucose production. While apoA-IV receptors remain to be conclusively identified, the latter modes of action suggest that this protein holds therapeutic promise for treating metabolic disease. PMID:25640749

  9. Evaluation of correlation between CT image features and ERCC1 protein expression in assessing lung cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Sun, Shenshen; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) usually have favorable prognosis. However, high percentage of NSCLC patients have cancer relapse after surgery. Accurately predicting cancer prognosis is important to optimally treat and manage the patients to minimize the risk of cancer relapse. Studies have shown that an excision repair crosscomplementing 1 (ERCC1) gene was a potentially useful genetic biomarker to predict prognosis of NSCLC patients. Meanwhile, studies also found that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was highly associated with lung cancer prognosis. In this study, we investigated and evaluated the correlations between COPD image features and ERCC1 gene expression. A database involving 106 NSCLC patients was used. Each patient had a thoracic CT examination and ERCC1 genetic test. We applied a computer-aided detection scheme to segment and quantify COPD image features. A logistic regression method and a multilayer perceptron network were applied to analyze the correlation between the computed COPD image features and ERCC1 protein expression. A multilayer perceptron network (MPN) was also developed to test performance of using COPD-related image features to predict ERCC1 protein expression. A nine feature based logistic regression analysis showed the average COPD feature values in the low and high ERCC1 protein expression groups are significantly different (p < 0.01). Using a five-fold cross validation method, the MPN yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC = 0.669±0.053) in classifying between the low and high ERCC1 expression cases. The study indicates that CT phenotype features are associated with the genetic tests, which may provide supplementary information to help improve accuracy in assessing prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  10. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  11. SNARE proteins synaptobrevin, SNAP-25, and syntaxin are involved in rapid and slow endocytosis at synapses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianhua; Luo, Fujun; Zhang, Zhen; Xue, Lei; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Shin, Wonchul; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2013-05-30

    Rapid endocytosis, which takes only a few seconds, is widely observed in secretory cells. Although it is more efficient in recycling vesicles than in slow clathrin-mediated endocytosis, its underlying mechanism, thought to be clathrin independent, is largely unclear. Here, we report that cleavage of three SNARE proteins essential for exocytosis, including synaptobrevin, SNAP-25, and syntaxin, inhibited rapid endocytosis at the calyx of Held nerve terminal, suggesting the involvement of the three SNARE proteins in rapid endocytosis. These SNARE proteins were also involved in slow endocytosis. In addition, SNAP-25 and syntaxin facilitated vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool, most likely via their roles in endocytosis and/or exocytosis. We conclude that both rapid and slow endocytosis share the involvement of SNARE proteins. The dual role of three SNARE proteins in exo- and endocytosis suggests that SNARE proteins may be molecular substrates contributing to the exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, which maintains exocytosis in secretory cells.

  12. Papillary thyroid carcinoma involving cervical neck lymph nodes: correlations with lymphangiogenesis and ultrasound features.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjung; Park, Kyung Joo; Ryu, Seungho; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Yun, Jisup; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Chun, Mison

    2012-01-01

    Stratification of risk factors for cervical lymph node metastasis (LNM) in thyroid papillary carcinoma is important for providing standards for post-operative adjuvant radio-iodine therapy and for patient prognosis. We investigated pathological factors based on the lymphatic vessel system and radiological features associated with tumor with cervical neck LNM. Among patients who had undergone thyroidectomy confirmed to be papillary thyroid carcinoma, we selected 126 age-sex matched paired patients without cervical LNM (group 1) and with LNM (group 2) to evaluate risk factors. Pathological factors evaluated were size, multiplicity, and extra thyroid extension state, based on the pathological reports using stored data. The lymphatic vessel density (LVD) of each tumor was evaluated by staining for VEGFR-3 and D2-40 and correlated with cervical LNM state. Malignant ultrasound features were evaluated to compare the differences between these two groups. Larger tumor size, multiplicity, extrathyroid extension were more common in group 2 (p<0.05). The median percentage of VEGFR-3 for group 1 was 20 (range 0-30) and D2-40 was 13 (range 7-23) while for group 2, VEGFR-3 was 80 (70-90) and D2-40 was 78 (54-114). LVD measured by intratumoral D2-40 staining was 20.6% and 79.4% for group 1 and group 2, respectively. Intra-tumoral lymphatics measured by D2-40 stain had a strong correlation with cervical LNM (Odds 1.230, CI 1.01.-1.499 p value 0.040). Ultrasound (US) features had no significant differences between the two groups although calcifications tended to be higher in group 2 (84% vs. 76% p=0.264). Lymphatic vessel density and nodule echogenicity were not associated with LNM. Intratumoral lymphangiogenesis was most strongly associated with LNM and thus, could be a useful predictive marker for cervical LNM.

  13. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  14. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  15. DNA Microarray Analysis in Screening Features of Genes Involved in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yugang; Wang, Ying; Teng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Xiufeng; Ding, Min; Zhang, Zhaojun; Chen, Junli; Xu, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the most critical complication of spinal injury. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and to find associated pathways that may function as targets for SCI prognosis and therapy. Material/Methods Seven gene microarray expression profiles, downloaded from the GEO database (ID: GSE33886), were used to screen the DEGs of leg tissue and to compare these between SCI patients and corresponding normal specimens. Then, GO enrichment analysis was performed on these selected DEGs. Afterwards, interactions among these DEGs were analyzed by String database and then a PPI network was constructed to obtain topology character and modules in the PPI network. Finally, roles of the critical proteins in the pathway were explained by comparing the enrichment results of the genes in sub-modules and all the DEGs. Results A total of 113 DEGs were determined. We found that 21 up-regulated genes were enriched in 7 biological processes, while 9 down-regulated genes were significantly enriched in 4 KEGG pathways. The PPI network was constructed, including 40 interacting genes and 73 interactions. Three obvious function modules were identified by exploring the PPI network, and ACTC1 was identified as the critical protein in the 3 enriched signal pathways. However, no obvious difference was found in the signal pathway in which both the 11 genes in module 1 and all 113 DEGs participated. Conclusions Core proteins in the signal pathway associated with spinal cord injury may serve as potential prognostic and predictive markers for the diagnosis and treatment of spinal cord injury in clinical applications. PMID:27160807

  16. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes.

  17. Structural Features of Vps35p Involved in Interaction with Other Subunits of the Retromer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Ricardo; Zhao, Xiang; Peter, Harald; Zhang, Bao-yan; Arvan, Peter; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    The penta-subunit retromer complex of yeast mediates selective retrieval of membrane proteins from the prevacuolar endosome to the trans Golgi network. In this study, we set out to generate a panel of vps35 dominant-negative mutants that disrupt retromer-mediated cargo sorting. Mapping of the mutations revealed two types of alterations leading to dominant-negative behavior of the 944-amino acid protein: (i) mutations at or near the R98 residue or (ii) C-terminal truncations exemplified by a nonsense mutation at codon 733. Both could be suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Vps35p, suggesting that these dominant-negative mutants compete for interactions with other retromer subunits. Interestingly, Vps35-R98W expression destabilized Vps26p while having no effect on Vps29p stability, while Vps35-Q733* expression affected Vps29p stability but had no effect on Vps26p. Measurement of Vps35/Vps26 and Vps35/Vps29 pairwise associations by coimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of other retromer subunits indicated that the R98 residue, which is part of a conserved PRLYL motif, is critical for Vps35p binding to Vps26p, while both R98 and residues 733–944 are needed for efficient binding to Vps29p. PMID:17892535

  18. Production of soluble mammalian proteins in Escherichia coli: identification of protein features that correlate with successful expression

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Michael R; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Perera, Rajika L; McCafferty, John

    2004-01-01

    Background In the search for generic expression strategies for mammalian protein families several bacterial expression vectors were examined for their ability to promote high yields of soluble protein. Proteins studied included cell surface receptors (Ephrins and Eph receptors, CD44), kinases (EGFR-cytoplasmic domain, CDK2 and 4), proteases (MMP1, CASP2), signal transduction proteins (GRB2, RAF1, HRAS) and transcription factors (GATA2, Fli1, Trp53, Mdm2, JUN, FOS, MAD, MAX). Over 400 experiments were performed where expression of 30 full-length proteins and protein domains were evaluated with 6 different N-terminal and 8 C-terminal fusion partners. Expression of an additional set of 95 mammalian proteins was also performed to test the conclusions of this study. Results Several protein features correlated with soluble protein expression yield including molecular weight and the number of contiguous hydrophobic residues and low complexity regions. There was no relationship between successful expression and protein pI, grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), or sub-cellular location. Only small globular cytoplasmic proteins with an average molecular weight of 23 kDa did not require a solubility enhancing tag for high level soluble expression. Thioredoxin (Trx) and maltose binding protein (MBP) were the best N-terminal protein fusions to promote soluble expression, but MBP was most effective as a C-terminal fusion. 63 of 95 mammalian proteins expressed at soluble levels of greater than 1 mg/l as N-terminal H10-MBP fusions and those that failed possessed, on average, a higher molecular weight and greater number of contiguous hydrophobic amino acids and low complexity regions. Conclusions By analysis of the protein features identified here, this study will help predict which mammalian proteins and domains can be successfully expressed in E. coli as soluble product and also which are best targeted for a eukaryotic expression system. In some cases proteins may be truncated

  19. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using a random forest model with hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces provides crucial information for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. Existing machine learning methods generally judge whether a given residue is likely to be a hot spot by extracting features only from the target residue. However, hot spots usually form a small cluster of residues which are tightly packed together at the center of protein interface. With this in mind, we present a novel method to extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatially neighboring residues, i.e. the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). We provide a novel random forest (RF) model to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. Our method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.482 in Alanine Scanning Energetics Database, and ACC of 77.6% and MCC of 0.429 in Binding Interface Database. In a comparison study, performance of our RF model exceeds other existing methods, such as Robetta, FOLDEF, KFC, KFC2, MINERVA and HotPoint. Of our hybrid features, three physicochemical features of target residues (mass, polarizability and isoelectric point), the relative side-chain accessible surface area and the average depth index of mirror-contact residues are found to be the main discriminative features in hot spots prediction. We also confirm that hot spots tend to form large contact surface areas between two interacting proteins. Source data and code are available at: http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/HotSpot. PMID:22258275

  20. Involvement of Iron-Containing Proteins in Genome Integrity in Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes numerous iron-containing proteins such as iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster proteins and hemoproteins. These proteins generally utilize iron as a cofactor, and they perform critical roles in photosynthesis, genome stability, electron transfer, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to maintain iron homeostasis for the assembly of functional iron-containing proteins, thereby ensuring genome stability, cell development, and plant growth. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron-containing proteins and their functions involved in genome stability has expanded enormously. In this review, I provide the current perspectives on iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis, followed by a summary of iron-containing protein functions involved in genome stability maintenance and a discussion of their possible molecular mechanisms. PMID:27330736

  1. Involvement of Iron-Containing Proteins in Genome Integrity in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes numerous iron-containing proteins such as iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster proteins and hemoproteins. These proteins generally utilize iron as a cofactor, and they perform critical roles in photosynthesis, genome stability, electron transfer, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to maintain iron homeostasis for the assembly of functional iron-containing proteins, thereby ensuring genome stability, cell development, and plant growth. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron-containing proteins and their functions involved in genome stability has expanded enormously. In this review, I provide the current perspectives on iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis, followed by a summary of iron-containing protein functions involved in genome stability maintenance and a discussion of their possible molecular mechanisms. PMID:27330736

  2. Proteomic analysis of chicory root identifies proteins typically involved in cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Degand, Hervé; Faber, Anne-Marie; Dauchot, Nicolas; Mingeot, Dominique; Watillon, Bernard; Cutsem, Pierre Van; Morsomme, Pierre; Boutry, Marc

    2009-05-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus) roots contain high amounts of inulin, a fructose polymer used as a storage carbohydrate by the plant and as a human dietary and prebiotic compound. We performed 2-D electrophoretic analysis of proteins from root material before the first freezing period. The proteins were digested with trypsin and the peptides analyzed by MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF). From the 881 protein spots analyzed, 714 proteins corresponded to a database accession, 619 of which were classified into functional categories. Besides expected proteins (e.g. related to metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, or cell structure), other well-represented categories were proteins related to folding and stability (49 spots), proteolysis (49 spots), and the stress response (67 spots). The importance of abiotic stress response was confirmed by the observation that 7 of the 21 most intense protein spots are known to be involved in cold acclimation. These results suggest a major effect of the low temperature period that preceded root harvesting.

  3. Autonomic involvement in Parkinson's disease: pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features and possible peripheral biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Cersosimo, Maria G; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2012-02-15

    Autonomic nervous system involvement occurs at early stages in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Lewy body disease (ILBD), and affects the sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems (ENS). It has been proposed that alpha-synuclein (α-SYN) pathology in PD has a distal to proximal progression along autonomic pathways. The ENS is affected before the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV), and distal axons of cardiac sympathetic nerves degenerate before there is loss of paravertebral sympathetic ganglion neurons. Consistent with neuropathological findings, some autonomic manifestations such as constipation or impaired cardiac uptake of norepinephrine precursors, occur at early stages of the disease even before the onset of motor symptoms. Biopsy of peripheral tissues may constitute a promising approach to detect α-SYN neuropathology in autonomic nerves and a useful early biomarker of PD.

  4. FALDO: A semantic standard for describing the location of nucleotide and protein feature annotation

    DOE PAGES

    Bolleman, Jerven T.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Strozzi, Francesco; Baran, Joachim; Dumontier, Michel; Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Buels, Robert; Hoehndorf, Robert; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Katayama, Toshiaki; et al

    2016-06-13

    In this study, nucleotide and protein sequence feature annotations are essential to understand biology on the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic level. Using Semantic Web technologies to query biological annotations, there was no standard that described this potentially complex location information as subject-predicate-object triples. Here, we have developed an ontology, the Feature Annotation Location Description Ontology (FALDO), to describe the positions of annotated features on linear and circular sequences. FALDO can be used to describe nucleotide features in sequence records, protein annotations, and glycan binding sites, among other features in coordinate systems of the aforementioned “omics” areas. Using the same datamore » format to represent sequence positions that are independent of file formats allows us to integrate sequence data from multiple sources and data types. The genome browser JBrowse is used to demonstrate accessing multiple SPARQL endpoints to display genomic feature annotations, as well as protein annotations from UniProt mapped to genomic locations. In conclusion, our ontology allows users to uniformly describe – and potentially merge – sequence annotations from multiple sources. Data sources using FALDO can prospectively be retrieved using federalised SPARQL queries against public SPARQL endpoints and/or local private triple stores.« less

  5. FALDO: a semantic standard for describing the location of nucleotide and protein feature annotation

    DOE PAGES

    Bolleman, Jerven T.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Strozzi, Francesco; Baran, Joachim; Dumontier, Michel; Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Buels, Robert; Hoehndorf, Robert; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Katayama, Toshiaki; et al

    2016-06-13

    Nucleotide and protein sequence feature annotations are essential to understand biology on the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic level. Using Semantic Web technologies to query biological annotations, there was no standard that described this potentially complex location information as subject-predicate-object triples. In this paper, we have developed an ontology, the Feature Annotation Location Description Ontology (FALDO), to describe the positions of annotated features on linear and circular sequences. FALDO can be used to describe nucleotide features in sequence records, protein annotations, and glycan binding sites, among other features in coordinate systems of the aforementioned “omics” areas. Using the same data formatmore » to represent sequence positions that are independent of file formats allows us to integrate sequence data from multiple sources and data types. The genome browser JBrowse is used to demonstrate accessing multiple SPARQL endpoints to display genomic feature annotations, as well as protein annotations from UniProt mapped to genomic locations. Our ontology allows users to uniformly describe – and potentially merge – sequence annotations from multiple sources. Finally, data sources using FALDO can prospectively be retrieved using federalised SPARQL queries against public SPARQL endpoints and/or local private triple stores.« less

  6. FASTERp: A Feature Array Search Tool for Estimating Resemblance of Protein Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, Derek; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2014-03-14

    Metagenome sequencing efforts have provided a large pool of billions of genes for identifying enzymes with desirable biochemical traits. However, homology search with billions of genes in a rapidly growing database has become increasingly computationally impractical. Here we present our pilot efforts to develop a novel alignment-free algorithm for homology search. Specifically, we represent individual proteins as feature vectors that denote the presence or absence of short kmers in the protein sequence. Similarity between feature vectors is then computed using the Tanimoto score, a distance metric that can be rapidly computed on bit string representations of feature vectors. Preliminary results indicate good correlation with optimal alignment algorithms (Spearman r of 0.87, ~;;1,000,000 proteins from Pfam), as well as with heuristic algorithms such as BLAST (Spearman r of 0.86, ~;;1,000,000 proteins). Furthermore, a prototype of FASTERp implemented in Python runs approximately four times faster than BLAST on a small scale dataset (~;;1000 proteins). We are optimizing and scaling to improve FASTERp to enable rapid homology searches against billion-protein databases, thereby enabling more comprehensive gene annotation efforts.

  7. Update of PROFEAT: a web server for computing structural and physicochemical features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Rao, H B; Zhu, F; Yang, G B; Li, Z R; Chen, Y Z

    2011-07-01

    Sequence-derived structural and physicochemical features have been extensively used for analyzing and predicting structural, functional, expression and interaction profiles of proteins and peptides. PROFEAT has been developed as a web server for computing commonly used features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence. To facilitate more extensive studies of protein and peptides, numerous improvements and updates have been made to PROFEAT. We added new functions for computing descriptors of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions, segment descriptors for local properties of protein sequences, topological descriptors for peptide sequences and small molecule structures. We also added new feature groups for proteins and peptides (pseudo-amino acid composition, amphiphilic pseudo-amino acid composition, total amino acid properties and atomic-level topological descriptors) as well as for small molecules (atomic-level topological descriptors). Overall, PROFEAT computes 11 feature groups of descriptors for proteins and peptides, and a feature group of more than 400 descriptors for small molecules plus the derived features for protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. Our computational algorithms have been extensively tested and used in a number of published works for predicting proteins of specific structural or functional classes, protein-protein interactions, peptides of specific functions and quantitative structure activity relationships of small molecules. PROFEAT is accessible free of charge at http://bidd.cz3.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/prof/protein/profnew.cgi.

  8. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  9. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  10. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants. PMID:26260516

  11. An ensemble method with hybrid features to identify extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic composite of secreted proteins that play important roles in numerous biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Furthermore, various diseases are caused by the dysfunction of ECM proteins. Therefore, identifying these important ECM proteins may assist in understanding related biological processes and drug development. In view of the serious imbalance in the training dataset, a Random Forest-based ensemble method with hybrid features is developed in this paper to identify ECM proteins. Hybrid features are employed by incorporating sequence composition, physicochemical properties, evolutionary and structural information. The Information Gain Ratio and Incremental Feature Selection (IGR-IFS) methods are adopted to select the optimal features. Finally, the resulting predictor termed IECMP (Identify ECM Proteins) achieves an balanced accuracy of 86.4% using the 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, which is much higher than results obtained by other methods (ECMPRED: 71.0%, ECMPP: 77.8%). Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves significantly improved performance over ECMPP and ECMPRED. These results indicate that IECMP is an effective method for ECM protein prediction, which has a more balanced prediction capability for positive and negative samples. It is anticipated that the proposed method will provide significant information to fully decipher the molecular mechanisms of ECM-related biological processes and discover candidate drug targets. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for ECM protein identification that is freely accessible at http://iecmp.weka.cc.

  12. Compositional features are potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression of tumor suppressor genes in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Khoshnevisan, Atefeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2014-12-15

    Different mechanisms regulate the expression level of tissue specific genes in human. Here we report some compositional features such as codon usage bias, amino acid usage bias, codon frequency, and base composition which may be potentially related to mRNA amount of tissue specific tumor suppressor genes. Our findings support the possibility that structural elements in gene and protein may play an important role in the regulation of tumor suppressor genes, development, and tumorigenesis. The data presented here can open broad vistas in the understanding and treatment of a variety of human malignancies.

  13. Secretomics identifies Fusarium graminearum proteins involved in the interaction with barley and wheat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fen; Jensen, Jens D; Svensson, Birte; Jørgensen, Hans J L; Collinge, David B; Finnie, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a phytopathogenic fungus primarily infecting small grain cereals, including barley and wheat. Secreted enzymes play important roles in the pathogenicity of many fungi. In order to access the secretome of F. graminearum, the fungus was grown in liquid culture with barley or wheat flour as the sole nutrient source to mimic the host-pathogen interaction. A gel-based proteomics approach was employed to identify the proteins secreted into the culture medium. Sixty-nine unique fungal proteins were identified in 154 protein spots, including enzymes involved in the degradation of cell walls, starch and proteins. Of these proteins, 35% had not been identified in previous in planta or in vitro studies, 70% were predicted to contain signal peptides and a further 16% may be secreted in a nonclassical manner. Proteins identified in the 72 spots showing differential appearance between wheat and barley flour medium were mainly involved in fungal cell wall remodelling and the degradation of plant cell walls, starch and proteins. The in planta expression of corresponding F. graminearum genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in barley and wheat spikelets harvested at 2-6 days after inoculation. In addition, a clear difference in the accumulation of fungal biomass and the extent of fungal-induced proteolysis of plant β-amylase was observed in barley and wheat. The present study considerably expands the current database of F. graminearum secreted proteins which may be involved in Fusarium head blight.

  14. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Lukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane.

  15. Neuron membrane trafficking and protein kinases involved in autism and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Minami, Akari; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Matsuda, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT). AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  16. [Experience in simulating the structural and dynamic features of small proteins using table supercomputers].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'ev, M S; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Khechinashvili, N N; Samchenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the structural and dynamic features of peptides and small proteins have been presented that were carried out by quantum chemical and molecular dynamics methods in high-performance graphic stations, "table supercomputers", using distributed calculations by the CUDA technology. PMID:22279747

  17. [Experience in simulating the structural and dynamic features of small proteins using table supercomputers].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'ev, M S; Kabanov, A V; Komarov, V M; Khechinashvili, N N; Samchenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the structural and dynamic features of peptides and small proteins have been presented that were carried out by quantum chemical and molecular dynamics methods in high-performance graphic stations, "table supercomputers", using distributed calculations by the CUDA technology.

  18. Self protein-protein interactions are involved in TPPP/p25 mediated microtubule bundling

    PubMed Central

    DeBonis, Salvatore; Neumann, Emmanuelle; Skoufias, Dimitrios A.

    2015-01-01

    TPPP/p25 is a microtubule-associated protein, detected in protein inclusions associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion analysis data show that TPPP/p25 has two microtubule binding sites, both located in intrinsically disordered domains, one at the N-terminal and the other in the C-terminal domain. In copolymerization assays the full-length protein exhibits microtubule stimulation and bundling activity. In contrast, at the same ratio relative to tubulin, truncated forms of TPPP/p25 exhibit either lower or no microtubule stimulation and no bundling activity, suggesting a cooperative phenomenon which is enhanced by the presence of the two binding sites. The binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminally truncated proteins to taxol-stabilized microtubules are similar to the full-length protein. However, the C-terminally truncated TPPP/p25 shows a lower Bmax for microtubule binding, suggesting that it may bind to a site of tubulin that is masked in microtubules. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays in cells expressing combinations of various TPPP/p25 fragments, but not that of the central folded domain, resulted in the generation of a fluorescence signal colocalized with perinuclear microtubule bundles insensitive to microtubule inhibitors. The data suggest that the central folded domain of TPPP/p25 following binding to microtubules can drive s homotypic protein-protein interactions leading to bundled microtubules. PMID:26289831

  19. Binding of Y-box proteins to RNA: involvement of different protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ladomery, M; Sommerville, J

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic Y-box proteins are reported to interact with a wide variety of nucleic acid structures to act as transcription factors and mRNA masking proteins. The modular structure of Y-box proteins includes a highly conserved N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD, equivalent to the bacterial cold-shock proteins) plus four basic C-terminal domains containing arginine clusters and aromatic residues. In addition, the basic domains are separated by acidic regions which contain several potential sites for serine/threonine phosphorylation. The interaction of Y-box proteins, isolated from Xenopus oocytes (FRGY2 type), with RNA molecules has been studied by UV crosslinking and protein fragmentation. We have identified two distinct binding activities. The CSD interacts preferentially with the polypurines poly(A,G) and poly(G) but not poly(A), this activity being sensitive to 5 mM MgCl2 but not to 5 mM spermidine. In the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 or 1 mM spermidine, the basic domains interact preferentially with poly(C,U), this activity being sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl. Binding of the basic domains is also sensitive to low concentrations of heparin. The basic domains can be crosslinked individually to labelled RNA. These results are discussed with reference to the various specificities noted in the binding of Y-box proteins to RNA and DNA. Images PMID:7530842

  20. FeatureMap3D--a tool to map protein features and sequence conservation onto homologous structures in the PDB.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Staerfeldt, Hans-Henrik; Sackett, Peter Wad; Mølgaard, Anne

    2006-07-01

    FeatureMap3D is a web-based tool that maps protein features onto 3D structures. The user provides sequences annotated with any feature of interest, such as post-translational modifications, protease cleavage sites or exonic structure and FeatureMap3D will then search the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for structures of homologous proteins. The results are displayed both as an annotated sequence alignment, where the user-provided annotations as well as the sequence conservation between the query and the target sequence are displayed, and also as a publication-quality image of the 3D protein structure with the selected features and sequence conservation enhanced. The results are also returned in a readily parsable text format as well as a PyMol (http://pymol.sourceforge.net/) script file, which allows the user to easily modify the protein structure image to suit a specific purpose. FeatureMap3D can also be used without sequence annotation, to evaluate the quality of the alignment of the input sequences to the most homologous structures in the PDB, through the sequence conservation colored 3D structure visualization tool. FeatureMap3D is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/FeatureMap3D/. PMID:16845115

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mice corneal tissues reveals angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minqian; Tao, Yimin; Feng, Yifan; Liu, Xing; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced in Balb/c mice by alkali burns in the central area of the cornea with a diameter of 2.5mm. After fourteen days, the cornea from one eye was collected for histological staining for CNV examination, while the cornea from the other eye of the same mouse was harvested for proteomic analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach was applied to analyze five normal corneal tissues (normal group mice n=5) and five corresponding neovascularized corneal tissues (model group mice n=5). A total of 2124 proteins were identified, and 1682 proteins were quantified from these corneal tissues. Among these quantified proteins, 290 proteins were significantly changed between normal and alkali burned corneal tissues. Of these significantly changed proteins, 35 were reported or predicted as angiogenesis-related proteins. Then, these 35 proteins were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software, resulting in 26 proteins enriched and connected to each other in the protein-protein interaction network, such as Lcn-2, αB-crystallin and Serpinf1 (PEDF). These three significantly changed proteins were selected for further Western blotting validation. Consistent with the quantitative proteomic results, Western blotting showed that Lcn-2 and αB-crystallin were significantly up-regulated in CNV model, while PEDF was down-regulated. This study provided increased understanding of angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal vascular development, which will be useful in the ophthalmic clinic of specifically target angiogenesis.

  2. A mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction approaches for protein fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Lyons, James; Paliwal, Kuldip K; Sattar, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancement in the pattern recognition field stimulates enormous interest in Protein Fold Recognition (PFR). PFR is considered as a crucial step towards protein structure prediction and drug design. Despite all the recent achievements, the PFR still remains as an unsolved issue in biological science and its prediction accuracy still remains unsatisfactory. Furthermore, the impact of using a wide range of physicochemical-based attributes on the PFR has not been adequately explored. In this study, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction methods based on the concepts of segmented distribution and density. We also explore the impact of 55 different physicochemical-based attributes on the PFR. Our results show that by providing more local discriminatory information as well as obtaining benefit from both physicochemical and evolutionary-based features simultaneously, we can enhance the protein fold prediction accuracy up to 5% better than previously reported results found in the literature.

  3. Protein kinase C is involved in the regulation of several calreticulin posttranslational modifications.

    PubMed

    Cristina Castañeda-Patlán, M; Razo-Paredes, Roberto; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; Robles-Flores, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone that affects many cellular functions both inside and outside the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. We previously reported that calreticulin interacts with several protein kinase C isozymes both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular determinants involved in the association between these proteins and the biochemical significance of their interaction. Using full-length or CRT-domain constructs expressed as GST-fusion proteins, we found that protein kinase C binds to the CRT N domain in overlay and pull-down assays. Phosphorylation experiments showed that only this CRT domain is phosphorylated by the kinase. Lectin blot analysis demonstrated that CRT is modified by N-glycosylation, but this modification did not affect its interaction with protein kinase C. We also demonstrated that although both domains of protein kinase C theta can bind to CRT, it is the catalytic one that binds with higher affinity to CRT. Immunofluorescence studies showed that CRT and PKC co-localize mainly at the ER (estimated in 35%). Activation of protein kinase C induced caused transient changes in CRT localization, and unexpectedly, also induced changes in posttranslational modifications found in the protein: CRT N-glycosylation is abolished, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation and O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine modification are increased. Together, these findings suggest that protein kinase C is involved in the regulation of CRT function. PMID:19800981

  4. Exocyst Sec10 is Involved in Basolateral Protein Translation and Translocation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly-made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane, consists of three main subunits, Sec61α, β, and γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others showed that the highly-conserved eight protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We also showed that the exocyst was involved in basolateral, and not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery was reported. Furthermore, we showed that the exocyst was necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. Methods GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic ER microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and 35S-methionine for protein detection, were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P32-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate the Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Results Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced recruitment to ER membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral VSVG protein translation, compared to apical HA protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. Conclusion These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. PMID:23037926

  5. Autophagy-linked FYVE protein (Alfy) promotes autophagic removal of misfolded proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Han, Huihui; Wei, Wanyi; Duan, Weisong; Guo, Yansu; Li, Yi; Wang, Jie; Bi, Yue; Li, Chunyan

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy-linked FYVE (Alfy) is a protein implicated in the selective degradation of aggregated proteins. In our present study, we found that Alfy was recruited into the aggregated G93A-SOD1 in transgenic mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We demonstrated that Alfy overexpression could decrease the expression of mutant proteins via the autophagosome-lysosome pathway, and thereby, the toxicity of mutant proteins was reduced. The clearance of the mutant proteins in NSC34 cells was significantly inhibited in an Alfy knockdown cellular model. We therefore deduced that Alfy translocalization likely is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. Alfy may be developed into a useful target for ALS therapy.

  6. Cloning of two sea urchin DNA-binding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Megli, Fiammetta; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Roberti, Marina

    2002-03-01

    The cloning of the cDNA for two mitochondrial proteins involved in sea urchin mtDNA replication and transcription is reported here. The cDNA for the mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has been cloned by a polymerase chain reaction-based approach. The protein displays a very high similarity with the Paracentrotus lividus homologue as it contains also the two leucine zipper-like domains which are thought to be involved in intramolecular interactions needed to expose the two DNA binding domains in the correct position for contacting DNA. The cDNA for the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB) from P. lividus has been also cloned by a similar approach. The precursor protein is 146 amino acids long with a presequence of 16 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the highest homology with the Xenopus laevis protein and the lowest with the Drosophila mtSSB. The computer modeling of the tertiary structure of P. lividus mtSSB shows a structure very similar to that experimentally determined for human mtSSB, with the conservation of the main residues involved in protein tetramerization and in DNA binding.

  7. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus - the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  8. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  9. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin "Shatangju" fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca(2+) signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca(2+) signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism. PMID:27303420

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Involved in Peel Senescence in Harvested Mandarin Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Taotao; Zhang, Jingying; Zhu, Hong; Qu, Hongxia; You, Shulin; Duan, Xuewu; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), a non-climacteric fruit, is an economically important fruit worldwide. The mechanism underlying senescence of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. In this study, a gel-based proteomic study followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was carried out to investigate the proteomic changes involved in peel senescence in harvested mandarin “Shatangju” fruit stored for 18 days. Over the course of the storage period, the fruit gradually senesced, accompanied by a decreased respiration rate and increased chlorophyll degradation and disruption of membrane integrity. Sixty-three proteins spots that showed significant differences in abundance were identified. The up-regulated proteins were mainly associated with cell wall degradation, lipid degradation, protein degradation, senescence-related transcription factors, and transcription-related proteins. In contrast, most proteins associated with ATP synthesis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were significantly down-regulated during peel senescence. Three thioredoxin proteins and three Ca2+ signaling-related proteins were significantly up-regulated during peel senescence. It is suggested that mandarin peel senescence is associated with energy supply efficiency, decreased antioxidant capability, and increased protein and lipid degradation. In addition, activation of Ca2+ signaling and transcription factors might be involved in cell wall degradation and primary or secondary metabolism. PMID:27303420

  12. Simple topological features reflect dynamics and modularity in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Pritykin, Yuri; Singh, Mona

    2013-01-01

    The availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction networks for numerous organisms provides an opportunity to comprehensively analyze whether simple properties of proteins are predictive of the roles they play in the functional organization of the cell. We begin by re-examining an influential but controversial characterization of the dynamic modularity of the S. cerevisiae interactome that incorporated gene expression data into network analysis. We analyse the protein-protein interaction networks of five organisms, S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana, and E. coli, and confirm significant and consistent functional and structural differences between hub proteins that are co-expressed with their interacting partners and those that are not, and support the view that the former tend to be intramodular whereas the latter tend to be intermodular. However, we also demonstrate that in each of these organisms, simple topological measures are significantly correlated with the average co-expression of a hub with its partners, independent of any classification, and therefore also reflect protein intra- and inter- modularity. Further, cross-interactomic analysis demonstrates that these simple topological characteristics of hub proteins tend to be conserved across organisms. Overall, we give evidence that purely topological features of static interaction networks reflect aspects of the dynamics and modularity of interactomes as well as previous measures incorporating expression data, and are a powerful means for understanding the dynamic roles of hubs in interactomes. PMID:24130468

  13. Computer-based comparison of structural features of envelope protein of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus with the homologous proteins of two closest viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was prediction of epitopes and medically important structural properties of protein E of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) and comparing these features with two closely relates viruses, i.e. Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by bioinformatics tools. Prediction of evolutionary distance, localization, sequence of signal peptides, C, N O glycosylation sites, transmembrane helices (TMHs), cysteine bond positions and B cell and T cell epitopes of E proteins were performed. 2D-MH, Virus-PLoc, Signal-CF, EnsembleGly, MemBrain, DiANNA, BCPREDS and MHCPred servers were applied for the prediction. According to the results, the evolutionary distance of E protein of AHFV and two other viruses was almost equal. In all three proteins of study, residues 1-35 were predicted as signal sequences and one asparagine was predicted to be glycosylated. Results of prediction of transmembrane helices showed one TMH at position 444-467 and the other one at position 476-490. Twelve cysteines were potentially involved to form six disulfide bridges in the proteins. Four parts were predicted as B cell epitopes in E protein of AHFV. One epitope was conserved between three proteins of study. The only conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding epitope between three viruses was for DRB0401 allele. As there are not much experimental data available about AHFV, computer-aided study and comparison of E protein of this virus with two closely related flaviviruses can help in better understanding of medical properties of the virus.

  14. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  15. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L.; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G.; Souza, Ana O.; Gaspari, Priscyla M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis—isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle—were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  16. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Souza, Ana O; Gaspari, Priscyla M; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis-isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle-were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  17. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Souza, Ana O; Gaspari, Priscyla M; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis-isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle-were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  18. Monte Carlo Modeling of Spectral Diffusion Employing Multiwell Protein Energy Landscapes: Application to Pigment-Protein Complexes Involved in Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mehdi; Zazubovich, Valter

    2015-06-25

    We are reporting development and initial applications of the light-induced and thermally induced spectral diffusion modeling software, covering nonphotochemical spectral hole burning (NPHB), hole recovery, and single-molecule spectroscopy and involving random generation of the multiwell protein energy landscapes. The model includes tunneling and activated barrier-hopping in both ground and excited states of a protein-chromophore system. Evolution of such a system is predicted by solving the system of rate equations. Using the barrier parameters from the range typical for the energy landscapes of the pigment-protein complexes involved in photosynthesis, we (a) show that realistic cooling of the sample must result in proteins quite far from thermodynamic equilibrium, (b) demonstrate hole evolution in the cases of burning, fixed-temperature recovery and thermocycling that mostly agrees with the experiment and modeling based on the NPHB master equation, and (c) explore the effects of different protein energy landscapes on the antihole shape. Introducing the multiwell energy landscapes and starting the hole burning experiments in realistic nonequilibrium conditions are not sufficient to explain all experimental observations even qualitatively. Therefore, for instance, one is required to invoke the modified NPHB mechanism where a complex interplay of several small conformational changes is poising the energy landscape of the pigment-protein system for downhill tunneling.

  19. The Deceptively Simple N170 Reflects Network Information Processing Mechanisms Involving Visual Feature Coding and Transfer Across Hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Robin A. A.; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Gross, Joachim; Panzeri, Stefano; van Rijsbergen, Nicola J.; Rousselet, Guillaume A.; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    A key to understanding visual cognition is to determine “where”, “when”, and “how” brain responses reflect the processing of the specific visual features that modulate categorization behavior—the “what”. The N170 is the earliest Event-Related Potential (ERP) that preferentially responds to faces. Here, we demonstrate that a paradigmatic shift is necessary to interpret the N170 as the product of an information processing network that dynamically codes and transfers face features across hemispheres, rather than as a local stimulus-driven event. Reverse-correlation methods coupled with information-theoretic analyses revealed that visibility of the eyes influences face detection behavior. The N170 initially reflects coding of the behaviorally relevant eye contralateral to the sensor, followed by a causal communication of the other eye from the other hemisphere. These findings demonstrate that the deceptively simple N170 ERP hides a complex network information processing mechanism involving initial coding and subsequent cross-hemispheric transfer of visual features. PMID:27550865

  20. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model. PMID:27763556

  1. A simple feature construction method for predicting upstream/downstream signal flow in human protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways play important roles in understanding the underlying mechanism of cell growth, cell apoptosis, organismal development and pathways-aberrant diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are commonly-used infrastructure to infer signaling pathways. However, PPI networks generally carry no information of upstream/downstream relationship between interacting proteins, which retards our inferring the signal flow of signaling pathways. In this work, we propose a simple feature construction method to train a SVM (support vector machine) classifier to predict PPI upstream/downstream relations. The domain based asymmetric feature representation naturally embodies domain-domain upstream/downstream relations, providing an unconventional avenue to predict the directionality between two objects. Moreover, we propose a semantically interpretable decision function and a macro bag-level performance metric to satisfy the need of two-instance depiction of an interacting protein pair. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves satisfactory cross validation performance and independent test performance. Lastly, we use the trained model to predict the PPIs in HPRD, Reactome and IntAct. Some predictions have been validated against recent literature. PMID:26648121

  2. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  3. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  4. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-14

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  5. Mammalian antimicrobial proteins and peptides: overview on the RNase A superfamily members involved in innate host defence.

    PubMed

    Boix, Ester; Nogués, M Victòria

    2007-05-01

    The review starts with a general outlook of the main mechanisms of action of antimicrobial proteins and peptides, with the final aim of understanding the biological function of antimicrobial RNases, and identifying the key events that account for their selective properties. Although most antibacterial proteins and peptides do display a wide-range spectrum of action, with a cytotoxic activity against bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses, we have only focused on their bactericidal activity. We start with a detailed description of the main distinctive structural features of the bacteria target and on the polypeptides, which act as selective host defence weapons.Following, we include an overview of all the current available information on the mammalian RNases which display an antimicrobial activity. There is a wealth of information on the structural, catalytic mechanism and evolutionary relationships of the RNase A superfamily. The bovine pancreatic RNase A (RNase A), the reference member of the mammalian RNase family, has been the main research object of several Nobel laureates in the 60s, 70s and 80s. A potential antimicrobial function was only recently suggested for several members of this family. In fact, the recent evolutionary studies indicate that this protein family may have started off with a host defence function. Antimicrobial RNases constitute an interesting example of proteins involved in the mammalian innate immune defence system. Besides, there is wealth of available information on the mechanism of action of short antimicrobial peptides, but little is known on larger polypeptides, that is, on proteins. Therefore, the identification of the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial RNases would contribute to the understanding of the proteins involved in the innate immunity.

  6. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  7. Hydrophobic effect in protein folding and other noncovalent processes involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Spolar, R S; Ha, J H; Record, M T

    1989-01-01

    Large negative standard heat capacity changes (delta CP degree much less than 0) are the hallmark of processes that remove nonpolar surface from water, including the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to a nonaqueous phase and the folding, aggregation/association, and ligand-binding reactions of proteins [Sturtevant, J. M. (1977) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 2236-2240]. More recently, Baldwin [Baldwin, R. L. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8069-8072] proposed that the delta CP degree of protein folding could be used to quantify the contribution of the burial of nonpolar surface (the hydrophobic effect) to the stability of a globular protein. We demonstrate that identical correlations between the delta CP degree and the change in water-accessible nonpolar surface area (delta Anp) are obtained for both the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to the pure liquid phase and the folding of small globular proteins: delta CP degree/delta Anp = -(0.28 +/- 0.05) (where delta Anp is expressed in A2 and delta CP degree is expressed in cal.mol-1.K-1; 1 cal = 4.184 J). The fact that these correlations are identical validates the proposals by both Sturtevant and Baldwin that the hydrophobic effect is in general the dominant contributor to delta CP degree and provides a straightforward means of estimating the contribution of the hydrophobic driving force (delta Ghyd degree) to the standard free energy change of a noncovalent process characterized by a large negative delta CP degree in the physiological temperature range: delta Ghyd degree congruent to (80 +/- 10)delta CP degree. PMID:2813394

  8. Sequence-only evolutionary and predicted structural features for the prediction of stability changes in protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even a single amino acid substitution in a protein sequence may result in significant changes in protein stability, structure, and therefore in protein function as well. In the post-genomic era, computational methods for predicting stability changes from only the sequence of a protein are of importance. While evolutionary relationships of protein mutations can be extracted from large protein databases holding millions of protein sequences, relevant evolutionary features for the prediction of stability changes have not been proposed. Also, the use of predicted structural features in situations when a protein structure is not available has not been explored. Results We proposed a number of evolutionary and predicted structural features for the prediction of stability changes and analysed which of them capture the determinants of protein stability the best. We trained and evaluated our machine learning method on a non-redundant data set of experimentally measured stability changes. When only the direction of the stability change was predicted, we found that the best performance improvement can be achieved by the combination of the evolutionary features mutation likelihood and SIFTscore in conjunction with the predicted structural feature secondary structure. The same two evolutionary features in the combination with the predicted structural feature accessible surface area achieved the lowest error when the prediction of actual values of stability changes was assessed. Compared to similar studies, our method achieved improvements in prediction performance. Conclusion Although the strongest feature for the prediction of stability changes appears to be the vector of amino acid identities in the sequential neighbourhood of the mutation, the most relevant combination of evolutionary and predicted structural features further improves prediction performance. Even the predicted structural features, which did not perform well on their own, turn out to be beneficial

  9. The TSG101 protein binds to connexins and is involved in connexin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, Tanja Schlueter, Sharazad; Urschel, Stephanie; Kussmann, Petra; Sonntag, Stephan; Hoeher, Thorsten; Kreuzberg, Maria M.; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Willecke, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Gap junctions mediate electrical and metabolic communication between cells in almost all tissues and are proposed to play important roles in cellular growth control, differentiation and embryonic development. Gap junctional communication and channel assembly were suggested to be regulated by interaction of connexins with different proteins including kinases and phosphatases. Here, we identified the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) protein to bind to the carboxyterminal tail of connexin45 in a yeast two-hybrid protein interaction screen. Glutathione S-transferase pull down experiments and immunoprecipitation revealed that not only connexin45 but also connexin30.2, -36, and -43 carboxyterminal regions were associated with TSG101 protein in pull down analyses and that connexin31, -43 and -45 co-precipitate with endogenous TSG101 protein in lysates from HM1 embryonic stem cells. TSG101 has been shown to be involved in cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation and turnover of endocytosed proteins. Thus, we decided to study the functional role of this interaction. SiRNA mediated knock down of TSG101 in HM1 embryonic stem cells led to increased levels of connexin43 and -45, prolonged half life of these connexins and increased transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Our results suggest that TSG101 is involved in the degradation of connexins via interaction with connexin proteins.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals proteins putatively involved in toxin biosynthesis in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Gao, Yue; Lin, Lin; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2013-01-22

    Alexandrium is a neurotoxin-producing dinoflagellate genus resulting in paralytic shellfish poisonings around the world. However, little is known about the toxin biosynthesis mechanism in Alexandrium. This study compared protein profiles of A. catenella collected at different toxin biosynthesis stages (non-toxin synthesis, initial toxin synthesis and toxin synthesizing) coupled with the cell cycle, and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that toxin biosynthesis of A. catenella occurred within a defined time frame in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Proteomic analysis indicated that 102 protein spots altered significantly in abundance (P < 0.05), and 53 proteins were identified using database searching. These proteins were involved in a variety of biological processes, i.e., protein modification and biosynthesis, metabolism, cell division, oxidative stress, transport, signal transduction, and translation. Among them, nine proteins with known functions in paralytic shellfish toxin-producing cyanobacteria, i.e., methionine S-adenosyltransferase, chloroplast ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, S-adenosylhomocysteinase, adenosylhomocysteinase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, sulfotransferase (similar to), alcohol dehydrogenase and arginine deiminase, varied significantly at different toxin biosynthesis stages and formed an interaction network, indicating that they might be involved in toxin biosynthesis in A. catenella. This study is the first step in the dissection of the behavior of the A. catenella proteome during different toxin biosynthesis stages and provides new insights into toxin biosynthesis in dinoflagellates.

  11. Olive seed protein bodies store degrading enzymes involved in mobilization of oil bodies

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-García, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The major seed storage reserves in oilseeds are accumulated in protein bodies and oil bodies, and serve as an energy, carbon, and nitrogen source during germination. Here, the spatio-temporal relationships between protein bodies and several key enzymes (phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase) involved in storage lipid mobilization in cotyledon cells was analysed during in vitro seed germination. Enzyme activities were assayed in-gel and their cellular localization were determined using microscopy techniques. At seed maturity, phospholipase A and triacylglycerol lipase activities were found exclusively in protein bodies. However, after seed imbibition, these activities were shifted to the cytoplasm and the surface of the oil bodies. The activity of neutral lipases was detected by using α-naphthyl palmitate and it was associated mainly with protein bodies during the whole course of germination. This pattern of distribution was highly similar to the localization of neutral lipids, which progressively appeared in protein bodies. Lipoxygenase activity was found in both the protein bodies and on the surface of the oil bodies during the initial phase of seed germination. The association of lipoxygenase with oil bodies was temporally correlated with the appearance of phospholipase A and lipase activities on the surface of oil bodies. It is concluded that protein bodies not only serve as simple storage structures, but are also dynamic and multifunctional organelles directly involved in storage lipid mobilization during olive seed germination. PMID:24170742

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Proteins Putatively Involved in Toxin Biosynthesis in the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Gao, Yue; Lin, Lin; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Alexandrium is a neurotoxin-producing dinoflagellate genus resulting in paralytic shellfish poisonings around the world. However, little is known about the toxin biosynthesis mechanism in Alexandrium. This study compared protein profiles of A. catenella collected at different toxin biosynthesis stages (non-toxin synthesis, initial toxin synthesis and toxin synthesizing) coupled with the cell cycle, and identified differentially expressed proteins using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results showed that toxin biosynthesis of A. catenella occurred within a defined time frame in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Proteomic analysis indicated that 102 protein spots altered significantly in abundance (P < 0.05), and 53 proteins were identified using database searching. These proteins were involved in a variety of biological processes, i.e., protein modification and biosynthesis, metabolism, cell division, oxidative stress, transport, signal transduction, and translation. Among them, nine proteins with known functions in paralytic shellfish toxin-producing cyanobacteria, i.e., methionine S-adenosyltransferase, chloroplast ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, S-adenosylhomocysteinase, adenosylhomocysteinase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, sulfotransferase (similar to), alcohol dehydrogenase and arginine deiminase, varied significantly at different toxin biosynthesis stages and formed an interaction network, indicating that they might be involved in toxin biosynthesis in A. catenella. This study is the first step in the dissection of the behavior of the A. catenella proteome during different toxin biosynthesis stages and provides new insights into toxin biosynthesis in dinoflagellates. PMID:23340676

  13. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  14. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  15. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  16. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  17. Application of intelligent techniques for classification of bacteria using protein sequence-derived features.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit Kumar; Ravi, Vadlamani; Murty, U S N; Sengupta, Neelava; Karuna, Batepatti

    2013-07-01

    Standard molecular experimental methodologies and mathematical procedures often fail to answer many phylogeny and classification related issues. Modern artificial intelligent-based techniques, such as radial basis function, genetic algorithm, artificial neural network, and support vector machines are of ample potential in this regard. Reliance on a large number of essential parameters will aid in enhanced robustness, reliability, and better accuracy as opposed to single molecular parameter. This study was conducted with dataset of computed protein physicochemical properties belonging to 20 different bacterial genera. A total of 57 sequential and structural parameters derived from protein sequences were considered for the initial classification. Feature selection based techniques were employed to find out the most important features influencing the dataset. Various amino acids, hydrophobicity, relative sulfur percentage, and codon number were selected as important parameters during the study. Comparative analyses were performed applying RapidMiner data mining platform. Support vector machine proved to be the best method with maximum accuracy of more than 91%.

  18. A cellulose synthase-like protein involved in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbin; Chater, Keith F; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2008-07-01

    Cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like proteins, responsible for synthesizing beta-glucan-containing polysaccharides, play a fundamental role in cellular architectures, such as plant cell and tissue morphogenesis, bacterial biofilm formation, and fruiting-body development. However, the roles of the proteins involved in the developmental process are not well understood. Here, we report that a cellulose synthase-like protein (CslA(Sc)) in Streptomyces has a function in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation. The cslA(Sc) replacement mutant showed pleiotropic defects, including the severe delay of aerial-hyphal formation and altered cell wall morphology. Calcofluor white fluorescence analysis demonstrated that polysaccharide synthesis at hyphal tips was dependent on CslA(Sc). cslA(Sc) was constitutively transcribed, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein-CslA(Sc) fusion protein was mostly located at the hyphal tips. An extract enriched in morphogenetic chaplin proteins promoted formation of aerial hyphae by the mutant. Furthermore, a two-hybrid experiment indicated that the glycosyltransferase domain of CslA(Sc) interacted with the tropomyosin-like polarity-determining DivIVA protein, suggesting that the tip-located DivIVA governed tip recruitment of the CslA(Sc) membrane protein. These results imply that the cellulose synthase-like protein couples extracellular and cytoskeletal components functioning in tip growth and cell development. PMID:18487344

  19. A Cellulose Synthase-Like Protein Involved in Hyphal Tip Growth and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbin; Chater, Keith F.; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like proteins, responsible for synthesizing β-glucan-containing polysaccharides, play a fundamental role in cellular architectures, such as plant cell and tissue morphogenesis, bacterial biofilm formation, and fruiting-body development. However, the roles of the proteins involved in the developmental process are not well understood. Here, we report that a cellulose synthase-like protein (CslASc) in Streptomyces has a function in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation. The cslASc replacement mutant showed pleiotropic defects, including the severe delay of aerial-hyphal formation and altered cell wall morphology. Calcofluor white fluorescence analysis demonstrated that polysaccharide synthesis at hyphal tips was dependent on CslASc. cslASc was constitutively transcribed, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein-CslASc fusion protein was mostly located at the hyphal tips. An extract enriched in morphogenetic chaplin proteins promoted formation of aerial hyphae by the mutant. Furthermore, a two-hybrid experiment indicated that the glycosyltransferase domain of CslASc interacted with the tropomyosin-like polarity-determining DivIVA protein, suggesting that the tip-located DivIVA governed tip recruitment of the CslASc membrane protein. These results imply that the cellulose synthase-like protein couples extracellular and cytoskeletal components functioning in tip growth and cell development. PMID:18487344

  20. The surprising features of the TEAD4-Vgll1 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Mesrouze, Yannick; Hau, Jean Christophe; Erdmann, Dirk; Zimmermann, Catherine; Fontana, Patrizia; Schmelzle, Tobias; Chène, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size in animals, is altered in various human cancers. The TEAD transcription factors, the most downstream elements in this pathway, are regulated by different cofactors, such as the Vgll (vestigial-like) proteins. Having studied the interaction between Vgll1-derived peptides and human TEAD4, we show that, although it lacks a key secondary structure element required for tight binding by two other TEAD cofactors (YAP and TAZ), Vgll1-derived peptides bind to TEAD with nanomolar affinity. We identify a β-strand:loop:α-helix motif as the minimal Vgll binding site. Finally, we reveal an unexpected difference between mouse and human Vgll1-derived peptides.

  1. Combining features in a graphical model to predict protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Wierschin, Torsten; Wang, Keyu; Welter, Marlon; Waack, Stephan; Stanke, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Large efforts have been made in classifying residues as binding sites in proteins using machine learning methods. The prediction task can be translated into the computational challenge of assigning each residue the label binding site or non-binding site. Observational data comes from various possibly highly correlated sources. It includes the structure of the protein but not the structure of the complex. The model class of conditional random fields (CRFs) has previously successfully been used for protein binding site prediction. Here, a new CRF-approach is presented that models the dependencies of residues using a general graphical structure defined as a neighborhood graph and thus our model makes fewer independence assumptions on the labels than sequential labeling approaches. A novel node feature "change in free energy" is introduced into the model, which is then denoted by ΔF-CRF. Parameters are trained with an online large-margin algorithm. Using the standard feature class relative accessible surface area alone, the general graph-structure CRF already achieves higher prediction accuracy than the linear chain CRF of Li et al. ΔF-CRF performs significantly better on a large range of false positive rates than the support-vector-machine-based program PresCont of Zellner et al. on a homodimer set containing 128 chains. ΔF-CRF has a broader scope than PresCont since it is not constrained to protein subgroups and requires no multiple sequence alignment. The improvement is attributed to the advantageous combination of the novel node feature with the standard feature and to the adopted parameter training method.

  2. Identification of human protein complexes from local sub-graphs of protein-protein interaction network based on random forest with topological structure features.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Zhou, Xuan; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2012-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, one of the most important and challenging tasks is to identify protein complexes and further elucidate its molecular mechanisms in specific biological processes. Previous computational approaches usually identify protein complexes from protein interaction network based on dense sub-graphs and incomplete priori information. Additionally, the computational approaches have little concern about the biological properties of proteins and there is no a common evaluation metric to evaluate the performance. So, it is necessary to construct novel method for identifying protein complexes and elucidating the function of protein complexes. In this study, a novel approach is proposed to identify protein complexes using random forest and topological structure. Each protein complex is represented by a graph of interactions, where descriptor of the protein primary structure is used to characterize biological properties of protein and vertex is weighted by the descriptor. The topological structure features are developed and used to characterize protein complexes. Random forest algorithm is utilized to build prediction model and identify protein complexes from local sub-graphs instead of dense sub-graphs. As a demonstration, the proposed approach is applied to protein interaction data in human, and the satisfied results are obtained with accuracy of 80.24%, sensitivity of 81.94%, specificity of 80.07%, and Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.4087 in 10-fold cross-validation test. Some new protein complexes are identified, and analysis based on Gene Ontology shows that the complexes are likely to be true complexes and play important roles in the pathogenesis of some diseases. PCI-RFTS, a corresponding executable program for protein complexes identification, can be acquired freely on request from the authors.

  3. The promoter of filamentation (POF1) protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ATPase involved in the protein quality control process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene YCL047C, which has been renamed promoter of filamentation gene (POF1), has recently been described as a cell component involved in yeast filamentous growth. The objective of this work is to understand the molecular and biological function of this gene. Results Here, we report that the protein encoded by the POF1 gene, Pof1p, is an ATPase that may be part of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein quality control pathway. According to the results, Δpof1 cells showed increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, heat shock and protein unfolding agents, such as dithiothreitol and tunicamycin. Besides, the overexpression of POF1 suppressed the sensitivity of Δpct1, a strain that lacks a gene that encodes a phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, to heat shock. In vitro analysis showed, however, that the purified Pof1p enzyme had no cytidylyltransferase activity but does have ATPase activity, with catalytic efficiency comparable to other ATPases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of proteins (ERAD). Supporting these findings, co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed a physical interaction between Pof1p and Ubc7p (an ubiquitin conjugating enzyme) in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, the results strongly suggest that the biological function of Pof1p is related to the regulation of protein degradation. PMID:22204397

  4. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  5. Expression of proteins involved in host plant defense against greenbug infestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), has been recognized as a major pest of small grains, including sorghum and wheat. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in host plant defense against greenbug aphids, a proteomic analysis of greenbug-induced proteins in the seedlings of sorghum...

  6. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  7. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, novel proteins involved in developmental genome remodelling in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization. PMID:25397898

  8. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, novel proteins involved in developmental genome remodelling in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization.

  9. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, Novel Proteins Involved in Developmental Genome Remodelling in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C.; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization. PMID:25397898

  10. EXPERIMENT-GUIDED MOLECULAR MODELING OF PROTEIN-PROTEIN COMPLEXES INVOLVING GPCRS

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Experimental structure determination for G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and especially their complexes with protein and peptide ligands is at its infancy. In the absence of complex structures, molecular modeling and docking play a large role not only by providing a proper 3D context for interpretation of biochemical and biophysical data, but also by prospectively guiding experiments. Experimentally confirmed restraints may help improve the accuracy and information content of the computational models. Here we present a hybrid molecular modeling protocol that integrates heterogeneous experimental data with force field-based calculations in the stochastic global optimization of the conformations and relative orientations of binding partners. Some experimental data, such as pharmacophore-like chemical fields or disulfide-trapping restraints, can be seamlessly incorporated in the protocol, while other types of data are more useful at the stage of solution filtering. The protocol was successfully applied to modeling and design of a stable construct that resulted in crystallization of the first complex between a chemokine and its receptor. Examples from this work are used to illustrate the steps of the protocol. The utility of different types of experimental data for modeling and docking is discussed and caveats associated with data misinterpretation are highlighted. PMID:26260608

  11. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness. PMID:19401147

  12. Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new

  13. Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new

  14. Systematic phenotypic screen of Arabidopsis peroxisomal mutants identifies proteins involved in β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Hu, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic and multifunctional organelles essential to development. Plant peroxisomes accommodate a multitude of metabolic reactions, many of which are related to the β-oxidation of fatty acids or fatty acid-related metabolites. Recently, several dozens of novel peroxisomal proteins have been identified from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through in silico and experimental proteomic analyses followed by in vivo protein targeting validations. To determine the functions of these proteins, we interrogated their transfer DNA insertion mutants with a series of physiological, cytological, and biochemical assays to reveal peroxisomal deficiencies. Sugar dependence and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid response assays uncovered statistically significant phenotypes in β-oxidation-related processes in mutants for 20 of 27 genes tested. Additional investigations uncovered a subset of these mutants with abnormal seed germination, accumulation of oil bodies, and delayed degradation of long-chain fatty acids during early seedling development. Mutants for seven genes exhibited deficiencies in multiple assays, strongly suggesting the involvement of their gene products in peroxisomal β-oxidation and initial seedling growth. Proteins identified included isoforms of enzymes related to β-oxidation, such as acyl-CoA thioesterase2, acyl-activating enzyme isoform1, and acyl-activating enzyme isoform5, and proteins with functions previously unknown to be associated with β-oxidation, such as Indigoidine synthase A, Senescence-associated protein/B12D-related protein1, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and Unknown protein5. This multipronged phenotypic screen allowed us to reveal β-oxidation proteins that have not been discovered by single assay-based mutant screens and enabled the functional dissection of different isoforms of multigene families involved in β-oxidation. PMID:25253886

  15. Systematic phenotypic screen of Arabidopsis peroxisomal mutants identifies proteins involved in β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Hu, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic and multifunctional organelles essential to development. Plant peroxisomes accommodate a multitude of metabolic reactions, many of which are related to the β-oxidation of fatty acids or fatty acid-related metabolites. Recently, several dozens of novel peroxisomal proteins have been identified from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through in silico and experimental proteomic analyses followed by in vivo protein targeting validations. To determine the functions of these proteins, we interrogated their transfer DNA insertion mutants with a series of physiological, cytological, and biochemical assays to reveal peroxisomal deficiencies. Sugar dependence and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid response assays uncovered statistically significant phenotypes in β-oxidation-related processes in mutants for 20 of 27 genes tested. Additional investigations uncovered a subset of these mutants with abnormal seed germination, accumulation of oil bodies, and delayed degradation of long-chain fatty acids during early seedling development. Mutants for seven genes exhibited deficiencies in multiple assays, strongly suggesting the involvement of their gene products in peroxisomal β-oxidation and initial seedling growth. Proteins identified included isoforms of enzymes related to β-oxidation, such as acyl-CoA thioesterase2, acyl-activating enzyme isoform1, and acyl-activating enzyme isoform5, and proteins with functions previously unknown to be associated with β-oxidation, such as Indigoidine synthase A, Senescence-associated protein/B12D-related protein1, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and Unknown protein5. This multipronged phenotypic screen allowed us to reveal β-oxidation proteins that have not been discovered by single assay-based mutant screens and enabled the functional dissection of different isoforms of multigene families involved in β-oxidation.

  16. Structural Features and Chaperone Activity of the NudC Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Janczyk, Pawe; #322; #321; .; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-05-25

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the nud gene family that is involved in the maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF, whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates: NudC, NudC-like (NudCL), and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by structural genomics centers (i.e., NudCL and mouse NudCL2). All proteins share the same core CS domain characteristic of proteins acting either as cochaperones of Hsp90 or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit the aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins is able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies on the cellular functions of the NudC family.

  17. Hsp90 is involved in the regulation of cytosolic precursor protein abundance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Bodo; Röth, Sascha; Bublak, Daniela; Sommer, Manuel; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Cytosolic chaperones are involved in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis in general. Members of the families of heat stress proteins 70 (Hsp70) and 90 (Hsp90) assist the transport of preproteins to organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. In addition, Hsp70 was described to be involved in the degradation of chloroplast preproteins that accumulate in the cytosol. Because a similar function has not been established for Hsp90, we analyzed the influences of Hsp90 and Hsp70 on the protein abundance in the cellular context using an in vivo system based on mesophyll protoplasts. We observed a differential behavior of preproteins with respect to the cytosolic chaperone-dependent regulation. Some preproteins such as pOE33 show a high dependence on Hsp90, whereas the abundance of preproteins such as pSSU is more strongly dependent on Hsp70. The E3 ligase, C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (Chip), appears to have a more general role in the control of cytosolic protein abundance. We discuss why the different reaction modes are comparable with the cytosolic unfolded protein response. PMID:25619681

  18. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  19. PredictProtein—an open resource for online prediction of protein structural and functional features

    PubMed Central

    Yachdav, Guy; Kloppmann, Edda; Kajan, Laszlo; Hecht, Maximilian; Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Peter; Schafferhans, Andrea; Roos, Manfred; Bernhofer, Michael; Richter, Lothar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Bromberg, Yana; Schneider, Reinhard; Vriend, Gerrit; Sander, Chris; Ben-Tal, Nir; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    PredictProtein is a meta-service for sequence analysis that has been predicting structural and functional features of proteins since 1992. Queried with a protein sequence it returns: multiple sequence alignments, predicted aspects of structure (secondary structure, solvent accessibility, transmembrane helices (TMSEG) and strands, coiled-coil regions, disulfide bonds and disordered regions) and function. The service incorporates analysis methods for the identification of functional regions (ConSurf), homology-based inference of Gene Ontology terms (metastudent), comprehensive subcellular localization prediction (LocTree3), protein–protein binding sites (ISIS2), protein–polynucleotide binding sites (SomeNA) and predictions of the effect of point mutations (non-synonymous SNPs) on protein function (SNAP2). Our goal has always been to develop a system optimized to meet the demands of experimentalists not highly experienced in bioinformatics. To this end, the PredictProtein results are presented as both text and a series of intuitive, interactive and visually appealing figures. The web server and sources are available at http://ppopen.rostlab.org. PMID:24799431

  20. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server.

  1. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server. PMID:27660761

  2. Staphylococcal Major Autolysin (Atl) Is Involved in Excretion of Cytoplasmic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Pasztor, Linda; Ziebandt, Anne-Kathrin; Nega, Mulugeta; Schlag, Martin; Haase, Sabine; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Madlung, Johannes; Nordheim, Alfred; Heinrichs, David E.; Götz, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    Many microorganisms excrete typical cytoplasmic proteins into the culture supernatant. As none of the classical secretion systems appears to be involved, this type of secretion was referred to as “nonclassical protein secretion.” Here, we demonstrate that in Staphylococcus aureus the major autolysin plays a crucial role in release of cytoplasmic proteins. Comparative secretome analysis revealed that in the wild type S. aureus strain, 22 typical cytoplasmic proteins were excreted into the culture supernatant, although in the atl mutant they were significantly decreased. The presence or absence of prophages had little influence on the secretome pattern. In the atl mutant, secondary peptidoglycan hydrolases were increased in the secretome; the corresponding genes were transcriptionally up-regulated suggesting a compensatory mechanism for the atl mutation. Using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a cytoplasmic indicator enzyme, we showed that all clinical isolates tested excreted this protein. In the wall teichoic acid-deficient tagO mutant with its increased autolysis activity, GAPDH was excreted in even higher amounts than in the WT, confirming the importance of autolysis in excretion of cytoplasmic proteins. To answer the question of how discriminatory the excretion of cytoplasmic proteins is, we performed a two-dimensional PAGE of cytoplasmic proteins isolated from WT. Surprisingly, the most abundant proteins in the cytoplasm were not found in the secretome of the WT, suggesting that there exists a selection mechanism in the excretion of cytoplasmic proteins. As the major autolysin binds at the septum site, we assume that the proteins are preferentially released at and during septum formation. PMID:20847047

  3. Structure of astrotactin-2: a conserved vertebrate-specific and perforin-like membrane protein involved in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Tao; Harlos, Karl; Gilbert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate-specific proteins astrotactin-1 and 2 (ASTN-1 and ASTN-2) are integral membrane perforin-like proteins known to play critical roles in neurodevelopment, while ASTN-2 has been linked to the planar cell polarity pathway in hair cells. Genetic variations associated with them are linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders and other neurological pathologies, including an advanced onset of Alzheimer's disease. Here we present the structure of the majority endosomal region of ASTN-2, showing it to consist of a unique combination of polypeptide folds: a perforin-like domain, a minimal epidermal growth factor-like module, a unique form of fibronectin type III domain and an annexin-like domain. The perforin-like domain differs from that of other members of the membrane attack complex-perforin (MACPF) protein family in ways that suggest ASTN-2 does not form pores. Structural and biophysical data show that ASTN-2 (but not ASTN-1) binds inositol triphosphates, suggesting a mechanism for membrane recognition or secondary messenger regulation of its activity. The annexin-like domain is closest in fold to repeat three of human annexin V and similarly binds calcium, and yet shares no sequence homology with it. Overall, our structure provides the first atomic-resolution description of a MACPF protein involved in development, while highlighting distinctive features of ASTN-2 responsible for its activity. PMID:27249642

  4. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  5. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  6. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu Hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI(+)] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI(+)]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI(+)] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  7. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a Dual Functional Protein Involved in the Immune Response of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-01-01

    Insect gut immunity is the first line of defense against oral infection. Although a few immune-related molecules in insect intestine has been identified by genomics or proteomics approach with comparison to well-studied tissues, such as hemolymph or fat body, our knowledge about the molecular mechanism underlying the gut immunity which would involve a variety of unidentified molecules is still limited. To uncover additional molecules that might take part in pathogen recognition, signal transduction or immune regulation in insect intestine, a T7 phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut is constructed. By use of different ligands for biopanning, Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been selected. BmTCTP is produced in intestinal epithelial cells and released into the gut lumen. The protein level of BmTCTP increases at the early time points during oral microbial infection and declines afterwards. In vitro binding assay confirms its activity as a multi-ligand binding molecule and it can further function as an opsonin that promotes the phagocytosis of microorganisms. Moreover, it can induce the production of anti-microbial peptide via a signaling pathway in which ERK is required and a dynamic tyrosine phosphorylation of certain cytoplasmic membrane protein. Taken together, our results characterize BmTCTP as a dual-functional protein involved in both the cellular and the humoral immune response of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. PMID:23894441

  8. Protein sequences classification by means of feature extraction with substitution matrices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper deals with the preprocessing of protein sequences for supervised classification. Motif extraction is one way to address that task. It has been largely used to encode biological sequences into feature vectors to enable using well-known machine-learning classifiers which require this format. However, designing a suitable feature space, for a set of proteins, is not a trivial task. For this purpose, we propose a novel encoding method that uses amino-acid substitution matrices to define similarity between motifs during the extraction step. Results In order to demonstrate the efficiency of such approach, we compare several encoding methods using some machine learning classifiers. The experimental results showed that our encoding method outperforms other ones in terms of classification accuracy and number of generated attributes. We also compared the classifiers in term of accuracy. Results indicated that SVM generally outperforms the other classifiers with any encoding method. We showed that SVM, coupled with our encoding method, can be an efficient protein classification system. In addition, we studied the effect of the substitution matrices variation on the quality of our method and hence on the classification quality. We noticed that our method enables good classification accuracies with all the substitution matrices and that the variances of the obtained accuracies using various substitution matrices are slight. However, the number of generated features varies from a substitution matrix to another. Furthermore, the use of already published datasets allowed us to carry out a comparison with several related works. Conclusions The outcomes of our comparative experiments confirm the efficiency of our encoding method to represent protein sequences in classification tasks. PMID:20377887

  9. Cathepsin L is involved in proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-10-01

    Proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins is essential for the generation of a mature and fusogenic form of the F protein. Although many paramyxovirus F proteins are proteolytically processed by the cellular protease furin at a multibasic cleavage motif, cleavage of the newly emerged Hendra virus F protein occurs by a previously unidentified cellular protease following a single lysine at residue 109. We demonstrate here that the cellular protease cathepsin L is involved in converting the Hendra virus precursor F protein (F(0)) to the active F(1) + F(2) disulfide-linked heterodimer. To initially identify the class of protease involved in Hendra virus F protein cleavage, Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F or pCAGGS-SV5 F (known to be proteolytically processed by furin) were metabolically labeled and chased in the absence or presence of serine, cysteine, aspartyl, and metalloprotease inhibitors. Nonspecific and specific protease inhibitors known to decrease cathepsin activity inhibited proteolytic processing of Hendra virus F but had no effect on simian virus 5 F processing. We next designed shRNA oligonucleotides to cathepsin L which dramatically reduced cathepsin L protein expression and enzyme activity. Cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F demonstrated a nondetectable amount of cleavage of the Hendra virus F protein and significantly decreased membrane fusion activity. Additionally, we found that purified human cathepsin L processed immunopurified Hendra virus F(0) into F(1) and F(2) fragments. These studies introduce a novel mechanism for primary proteolytic processing of viral glycoproteins and also suggest a previously unreported biological role for cathepsin L.

  10. Protein interactions of MADS box transcription factors involved in flowering in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Stefano; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Frau, Marta; Tonaco, Isabella A Nougalli; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Klaus K; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of flowering time is best understood in the dicot model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Molecular analyses revealed that genes belonging to the MADS box transcription factor family play pivotal regulatory roles in both the vernalization- and photoperiod-regulated flowering pathways. Here the analysis of three APETALA1 (AP1)-like MADS box proteins (LpMADS1-3) and a SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP)-like MADS box protein (LpMADS10) from the monocot perennial grass species Lolium perenne is reported. Features of these MADS box proteins were studied by yeast two-hybrid assays. Protein-protein interactions among the Lolium proteins and with members of the Arabidopsis MADS box family have been studied. The expression pattern for LpMADS1 and the protein properties suggest that not the Arabidopsis AP1 gene, but the SUPPRESSOR OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) gene, is the functional equivalent of LpMADS1. To obtain insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of LpMADS1 gene expression in vernalization-sensitive and -insensitive Lolium accessions, the upstream sequences of this gene from a winter and spring growth habit variety were compared with respect to MADS box protein binding. In both promoter elements, a putative MADS box transcription factor-binding site (CArG-box) is present; however, the putative spring promoter has a short deletion adjacent to this DNA motif. Experiments using yeast one-hybrid and gel retardation assays demonstrated that the promoter element is bound by an LpMADS1-LpMADS10 higher order protein complex and, furthermore, that this complex binds efficiently to the promoter element from the winter variety only. This strongly supports the model that LpMADS1 together with LpMADS10 controls the vernalization-dependent regulation of the LpMADS1 gene, which is part of the vernalization-induced flowering process in Lolium. PMID:17005923

  11. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  12. Mammary collective cell migration involves transient loss of epithelial features and individual cell migration within the epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Andrew J.; Huebner, Robert J.; Palsdottir, Hildur; Lee, Jessie K.; Perez, Melissa J.; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Tauscher, Andrew N.; Cheung, Kevin J.; Werb, Zena; Auer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Normal mammary morphogenesis involves transitions between simple and multilayered epithelial organizations. We used electron microscopy and molecular markers to determine whether intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity were maintained in the multilayered epithelium. We found that multilayered elongating ducts had polarized apical and basal tissue surfaces both in three-dimensional culture and in vivo. However, individual cells were only polarized on surfaces in contact with the lumen or extracellular matrix. The basolateral marker scribble and the apical marker atypical protein kinase C zeta localized to all interior cell membranes, whereas PAR3 displayed a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that the apico-basal polarity was incomplete. Despite membrane localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin, we did not observe a defined zonula adherens connecting interior cells. Instead, interior cells were connected through desmosomes and exhibited complex interdigitating membrane protrusions. Single-cell labeling revealed that individual cells were both protrusive and migratory within the epithelial multilayer. Inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) further reduced intercellular adhesion on apical and lateral surfaces but did not disrupt basal tissue organization. Following morphogenesis, segregated membrane domains were re-established and junctional complexes re-formed. We observed similar epithelial organization during mammary morphogenesis in organotypic culture and in vivo. We conclude that mammary epithelial morphogenesis involves a reversible, spatially limited, reduction in polarity and intercellular junctions and active individualistic cell migration. Our data suggest that reductions in polarity and adhesion during breast cancer progression might reflect partial recapitulation of a normal developmental program. PMID:22344263

  13. Membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus involves homotrimers of the fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, J M; Bron, R; Wilschut, J; Garoff, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated fusion process of the alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The spike protein of SFV is composed of three copies of the protein heterodimer E2E1. This structure is resistant to solubilization in mild detergents such as Nonidet P-40 (NP40). We have recently shown that the spike structure is reorganized during virus entry into acidic endosomes (J. M. Wahlberg and H. Garoff, J. Cell Biol. 116:339-348, 1992). The original NP40-resistant heterodimer is dissociated, and the E1 subunits form new NP40-resistant protein oligomers. Here, we show that the new oligomer is represented by an E1 trimer. From studies that use an in vitro assay for fusion of SFV with liposomes, we show that the E1 trimer is efficiently expressed during virus-mediated membrane fusion. Time course studies show that both E1 trimer formation and fusion are fast processes, occurring in seconds. It was also possible to inhibit virus binding and fusion with a monoclonal antibody directed toward the trimeric E1. These results give support for a model in which the E1 trimeric structure is involved in the SFV-mediated fusion reaction. Images PMID:1433520

  14. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  15. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Lo, Allan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM) model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways yield a significant

  16. Prediction of phosphothreonine sites in human proteins by fusing different features

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-Wei; Lai, Hong-Yan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most important protein post-translation modifications. With the rapid development of high-throughput mass spectrometry, phosphorylation site data is rapidly accumulating, which provides us an opportunity to systematically investigate and predict phosphorylation in proteins. The phosphorylation of threonine is the addition of a phosphoryl group to its polar side chains group. In this work, we statistically analyzed the distribution of the different properties including position conservation, secondary structure, accessibility and some other physicochemical properties of the residues surrounding the phosphothreonine site and non-phosphothreonine site. We found that the distributions of those features are non-symmetrical. Based on the distribution of properties, we developed a new model by using optimal window size strategy and feature selection technique. The cross-validated results show that the area under receiver operating characteristic curve reaches to 0.847, suggesting that our model may play a complementary role to other existing methods for predicting phosphothreonine site in proteins. PMID:27698459

  17. Yeast prions and human prion-like proteins: sequence features and prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Cascarina, Sean M; Ross, Eric D

    2014-06-01

    Prions are self-propagating infectious protein isoforms. A growing number of prions have been identified in yeast, each resulting from the conversion of soluble proteins into an insoluble amyloid form. These yeast prions have served as a powerful model system for studying the causes and consequences of prion aggregation. Remarkably, a number of human proteins containing prion-like domains, defined as domains with compositional similarity to yeast prion domains, have recently been linked to various human degenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This suggests that the lessons learned from yeast prions may help in understanding these human diseases. In this review, we examine what has been learned about the amino acid sequence basis for prion aggregation in yeast, and how this information has been used to develop methods to predict aggregation propensity. We then discuss how this information is being applied to understand human disease, and the challenges involved in applying yeast prediction methods to higher organisms.

  18. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  19. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  20. Evolutionary Implications of Metal Binding Features in Different Species’ Prion Protein: An Inorganic Point of View

    PubMed Central

    La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Prion disorders are a group of fatal neurodegenerative conditions of mammals. The key molecular event in the pathogenesis of such diseases is the conformational conversion of prion protein, PrPC, into a misfolded form rich in β-sheet structure, PrPSc, but the detailed mechanistic aspects of prion protein conversion remain enigmatic. There is uncertainty on the precise physiological function of PrPC in healthy individuals. Several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ mainly through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. In addition to mammals, PrP homologues have also been identified in birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The globular domain of protein is retained in the different species, suggesting that the protein carries out an essential common function. However, the comparison of amino acid sequences indicates that prion protein has evolved differently in each vertebrate class. The primary sequences are strongly conserved in each group, but these exhibit a low similarity with those of mammals. The N-terminal domain of different prions shows tandem amino acid repeats with an increasing amount of histidine residues going from amphibians to mammals. The difference in the sequence affects the number of copper binding sites, the affinity and the coordination environment of metal ions, suggesting that the involvement of prion in metal homeostasis may be a specific characteristic of mammalian prion protein. In this review, we describe the similarities and the differences in the metal binding of different species’ prion protein, as revealed by studies carried out on the entire protein and related peptide fragments. PMID:24970230

  1. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock. PMID:24591057

  2. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock.

  3. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  4. Nuclear and cytoplasmic tau proteins from human nonneuronal cells share common structural and functional features with brain tau.

    PubMed

    Cross, D C; Muñoz, J P; Hernández, P; Maccioni, R B

    2000-05-01

    The heterogeneous family of tau proteins interacts with microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The tau isoforms have been shown to play a major role in neuronal polarity. However, tau-like proteins have been found in several other types of cells. Previous studies have also indicated the presence of a nuclear tau. The relationships between nuclear and cytoplasmic tau as well as the functional aspects of the nuclear tau are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using specific primers that a transcript with features of neuronal tau is present in human fibroblast and Huh-7 hepatoma cell lines. Additionally, we present the first isolation and characterization of cytosolic and nuclear tau-like proteins from nonneuronal cells. Nonneuronal cytosolic tau components were isolated using the perchloric acid precipitation approach, while nuclear tau was isolated after selective extractions using high-ionic strength buffers. The cytoplasmic tau of nonneuronal cells is composed of at least three isoforms, whereas two main isoforms were detected in nuclear tau. Interestingly, the cytoplasmic and nuclear tau components exhibited the capacity to promote tubulin polymerization in vitro. Immunofluorescence studies using monoclonal anti-tau antibodies indicated a discrete distribution of tau protein in both the interphase and mitotic nucleus. In the latter, tau colocalized with the chromosomal scaffold. These studies, together with previous evidence on tau roles in modulating microtubule growth from centrosomes, and its role in the interaction patterns that stabilize the integrity of the cytoskeletal network, strongly support the idea that tau is a multifunctional protein involved in fundamental cellular processes. PMID:10842324

  5. Differential role of molten globule and protein folding in distinguishing unique features of botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Kukreja, Roshan V; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal R

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are proteins of great interest not only because of their extreme toxicity but also paradoxically for their therapeutic applications. All the known serotypes (A-G) have varying degrees of longevity and potency inside the neuronal cell. Differential chemical modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination have been suggested as possible mechanisms for their longevity, but the molecular basis of the longevity remains unclear. Since the endopeptidase domain (light chain; LC) of toxin apparently survives inside the neuronal cells for months, it is important to examine the structural features of this domain to understand its resistance to intracellular degradation. Published crystal structures (both botulinum neurotoxins and endopeptidase domain) have not provided adequate explanation for the intracellular longevity of the domain. Structural features obtained from spectroscopic analysis of LCA and LCB were similar, and a PRIME (PReImminent Molten Globule Enzyme) conformation appears to be responsible for their optimal enzymatic activity at 37°C. LCE, on the other hand, was although optimally active at 37°C, but its active conformation differed from the PRIME conformation of LCA and LCB. This study establishes and confirms our earlier finding that an optimally active conformation of these proteins in the form of PRIME exists for the most poisonous poison, botulinum neurotoxin. There are substantial variations in the structural and functional characteristics of these active molten globule related structures among the three BoNT endopeptidases examined. These differential conformations of LCs are important in understanding the fundamental structural features of proteins, and their possible connection to intracellular longevity could provide significant clues for devising new countermeasures and effective therapeutics. PMID:24568862

  6. Fission yeast pkl1 is a kinesin-related protein involved in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, A L; LeDizet, M; Cande, W Z

    1996-01-01

    We have used anti-peptide antibodies raised against highly conserved regions of the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesin-related proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the identification of a new kinesin-related protein, which we have named pkl1. Sequence homology and domain organization place pkl1 in the Kar3/ncd subfamily of kinesin-related proteins. Bacterially expressed pkl1 fusion proteins display microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity, nucleotide-sensitive binding, and bundling of microtubules. Immunofluorescence studies with affinity-purified antibodies indicate that the pkl1 protein localizes to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle. Pkl1 null mutants are viable but have increased sensitivity to microtubule-disrupting drugs. Disruption of pkl1+ suppresses mutations in another kinesin-related protein, cut7, which is known to act in the spindle. Overexpression of pkl1 to very high levels causes a similar phenotype to that seen in cut7 mutants: V-shaped and star-shaped microtubule structures are observed, which we interpret to be spindles with unseparated spindle poles. These observations suggest that pkl1 and cut7 provide opposing forces in the spindle. We propose that pkl1 functions as a microtubule-dependent motor that is involved in microtubule organization in the mitotic spindle. Images PMID:8898367

  7. Hyperhomocysteinemia and bleomycin hydrolase modulate the expression of mouse brain proteins involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH) participates in Hcy metabolism and is also linked to AD. The inactivation of the Blmh gene in mice causes accumulation of Hcy-thiolactone in the brain and increases susceptibility to Hcy-thiolactone-induced seizures. To gain insight into brain-related Blmh function, we used two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry to examine brain proteomes of Blmh-/- mice and their Blmh+/+ littermates fed with a hyperhomocysteinemic high-Met or a control diet. We found that: (1) proteins involved in brain-specific function (Ncald, Nrgn, Stmn1, Stmn2), antioxidant defenses (Aop1), cell cycle (RhoGDI1, Ran), and cytoskeleton assembly (Tbcb, CapZa2) were differentially expressed in brains of Blmh-null mice; (2) hyperhomocysteinemia amplified effects of the Blmh-/- genotype on brain protein expression; (3) proteins involved in brain-specific function (Pebp1), antioxidant defenses (Sod1, Prdx2, DJ-1), energy metabolism (Atp5d, Ak1, Pgam-B), and iron metabolism (Fth) showed differential expression in Blmh-null brains only in hyperhomocysteinemic animals; (4) most proteins regulated by the Blmh-/- genotype were also regulated by high-Met diet, albeit in the opposite direction; and (5) the differentially expressed proteins play important roles in neural development, learning, plasticity, and aging and are linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Taken together, our findings suggest that Blmh interacts with diverse cellular processes from energy metabolism and anti-oxidative defenses to cell cycle, cytoskeleton dynamics, and synaptic plasticity essential for normal brain homeostasis and that modulation of these interactions by hyperhomocysteinemia underlies the involvement of Hcy in AD.

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens: iron-responsive proteins and their involvement in host infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-yuan; Sun, Li

    2015-04-17

    For pathogenic bacteria, the ability to acquire iron is vital to survival in the host. In consequence, many genes involved in iron acquisition are associated with bacterial virulence. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a bacterial pathogen to a variety of farmed fish. However, the global regulatory function of iron in pathogenic P. fluorescens is essentially unknown. In this study, in order to identify proteins affected by iron condition at the expression level, we performed proteomic analysis to compare the global protein profiles of P. fluorescens strain TSS, a fish pathogen, cultured under iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Twenty-two differentially expressed proteins were identified, most of which were confirmed to be regulated by iron at the mRNA level. To investigate their potential involvement in virulence, the genes encoding four of the 22 proteins, i.e. HemO (heme oxygenase), PspB (serine protease), Sod (superoxide dismutase), and TfeR (TonB-dependent outermembrane ferric enterobactin receptor), were knocked out, and the pathogenicity of the mutants was examined in a model of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). The results showed that compared to the wild type, the hemO, pspB, and tfeR knockouts were significantly impaired in the ability to survive in host serum, to invade host tissues, and to cause host mortality. Immunization of turbot with recombinant TfeR (rTfeR) and PspB induced production of specific serum antibodies and significant protections against lethal TSS challenge. Further analysis showed that rTfeR antibodies recognized and bound to TSS, and that treatment of TSS with rTfeR antibodies significantly impaired the infectivity of TSS to fish cells. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that in pathogenic P. fluorescens, iron affects the expression of a large number of proteins including those that are involved in host infection.

  9. The SERRATE protein is involved in alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Stepien, Agata; Kierzkowski, Daniel; Kalak, Malgorzata; Bajczyk, Mateusz; McNicol, Jim; Simpson, Craig G.; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Brown, John W. S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    How alternative splicing (AS) is regulated in plants has not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that the nuclear cap-binding protein complex (AtCBC) is involved in AS in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that both subunits of AtCBC (AtCBP20 and AtCBP80) interact with SERRATE (AtSE), a protein involved in the microRNA biogenesis pathway. Moreover, using a high-resolution reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction AS system we have found that AtSE influences AS in a similar way to the cap-binding complex (CBC), preferentially affecting selection of 5′ splice site of first introns. The AtSE protein acts in cooperation with AtCBC: many changes observed in the mutant lacking the correct SERRATE activity were common to those observed in the cbp mutants. Interestingly, significant changes in AS of some genes were also observed in other mutants of plant microRNA biogenesis pathway, hyl1-2 and dcl1-7, but a majority of them did not correspond to the changes observed in the se-1 mutant. Thus, the role of SERRATE in AS regulation is distinct from that of HYL1 and DCL1, and is similar to the regulation of AS in which CBC is involved. PMID:24137006

  10. A new ATP-binding cassette protein is involved in intracellular haem trafficking in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Campos-Salinas, Jenny; Cabello-Donayre, María; García-Hernández, Raquel; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2011-03-01

    The characterization of LABCG5, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette protein in Leishmania donovani, is described. Unlike other ABCG half-transporters, LABCG5 is not involved in either drug resistance or phospholipid efflux. However, we provide evidence suggesting that this protein is involved in intracellular haem trafficking. Thus, downregulation of LABCG5 function produced upon overexpression of an inactive version of the protein caused a dramatic growth arrest unless a haemin supplement was added or the mutated gene was eliminated. Supplementation with haemoglobin, an upstream metabolite normally sufficient to meet parasite haem requirements, was unable to rescue the growth defect phenotype. Haemoglobin endocytosis was not hampered in dominant-negative parasites and neither was haem uptake, a process that we show here to be dependent on a specific transporter. In contrast, LABCG5 function was required for the correct intracellular trafficking of haemoglobin-bound porphyrins to the mitochondria, not affecting the routing of free haem. Finally, LABCG5 binds haem through hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Altogether, these data suggest that LABCG5 is involved in the salvage of the haem released after the breakdown of internalized haemoglobin. As Leishmania is auxotrophic for haem, the pharmacological targeting of this route could represent a novel approach to control fatal visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21255121

  11. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3428273

  12. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation.

  13. Involvement of Fis protein in replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Filutowicz, M; Ross, W; Wild, J; Gourse, R L

    1992-01-01

    We report evidence indicating that Fis protein plays a role in initiation of replication at oriC in vivo. At high temperatures, fis null mutants form filamentous cells, show aberrant nucleoid segregation, and are unable to form single colonies. DNA synthesis is inhibited in these fis mutant strains following upshift to 44 degrees C. The pattern of DNA synthesis inhibition upon temperature upshift and the requirement for RNA synthesis, but not protein synthesis, for resumed DNA synthesis upon downshift to 32 degrees C indicate that synthesis is affected in the initiation phase. fis mutations act synergistically with gyrB alleles known to affect initiation. oriC-dependent plasmids are poorly established and maintained in fis mutant strains. Finally, purified Fis protein interacts in vitro with sites in oriC. These interactions could be involved in mediating the effect of Fis on DNA synthesis in vivo. Images PMID:1309527

  14. Clinical and genetic features of protein C deficiency in 23 unrelated Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiulan; Shen, Wei; Ye, Xu; Wu, Yingting; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the clinical and genetic features of protein C deficiency in the Chinese population. A total of 23 symptomatic patients with protein C deficiency were identified by thrombophilic assays. Detailed clinical data about the patients with respect to their personal and family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were collected. Mutational analysis was then performed by direct sequencing of the protein C gene (PROC) in the patients and their family members. Of the 23 patients, 30.4% (7/23) had additional risk factors, 51.2% (12/23) suffered from recurrent thrombotic episodes, and 50.0% (6/12) of the patients with recurrent thrombosis had more than one heterozygous mutation in PROC itself or combined with protein S gene (PROS). The sex distribution of male:female was 19:4 in the 23 symptomatic patients and 10:2 in the 12 recurrent patients. Almost all patients (22/23) had lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and one had pulmonary embolism (PE) only. A total of 15 different causative mutations were identified from the 23 subjects with 6 (40.0%) of the mutations being novel. Among the mutations identified, the Arg147Trp substitution was hotspot mutation in the Chinese population with a high frequency of 43.5%. Our finding suggests that complex genotypes of PROC or combined with protein S deficiency are primarily responsible for an increased risk of recurrent VTE. Our data further provides a framework for correlating the clinical pathogenesis of protein C deficiency to ethnic backgrounds in the Chinese population.

  15. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  16. NAP-1, Nucleosome assembly protein 1, a histone chaperone involved in Drosophila telomeres.

    PubMed

    López-Panadès, Elisenda; Casacuberta, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Telomere elongation is a function that all eukaryote cells must accomplish in order to guarantee, first, the stability of the end of the chromosomes and second, to protect the genetic information from the inevitable terminal erosion. The targeted transposition of the telomere transposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE perform this function in Drosophila, while the telomerase mechanism elongates the telomeres in most eukaryotes. In order to integrate telomere maintenance together with cell cycle and metabolism, different components of the cell interact, regulate, and control the proteins involved in telomere elongation. Different partners of the telomerase mechanism have already been described, but in contrast, very few proteins have been related with assisting the telomere transposons of Drosophila. Here, we describe for the first time, the implication of NAP-1 (Nucleosome assembly protein 1), a histone chaperone that has been involved in nuclear transport, transcription regulation, and chromatin remodeling, in telomere biology. We find that Nap-1 and HeT-A Gag, one of the major components of the Drosophila telomeres, are part of the same protein complex. We also demonstrate that their close interaction is necessary to guarantee telomere stability in dividing cells. We further show that NAP-1 regulates the transcription of the HeT-A retrotransposon, pointing to a positive regulatory role of NAP-1 in telomere expression. All these results facilitate the understanding of the transposon telomere maintenance mechanism, as well as the integration of telomere biology with the rest of the cell metabolism.

  17. CUP-1 Is a Novel Protein Involved in Dietary Cholesterol Uptake in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Victor J.; Athie, Alejandro; Salinas, Laura S.; Navarro, Rosa E.; Vaca, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Sterols transport and distribution are essential processes in all multicellular organisms. Survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans depends on dietary absorption of sterols present in the environment. However the general mechanisms associated to sterol uptake in nematodes are poorly understood. In the present work we provide evidence showing that a previously uncharacterized transmembrane protein, designated Cholesterol Uptake Protein-1 (CUP-1), is involved in dietary cholesterol uptake in C. elegans. Animals lacking CUP-1 showed hypersensitivity to cholesterol limitation and were unable to uptake cholesterol. A CUP-1-GFP fusion protein colocalized with cholesterol-rich vesicles, endosomes and lysosomes as well as the plasma membrane. Additionally, by FRET imaging, a direct interaction was found between the cholesterol analog DHE and the transmembrane “cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus” (CRAC) motif present in C. elegans CUP-1. In-silico analysis identified two mammalian homologues of CUP-1. Most interestingly, CRAC motifs are conserved in mammalian CUP-1 homologous. Our results suggest a role of CUP-1 in cholesterol uptake in C. elegans and open up the possibility for the existence of a new class of proteins involved in sterol absorption in mammals. PMID:22479487

  18. Short-Time Glassy-like Dynamics Observed in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Potential Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Godfrin, Doug; Liu, Yun

    Structures in concentrated protein solutions caused by the combination of short-range attraction (SA) and long-range repulsion (LR) have been extensively studied due to their importance in understanding therapeutic protein formulations and the phase behavior in general. Despite extensive studies of kinetically arrested states in colloidal systems with short-range attraction, less is understood for the effect of an additional longer-range repulsion on model colloidal systems with a SA interaction. Highly purified lysozyme is used a model experimental system due to its stable globular structure and SALR interactions at low ionic strength that can be quantitatively modeled. The fluid microstructure and protein short time self diffusion are measured across a broad range of conditions by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE), respectively. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even with an increase of zero shear viscosity by almost four orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. However, dynamic measurements demonstrate a sub-diffusive regime at relatively short time scales for concentrated samples at low temperature. The formation of a heterogeneous density distribution is shown to produce localized regions of high density that reduce protein motion, giving it a glassy-like behavior at the short time scale. This heterogeneity occurs at the length scale associated with the intermediate range order driven by the competing potential features, distinguishable from heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  19. Identification of Proteins Likely To Be Involved in Morphogenesis, Cell Division, and Signal Transduction in Planctomycetes by Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Jost; Huang, Xiaoluo; Jogler, Mareike; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Mascher, Thorsten; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Planctomycetes clade share many unusual features for bacteria. Their cytoplasm contains membrane-bound compartments, they lack peptidoglycan and FtsZ, they divide by polar budding, and they are capable of endocytosis. Planctomycete genomes have remained enigmatic, generally being quite large (up to 9 Mb), and on average, 55% of their predicted proteins are of unknown function. Importantly, proteins related to the unusual traits of Planctomycetes remain largely unknown. Thus, we embarked on bioinformatic analyses of these genomes in an effort to predict proteins that are likely to be involved in compartmentalization, cell division, and signal transduction. We used three complementary strategies. First, we defined the Planctomycetes core genome and subtracted genes of well-studied model organisms. Second, we analyzed the gene content and synteny of morphogenesis and cell division genes and combined both methods using a “guilt-by-association” approach. Third, we identified signal transduction systems as well as sigma factors. These analyses provide a manageable list of candidate genes for future genetic studies and provide evidence for complex signaling in the Planctomycetes akin to that observed for bacteria with complex life-styles, such as Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:23002222

  20. Possible involvement of the novel CPI-17 protein in protein kinase C signal transduction of rabbit arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Eto, M; Lee, M R; Morita, F; Yazawa, M; Kitazawa, T

    1998-01-01

    CPI-17 has recently been identified as a novel protein in vascular smooth muscle. In vitro, its phosphorylation and thiophosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) specifically inhibits the type 1 class of protein phosphatases, including myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase. Both of the phosphorylated CPI-17 states dose-dependently potentiated submaximal contractions at constant [Ca2+] in β-escin-permeabilized and Triton X-100-demembranated arterial smooth muscle, but produced no effect in intact and less intensely permeabilized (α-toxin) tissue. Thiophosphorylated CPI-17 (tp-CPI) induced large contractions even under Ca2+-free conditions and decreased Ca2+ EC50 by more than an order of magnitude. Unphosphorylated CPI-17 produced minimal but significant effects. tp-CPI substantially increased the steady-state MLC phosphorylation to Ca2+ ratios in β-escin preparations. tp-CPI affected the kinetics of contraction and relaxation and of MLC phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in such a manner that indicates its major physiological effect is to inhibit MLC phosphatase. Results from use of specific inhibitors in concurrence with tp-CPI repudiate the involvement of general G proteins, rho A or PKC itself in the Ca2+ sensitization by tp-CPI. Our results indicate that phosphorylation of CPI-17 by PKC stimulates binding of CPI-17 to and subsequent inhibition of MLC phosphatase. This implies that CPI-17 accounts largely for the heretofore unknown signalling pathway between PKC and inhibited MLC phosphatase. PMID:9518739

  1. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  2. Identification and characterization of plastid-type proteins from sequence-attributed features using machine learning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plastids are an important component of plant cells, being the site of manufacture and storage of chemical compounds used by the cell, and contain pigments such as those used in photosynthesis, starch synthesis/storage, cell color etc. They are essential organelles of the plant cell, also present in algae. Recent advances in genomic technology and sequencing efforts is generating a huge amount of DNA sequence data every day. The predicted proteome of these genomes needs annotation at a faster pace. In view of this, one such annotation need is to develop an automated system that can distinguish between plastid and non-plastid proteins accurately, and further classify plastid-types based on their functionality. We compared the amino acid compositions of plastid proteins with those of non-plastid ones and found significant differences, which were used as a basis to develop various feature-based prediction models using similarity-search and machine learning. Results In this study, we developed separate Support Vector Machine (SVM) trained classifiers for characterizing the plastids in two steps: first distinguishing the plastid vs. non-plastid proteins, and then classifying the identified plastids into their various types based on their function (chloroplast, chromoplast, etioplast, and amyloplast). Five diverse protein features: amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, the pseudo amino acid composition, Nterminal-Center-Cterminal composition and the protein physicochemical properties are used to develop SVM models. Overall, the dipeptide composition-based module shows the best performance with an accuracy of 86.80% and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.74 in phase-I and 78.60% with a MCC of 0.44 in phase-II. On independent test data, this model also performs better with an overall accuracy of 76.58% and 74.97% in phase-I and phase-II, respectively. The similarity-based PSI-BLAST module shows very low performance with about 50% prediction

  3. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters.

  4. Prediction of Protein Cleavage Site with Feature Selection by Random Forest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bi-Qing; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Gui-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play critical roles in both intra and extracellular processes by binding and cleaving their protein substrates. The cleavage can either be non-specific as part of degradation during protein catabolism or highly specific as part of proteolytic cascades and signal transduction events. Identification of these targets is extremely challenging. Current computational approaches for predicting cleavage sites are very limited since they mainly represent the amino acid sequences as patterns or frequency matrices. In this work, we developed a novel predictor based on Random Forest algorithm (RF) using maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR) method followed by incremental feature selection (IFS). The features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid occurrence frequency, secondary structure and solvent accessibility were utilized to represent the peptides concerned. Here, we compared existing prediction tools which are available for predicting possible cleavage sites in candidate substrates with ours. It is shown that our method makes much more reliable predictions in terms of the overall prediction accuracy. In addition, this predictor allows the use of a wide range of proteinases. PMID:23029276

  5. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E.; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  6. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  7. A histidine protein kinase is involved in polar organelle development in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S P; Sharma, P L; Schoenlein, P V; Ely, B

    1993-01-01

    Mutations having pleiotropic effects on polar organelle development (pod) in Caulobacter crescentus have been identified and shown to occur in at least 13 genes scattered throughout the genome. Mutations at each locus affect a unique combination of polar traits, suggesting that complex interactions occur among these genes. The DNA sequence of one of these genes, pleC, indicates that it is homologous to members of the family of histidine protein kinase genes. Membes of this family include the senor components of the bacterial two-component regulatory systems. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated that the PleC protein was capable of autophosphorylation. These results suggest that the PleC protein (and perhaps the proteins encoded by the other pod genes as well) regulates the expression of genes involved in polar organelle development through the phosphorylation of key regulatory proteins. The use of a phosphorelay system cued to internal changes in the cell would provide a mechanism for coordinating major changes in gene expression with the completion of specific cell cycle events. Images PMID:8421698

  8. Identification of Glutathione S-Transferase Pi as a Protein Involved in Parkinson Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Bradner, Joshua; Bammler, Theo K.; Eaton, David L.; Zhang, JianPeng; Ye, ZuCheng; Wilson, Angela M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Pan, Catherine; Zhang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) typically affects the cortical regions during the later stages of disease, with neuronal loss, gliosis, and formation of diffuse cortical Lewy bodies in a significant portion of patients with dementia. To identify novel proteins involved in PD progression, we prepared synaptosomal fractions from the frontal cortices of pathologically verified PD patients at different stages along with age-matched controls. Protein expression profiles were compared using a robust quantitative proteomic technique. Approximately 100 proteins displayed significant differences in their relative abundances between PD patients at various stages and controls; three of these proteins were validated using independent techniques. One of the confirmed proteins, glutathione S-transferase Pi, was further investigated in cellular models of PD, demonstrating that its level was intimately associated with several critical cellular processes that are directly related to neurodegeneration in PD. These results have, for the first time, suggested that the levels of glutathione S-transferase Pi may play an important role in modulating the progression of PD. PMID:19498008

  9. A TAF4 coactivator function for E proteins that involves enhanced TFIID binding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yi; Zhang, Jinsong; Geng, Huimin; Du, Zhimei; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The multisubunit TFIID plays a direct role in transcription initiation by binding to core promoter elements and directing preinitiation complex assembly. Although TFIID may also function as a coactivator through direct interactions with promoter-bound activators, mechanistic aspects of this poorly defined function remain unclear. Here, biochemical studies show a direct TFIID–E-protein interaction that (1) is mediated through interaction of a novel E-protein activation domain (activation domain 3 [AD3]) with the TAF homology (TAFH) domain of TAF4, (2) is critical for activation of a natural target gene by an E protein, and (3) mechanistically acts by enhancing TFIID binding to the core promoter. Complementary assays establish a gene-specific role for the TAFH domain in TFIID recruitment and activation of a large subset of genes in vivo. These results firmly establish TAF4 as a bona fide E-protein coactivator as well as a mechanism involving facilitated TFIID binding through direct interaction with an E-protein activation domain. PMID:23873942

  10. Microtubule-severing proteins are involved in flagellar length control and mitosis in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Magali; Crobu, Lucien; Blaineau, Christine; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel

    2009-03-01

    Microtubules are key players in the biology of Trypanosomatid parasites, not only as classical components of the mitotic spindle, microtubule-organizing centres and flagellum but also as the essential constituent of the cytoskeleton. Their length dynamics are regulated by, among others, microtubule-severing proteins. Four and six genes encoding microtubule-severing proteins can be found bioinformatically in the Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei genome respectively. We investigated all these proteins in these organisms, which include the katanin, katanin-like, spastin and fidgetin, and looked at their subcellular localization as well as their putative function by examining 'loss-of-function' phenotypes. The katanin-like KAT60b was found implicated in flagellar length reduction, but not in its size increase, while the katanin p80 subunit appeared clearly involved in cytokinesis. Fidgetin and spastin homologues were both localized in the nucleus: the first as a discrete and variable number of dots during most of the cell cycle, redistributing to the spindle and midbody during mitosis; the second concentrated as < or = 5 perinucleolar punctuations, similar to the electron-dense plaques identified in T. brucei, which were assimilated to kinetochores. This first study of microtubule-severing proteins in 'divergent' eukaryotes gives further insight into the multiple functions of these proteins identified in the hitherto studied models. PMID:19183280

  11. New Proteins Involved in Sulfur Trafficking in the Cytoplasm of Allochromatium vinosum*

    PubMed Central

    Stockdreher, Yvonne; Sturm, Marga; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dobler, Nadine; Zigann, Renate; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The formation of periplasmic sulfur globules is an intermediate step during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in various sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. The mechanism of how this sulfur is activated and crosses the cytoplasmic membrane for further oxidation to sulfite by the dissimilatory reductase DsrAB is incompletely understood, but it has been well documented that the pathway involves sulfur trafficking mediated by sulfur-carrying proteins. So far sulfur transfer from DsrEFH to DsrC has been established. Persulfurated DsrC very probably serves as a direct substrate for DsrAB. Here, we introduce further important players in oxidative sulfur metabolism; the proteins Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 are strictly conserved in the Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, and Acidithiobacillaceae families of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and are linked to genes encoding complexes involved in sulfur oxidation (Dsr or Hdr) in the latter two. Here we show via relative quantitative real-time PCR and microarray analysis an increase of mRNA levels under sulfur-oxidizing conditions for rhd_2599, tusA, and dsrE2 in Allochromatium vinosum. Transcriptomic patterns for the three genes match those of major genes for the sulfur-oxidizing machinery rather than those involved in biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. TusA appears to be one of the major proteins in A. vinosum. A rhd_2599-tusA-dsrE2-deficient mutant strain, although not viable in liquid culture, was clearly sulfur oxidation negative upon growth on solid media containing sulfide. Rhd_2599, TusA, and DsrE2 bind sulfur atoms via conserved cysteine residues, and experimental evidence is provided for the transfer of sulfur between these proteins as well as to DsrEFH and DsrC. PMID:24648525

  12. Protein-ligand binding region prediction (PLB-SAVE) based on geometric features and CUDA acceleration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-ligand interactions are key processes in triggering and controlling biological functions within cells. Prediction of protein binding regions on the protein surface assists in understanding the mechanisms and principles of molecular recognition. In silico geometrical shape analysis plays a primary step in analyzing the spatial characteristics of protein binding regions and facilitates applications of bioinformatics in drug discovery and design. Here, we describe the novel software, PLB-SAVE, which uses parallel processing technology and is ideally suited to extract the geometrical construct of solid angles from surface atoms. Representative clusters and corresponding anchors were identified from all surface elements and were assigned according to the ranking of their solid angles. In addition, cavity depth indicators were obtained by proportional transformation of solid angles and cavity volumes were calculated by scanning multiple directional vectors within each selected cavity. Both depth and volume characteristics were combined with various weighting coefficients to rank predicted potential binding regions. Results Two test datasets from LigASite, each containing 388 bound and unbound structures, were used to predict binding regions using PLB-SAVE and two well-known prediction systems, SiteHound and MetaPocket2.0 (MPK2). PLB-SAVE outperformed the other programs with accuracy rates of 94.3% for unbound proteins and 95.5% for bound proteins via a tenfold cross-validation process. Additionally, because the parallel processing architecture was designed to enhance the computational efficiency, we obtained an average of 160-fold increase in computational time. Conclusions In silico binding region prediction is considered the initial stage in structure-based drug design. To improve the efficacy of biological experiments for drug development, we developed PLB-SAVE, which uses only geometrical features of proteins and achieves a good overall performance

  13. A deep learning framework for modeling structural features of RNA-binding protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sai; Zhou, Jingtian; Hu, Hailin; Gong, Haipeng; Chen, Ligong; Cheng, Chao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the post-transcriptional control of RNAs. Identifying RBP binding sites and characterizing RBP binding preferences are key steps toward understanding the basic mechanisms of the post-transcriptional gene regulation. Though numerous computational methods have been developed for modeling RBP binding preferences, discovering a complete structural representation of the RBP targets by integrating their available structural features in all three dimensions is still a challenging task. In this paper, we develop a general and flexible deep learning framework for modeling structural binding preferences and predicting binding sites of RBPs, which takes (predicted) RNA tertiary structural information into account for the first time. Our framework constructs a unified representation that characterizes the structural specificities of RBP targets in all three dimensions, which can be further used to predict novel candidate binding sites and discover potential binding motifs. Through testing on the real CLIP-seq datasets, we have demonstrated that our deep learning framework can automatically extract effective hidden structural features from the encoded raw sequence and structural profiles, and predict accurate RBP binding sites. In addition, we have conducted the first study to show that integrating the additional RNA tertiary structural features can improve the model performance in predicting RBP binding sites, especially for the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which also provides a new evidence to support the view that RBPs may own specific tertiary structural binding preferences. In particular, the tests on the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) segments yield satisfiable results with experimental support from the literature and further demonstrate the necessity of incorporating RNA tertiary structural information into the prediction model. The source code of our approach can be found in https

  14. A GTPase distinct from Ran is involved in nuclear protein import

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Signal-dependent transport of proteins into the nucleus is a multi-step process mediated by nuclear pore complexes and cytosolic transport factors. One of the cytosolic factors, Ran, is the only GTPase that has a characterized role in the nuclear import pathway. We have used a mutant form of Ran with altered nucleotide binding specificity to investigate whether any other GTPases are involved in nuclear protein import. D125N Ran (XTP-Ran) binds specifically to xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) and has a greatly reduced affinity for GTP, so it is no longer sensitive to inhibition by nonhydrolyzable analogues of GTP such as guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). using in vitro transport assays, we have found that nuclear import supported by XTP-Ran is nevertheless inhibited by the addition of non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues. This in conjunction with the properties of the inhibitory effect indicates that at least one additional GTPase is involved in the import process. Initial characterization suggests that the inhibited GTPase plays a direct role in protein import and could be a component of the nuclear pore complex. PMID:8655588

  15. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  16. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process. PMID:26906695

  17. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm.

    PubMed

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-11-02

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M³) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M³ mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M³ locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M³ and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm.

  18. Functional features, biological pathways, and protein interaction networks of addiction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Addictions are chronic and common brain disorders affected by many genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Recent genome-wide linkage and association studies have revealed several promising genomic regions and multiple genes relating to addictions. To explore the underlying biological processes in the development of addictions, we used 62 genes recently reviewed by Li and Burmeister (2009) as representative addiction-related genes, and then we investigated their features in gene function, pathways, and protein interaction networks. We performed enrichment tests of their Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and of their pathways in the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) system. The tests revealed that these addiction-related genes were highly enriched in neurodevelopment-related processes. Interestingly, we found circadian rhythm signaling in one of the enriched pathways. Moreover, these addiction-related genes tended to have higher connectivity and shorter characteristic shortest-path distances compared to control genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. This investigation is the first of such kind in addiction studies, and it is useful for further addiction candidate-gene prioritization and verification, thus helping us to better understand molecular mechanisms of addictions.

  19. Causal involvement of visual area MT in global feature-based enhancement but not contingent attentional capture.

    PubMed

    Painter, David R; Dux, Paul E; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-09-01

    When visual attention is set for a particular target feature, such as color or shape, neural responses to that feature are enhanced across the visual field. This global feature-based enhancement is hypothesized to underlie the contingent attentional capture effect, in which task-irrelevant items with the target feature capture spatial attention. In humans, however, different cortical regions have been implicated in global feature-based enhancement and contingent capture. Here, we applied intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) to assess the causal roles of two regions of extrastriate cortex - right area MT and the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) - in both global feature-based enhancement and contingent capture. We recorded cortical activity using EEG while participants monitored centrally for targets defined by color and ignored peripheral checkerboards that matched the distractor or target color. In central vision, targets were preceded by colored cues designed to capture attention. Stimuli flickered at unique frequencies, evoking distinct cortical oscillations. Analyses of these oscillations and behavioral performance revealed contingent capture in central vision and global feature-based enhancement in the periphery. Stimulation of right area MT selectively increased global feature-based enhancement, but did not influence contingent attentional capture. By contrast, stimulation of the right TPJ left both processes unaffected. Our results reveal a causal role for the right area MT in feature-based attention, and suggest that global feature-based enhancement does not underlie the contingent capture effect.

  20. Antisperm antibodies: invaluable tools toward the identification of sperm proteins involved in fertilization.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H; Marín-Briggiler, Clara I; Veaute, Carolina

    2014-08-01

    The identification of sperm proteins involved in fertilization has been the subject of numerous investigations. Much interest has been dedicated to naturally occurring antisperm antibodies (ASA) and their impact in fertility. Their presence in men and women has been associated with 2-50% of infertility cases. ASA may impair pre- and post-fertilization steps. Experimental models have been developed using sperm proteins as immunogens to evaluate their involvement in sperm function. Our team has pursued investigations to assess ASA presence in biological fluids from patients consulting for infertility and their effect on fertilization. We found ASA in follicular fluids with ability of inducing the acrosome reaction and blocking sperm-zona pellucida interaction and used them to identify sperm entities involved in these events. We generated and utilized antibodies against proacrosin/acrosin to characterize the sperm protease system. We implemented an ELISA to detect proacrosin/acrosin antibodies in human sera and evaluated their impact upon fertility by developing in vitro assays and a gene immunization model. This review presents a summary of ASA history, etiology, current approaches for detection and effects upon fertility. ASA (naturally occurring, generated by animal immunization and/or of commercial origin) are invaluable tools to understand the molecular basis of fertilization, better diagnose/treat immunoinfertility and develop immunocontraceptive methods.

  1. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  2. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  3. Assessment of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors for interaction with proteins involved in the immune response to infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ronald W; Cunningham, David; Cong, Yang; Subashi, Timothy A; Tkalcevic, George T; Lloyd, David B; Boyd, James G; Chrunyk, Boris A; Karam, George A; Qiu, Xiayang; Wang, Ing-Kae; Francone, Omar L

    2010-05-01

    The CETP inhibitor, torcetrapib, was prematurely terminated from phase 3 clinical trials due to an increase in cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Because nearly half of the latter deaths involved patients with infection, we have tested torcetrapib and other CETPIs to see if they interfere with lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) or bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). No effect of these potent CETPIs on LPS binding to either protein was detected. Purified CETP itself bound weakly to LPS with a Kd >or= 25 microM compared with 0.8 and 0.5 nM for LBP and BPI, respectively, and this binding was not blocked by torcetrapib. In whole blood, LPS induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha normally in the presence of torcetrapib. Furthermore, LPS had no effect on CETP activity. We conclude that the sepsis-related mortality of the ILLUMINATE trial was unlikely due to a direct effect of torcetrapib on LBP or BPI function, nor to inhibition of an interaction of CETP with LPS. Instead, we speculate that the negative outcome seen for patients with infections might be related to the changes in plasma lipoprotein composition and metabolism, or alternatively to the known off-target effects of torcetrapib, such as aldosterone elevation, which may have aggravated the effects of sepsis. PMID:19965592

  4. The Xanthomonas citri effector protein PthA interacts with citrus proteins involved in nuclear transport, protein folding and ubiquitination associated with DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mariane Noronha; De Souza, Tiago Antonio; Cernadas, Raúl Andrés; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Peixoto; Docena, Cássia; Farah, Chuck Shaker; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri utilizes the type III effector protein PthA to modulate host transcription to promote citrus canker. PthA proteins belong to the AvrBs3/PthA family and carry a domain comprising tandem repeats of 34 amino acids that mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We show here that variants of PthAs from a single bacterial strain localize to the nucleus of plant cells and form homo- and heterodimers through the association of their repeat regions. We hypothesize that the PthA variants might also interact with distinct host targets. Here, in addition to the interaction with alpha-importin, known to mediate the nuclear import of AvrBs3, we describe new interactions of PthAs with citrus proteins involved in protein folding and K63-linked ubiquitination. PthAs 2 and 3 preferentially interact with a citrus cyclophilin (Cyp) and with TDX, a tetratricopeptide domain-containing thioredoxin. In addition, PthAs 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4, interact with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex formed by Ubc13 and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Uev), required for K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. We show that Cyp, TDX and Uev interact with each other, and that Cyp and Uev localize to the nucleus of plant cells. Furthermore, the citrus Ubc13 and Uev proteins complement the DNA repair phenotype of the yeast Deltaubc13 and Deltamms2/uev1a mutants, strongly indicating that they are also involved in K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. Notably, PthA 2 affects the growth of yeast cells in the presence of a DNA damage agent, suggesting that it inhibits K63-linked ubiquitination required for DNA repair.

  5. The Arabidopsis PLAT Domain Protein1 Is Critically Involved in Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Seung Hee; Großkinsky, Dominik K.; Böhm, Hannah; Janschek, Ursula; Rim, Yeonggil; Ali, Walid Wahid; Kim, Soo Young; Roitsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, for only a relatively low percentage of the encoded proteins experimental evidence concerning their function is available. Plant proteins that harbour a single PLAT (Polycystin, Lipoxygenase, Alpha-toxin and Triacylglycerol lipase) domain and belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicots. However, the function of PLAT-plant-stress proteins is still poorly understood. Therefore, we have assessed the function of the uncharacterised Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress family members through a combination of functional genetic and physiological approaches. PLAT1 overexpression conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance, including cold, drought and salt stress, while loss-of-function resulted in opposite effects on abiotic stress tolerance. Strikingly, PLAT1 promoted growth under non-stressed conditions. Abiotic stress treatments induced PLAT1 expression and caused expansion of its expression domain. The ABF/ABRE transcription factors, which are positive mediators of abscisic acid signalling, activate PLAT1 promoter activity in transactivation assays and directly bind to the ABRE elements located in this promoter in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This suggests that PLAT1 represents a novel downstream target of the abscisic acid signalling pathway. Thus, we showed that PLAT1 critically functions as positive regulator of abiotic stress tolerance, but also is involved in regulating plant growth, and thereby assigned a function to this previously uncharacterised PLAT domain protein. The functional data obtained for PLAT1 support that PLAT-plant-stress proteins in general could be promising targets for improving abiotic stress tolerance without yield penalty. PMID:25396746

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  7. An Arabidopsis WDR protein coordinates cellular networks involved in light, stress response and hormone signals.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huey-Wen; Feng, Ji-Huan; Feng, Yung-Lin; Wei, Miam-Ju

    2015-12-01

    The WD-40 repeat (WDR) protein acts as a scaffold for protein interactions in various cellular events. An Arabidopsis WDR protein exhibited sequence similarity with human WDR26, a scaffolding protein implicated in H2O2-induced cell death in neural cells. The AtWDR26 transcript was induced by auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ET), osmostic stress and salinity. The expression of AtWDR26 was regulated by light, and seed germination of the AtWDR26 overexpression (OE) and seedling growth of the T-DNA knock-out (KO) exhibited altered sensitivity to light. Root growth of the OE seedlings increased tolerance to ZnSO4 and NaCl stresses and were hypersensitive to inhibition of osmotic stress. Seedlings of OE and KO altered sensitivities to multiple hormones. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic plants overexpressing AtWDR26 showed that genes involved in the chloroplast-related metabolism constituted the largest group of the up-regulated genes. AtWDR26 overexpression up-regulated a large number of genes related to defense cellular events including biotic and abiotic stress response. Furthermore, several members of genes functioning in the regulation of Zn homeostasis, and hormone synthesis and perception of auxin and JA were strongly up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Our data provide physiological and transcriptional evidence for AtWDR26 role in hormone, light and abiotic stress cellular events.

  8. Identification of proteins involved in desiccation tolerance in the red seaweed Pyropia orbicularis (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    López-Cristoffanini, Camilo; Zapata, Javier; Gaillard, Fanny; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto

    2015-12-01

    Extreme reduction in cellular water content leads to desiccation, which, if persistent, affects the physiology of organisms, mainly through oxidative stress. Some organisms are highly tolerant to desiccation, including resurrection plants and certain intertidal seaweeds. One such species is Pyropia orbicularis, a rhodophycean that colonizes upper intertidal zones along the Chilean coast. Despite long, daily periods of air exposure due to tides, this alga is highly tolerant to desiccation. The present study examined the proteome of P. orbicularis by 2DE and LC-MS/MS analyses to determine the proteins associated with desiccation tolerance (DT). The results showed that, under natural conditions, there were significant changes in the protein profile during low tide as compared to naturally hydrated plants at high tide. These changes were mainly in newly appeared proteins spots such as chaperones, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase, among others. Previously undescribed proteins under desiccation conditions included phycobiliproteins, glyoxalase I, and phosphomannomutase. These changes evidenced that several physiological responses involved in DT are activated during low tide, including decreased photosynthetic activity, increased antioxidant capacity, and the preservation of cell physiology by regulating water content, cell wall structure, and cell volume. Similar responses have been observed in resurrection plants and bryophytes exposed to desiccation. Therefore, the coordinated activation of different desiccation tolerance pathways in P. orbicularis could explain the successful biological performance of this seaweed in the upper intertidal rocky zones.

  9. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (responsive to desiccation 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles' heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  10. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  12. CDC27 protein is involved in radiation response in squamous cell cervix carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, T; Gopal, G; Selvaluxmi, G; Rajalekshmy, K R

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to identify genes involved in radiation response in cervix carcinoma. Differential display technique was used to study the expression profiles of tumour biopsy samples obtained from patients, responding and not responding to treatment. The samples were obtained prior to radiotherapy and subsequent to treatment with Tele-radiation at 10 Gray (Gy). One of the differentially expressed cDNAs, when sequenced was identified to be CDC27. Immuno-histochemical analysis of pre- and post-treated tumour samples from fifteen patients showed the downregulation of expression of CDC27 protein in seven patients. Down-regulation was associated with poorer response to radiotherapy. Cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and C33A were irradiated and their nuclei were stained for expression of CDC27 and analyzed using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS). Down-regulation of CDC27 protein in the irradiated SiHa cell line was associated with greater survival fraction, compared to the irradiated C33A cell line, which had only slight fall in the level of CDC27 protein. This is the first study to suggest a role for CDC27 in radiation response. However, a larger cohort is needed to further confirm the value of CDC27 protein as a predictive marker, for radiation response in cervix cancer.

  13. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  14. Identification of proteins involved in desiccation tolerance in the red seaweed Pyropia orbicularis (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    López-Cristoffanini, Camilo; Zapata, Javier; Gaillard, Fanny; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto

    2015-12-01

    Extreme reduction in cellular water content leads to desiccation, which, if persistent, affects the physiology of organisms, mainly through oxidative stress. Some organisms are highly tolerant to desiccation, including resurrection plants and certain intertidal seaweeds. One such species is Pyropia orbicularis, a rhodophycean that colonizes upper intertidal zones along the Chilean coast. Despite long, daily periods of air exposure due to tides, this alga is highly tolerant to desiccation. The present study examined the proteome of P. orbicularis by 2DE and LC-MS/MS analyses to determine the proteins associated with desiccation tolerance (DT). The results showed that, under natural conditions, there were significant changes in the protein profile during low tide as compared to naturally hydrated plants at high tide. These changes were mainly in newly appeared proteins spots such as chaperones, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase, among others. Previously undescribed proteins under desiccation conditions included phycobiliproteins, glyoxalase I, and phosphomannomutase. These changes evidenced that several physiological responses involved in DT are activated during low tide, including decreased photosynthetic activity, increased antioxidant capacity, and the preservation of cell physiology by regulating water content, cell wall structure, and cell volume. Similar responses have been observed in resurrection plants and bryophytes exposed to desiccation. Therefore, the coordinated activation of different desiccation tolerance pathways in P. orbicularis could explain the successful biological performance of this seaweed in the upper intertidal rocky zones. PMID:26154304

  15. Centlein, a novel microtubule-associated protein stabilizing microtubules and involved in neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhenli; Yin, Huilong; Wang, Pan; Gao, Juntao; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that the centriolar protein centlein functions as a molecular link between C-Nap1 and Cep68 to maintain centrosome cohesion [1]. In this study, we identified centlein as a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP), directly binding to purified microtubules (MTs) via its longest coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of centlein caused profound nocodazole- and cold-resistant MT bundles, which also relied on its MT-binding domain. siRNA-mediated centlein depletion resulted in a significant reduction in tubulin acetylation level and overall fluorescence intensity of cytoplasmic MT acetylation. Centlein was further characterized in neurons. We found that centlein overexpression inhibited neurite formation in retinoic acid (RA)-induced SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Taken together, we propose that centlein is involved in MT stability and neuritogenesis in vivo. PMID:26915804

  16. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines.

  17. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines. PMID:25475262

  18. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-δ in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong J; Jung, Jong P; Park, Soon E; Lee, Minhyun; Kwon, Byungsuk; Cho, Hong R

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-δ function in ALI using PKC-δ knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-δ KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-δ inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-δ-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-δ inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-δ inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils.

  19. Involvement of Protein Kinase CK2 in Angiogenesis and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Caballero, Sergio; Aoki, Annette M.; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Grant, Maria B.; Castellon, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to characterize signaling intermediates involved in angiogenic responses of retinal endothelial cells (RECs) to the extracellular matrix and growth factors, by using specific inhibitors. Methods Tubelike structure formation and the development of secondary sprouts on a basement membrane (BM) matrix, cell proliferation, and cell migration were studied in cultures of bovine and human RECs. Specific inhibitors were tested for inhibition of retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Results In initial experiments, the broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitors, H7 and H89, stabilized REC tubes on BM matrix and inhibited secondary sprouting, cell migration, and cell proliferation. Among more specific kinase inhibitors tested, only inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 (formerly, casein kinase II), such as emodin and DRB, were able to duplicate the effects of H7 and H89. Actinomycin D caused only minor changes in angiogenic assays, suggesting that CK2’s effects on REC did not involve its known impact on transcription. The extent of retinal neovascularization in a mouse OIR model was reduced >70% (versus untreated or vehicle-treated groups) after treatment with emodin (6 days at 60 mg/kg per day) and by approximately 60% after treatment at the same dose with TBB, the most specific CK2 inhibitor known. In the treated retinas, the main vascular tree had minimal changes, but the neovascular tufts were greatly reduced in number or absent. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of the involvement of ubiquitous protein kinase CK2 in angiogenesis. Naturally derived CK2 inhibitors may be useful for treatment of proliferative retinopathies. PMID:15557471

  20. A Novel E2F-like Protein Involved in Transcriptional Activation of Cyst Wall Protein Genes in Giardia lamblia*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Hsin; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Huang, Yu-Chang; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Wei; Huang, Shao-Wei; Chuang, Sheng-Fung; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia differentiates into resistant walled cysts for survival outside the host and transmission. During encystation, synthesis of cyst wall proteins is coordinately induced. The E2F family of transcription factors in higher eukaryotes is involved in cell cycle progression and cell differentiation. We asked whether Giardia has E2F-like genes and whether they influence gene expression during Giardia encystation. Blast searches of the Giardia genome database identified one gene (e2f1) encoding a putative E2F protein with two putative DNA-binding domains. We found that the e2f1 gene expression levels increased significantly during encystation. Epitope-tagged E2F1 was found to localize to nuclei. Recombinant E2F1 specifically bound to the thymidine kinase and cwp1–3 gene promoters. E2F1 contains several key residues for DNA binding, and mutation analysis revealed that its binding sequence is similar to those of the known E2F family proteins. The E2F1-binding sequences were positive cis-acting elements of the thymidine kinase and cwp1 promoters. We also found that E2F1 transactivated the thymidine kinase and cwp1 promoters through its binding sequences in vivo. Interestingly, E2F1 overexpression resulted in a significant increase of the levels of CWP1 protein, cwp1–3 gene mRNA, and cyst formation. We also found E2F1 can interact with Myb2, a transcription factor that coordinate up-regulates the cwp1–3 genes during encystation. Our results suggest that E2F family has been conserved during evolution and that E2F1 is an important transcription factor in regulation of the Giardia cwp genes, which are key to Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:21835923

  1. Human skeletal muscle and erythrocyte proteins involved in acid-base homeostasis: adaptations to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Juel, C; Lundby, C; Sander, M; Calbet, J A L; Hall, G van

    2003-04-15

    Chronic hypoxia is accompanied by changes in blood and skeletal muscle acid-base control. We hypothesized that the underlying mechanisms include altered protein expression of transport systems and the enzymes involved in lactate, HCO3- and H+ fluxes in skeletal muscle and erythrocytes. Immunoblotting was used to quantify densities of the transport systems and enzymes. Muscle and erythrocyte samples were obtained from eight Danish lowlanders at sea level and after 2 and 8 weeks at 4100 m (Bolivia). For comparison, samples were obtained from eight Bolivian natives. In muscle membranes there were no changes in fibre-type distribution, lactate dehydrogenase isoforms, Na+,K+-pump subunits or in the lactate-H+ co-transporters MCT1 and MCT4. The Na+-H+ exchanger protein NHE1 was elevated by 39 % in natives compared to lowlanders. The Na+-HCO3- co-transporter density in muscle was elevated by 47-69 % after 2 and 8 weeks at altitude. The membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase (CA) IV in muscle increased in the lowlanders by 39 %, whereas CA XIV decreased by 23-47 %. Levels of cytosolic CA II and III in muscle and CA I and II in erythrocytes were unchanged. The erythrocyte lactate-H+ co-transporter MCT1 increased by 230-405 % in lowlanders and was 324 % higher in natives. The erythrocyte inorganic anion exchanger (Cl--HCO3- exchanger AE1) was increased by 149-228 %. In conclusion, chronic hypoxia induces dramatic changes in erythrocyte proteins, but only moderate changes in muscle proteins involved in acid-base control. Together, these changes suggest a hypoxia-induced increase in the capacity for lactate, HCO3- and H+ fluxes from muscle to blood and from blood to erythrocytes. PMID:12611920

  2. The SNARE proteins SNAP25 and synaptobrevin are involved in endocytosis at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Dongsheng; Sun, Tao; Xu, Jianhua; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Shin, Wonchul; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2013-05-22

    SNAP25, an essential component of the soluble NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor) attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex that mediates exocytosis, is not considered to play a role in endocytosis, which couples to exocytosis by retrieving a similar amount of exocytosed vesicles. By knocking down SNAP25 and imaging slow endocytosis at a conventional synapse, the rat cultured hippocampal synapse, we found that SNAP25 is involved in slow, clathrin-dependent endocytosis. With similar techniques, we found that not only SNAP25, but also synaptobrevin is involved in slow endocytosis. These results provide the first evidence showing the dual role of SNAP25 and synaptobrevin in both exocytosis and slow endocytosis at conventional synapses. Such a dual role may contribute to mediate the coupling between exocytosis and clathrin-dependent endocytosis at conventional synapses, a mechanism critical for the maintenance of synaptic transmission and the normal structure of nerve terminals.

  3. Mouse neuron navigator 1, a novel microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, María José; Alcántara, Soledad; Mascaró, Cristina; Pérez-Brangulí, Francesc; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Maes, Tamara; Soriano, Eduardo; Buesa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The development of the nervous system (NS) requires the coordinated migration of multiple waves of neurons and subsequent processes of neurite maturation, both involving selective guidance mechanisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, unc-53 codes for a new multidomain protein involved in the directional migration of a subset of cells. We describe here the first functional characterization of the mouse homologue, mouse Neuron navigator 1 (mNAV1), whose expression is largely restricted to the NS during development. EGFP-mNAV1 associates with microtubules (MTs) plus ends present in the growth cone through a new microtubule-binding (MTB) domain. Moreover, its overexpression in transfected cells leads to MT bundling. The abolition of mNAV1 causes loss of directionality in the leading processes of pontine-migrating cells, providing evidence for a role of mNAV1 in mediating Netrin-1-induced directional migration. PMID:15797708

  4. Automatic segmentation and 3D feature extraction of protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Moreira, António H. J.; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Oliveira, João; Dias, Nuno; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-03-01

    In the last years, it has become increasingly clear that neurodegenerative diseases involve protein aggregation, a process often used as disease progression readout and to develop therapeutic strategies. This work presents an image processing tool to automatic segment, classify and quantify these aggregates and the whole 3D body of the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans. A total of 150 data set images, containing different slices, were captured with a confocal microscope from animals of distinct genetic conditions. Because of the animals' transparency, most of the slices pixels appeared dark, hampering their body volume direct reconstruction. Therefore, for each data set, all slices were stacked in one single 2D image in order to determine a volume approximation. The gradient of this image was input to an anisotropic diffusion algorithm that uses the Tukey's biweight as edge-stopping function. The image histogram median of this outcome was used to dynamically determine a thresholding level, which allows the determination of a smoothed exterior contour of the worm and the medial axis of the worm body from thinning its skeleton. Based on this exterior contour diameter and the medial animal axis, random 3D points were then calculated to produce a volume mesh approximation. The protein aggregations were subsequently segmented based on an iso-value and blended with the resulting volume mesh. The results obtained were consistent with qualitative observations in literature, allowing non-biased, reliable and high throughput protein aggregates quantification. This may lead to a significant improvement on neurodegenerative diseases treatment planning and interventions prevention.

  5. Characterization of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Involved in Tubercidin Resistance in Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Coelho, Adriano Cappellazzo; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Sanchez, Eduardo Milton Ramos; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Cotrim, Paulo Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Background Tubercidin (TUB) is a toxic adenosine analog with potential antiparasitic activity against Leishmania, with mechanism of action and resistance that are not completely understood. For understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying the potential metabolic pathways affected by this drug, we employed in this study an overexpression/selection approach using TUB for the identification of potential targets, as well as, drug resistance genes in L. major. Although, TUB is toxic to the mammalian host, these findings can provide evidences for a rational drug design based on purine pathway against leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal findings After transfection of a cosmid genomic library into L. major Friedlin (LmjF) parasites and application of the overexpression/selection method, we identified two cosmids (cosTUB1 and cosTU2) containing two different loci capable of conferring significant levels of TUB resistance. In the cosTUB1 contained a gene encoding NUPM1-like protein, which has been previously described as associated with TUB resistance in L. amazonensis. In the cosTUB2 we identified and characterized a gene encoding a 63 kDa protein that we denoted as tubercidin-resistance protein (TRP). Functional analysis revealed that the transfectants were less susceptible to TUB than LmjF parasites or those transfected with the control vector. In addition, the trp mRNA and protein levels in cosTUB2 transfectants were higher than LmjF. TRP immunolocalization revealed that it was co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a cellular compartment with many functions. In silico predictions indicated that TRP contains only a hypothetical transmembrane domain. Thus, it is likely that TRP is a lumen protein involved in multidrug efflux transport that may be involved in the purine metabolic pathway. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated for the first time that TRP is associated with TUB resistance in Leishmania. The next challenge is to determine how

  6. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca(2+) sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca(2+) signals. Ca(2+)-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca(2+) signal and overview of Ca(2+) signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca(2+) signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to

  7. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca2+ sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca2+ signals. Ca2+-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal and overview of Ca2+ signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca2+ signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to improve stress-tolerance of

  8. Characterization of the Autophagy Marker Protein Atg8 Reveals Atypical Features of Autophagy in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Allanki, Aparna Devi; Sijwali, Puran Singh

    2014-01-01

    Conventional autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation process that has crucial homeostatic and regulatory functions in eukaryotic organisms. As malaria parasites must dispose a number of self and host cellular contents, we investigated if autophagy in malaria parasites is similar to the conventional autophagy. Genome wide analysis revealed a partial autophagy repertoire in Plasmodium, as homologs for only 15 of the 33 yeast autophagy proteins could be identified, including the autophagy marker Atg8. To gain insights into autophagy in malaria parasites, we investigated Plasmodium falciparum Atg8 (PfAtg8) employing techniques and conditions that are routinely used to study autophagy. Atg8 was similarly expressed and showed punctate localization throughout the parasite in both asexual and sexual stages; it was exclusively found in the pellet fraction as an integral membrane protein, which is in contrast to the yeast or mammalian Atg8 that is distributed among cytosolic and membrane fractions, and suggests for a constitutive autophagy. Starvation, the best known autophagy inducer, decreased PfAtg8 level by almost 3-fold compared to the normally growing parasites. Neither the Atg8-associated puncta nor the Atg8 expression level was significantly altered by treatment of parasites with routinely used autophagy inhibitors (cysteine (E64) and aspartic (pepstatin) protease inhibitors, the kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine), indicating an atypical feature of autophagy. Furthermore, prolonged inhibition of the major food vacuole protease activity by E64 and pepstatin did not cause accumulation of the Atg8-associated puncta in the food vacuole, suggesting that autophagy is primarily not meant for degradative function in malaria parasites. Atg8 showed partial colocalization with the apicoplast; doxycycline treatment, which disrupts apicoplast, did not affect Atg8 localization, suggesting a role, but not exclusive, in apicoplast

  9. Structural features of cholesteryl ester transfer protein: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xing; Jiang, Shengbo; Cai, Zhaodi; Rames, Matthew J; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Gang; Zhang, Shengli

    2013-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the net transfer of cholesteryl esters (CEs) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) or very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs). Inhibition of CETP raises HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) levels and reduces LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) levels, making it a promising drug target for the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. Although the crystal structure of CETP has been determined, the molecular mechanism mediating CEs transfer is still unknown, even the structural features of CETP in a physiological environment remain elusive. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to explore the structural features of CETP in an aqueous solution. Results show that the distal portion flexibility of N-terminal β-barrel domain is considerably greater in solution than in crystal; conversely, the flexibility of helix X is slightly less. During the simulations the distal end of C-terminal β-barrel domain expanded while the hydrophilic surface increasing more than the hydrophobic surface. In addition, a new surface pore was generated in this domain. This surface pore and all cavities in CETP are stable. These results suggest that the formation of a continuous tunnel within CETP by connecting cavities is permitted in solution. PMID:23042613

  10. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Assenberg, R; Delmas, O; Morin, B; Graham, S C; De Lamballerie, X; Laubert, C; Coutard, B; Grimes, J M; Neyts, J; Owens, R J; Brandt, B W; Gorbalenya, A; Tucker, P; Stuart, D I; Canard, B; Bourhy, H

    2010-08-01

    Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehensive structural characterization of the replicative machinery. The contribution of VIZIER programme was of several orders. First, it contributed substantially to research aimed at understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of rhabdoviruses. This diversity was then used to obtain further structural information on the proteins involved in replication. Two strategies were used to produce recombinant proteins by expression of both full length or domain constructs in either E. coli or insect cells, using the baculovirus system. In both cases, parallel cloning and expression screening at small-scale of multiple constructs based on different viruses including the addition of fusion tags, was key to the rapid generation of expression data. As a result, some progress has been made in the VIZIER programme towards dissecting the multi-functional L protein into components suitable for structural and functional studies. However, the phosphoprotein polymerase co-factor and the structural matrix protein, which play a number of roles during viral replication and drives viral assembly, have both proved much more amenable to structural biology. Applying the multi-construct/multi-virus approach central to protein production processes in VIZIER has yielded new structural information which may ultimately be exploitable in the derivation of novel ways of intervening in viral replication.

  11. Identification of a novel thylakoid protein gene involved in cold acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizhi; Gao, Hong; Yin, Chuntao; Xu, Xudong

    2012-09-01

    In cyanobacteria, genes involved in cold acclimation can be upregulated in response to cold stress with or without light. By inactivating 17 such genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, slr0815 (ccr2) was identified to be a novel gene required for survival at 15 °C. It was upregulated by cold stress in the light. Upon exposure to low temperature, a ccr2-null mutant showed greatly reduced photosynthetic and respiratory activities within 12 h relative to the wild-type. At 48 h, the photosystem (PS)II-mediated electron transport in the mutant was reduced to less than one-third of the wild-type level, and the duration of electron transfer from the Q(B) binding site of PSII to PSI was increased to about eight times the wild-type level, whereas the PSI-mediated electron transport remained unchanged. Using an antibody against GFP, a Ccr2-GFP fusion protein was localized to the thylakoid membrane rather than the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. Homologues to Ccr2 can be found in most cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants with sequenced genomes. Ccr2 is probably representative of a group of novel thylakoid proteins involved in acclimation to cold or other stresses.

  12. Lithostathine and pancreatitis-associated protein are involved in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duplan, L; Michel, B; Boucraut, J; Barthellémy, S; Desplat-Jego, S; Marin, V; Gambarelli, D; Bernard, D; Berthézène, P; Alescio-Lautier, B; Verdier, J M

    2001-01-01

    According to one of the theories formulated to explain the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amylosis may reflect a specific inflammatory response. Two inflammatory proteins, lithostathine and PAP, were evidenced by immunohistochemistry in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of patients with AD. In addition, lithostathine and PAP were significantly increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD when compared to patients with multiple sclerosis, another inflammatory disease, and to normal control subjects. However, no correlation was observed with age of occurrence. Furthermore, lithostathine and PAP were increased even at the very early stages of AD, and their level remained elevated during the course of the AD unlike TNFalpha whose level, very high at very early stages, regularly decreased. Finally, if part of lithostathine and PAP are synthesized in the brain, a large part comes from serum by passage over the blood-brain barrier. These results indicate (i) the existence of an acute phase response followed by a chronic inflammation in AD, and (ii) that lithostathine and PAP are involved even at the first pre-clinical biochemical events of AD. In addition, because lithostathine undergoes an autolytic cleavage leading to its precipitation and the formation of fibrils, we believe that it may be involved in amyloidosis and tangles by allowing heterogeneous precipitation of other proteins.

  13. Structural features of cartilage matrix protein deduced from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Argraves, W S; Deák, F; Sparks, K J; Kiss, I; Goetinck, P F

    1987-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the Mr 54,000 chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP) were selected from a cartilage cDNA expression library by immunological means. Antibodies elicited against insert-encoded protein purified from one of the clones reacted specifically with chicken CMP in immunoblots of total cartilage extract, providing positive identification of the cDNA clones isolated. The cDNAs detect a 3.4-kilobase transcript that was present in sternal cartilage and in cartilaginous but not in precartilaginous embryonic limb tissues. The cDNAs code for 416 amino acids of the chicken CMP, including its COOH terminus. There are two striking features in the deduced CMP amino acid sequence: first, it contains a region with significant homologies to repeat sequences in the precursor for epidermal growth factor; and second, it is made up of two large homologous repeat sequences. These results provide the first detailed structural information on the CMP and establish it as a developmentally regulated marker of cartilage differentiation. Images PMID:3025875

  14. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  15. Identification and Characterization of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Proteins Involved in Infection of the Tick Vector, Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Kocan, Katherine M; Bonzón-Kulichenko, Elena; Alberdi, Pilar; Blouin, Edmour F; Weisheit, Sabine; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Vancová, Marie; Bílý, Tomáš; Meyer, Damien F; Sterba, Jan; Contreras, Marinela; Rudenko, Nataliia; Grubhoffer, Libor; Vázquez, Jesús; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen transmitted by Ixodes scapularis that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, a high throughput quantitative proteomics approach was used to characterize A. phagocytophilum proteome during rickettsial multiplication and identify proteins involved in infection of the tick vector, I. scapularis. The first step in this research was focused on tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and sampled at two time points containing 10-15% and 65-71% infected cells, respectively to identify key bacterial proteins over-represented in high percentage infected cells. The second step was focused on adult female tick guts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum to compare in vitro results with those occurring during bacterial infection in vivo. The results showed differences in the proteome of A. phagocytophilum in infected ticks with higher impact on protein synthesis and processing than on bacterial replication in tick salivary glands. These results correlated well with the developmental cycle of A. phagocytophilum, in which cells convert from an intracellular reticulated, replicative form to the nondividing infectious dense-core form. The analysis of A. phagocytophilum differentially represented proteins identified stress response (GroEL, HSP70) and surface (MSP4) proteins that were over-represented in high percentage infected tick cells and salivary glands when compared to low percentage infected cells and guts, respectively. The results demonstrated that MSP4, GroEL and HSP70 interact and bind to tick cells, thus playing a role in rickettsia-tick interactions. The most important finding of these studies is the increase in the level of certain bacterial stress response and surface proteins in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells and salivary glands with functional implication in tick-pathogen interactions. These results gave a new dimension to the role of these stress response and surface

  16. Identification and Characterization of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Proteins Involved in Infection of the Tick Vector, Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Kocan, Katherine M.; Bonzón-Kulichenko, Elena; Alberdi, Pilar; Blouin, Edmour F.; Weisheit, Sabine; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Vancová, Marie; Bílý, Tomáš; Meyer, Damien F.; Sterba, Jan; Contreras, Marinela; Rudenko, Nataliia; Grubhoffer, Libor; Vázquez, Jesús; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen transmitted by Ixodes scapularis that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, a high throughput quantitative proteomics approach was used to characterize A. phagocytophilum proteome during rickettsial multiplication and identify proteins involved in infection of the tick vector, I. scapularis. The first step in this research was focused on tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and sampled at two time points containing 10–15% and 65–71% infected cells, respectively to identify key bacterial proteins over-represented in high percentage infected cells. The second step was focused on adult female tick guts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum to compare in vitro results with those occurring during bacterial infection in vivo. The results showed differences in the proteome of A. phagocytophilum in infected ticks with higher impact on protein synthesis and processing than on bacterial replication in tick salivary glands. These results correlated well with the developmental cycle of A. phagocytophilum, in which cells convert from an intracellular reticulated, replicative form to the nondividing infectious dense-core form. The analysis of A. phagocytophilum differentially represented proteins identified stress response (GroEL, HSP70) and surface (MSP4) proteins that were over-represented in high percentage infected tick cells and salivary glands when compared to low percentage infected cells and guts, respectively. The results demonstrated that MSP4, GroEL and HSP70 interact and bind to tick cells, thus playing a role in rickettsia-tick interactions. The most important finding of these studies is the increase in the level of certain bacterial stress response and surface proteins in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells and salivary glands with functional implication in tick-pathogen interactions. These results gave a new dimension to the role of these stress response and surface

  17. Structural and Functional Features of a Developmentally Regulated Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Krasity, Benjamin C.; Troll, Joshua V.; Lehnert, Erik M.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding proteins (LBPs) occur mainly in extracellular fluids and promote LPS delivery to specific host cell receptors. The function of LBPs has been studied principally in the context of host defense; the possible role of LBPs in nonpathogenic host-microbe interactions has not been well characterized. Using the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri model, we analyzed the structure and function of an LBP family protein, E. scolopes LBP1 (EsLBP1), and provide evidence for its role in triggering a symbiont-induced host developmental program. Previous studies showed that, during initial host colonization, the LPS of V. fischeri synergizes with peptidoglycan (PGN) monomer to induce morphogenesis of epithelial tissues of the host animal. Computationally modeled EsLBP1 shares some but not all structural features of mammalian LBPs that are thought important for LPS binding. Similar to human LBP, recombinant EsLBP1 expressed in insect cells bound V. fischeri LPS and Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with nanomolar or greater affinity but bound Francisella tularensis LPS only weakly and did not bind PGN monomer. Unlike human LBP, EsLBP1 did not bind N. meningitidis LOS:CD14 complexes. The eslbp1 transcript was upregulated ~22-fold by V. fischeri at 24 h postinoculation. Surprisingly, this upregulation was not induced by exposure to LPS but, rather, to the PGN monomer alone. Hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) localized eslbp1 transcript and protein in crypt epithelia, where V. fischeri induces morphogenesis. The data presented here provide a window into the evolution of LBPs and the scope of their roles in animal symbioses. PMID:26463160

  18. Structural and dynamic features of cold-shock proteins of Listeria monocytogenes, a psychrophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juho; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Jin, Bonghwan; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Kim, Yangmee

    2013-04-01

    Cold-shock proteins (Csps), proteins expressed when the ambient temperature drops below the growth-supporting temperature, bind to single-stranded nucleic acids and act as RNA chaperones to regulate translation. Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrophilic food-borne pathogen that is problematic for the food industry. Structures of Csps from psychrophilic bacteria have not yet been studied. Despite dramatic differences in the thermostability of Csps of various thermophilic microorganisms, these proteins share a high degree of primary sequence homology and a high degree of three-dimensional structural similarity. Here, we investigated the structural and dynamic features as well as the thermostability of L. monocytogenes CspA (Lm-CspA). Lm-CspA has a five-stranded β-barrel structure with hydrophobic core packing and two salt bridges. When heptathymidine (dT(7)) binds, values for the heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect and order parameters of residues in surface loop regions near nucleic acid binding sites increase dramatically. Moreover, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments showed that slow motions observed for the nucleic acid binding residues K7, W8, F15, F27, and R56 disappeared in Lm-CspA-dT(7). Lm-CspA is less thermostable than mesophilic and thermophilic Csps, with a lower melting temperature (40 °C). The structural flexibility that accompanies longer surface loops and less hydrophobic core packing and a number of salt bridges and unfavorable electrostatic repulsion are likely key factors in the low thermostability of Lm-CspA. This implies that the large conformational flexibility of psychrophilic Lm-CspA, which more easily accommodates nucleic acids at low temperature, is required for RNA chaperone function under cold-shock conditions and for the cold adaptation of L. monocytogenes. PMID:23506337

  19. SNF1-related protein kinases type 2 are involved in plant responses to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Anna; Anielska-Mazur, Anna; Bucholc, Maria; Koen, Emmanuel; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Zmienko, Agnieszka; Krzywinska, Ewa; Wawer, Izabela; McLoughlin, Fionn; Ruszkowski, Dariusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Testerink, Christa; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Wendehenne, David; Dobrowolska, Grazyna

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium ions are notorious environmental pollutants. To adapt to cadmium-induced deleterious effects plants have developed sophisticated defense mechanisms. However, the signaling pathways underlying the plant response to cadmium are still elusive. Our data demonstrate that SnRK2s (for SNF1-related protein kinase2) are transiently activated during cadmium exposure and are involved in the regulation of plant response to this stress. Analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Osmotic Stress-Activated Protein Kinase activity in tobacco Bright Yellow 2 cells indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide, produced mainly via an l-arginine-dependent process, contribute to the kinase activation in response to cadmium. SnRK2.4 is the closest homolog of tobacco Osmotic Stress-Activated Protein Kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Comparative analysis of seedling growth of snrk2.4 knockout mutants versus wild-type Arabidopsis suggests that SnRK2.4 is involved in the inhibition of root growth triggered by cadmium; the mutants were more tolerant to the stress. Measurements of the level of three major species of phytochelatins (PCs) in roots of plants exposed to Cd(2+) showed a similar (PC2, PC4) or lower (PC3) concentration in snrk2.4 mutants in comparison to wild-type plants. These results indicate that the enhanced tolerance of the mutants does not result from a difference in the PCs level. Additionally, we have analyzed ROS accumulation in roots subjected to Cd(2+) treatment. Our data show significantly lower Cd(2+)-induced ROS accumulation in the mutants' roots. Concluding, the obtained results indicate that SnRK2s play a role in the regulation of plant tolerance to cadmium, most probably by controlling ROS accumulation triggered by cadmium ions.

  20. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  1. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of functional proteins involved in obesity associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allam Appa; Tayaru, N Manga; Thota, Hanuman; Changalasetty, Suresh Babu; Thota, Lalitha Saroja; Gedela, Srinubabu

    2008-03-01

    The twin epidemic of diabetes and obesity pose daunting challenges worldwide. The dramatic rise in obesity-associated diabetes resulted in an alarming increase in the incidence and prevalence of obesity an important complication of diabetes. Differences among individuals in their susceptibility to both these conditions probably reflect their genetic constitutions. The dramatic improvements in genomic and bioinformatic resources are accelerating the pace of gene discovery. It is tempting to speculate the key susceptible genes/proteins that bridges diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this regard, we evaluated the role of several genes/proteins that are believed to be involved in the evolution of obesity associated diabetes by employing multiple sequence alignment using ClustalW tool and constructed a phylogram tree using functional protein sequences extracted from NCBI. Phylogram was constructed using Neighbor-Joining Algorithm a bioinformatic tool. Our bioinformatic analysis reports resistin gene as ominous link with obesity associated diabetes. This bioinformatic study will be useful for future studies towards therapeutic inventions of obesity associated type 2 diabetes. PMID:23675069

  3. Five RecA-like proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are involved in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, A L; Kohli, J

    2003-01-01

    The genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains five genes that code for proteins with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli recombination protein RecA: rad51+, rhp55+, rhp57+, rlp1+, and dmc1+. We analyzed the effect of deletion of each of these genes on meiotic recombination and viability of spores. Meiotic recombination levels were different from wild type in all recA-related mutants in several genetic intervals, suggesting that all five RecA homologs of S. pombe are required for normal levels of meiotic recombination. Spore viability was reduced in rad51, rhp55, and rhp57 mutants, but not in rlp1 and dmc1. It is argued that reduction of crossover is not the only cause for the observed reduction of spore viability. Analysis of double and triple mutants revealed that Rad51 and Dmc1 play major and partially overlapping roles in meiotic recombination, while Rhp55, Rhp57, and Rlp1 play accessory roles. Remarkably, deletion of Rlp1 decreases the frequency of intergenic recombination (crossovers), but increases intragenic recombination (gene conversion). On the basis of our results, we present a model for the involvement of five RecA-like proteins of S. pombe in meiotic recombination and discuss their respective roles. PMID:14668362

  4. NELF is a nuclear protein involved in hypothalamic GnRH neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Bhagavath, Balasubramanian; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Halvorson, Lisa; Podolsky, Robert S; Chorich, Lynn P; Prasad, Puttur; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Cameron, Richard S; Layman, Lawrence C

    2010-05-01

    Nasal embryonic LHRH factor (NELF) has been hypothesized to participate in the migration of GnRH and olfactory neurons into the forebrain, a prerequisite for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in puberty and reproduction. However, the biological functions of NELF, which has no homology to any human protein, remain largely elusive. Although mRNA expression did not differ, NELF protein expression was greater in migratory than postmigratory GnRH neurons. Pituitary Nelf mRNA expression was also observed and increased 3-fold after exogenous GnRH administration. Contrary to a previous report, NELF displayed predominant nuclear localization in GnRH neurons, confirmed by mutagenesis of a putative nuclear localization signal resulting in impaired nuclear expression. NELF knockdown impaired GnRH neuronal migration of NLT cells in vitro. These findings and the identification of two putative zinc fingers suggest that NELF could be a transcription factor. Collectively, our findings implicate NELF as a nuclear protein involved in the developmental function of the reproductive axis.

  5. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui; Cheah, Yew-Hoong; Meenakshii, Nallappan; Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum proteins involved in cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to chemokine CX3CL1

    PubMed Central

    Hermand, Patricia; Cicéron, Liliane; Pionneau, Cédric; Vaquero, Catherine; Combadière, Christophe; Deterre, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is associated with cytoadherence of infected red blood cells (iRBC) to endothelial cells. Numerous host molecules have been involved in cytoadherence, including the adhesive chemokine CX3CL1. Most of the identified parasite ligands are from the multigenic and hypervariable Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) family which makes them poor targets for the development of a broadly protective vaccine. Using proteomics, we have identified two 25-kDa parasite proteins with adhesive properties for CX3CL1, called CBP for CX3CL1 Binding Proteins. CBPs are coded by single-copy genes with little polymorphic variation and no homology with other P. falciparum gene products. Specific antibodies raised against epitopes from the predicted extracellular domains of each CBP efficiently stain the surface of RBC infected with trophozoites or schizonts, which is a strong indication of CBP expression at the surface of iRBC. These anti-CBP antibodies partially neutralize iRBC adherence to CX3CL1. This adherence is similarly inhibited in the presence of peptides from the CBP extracellular domains, while irrelevant peptides had no such effect. CBP1 and CBP2 are new P. falciparum ligands for the human chemokine CX3CL1. The identification of this non-polymorphic P. falciparum factors provides a new avenue for innovative vaccination approaches. PMID:27653778

  7. Looking for prosocial genes: ITRAQ analysis of proteins involved in MDMA-induced sociability in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuteykin-Teplyakov, Konstantin; Maldonado, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Social behavior plays a fundamental role in life of many animal species, allowing the interaction between individuals and sharing of experiences, needs, and goals across them. In humans, some neuropsychiatric diseases, including anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder and autism spectrum disorders, are often characterized by impaired sociability. Here we report that N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") at low dose (3mg/kg) has differential effects on mouse social behavior. In some animals, MDMA promotes sociability without hyperlocomotion, whereas in other mice it elevates locomotor activity without affecting sociability. Both WAY-100635, a selective antagonist of 5-HT1A receptor, and L-368899, a selective oxytocin receptor antagonist, abolish prosocial effects of MDMA. Differential quantitative analysis of brain proteome by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification technology (iTRAQ) revealed 21 specific proteins that were highly correlated with sociability, and allowed to distinguish between entactogenic prosocial and hyperlocomotor effects of MDMA on proteome level. Our data suggest particular relevance of neurotransmission mediated by GABA B receptor, as well as proteins involved in energy maintenance for MDMA-induced sociability. Functional association network for differentially expressed proteins in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and amygdala were identified. These results provide new information for understanding the neurobiological substrate of sociability and may help to discover new therapeutic approaches to modulate social behavior in patients suffering from social fear and low sociability.

  8. Chemical genetic screen for AMPKα2 substrates uncovers a network of proteins involved in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Banko, Max R.; Allen, Jasmina J.; Schaffer, Bethany E.; Wilker, Erik W.; Tsou, Peiling; White, Jamie L.; Villén, Judit; Wang, Beatrice; Kim, Sara R.; Sakamoto, Kei; Gygi, Steven P.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Brunet, Anne

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated by low nutrient levels. Functions of AMPK, other than its role in cellular metabolism, are just beginning to emerge. Here we use a chemical genetics screen to identify direct substrates of AMPK in human cells. We find that AMPK phosphorylates 28 previously unidentified substrates, several of which are involved in mitosis and cytokinesis. We identify the residues phosphorylated by AMPK in vivo in several substrates, including protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12C (PPP1R12C) and p21 -activated protein kinase (PAK2). AMPK-induced phosphorylation is necessary for PPP1R12C interaction with 14-3-3 and phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain. Both AMPK activity and PPP1R12C phosphorylation are increased in mitotic cells and are important for mitosis completion. These findings suggest that AMPK coordinates nutrient status with mitosis completion, which may be critical for the organism’s response to low nutrients during development, or in adult stem and cancer cells. PMID:22137581

  9. Abrogation of TNF-mediated cytotoxicity by space flight involves protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, K. M.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Experiments conducted on STS-50 indicated that space flight significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated killing of LM929 cells compared to ground controls. In ground-based studies, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also inhibited TNF-mediated killing of LM929 cells. Therefore, we used PKC inhibitors to determine if the inhibitory effects of spaceflight on TNF-mediated cytotoxicity involved the activation of PKC. In experiments conducted onboard space shuttle mission STS-54, we saw that in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors H7 and H8, TNF-mediated cytotoxicity was restored to levels of those observed in the ground controls. Subsequent experiments done during the STS-57 mission tested the dose response of two protein kinase inhibitors, H7 and HA1004. We again saw that killing was restored in a dose-dependent manner, with inhibitor concentrations known to inhibit PKC being most effective. These data suggest that space flight ameliorates the action of TNF by affecting PKC in target cells.

  10. A VAMP-associated protein, PVA31 is involved in leaf senescence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Mie; Nakai, Yusuke; Arima, Keita; Nishiyama, Sayo; Hirano, Tomoko; Sato, Masa H

    2015-01-01

    VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs) are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here, we report a functional analysis of one of the VAPs, PVA31, and demonstrate its novel function on leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. The expression of PVA31 is highly induced in senescence leaves, and localizes to the plasma membrane as well as the ARA7-positive endosomes. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrates that PVA31 is interacted with the plasma membrane localized-VAMP proteins, VAMP721/722/724 but not with the endosome-localized VAMPs, VAMP711 and VAMP727, indicating that PVA31 is associated with VAMP721/722/724 on the plasma membrane. Strong constitutive expression of PVA31 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induces the typical symptom of leaf senescence earlier than WT in normal growth and an artificially induced senescence conditions. In addition, the marker genes for the SA-mediated signaling pathways, PR-1, is promptly expressed with elicitor application. These data indicate that PVA31-overexpressing plants exhibit the early senescence phenotype in their leaves, and suggest that PVA31 is involved in the SA-mediated programmed cell death process during leaf senescence and PR-protein secretion during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis. PMID:25897470

  11. A VAMP-associated protein, PVA31 is involved in leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mie; Nakai, Yusuke; Arima, Keita; Nishiyama, Sayo; Hirano, Tomoko; Sato, Masa H

    2015-01-01

    VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs) are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here, we report a functional analysis of one of the VAPs, PVA31, and demonstrate its novel function on leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. The expression of PVA31 is highly induced in senescence leaves, and localizes to the plasma membrane as well as the ARA7-positive endosomes. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrates that PVA31 is interacted with the plasma membrane localized-VAMP proteins, VAMP721/722/724 but not with the endosome-localized VAMPs, VAMP711 and VAMP727, indicating that PVA31 is associated with VAMP721/722/724 on the plasma membrane. Strong constitutive expression of PVA31 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induces the typical symptom of leaf senescence earlier than WT in normal growth and an artificially induced senescence conditions. In addition, the marker genes for the SA-mediated signaling pathways, PR-1, is promptly expressed with elicitor application. These data indicate that PVA31-overexpressing plants exhibit the early senescence phenotype in their leaves, and suggest that PVA31 is involved in the SA-mediated programmed cell death process during leaf senescence and PR-protein secretion during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis.

  12. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  13. Abrogation of TNF-mediated cytotoxicity by space flight involves protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Woods, K M; Chapes, S K

    1994-03-01

    Experiments conducted on STS-50 indicated that space flight significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated killing of LM929 cells compared to ground controls. In ground-based studies, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also inhibited TNF-mediated killing of LM929 cells. Therefore, we used PKC inhibitors to determine if the inhibitory effects of spaceflight on TNF-mediated cytotoxicity involved the activation of PKC. In experiments conducted onboard space shuttle mission STS-54, we saw that in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors H7 and H8, TNF-mediated cytotoxicity was restored to levels of those observed in the ground controls. Subsequent experiments done during the STS-57 mission tested the dose response of two protein kinase inhibitors, H7 and HA1004. We again saw that killing was restored in a dose-dependent manner, with inhibitor concentrations known to inhibit PKC being most effective. These data suggest that space flight ameliorates the action of TNF by affecting PKC in target cells.

  14. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  15. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src.

  16. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  17. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. p53 response to arsenic exposure in epithelial cells: protein kinase B/Akt involvement.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Marisol; Morales, Moisés; Tapia, Rocío; del Carmen Alarcón, Luz; Sordo, Montserrat; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Ortega, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther

    2007-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a major environmental contaminant associated with an increased risk of human skin cancer. Arsenic modulates cellular signaling pathways that affect diverse processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, including genotoxic damage. The p53 protein plays a central role in mediating stress and DNA damage responses, leading to either growth arrest or apoptosis. Several signal transduction pathways activated under a plethora of stressing conditions increase p53 protein levels. To further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the arsenic mode of action, we explored the effects of this metalloid on the activation of the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Ca2+/diacylglicerol dependent protein kinase/protein kinase B (PKB) signaling cascade and its repercussion in p53 activation in two epithelial cell types: primary normal human keratinocytes cultures (NHK) and the carcinoma-derived C33-A cell line. Although in both cell systems arsenic leads to an increase in p53 and its binding to DNA, the final outcome is different. In NHK, arsenic triggers a sustained activation of the PI3K/PKB/glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta pathway, driving the cell into a cell-differentiated stage in which the proliferation signals are turned down. In sharp contrast, in C33-A cells, arsenic leads to a transient increase in p53 followed by a drastic reduction in its nuclear levels and an increase in cell proliferation. These findings favor the notion that p53-stage and transcriptional abilities are important to understand modifications in the proliferation-differentiation balance, an equilibrium that is severely impaired by arsenic.

  19. Triskelion Structure of the Gli521 Protein, Involved in the Gliding Mechanism of Mycoplasma mobile▿

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Takahiro; Adan-Kubo, Jun; Miyata, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma mobile binds to solid surfaces and glides smoothly and continuously by a unique mechanism. A huge protein, Gli521 (521 kDa), is involved in the gliding machinery, and it is localized in the cell neck, the base of the membrane protrusion. This protein is thought to have the role of force transmission. In this study, the Gli521 protein was purified from M. mobile cells, and its molecular shape was studied. Gel filtration analysis showed that the isolated Gli521 protein forms mainly a monomer in Tween 80-containing buffer and oligomers in Triton X-100-containing buffer. Rotary shadowing electron microscopy showed that the Gli521 monomer consisted of three parts: an oval, a rod, and a hook. The oval was 15 nm long by 11 nm wide, and the filamentous part composed of the rod and the hook was 106 nm long and 3 nm in diameter. The Gli521 molecules form a trimer, producing a “triskelion” reminiscent of eukaryotic clathrin, through association at the hook end. Image averaging of the central part of the triskelion suggested that there are stable and rigid structures. The binding site of a previously isolated monoclonal antibody on Gli521 images showed that the hook end and oval correspond to the C- and N-terminal regions, respectively. Partial digestion of Gli521 showed that the molecule could be divided into three domains, which we assigned to the oval, rod, and hook of the molecular image. The Gli521 molecule's role in the gliding mechanism is discussed. PMID:19915029

  20. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  1. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  2. Statistical Analysis of Crystallization Database Links Protein Physico-Chemical Features with Crystallization Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J.; Bruno, Andrew E.; Luft, Joseph R.; Snell, Edward H.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  3. Statistical analysis of crystallization database links protein physico-chemical features with crystallization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J; Bruno, Andrew E; Luft, Joseph R; Snell, Edward H; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  4. Spial: analysis of subtype-specific features in multiple sequence alignments of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wuster, Arthur; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Babu, M. Madan

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Spial (Specificity in alignments) is a tool for the comparative analysis of two alignments of evolutionarily related sequences that differ in their function, such as two receptor subtypes. It highlights functionally important residues that are either specific to one of the two alignments or conserved across both alignments. It permits visualization of this information in three complementary ways: by colour-coding alignment positions, by sequence logos and optionally by colour-coding the residues of a protein structure provided by the user. This can aid in the detection of residues that are involved in the subtype-specific interaction with a ligand, other proteins or nucleic acids. Spial may also be used to detect residues that may be post-translationally modified in one of the two sets of sequences. Availability: http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/genomes/spial/; supplementary information is available at http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/genomes/spial/help.html Contact: ajv@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk PMID:20880955

  5. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  6. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan; Zheng, Qiping; Yang, Xiaoming; Wang, Siying

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  7. Immunological Features of the Non-Structural Proteins of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rascón-Castelo, Edgar; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Mateu, Enric; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is currently one of the most important viruses affecting the swine industry worldwide. Despite the large number of papers published each year, the participation of non-structural proteins (nsps) in the immune response is not completely clear. nsps have been involved in the host innate immune response, specifically, nsp1α/β, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp11 have been associated with the immunomodulation capability of the virus. To date, only participation by nsp1, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp7 in the humoral immune response has been reported, with the role of other nsps being overlooked. Furthermore, nsp1, nsp2, nsp5, nsp7 nsp9, nsp10, nsp11 have been implicated in the induction of IFN-γ and probably in the development of the cell-mediated immune response. This review discusses recent reports involving the participation of nsps in the modulation of the innate immune response and their role in the induction of both the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:25719944

  8. NMR studies of conformational states of proteins involved in biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ziqi

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are the most ancient and ubiquitous cofactors that exist throughout evolution. The most important biosynthetic system of the cluster in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is the ISC system. Defects in this system can be lethal and have been associated with a number of human diseases. Previous works show that a number of proteins are involved in the [Fe-S] biosynthetic processes and the structural flexibility may play an important role. For example, it was shown that apo-IscU, the scaffold protein, from Escherichia coli populates two functionally important conformational states, one dynamically disordered (D-state) and the other more structured (S-state) (Kim et al., 2009; Kim et al., 2012c). To further investigate the characteristics and transition of the conformational states of proteins involved in this system, I performed extensive NMR studies. Here, I present the findings based on my studies of two important players of the ISC system, IscU and HscB. In this research, I find that a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization might account for the slow step in the S-D interconversion of IscU. More specifically, P14 and P101 are trans in the S-state, but become cis in the D-state. In addition, I discover that IscU is very responsive to pH changes, and I postulate that this response is correlated to conserved histidine residues, H10 and H105. Moreover, my thermodynamic analyses reveal that the S-D equilibrium of IscU is also very sensitive to change in temperature, pressure, and amino acid sequence compared to other proteins. In the study, I also discovered a novel state of IscU, the unfolded U-state. I suspect that this state may serve as an intermediate of interconversion between IscU S-/D-states. Finally, I extended the effort to HscB, and find that it may possess more conformational flexibility than expected earlier. I postulate that this flexibility may be the cause of the line-broadening observed during interaction of HscB with Isc

  9. Regulatory elements and structural features of Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene for fungal and pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are involved in plant defense. PGIPs are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that are known to inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs) during the infection process. Several sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes (BvPGIP) were clon...

  10. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  11. Mitochondrial acyl carrier protein is involved in lipoic acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brody, S; Oh, C; Hoja, U; Schweizer, E

    1997-05-19

    The yeast gene, ACP1, encoding the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, was deleted by gene replacement. The resulting acp1-deficient mutants had only 5-10% of the wild-type lipoic acid content remaining, and exhibited a respiratory-deficient phenotype. Upon meiosis, the lipoate deficiency co-segregated with the acp1 deletion. The role of ACP1 in long-chain fatty acid synthesis was studied in fast and fas2 null mutants completely lacking cytoplasmic fatty acid synthase. When grown on odd-chain (13:0 and 15:0) fatty acids, these cells showed less than 1% of C-16 and C-18 acids in their total lipids. Mitochondrial ACP is therefore suggested to be involved with the biosynthesis of octanoate, a precursor to lipoic acid. PMID:9187370

  12. Using intramolecular disulfide bonds in tau protein to deduce structural features of aggregation-resistant conformations.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sophie; Ullman, Orly; Stultz, Collin M

    2012-03-16

    Because tau aggregation likely plays a role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the processes that affect tau aggregation is of considerable importance. One factor that has been shown to influence the aggregation propensity is the oxidation state of the protein itself. Tau protein, which contains two naturally occurring cysteine residues, can form both intermolecular disulfide bonds and intramolecular disulfide bonds. Several studies suggest that intermolecular disulfide bonds can promote tau aggregation in vitro. By contrast, although there are data to suggest that intramolecular disulfide bond formation retards tau aggregation in vitro, the precise mechanism underlying this observation remains unclear. While it has been hypothesized that a single intramolecular disulfide bond in tau leads to compact conformations that cannot form extended structure consistent with tau fibrils, there are few data to support this conjecture. In the present study we generate oxidized forms of the truncation mutant, K18, which contains all four microtubule binding repeats, and isolate the monomeric fraction, which corresponds to K18 monomers that have a single intramolecular disulfide bond. We study the aggregation propensity of the oxidized monomeric fraction and relate these data to an atomistic model of the K18 unfolded ensemble. Our results argue that the main effect of intramolecular disulfide bond formation is to preferentially stabilize conformers within the unfolded ensemble that place the aggregation-prone tau subsequences, PHF6* and PHF6, in conformations that are inconsistent with the formation of cross-β-structure. These data further our understanding of the precise structural features that retard tau aggregation.

  13. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  14. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling.

  15. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  16. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  17. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  18. The Ku70 DNA-repair protein is involved in centromere function in a grasshopper species.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-06-25

    The Ku70 protein is involved in numerous cell functions, the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway being the best known. Here, we report a novel function for this protein in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. We observed the presence of large Ku70 foci on the centromeres of meiotic and mitotic chromosomes during the cell cycle stages showing the highest centromeric activity (i.e., metaphase and anaphase). The fact that colchicine treatment prevented centromeric location of Ku70, suggests a microtubule-dependent centromeric function for Ku70. Likewise, the absence of Ku70 at metaphase-anaphase centromeres from three males whose Ku70 gene had been knocked down using interference RNA, and the dramatic increase in the frequency of polyploid spermatids observed in these males, suggest that the centromeric presence of Ku70 is required for normal cytokinesis in this species. The centromeric function of Ku70 was not observed in 14 other grasshopper and locust species, or in the mouse, thus suggesting that it is an autapomorphy in E. plorans. PMID:23797468

  19. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B is involved in virus morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gouklani, Hamed; Bull, Rowena A; Beyer, Claudia; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Gowans, Eric J; Drummer, Heidi E; Netter, Hans J; White, Peter A; Haqshenas, Gholamreza

    2012-05-01

    The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viroporin that is dispensable for viral genome replication but plays a critical role in virus morphogenesis. In this study, we generated a JFH1-based intergenotypic chimeric genome that encoded a heterologous genotype 1b (GT1b) p7. The parental intergenotypic chimeric genome was nonviable in human hepatoma cells, and infectious chimeric virions were produced only when cells transfected with the chimeric genomes were passaged several times. Sequence analysis of the entire polyprotein-coding region of the recovered chimeric virus revealed one predominant amino acid substitution in nonstructural protein 2 (NS2), T23N, and one in NS5B, K151R. Forward genetic analysis demonstrated that each of these mutations per se restored the infectivity of the parental chimeric genome, suggesting that interactions between p7, NS2, and NS5B were required for virion assembly/maturation. p7 and NS5B colocalized in cellular compartments, and the NS5B mutation did not affect the colocalization pattern. The NS5B K151R mutation neither increased viral RNA replication in human hepatoma cells nor altered the polymerase activity of NS5B in an in vitro assay. In conclusion, this study suggests that HCV NS5B is involved in virus morphogenesis.

  20. Charged MVB protein 5 is involved in T-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-29

    Charged multivesicular body protein 5 (CHMP5) has a key role in multivesicular body biogenesis and a critical role in the downregulation of signaling pathways through receptor degradation. However, the role of CHMP5 in T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling has not been previously investigated. In this study, we utilized a short hairpin RNA-based RNA interference approach to investigate the functional role of CHMP5. Upon TCR stimulation, CHMP5-knockdown (CHMP5(KD)) Jurkat T cells exhibited activation of TCR downstream signaling molecules, such as PKCθ and IKKαβ, and resulted in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and the marked upregulation of TCR-induced gene expression. Moreover, we found that activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells transcriptional factors were markedly activated in CHMP5(KD) Jurkat cells in response to TCR stimulation, which led to a significant increase in interleukin-2 secretion. Biochemical studies revealed that CHMP5 endogenously forms high-molecular-weight complexes, including TCR molecules, and specifically interacts with TCRβ. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis also revealed that CHMP5(KD) Jurkat T cells exhibit upregulation of TCR expression on the cell surface compared with control Jurkat T cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that CHMP5 might be involved in the homeostatic regulation of TCR on the cell surface, presumably through TCR recycling or degradation. Thus CHMP5 is implicated in TCR-mediated signaling.

  1. Involvement of zinc in cell-free protein synthesizing systems from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S.E.; Wallwork, J.C.

    1986-03-05

    There are conflicting reports in the literature concerning the role of zinc in protein synthesis. This study presents evidence for the direct involvement of zinc in the translation of polypeptide chains in rats. Cell-free systems for incorporation of amino acids into acid-insoluble proteins were prepared from livers of three populations of rats: (1) rats fed ad libitum a diet containing 25 ppm zinc; (2) rats fed a diet containing less than 1 ppm zinc and (3) rats pair-fed a diet containing 25 ppm zinc. The diets contained 20% egg white and were enriched with biotin. Distilled deionized drinking water was given. The animals were maintained on the regimen for 45 days with precautions to limit zinc contamination. Group 2 showed typical signs of zinc deficiency, including decreased bone zinc. In vitro systems containing liver polysomes and a pH5 precipitate enzyme fraction indicated that the synthetic ability of systems isolated from zinc-deficient rats was considerably depressed, resulting in incorporation of amino acids 15 to 30% less than systems from pair-fed rats and 30 to 50% less than ad libitum-fed control animals. The results of crossover experiments performed by mixing polysome and enzyme fractions from the different groups indicated that the defect is due primarily to the pH precipitate enzyme fraction and not the polysomes.

  2. Trichoderma mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is involved in induction of plant systemic resistance.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Harel, Michal; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Chet, Ilan; Mukherjee, Prasun K

    2005-10-01

    The role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) TmkA in inducing systemic resistance in cucumber against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. lacrymans was investigated by using tmkA loss-of-function mutants of Trichoderma virens. In an assay where Trichoderma spores were germinated in proximity to cucumber roots, the mutants were able to colonize the plant roots as effectively as the wild-type strain but failed to induce full systemic resistance against the leaf pathogen. Interactions with the plant roots enhanced the level of tmkA transcript in T. virens and its homologue in Trichoderma asperellum. At the protein level, we could detect the activation of two forms reacting to the phospho-p44/42 MAPK antibody. Biocontrol experiments demonstrated that the tmkA mutants retain their biocontrol potential against Rhizoctonia solani in soil but are not effective against Sclerotium rolfsii in reducing disease incidence. Our results show that, unlike in many plant-pathogen interactions, Trichoderma TmkA MAPK is not involved in limited root colonization. Trichoderma, however, needs MAPK signaling in order to induce full systemic resistance in the plant.

  3. Midkine and pleiotrophin: two related proteins involved in development, survival, inflammation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Takashi

    2002-09-01

    Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are low molecular weight proteins with closely related structures. They are mainly composed of two domains held by disulfide bridges, and there are three antiparallel beta-sheets in each domain. MK and PTN promote the growth, survival, and migration of various cells, and play roles in neurogenesis and epithelial mesenchymal interactions during organogenesis. A chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, protein-tyrosine phosphatase zeta (PTPzeta), is a receptor for MK and PTN. The downstream signaling system includes ERK and PI3 kinase. MK binds to the chondroitin sulfate portion of PTPzeta with high affinity. Among the various chondroitin sulfate structures, the E unit, which has 4,6-disulfated N-acetylgalactosamine, provides the strongest binding site. The expression of MK and PTN is increased in various human tumors, making them promising as tumor markers and as targets for tumor therapy. MK and PTN expression also increases upon ischemic injury. MK enhances the migration of inflammatory cells, and is involved in neointima formation and renal injury following ischemia. MK is also interesting from the viewpoints of the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, increasing the efficiency of in vitro development, and the prevention of HIV infection.

  4. Simiate is an Actin binding protein involved in filopodia dynamics and arborization of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Derlig, Kristin; Ehrhardt, Toni; Gießl, Andreas; Brandstätter, Johann H.; Enz, Ralf; Dahlhaus, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The Actin cytoskeleton constitutes the functional base for a multitude of cellular processes extending from motility and migration to cell mechanics and morphogenesis. The latter is particularly important to neuronal cells since the accurate functioning of the brain crucially depends on the correct arborization of neurons, a process that requires the formation of several dozens to hundreds of dendritic branches. Recently, a model was proposed where different transcription factors are detailed to distinct facets and phases of dendritogenesis and exert their function by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton, however, the proteins involved as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Simiate, a protein previously indicated to activate transcription, directly associates with both, G- and F-Actin and in doing so, affects Actin polymerization and Actin turnover in living cells. Imaging studies illustrate that Simiate particularly influences filopodia dynamics and specifically increases the branching of proximal, but not distal dendrites of developing neurons. The data suggests that Simiate functions as a direct molecular link between transcription regulation on one side, and dendritogenesis on the other, wherein Simiate serves to coordinate the development of proximal and distal dendrites by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton of filopodia and on transcription regulation, hence supporting the novel model. PMID:24782708

  5. Association of RNF43 with cell cycle proteins involved in p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Haiyang; Xing, Chunyang; Cao, Guoqiang; Wei, Bajin; Xu, Xiao; Song, Penghong; Chen, Leiming; Chen, Hai; Yin, Shengyong; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that RNF43 could regulate the cell cycle in a p53-dependent manner in HCC. In this study, we aimed to access whether RNF43 could interact with cell cycle proteins involved in p53 pathway, including pRB, Cyclin D1 and MDM2. Totally, 123 paired HCC tissues and corresponding noncancerous tissues from HCC patients were included, and the expression of Cyclin D1, pRB and MDM2 was analyzed using tissue microarray. Our results showed the expression level of RNF43 in HCC was positively correlated with that of MDM2, Cyclin D1 and pRB-S780. There was no significant correlation between the expression of RNF43 and pRB-S807/S811. Indicating that RNF43 effected cell cycling by regulating the expression of pRB, Cyclin D1 and MDM2 proteins, and pRB-S780 but not pRB-S807/S811, was participated in RNF43 regulated cell cycling. PMID:26823834

  6. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteoglycans by human fibroblasts involves recognition of the protein core.

    PubMed Central

    Glössl, J; Schubert-Prinz, R; Gregory, J D; Damle, S P; von Figura, K; Kresse, H

    1983-01-01

    Endocytosis by cultured human skin fibroblasts of 35SO4(2-)-labelled or [3H]leucine-labelled proteoglycans from fibroblast secretions and of 125I-proteodermatan sulphate from pig skin was quantitatively investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) Core proteins prepared by digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase were at least as efficiently endocytosed as native proteoglycans. Pig skin proteodermatan sulphate was a competitive inhibitor of endocytosis of 35SO4(2-)-labelled proteoglycans. (2) Proteoglycans produced in the presence of tunicamycin and native proteoglycans degraded with endoglycosaminidase H were internalized at a normal rate. Several monosaccharides that can be bound by mammalian lectins were unable to influence the internalization of proteoglycans. Treatment of proteoglycans with neuraminidase, however, resulted in an increased clearance rate. (3) Reductive methylation or acetoacetylation of lysine residues was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the rate of proteoglycan endocytosis. Reversal of acetoacetylation normalized the uptake properties. Endocytosis of native proteoglycans was also reduced in the presence of poly-L-lysine, and this reduction in endocytosis was observed as well with proteoglycans synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethylcysteine. These results suggest that the recognition marker required for receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteodermatan sulphate resides in its protein moiety and involves lysine residues. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6316923

  7. Small G proteins in peroxisome biogenesis: the potential involvement of ADP-ribosylation factor 6

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomes execute diverse and vital functions in virtually every eukaryote. New peroxisomes form by budding from pre-existing organelles or de novo by vesiculation of the ER. It has been suggested that ADP-ribosylation factors and COPI coatomer complexes are involved in these processes. Results Here we show that all viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in one of the small GTPases which have an important role in the regulation of vesicular transport contain functional peroxisomes, and that the number of these organelles in oleate-grown cells is significantly upregulated in the arf1 and arf3 null strains compared to the wild-type strain. In addition, we provide evidence that a portion of endogenous Arf6, the mammalian orthologue of yeast Arf3, is associated with the cytoplasmic face of rat liver peroxisomes. Despite this, ablation of Arf6 did neither influence the regulation of peroxisome abundance nor affect the localization of peroxisomal proteins in cultured fetal hepatocytes. However, co-overexpression of wild-type, GTP hydrolysis-defective or (dominant-negative) GTP binding-defective forms of Arf1 and Arf6 caused mislocalization of newly-synthesized peroxisomal proteins and resulted in an alteration of peroxisome morphology. Conclusion These observations suggest that Arf6 is a key player in mammalian peroxisome biogenesis. In addition, they also lend strong support to and extend the concept that specific Arf isoform pairs may act in tandem to regulate exclusive trafficking pathways. PMID:19686593

  8. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  9. Involvement of Arabidopsis RACK1 in Protein Translation and Its Regulation by Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Wang, Shucai; Valerius, Oliver; Hall, Hardy; Zeng, Qingning; Li, Jian-Feng; Weston, David; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that RACK1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA responses in Arabidopsis, but the molecular mechanism of the action of RACK1 in these processes remains elusive. Global gene expression profiling revealed that approximately 40% of the genes affected by ABA treatment were affected in a similar manner by the rack1 mutation, supporting the view that RACK1 is an important regulator of ABA responses. On the other hand, co-expression analysis revealed that >80% of the genes co-expressed with RACK1 encode ribosome proteins, implying a close relationship between RACK1 s function and the ribosome complex. These results implied that the regulatory role for RACK1 in ABA responses may be partially due to its putative function in protein translation, which is one of the major cellular processes that mammalian and yeast RACK1 is involved in. Consistently, all three Arabidopsis RACK1 homologous genes, namely RACK1A, RACK1B and RACK1C, complemented the growth defects of the S. cerevisiae cpc2/rack1 mutant. In addition, RACK1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6), whose mammalian homologue is a key regulator of 80S ribosome assembly. Moreover, rack1 mutants displayed hypersensitivity to anisomycin, an inhibitor of protein translation, and displayed characteristics of impaired 80S functional ribosome assembly and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in a ribosome profiling assay. Gene expression analysis revealed that ABA inhibits the expression of both RACK1 and eIF6. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 may be required for normal production of 60S and 80S ribosomes and that its action in these processes may be regulated by ABA.

  10. Proteins involved in formation of the outermost layer of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Daisuke; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the outermost structure of the Bacillus subtilis spore, we analyzed the accessibility of antibodies to proteins on spores of B. subtilis. Anti-green fluorescent protein (GFP) antibodies efficiently accessed GFP fused to CgeA or CotZ, which were previously assigned to the outermost layer termed the spore crust. However, anti-GFP antibodies did not bind to spores of strains expressing GFP fused to 14 outer coat, inner coat, or cortex proteins. Anti-CgeA antibodies bound to spores of wild-type and CgeA-GFP strains but not cgeA mutant spores. These results suggest that the spore crust covers the spore coat and is the externally exposed, outermost layer of the B. subtilis spore. We found that CotZ was essential for the spore crust to surround the spore but not for spore coat formation, indicating that CotZ plays a critical role in spore crust formation. In addition, we found that CotY-GFP was exposed on the surface of the spore, suggesting that CotY is an additional component of the spore crust. Moreover, the localization of CotY-GFP around the spore depended on CotZ, and CotY and CotZ depended on each other for spore assembly. Furthermore, a disruption of cotW affected the assembly of CotV-GFP, and a disruption of cotX affected the assembly of both CotV-GFP and CgeA-GFP. These results suggest that cgeA and genes in the cotVWXYZ cluster are involved in spore crust formation.

  11. Oxidation by Neutrophils-Derived HOCl Increases Immunogenicity of Proteins by Converting Them into Ligands of Several Endocytic Receptors Involved in Antigen Uptake by Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Biedroń, Rafał; Konopiński, Maciej K.; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Józefowski, Szczepan

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of adaptive immune responses to protein antigens has to be preceded by their uptake by antigen presenting cells and intracellular proteolytic processing. Paradoxically, endocytic receptors involved in antigen uptake do not bind the majority of proteins, which may be the main reason why purified proteins stimulate at most weak immune responses. A shared feature of different types of adjuvants, capable of boosting immunogenicity of protein vaccines, is their ability to induce acute inflammation, characterized by early influx of activated neutrophils. Neutrophils are also rapidly recruited to sites of tissue injury or infection. These cells are the source of potent oxidants, including hypochlorous acid (HOCl), causing oxidation of proteins present in inflammatory foci. We demonstrate that oxidation of proteins by endogenous, neutrophils-derived HOCl increases their immunogenicity. Upon oxidation, different, randomly chosen simple proteins (yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, human and bovine serum albumin) and glycoproteins (human apo-transferrin, ovalbumin) gain the ability to bind with high affinity to several endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells, which seems to be the major mechanism of their increased immunogenicity. The mannose receptor (CD206), scavenger receptors A (CD204) and CD36 were responsible for the uptake and presentation of HOCl-modified proteins by murine dendritic cells and macrophages. Other scavenger receptors, SREC-I and LOX-1, as well as RAGE were also able to bind HOCl-modified proteins, but they did not contribute significantly to these ligands uptake by dendritic cells because they were either not expressed or exhibited preference for more heavily oxidised proteins. Our results indicate that oxidation by neutrophils-derived HOCl may be a physiological mechanism of conferring immunogenicity on proteins which in their native forms do not bind to endocytic receptors. This mechanism might enable the immune system to detect

  12. Daphnia response to predation threat involves heat-shock proteins and the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Pijanowska, Joanna; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2004-02-01

    Of all the environmental pressures that all organisms across all kingdoms must face, one of the greatest is the risk of predation. The unpredictability of predation events from the perspective of a single individual is one of the major components of a changing, unstable environment (Gliwicz and Pijanowska, 1989; Lampert, 1987). The panoply of antipredator defenses among terrestrial and aquatic organisms involves a variety of morphological, behavioral, and life-history adaptations that even if they are not life-saving, may enable organisms to complete reproduction before predation occurs. Most of these phenotypic changes are directly induced by cues associated with the biotic agent, in the case of aquatic organisms, the chemical compounds (kairomones) released by a predator into the water. Herein we show that exposure of Daphnia to invertebrate and vertebrate kairomones results in changes in motion, behavior, and life history and at the molecular level involves changes in heat-shock proteins (HSPs) level and the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton. In addition, some of these effects are transgenerational, i.e., they are passed on from the mother to her offspring. PMID:14994270

  13. Oncogenic features of the bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Leinhäuser, Ines; Richter, Andrea; Lee, Misu; Höfig, Ines; Anastasov, Nataša; Fend, Falko; Ercolino, Tonino; Mannelli, Massimo; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Robledo, Mercedes; de Krijger, Ronald; Beuschlein, Felix; Atkinson, Michael J.; Pellegata, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    BMP7 is a growth factor playing pro- or anti-oncogenic roles in cancer in a cell type-dependent manner. We previously reported that the BMP7 gene is overexpressed in pheochromocytomas (PCCs) developing in MENX-affected rats and human patients. Here, analyzing a large cohort of PCC patients, we found that 72% of cases showed elevated levels of the BMP7 protein. To elucidate the role of BMP7 in PCC, we modulated its levels in PCC cell lines (overexpression in PC12, knockdown in MPC and MTT cells) and conducted functional assays. Active BMP signaling promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, and sustained survival of MENX rat primary PCC cells. In PCC, BMP7 signals through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and causes integrin β1 up-regulation. Silencing integrin β1 in PC12 cells suppressed BMP7-mediated oncogenic features. Treatment of MTT cells with DMH1, a novel BMP antagonist, suppressed proliferation and migration. To verify the clinical applicability of our findings, we evaluated a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) in MENX-affected rats in vivo. PCCs treated with NVP-BEZ235 had decreased proliferation and integrin β1 levels, and higher apoptosis. Altogether, BMP7 activates pro-oncogenic pathways in PCC. Downstream effectors of BMP7-mediated signaling may represent novel targets for treating progressive/inoperable PCC, still orphan of effective therapy. PMID:26337467

  14. Oncogenic features of the bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Leinhäuser, Ines; Richter, Andrea; Lee, Misu; Höfig, Ines; Anastasov, Nataša; Fend, Falko; Ercolino, Tonino; Mannelli, Massimo; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Robledo, Mercedes; de Krijger, Ronald; Beuschlein, Felix; Atkinson, Michael J; Pellegata, Natalia S

    2015-11-17

    BMP7 is a growth factor playing pro- or anti-oncogenic roles in cancer in a cell type-dependent manner. We previously reported that the BMP7 gene is overexpressed in pheochromocytomas (PCCs) developing in MENX-affected rats and human patients. Here, analyzing a large cohort of PCC patients, we found that 72% of cases showed elevated levels of the BMP7 protein. To elucidate the role of BMP7 in PCC, we modulated its levels in PCC cell lines (overexpression in PC12, knockdown in MPC and MTT cells) and conducted functional assays. Active BMP signaling promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, and sustained survival of MENX rat primary PCC cells. In PCC, BMP7 signals through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and causes integrin β1 up-regulation. Silencing integrin β1 in PC12 cells suppressed BMP7-mediated oncogenic features. Treatment of MTT cells with DMH1, a novel BMP antagonist, suppressed proliferation and migration. To verify the clinical applicability of our findings, we evaluated a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) in MENX-affected rats in vivo. PCCs treated with NVP-BEZ235 had decreased proliferation and integrin β1 levels, and higher apoptosis. Altogether, BMP7 activates pro-oncogenic pathways in PCC. Downstream effectors of BMP7-mediated signaling may represent novel targets for treating progressive/inoperable PCC, still orphan of effective therapy. PMID:26337467

  15. Genes involved in protein metabolism of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, A P; da Silva, D F; De Oliveira, M N V; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2011-09-01

    A basic requirement for the prediction of the potential use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the dairy industry is the identification of specific genes involved in flavour-forming pathways. The probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 was submitted to a genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in protein catabolism. Eight genes belonging to this system were identified, which possess a closely phylogenetic relationship to NCFM strains representative, as it was demonstrated for oppC and oppBII, encoding oligopeptide transport system components. PepC, PepN, and PepX might be essential for growth of LAB, probiotic or not, since the correspondent genes are always present, including in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome. For pepX gene, a probable link between carbohydrate catabolism and PepX expression may exists, where it is regulated by PepR1/CcpA-like, a common feature between Lactobacillus strains and also in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. The well conserved evolutionary history of the ilvE gene is evidence that the pathways leading to branched-chain amino acid degradation, such as isoleucine and valine, are similar among L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. Thus, the involvement of succinate in flavour formation can be attributed to IlvE activity. The presence of aminopeptidase G in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome, which is absent in several strains, might improve the proteolytic activity and effectiveness. The nucleotide sequence encoding PepG revealed that it is a cysteine endopeptidase, belonging to Peptidase C1 superfamily; sequence analysis showed 99% identity with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 pepG, whereas protein sequence analysis revealed 100% similarity with PepG from the same organism. The present study proposes a schematic model to explain how the proteolytic system of the probiotic L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 works, based on the components identified so far.

  16. A small RNA controls a protein regulator involved in antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Eyraud, Alex; Tattevin, Pierre; Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Felden, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to glycopeptides has led to alarming scenarios where serious staphylococcal infections cannot be treated. The bacterium expresses many small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that have unknown biological functions for the most part. Here we show that an S. aureus sRNA, SprX (alias RsaOR), shapes bacterial resistance to glycopeptides, the invaluable treatments for Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. Modifying SprX expression levels influences Vancomycin and Teicoplanin glycopeptide resistance. Comparative proteomic studies have identified that SprX specifically downregulates stage V sporulation protein G, SpoVG. SpoVG is produced from the yabJ-spoVG operon and contributes to S. aureus glycopeptide resistance. SprX negatively regulates SpoVG expression by direct antisense pairings at the internal translation initiation signals of the second operon gene, without modifying bicistronic mRNA expression levels or affecting YabJ translation. The SprX and yabJ-spoVG mRNA domains involved in the interaction have been identified, highlighting the importance of a CU-rich loop of SprX in the control of SpoVG expression. We have shown that SpoVG might not be the unique SprX target involved in the glycopeptide resistance and demonstrated that the regulation of glycopeptide sensitivity involves the CU-rich domain of SprX. Here we report the case of a sRNA influencing antibiotic resistance of a major human pathogen. PMID:24557948

  17. Prediction of hot regions in protein-protein interaction by combining density-based incremental clustering with feature-based classification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming; Tang, Jinshan

    2015-06-01

    Discovering hot regions in protein-protein interaction is important for drug and protein design, while experimental identification of hot regions is a time-consuming and labor-intensive effort; thus, the development of predictive models can be very helpful. In hot region prediction research, some models are based on structure information, and others are based on a protein interaction network. However, the prediction accuracy of these methods can still be improved. In this paper, a new method is proposed for hot region prediction, which combines density-based incremental clustering with feature-based classification. The method uses density-based incremental clustering to obtain rough hot regions, and uses feature-based classification to remove the non-hot spot residues from the rough hot regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method significantly improves the prediction performance of hot regions.

  18. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  19. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces.

  20. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  1. REF2 encodes an RNA-binding protein directly involved in yeast mRNA 3'-end formation.

    PubMed Central

    Russnak, R; Nehrke, K W; Platt, T

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ref2-1 (REF = RNA end formation) was originally identified by a genetic strategy predicted to detect decreases in the use of a CYC1 poly(A) site interposed within the intron of an ACT1-HIS4 fusion reporter gene. Direct RNA analysis now proves this effect and also demonstrates the trans action of the REF2 gene product on cryptic poly(A) sites located within the coding region of a plasmid-borne ACT1-lacZ gene. Despite impaired growth of ref2 strains, possibly because of a general defect in the efficiency of mRNA 3'-end processing, the steady-state characteristics of a variety of normal cellular mRNAs remain unaffected. Sequencing of the complementing gene predicts the Ref2p product to be a novel, basic protein of 429 amino acids (M(r), 48,000) with a high-level lysine/serine content and some unusual features. Analysis in vitro, with a number of defined RNA substrates, confirms that efficient use of weak poly(A) sites requires Ref2p: endonucleolytic cleavage is carried out accurately but at significantly lower rates in extracts prepared from delta ref2 cells. The addition of purified, epitope-tagged Ref2p (Ref2pF) reestablishes wild-type levels of activity in these extracts, demonstrating direct involvement of this protein in the cleavage step of 3' mRNA processing. Together with the RNA-binding characteristics of Ref2pF in vitro, our results support an important contributing role for the REF2 locus in 3'-end processing. As the first gene genetically identified to participate in mRNA 3'-end maturation prior to the final polyadenylation step, REF2 provides an ideal starting point for identifying related genes in this event. PMID:7862160

  2. Cardiovascular involvement, an overlooked feature of Erdheim-Chester disease: report of 6 new cases and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Amoura, Zahir; Dion, Elisabeth; Wechsler, Bertrand; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cacoub, Patrice; Isnard, Richard; Généreau, Thierry; Wechsler, Janine; Weber, Nina; Graef, Claire; Cluzel, Philippe; Grenier, Philippe; Piette, Jean-Charles

    2004-11-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare, non-Langerhans form of histiocytosis of unknown origin. It is characterized by xanthomatous or xanthogranulomatous infiltration of tissues by spumous ("foamy") histiocytes. As of this writing, 178 cases have been reported. ECD is characterized by heterogeneous systemic manifestations. Bone pain is the most frequent symptom. About half of all patients have extraskeletal manifestations. Cardiovascular manifestations of ECD remain underestimated. We report 6 new cases of ECD associated with periaortic fibrosis. In 4 of these cases, the whole aorta had a "coated" aspect. A literature review revealed 66 cases of ECD with cardiovascular involvement. We therefore analyzed 72 ECD patients with cardiovascular involvement: 40 (55.6%) had periaortic "fibrosis," 32 (44.4%) had pericardial involvement, and 22 (30.6%) had myocardial involvement. Six had a right atrial tumor. Symptomatic valvular heart disease (3 aortic and 3 mitral regurgitations) was found in 6 patients. Nineteen patients (26.4%) had heart failure, leading to death in 8 cases. Six patients had renovascular hypertension related to perirenal artery stenosis. Data concerning follow-up were available for 58 (80.6%) patients. Of these, 35 (60.3%) patients died, confirming the severe prognosis of ECD. Cardiovascular complications were responsible for the death of 11 of the 35 patients (31.4%). PMID:15525849

  3. Proteins involved on TGF-β pathway are up-regulated during the acute phase of experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberto Rodrigues; de Souza, Elen Mello; de Oliveira, Fabiane Loiola; Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; Gomes, Leonardo Henrique Ferreira; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Bailly, Sabine; Feige, Jean Jacques; de Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2016-05-01

    Studies developed by our group in the last years have shown the involvement of TGF-β in acute and chronic Chagas heart disease, with elevated plasma levels and activated TGF-β cell signaling pathway as remarkable features of patients in the advanced stages of this disease, when high levels of cardiac fibrosis is present. Imbalance in synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix components is the basis of pathological fibrosis and TGF-β is considered as one of the key regulators of this process. In the present study, we investigated the activity of the TGF-β signaling pathway, including receptors and signaling proteins activation in the heart of animals experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi during the period that mimics the acute phase of Chagas disease. We observed that T. cruzi-infected animals presented increased expression of TGF-β receptors. Overexpression of receptors was followed by an increased phosphorylation of Smad2/3, p38 and ERK. Furthermore, we correlated these activities with cellular factors involved in the fibrotic process induced by TGF-β. We observed that the expression of collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF were increased in the heart of infected animals on day 15 post-infection. Correlated with the increased TGF-β activity in the heart, we found that serum levels of total TGF-β were significantly higher during acute infection. Taken together, our data suggest that the commitment of the heart associates with increased activity of TGF-β pathway and expression of its main components. Our results, confirm the importance of this cytokine in the development and maintenance of cardiac damage caused by T. cruzi infection.

  4. A novel Drosophila Girdin-like protein is involved in Akt pathway control of cell size

    SciTech Connect

    Puseenam, Aekkachai; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Nagai, Rika; Hashimoto, Reina; Suyari, Osamu; Itoh, Masanobu; Enomoto, Atsushi; Takahashi, Masahide; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2009-11-15

    The Akt signaling pathway is well known to regulate cell proliferation and growth. Girdin, a novel substrate of Akt, plays a crucial role in organization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility under the control of Akt. We here identified a novel Girdin-like protein in Drosophila (dGirdin), which has two isoforms, dGirdin PA and dGirdin PB. dGirdin shows high homology with human Girdin in the N-terminal and coiled-coil domains, while diverging at the C-terminal domain. On establishment of transgenic fly lines, featuring knockdown or overexpression of dGirdin in vivo, overexpression in the wing disc cells induced ectopic apoptosis, implying a role in directing apoptosis. Knockdown of dGirdin in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc cells resulted in reduction of cell size. Furthermore, this was enhanced by half reduction of the Akt gene dose, suggesting that Akt positively regulates dGirdin. In the wing disc, cells in which dGirdin was knocked down exhibited disruption of actin filaments. From these in vivo analyses, we conclude that dGirdin is required for actin organization and regulation of appropriate cell size under control of the Akt signaling pathway.

  5. Human Suv3 protein reveals unique features among SF2 helicases

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrzejczak, Robert; Wang, Jiawei; Dauter, Miroslawa; Szczesny, Roman J.; Stepien, Piotr P.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2011-11-01

    Crystal structures of the human mitochondrial helicase hSuv3 in complex with AMPPNP and with a short strand of RNA are presented. Suv3 is a helicase that is involved in efficient turnover and surveillance of RNA in eukaryotes. In vitro studies show that human Suv3 (hSuv3) in complex with human polynucleotide phosphorylase has RNA degradosome activity. The enzyme is mainly localized in mitochondria, but small fractions are found in cell nuclei. Here, two X-ray crystallographic structures of human Suv3 in complex with AMPPNP, a nonhydrolysable analog of ATP, and with a short five-nucleotide strand of RNA are presented at resolutions of 2.08 and 2.9 Å, respectively. The structure of the enzyme is very similar in the two complexes and consists of four domains. Two RecA-like domains form the tandem typical of all helicases from the SF2 superfamily which together with the C-terminal all-helical domain makes a ring structure through which the nucleotide strand threads. The mostly helical N-terminal domain is positioned externally with respect to the core of the enzyme. Most of the typical helicase motifs are present in hSuv3, but the protein shows certain unique characteristics, suggesting that Suv3 enzymes may constitute a separate subfamily of helicases.

  6. Human Suv3 protein reveals unique features among SF2 helicases

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrzejczak, Robert; Wang, Jiawei; Dauter, Miroslawa; Szczesny, Roman J.; Stepien, Piotr P.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2012-03-16

    Suv3 is a helicase that is involved in efficient turnover and surveillance of RNA in eukaryotes. In vitro studies show that human Suv3 (hSuv3) in complex with human polynucleotide phosphorylase has RNA degradosome activity. The enzyme is mainly localized in mitochondria, but small fractions are found in cell nuclei. Here, two X-ray crystallographic structures of human Suv3 in complex with AMPPNP, a nonhydrolysable analog of ATP, and with a short five-nucleotide strand of RNA are presented at resolutions of 2.08 and 2.9 {angstrom}, respectively. The structure of the enzyme is very similar in the two complexes and consists of four domains. Two RecA-like domains form the tandem typical of all helicases from the SF2 superfamily which together with the C-terminal all-helical domain makes a ring structure through which the nucleotide strand threads. The mostly helical N-terminal domain is positioned externally with respect to the core of the enzyme. Most of the typical helicase motifs are present in hSuv3, but the protein shows certain unique characteristics, suggesting that Suv3 enzymes may constitute a separate subfamily of helicases.

  7. Human Suv3 protein reveals unique features among SF2 helicases

    PubMed Central

    Jedrzejczak, Robert; Wang, Jiawei; Dauter, Miroslawa; Szczesny, Roman J.; Stepien, Piotr P.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Suv3 is a helicase that is involved in efficient turnover and surveillance of RNA in eukaryotes. In vitro studies show that human Suv3 (hSuv3) in complex with human polynucleotide phosphorylase has RNA degradosome activity. The enzyme is mainly localized in mitochondria, but small fractions are found in cell nuclei. Here, two X-ray crystallographic structures of human Suv3 in complex with AMPPNP, a nonhydrolysable analog of ATP, and with a short five-nucleotide strand of RNA are presented at resolutions of 2.08 and 2.9 Å, respectively. The structure of the enzyme is very similar in the two complexes and consists of four domains. Two RecA-like domains form the tandem typical of all helicases from the SF2 superfamily which together with the C-terminal all-helical domain makes a ring structure through which the nucleotide strand threads. The mostly helical N-terminal domain is positioned externally with respect to the core of the enzyme. Most of the typical helicase motifs are present in hSuv3, but the protein shows certain unique characteristics, suggesting that Suv3 enzymes may constitute a separate subfamily of helicases. PMID:22101826

  8. The effects of (-)-epicatechin on endothelial cells involve the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Mendez-Luna, David; Beltran-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo, Carmen; Guevara, Gustavo; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Correa-Basurto, José; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    We have provided evidence that the stimulatory effects of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-EPI) on endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production may involve the participation of a cell-surface receptor. Thus far, such entity(ies) has not been fully elucidated. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a cell-surface receptor that has been linked to protective effects on the cardiovascular system and activation of intracellular signaling pathways (including NO production) similar to those reported with (-)-EPI. In bovine coronary artery endothelial cells (BCAEC) by the use of confocal imaging, we evidence the presence of GPER at the cell-surface and on F-actin filaments. Using in silico studies we document the favorable binding mode between (-)-EPI and GPER. Such binding is comparable to that of the GPER agonist, G1. By the use of selective blockers, we demonstrate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and CaMKII by (-)-EPI is dependent on the GPER/c-SRC/EGFR axis mimicking those effects noted with G1. We also evidence by the use of siRNA the role that GPER has on mediating ERK1/2 activation by (-)-EPI. GPER appears to be coupled to a non Gαi/o or Gαs, protein subtype. To extrapolate our findings to an ex vivo model, we employed phenylephrine pre-contracted aortic rings evidencing that (-)-EPI can mediate vasodilation through GPER activation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that suggests the GPER as a potential mediator of (-)-EPI effects and highlights the important role that GPER may have on cardiovascular system protection.

  9. Involvement of protein phosphatases in the destabilization of methamphetamine-associated contextual memory.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Jung; Huang, Chien-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Hua; Gean, Po-Wu

    2016-09-01

    Destabilization refers to a memory that becomes unstable when reactivated and is susceptible to disruption by amnestic agents. Here we delineated the cellular mechanism underlying the destabilization of drug memory. Mice were conditioned with methamphetamine (MeAM) for 3 d, and drug memory was assessed with a conditioned place preference (CPP) protocol. Anisomycin (ANI) was administered 60 min after the CPP retrieval to disrupt reconsolidation. We found that destabilization of MeAM CPP after the application of ANI was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801 and the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil (IFN) but not by the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). In addition, decrease in the phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine845 (p-GluR1-Ser845), decrease in spine density, and a reduction in the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) were reversed after the MK-801 treatment. The effect of ANI on destabilization was prevented by the protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin, CaN) inhibitors cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK-506 and the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitors calyculin A (CA) and okadaic acid (OA). These results suggest that memory destabilization involves the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, which in turn allows the influx of Ca(2+) Increased intracellular Ca(2+) stimulates CaN, leading to the dephosphorylation and inactivation of inhibitor 1 and the activation of PP1. PP1 then dephosphorylates p-GluR1-Ser845 to elicit AMPA receptor (AMPAR) endocytosis and destabilization of the drug memory. PMID:27531839

  10. Signatures of nitrogen limitation in the elemental composition of the proteins involved in the metabolic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Acquisti, Claudia; Kumar, Sudhir; Elser, James J

    2009-07-22

    Nitrogen (N) is a fundamental component of nucleotides and amino acids and is often a limiting nutrient in natural ecosystems. Thus, study of the N content of biomolecules may establish important connections between ecology and genomics. However, while significant differences in the elemental composition of whole organisms are well documented, how the flux of nutrients in the cell has shaped the evolution of different cellular processes remains poorly understood. By examining the elemental composition of major functional classes of proteins in four multicellular eukaryotic model organisms, we find that the catabolic machinery shows substantially lower N content than the anabolic machinery and the rest of the proteome. This pattern suggests that ecological selection for N conservation specifically targets cellular components that are highly expressed in response to nutrient limitation. We propose that the RNA component of the anabolic machineries is the mechanistic force driving the elemental imbalance we found, and that RNA functions as an intracellular nutrient reservoir that is degraded and recycled during starvation periods. A comparison of the elemental composition of the anabolic and catabolic machineries in species that have experienced different levels of N limitation in their evolutionary history (animals versus plants) suggests that selection for N conservation has preferentially targeted the catabolic machineries of plants, resulting in a lower N content of the proteins involved in their catabolic processes. These findings link the composition of major cellular components to the environmental factors that trigger the activation of those components, suggesting that resource availability has constrained the atomic composition and the molecular architecture of the biotic processes that enable cells to respond to reduced nutrient availability.

  11. Heat shock protein 90 is involved in IL-17-mediated skin inflammation following thermal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyung; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Ji-Yon; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Woo, So-Youn

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases involves interactions between immune cells and keratinocytes, including the T helper 17 (Th17)-mediated immune response. Several chemokines [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)1, CXCL5 and CXCL8] and antimicrobial peptides [β-defensin 1 (BD1), LL-37, S100A8 and S100A9] were transcriptionally upregulated in the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT upon stimulation with interleukin (IL)-17. Balneotherapy, the treatment of disease by bathing, is an alternative therapy that has frequently been used for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. Immersion in pools of thermal mineral water is often considered to have chemical, thermal, mechanical and immunomodulatory benefits. We examined the effect of thermal treatment on IL-17-mediated inflammation in a model of skin disease. As Act1 is required for IL-17 signaling and is a client protein of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), we evaluated the effect of HSP90 inhibition on IL-17-mediated cytokine and antimicrobial peptide expression in keratinocytes following heat treatment. We found that after thermal stimulation, Act1 binding to HSP90α was significantly increased in the presence of IL-17 (100 ng/ml) and 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, 1 µM). Antimicrobial peptide and chemokine expression generally increased after heat treatment; Act1 knockdown and 17‑AAG reversed this effect. These observations demonstrate the possible immunomodulatory effect of heat on keratinocytes during the progression of IL-17-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27279135

  12. Development of Novel In Vivo Chemical Probes to Address CNS Protein Kinase Involvement in Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, D. Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie L.; Roy, Saktimayee M.; Schavocky, James P.; Bradaric, Brinda Desai; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Xing, Bin; Dimayuga, Edgardo; Saeed, Faisal; Zhang, Hong; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Pelletier, Jeffrey C.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Arancio, Ottavio; Van Eldik, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Serine-threonine protein kinases are critical to CNS function, yet there is a dearth of highly selective, CNS-active kinase inhibitors for in vivo investigations. Further, prevailing assumptions raise concerns about whether single kinase inhibitors can show in vivo efficacy for CNS pathologies, and debates over viable approaches to the development of safe and efficacious kinase inhibitors are unsettled. It is critical, therefore, that these scientific challenges be addressed in order to test hypotheses about protein kinases in neuropathology progression and the potential for in vivo modulation of their catalytic activity. Identification of molecular targets whose in vivo modulation can attenuate synaptic dysfunction would provide a foundation for future disease-modifying therapeutic development as well as insight into cellular mechanisms. Clinical and preclinical studies suggest a critical link between synaptic dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and the activation of p38αMAPK mediated signaling cascades. Activation in both neurons and glia also offers the unusual potential to generate enhanced responses through targeting a single kinase in two distinct cell types involved in pathology progression. However, target validation has been limited by lack of highly selective inhibitors amenable to in vivo use in the CNS. Therefore, we employed high-resolution co-crystallography and pharmacoinformatics to design and develop a novel synthetic, active site targeted, CNS-active, p38αMAPK inhibitor (MW108). Selectivity was demonstrated by large-scale kinome screens, functional GPCR agonist and antagonist analyses of off-target potential, and evaluation of cellular target engagement. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that MW108 ameliorates beta-amyloid induced synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. A serendipitous discovery during co-crystallographic analyses revised prevailing models about active site targeting of inhibitors, providing insights that will

  13. Involvement of decreased neuroglobin protein level in cognitive dysfunction induced by 1-bromopropane in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Yuan, Hua; Jiang, Lulu; Yang, Junlin; Zeng, Tao; Xie, Keqin; Zhang, Cuili; Zhao, Xiulan

    2015-03-10

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is used as a substitute for ozone-depleting solvents (ODS) in industrial applications. 1-BP could display central nervous system (CNS) neurotoxicity manifested by cognitive dysfunction. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotectant and is predominantly expressed in the nervous system. The present study aimed to investigate Ngb involvement in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=14) and treated with 0, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg bw 1-BP, respectively, by gavage for consecutive 12 days. Rats displayed cognitive dysfunction dose-dependently through Morris water maze (MWM) test. Significant neuron loss in layer 5 of the prelimbic cortex (PL) was observed. Moreover, 1-BP decreased Ngb protein level in cerebral cortex and Ngb decrease was significantly positively correlated with cognitive dysfunction. Glutathione (GSH) content, GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) activity decreased in cerebral cortex, coupled with the increase in GSSG content. GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio decrease were significantly positively correlated with cortical Ngb decrease. Additionally, levels of N-epsilon-hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins in cerebral cortex of 1-BP-treated rats increased significantly. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1-BP resulted in decreased endogenous neuroprotectant Ngb in cerebral cortex, which might play an important role in CNS neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP and that 1-BP-induced oxidative stress in cerebral cortex might partly be responsible for Ngb decrease.

  14. The effects of (-)-epicatechin on endothelial cells involve the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Mendez-Luna, David; Beltran-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo, Carmen; Guevara, Gustavo; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Correa-Basurto, José; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    We have provided evidence that the stimulatory effects of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-EPI) on endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production may involve the participation of a cell-surface receptor. Thus far, such entity(ies) has not been fully elucidated. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a cell-surface receptor that has been linked to protective effects on the cardiovascular system and activation of intracellular signaling pathways (including NO production) similar to those reported with (-)-EPI. In bovine coronary artery endothelial cells (BCAEC) by the use of confocal imaging, we evidence the presence of GPER at the cell-surface and on F-actin filaments. Using in silico studies we document the favorable binding mode between (-)-EPI and GPER. Such binding is comparable to that of the GPER agonist, G1. By the use of selective blockers, we demonstrate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and CaMKII by (-)-EPI is dependent on the GPER/c-SRC/EGFR axis mimicking those effects noted with G1. We also evidence by the use of siRNA the role that GPER has on mediating ERK1/2 activation by (-)-EPI. GPER appears to be coupled to a non Gαi/o or Gαs, protein subtype. To extrapolate our findings to an ex vivo model, we employed phenylephrine pre-contracted aortic rings evidencing that (-)-EPI can mediate vasodilation through GPER activation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that suggests the GPER as a potential mediator of (-)-EPI effects and highlights the important role that GPER may have on cardiovascular system protection. PMID:26303816

  15. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  16. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-Telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Dokládal, Ladislav; Honys, David; Rana, Rajiv; Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B; Sýkorová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT) plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE) TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains an RNA recognition motif (RRM). This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions. PMID:26617625

  17. DYW-type PPR proteins in a heterolobosean protist: plant RNA editing factors involved in an ancient horizontal gene transfer?

    PubMed

    Knoop, Volker; Rüdinger, Mareike

    2010-10-22

    A particular type of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins with variable length of the 35 aa PPR motifs and conserved carboxyterminal extensions, named the PLS proteins, was so far exclusively identified in land plants. Several PLS proteins with such domain extensions (E, E+, DYW) were shown to be involved in plant organellar RNA editing but their evolutionary origin had remained enigmatic. We here report the first case of DYW-type PLS proteins outside of the plant kingdom in the protist Naegleria gruberi and hypothesize on horizontal gene transfer in very early land plant evolution.

  18. Calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in Tetrahymena thermophila phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gonda, K; Komatsu, M; Numata, O

    2000-08-01

    The ciliated protist, Tetrahymena thermophila, possesses one oral apparatus for phagocytosis, one of the most important cell functions, in the anterior cell cortex. The apparatus comprises four membrane structures which consist of ciliated and unciliated basal bodies, a cytostome where food is collected by oral ciliary motility, and a cytopharynx where food vacuoles are formed. The food vacuole is thought to be transported into the cytoplasm by a deep fiber which connects with the oral apparatus. Although a large number of studies have been done on the structure of the oral apparatus, the molecular mechanisms of phagocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila are not well understood. In this study, using indirect immunofluorescence, we demonstrated that the deep fiber consisted of actin, CaM, and Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins, p85 and EF-1alpha, which are closely involved in cytokinesis. Moreover, we showed that CaM, p85, and EF-1alpha are colocalized in the cytostome and the cytopharynx of the oral apparatus. Next, we examined whether Ca2+/CaM signal regulates Tetrahymena thermophila phagocytosis, using Ca2+/CaM inhibitors chlorpromazine, trifluoperazine, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide, and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide HCI. In Tetrahymena, it is known that Ca2+/CaM signal is closely involved in ciliary motility and cytokinesis. The results showed that one of the inhibitors, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide HCl, inhibited the food vacuole formation rather than the ciliary motility, while the other three inhibitors effectively prevented the ciliary motility. Considering the colocalization of CaM, p85, and EF-1alpha to the cytopharynx, these results suggest that the Ca2+/CaM signal plays a pivotal role in Tetrahymena thermophila food vacuole formation.

  19. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  20. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  1. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  2. The Mammalian Proteins MMS19, MIP18, and ANT2 Are Involved in Cytoplasmic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Protein Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    van Wietmarschen, Niek; Moradian, Annie; Morin, Gregg B.; Lansdorp, Peter M.; Uringa, Evert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors of proteins with a wide range of biological functions. A dedicated cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly (CIA) system is required to assemble Fe-S clusters into cytosolic and nuclear proteins. Here, we show that the mammalian nucleotide excision repair protein homolog MMS19 can simultaneously bind probable cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly protein CIAO1 and Fe-S proteins, confirming that MMS19 is a central protein of the CIA machinery that brings Fe-S cluster donor proteins and the receiving apoproteins into proximity. In addition, we show that mitotic spindle-associated MMXD complex subunit MIP18 also interacts with both CIAO1 and Fe-S proteins. Specifically, it binds the Fe-S cluster coordinating regions in Fe-S proteins. Furthermore, we show that ADP/ATP translocase 2 (ANT2) interacts with Fe-S apoproteins and MMS19 in the CIA complex but not with the individual proteins. Together, these results elucidate the composition and interactions within the late CIA complex. PMID:23150669

  3. ProViz-a web-based visualization tool to investigate the functional and evolutionary features of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Peter; Manguy, Jean; Shields, Denis C; Higgins, Desmond G; Davey, Norman E

    2016-07-01

    Low-throughput experiments and high-throughput proteomic and genomic analyses have created enormous quantities of data that can be used to explore protein function and evolution. The ability to consolidate these data into an informative and intuitive format is vital to our capacity to comprehend these distinct but complementary sources of information. However, existing tools to visualize protein-related data are restricted by their presentation, sources of information, functionality or accessibility. We introduce ProViz, a powerful browser-based tool to aid biologists in building hypotheses and designing experiments by simplifying the analysis of functional and evolutionary features of proteins. Feature information is retrieved in an automated manner from resources describing protein modular architecture, post-translational modification, structure, sequence variation and experimental characterization of functional regions. These features are mapped to evolutionary information from precomputed multiple sequence alignments. Data are displayed in an interactive and information-rich yet intuitive visualization, accessible through a simple protein search interface. This allows users with limited bioinformatic skills to rapidly access data pertinent to their research. Visualizations can be further customized with user-defined data either manually or using a REST API. ProViz is available at http://proviz.ucd.ie/.

  4. ProViz—a web-based visualization tool to investigate the functional and evolutionary features of protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jehl, Peter; Manguy, Jean; Shields, Denis C.; Higgins, Desmond G.; Davey, Norman E.

    2016-01-01

    Low-throughput experiments and high-throughput proteomic and genomic analyses have created enormous quantities of data that can be used to explore protein function and evolution. The ability to consolidate these data into an informative and intuitive format is vital to our capacity to comprehend these distinct but complementary sources of information. However, existing tools to visualize protein-related data are restricted by their presentation, sources of information, functionality or accessibility. We introduce ProViz, a powerful browser-based tool to aid biologists in building hypotheses and designing experiments by simplifying the analysis of functional and evolutionary features of proteins. Feature information is retrieved in an automated manner from resources describing protein modular architecture, post-translational modification, structure, sequence variation and experimental characterization of functional regions. These features are mapped to evolutionary information from precomputed multiple sequence alignments. Data are displayed in an interactive and information-rich yet intuitive visualization, accessible through a simple protein search interface. This allows users with limited bioinformatic skills to rapidly access data pertinent to their research. Visualizations can be further customized with user-defined data either manually or using a REST API. ProViz is available at http://proviz.ucd.ie/. PMID:27085803

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  6. Heterochromatin Protein 1 Is Involved in Control of Telomere Elongation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Savitsky, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Oksana; Melnikova, Larisa; Georgiev, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres of Drosophila melanogaster contain arrays of the retrotransposon-like elements HeT-A and TART. Their transposition to broken chromosome ends has been implicated in chromosome healing and telomere elongation. We have developed a genetic system which enables the determination of the frequency of telomere elongation events and their mechanism. The frequency differs among lines with different genotypes, suggesting that several genes are in control. Here we show that the Su(var)2-5 gene encoding heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is involved in regulation of telomere length. Different Su(var)2-5 mutations in the heterozygous state increase the frequency of HeT-A and TART attachment to the broken chromosome end by more than a hundred times. The attachment occurs through either HeT-A/TART transposition or recombination with other telomeres. Terminal DNA elongation by gene conversion is greatly enhanced by Su(var)2-5 mutations only if the template for DNA synthesis is on the same chromosome but not on the homologous chromosome. The Drosophila lines bearing the Su(var)2-5 mutations maintain extremely long telomeres consisting of HeT-A and TART for many generations. Thus, HP1 plays an important role in the control of telomere elongation in D. melanogaster. PMID:11940677

  7. Shrinkage activates a nonselective conductance: involvement of a Walker-motif protein and PKC.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D J; Tien, X Y; Xie, W; Brasitus, T A; Kaetzel, M A; Dedman, J R

    1996-01-01

    The ability of all cells to maintain their volume during an osmotic challenge is dependent on the regulated movement of salt and water across the plasma membrane. We demonstrate the phosphorylation-dependent gating of a nonselective conductance in Caco-2 cells during cellular shrinkage. Intracellular application of exogenous purified rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) resulted in the activation of a current similar to that activated during shrinkage with a Na(+)-to-Cl- permeability ratio of approximately 1.7:1. To prevent possible PKC- and/or shrinkage-dependent activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which is expressed at high levels in Caco-2 cells, a functional anti-peptide antibody, anti-CFTR505-511, was introduced into the cells via the patch pipette. Anti-CFTR505-511, which is directed against the Walker motif in the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR, prevented the PKC/shrink-age current activation. The peptide CFTR505-511 also induced current inhibition, suggesting the possible involvement of a regulatory element in close proximity to the channel that shares sequence homology with the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR and whose binding to the channel is required for channel gating. PMID:8772443

  8. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Rieger, Simone; Moquet, Jayne; Spanswick, Victoria J.; Hartley, John A.; Rothkamm, Kai; Huang, Paul H.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1) is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ). Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution. PMID:25818292

  9. Are G-protein-coupled receptors involved in mediating larval settlement and metamorphosis of coral planulae?

    PubMed

    Tran, Cawa; Hadfield, Michael G

    2012-04-01

    Larvae of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis are induced to settle and metamorphose by the presence of marine bacterial biofilms, and the larvae of Montipora capitata respond to a combination of filamentous and crustose coralline algae. The primary goal of this study was to better understand metamorphosis of cnidarian larvae by determining what types of receptors and signal-transduction pathways are involved during stimulation of metamorphosis of P. damicornis and M. capitata. Evidence from studies on larvae of hydrozoans suggests that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are good candidates. Settlement experiments were conducted in which competent larvae were exposed to neuropharmacological agents that affect GPCRs and their associated signal-transduction pathways, AC/cAMP and PI/DAG/PKC. On the basis of the results of these experiments, we conclude that GPCRs and these pathways do not mediate settlement and metamorphosis in either coral species. Two compounds that had an effect on both species, forskolin and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA), may be acting on other cellular processes not related to GPCRs. This study strengthens our understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis in coral larvae. PMID:22589403

  10. Nicotine-induced plasticity in the retinocollicular pathway: Evidence for involvement of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R G J; Vasques, J F; Trindade, P; Serfaty, C A; Campello-Costa, P; Faria-Melibeu, A C

    2016-01-28

    During early postnatal development retinocollicular projections undergo activity-dependent synaptic refinement that results in the formation of precise topographical maps in the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the regulation of several aspects of neural development, such as neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and plasticity. Stimulation of cholinergic system has been found to alter the expression and processing of APP in different cell lines. Herein, we investigated the effect of nicotine on the development of retinocollicular pathway and on APP metabolism in the SC of pigmented rats. Animals were submitted to intracranial Elvax implants loaded with nicotine or phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle) at postnatal day (PND) 7. The ipsilateral retinocollicular pathway of control and experimental groups was anterogradely labeled either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery (PND 14 or PND 28). Local nicotine exposure produces a transitory sprouting of uncrossed retinal axons outside their main terminal zones. Nicotine also increases APP content and its soluble neurotrophic fragment sAPPα. Furthermore, nicotine treatment upregulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 and β2 subunits. Taken together, these data indicate that nicotine disrupts the ordering and topographic mapping of axons in the retinocollicular pathway and facilitates APP processing through the nonamyloidogenic pathway, suggesting that sAPPα may act as a trophic agent that mediates nicotine-induced morphological plasticity.

  11. The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Fata, Giorgio La; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  12. The fragile X protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; La Fata, Giorgio; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  13. The involvement of heat-shock proteins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Nung; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on the role of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in animal models ans patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The published literature in Medline (PubMed), including our published work on the cell-mediated as well as humoral immune response to various HSPs was reviewed. Studies in both the pre-clinical animal models of arthritis as well as RA were examined critically and the data presented. Results In experimental arthritis, disease induction by different arthritogenic stimuli, including an adjuvant, led to immune response to mycobacterial HSP65 (BHSP65). However, attempts to induce arthritis by a purified HSP have not met with success. There are several reports of a significant immune response to HSP65 in RA patients. But, the issue of cause and effect is difficult to address. Nevertheless, several studies in animal models and a couple of clinical trials in RA patients have shown the beneficial effect of HSPs against autoimmune arthritis. Conclusions There is a clear association between immune response to HSPs, particularly HSP65, and the initiation and propagation of autoimmune arthritis in experimental models. The correlation is relatively less convincing in RA patients. In both cases, the ability of HSPs to modulate arthritis offers support, albeit an indirect one, for the involvement of these antigens in the disease process. PMID:19969325

  14. bHLH proteins involved in Drosophila neurogenesis are mutually regulated at the level of stability

    PubMed Central

    Kiparaki, Marianthi; Zarifi, Ioanna; Delidakis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Proneural bHLH activators are expressed in all neuroectodermal regions prefiguring events of central and peripheral neurogenesis. Drosophila Sc is a prototypical proneural activator that heterodimerizes with the E-protein Daughterless (Da) and is antagonized by, among others, the E(spl) repressors. We determined parameters that regulate Sc stability in Drosophila S2 cells. We found that Sc is a very labile phosphoprotein and its turnover takes place via at least three proteasome-dependent mechanisms. (i) When Sc is in excess of Da, its degradation is promoted via its transactivation domain (TAD). (ii) In a DNA-bound Da/Sc heterodimer, Sc degradation is promoted via an SPTSS phosphorylation motif and the AD1 TAD of Da; Da is spared in the process. (iii) When E(spl)m7 is expressed, it complexes with Sc or Da/Sc and promotes their degradation in a manner that requires the corepressor Groucho and the Sc SPTSS motif. Da/Sc reciprocally promotes E(spl)m7 degradation. Since E(spl)m7 is a direct target of Notch, the mutual destabilization of Sc and E(spl) may contribute in part to the highly conserved anti-neural activity of Notch. Sc variants lacking the SPTSS motif are dramatically stabilized and are hyperactive in transgenic flies. Our results propose a novel mechanism of regulation of neurogenesis, involving the stability of key players in the process. PMID:25694512

  15. Lincomycin Biosynthesis Involves a Tyrosine Hydroxylating Heme Protein of an Unusual Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Jitka; Olsovska, Jana; Novak, Petr; Mojzes, Peter; Chaloupkova, Radka; Kamenik, Zdenek; Spizek, Jaroslav; Kutejova, Eva; Mareckova, Marketa; Tichy, Pavel; Damborsky, Jiri; Janata, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The gene lmbB2 of the lincomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces lincolnensis ATCC 25466 was shown to code for an unusual tyrosine hydroxylating enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of this clinically important antibiotic. LmbB2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified near to homogeneity and shown to convert tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In contrast to the well-known tyrosine hydroxylases (EC 1.14.16.2) and tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), LmbB2 was identified as a heme protein. Mass spectrometry and Soret band-excited Raman spectroscopy of LmbB2 showed that LmbB2 contains heme b as prosthetic group. The CO-reduced differential absorption spectra of LmbB2 showed that the coordination of Fe was different from that of cytochrome P450 enzymes. LmbB2 exhibits sequence similarity to Orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which has recently been classified as a heme peroxidase. Tyrosine hydroxylating activity of LmbB2 yielding DOPA in the presence of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) was also observed. Reaction mechanism of this unique heme peroxidases family is discussed. Also, tyrosine hydroxylation was confirmed as the first step of the amino acid branch of the lincomycin biosynthesis. PMID:24324587

  16. Involvement of inhibitory PAS domain protein in neuronal cell death in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Torii, S; Kasai, S; Suzuki, A; Todoroki, Y; Yokozawa, K; Yasumoto, K-I; Seike, N; Kiyonari, H; Mukumoto, Y; Kakita, A; Sogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory PAS domain protein (IPAS), a repressor of hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent transcription under hypoxia, was found to exert pro-apoptotic activity in oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, physiological and pathological processes associated with this activity are not known. Here we show that IPAS is a key molecule involved in neuronal cell death in Parkinson’s disease (PD). IPAS was ubiquitinated by Parkin for proteasomal degradation following carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone treatment. Phosphorylation of IPAS at Thr12 by PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) was required for ubiquitination to occur. Activation of the PINK1–Parkin pathway attenuated IPAS-dependent apoptosis. IPAS was markedly induced in the midbrain following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) administration, and IPAS-deficient mice showed resistance to MPTP-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). A significant increase in IPAS expression was found in SNpc neurons in patients with sporadic PD. These results indicate a mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:27551449

  17. Using co-expression analysis and stress-based screens to uncover Arabidopsis peroxisomal proteins involved in drought response

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping; Bassham, Diane

    2015-09-14

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles that house a wide array of metabolic reactions important for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge regarding the role of peroxisomal proteins in various biological processes, including plant stress response, is still incomplete. Recent proteomic studies of plant peroxisomes significantly increased the number of known peroxisomal proteins and greatly facilitated the study of peroxisomes at the systems level. The objectives of this study were to determine whether genes that encode peroxisomal proteins with related functions are co-expressed in Arabidopsis and identify peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response using in silico analysis and mutant screens. Usingmore » microarray data from online databases, we performed hierarchical clustering analysis to generate a comprehensive view of transcript level changes for Arabidopsis peroxisomal genes during development and under abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Many genes involved in the same metabolic pathways exhibited co-expression, some genes known to be involved in stress response are regulated by the corresponding stress conditions, and function of some peroxisomal proteins could be predicted based on their coexpression pattern. Since drought caused expression changes to the highest number of genes that encode peroxisomal proteins, we subjected a subset of Arabidopsis peroxisomal mutants to a drought stress assay. Mutants of the LON2 protease and the photorespiratory enzyme hydroxypyruvate reductase 1 (HPR1) showed enhanced susceptibility to drought, suggesting the involvement of peroxisomal quality control and photorespiration in drought resistance. Lastly, our study provided a global view of how genes that encode peroxisomal proteins respond to developmental and environmental cues and began to reveal additional peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response, thus opening up new avenues to investigate the role of peroxisomes in plant adaptation to

  18. Using co-expression analysis and stress-based screens to uncover Arabidopsis peroxisomal proteins involved in drought response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping; Bassham, Diane

    2015-09-14

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles that house a wide array of metabolic reactions important for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge regarding the role of peroxisomal proteins in various biological processes, including plant stress response, is still incomplete. Recent proteomic studies of plant peroxisomes significantly increased the number of known peroxisomal proteins and greatly facilitated the study of peroxisomes at the systems level. The objectives of this study were to determine whether genes that encode peroxisomal proteins with related functions are co-expressed in Arabidopsis and identify peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response using in silico analysis and mutant screens. Using microarray data from online databases, we performed hierarchical clustering analysis to generate a comprehensive view of transcript level changes for Arabidopsis peroxisomal genes during development and under abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Many genes involved in the same metabolic pathways exhibited co-expression, some genes known to be involved in stress response are regulated by the corresponding stress conditions, and function of some peroxisomal proteins could be predicted based on their coexpression pattern. Since drought caused expression changes to the highest number of genes that encode peroxisomal proteins, we subjected a subset of Arabidopsis peroxisomal mutants to a drought stress assay. Mutants of the LON2 protease and the photorespiratory enzyme hydroxypyruvate reductase 1 (HPR1) showed enhanced susceptibility to drought, suggesting the involvement of peroxisomal quality control and photorespiration in drought resistance. Lastly, our study provided a global view of how genes that encode peroxisomal proteins respond to developmental and environmental cues and began to reveal additional peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response, thus opening up new avenues to investigate the role of peroxisomes in plant adaptation to

  19. Overproduction, purification, and ATPase activity of the Escherichia coli RuvB protein involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, H; Shiba, T; Makino, K; Nakata, A; Shinagawa, H

    1989-01-01

    The ruvA and ruvB genes of Escherichia coli constitute an operon which belongs to the SOS regulon. Genetic evidence suggests that the products of the ruv operon are involved in DNA repair and recombination. To begin biochemical characterization of these proteins, we developed a plasmid system that overproduced RuvB protein to 20% of total cell protein. Starting from the overproducing system, we purified RuvB protein. The purified RuvB protein behaved like a monomer in gel filtration chromatography and had an apparent relative molecular mass of 38 kilodaltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which agrees with the value predicted from the DNA sequence. The amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal region of the purified protein was analyzed, and the sequence agreed with the one deduced from the DNA sequence. Since the deduced sequence of RuvB protein contained the consensus sequence for ATP-binding proteins, we examined the ATP-binding and ATPase activities of the purified RuvB protein. RuvB protein had a stronger affinity to ADP than to ATP and weak ATPase activity. The results suggest that the weak ATPase activity of RuvB protein is at least partly due to end product inhibition by ADP. Images PMID:2529252

  20. Complex odontoma of unusual size involving the maxillary sinus: report of a case and review of CT and histopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Singer, Steven R; Rinaggio, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    An unusually large complex odontoma of the maxilla, occupying the entire maxillary sinus with expansion into the floor of the orbit and left nasal fossa, is reported. Although occurrences of complex odontomas are not considered rare, odontomas attaining extremely large sizes, especially involving the entire maxillary sinus with extension to the orbital floor and nasal fossae, are indeed, rare. In this article, the literature is reviewed to identify the common clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics of such lesions, and the outcome of treatment is discussed. Complex odontomas occasionally have significant growth potential, especially in the first two decades of life. Early recognition and consideration for surgical excision are key to successful management of this common odontogenic lesion. When odontomas extend beyond the alveolar process into the fascial planes, nasal fossae, paranasal sinuses, and orbits, computed tomography can readily demonstrate the extent and boundaries of the lesion.

  1. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M.; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  2. A Proteomic Approach for the Identification of Up-Regulated Proteins Involved in the Metabolic Process of the Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Franchin, Cinzia; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign smooth muscle cell tumor of the uterus. Proteomics is a powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures of proteins. In our study, we focused on proteins that were upregulated in the leiomyoma compared to the myometrium. Paired samples of eight leiomyomas and adjacent myometrium were obtained and submitted to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry for protein identification and to Western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The comparison between the patterns revealed 24 significantly upregulated (p < 0.05) protein spots, 12 of which were found to be associated with the metabolic processes of the leiomyoma and not with the normal myometrium. The overexpression of seven proteins involved in the metabolic processes of the leiomyoma was further validated by Western blotting and 2D Western blotting. Four of these proteins have never been associated with the leiomyoma before. The 2-DE approach coupled with mass spectrometry, which is among the methods of choice for comparative proteomic studies, identified a number of proteins overexpressed in the leiomyoma and involved in several biological processes, including metabolic processes. A better understanding of the mechanism underlying the overexpression of these proteins may be important for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27070597

  3. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    PubMed

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP level<10 mg/L. To determine if diagnosis of septic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRP<10 mg/L (K. kingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRP<10 mg/L group than in the other (37.3°C vs. 37.9°C, P=0.039 and 4.19 vs. 5.72 g/L, P=0.003, respectively). Age, symptom duration before diagnosis, as well as leukocyte and platelet counts were similar in both groups. Two children (2/89=2.2%) with S. aureus septic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRP<10 mg/L needed a second surgical drainage because of relapse of arthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP<10 mg/L experienced complications, while six of those with initial CRP≥10 mg/L needed a second surgical act

  4. Mobilization of T-DNA from Agrobacterium to plant cells involves a protein that binds single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gietl, C; Koukolíková-Nicola, Z; Hohn, B

    1987-01-01

    Crude protein extracts of induced and uninduced octopine wild-type strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, as well as several mutants of the virulence loci virA, -B, -G, -C, -D, and -E, were probed with single- and double-stranded synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides of different sequence and length in an electrophoretic retardation assay. Four complexes involving sequence-nonspecific, single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins were recognized. One inducible complex is determined by the virE locus, two Ti-plasmid-dependent complexes are constitutively expressed, and a fourth one is controlled by chromosomal genes. The protein-DNA complexes were characterized by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and by determination of the length of single-stranded DNA required for their formation. It is hypothesized that the single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins are involved in the production of T-DNA intermediates or have a carrier or protective function during T-DNA transfer. Images PMID:3480525

  5. Platyhelminth Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins: revealing structural diversity, class-specific features and biological associations across the phylum.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Iain W; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2012-09-01

    During platyhelminth infection, a cocktail of proteins is released by the parasite to aid invasion, initiate feeding, facilitate adaptation and mediate modulation of the host immune response. Included amongst these proteins is the Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) family, part of the larger sperm coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) superfamily. To explore the significance of this protein family during Platyhelminthes development and host interactions, we systematically summarize all published proteomic, genomic and immunological investigations of the VAL protein family to date. By conducting new genomic and transcriptomic interrogations to identify over 200 VAL proteins (228) from species in all 4 traditional taxonomic classes (Trematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Turbellaria), we further expand our knowledge related to platyhelminth VAL diversity across the phylum. Subsequent phylogenetic and tertiary structural analyses reveal several class-specific VAL features, which likely indicate a range of roles mediated by this protein family. Our comprehensive analysis of platyhelminth VALs represents a unifying synopsis for understanding diversity within this protein family and a firm context in which to initiate future functional characterization of these enigmatic members.

  6. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: exercise attenuated oxidative stress may be involved in fatty liver improvement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Duan, Zhigui; Hu, Hui; Li, Guolin; Yan, Siyu; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Jun; Yin, Dazhong; Xie, Qingji

    2013-05-01

    To screen target proteins of oxidative stress which mediate the effects of exercise on preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the methods for selecting carbonylated proteins were modified, and carbonylated proteins were profiled. The results showed that treadmill training reduced oxidative stress and the levels of intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG). The changes in IHTG showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde level. Further results from proteomics illustrated that 17 functional proteins were susceptible to oxidative modification, and exercise protected three proteins from carbonylation. The latter three proteins may serve as both direct target proteins of oxidative stress and mediators contributing to the beneficial effects of exercise. In particular, a long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL) which was a key enzyme in lipid metabolism was not carbonylated and with higher activities in exercise group. These findings indicate that this modified technique is practical and powerful in selecting carbonylated proteins. Long-term treadmill training is effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preventing the accumulation of IHTG. Among the 17 target proteins of oxidative modification, three proteins contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise. Preventing ACADL from carbonylation may be involved in the physiological mechanism of exercise-induced NAFLD improvement.

  7. The RNase R from Campylobacter jejuni has unique features and is involved in the first steps of infection.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nabila; Matos, Rute G; Pinto, Teresa; Rannou, Pauline; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens must adapt/respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Ribonucleases (RNases) can be crucial factors contributing to the fast adaptation of RNA levels to different environmental demands. It has been demonstrated that the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) facilitates survival of Campylobacter jejuni in low temperatures and favors swimming, chick colonization, and cell adhesion/invasion. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of other ribonucleases in this microorganism. Members of the RNB family of enzymes have been shown to be involved in virulence of several pathogens. We have searched C. jejuni genome for homologues and found one candidate that displayed properties more similar to RNase R (Cj-RNR). We show here that Cj-RNR is important for the first steps of infection, the adhesion and invasion of C. jejuni to eukaryotic cells. Moreover, Cj-RNR proved to be active in a wide range of conditions. The results obtained lead us to conclude that Cj-RNR has an important role in the biology of this foodborne pathogen.

  8. Comparison of clinical features of left-sided infective endocarditis involving previously normal versus previously abnormal valves.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Carmen; Vilacosta, Isidre; Fernández, Cristina; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Del Trigo, María; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Maroto, Luis; Hernández, Miguel; Rodríguez, Enrique; San Román, José Alberto

    2014-07-15

    Native valve infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with normal valves has increased in the last decades. Whether patients with normal valves present a similar prognosis to those with pathologic valves is unresolved. Our aim is to describe epidemiologic and clinical differences between patients with left-sided IE and normal valves and those with native pathologic valves. We analyzed 945 consecutive episodes of IE, 435 of which involved left-sided nonprosthetic IE. They were classified into 2 groups: episodes in normal valves (normal group, n=173) and episodes in pathologic valves (abnormal group, n=262). Patients in the normal group were younger, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus bovis were more frequently isolated, and vegetations were more frequently found. Heart failure, septic shock, and the need for surgery or death were more common. Multivariate analysis identified the following as factors independently associated with normal valve IE: age<65 years, S bovis, S aureus, heart failure, and vegetation detection. Factors independently associated with in-hospital events included S aureus, periannular complications, heart failure, and septic shock development. In conclusion, compared with patients with abnormal valve IE, patients with IE on normal valves were younger, had a more virulent microbiological profile, developed heart failure and septic shock more frequently, needed more surgical procedures, and had worse prognosis.

  9. The RNase R from Campylobacter jejuni Has Unique Features and Is Involved in the First Steps of Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Matos, Rute G.; Pinto, Teresa; Rannou, Pauline; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens must adapt/respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Ribonucleases (RNases) can be crucial factors contributing to the fast adaptation of RNA levels to different environmental demands. It has been demonstrated that the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) facilitates survival of Campylobacter jejuni in low temperatures and favors swimming, chick colonization, and cell adhesion/invasion. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of other ribonucleases in this microorganism. Members of the RNB family of enzymes have been shown to be involved in virulence of several pathogens. We have searched C. jejuni genome for homologues and found one candidate that displayed properties more similar to RNase R (Cj-RNR). We show here that Cj-RNR is important for the first steps of infection, the adhesion and invasion of C. jejuni to eukaryotic cells. Moreover, Cj-RNR proved to be active in a wide range of conditions. The results obtained lead us to conclude that Cj-RNR has an important role in the biology of this foodborne pathogen. PMID:25100732

  10. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures) and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets) was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Results Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate), including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM) proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome) contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA) and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB) indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB) implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB) were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA), OM lipoproteins (NlpD), chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB) and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp) were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins) required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release of bacteria

  11. Protein kinase Cδ but not PKCα is involved in insulin-induced glucose metabolism in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Brutman-Barazani, Tamar; Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Brand, Chagit; Brodie, Chaya; Rosa, Jagoda; Sampson, Sanford R

    2012-06-01

    The liver is a major insulin-responsive tissue responsible for glucose regulation. One important mechanism in this phenomenon is insulin-induced glycogen synthesis. Studies in our laboratory have shown that protein kinase Cs delta (PKCδ) and alpha (α) have important roles in insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and that their expression and activity are regulated by insulin. Their importance in glucose regulation in liver cells is unclear. In this study we investigated the possibility that these isoforms are involved in the mediation of insulin-induced glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes. Studies were done on rat hepatocytes in primary culture and on the AML-12 (alpha mouse liver) cell line. Insulin increased activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCδ within 5 min. In contrast, activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCα were not increased by insulin. PKCδ was constitutively associated with IR, and this was increased by insulin stimulation. Suppression of PKCδ expression by transfection with RNAi, or overexpression of kinase dead (dominant negative) PKCδ reduced both the insulin-induced activation of PKB/Akt and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and reduced significantly insulin-induced glucose uptake. In addition, treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with rottlerin abrogated insulin-induced increase in glycogen synthesis. Neither overexpression nor inhibition of PKCα appeared to alter activation of PKB, phosphorylation of GSK3 or glucose uptake in response to insulin. We conclude that PKCδ, but not PKCα, plays an essential role in insulin-induced glucose uptake and glycogenesis in hepatocytes.

  12. Tau deficiency leads to the upregulation of BAF-57, a protein involved in neuron-specific gene repression.

    PubMed

    de Barreda, Elena Gómez; Dawson, Hana N; Vitek, Michel P; Avila, Jesús

    2010-06-01

    Although tau is mainly located in the cell cytoplasm, mostly bound to tubulin, it may also be found in the nucleus of neurons. Hence, we tested whether tau might play a role in regulating the expression of certain genes by comparing gene expression in mice containing or lacking the tau protein. Our results identified a significant difference in the expression of the smarce1 gene, which codes for the BAF-57 protein, a protein involved in the repression of neuron specific genes. These data suggest a role for tau in neuron maturation.

  13. Ligand-induced association of surface immunoglobulin with the detergent insoluble cytoskeleton may involve an 89K protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.K.; Woda, B.

    1986-03-01

    Membrane immunoglobulin of B-lymphocytes is thought to play an important role in antigen recognition and cellular activation. Binding of cross-linking ligands to surface immunoglobulin (SIg) on intact cells converts it to a detergent insoluble state, and this conversion is associated with the transmission of a mitogenic signal. Insolubilized membrane proteins may be solubilized by incubating the detergent insoluble cytoskeletons in buffers which convert F-actin to G-actin ((Buffer 1), 0.34M sucrose, 0.5mM ATP, 0.5mM Dithiothrietol and lmM EDTA). Immunoprecipitation of SIg from the detergent soluble fraction of /sup 35/S-methionine labeled non ligand treated rat B-cells results in the co-isolation of an 89K protein and a 44K protein, presumably actin. The 89K protein is not associated with the fraction of endogenous detergent insoluble SIg. On treatment of rat B cells with cross-linking ligand (anti-Ig) the 89K protein becomes detergent insoluble along with most of the SIg and co-isolates with SIg on immunoprecipitation of the detergent insoluble, buffer l solubilized fraction. The migration of the SIg-associated 89K protein from the detergent soluble fraction to the detergent insoluble fraction after ligand treatment, suggests that this protein might be involved in linking SIg to the underlying cytoskeleton and could be involved in the transmission of a mitogenic signal.

  14. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins involved in ethylene-induced chilling tolerance in harvested banana fruit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Taotao; Yun, Ze; Zhang, Dandan; Yang, Chengwei; Zhu, Hong; Jiang, Yueming; Duan, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism involved in ethylene-induced chilling tolerance in harvested banana fruit, a gel-based proteomic study followed by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS was carried out. Banana fruit were treated with 500 ppm ethylene for 12 h and then stored at 6°C. During cold storage, the chilling tolerance was assessed and the proteins from the peel were extracted for proteomic analysis. It was observed that ethylene pretreatment significantly induced the chilling tolerance in harvested banana fruit, manifesting as increases in maximal chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) and decreased electrolyte leakage. Sixty-four proteins spots with significant differences in abundance were identified, most of which were induced by ethylene pretreatment during cold storage. The up-regulated proteins induced by ethylene pretreatment were mainly related to energy metabolism, stress response and defense, methionine salvage cycle and protein metabolism. These proteins were involved in ATP synthesis, ROS scavenging, protective compounds synthesis, protein refolding and degradation, and polyamine biosynthesis. It is suggested that these up-regulated proteins might play a role in the ethylene-induced chilling tolerance in harvested banana fruit. PMID:26528309

  15. Amino acid residues in the laminin G domains of protein S involved in tissue factor pathway inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed

    Somajo, Sofia; Ahnström, Josefin; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Gierula, Magdalena; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Protein S functions as a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and activated protein C (APC). The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like region of protein S, consisting of two laminin G-like domains (LG1 and LG2), contains the binding site for C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and TFPI. Furthermore, the LG-domains are essential for the TFPI-cofactor function and for expression of full APC-cofactor function. The aim of the current study was to localise functionally important interaction sites in the protein S LG-domains using amino acid substitutions. Four protein S variants were created in which clusters of surface-exposed amino acid residues within the LG-domains were substituted. All variants bound normally to C4BP and were fully functional as cofactors for APC in plasma and in pure component assays. Two variants, SHBG2 (E612A, I614A, F265A, V393A, H453A), involving residues from both LG-domains, and SHBG3 (K317A, I330A, V336A, D365A) where residues in LG1 were substituted, showed 50-60 % reduction in enhancement of TFPI in FXa inhibition assays. For SHBG3 the decreased TFPI cofactor function was confirmed in plasma based thrombin generation assays. Both SHBG variants bound to TFPI with decreased affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. The TFPI Kunitz 3 domain is known to contain the interaction site for protein S. Using in silico analysis and protein docking exercises, preliminary models of the protein S SHBG/TFPI Kunitz domain 3 complex were created. Based on a combination of experimental and in silico data we propose a binding site for TFPI on protein S, involving both LG-domains.

  16. Cybip, a starfish cyclin B-binding protein, is involved in meiotic M-phase exit.

    PubMed

    Offner, Nicolas; Derancourt, Jean; Lozano, Jean Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Picard, André; Peaucellier, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We designed a screen to identify starfish oocyte proteins able to bind monomeric cyclin B by affinity chromatography on a cyclin B splice variant displaying low affinity for cdc2. We identified a 15kDa protein previously described as a cdk-binding protein [Biochim. Biophys. Acta Mol. Cell Res. 1589 (2002) 219-231]. Cybip is encoded by a single polymorphic gene and the native protein is matured by cleaving a signal peptide. We firmly establish the fact that it is a true cyclin B-binding protein, since the recombinant protein binds recombinant cyclin B in absence of any cdk. Finally, we show that the microinjection of GST-cybip, and of anti-cybip antibody, in maturing starfish oocytes, inhibits H1 kinase and MPF inactivation, and first polar body emission.

  17. Biochemical localization of a protein involved in Gluconacetobacter hansenii cellulose synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Prashanti R; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Brown, Nicole Robitaille; Tien, Ming

    2011-02-08

    Using subcellular fractionation and Western blot methods, we have shown that AcsD, one of the proteins encoded by the Acetobacter cellulose synthase (acs) operon, is localized in the periplasmic region of the cell. AcsD protein was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using histidine tag affinity methods. The purified protein was used to obtain rabbit polyclonal antibodies. The purity of the subcellular fractions was assessed by marker enzyme assays.

  18. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  19. Sequences of the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein involved in binding to nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Kaptur, P E; Rhodes, R B; Lyles, D S

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to study the physical structure of the nucleocapsid-M protein complex of vesicular stomatitis virus by analysis of nucleocapsid binding by wild-type and mutant M proteins and by limited proteolysis. We used the temperature-sensitive M protein mutant tsO23 and six temperature-stable revertants of tsO23 to test the effect of sequence changes on M protein binding to the nucleocapsid as a function of NaCl concentration. The results showed that M proteins from wild-type, mutant, and three of the revertant viruses had similar NaCl titration curves, while the curve for M proteins from the other three revertants differed significantly. The altered NaCl dependence of M protein was correlated with a single amino acid substitution from Phe to Leu at position 111 compared with the original temperature-sensitive mutant and was not correlated with a substitution of Gly to Glu at position 21 in tsO23 and the revertants. To determine whether protease cleavage sites in the M protein were protected by interaction with the nucleocapsid, nucleocapsid-M protein complexes were subjected to limited proteolysis with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. The initial trypsin and chymotrypsin cleavage sites, located after amino acids 19 and 20, respectively, were as accessible to proteases when M protein was bound to the nucleocapsid as when it was purified, indicating that this region of the protein does not interact directly with the nucleocapsid. Furthermore, trypsin or chymotrypsin treatment released the M protein fragments from the nucleocapsid, presumably due to conformational changes following proteolysis. V8 protease cleaved the M protein at position 34 or 50, producing two distinct fragments. The M protein fragment produced by V8 protease cleavage at position 34 remained associated with the nucleocapsid, while the fragment produced by cleavage at position 50 was released from the nucleocapsid. These results suggest that the

  20. Proteomic study identifies proteins involved in brassinosteroid regulation of rice growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengru; Bai, Ming-Yi; Deng, Zhiping; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Burlingame, Alma L; Lu, Tiegang; Chong, Kang; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential hormones for growth and development of plant. In rice, BRs regulate multiple developmental processes and affect many important traits such as height, leaf angle, fertility and seed filling. We identified brassinosteroid-regulated proteins in rice using proteomic approaches and performed functional analysis of some BR-regulated proteins by overexpression experiments. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, we compared proteomic differences in the shoots and roots of the BR-insensitive mutant d61-4 and BR-deficient mutant brd1-3. We identified a large number of proteins differentially expressed in the mutants compared with wild type control. These include a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein (OsGRP1) and a DREPP2 protein, which showed reduced levels in the BR mutants. Overexpression of these two proteins partially suppressed the dwarf phenotype of the Arabidopsis BR-insensitive mutant bri1-5. In contrast to the reduced protein level, the RNA level of OsGRP1 was not significantly affected in the BR mutants or by BR treatment, suggesting BR regulation of OsGRP1 at the posttranslational level. This study identifies many BR-regulated proteins and demonstrates that OsGRP1 functions downstream in the BR signal transduction pathway to promote cell expansion.

  1. Protein mobilization in germinating mung bean seeds involves vacuolar sorting receptors and multivesicular bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqi; Li, Yubing; Lo, Sze Wan; Hillmer, Stefan; Sun, Samuel S M; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2007-04-01

    Plants accumulate and store proteins in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) during seed development and maturation. Upon seed germination, these storage proteins are mobilized to provide nutrients for seedling growth. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of protein degradation during seed germination. Here we test the hypothesis that vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins play a role in mediating protein degradation in germinating seeds. We demonstrate that both VSR proteins and hydrolytic enzymes are synthesized de novo during mung bean (Vigna radiata) seed germination. Immunogold electron microscopy with VSR antibodies demonstrate that VSRs mainly locate to the peripheral membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), presumably as recycling receptors in day 1 germinating seeds, but become internalized to the MVB lumen, presumably for degradation at day 3 germination. Chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation with VSR antibodies have identified the cysteine protease aleurain as a specific VSR-interacting protein in germinating seeds. Further confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrate that VSR and aleurain colocalize to MVBs as well as PSVs in germinating seeds. Thus, MVBs in germinating seeds exercise dual functions: as a storage compartment for proteases that are physically separated from PSVs in the mature seed and as an intermediate compartment for VSR-mediated delivery of proteases from the Golgi apparatus to the PSV for protein degradation during seed germination.

  2. "Features of two proteins of Leptospira interrogans with potential role in host-pathogen interactions"

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is considered a re-emerging infectious disease caused by pathogenic spirochaetes of the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires have the ability to survive and disseminate to multiple organs after penetrating the host. Leptospires were shown to express surface proteins that interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to plasminogen (PLG). This study examined the interaction of two putative leptospiral proteins with laminin, collagen Type I, collagen Type IV, cellular fibronectin, plasma fibronectin, PLG, factor H and C4bp. Results We show that two leptospiral proteins encoded by LIC11834 and LIC12253 genes interact with laminin in a dose - dependent and saturable mode, with dissociation equilibrium constants (KD) of 367.5 and 415.4 nM, respectively. These proteins were named Lsa33 and Lsa25 (Leptospiral surface adhesin) for LIC11834 and LIC12253, respectively. Metaperiodate - treated laminin reduced Lsa25 - laminin interaction, suggesting that sugar moieties of this ligand participate in this interaction. The Lsa33 is also PLG - binding receptor, with a KD of 23.53 nM, capable of generating plasmin in the presence of an activator. Although in a weak manner, both proteins interact with C4bp, a regulator of complement classical route. In silico analysis together with proteinase K and immunoflorescence data suggest that these proteins might be surface exposed. Moreover, the recombinant proteins partially inhibited leptospiral adherence to immobilized laminin and PLG. Conclusions We believe that these multifunctional proteins have the potential to participate in the interaction of leptospires to hosts by mediating adhesion and by helping the bacteria to escape the immune system and to overcome tissue barriers. To our knowledge, Lsa33 is the first leptospiral protein described to date with the capability of binding laminin, PLG and C4bp in vitro. PMID:22463075

  3. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  4. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC. PMID:26187821

  5. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  6. Involvement of heat shock protein 47 in Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Quan; Tao, Ran; Li, Lan; Ma, Ke; Xu, Lei; Ai, Guo; Fan, Xiang-Xue; Jiao, Yun-Tao; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is associated with both liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previously, heat shock protein 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, was shown to play a critical role in the maturation of procollagen. However, less is known about the role of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated the expression of heat shock protein 47 in S. japonicum-induced liver fibrosis and attempted to determine whether inhibition of heat shock protein 47 could have beneficial effects on fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that the expression of heat shock protein 47 was significantly increased in patients with Schistosoma-induced fibrosis, as well as in rodent models. Immunohistochemistry revealed heat shock protein 47-positive cells were found in the periphery of egg granulomas. Administration of heat shock protein 47-targeted short hairpin (sh)RNA remarkably reduced heat shock protein 47 expression and collagen deposition in NIH3T3 cells and liver tissue of S. japonicum-infected mice. Life-table analysis revealed a dose-dependent prolongation of survival rates with the treatment of heat shock protein 47-shRNA in murine fibrosis models. Moreover, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activity, splenomegaly, spleen weight index and portal hypertension were also measured, which showed improvement with the anti-fibrosis treatment. The fibrosis-related parameters assessed were expressions of Col1a1, Col3a1, TGF-β1, CTGF, IL-13, IL-17, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and PAI-1 in the liver. This study demonstrated that heat shock protein 47-targeted shRNA directly reduced collagen production of mouse liver fibrosis associated with S. japonicum. We conclude that heat shock protein 47 plays an essential role in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice and may be a potential target for ameliorating the hepatic fibrosis caused by this parasite. PMID:24295791

  7. Involvement of Protein Kinase D1 in Signal Transduction from the Protein Kinase C Pathway to the Tyrosine Kinase Pathway in Response to Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone*

    PubMed Central

    Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Maeda, Noriko; Toku, Seikichi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its stimulation activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK). We found that the transactivation of ErbB4 was involved in GnRH-induced ERK activation in immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1–7 cells). We found also that GnRH induced the cleavage of ErbB4. In the present study, we examined signal transduction for the activation of ERK and the cleavage of ErbB4 after GnRH treatment. Both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage were completely inhibited by YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gq/11 proteins. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) markedly decreased both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Experiments with two types of PKC inhibitors, Gö 6976 and bisindolylmaleimide I, indicated that novel PKC isoforms but not conventional PKC isoforms were involved in ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Our experiments indicated that the novel PKC isoforms activated protein kinase D (PKD) after GnRH treatment. Knockdown and inhibitor experiments suggested that PKD1 stimulated the phosphorylation of Pyk2 by constitutively activated Src and Fyn for ERK activation. Taken together, it is highly possible that PKD1 plays a critical role in signal transduction from the PKC pathway to the tyrosine kinase pathway. Activation of the tyrosine kinase pathway may be involved in the progression of cancer. PMID:26338704

  8. Prediction of protein structural features from sequence data based on Shannon entropy and Kolmogorov complexity.

    PubMed

    Bywater, Robert Paul

    2015-01-01

    While the genome for a given organism stores the information necessary for the organism to function and flourish it is the proteins that are encoded by the genome that perhaps more than anything else characterize the phenotype for that organism. It is therefore not surprising that one of the many approaches to understanding and predicting protein folding and properties has come from genomics and more specifically from multiple sequence alignments. In this work I explore ways in which data derived from sequence alignment data can be used to investigate in a predictive way three different aspects of protein structure: secondary structures, inter-residue contacts and the dynamics of switching between different states of the protein. In particular the use of Kolmogorov complexity has identified a novel pathway towards achieving these goals.

  9. Comparison of Algorithms for Prediction of Protein Structural Features from Evolutionary Data

    PubMed Central

    Bywater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have many functions and predicting these is still one of the major challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics. Foremost amongst these functions is the need to fold correctly thereby allowing the other genetically dictated tasks that the protein has to carry out to proceed efficiently. In this work, some earlier algorithms for predicting protein domain folds are revisited and they are compared with more recently developed methods. In dealing with intractable problems such as fold prediction, when different algorithms show convergence onto the same result there is every reason to take all algorithms into account such that a consensus result can be arrived at. In this work it is shown that the application of different algorithms in protein structure prediction leads to results that do not converge as such but rather they collude in a striking and useful way that has never been considered before. PMID:26963911

  10. Comparison of Algorithms for Prediction of Protein Structural Features from Evolutionary Data.

    PubMed

    Bywater, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have many functions and predicting these is still one of the major challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics. Foremost amongst these functions is the need to fold correctly thereby allowing the other genetically dictated tasks that the protein has to carry out to proceed efficiently. In this work, some earlier algorithms for predicting protein domain folds are revisited and they are compared with more recently developed methods. In dealing with intractable problems such as fold prediction, when different algorithms show convergence onto the same result there is every reason to take all algorithms into account such that a consensus result can be arrived at. In this work it is shown that the application of different algorithms in protein structure prediction leads to results that do not converge as such but rather they collude in a striking and useful way that has never been considered before.

  11. [Features of allele polymorphism of genes involved in homocysteine and folate metabolism in patients with atherosclerosis of the lower extremity arteries].

    PubMed

    Klenkova, N A; Kapustin, S I; Saltykova, N B; Shmeleva, V M; Blinov, M N

    2009-01-01

    Under study were features of allele polymorphism of genes of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C), methionine synthase (MS A 2756G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G) and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD G1958A) in patients with atherosclerosis of the lower extremity arteries (ALEA). Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) had statistically significant increase of allele MTHFR 677T and MTRR 66GG as compared both with the control group and with the group of patients without HHcy. It suggests that polymorphism of genes involved in homocystein and folate metabolism might affect the risk of HHcy in patients with ALEA. PMID:20209990

  12. [Features of allele polymorphism of genes involved in homocysteine and folate metabolism in patients with atherosclerosis of the lower extremity arteries].

    PubMed

    Klenkova, N A; Kapustin, S I; Saltykova, N B; Shmeleva, V M; Blinov, M N

    2009-01-01

    Under study were features of allele polymorphism of genes of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C), methionine synthase (MS A 2756G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G) and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD G1958A) in patients with atherosclerosis of the lower extremity arteries (ALEA). Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) had statistically significant increase of allele MTHFR 677T and MTRR 66GG as compared both with the control group and with the group of patients without HHcy. It suggests that polymorphism of genes involved in homocystein and folate metabolism might affect the risk of HHcy in patients with ALEA.

  13. Identification of candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen-derived small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (...

  14. Quantitative analysis of regions of adenovirus E1A products involved in interactions with cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, D; Marcellus, R C; Bacchetti, S; Bayley, S T; Branton, P E

    1992-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins and oncogene products of several other DNA tumour viruses derive much of their oncogenic potential from interactions with cellular polypeptides. E1A proteins form complexes with p105Rb and a related p107 polypeptide, and with at least three other proteins (p60cycA, p130, and p300); all may be required for cell transformation. Using a series of E1A deletion mutants, we have carried out a quantitative analysis of the binding patterns of cellular proteins to E1A products. Binding of most of the proteins was affected at least partially by mutations within the amino terminal 25 residues, amino acids 36-69 within conserved region 1 (CR1), and residues 121-138 in conserved region 2 (CR2). However, the specific binding characteristics of each protein varied considerably. p300 was the only species for which binding was totally eliminated by deletions at the amino terminus. Removal of regions within CR1 eliminated binding of all species except p107 and p60cycA. Deletion of portions of CR2 reduced or eliminated binding of all proteins except p300. Thus, whereas cellular polypeptides generally were found to interact with the same three regions of E1A proteins, specific interactions varied considerably. PMID:1297336

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  16. Classical Swine Fever Virus p7 protein is a viroporin involved in virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The non-structural protein p7 of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) is a hydrophobic polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 7 kDa. The protein contains two hydrophobic stretches of amino acids interrupted by a short charged segment that are predicted to form transmembrane helices and a cytos...

  17. PredPPCrys: Accurate Prediction of Sequence Cloning, Protein Production, Purification and Crystallization Propensity from Protein Sequences Using Multi-Step Heterogeneous Feature Fusion and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huilin; Wang, Mingjun; Tan, Hao; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the primary approach to solve the three-dimensional structure of a protein. However, a major bottleneck of this method is the failure of multi-step experimental procedures to yield diffraction-quality crystals, including sequence cloning, protein material production, purification, crystallization and ultimately, structural determination. Accordingly, prediction of the propensity of a protein to successfully undergo these experimental procedures based on the protein sequence may help narrow down laborious experimental efforts and facilitate target selection. A number of bioinformatics methods based on protein sequence information have been developed for this purpose. However, our knowledge on the important determinants of propensity for a protein sequence to produce high diffraction-quality crystals remains largely incomplete. In practice, most of the existing methods display poorer performance when evaluated on larger and updated datasets. To address this problem, we constructed an up-to-date dataset as the benchmark, and subsequently developed a new approach termed ‘PredPPCrys’ using the support vector machine (SVM). Using a comprehensive set of multifaceted sequence-derived features in combination with a novel multi-step feature selection strategy, we identified and characterized the relative importance and contribution of each feature type to the prediction performance of five individual experimental steps required for successful crystallization. The resulting optimal candidate features were used as inputs to build the first-level SVM predictor (PredPPCrys I). Next, prediction outputs of PredPPCrys I were used as the input to build second-level SVM classifiers (PredPPCrys II), which led to significantly enhanced prediction performance. Benchmarking experiments indicated that our PredPPCrys method outperforms most existing procedures on both up-to-date and previous datasets. In addition, the predicted crystallization targets of

  18. Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70 Is Involved in Rotavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Bouyssounade, Daniela; Zárate, Selene; Iša, Pavel; López, Tomás; Espinosa, Rafaela; Romero, Pedro; Méndez, Ernesto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have identified the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) as a receptor candidate for rotaviruses. hsc70 was shown to be present on the surface of MA104 cells, and antibodies to this protein blocked rotavirus infectivity, while not affecting the infectivity of reovirus and poliovirus. Preincubation of the hsc70 protein with the viruses also inhibited their infectivity. Triple-layered particles (mature virions), but not double-layered particles, bound hsc70 in a solid-phase assay, and this interaction was blocked by monoclonal antibodies to the virus surface proteins VP4 and VP7. Rotaviruses were shown to interact with hsc70 at a postattachment step, since antibodies to hsc70 and the protein itself did not inhibit the virus attachment to cells. We propose that the functional rotavirus receptor is a complex of several cell surface molecules that include, among others, hsc70. PMID:11907249

  19. Mapping the H(+) (V)-ATPase interactome: identification of proteins involved in trafficking, folding, assembly and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Merkulova, Maria; Păunescu, Teodor G; Azroyan, Anie; Marshansky, Vladimir; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    V-ATPases (H(+) ATPases) are multisubunit, ATP-dependent proton pumps that regulate pH homeostasis in virtually all eukaryotes. They are involved in key cell biological processes including vesicle trafficking, endosomal pH sensing, membrane fusion and intracellular signaling. They also have critical systemic roles in renal acid excretion and blood pH balance, male fertility, bone remodeling, synaptic transmission, olfaction and hearing. Furthermore, V-ATPase dysfunction either results in or aggravates various other diseases, but little is known about the complex protein interactions that regulate these varied V-ATPase functions. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to identify V-ATPase associated proteins and construct a V-ATPase interactome. Our analysis using kidney tissue revealed V-ATPase-associated protein clusters involved in protein quality control, complex assembly and intracellular trafficking. ARHGEF7, DMXL1, EZR, NCOA7, OXR1, RPS6KA3, SNX27 and 9 subunits of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex (CCT) were found to interact with V-ATPase for the first time in this study. Knockdown of two interacting proteins, DMXL1 and WDR7, inhibited V-ATPase-mediated intracellular vesicle acidification in a kidney cell line, providing validation for the utility of our interactome as a screen for functionally important novel V-ATPase-regulating proteins. Our data, therefore, provide new insights and directions for the analysis of V-ATPase cell biology and (patho)physiology. PMID:26442671

  20. STAT3 and its phosphorylation are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced transactivation of glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Timani, Khalid Amine; He, Johnny J

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein is a major pathogenic factor in HIV-associated neurological diseases; it exhibits direct neurotoxicity and indirect astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity. We have shown that Tat alone is capable of activating glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression and inducing astrocytosis involving sequential activation of early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) and p300. In this study, we determined the roles of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in Tat-induced GFAP transactivation. STAT3 expression and phosphorylation led to significant increases in GFAP transcription and protein expression. Tat expression was associated with increased STAT3 expression and phosphorylation in Tat-expressing astrocytes and HIV-infected astrocytes. GFAP, Egr-1 and p300 transcription and protein expression all showed positive response to STAT3 and its phosphorylation. Importantly, knockdown of STAT3 resulted in significant decreases in Tat-induced GFAP and Egr-1 transcription and protein expression. Taken together, these findings show that STAT3 is involved in and acts upstream of Egr1 and p300 in the Tat-induced GFAP transactivation cascade and suggest important roles of STAT3 in controlling astrocyte proliferation and activation in the HIV-infected central nervous system.

  1. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed and phosphorylated proteins in epidermis involved in larval-pupal metamorphosis of Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Metamorphosis is an important process in the life cycle of holometabolous insects and is regulated by insect hormones. During metamorphosis, the epidermis goes through a significant transformation at the biochemical and molecular levels. Results To identify proteins and phosphoproteins involved in this process, we separated and compared epidermal protein profiles between feeding larvae and metamorphically committed larvae using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Pro-Q Diamond Phosphoprotein Staining. Sixty-one spots showing differential expression and/or phosphorylation were analyzed by mass spectrometry and eighteen proteins were proved related to larval-pupal transformation. Eight of them were further examined at the mRNA level by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and two of them were examined at the protein level by Western blot. Calponin was highly expressed in the metamorphic epidermis and phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Conclusion Our results suggest that the expression and phosphorylation of these proteins may play important roles in coordinating the biochemical processes involved in larval-pupal metamorphosis. PMID:20003373

  2. Mapping the H+ (V)-ATPase interactome: identification of proteins involved in trafficking, folding, assembly and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Merkulova, Maria; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Azroyan, Anie; Marshansky, Vladimir; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    V-ATPases (H+ ATPases) are multisubunit, ATP-dependent proton pumps that regulate pH homeostasis in virtually all eukaryotes. They are involved in key cell biological processes including vesicle trafficking, endosomal pH sensing, membrane fusion and intracellular signaling. They also have critical systemic roles in renal acid excretion and blood pH balance, male fertility, bone remodeling, synaptic transmission, olfaction and hearing. Furthermore, V-ATPase dysfunction either results in or aggravates various other diseases, but little is known about the complex protein interactions that regulate these varied V-ATPase functions. Therefore, we performed a proteomic analysis to identify V-ATPase associated proteins and construct a V-ATPase interactome. Our analysis using kidney tissue revealed V-ATPase-associated protein clusters involved in protein quality control, complex assembly and intracellular trafficking. ARHGEF7, DMXL1, EZR, NCOA7, OXR1, RPS6KA3, SNX27 and 9 subunits of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex (CCT) were found to interact with V-ATPase for the first time in this study. Knockdown of two interacting proteins, DMXL1 and WDR7, inhibited V-ATPase-mediated intracellular vesicle acidification in a kidney cell line, providing validation for the utility of our interactome as a screen for functionally important novel V-ATPase-regulating proteins. Our data, therefore, provide new insights and directions for the analysis of V-ATPase cell biology and (patho)physiology. PMID:26442671

  3. Functional dissection of protein domains involved in the immunomodulatory properties of PE_PGRS33 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumbo, Antonella; Palucci, Ivana; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Sali, Michela; Ventura, Marcello; D'Alfonso, Pamela; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Di Sante, Gabriele; Ria, Francesco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fadda, Giovanni; Manganelli, Riccardo; Delogu, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    PE_PGRSs are a large family of proteins identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and in few other pathogenic mycobacteria. The PE domain of PE_PGRS33 mediates localization of the protein on the mycobacterial cell surface, where the PGRS domain is available to interact with host components. In this study, PE_PGRS33 and its functional deletion mutants were expressed in M. smegmatis, and in vitro and in vivo assays were used to dissect the protein domains involved in the immunomodulatory properties of the protein. We demonstrate that PE_PGRS33-mediated secretion of TNF-α by macrophages occurs by extracellular interaction with TLR2. Our results also show that while the PGRS domain of the protein is required for triggering TNF-α secretion, mutation in the PE domain affects the pro-inflammatory properties of the protein. These results indicate that PE_PGRS33 is a protein with immunomodulatory activity and that protein stability and localization on the mycobacterial surface can affect these properties.

  4. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods.

  5. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods. PMID:25463695

  6. KHARON Is an Essential Cytoskeletal Protein Involved in the Trafficking of Flagellar Membrane Proteins and Cell Division in African Trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Marco A; Tran, Khoa D; Valli, Jessica; Hobbs, Sam; Johnson, Errin; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M

    2016-09-16

    African trypanosomes and related kinetoplastid parasites selectively traffic specific membrane proteins to the flagellar membrane, but the mechanisms for this trafficking are poorly understood. We show here that KHARON, a protein originally identified in Leishmania parasites, interacts with a putative trypanosome calcium channel and is required for its targeting to the flagellar membrane. KHARON is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme, where it likely mediates targeting of flagellar membrane proteins, but is also on the subpellicular microtubules and the mitotic spindle. Hence, KHARON is probably a multifunctional protein that associates with several components of the trypanosome cytoskeleton. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of KHARON mRNA results in failure of the calcium channel to enter the flagellar membrane, detachment of the flagellum from the cell body, and disruption of mitotic spindles. Furthermore, knockdown of KHARON mRNA induces a lethal failure of cytokinesis in both bloodstream (mammalian host) and procyclic (insect vector) life cycle stages, and KHARON is thus critical for parasite viability. PMID:27489106

  7. STP1, a gene involved in pre-tRNA processing, encodes a nuclear protein containing zinc finger motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S S; Stanford, D R; Silvers, C D; Hopper, A K

    1992-01-01

    STP1 is an unessential yeast gene involved in the removal of intervening sequences from some, but not all, families of intervening sequence-containing pre-tRNAs. Previously, we proposed that STP1 might encode a product that generates pre-tRNA conformations efficiently recognized by tRNA-splicing endonuclease. To test the predictions of this model, we have undertaken a molecular analysis of the STP1 gene and its products. The STP1 locus is located on chromosome IV close to at least two other genes involved in RNA splicing: PRP3 and SPP41. The STP1 open reading frame (ORF) could encode a peptide of 64,827 Da; however, inspection of putative transcriptional and translational regulatory signals and mapping of the 5' ends of mRNA provide evidence that translation of the STP1 ORF usually initiates at a second AUG to generate a protein of 58,081 Da. The STP1 ORF contains three putative zinc fingers. The first of these closely resembles both the DNA transcription factor consensus and the Xenopus laevis p43 RNA-binding protein consensus. The third motif more closely resembles the fingers found in spliceosomal proteins. Employing antisera to the endogenous STP1 protein and to STP1-LacZ fusion proteins, we show that the STP1 protein is localized to nuclei. The presence of zinc finger motifs and the nuclear location of the STP1 protein support the model that this gene product is involved directly in pre-tRNA splicing. Images PMID:1588961

  8. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late-stage erythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage of major nuclear substructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J; Short, Sarah A; Koury, Mark J; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-09-15

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in 3 cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium, and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA (Nuclear mitotic apparatus), and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus, nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  9. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Contain Calprotectin, a Cytosolic Protein Complex Involved in Host Defense against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Constantin F.; Ermert, David; Schmid, Monika; Abu-Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Nacken, Wolfgang; Brinkmann, Volker; Jungblut, Peter R.; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19876394

  10. Surface proteins of C6/36 cells involved in dengue virus 4 binding and entry.

    PubMed

    Vega-Almeida, Tania Olivia; Salas-Benito, Mariana; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica Ascensión; Del Angel, Rosa María; Salas-Benito, Juan Santiago

    2013-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of the most important mosquito-borne viral disease, which is endemic to over 100 countries in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. It is transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. The first step in the viral infection of host cells is virion attachment to the plasma membrane, which is mediated by specific surface molecules. There are several molecules that participate in DENV infection of mosquitoes, but only a few have been identified. In this work, we co-purified 4 proteins from C6/36 cells using a recombinant DENV 4 E protein and identified them as 70 kDa Heat Shock and 70 kDa Heat Shock cognate proteins (HSP70/HSc70), Binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), Thioredoxin/protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), and 44 kDa Endoplasmic reticulum resident protein (ERp44) via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight (Maldi-ToF) analysis. Using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry assays, we observed re-localisation of HSP70/HSc70 and, to a lesser extent, BiP to the plasma membrane under stress conditions, such as during DENV infection. By performing binding and infection assays independently, we found that all 4 proteins participate in both processes, but to differing extents: HSP70/HSc70 is the most critical component, while ERp44 is less important. Viral infection was not inhibited when the cells were incubated with antibodies against all of the surface proteins after virus binding, which suggests that DENV entry to C6/36 cells is mediated by these proteins at the same step and not sequentially.

  11. Discovering New Features of Protein Complexes Structures by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. L. P.; Vorup-Jensen, T.; Andersen, C. B. F.; Andersen, G. R.; Pedersen, J. S.

    In spite of the recent advances in the X-Ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, the determination of the quaternary structure of large protein complexes is still a challenge in molecular biology and biological sciences. In this respect, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a key technique, enabling the determination of the possible structural conformation of complexes in an almost native state. Despite of this book being devoted to scattering techniques by synchrotron radiation, in this chapter we present two examples of application of laboratory-based SAXS to protein solution. The fundaments of the technique are obviously the same and have been deeply described in Chap. 2. In this chapter, we will introduce the application of SAXS to protein solution. Special emphasis is done on data reduction and absolute units calibration. As an example to illustrate the power of this technique, two new data sets for two protein complexes will be presented. This will show how high-quality SAXS data combined with advanced model strategies enables the determination of the quaternary structure of protein complexes.

  12. Isolation and partial characterization of proteins involved in maternal transfer of selenium in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Unrine, Jason M; Jackson, Brian P; Hopkins, William A; Romanek, Christopher

    2006-07-01

    Selenium from dietary exposure is efficiently transferred from mother to offspring in oviparous vertebrates, where it can cause severe teratogenic effects. We isolated and partially characterized proteins involved in maternal transfer of selenium in the oviparous lizard Sceloporus occidentalis using size-exclusion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Selenium from dietary selenomethionine exposure was incorporated into at least three egg proteins. One of these proteins was lipovitellin. The other two proteins may be part of a previously unknown mechanism of maternal transfer of Se that is independent of vitellogenesis or albumin secretion. Our results suggest at least three pathways for maternal transfer of Se in vertebrates that may vary in importance depending on the species. PMID:16833149

  13. Proteomics, metabolomics, and protein interactomics in the characterization of the molecular features of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Omics technologies emerged as complementary strategies to genomics in the attempt to understand human illnesses. In general, proteomics technologies emerged earlier than those of metabolomics for major depressive disorder (MDD) research, but both are driven by the identification of proteins and/or metabolites that can delineate a comprehensive characterization of MDD's molecular mechanisms, as well as lead to the identification of biomarker candidates of all types-prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and patient stratification. Also, one can explore protein and metabolite interactomes in order to pinpoint additional molecules associated with the disease that had not been picked up initially. Here, results and methodological aspects of MDD research using proteomics, metabolomics, and protein interactomics are reviewed, focusing on human samples.

  14. Structural Insights into the MMACHC-MMADHC Protein Complex Involved in Vitamin B12 Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Kopec, Jolanta; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Schuller, Marion; McCorvie, Thomas J.; Chalk, Rod; Plessl, Tanja; Fettelschoss, Victoria; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) into the cofactor forms methyl-Cbl (MeCbl) and adenosyl-Cbl (AdoCbl) is required for the function of two crucial enzymes, mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and cytosolic methionine synthase, respectively. The intracellular proteins MMACHC and MMADHC play important roles in processing and targeting the Cbl cofactor to its destination enzymes, and recent evidence suggests that they may interact while performing these essential trafficking functions. To better understand the molecular basis of this interaction, we have mapped the crucial protein regions required, indicate that Cbl is likely processed by MMACHC prior to interaction with MMADHC, and identify patient mutations on both proteins that interfere with complex formation, via different mechanisms. We further report the crystal structure of the MMADHC C-terminal region at 2.2 Å resolution, revealing a modified nitroreductase fold with surprising homology to MMACHC despite their poor sequence conservation. Because MMADHC demonstrates no known enzymatic activity, we propose it as the first protein known to repurpose the nitroreductase fold solely for protein-protein interaction. Using small angle x-ray scattering, we reveal the MMACHC-MMADHC complex as a 1:1 heterodimer and provide a structural model of this interaction, where the interaction region overlaps with the MMACHC-Cbl binding site. Together, our findings provide novel structural evidence and mechanistic insight into an essential biological process, whereby an intracellular “trafficking chaperone” highly specific for a trace element cofactor functions via protein-protein interaction, which is disrupted by inherited disease mutations. PMID:26483544

  15. Protein kinase C is involved in regulation of Ca2+ channels in plasmalemma of Nitella syncarpa.

    PubMed

    Zherelova, O M

    1989-01-01

    Ca2+ current recordings have been made on Nitella syncarpa cells using the intracellular perfusion and the voltage-clamp technique. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), a substance capable of activating protein kinase C from plasmalemma of Nitella cells, modulates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Polymixin B, inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks the Nitella plasmalemma Ca2+ channels; the rate of channel blockage depends on the concentration and exposure time of the substance. PMID:2536617

  16. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome Protein Family Is Involved in RNA Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenko, A; Krogan, Nevan; Cort, John R.; Evdokimova, Elena; Lew, Jocelyne M.; Yee, Adelinda; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Andrade, Miguel; Bochkarev, Alexey; Watson, James D.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Greenblatt, Jack; Hughes, Timothy; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Edwards, Aled M.

    2005-05-13

    A combination of structural, biochemical, and genetic studies in model organisms was used to infer a cellular role for the human protein (SBDS) responsible for Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome. The crystal structure of the SBDS homologue in Archaeoglobus fulgidus, AF0491, revealed a three domain protein. The N-terminal domain, which harbors the majority of disease-linked mutations, has a novel three-dimensional fold.

  17. Physiological Features of Perigonadal Adipose Tissue Containing Uncoupling Protein UCP1 in ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Elsukova, E I; Medvedev, L N; Mizonova, O V

    2016-07-01

    Immunoreactive uncoupling protein UCP1 was found in the perigonadal fat of only twothirds of 14-week-old male ICR mice. The presence of UCP1 had no effect on the rate of O2 consumption by the adipose tissue. The cellularity of perigonadal fat estimated by the DNA content was significantly higher in tissue containing UCP1 than in samples without this protein. This regularity was also observed after adaptation of mice to moderate cold (10oC) over 8 weeks. PMID:27496031

  18. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    PubMed

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  19. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    PubMed

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  20. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  1. Immunological identification of candidate proteins involved in regulating active shape changes of outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Knipper, M; Zimmermann, U; Köpschall, I; Rohbock, K; Jüngling, S; Zenner, H P

    1995-06-01

    By employing immunological methods, it has been demonstrated that myosin, myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) proteins in outer hair cells (OHC) are immunologically different from isoforms in platelets, smooth muscle and heart muscle, and are probably more related to isoforms found in red blood cells (RBC). Moreover, proteins related to band 3 protein (b3p) and protein 4.1 (p 4.1), ankyrin as well as fodrin and spectrin, but not glycophorin, have been identified in isolated OHCs. Both OHCs and RBC differ from other motile non-muscle cells in their lack of smooth muscle isoforms of actin, their common high levels of spectrin-, ankyrin- and band 3-like proteins, as well as the expression of the 80 kDa protein 4.1 isoform. The data support the notion that motility of OHC may be based upon regulation of the b3p/p 4.1/ankyrin complex, and thus may be reminiscent to the active shape changes in RBC.

  2. The type III protein translocation system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli involves EspA-EspB protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Neves, B C; Wallis, T; Shaw, R K; Hale, C; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2000-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), like many bacterial pathogens, use a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins across the bacterial cell wall. In EPEC, four proteins, EspA, EspB, EspD and Tir are known to be exported by a type III secretion system and to be essential for 'attaching and effacing' (A/E) lesion formation, the hallmark of EPEC pathogenicity. EspA was recently shown to be a structural protein and a major component of a large, transiently expressed, filamentous surface organelle which forms a direct link between the bacterium and the host cell. In contrast, EspB is translocated into the host cell where it is localized to both membrane and cytosolic cell fractions. EspA and EspB are required for translocation of Tir to the host cell membrane suggesting that they may both be components of the translocation apparatus. In this study, we show that EspB co-immunoprecipitates with the EspA filaments and that, during EPEC infection of HEp-2 cells, EspB localizes closely with EspA. Using a number of binding assays, we also show that EspB can bind and be copurified with EspA. Nevertheless, binding of EspA filaments to the host cell membranes occurred even in the absence of EspB. These results suggest that following initial attachment of the EspA filaments to the target cells, EspB is delivered into the host cell membrane and that the interaction between EspA and EspB may be important for protein translocation.

  3. Maternal protein restriction compromises myocardial contractility in the young adult rat by changing proteins involved in calcium handling.

    PubMed

    de Belchior, Aucelia C S; Freire, David D; da Costa, Carlos P; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    Maternal protein restriction (MPR) during pregnancy is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in the offspring in adulthood. In this study we evaluated the cardiac function of young male rats born from mothers subjected to MPR during pregnancy, focusing on the myocardial mechanics and calcium-handling proteins. After weaning, rats received normal diet until 3 mo old, when the following parameters were assessed: arterial and left ventricular hemodynamics and in vitro cardiac contractility in isolated papillary muscles. The body weight was lower and arterial pressure higher in the MPR group compared with young adult offspring of female rats that received standard diet (controls); and left ventricle time derivatives increased in the MPR group. The force developed by the cardiac muscle was similar; but time to peak and relaxation time were longer, and the derivatives of force were depressed in the MPR. In addition, MPR group exhibited decreased post-pause potentiation of force, suggesting reduced reuptake function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Corroborating, the myocardial content of SERCA-2a and phosphorylated PLB-Ser16/total PLB ratio was decreased and sodium-calcium exchanger was increased in the MPR group. The contraction dependent on transsarcolemmal influx of calcium was higher in MPR if compared with the control group. In summary, young rats born from mothers subjected to protein restriction during pregnancy exhibit changes in the myocardial mechanics with altered expression of calcium-handling proteins, reinforcing the hypothesis that maternal malnutrition is related to increased cardiovascular risk in the offspring, not only for hypertension, but also cardiac dysfunction.

  4. The SeqFEATURE library of 3D functional site models: comparison to existing methods and applications to protein function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shirley; Liang, Mike P; Altman, Russ B

    2008-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts have led to increasing numbers of novel, uncharacterized protein structures with low sequence identity to known proteins, resulting in a growing need for structure-based function recognition tools. Our method, SeqFEATURE, robustly models protein functions described by sequence motifs using a structural representation. We built a library of models that shows good performance compared to other methods. In particular, SeqFEATURE demonstrates significant improvement over other methods when sequence and structural similarity are low. PMID:18197987

  5. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  6. Whole Cell Formaldehyde Cross-Linking Simplifies Purification of Mitochondrial Nucleoids and Associated Proteins Involved in Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Nina; Hensen, Fenna; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Ives, Daniel; Gloerich, Jolein; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA/protein complexes (nucleoids) appear as discrete entities inside the mitochondrial network when observed by live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence. This somewhat trivial observation in recent years has spurred research towards isolation of these complexes and the identification of nucleoid-associated proteins. Here we show that whole cell formaldehyde crosslinking combined with affinity purification and tandem mass-spectrometry provides a simple and reproducible method to identify potential nucleoid associated proteins. The method avoids spurious mitochondrial isolation and subsequent multifarious nucleoid enrichment protocols and can be implemented to allow for label-free quantification (LFQ) by mass-spectrometry. Using expression of a Flag-tagged Twinkle helicase and appropriate controls we show that this method identifies many previously identified nucleoid associated proteins. Using LFQ to compare HEK293 cells with and without mtDNA, but both expressing Twinkle-FLAG, identifies many proteins that are reduced or absent in the absence of mtDNA. This set not only includes established mtDNA maintenance proteins but also many proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism and translation and therefore represents what can be considered an mtDNA gene expression proteome. Our data provides a very valuable resource for both basic mitochondrial researchers as well as clinical geneticists working to identify novel disease genes on the basis of exome sequence data. PMID:25695250

  7. The Involvement of Microbially Derived Extracellular Proteins in Nanoparticle Formation and Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, C. I.; Moreau, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    While humans are newcomers to the field of nanoscience, microbes have been synthesizing functional nanoscale structures for billions of years. Bacteria have evolved the capability to produce proteins that can unite cellular processes with inorganic substrates, transfer electrons, template biomineralization, and facilitate adhesion. Biominerals are commonly nano-composite materials in which biomolecules such as proteins and/or polysaccharides act as a template to direct nanoparticle nucleation and growth. Understanding the capability of microbes to form nanoparticles and influence their reactive transport properties offers potential for bioremediation and materials synthesis applications. The identification of biomolecules and functional groups associated with biogenic nanoparticle formation in both environmental and laboratory systems is the objective of our research. Two such systems in which protein-nanoparticle interactions were studied are discussed. First, the biogenic reduction of selenium oxyanions to Se0 was studied in pure cultures of Veillonella atypica, Bacillus selenitireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Biogenic Se0 nanostructures were observed as spherical, fibrillar, granular or amorphous aggregates, both in the cytoplasm or periplasmic space and extracellularly. These nanoparticles formed as protein-nanoparticle complexes that could be separated from the cells on the basis of density. A protein of ~39 kDa associated with biogenic nano-Se0 was recovered via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Initial results suggest that this protein plays an integral, structural role in Se0 nanosphere formation. Second, the nanoparticulate products of bacterial sulfate reduction in a biofilm growing in minewater were investigated with multiple high- spatial resolution microanalyses. Biogenic zinc-sulfide nanoparticles exhibited evidence for rapid, highly efficient aggregation to form orders-of-magnitude larger

  8. Correlation Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Study the Structural Features of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varriale, Antonio; Marabotti, Anna; Mei, Giampiero; Staiano, Maria; D’Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we used a combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methodologies to acquire structural information on pH-induced unfolding of the maltotriose-binding protein from Thermus thermophilus (MalE2). FCS has emerged as a powerful technique for characterizing the dynamics of molecules and it is, in fact, used to study molecular diffusion on timescale of microsecond and longer. Our results showed that keeping temperature constant, the protein diffusion coefficient decreased from 84±4 µm2/s to 44±3 µm2/s when pH was changed from 7.0 to 4.0. An even more marked decrease of the MalE2 diffusion coefficient (31±3 µm2/s) was registered when pH was raised from 7.0 to 10.0. According to the size of MalE2 (a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 43 kDa) as well as of its globular native shape, the values of 44 µm2/s and 31 µm2/s could be ascribed to deformations of the protein structure, which enhances its propensity to form aggregates at extreme pH values. The obtained fluorescence correlation data, corroborated by circular dichroism, fluorescence emission and light-scattering experiments, are discussed together with the MD simulations results. PMID:23750215

  9. Semantic similarity analysis of protein data: assessment with biological features and issues.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro H; Mina, Marco; Guerra, Concettina; Cannataro, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The integration of proteomics data with biological knowledge is a recent trend in bioinformatics. A lot of biological information is available and is spread on different sources and encoded in different ontologies (e.g. Gene Ontology). Annotating existing protein data with biological information may enable the use (and the development) of algorithms that use biological ontologies as framework to mine annotated data. Recently many methodologies and algorithms that use ontologies to extract knowledge from data, as well as to analyse ontologies themselves have been proposed and applied to other fields. Conversely, the use of such annotations for the analysis of protein data is a relatively novel research area that is currently becoming more and more central in research. Existing approaches span from the definition of the similarity among genes and proteins on the basis of the annotating terms, to the definition of novel algorithms that use such similarities for mining protein data on a proteome-wide scale. This work, after the definition of main concept of such analysis, presents a systematic discussion and comparison of main approaches. Finally, remaining challenges, as well as possible future directions of research are presented.

  10. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  11. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease.

  12. HCF243 Encodes a Chloroplast-Localized Protein Involved in the D1 Protein Stability of the Arabidopsis Photosystem II Complex1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyuan; Zhou, Gongke; Liu, Bingbing; Kong, Yingzhen; Chen, Na; Qiu, Qiang; Yin, Hongju; An, Jiaxing; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Numerous auxiliary nuclear factors have been identified to be involved in the dynamics of the photosystem II (PSII) complex. In this study, we characterized the high chlorophyll fluorescence243 (hcf243) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which shows higher chlorophyll fluorescence and is severely deficient in the accumulation of PSII supercomplexes compared with the wild type. The amount of core subunits was greatly decreased, while the outer antenna subunits and other subunits were hardly affected in hcf243. In vivo protein-labeling experiments indicated that the synthesis rate of both D1 and D2 proteins decreased severely in hcf243, whereas no change was found in the rate of other plastid-encoded proteins. Furthermore, the degradation rate of the PSII core subunit D1 protein is higher in hcf243 than in the wild type, and the assembly of PSII is retarded significantly in the hcf243 mutant. HCF243, a nuclear gene, encodes a chloroplast protein that interacts with the D1 protein. HCF243 homologs were identified in angiosperms with one or two copies but were not found in lower pl