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Sample records for protein hydrophobic dressing

  1. Development of nonstick and drug-loaded wound dressing based on the hydrolytic hydrophobic poly(carboxybetaine) ester analogue.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fangqin; Lin, Weifeng; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Longgang; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Guanglong; Chen, Shengfu

    2013-11-13

    A novel biocompatible polymer is developed for antimicrobial and nonstick coatings of wound dressing. The polymer is formed by copolymerization of carboxybetaine ester analogue methacrylate (CB-ester) and small partial poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) for cross-linking by hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), which is highly resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption and mammalian cell attachment after a quick hydrolysis. A small hydrophobic drug, aspirin, can be incorporated into the new polymer and slowly released to inhibit microorganism growth while the new polymer shows very low cytotoxicity. Moreover, the wound dressing, the new polymer coated medical gauze, shows good mechanic properties, such as flexibility and strength, for medical application. After all, this new nonfouling polymer offers great potential for an antimicrobial wound dressing and other applications.

  2. Prospective cohort study on surgical wounds comparing a polyhexanide-containing biocellulose dressing with a dialkyl-carbamoyl-chloride-containing hydrophobic dressing.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anna Marie; Andriessen, Anneke

    2012-09-01

    Postsurgery dressing changes in diabetic foot amputation wounds and surgical wounds healing by secondary intention are often conducted in the operating room under general anesthesia. A prospective comparative cohort study was performed in 60 patients (n = 60: n = 30/n = 30) with secondary-intention surgical wounds (82% had forefoot and/or digit[s] amputations) to compare 2 different dressing types. Patients at the study center gave informed written consent, after which they were randomly allocated to one of the treatment groups. Group A received a biocellulose dressing with polyhexanide, and group B a hydrophobic dressing with dialkyl-carbamoyl-chloride. In both groups, gauze was used as secondary dressing and fixed with a film dressing. One day after surgery, the dressings were removed by the surgeon and patient-reported pain and dressing adherence/integrity were evaluated. The number of patients that required general anesthesia was determined during the procedure and afterward. All patients (n = 60; n = 30/n = 30) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Pain levels in group A were significantly (t (59) = 4.026, P < .000) lower upon dressing removal, when compared with group B; in group A, n = 21 reported no pain versus n = 8 (26%) for group B. In group A, the dressing adhered in 7 subjects (23%) versus n = 27 (90%) of cases in group B (P = .000). No anesthesia was required for the patients in group A, contrary to group B, where 16% of patients received general anesthesia for dressing removal. Pain levels were significantly lower and the dressing adhered significantly less in group A, compared with group B, demonstrating a better quality of life for the patients in group A.

  3. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  4. Local hydrophobicity stabilizes secondary structures in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehisa, M.I.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of helix and ..beta..-sheet residues in 47 globular proteins was determined as a function of local hydrophobicity, which was defined by the sum of the Nozaki-Tanford transfer free energies at two nearest-neighbors on both sides of the amino acid sequence. In general, hydrophilic amino acids favor neither helix nor ..beta..-sheet formations when neighbor residues are also hydrophilic but favor helix formation at higher local hydrophobicity. On the other hand, some hydrophobic amino acids such as Met, Leu, and Ile favor helix formation when neighbor residues are hydrophilic. None of the hydrophobic amino acids favor ..beta..-sheet formation with hydrophilic neighbors, but most of them strongly favor ..beta..-sheet formation at high local hydrophobicity. When the average of 20 amino acids is taken, both helix and ..beta..-sheet residue probabilities are higher at higher local hydrophobicity, although the increase is steeper for ..beta..-sheets. Therefore, ..beta..-sheet formation is more influenced by local hydrophobicity than helix formation. Generally, helices are nearer the surface and tend to have hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces at opposite sides. The tendency of alternating regions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in a helical sequence was revealed by calculating the correlation of the Nozaki-Tanford values. Such amphipathic helices may be important in protein-protein-lipid interactions and in forming hydrophilic channels in the membrane. The choice of 30 nonhomologous proteins as the data set did not alter the above results.

  5. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  6. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-06

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Wound Dressings Based on Collagen-Mimetic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cereceres, Stacy; Touchet, Tyler; Browning, Mary Beth; Smith, Clayton; Rivera, Jose; Höök, Magnus; Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan; Russell, Brooke; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Chronic wounds are projected to reach epidemic proportions due to the aging population and the increasing incidence of diabetes. There is a strong clinical need for an improved wound dressing that can balance wound moisture, promote cell migration and proliferation, and degrade at an appropriate rate to minimize the need for dressing changes. Approach: To this end, we have developed a bioactive, hydrogel microsphere wound dressing that incorporates a collagen-mimetic protein, Scl2GFPGER, to promote active wound healing. A redesigned Scl2GFPGER, engineered collagen (eColGFPGER), was created to reduce steric hindrance of integrin-binding motifs and increase overall stability of the triple helical backbone, thereby resulting in increased cell adhesion to substrates. Results: This study demonstrates the successful modification of the Scl2GFPGER protein to eColGFPGER, which displayed enhanced stability and integrin interactions. Fabrication of hydrogel microspheres provided a matrix with adaptive moisture technology, and degradation rates have potential for use in human wounds. Innovation: This collagen-mimetic wound dressing was designed to permit controlled modulation of cellular interactions and degradation rate without impact on other physical properties. Its fabrication into uniform hydrogel microspheres provides a bioactive dressing that can readily conform to irregular wounds. Conclusion: Overall, this new eColGFPGER shows strong promise in the generation of bioactive hydrogels for wound healing as well as a variety of tissue scaffolds. PMID:26244101

  8. Hydrophobic-hydrophilic forces in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Durell, Stewart R; Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-08-01

    The process of protein folding is obviously driven by forces exerted on the atoms of the amino-acid chain. These forces arise from interactions with other parts of the protein itself (direct forces), as well as from interactions with the solvent (solvent-induced forces). We present a statistical-mechanical formalism that describes both these direct and indirect, solvent-induced thermodynamic forces on groups of the protein. We focus on 2 kinds of protein groups, commonly referred to as hydrophobic and hydrophilic. Analysis of this result leads to the conclusion that the forces on hydrophilic groups are in general stronger than on hydrophobic groups. This is then tested and verified by a series of molecular dynamics simulations, examining both hydrophobic alkanes of different sizes and hydrophilic moieties represented by polar-neutral hydroxyl groups. The magnitude of the force on assemblies of hydrophilic groups is dependent on their relative orientation: with 2 to 4 times larger forces on groups that are able to form one or more direct hydrogen bonds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Plugging into proteins: poisoning protein function by a hydrophobic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guanghong; Huang, Qing; Wei, Guanghong; Zhou, Ruhong; Fang, Haiping

    2010-12-28

    Nanoscale particles have become promising materials in many fields, such as cancer therapeutics, diagnosis, imaging, drug delivery, catalysis, as well as biosensors. In order to stimulate and facilitate these applications, there is an urgent need for the understanding of the nanoparticle toxicity and other risks involved with these nanoparticles to human health. In this study, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between several proteins (WW domains) and carbon nanotubes (one form of hydrophobic nanoparticles). We have found that the carbon nanotube can plug into the hydrophobic core of proteins to form stable complexes. This plugging of nanotubes disrupts and blocks the active sites of WW domains from binding to the corresponding ligands, thus leading to the loss of the original function of the proteins. The key to this observation is the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticle and the hydrophobic residues, particularly tryptophans, in the core of the domain. We believe that these findings might provide a novel route to the nanoparticle toxicity on the molecular level for the hydrophobic nanoparticles.

  10. Computational Protein Design with Explicit Consideration of Surface Hydrophobic Patches

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, Ron; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    De novo protein design requires the identification of amino-acid sequences that favor the target folded conformation and are soluble in water. One strategy for promoting solubility is to disallow hydrophobic residues on the protein surface during design. However, naturally occurring proteins often have hydrophobic amino acids on their surface that contribute to protein stability via the partial burial of hydrophobic surface area or play a key role in the formation of protein-protein interactions. A less restrictive approach for surface design that is used by the modeling program Rosetta is to parameterize the energy function so that the number of hydrophobic amino acids designed on the protein surface is similar to what is observed in naturally occurring monomeric proteins. Previous studies with Rosetta have shown that this limits surface hydrophobics to the naturally occurring frequency (~28%) but that it does not prevent the formation of hydrophobic patches that are considerably larger than those observed in naturally occurring proteins. Here, we describe a new score term that explicitly detects and penalizes the formation of hydrophobic patches during computational protein design. With the new term we are able to design protein surfaces that include hydrophobic amino acids at naturally occurring frequencies, but do not have large hydrophobic patches. By adjusting the strength of the new score term the emphasis of surface redesigns can be switched between maintaining solubility and maximizing folding free energy. PMID:22223219

  11. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Robert L.; Rose, George D.

    2016-01-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki–Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484–7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470–3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells. PMID:27791131

  12. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L; Rose, George D

    2016-11-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki-Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484-7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470-3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells.

  13. Distance-dependent hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts in protein folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; Punzi, Giuseppe; Todisco, Simona; Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Bossis, Fabrizio; Turi, Antonio; De Grassi, Anna; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo

    2014-09-21

    Successful prediction of protein folding from an amino acid sequence is a challenge in computational biology. In order to reveal the geometric constraints that drive protein folding, highlight those constraints kept or missed by distinct lattices and for establishing which class of intra- and inter-secondary structure element interactions is the most relevant for the correct folding of proteins, we have calculated inter-alpha carbon distances in a set of 42 crystal structures consisting of mainly helix, sheet or mixed conformations. The inter-alpha carbon distances were also calculated in several lattice "hydrophobic-polar" models built from the same protein set. We found that helix structures are more prone to form "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts than beta-sheet structures. At a distance lower than or equal to 3.8 Å (very short-range interactions), "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts are almost absent in the native structures, while they are frequent in all the analyzed lattice models. At distances in-between 3.8 and 9.5 Å (short-/medium-range interactions), the best performing lattice for reproducing mainly helix structures is the body-centered-cubic lattice. If protein structures contain sheet portions, lattice performances get worse, with few exceptions observed for double-tetrahedral and body-centered-cubic lattices. Finally, we can observe that ab initio protein folding algorithms, i.e. those based on the employment of lattices and Monte Carlo simulated annealings, can be improved simply and effectively by preventing the generation of "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts shorter than 3.8 Å, by monitoring the "hydrophobic-hydrophobic/polar-polar" contact ratio in short-/medium distance ranges and by using preferentially a body-centered-cubic lattice.

  14. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  16. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  17. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  18. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  19. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-30

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  20. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  1. Prediction of transmembrane helices from hydrophobic characteristics of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, P K; Gromiha, M M

    1993-10-01

    Membrane proteins, requiring to be embedded into the lipid bilayers, have evolved to have amino acid sequences that will fold with a hydrophobic surface in contact with the alkane chains of the lipids and polar surface in contact with the aqueous phases on both sides of the membrane and the polar head groups of the lipids. It is generally assumed that the characteristics of the aqueous parts of the membrane proteins are similar to those of normal globular proteins, and the embedded parts are highly hydrophobic. In our earlier works, we introduced the concept of 'surrounding hydrophobicity' and developed a hydrophobicity scale for the 20 amino acid residues, and applied it successfully to the study of the family of globular proteins. In this work we use the concept of surrounding hydrophobicity to indicate quantitatively how the aqueous parts of membrane proteins compare with the normal globular proteins, and how rich the embedded parts are in their hydrophobic activity. We then develop a surrounding hydrophobicity scale applicable to membrane proteins, by mixing judicially the surrounding hydrophobicities observed in the crystals of the membrane protein, photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus and a set of 64 globular proteins. A predictive scheme based on this scale predicts from amino acid sequence, transmembrane segments in PRC and randomly selected 26 membrane proteins to 80% level of accuracy. This is a much higher predictive power when compared to the existing popular methods. A new procedure to measure the amphipathicity of sequence segments is proposed, and it is used to characterize the transmembrane parts of the sample membrane proteins.

  2. Prediction of Hydrophobic Cores of Proteins Using Wavelet Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa; Kuhara

    1997-01-01

    Information concerning the secondary structures, flexibility, epitope and hydrophobic regions of amino acid sequences can be extracted by assigning physicochemical indices to each amino acid residue, and information on structure can be derived using the sliding window averaging technique, which is in wide use for smoothing out raw functions. Wavelet analysis has shown great potential and applicability in many fields, such as astronomy, radar, earthquake prediction, and signal or image processing. This approach is efficient for removing noise from various functions. Here we employed wavelet analysis to smooth out a plot assigned to a hydrophobicity index for amino acid sequences. We then used the resulting function to predict hydrophobic cores in globular proteins. We calculated the prediction accuracy for the hydrophobic cores of 88 representative set of proteins. Use of wavelet analysis made feasible the prediction of hydrophobic cores at 6.13% greater accuracy than the sliding window averaging technique.

  3. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane-associate proteins: glycoprotein (G), fusion (F), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins. Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain para...

  4. Hydrophobicity – Shake Flasks, Protein Folding and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are some of the most important interactions in nature. They are the primary driving force in a number of phenomena. This is mostly an entropic effect and can account for a number of biophysical events such as protein-protein or protein-ligand binding that are of immense importance in drug design. The earliest studies on this phenomenon can be dated back to the end of the 19th century when Meyer and Overton independently correlated the hydrophobic nature of gases to their anesthetic potency. Since then, significant progress has been made in this realm of science. This review briefly traces the history of hydrophobicity research along with the theoretical estimation of partition coefficients. Finally, the application of hydrophobicity estimation methods in the field of drug design and protein folding is discussed. PMID:19929828

  5. Fractionation and recovery of whey proteins by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria João; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2011-03-01

    A method for the recovery and fractionation of whey proteins from a whey protein concentrate (80%, w/w) by hydrophobic interaction chromatography is proposed. Standard proteins and WPC 80 dissolved in phosphate buffer with ammonium sulfate 1 M were loaded in a HiPrep Octyl Sepharose FF column coupled to a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system and eluted by decreasing the ionic strength of the buffer using a salt gradient. The results showed that the most hydrophobic protein from whey is α-lactalbumin and the less hydrophobic is lactoferrin. It was possible to recover 45.2% of β-lactoglobulin using the HiPrep Octyl Sepharose FF column from the whey protein concentrate mixture with 99.6% purity on total protein basis.

  6. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  7. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  8. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  9. Determining protein similarity by comparing hydrophobic core structure.

    PubMed

    Gadzała, M; Kalinowska, B; Banach, M; Konieczny, L; Roterman, I

    2017-02-01

    Formal assessment of structural similarity is - next to protein structure prediction - arguably the most important unsolved problem in proteomics. In this paper we propose a similarity criterion based on commonalities between the proteins' hydrophobic cores. The hydrophobic core emerges as a result of conformational changes through which each residue reaches its intended position in the protein body. A quantitative criterion based on this phenomenon has been proposed in the framework of the CASP challenge. The structure of the hydrophobic core - including the placement and scope of any deviations from the idealized model - may indirectly point to areas of importance from the point of view of the protein's biological function. Our analysis focuses on an arbitrarily selected target from the CASP11 challenge. The proposed measure, while compliant with CASP criteria (70-80% correlation), involves certain adjustments which acknowledge the presence of factors other than simple spatial arrangement of solids.

  10. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Frederic N R; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2009-10-02

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid<-->gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  11. Use and application of hydrophobic interaction chromatography for protein purification.

    PubMed

    McCue, Justin T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this section is to provide the reader with guidelines and background on the use and experimental application of Hydrophobic Interaction chromatography (HIC) for the purification of proteins. The section will give step by step instructions on how to use HIC in the laboratory to purify proteins. General guidelines and relevant background information is also provided.

  12. Hydrophobicity of protein surfaces: Separating geometry from chemistry.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Lopez, Carlos F; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2008-02-19

    To better understand the role of surface chemical heterogeneity in natural nanoscale hydration, we study via molecular dynamics simulation the structure and thermodynamics of water confined between two protein-like surfaces. Each surface is constructed to have interactions with water corresponding to those of the putative hydrophobic surface of a melittin dimer, but is flattened rather than having its native "cupped" configuration. Furthermore, peripheral charged groups are removed. Thus, the role of a rough surface topography is removed, and results can be productively compared with those previously observed for idealized, atomically smooth hydrophilic and hydrophobic flat surfaces. The results indicate that the protein surface is less hydrophobic than the idealized counterpart. The density and compressibility of water adjacent to a melittin dimer is intermediate between that observed adjacent to idealized hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces. We find that solvent evacuation of the hydrophobic gap (cavitation) between dimers is observed when the gap has closed to sterically permit a single water layer. This cavitation occurs at smaller pressures and separations than in the case of idealized hydrophobic flat surfaces. The vapor phase between the melittin dimers occupies a much smaller lateral region than in the case of the idealized surfaces; cavitation is localized in a narrow central region between the dimers, where an apolar amino acid is located. When that amino acid is replaced by a polar residue, cavitation is no longer observed.

  13. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  14. Protein folding, stability, and solvation structure in osmolyte solutions hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect between solutes in aqueous solutions plays a central role in our understanding of recognition and folding of proteins and self assembly of lipids. Hydrophobicity induces nonideal solution behavior which plays a role in many aspects of biophysics. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. This effect has recently been restudied and new mechanisms proposed for its origins in terms of transfer free energies and hydrophobicity.

  15. Hydrophobic, Hydrophilic, and Charged Amino Acid Networks within Protein

    PubMed Central

    Aftabuddin, Md.; Kundu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The native three-dimensional structure of a single protein is determined by the physicochemical nature of its constituent amino acids. The 20 different types of amino acids, depending on their physicochemical properties, can be grouped into three major classes: hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged. The anatomy of the weighted and unweighted networks of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and charged residues separately for a large number of proteins were studied. Results showed that the average degree of the hydrophobic networks has a significantly larger value than that of hydrophilic and charged networks. The average degree of the hydrophilic networks is slightly higher than that of the charged networks. The average strength of the nodes of hydrophobic networks is nearly equal to that of the charged network, whereas that of hydrophilic networks has a smaller value than that of hydrophobic and charged networks. The average strength for each of the three types of networks varies with its degree. The average strength of a node in a charged network increases more sharply than that of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic networks. Each of the three types of networks exhibits the “small-world” property. Our results further indicate that the all-amino-acids networks and hydrophobic networks are of assortative type. Although most of the hydrophilic and charged networks are of the assortative type, few others have the characteristics of disassortative mixing of the nodes. We have further observed that all-amino-acids networks and hydrophobic networks bear the signature of hierarchy, whereas the hydrophilic and charged networks do not have any hierarchical signature. PMID:17172302

  16. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition).

  17. A computational solution to analyze hydrophobic characteristics in protein chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marilia Amável Gomes; Azevedo, Alexandre; Missailidis, Sotiris; Silva, Dilson

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a program developed to facilitate calculations of the total or partial hidrophobicity value of polypeptides and proteins chains. It was built using the Fortran 77 language and performs additional functions, determining the total free energy and the electromotive force of an amino acid in a protein. These values were then used to estimate the average hydrophobicity of the protein or fragment sequence.

  18. A method for detecting hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lijnzaad, P; Berendsen, H J; Argos, P

    1996-10-01

    A method for the detection of hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein tertiary structures is presented. It delineates explicit contiguous pieces of surface of arbitrary size and shape that consist solely of carbon and sulphur atoms using a dot representation of the solvent-accessible surface. The technique is also useful in detecting surface segments with other characteristics, such as polar patches. Its potential as a tool in the study of protein-protein interactions and substrate recognition is demonstrated by applying the method to myoglobin, Leu/IIe/Val-binding protein, lipase, lysozyme, azurin, triose phosphate isomerase, carbonic anhydrase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. Only the largest patches, having sizes exceeding random expectation, are deemed meaningful. In addition to well-known hydrophobic patches on these proteins, a number of other patches are found, and their significance is discussed. The method is simple, fast, and robust. The program text is obtainable by anonymous ftp.

  19. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding.

    PubMed

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-07-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices-implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  20. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  1. Hydrophobic folding units at protein-protein interfaces: implications to protein folding and to protein-protein association.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Nussinov, R.

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic folding unit cutting algorithm, originally developed for dissecting single-chain proteins, has been applied to a dataset of dissimilar two-chain protein-protein interfaces. Rather than consider each individual chain separately, the two-chain complex has been treated as a single chain. The two-chain parsing results presented in this work show hydrophobicity to be a critical attribute of two-state versus three-state protein-protein complexes. The hydrophobic folding units at the interfaces of two-state complexes suggest that the cooperative nature of the two-chain protein folding is the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, similar to its being the driving force in a single-chain folding. In analogy to the protein-folding process, the two-chain, two-state model complex may correspond to the formation of compact, hydrophobic nuclei. On the other hand, the three-state model complex involves binding of already folded monomers, similar to the association of the hydrophobic folding units within a single chain. The similarity between folding entities in protein cores and in two-state protein-protein interfaces, despite the absence of some chain connectivities in the latter, indicates that chain linkage does not necessarily affect the native conformation. This further substantiates the notion that tertiary, non-local interactions play a critical role in protein folding. These compact, hydrophobic, two-chain folding units, derived from structurally dissimilar protein-protein interfaces, provide a rich set of data useful in investigations of the role played by chain connectivity and by tertiary interactions in studies of binding and of folding. Since they are composed of non-contiguous pieces of protein backbones, they may also aid in defining folding nuclei. PMID:9232644

  2. A comprehensive study to protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baca, Martyna; De Vos, Jelle; Bruylants, Gilles; Bartik, Kristin; Liu, Xiaodong; Cook, Ken; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of different kosmotropic/chaotropic salt systems on retention characteristics of intact proteins has been examined in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The performance was assessed using different column chemistries, i.e., polyalkylamide, alkylamine incorporating hydrophobic moieties, and a butyl chemistry. Selectivity in HIC is mainly governed by the salt concentration and by the molal surface tension increment of the salt. Typically, a linear relationship between the natural logarithm of the retention factor and the salt concentration is obtained. Using a 250mm long column packed with 5μm polyalkylamide functionalized silica particles and applying a 30min linear salt gradient, a peak capacity of 78 was achieved, allowing the baseline separation of seven intact proteins. The hydrophobicity index appeared to be a good indicator to predict the elution order of intact proteins in HIC mode. Furthermore, the effect of adding additives in the mobile phase, such as calcium chloride (stabilizing the 3D conformation of α-lactalbumin) and isopropanol, on retention properties has been assessed. Results indicate that HIC retention is also governed by conformational in the proteins which affect the number of accessible hydrophobic moieties.

  3. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  4. Nanocarriers from GRAS Zein Proteins to Encapsulate Hydrophobic Actives.

    PubMed

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Lu, Hoang D; Hurley, Amanda; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-11-14

    One factor limiting the expansion of nanomedicines has been the high cost of the materials and processes required for their production. We present a continuous, scalable, low cost nanoencapsulation process, Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) that enables the production of nanocarriers (NCs) with a narrow size distribution using zein corn proteins. Zein is a low cost, GRAS protein (having the FDA status of "Generally Regarded as Safe") currently used in food applications, which acts as an effective encapsulant for hydrophobic compounds using FNP. The four-stream FNP configuration allows the encapsulation of very hydrophobic compounds in a way that is not possible with previous precipitation processes. We present the encapsulation of several model active compounds with as high as 45 wt % drug loading with respect to zein concentration into ∼100 nm nanocarriers. Three examples are presented: (1) the pro-drug antioxidant, vitamin E-acetate, (2) an anticholera quorum-sensing modulator CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one; CAI-1 that reduces Vibrio cholerae virulence by modulating cellular communication), and (3) hydrophobic fluorescent dyes with a range of hydrophobicities. The specific interaction between zein and the milk protein, sodium caseinate, provides stabilization of the NCs in PBS, LB medium, and in pH 2 solutions. The stability and size changes in the three media provide information on the mechanism of assembly of the zein/active/casein NC.

  5. Protein interactions in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC).

    PubMed

    Ghose, Sanchayita; Hubbard, Brian; Cramer, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of how proteins interact with hydrophobic charge induction chromatographic resins is provided. Selectivity on this mode of chromatography for monoclonal antibodies as compared to other model proteins is probed by means of a linear retention vs pH plot. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior on this mode of chromatography for a hydrophobic, charged solute is described by taking into account the equilibrium between a hydrophobic, charged solute and an ionizable, heterocyclic ligand. By analogy, an equation that is seen to adequately describe macromolecular retention under linear conditions over a range of pH is developed. A preparative, nonlinear isotherm that can capture both pH and salt concentration dependency for proteins is proposed by using an exponentially modified Langmuir isotherm model. This model is seen to successfully simulate adsorption isotherms for a variety of proteins over a range of pHs and mobile phase salt concentrations. Finally, the widely differing retention characteristics of two monoclonal antibodies are used to derive two different strategies for improving separations on this mode of chromatography. A better understanding of protein binding to this class of resins is seen as an important step to future exploitation of this mode of chromatography for industrial scale purification of proteins.

  6. Identification of hydrophobic proteins as biomarker candidates for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Chaver, Paula; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S; Páez de la Cadena, María

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death in Western countries. Due to the lack of biomarkers with clinical utility for this pathology, and considering that membrane and hydrophobic proteins have not been studied in depth, we performed a prefractionation of colorectal tissues prior to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in order to identify hydrophobic proteins differentially expressed in colorectal cancer patients. Fractions enriched in hydrophobic proteins were obtained from healthy mucosa and tumor tissue by a specific extraction method based on temperature-dependent phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and gels were silver-stained, scanned and compared using the PDQuest software. Those spots presenting significantly different abundance were submitted to mass spectrometry for protein identification. Alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins, including a decrease of vimentin and the absence of desmin, were found. We also detected alterations in antioxidant and transport proteins, chaperones, and in two isoforms of the calcium-binding protein S100A6. On the other hand, vimentin was chosen to corroborate the electrophoretic results by specific immunodetection. Most of the altered proteins have been related to cellular membranes, many of them to lipid rafts microdomains in the plasma membrane, and they have also been implicated in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, or metastasis. In conclusion, all the proteins found altered in colorectal tumor samples could be considered as candidates for future studies focused on their utility as markers for colorectal diagnosis and prognosis, or as targets for colorectal cancer therapy.

  7. Urea impedes the hydrophobic collapse of partially unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, Martin C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2009-05-06

    Proteins are denatured in aqueous urea solution. The nature of the molecular driving forces has received substantial attention in the past, whereas the question how urea acts at different phases of unfolding is not yet well understood at the atomic level. In particular, it is unclear whether urea actively attacks folded proteins or instead stabilizes unfolded conformations. Here we investigated the effect of urea at different phases of unfolding by molecular dynamics simulations, and the behavior of partially unfolded states in both aqueous urea solution and in pure water was compared. Whereas the partially unfolded protein in water exhibited hydrophobic collapses as primary refolding events, it remained stable or even underwent further unfolding steps in aqueous urea solution. Further, initial unfolding steps of the folded protein were found not to be triggered by urea, but instead, stabilized. The underlying mechanism of this stabilization is a favorable interaction of urea with transiently exposed, less-polar residues and the protein backbone, thereby impeding back-reactions. Taken together, these results suggest that, quite generally, urea-induced protein unfolding proceeds primarily not by active attack. Rather, thermal fluctuations toward the unfolded state are stabilized and the hydrophobic collapse of partially unfolded proteins toward the native state is impeded. As a result, the equilibrium is shifted toward the unfolded state.

  8. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Iterative Assembly of Helical Proteins by Optimal Hydrophobic Packing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G. Albert; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Dill, Ken A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a method for the computer-based iterative assembly of native-like tertiary structures of helical proteins from alpha-helical fragments. For any pair of helices, our method, called MATCHSTIX, first generates an ensemble of possible relative orientations of the helices with various ways to form hydrophobic contacts between them. Those conformations having steric clashes, or a large radius of gyration of hydrophobic residues, or with helices too far separated to be connected by the intervening linking region, are discarded. Then, we attempt to connect the two helical fragments by using a robotics-based loop-closure algorithm. When loop closure is feasible, the algorithm generates an ensemble of viable interconnecting loops. After energy minimization and clustering, we use a representative set of conformations for further assembly with the remaining helices, adding one helix at a time. To efficiently sample the conformational space, the order of assembly generally proceeds from the pair of helices connected by the shortest loop, followed by joining one of its adjacent helices, always proceeding with the shorter connecting loop. We tested MATCHSTIX on 28 helical proteins each containing up to 5 helices and found it to heavily sample native-like conformations. The average RMSD of the best conformations for the 17 helix-bundle proteins that have 2 or 3 helices is less than 2 Å; errors increase somewhat for proteins containing more helices. Native-like states are even more densely sampled when disulfide bonds are known and imposed as restraints. We conclude that, at least for helical proteins, if the secondary structures are known, this rapid rigid-body maximization of hydrophobic interactions can lead to small ensembles of highly native-like structures. It may be useful for protein structure prediction. PMID:18682227

  10. Iterative assembly of helical proteins by optimal hydrophobic packing.

    PubMed

    Wu, G Albert; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2008-08-06

    We present a method for the computer-based iterative assembly of native-like tertiary structures of helical proteins from alpha-helical fragments. For any pair of helices, our method, called MATCHSTIX, first generates an ensemble of possible relative orientations of the helices with various ways to form hydrophobic contacts between them. Those conformations having steric clashes, or a large radius of gyration of hydrophobic residues, or with helices too far separated to be connected by the intervening linking region, are discarded. Then, we attempt to connect the two helical fragments by using a robotics-based loop-closure algorithm. When loop closure is feasible, the algorithm generates an ensemble of viable interconnecting loops. After energy minimization and clustering, we use a representative set of conformations for further assembly with the remaining helices, adding one helix at a time. To efficiently sample the conformational space, the order of assembly generally proceeds from the pair of helices connected by the shortest loop, followed by joining one of its adjacent helices, always proceeding with the shorter connecting loop. We tested MATCHSTIX on 28 helical proteins each containing up to 5 helices and found it to heavily sample native-like conformations. The average rmsd of the best conformations for the 17 helix-bundle proteins that have 2 or 3 helices is less than 2 A; errors increase somewhat for proteins containing more helices. Native-like states are even more densely sampled when disulfide bonds are known and imposed as restraints. We conclude that, at least for helical proteins, if the secondary structures are known, this rapid rigid-body maximization of hydrophobic interactions can lead to small ensembles of highly native-like structures. It may be useful for protein structure prediction.

  11. Cluster formation of transmembrane proteins due to hydrophobic mismatching.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-09-19

    Membranes are the defining envelopes of living cells. At this boundary a multitude of transmembrane proteins mediate signal and mass transfer between cells and their environment. Clustering of these proteins is a frequent and often vital phenomenon that relies at least in part on membrane-mediated interactions. Indeed, the mismatch between proteins' hydrophobic transmembrane domains and the surrounding lipid bilayer has been predicted to facilitate clustering, yet unequivocal quantitative data in support of these predictions have been lacking. Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to thoroughly address the clustering of transmembrane proteins in detail. Our results emphasize the universal nature of membrane-mediated attraction which relaxes the need for a plethora of fine-tuned interactions between membrane proteins.

  12. Influence of Hydrophobic Mismatching on Membrane Protein Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The observation of membrane domains in vivo and in vitro has triggered a renewed interest in the size-dependent diffusion of membrane inclusions (e.g., clusters of transmembrane proteins and lipid rafts). Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to quantify the influence of a hydrophobic mismatch between the inclusion's transmembrane portion and the surrounding lipid bilayer on the diffusive mobility of the inclusion. Our data indicate only slight changes in the mobility (<30%) when altering the hydrophobic mismatch, and the scaling of the diffusion coefficient D is most consistent with previous hydrodynamic predictions, i.e., with the Saffman-Delbruck relation and the edgewise motion of a thin disk in the limit of small and large radii, respectively. PMID:18502792

  13. Influence of hydrophobic mismatching on membrane protein diffusion.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-08-01

    The observation of membrane domains in vivo and in vitro has triggered a renewed interest in the size-dependent diffusion of membrane inclusions (e.g., clusters of transmembrane proteins and lipid rafts). Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to quantify the influence of a hydrophobic mismatch between the inclusion's transmembrane portion and the surrounding lipid bilayer on the diffusive mobility of the inclusion. Our data indicate only slight changes in the mobility (<30%) when altering the hydrophobic mismatch, and the scaling of the diffusion coefficient D is most consistent with previous hydrodynamic predictions, i.e., with the Saffman-Delbruck relation and the edgewise motion of a thin disk in the limit of small and large radii, respectively.

  14. Solvent and temperature effects on crambin, a hydrophobic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Llinas, M.; Lecomte, J.T.J.; De Marco, A.

    1980-10-01

    Crambin, a 5000-mol. wt. water-insoluble protein found in crambe abyssinica seeds is presently being studied by x-ray diffraction to 0.9 A resolution and /sup 1/H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR data at 250 and 600 MHz have suggested that this hydrophobic protein retains a similar globular conformation in both glacial acetic acid (AA), a Bronsted acid, and dimethylformamide (DMF), a Lewis base. These observations suggest that the globular conformation observed in these organic solvents is most likely the native structure present in the crystalline state. As suggested by the high intrinsic resolution of the crystallographic x-ray diffraction pattern, and demonstrated by the NMR data, crambin is a very rigid protein. Work is in progress to assign the /sup 1/H-resonances and to correlate H and /sup 13/C NMR dynamic data with the crystallographic model. It is hoped that unravelling conformational features of this hydrophobic protein will provide clues to help us understand other membrane-bound functional proteins.

  15. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neutron structure of the hydrophobic plant protein crambin

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, M.M.; Kossiakoff, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Crystals of the small hydrophobic protein crambin have been shown to diffract to a resolution of at least 0.88 A. This means that crambin presents a rare opportunity to study a protein structure at virtually atomic resolution. The high resolution of the diffraction pattern coupled with the assets of neutron diffraction present the distinct possibility that crambin's analysis may surpass that of any other protein system in degree and accuracy of detail. The neutron crambin structure is currently being refined at 1.50 A (44.9% of the data to 1.2 A has also been included). It is expected that a nominal resolution of 1.0 A can be achieved. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  18. Purification of proteins by the use of hydrophobic zeolite Y.

    PubMed

    Klint, D; Arvidsson, P; Blum, Z; Eriksson, H

    1994-12-01

    Hydrophobic zeolite Y can be used as a fast and efficient and inexpensive matrix in the purification of proteins from crude extracts. Preferably the zeolite can be used in the first purification step, replacing the commonly used precipitation techniques with (NH4)2SO4 or ethanol. The time required for the zeolite prefractionation was a few hours compared to the much more time consuming precipitation procedure which demands centrifugation and subsequent dialysis. Proteins can be absorbed on the zeolite either in order to remove undesired proteins or to be subsequently eluted from the zeolite in order to achieve purification and concentration. Removal of undesired proteins is exemplified by the purification of horseradish peroxidase from a crude extract. The zeolite procedure enhanced the specific activity five times and provided a yield similar to that which was obtained by the use of standard procedures, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. Binding and subsequent elution of proteins from the zeolite is exemplified by the purification of monoclonal antibodies from hybridoma culture supernatants. Proteins were desorbed from the zeolite by the use of polyethylene glycol 600 and this procedure yielded a purification factor of 5.

  19. Experimental and computational surface hydrophobicity analysis of a non-enveloped virus and proteins.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Caryn L; Zahid, Amna; Vijayaragavan, K Saagar; Mi, Xue

    2017-05-01

    The physical characteristics of viruses needs to be understood in order to manipulate the interaction of viruses with host cells, as well as to create specific molecular recognition techniques to detect, purify, and remove viruses. Viruses are generally believed to be positively charged at physiological pH, but there are few other defining characteristics. Here, we have experimentally and computationally demonstrated that a non-enveloped virus is more hydrophobic than a panel of model proteins. Reverse-phase and hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ANS fluorescence determined the experimental hydrophobic strength of each entity. Computational surface hydrophobicity was calculated by the solvent exposed surface area of the protein weighted by the hydrophobicity of each amino acid. The results obtained indicate a strong correlation between the computational surface hydrophobicity and experimentally determined hydrophobicity using reverse-phase chromatography and ANS fluorescence. The surface hydrophobicity did not compare strongly to the weighted average of the amino acid sequence hydrophobicity. This demonstrates that our simple method of calculating the surface hydrophobicity gives general hydrophobicity information about proteins and viruses with crystal structures. In the process, this method demonstrated that porcine parvovirus (PPV) is more hydrophobic than the model proteins used in this study. This adds an additional dimension to currently known virus characteristics and can improve our manipulation of viruses for gene therapy targeting, surface adsorption and general understanding of virus interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  1. Protein patterning on silicon-based surface using background hydrophobic thin film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2003-04-01

    A new and convenient protein patterning method on silicon-based surface was developed for protein array by spin coating of hydrophobic thin film (CYTOP). Photolithographic lift-off process was used to display two-dimensional patterns of spatially hydrophilic region. The background hydrophobic thin film was used to suppress nonspecific protein binding, and the hydrophilic target protein binding region was chemically modified to introduce aldehyde group after removal of the photoresist layer. The difference in surface energy between the hydrophilic pattern and background hydrophobic film would induce easier covalent binding of proteins onto defined hydrophilic areas having physical and chemical constraints. Below 1 microg/ml of total protein concentration, the CYTOP hydrophobic film effectively suppressed nonspecific binding of the protein. During the process of protein patterning, inherent property of the hydrophobic thin film was not changed judging from static and dynamic contact angle survey. Quantitative analysis of the protein binding was demonstrated by streptavidin-biotin system.

  2. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clot-Inducing Minerals Versus Plasma Protein Dressing for Topical Treatment of External Bleeding in the Presence of Coagulopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Clot-Inducing Minerals Versus Plasma Protein Dressing for Topical Treatment of External Bleeding in the Presence of Coagulopathy...N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Clot-inducing minerals versus plasma protein dressing for topical treatment of external bleeding...known sealant properties of smectite clay that form when the dry minerals are mixed with water or blood suggested a possible hemostatic advantage of

  4. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  5. Energetics of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in a Hydrophobic Protein Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Baergen, Alyson; Michelsen, Klaus; Kitova, Elena N.; Schnier, Paul D.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-05-01

    This work explores the energetics of intermolecular H-bonds inside a hydrophobic protein cavity. Kinetic measurements were performed on the gaseous deprotonated ions (at the -7 charge state) of complexes of bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and three monohydroxylated analogs of palmitic acid (PA): 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3-OHPA), 7-hydroxypalmitic acid (7-OHPA), and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (16-OHPA). From the increase in the activation energy for the dissociation of the (Lg + X-OHPA)7- ions, compared with that of the (Lg + PA)7- ion, it is concluded that the -OH groups of the X-OHPA ligands participate in strong (5 - 11 kcal mol-1) intermolecular H-bonds in the hydrophobic cavity of Lg. The results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the -OH groups of 3-OHPA and 16-OHPA act as H-bond donors and interact with backbone carbonyl oxygens, whereas the -OH group of 7-OHPA acts as both H-bond donor and acceptor with nearby side chains. The capacity for intermolecular H-bonds within the Lg cavity, as suggested by the gas-phase measurements, does not necessarily lead to enhanced binding in aqueous solution. The association constant (Ka) measured for 7-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 105 M-1] is similar to the value for the PA [(3.8 ± 0.1) × 105 M-1]; Ka for 3-OHPA [(1.1 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1] is approximately three-times larger, whereas Ka for 16-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 104 M-1] is an order of magnitude smaller. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the energetic penalty to desolvating the ligand -OH groups, which is necessary for complex formation, is similar in magnitude to the energetic contribution of the intermolecular H-bonds.

  6. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  7. Prediction and Analysis of Surface Hydrophobic Residues in Tertiary Structure of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Malleshappa Gowder, Shambhu; Chaudhuri, Tanusree; Paul, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of protein structures provides plenty of information about the factors governing the folding and stability of proteins, the preferred amino acids in the protein environment, the location of the residues in the interior/surface of a protein and so forth. In general, hydrophobic residues such as Val, Leu, Ile, Phe, and Met tend to be buried in the interior and polar side chains exposed to solvent. The present work depends on sequence as well as structural information of the protein and aims to understand nature of hydrophobic residues on the protein surfaces. It is based on the nonredundant data set of 218 monomeric proteins. Solvent accessibility of each protein was determined using NACCESS software and then obtained the homologous sequences to understand how well solvent exposed and buried hydrophobic residues are evolutionarily conserved and assigned the confidence scores to hydrophobic residues to be buried or solvent exposed based on the information obtained from conservation score and knowledge of flanking regions of hydrophobic residues. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure, the ability to predict surface accessibility of hydrophobic residues directly from the sequence is of great help in choosing the sites of chemical modification or specific mutations and in the studies of protein stability and molecular interactions. PMID:24672404

  8. Prediction and analysis of surface hydrophobic residues in tertiary structure of proteins.

    PubMed

    Malleshappa Gowder, Shambhu; Chatterjee, Jhinuk; Chaudhuri, Tanusree; Paul, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of protein structures provides plenty of information about the factors governing the folding and stability of proteins, the preferred amino acids in the protein environment, the location of the residues in the interior/surface of a protein and so forth. In general, hydrophobic residues such as Val, Leu, Ile, Phe, and Met tend to be buried in the interior and polar side chains exposed to solvent. The present work depends on sequence as well as structural information of the protein and aims to understand nature of hydrophobic residues on the protein surfaces. It is based on the nonredundant data set of 218 monomeric proteins. Solvent accessibility of each protein was determined using NACCESS software and then obtained the homologous sequences to understand how well solvent exposed and buried hydrophobic residues are evolutionarily conserved and assigned the confidence scores to hydrophobic residues to be buried or solvent exposed based on the information obtained from conservation score and knowledge of flanking regions of hydrophobic residues. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure, the ability to predict surface accessibility of hydrophobic residues directly from the sequence is of great help in choosing the sites of chemical modification or specific mutations and in the studies of protein stability and molecular interactions.

  9. Production of hydrophobic amino acids from biobased resources: wheat gluten and rubber seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Widyarani; Sari, Yessie W; Ratnaningsih, Enny; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2016-09-01

    Protein hydrolysis enables production of peptides and free amino acids that are suitable for usage in food and feed or can be used as precursors for bulk chemicals. Several essential amino acids for food and feed have hydrophobic side chains; this property may also be exploited for subsequent separation. Here, we present methods for selective production of hydrophobic amino acids from proteins. Selectivity can be achieved by selection of starting material, selection of hydrolysis conditions, and separation of achieved hydrolysate. Several protease combinations were applied for hydrolysis of rubber seed protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). High degree of hydrolysis (>50 %) could be achieved. Hydrophobic selectivity was influenced by the combination of proteases and by the extent of hydrolysis. Combination of Pronase and Peptidase R showed the highest selectivity towards hydrophobic amino acids, roughly doubling the content of hydrophobic amino acids in the products compared to the original substrates. Hydrophobic selectivity of 0.6 mol-hydrophobic/mol-total free amino acids was observed after 6 h hydrolysis of wheat gluten and 24 h hydrolysis of rubber seed proteins and BSA. The results of experiments with rubber seed proteins and wheat gluten suggest that this process can be applied to agro-industrial residues.

  10. Heating and reduction affect the reaction with tannins of wine protein fractions differing in hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Vincenzi, Simone; Lucchetta, Marco; Curioni, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    During the storage, bottled white wines can manifest haziness due to the insolubilisation of the grape proteins that may 'survive' in the fermentation process. Although the exact mechanism of this occurrence is not fully understood, proteins and tannins are considered two of the key factors involved in wine hazing, since their aggregation leads to the formation of insoluble particles. To better understand this complex interaction, proteins and tannins from the same unfined Pinot grigio wine were separated. Wine proteins were then fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). A significant correlation between hydrophobicity of the wine protein fractions and the haze formed after reacting with wine tannins was found, with the most reactive fractions revealing (by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC analyses) the predominant presence of thaumatin-like proteins. Moreover, the effects of both protein heating and disulfide bonds reduction (with dithiotreithol) on haze formation in the presence of tannins were assessed. These treatments generally resulted in an improved reactivity with tannins, and this phenomenon was related to both the surface hydrophobicity and composition of the protein fractions. Therefore, haze formation in wines seems to be related to hydrophobic interactions occurring among proteins and tannins. These interactions should occur on hydrophobic tannin-binding sites, whose exposition on the proteins can depend on both protein heating and reduction.

  11. Globular-disorder transition in proteins: a compromise between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions?

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2016-08-17

    The charge-hydrophobicity correlation of globular and disordered proteins is explored using a generalized self-consistent field theoretical method combined with Monte Carlo simulations. Globular and disordered protein sequences with varied mean net charge and mean hydrophobicity are designed by theory, while Metropolis Monte Carlo generates a suitable ensemble of conformations. Results imply a transition of the dominant interactions between globular and disordered proteins across the charge-hydrophobicity boundary. It is observed that the charge-hydrophobicity boundary actually represents a trade-off between the repulsive and attractive interactions in a protein sequence. The attractive interactions predominate on the globular side of the boundary, while the repulsive interactions prevail on the disordered side. For globular proteins, core forming hydrophobic interactions are dominant leading to a minimally frustrated native conformation. For disordered proteins, the repulsive electrostatic interactions prevail yielding a minimally frustrated region comprising of an expanded, dynamic conformational ensemble. Thus, protein disorder, like protein folding, satisfies the principle of minimal frustration. All results are compared to real globular and disordered proteins. Thus this algorithm may be useful to probe the conformational characteristics of disordered proteins.

  12. Dynamic control of protein conformation transition in chromatographic separation based on hydrophobic interactions: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2009-03-20

    Conformational transitions of a protein in hydrophobic interaction based chromatography, including hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), and their impact on the separation process and performance were probed by molecular dynamics simulation of a 46-bead beta-barrel coarse-grained model protein in a confined pore, which represents the porous adsorbent. The transition of the adsorbed protein from the native conformation to an unfolded one occurred as a result of strong hydrophobic interactions with the pore surface, which reduced the formation of protein aggregates. The conformational transition was also displayed in the simulation once an elution buffer characterized by weaker hydrophobicity was introduced to strip protein from pore surface. The discharged proteins that underwent conformational transition were prone to aggregation; thus, an unsatisfactory yield of the native protein was obtained. An orthogonal experiment revealed that in addition to the strengths of the protein-protein and protein-adsorbent hydrophobic interactions, the elution time required to reduce the above-mentioned interactions also determined the yield of native protein by HIC and RPLC. Stepwise elution, characterized by sequential reduction of the hydrophobic interactions between the protein and adsorbent, was presented as a dynamic strategy for tuning conformational transitions to favor the native conformation and reduce the formation of protein aggregates during the elution process. The yield of the native protein obtained by this dynamic operation strategy was higher than that obtained by steady-state elution. The simulation study qualitatively reproduced the experimental observations and provided molecular insight that would be helpful for designing and optimizing HIC and RPLC separation of proteins.

  13. Organic solvent extraction as a versatile procedure to identify hydrophobic chloroplast membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferro, M; Seigneurin-Berny, D; Rolland, N; Chapel, A; Salvi, D; Garin, J; Joyard, J

    2000-10-01

    As a complementary approach to genome projects, proteomic analyses have been set up to identify new gene products. One of the major challenges in proteomics concerns membrane proteins, especially the minor ones. A procedure based on the differential extraction of membrane proteins in chloroform/methanol mixtures, was tested on the two different chloroplast membrane systems: envolope and thylakoid membranes. Combining the use of classical sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry analyses, this procedure enabled identification of hydrophobic proteins. The propensity of hydrophobic proteins to partition in chloroform/methanol mixtures was directly correlated with the number of amino acid residues/number of putative transmembrane regions (Res/TM ratio). Regardless of the particular case of some lipid-interacting proteins, chloroform/methanol extractions allowed enrichment of hydrophobic proteins and exclusion of hydrophilic proteins from both membrane systems, thus demonstrating the versatility of the procedure.

  14. Protein adsorption to hydrophobic Zeolite Y: salt effects and application to protein fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ghose, S; Mattiasson, B

    1993-12-01

    The binding equilibria of proteins with a hydrophobic variety of crystalline Zeolite Y is affected by salt and is a function of the type of salt and its concentration. The behaviour does not always follow the conventional pattern of increased binding at high salt concentrations and varies also for the different proteins involved. The overall process may be looked upon as a salting-in/salting-out mechanism. This material can be used as a surface for the selective adsorption of proteins and has been applied for the fractionation of ox heart homogenate in multi-stage operations. The presence of NaCl influences the protein binding, and this can be seen by monitoring the activity profile of lactate dehydrogenase. The bound protein can be reversed by treating the equilibrium mixture with low-molecular-mass poly(ethylene glycol)s.

  15. Protein adsorption onto polyelectrolyte layers: effects of protein hydrophobicity and charge anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rubens A; Urzúa, Marcela D; Petri, Denise F S; Dubin, Paul L

    2010-09-07

    Ellipsometry was used to investigate the influence of ionic strength (I) and pH on the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) onto preabsorbed layers of two polycations: poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) or poly(4-vinylpyridine bromide) quaternized with linear aliphatic chains of two (QPVP-C2) or five (QPVP-C5) carbons. Comparisons among results for the three polycations reveal hydrophobic interactions, while comparisons between BSA and BLG-proteins of very similar isoelectric points (pI)-indicate the importance of protein charge anisotropy. At pH close to pI, the ionic strength dependence of the adsorbed amount of protein (Gamma) displayed maxima in the range 10 < I < 25 mM corresponding to Debye lengths close to the protein radii. Visualization of protein charge by Delphi suggested that these ionic strength conditions corresponded to suppression of long-range repulsion between polycations and protein positive domains, without diminution of short-range attraction between polycation segments and locally negative protein domains, in a manner similar to the behavior of PE-protein complexes in solution. (1-4) This description was consistent with the disappearance of the maxima at pH either above or below pI. In the former case, Gamma values decrease exponentially with I(1/2), due to screening of attractions, while in the latter case adsorption of both proteins decreased at low I due to strong repulsion. Close to or below pI both proteins adsorbed more strongly onto QPVP-C5 than onto QPVP-C2 or PDADMAC due to hydrophobic interactions with the longer alkyl group. Above pI, the adsorption was more pronounced with PDADMAC because these chains may assume more loosely bound layers due to lower linear charge density.

  16. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  17. Molecular insight into protein conformational transition in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Guofeng; Sun, Yan

    2009-05-14

    Hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) is an adsorption chromatography combining hydrophobic interaction in adsorption with electrostatic repulsion in elution. The method has been successfully applied in the separation and purification of antibodies and other proteins. However, little is understood about protein conformational transition and the dynamic process within adsorbent pores. In the present study, a pore model is established to represent the realistic porous adsorbent composed of matrix and immobilized HCIC ligands. Protein adsorption, desorption, and conformational transition in the HCIC pore and its implications to the separation performance are shown by a molecular dynamics simulation of a 46-bead beta-barrel coarse-grained model protein in the adsorbent pore. Repeated adjustment of both protein position and orientation is observed before reaching a stable adsorption. Once the protein is adsorbed, there is a dynamic equilibrium between unfolding and refolding. The effect of hydrophobic interaction strength between protein and ligands on adsorption phenomena is then examined. Strong hydrophobic interaction, representing the presence of high-concentration lyotropic salt in mobile phase, can speed up the adsorption but cause protein unfolding more significantly. On the contrary, weak hydrophobic interaction, representing the absence of a lyotropic salt or the presence of a chaotropic agent, can reserve native protein conformation but does not lead to stable adsorption. In the elution, protein unfolding occurs due to simultaneous hydrophobic adsorption and electrostatic repulsion in the opposite directions. When the protein has been desorbed, the conformational transition between unfolded and native protein is still observed due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interaction. The simulation has provided molecular insight into protein conformational transition in the whole HCIC process, and it would be beneficial to the rational design of

  18. The Hydrophobic Temperature Dependence of Amino Acids Directly Calculated from Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Erik; Hoogeveen, Arlo; Abeln, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is the main driving force in protein folding. One can estimate the relative strength of this hydrophobic effect for each amino acid by mining a large set of experimentally determined protein structures. However, the hydrophobic force is known to be strongly temperature dependent. This temperature dependence is thought to explain the denaturation of proteins at low temperatures. Here we investigate if it is possible to extract this temperature dependence directly from a large set of protein structures determined at different temperatures. Using NMR structures filtered for sequence identity, we were able to extract hydrophobicity propensities for all amino acids at five different temperature ranges (spanning 265-340 K). These propensities show that the hydrophobicity becomes weaker at lower temperatures, in line with current theory. Alternatively, one can conclude that the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect has a measurable influence on protein structures. Moreover, this work provides a method for probing the individual temperature dependence of the different amino acid types, which is difficult to obtain by direct experiment. PMID:26000449

  19. Topology and cellular localization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type II integral membrane protein that is packaged into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses including metapneumovirus. In addition to a highly divergent primary sequence, SH proteins vary significantly in size among the different viruses. Hu...

  20. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  1. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins. IV. Protein adsorption capacity and transport in preparative mode.

    PubMed

    To, Brian C S; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-01-21

    The adsorption isotherms of four model proteins (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, ovalbumin, and BSA) on eight commercial phenyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography media were measured. The isotherms were softer than those usually seen in ion-exchange chromatography of proteins, and the static capacities of the media were lower, ranging from 30 to 110 mg/mL, depending on the ammonium sulfate concentration and the protein and adsorbent types. The protein-accessible surface area appears to be the main factor determining the binding capacity, and little correlation was seen with the protein affinities of the adsorbents. Breakthrough experiments showed that the dynamic capacities of the adsorbents at 10% breakthrough were 20-80% of the static capacities, depending on adsorbent type. Protein diffusivities in the adsorbents were estimated from batch uptake experiments using the pore diffusion and homogeneous diffusion models. Protein transport was affected by the adsorbent pore structures. Apparent diffusivities were higher at lower salt concentrations and column loadings, suggesting that adsorbed proteins may retard intraparticle protein transport. The diffusivities estimated from the batch uptake experiments were used to predict column breakthrough behavior. Analytical solutions developed for ion-exchange systems were able to provide accurate predictions for lysozyme breakthrough but not for ovalbumin. Impurities in the ovalbumin solutions used for the breakthrough experiments may have affected the ovalbumin uptake and led to the discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results.

  2. Improvement of hydrophobic integral membrane protein identification by mild performic acid oxidation-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rui; Liu, Yisong; Chen, Ping; Lv, Rong; Song, Qin; Sheng, Tingting; He, Quanyuan; Wang, Yin; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2010-12-15

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of IMPs make them difficult to analyze. In proteomic analyses, hydrophobic peptides including transmembrane domains are often underrepresented, and this reduces the sequence coverage and reliability of the identified IMPs. Here we report a new strategy, mild performic acid oxidation treatment (mPAOT), for improvement of IMP identification. In the mPAOT strategy, the hydrophobicity of IMPs is significantly decreased by oxidizing their methionine and cysteine residues with performic acid, thereby improving the solubility and enzymolysis of these proteins. The application of the mPAOT strategy to the analysis of IMPs from human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 cell line demonstrated that many IMPs, including those with high hydrophobicity, could be reliably identified.

  3. Canine Distemper Virus Envelope Protein Interactions Modulated by Hydrophobic Residues in the Fusion Protein Globular Head

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Mislay; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Alves, Lisa; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion for morbillivirus cell entry relies on critical interactions between the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) envelope glycoproteins. Through extensive mutagenesis of an F cavity recently proposed to contribute to F's interaction with the H protein, we identified two neighboring hydrophobic residues responsible for severe F-to-H binding and fusion-triggering deficiencies when they were mutated in combination. Since both residues reside on one side of the F cavity, the data suggest that H binds the F globular head domain sideways. PMID:25355896

  4. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions of pore, channel, and transporter proteins contain beta-burst patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Selz, K A; Mandell, A J; Shlesinger, M F

    1998-01-01

    Hydropathy plots are often used in place of missing physical data to model transmembrane proteins that are difficult to crystallize. The sequential maxima of their graphs approximate the number and locations of transmembrane segments, but potentially useful additional information about sequential hydrophobic variation is lost in this smoothing procedure. To explore a broader range of hydrophobic variations without loss of the transmembrane segment-relevant sequential maxima, we utilize a sequence of linear decompositions and transformations of the n-length hydrophobic free energy sequences, Hi, i = 1...n, of proteins. Constructions of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions, psil, from M-lagged, M x M autocovariance matrices, CM, were followed by their all-poles, maximum entropy power spectral, Somega(psil), and Mexican Hat wavelet, Wa,b(psil), transformations. These procedures yielded graphs indicative of inverse frequencies, omega-1, and sequence locations of hydrophobic modes suggestive of secondary and supersecondary protein structures. The graphs of these computations discriminated between Greek Key, Jelly Role, and Up and Down categories of antiparallel beta-barrel proteins. With these methods, examples of porins, connexins, hexose transporters, nuclear membrane proteins, and potassium but not sodium channels appear to belong to the Up and Down antiparallel beta-barrel variety. PMID:9788928

  6. Hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions of pore, channel, and transporter proteins contain beta-burst patterns.

    PubMed

    Selz, K A; Mandell, A J; Shlesinger, M F

    1998-11-01

    Hydropathy plots are often used in place of missing physical data to model transmembrane proteins that are difficult to crystallize. The sequential maxima of their graphs approximate the number and locations of transmembrane segments, but potentially useful additional information about sequential hydrophobic variation is lost in this smoothing procedure. To explore a broader range of hydrophobic variations without loss of the transmembrane segment-relevant sequential maxima, we utilize a sequence of linear decompositions and transformations of the n-length hydrophobic free energy sequences, Hi, i = 1...n, of proteins. Constructions of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions, psil, from M-lagged, M x M autocovariance matrices, CM, were followed by their all-poles, maximum entropy power spectral, Somega(psil), and Mexican Hat wavelet, Wa,b(psil), transformations. These procedures yielded graphs indicative of inverse frequencies, omega-1, and sequence locations of hydrophobic modes suggestive of secondary and supersecondary protein structures. The graphs of these computations discriminated between Greek Key, Jelly Role, and Up and Down categories of antiparallel beta-barrel proteins. With these methods, examples of porins, connexins, hexose transporters, nuclear membrane proteins, and potassium but not sodium channels appear to belong to the Up and Down antiparallel beta-barrel variety.

  7. Predicting the behaviour of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography. 1: Using the hydrophobic imbalance (HI) to describe their surface amino acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J Cristian; Rapaport, Ivan; Asenjo, Juan A

    2006-02-24

    This paper focuses on the prediction of the dimensionless retention time of proteins (DRT) in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) by means of mathematical models based on characteristics of the surface hydrophobicity distribution. We introduce a new parameter, called hydrophobic imbalance (HI), obtained from the three-dimensional structure of proteins. This parameter quantifies the displacement of the superficial geometric centre of the protein when the effect of the hydrophobicity of each amino acid is considered. This parameter is simpler and less expensive than those reported previously. We use HI as a way to incorporate information about the surface hydrophobicity distribution in order to improve the prediction of DRT. We tested the performance of our DRT predictive models in a set of 15 proteins. This set includes four proteins whose DRTs are known as very difficult to predict. By means of the variable HI, it was possible to improve the predictive characteristics obtained by models based on the average surface hydrophobicity (ASH) by 9.1%. Also, we studied linear multivariable models based on characteristics determined from the HI. By using this multivariable model, a correlation coefficient of 0.899 was obtained. With this model, we managed to improve the predictive characteristics shown by previous models based on ASH by 31.8%.

  8. Hydrophobic protein-ligand interactions preserved in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Bagal, Dhanashri; Kitova, Elena N; Schnier, Paul D; Klassen, John S

    2009-11-11

    The results of time-resolved thermal dissociation measurements and molecular dynamic simulations are reported for gaseous deprotonated ions of the specific complexes of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (Lg) and a series of the fatty acids (FA): CH(3)(CH(2))(x)COOH, where x = 10, 12, 14, and 16. At the reaction temperatures investigated, 25-66 degrees C, the gaseous ions dissociate exclusively by the loss of neutral FA. According to the kinetic data, and confirmed by ion mobility measurements, the (Lg + FA)(7-) ions exist in two, noninterconverting structures designated the fast (Lg + FA)(f)(7-) and slow (Lg + FA)(s)(7-) components. The Arrhenius parameters for both components are sensitive to the length of the FA aliphatic chain. For the fast components, the activation energy (E(a)) increases in a nearly linear fashion, with each methylene group contributing approximately 0.8 kcal mol(-1) to E(a). This is similar to the contribution of -CH(2)- groups to the solvation of n-alkanes in nonpolar solvents. Furthermore, the magnitude of the E(a) values for the fast components is similar to the solvation enthalpies expected for the FA aliphatic chains in nonpolar and weakly polar solvents. The E(a) values determined for the slow components are larger than those of the fast components. Furthermore, the E(a) values do not vary in a simple fashion with the length of the aliphatic chain. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on the (Lg + PA) complex revealed that, depending on the charge configuration, the (Lg + PA)(7-) ion can exist in two distinct structures, which differ primarily by the position of the EF loop. In the open structure the EF loop is positioned away from the entrance to the hydrophobic cavity and the ligand is stabilized only through nonpolar intermolecular interactions. In the closed structure the EF loop covers the entrance of the cavity and the carboxylic group of PA participates in H-bonds with residues on the EF loop or residues located at the entrance of

  9. Mechanism of Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 binding to proteins: a hydrophobic assay for nanogram quantities of proteins.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Zervoudakis, George; Papapostolou, Ioannis

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the mechanism of Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 (CBB) binding to proteins in order to develop a protein assay with the maximum possible sensitivity. We found that the neutral ionic species of CBB binds to proteins by a combination of hydrophobic interactions and heteropolar bonding with basic amino acids. On the basis of these findings, we developed a very sensitive hydrophobic assay for proteins (at the nanogram level) using the hydrophobic reagents ammonium sulfate and trichloroacetic acid under pH conditions that increase neutral species concentration in the assay reagent in order to enhance the binding of more CBB dye molecules per protein molecule than in previous CBB-based assays.

  10. Non-invasive high throughput approach for protein hydrophobicity determination based on surface tension.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Sven; Bauer, Katharina Christin; Galm, Lara; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The surface hydrophobicity of a protein is an important factor for its interactions in solution and thus the outcome of its production process. Yet most of the methods are not able to evaluate the influence of these hydrophobic interactions under natural conditions. In the present work we have established a high resolution stalagmometric method for surface tension determination on a liquid handling station, which can cope with accuracy as well as high throughput requirements. Surface tensions could be derived with a low sample consumption (800 μL) and a high reproducibility (<0.1‰ for water) within a reasonable time (3.5 min per sample). This method was used as a non-invasive HTP compatible approach to determine surface tensions of protein solutions dependent on protein content. The protein influence on the solutions' surface tension was correlated to the hydrophobicity of lysozyme, human lysozyme, BSA, and α-lactalbumin. Differences in proteins' hydrophobic character depending on pH and species could be resolved. Within this work we have developed a pH dependent hydrophobicity ranking, which was found to be in good agreement with literature. For the studied pH range of 3-9 lysozyme from chicken egg white was identified to be the most hydrophilic. α-lactalbumin at pH 3 exhibited the most pronounced hydrophobic character. The stalagmometric method occurred to outclass the widely used spectrophotometric method with bromophenol blue sodium salt as it gave reasonable results without restrictions on pH and protein species.

  11. Optimizing the selective recognition of protein isoforms through tuning of nanoparticle hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaimin; Rana, Subinoy; Moyano, Daniel F.; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate that ligand hydrophobicity can be used to increase affinity and selectivity of binding between monolayer-protected cationic gold nanoparticles and β-lactoglobulin protein isoforms containing two amino acid mutations.We demonstrate that ligand hydrophobicity can be used to increase affinity and selectivity of binding between monolayer-protected cationic gold nanoparticles and β-lactoglobulin protein isoforms containing two amino acid mutations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, ITC, and DLS analyses. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01085j

  12. Fluorescence based assessment of SDS induced hydrophobic collapse in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunath, S.; Makani, Venkata Krishna Kanth; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Bhat, Gopalkrishna; Kanth, Akriti Baby; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of interaction between SDS and proteins is not clearly understood so far. According to the current knowledge SDS is known to interact with the hydrophobic regions of the proteins. Tryptophan and tyrosine are hydrophobic and hydrophilic aromatic amino acids respectively, which are also known for their intrinsic fluorescence nature in proteins. By observing the autofluorescence of both these hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids upon SDS treatment, information about SDS-protein interactions could be obtained. In the present study we have recorded the autofluorescence spectra of five globular proteins [Bovine serum albumin (BSA), Human serum albumin (HSA), Ribonuclease A (RNase A), Lysozyme and Trypsin] by the sequential excitation from 260nm to 295nm at every 5nm intervals. The results obtained clearly indicated BSA and HSA undergone hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties due to the increased folding of their secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment. Trypsin on the other hand showed complete unfolding upon treatment with SDS. Lysozyme and RNase A did not show any difference in their autofluorescence upon SDS treatment may be due to the stability and fluorophores composition in them. The above results obtained with specific UV excitations clearly shown the tertiary folding and ensembles of the secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment is governed by their stability and bonds stabilizing the proteins.

  13. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; ...

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated goldmore » surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.« less

  14. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated gold surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.

  15. Breaking and restoring the hydrophobic core of a centromere-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sadia; Jowitt, Thomas A; Warwicker, Jim; Hayes, Finbarr

    2015-04-03

    The ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) superfamily of DNA-binding proteins is dispersed widely in procaryotes. The dimeric RHH fold is generated by interlocking of two monomers into a 2-fold symmetrical structure that comprises four α-helices enwrapping a pair of antiparallel β-strands (ribbon). Residues in the ribbon region are the principal determinants of DNA binding, whereas the RHH hydrophobic core is assembled from amino acids in both the α-helices and ribbon element. The ParG protein encoded by multiresistance plasmid TP228 is a RHH protein that functions dually as a centromere binding factor during segrosome assembly and as a transcriptional repressor. Here we identify residues in the α-helices of ParG that are critical for DNA segregation and in organization of the protein hydrophobic core. A key hydrophobic aromatic amino acid at one position was functionally substitutable by other aromatic residues, but not by non-aromatic hydrophobic amino acids. Nevertheless, intramolecular suppression of the latter by complementary change of a residue that approaches nearby from the partner monomer fully restored activity in vivo and in vitro. The interactions involved in assembling the ParG core may be highly malleable and suggest that RHH proteins are tractable platforms for the rational design of diverse DNA binding factors useful for synthetic biology and other purposes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Predicting the orientation of protein G B1 on hydrophobic surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elisa T.; Weidner, Tobias; Castner, David G.; Interlandi, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to predict the most likely orientations of protein G B1, an immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody-binding domain of protein G, adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface. At each Monte Carlo step, the protein was rotated and translated as a rigid body. The assumption about rigidity was supported by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring experiments, which indicated that protein G B1 adsorbed on a polystyrene surface with its native structure conserved and showed that its IgG antibody-binding activity was retained. The Monte Carlo simulations predicted that protein G B1 is likely adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface in two different orientations, characterized as two mutually exclusive sets of amino acids contacting the surface. This was consistent with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy results. In fact, theoretical SFG spectra calculated from an equal combination of the two predicted orientations exhibited reasonable agreement with measured spectra of protein G B1 on polystyrene surfaces. Also, in explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, protein G B1 maintained its predicted orientation in three out of four runs. This work shows that using a Monte Carlo approach can provide an accurate estimate of a protein orientation on a hydrophobic surface, which complements experimental surface analysis techniques and provides an initial system to study the interaction between a protein and a surface in molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27923271

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of the effect of concentrated salts on protein interaction with hydrophobic and polysaccharide columns.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T

    1986-07-01

    An attempt was made to explain the effect of concentrated salts on protein interaction with hydrophobic columns. From the previously observed results of preferential interactions for salting-out salts with proteins, it was shown that the free energy of the protein is increased by addition of the salts and this unfavorable free energy is smaller for the proteins bound to the columns because of their smaller surface area exposed to solvent; i.e., the bound form of the proteins is thermodynamically more stable. This explains the protein binding to the hydrophobic columns at high salt concentrations and the elution by decreasing the salt concentration. The unfavorable interaction free energy was greater for Na2SO4 or (NH4)2SO4 than for NaCl, which explains the stronger effect of the former salts on the protein binding to the columns. The observed favorable interaction between KSCN or guanidine hydrochloride and the proteins explains the decreasing effect of these salts on the protein binding to the hydrophobic columns.

  18. Whey protein coating efficiency on surfactant-modified hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yu D; Krochta, John M

    2005-06-15

    Whey protein oxygen-barrier coatings on peanuts are not effective, due to incomplete peanut-surface coverage, as well as some cracking and flaking of the coating. Addition of sorbitan laurate (Span 20) in the whey protein coating solution up to the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of 0.05% (w/w) significantly improved coating coverage to 88% of the peanut surface. Increasing the Span 20 concentration in the coating solution to 3 times the cmc (0.15% w/w) produced a substantial increase in peanut surface energy (>70 dyn/cm), indicating adsorption of the surfactant to the peanut surface. With this level of Span 20, the whey protein coating coverage on peanuts increased to 95%. These results suggest that a concentration of surfactant above the cmc in the coating solution is required for formation of self-assembled structures of surfactant molecules on peanut surfaces, which significantly increases the hydrophilicity, and thus coatability, of peanut surfaces.

  19. [Wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Breuninger, H

    1988-01-01

    The wide variety of dermatologic surgical procedures has resulted in a corresponding choice of wound dressings. Considering the chemical and physical properties as well as the function of the dressings, standardized dressing techniques can be performed with relatively few materials. This saves both time and money.

  20. Hydrophobic forces drive spontaneous membrane insertion of the bacteriophage Pf3 coat protein without topological control.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, D; Kuhn, A

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial integral inner membrane proteins are either translocated across the lipid bilayer using an energy-driven enzyme, such as the Sec translocase, or they might interact directly with the membrane due to hydrophobic forces. We report that the single-spanning Pf3 coat protein is spontaneously inserted into the membrane of Escherichia coli and requires the electrical component of the membrane potential (DeltaPsi) to translocate its N-terminal region. This results in a final N(out)C(in) orientation of the protein in the cytoplasmic membrane, due the potential-driven translocation of the aspartyl residue at position 18 in the hydrophilic N-terminal tail. Uncharged protein tails are only translocated when the hydrophobic transmembrane region of the protein has been extended. An extended transmembrane anchor allows membrane insertion in the absence of an electrochemical membrane potential, but also causes the loss of a strict determination of the topology. PMID:10562542

  1. Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gibbins, Betty M.

    2000-01-01

    Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction HPLC were examined. The supports were allnon-porous, packed in columns of identical dimensions. Two ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), anion and cation, as well as a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) columns were tested. Proteins included cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen. Temperature effects on HIC supports were studied for cytochrome c and BSA. Both retention times and recoveries of the proteins were measured. The influence of column residence time on the recovery of proteins were also investigated. We found a linear relationship between the amount of protein recovered and the log of the molecular mass. Retention times also generally increased with temperature for both HIC and IEC. Other trends in retention behavior and recoveries are discussed.

  2. Structural Reorganization Triggered by Charging of Lys Residues in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chimenti M. S.; Heroux A.; Khangulov, V. S.; Robinson, A. C.; Majumdar, A.; Schlessman, J. L.; Garcia-Moreno, B.

    2012-06-06

    Structural consequences of ionization of residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins were examined systematically in 25 proteins with internal Lys residues. Crystal structures showed that the ionizable groups are buried. NMR spectroscopy showed that in 2 of 25 cases studied, the ionization of an internal Lys unfolded the protein globally. In five cases, the internal charge triggered localized changes in structure and dynamics, and in three cases, it promoted partial or local unfolding. Remarkably, in 15 proteins, the ionization of the internal Lys had no detectable structural consequences. Highly stable proteins appear to be inherently capable of withstanding the presence of charge in their hydrophobic interior, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. The extent of structural reorganization paralleled loosely with global thermodynamic stability, suggesting that structure-based pK{sub a} calculations for buried residues could be improved by calculation of thermodynamic stability and by enhanced conformational sampling.

  3. Drastically lowered protein adsorption on microbicidal hydrophobic/hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sze Yinn; Han, Lin; Timachova, Ksenia; Veselinovic, Jovana; Hyder, Md Nasim; Ortiz, Christine; Klibanov, Alexander M; Hammond, Paula T

    2012-03-12

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer films assembled from a hydrophobic N-alkylated polyethylenimine and a hydrophilic polyacrylate were discovered to exhibit strong antifouling, as well as antimicrobial, activities. Surfaces coated with these layer-by-layer (LbL) films, which range from 6 to 10 bilayers (up to 45 nm in thickness), adsorbed up to 20 times less protein from blood plasma than the uncoated controls. The dependence of the antifouling activity on the nature of the polycation, as well as on assembly conditions and the number of layers in the LbL films, was investigated. Changing the hydrophobicity of the polycation altered the surface composition and the resistance to protein adsorption of the LbL films. Importantly, this resistance was greater for coated surfaces with the polyanion on top; for these films, the average zeta potential pointed to a near neutral surface charge, thus, presumably minimizing their electrostatic interactions with the protein. The film surface exhibited a large contact angle hysteresis, indicating a heterogeneous topology likely due to the existence of hydrophobic-hydrophilic regions on the surface. Scanning electron micrographs of the film surface revealed the existence of nanoscale domains. We hypothesize that the existence of hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanodomains, as well as surface charge neutrality, contributes to the LbL film's resistance to protein adsorption.

  4. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of plant protein sequences. A domain homology between storage and lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Popineau, Y; Kader, J C

    1988-01-01

    Hydrophobic-cluster analysis was used to characterize a conserved domain located near the C-terminal amino acid sequence of wheat (Triticum aestivum) storage proteins. This domain was transformed into a linear template for a global search for similarities in over 5200 protein sequences. In addition to proteins that had already been found to exhibit homology to wheat storage proteins, a previously unreported homology was found with non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) and from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of various members of the present protein group clearly shows a typical domain structure where (i) variable and conserved domains are located along the sequence at precise positions, (ii) the conserved domains probably reflect a common ancestor, and (iii) the unique properties of a given protein (chain cut into subunits, repetitive domains, trypsin-inhibitor active site) are associated with the variable domains. PMID:3214430

  5. Hydrophobic Fractionation Enhances Novel Protein Detection by Mass Spectrometry in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Chang, Helena R.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel fractionation protocol targeting hydrophobic proteins as possible cancer cell membrane biomarkers. Hydrophobic proteins of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were enriched by polymeric reverse phase columns. The retained proteins were eluted and digested for peptide identification by nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a hybrid linear ion-trap Orbitrap. Hundreds of proteins were identified from each of these three specimens: tumors, normal breast tissue, and breast cancer cell lines. Many of the identified proteins defined key cellular functions. Protein profiles of cancer and normal tissues from the same patient were systematically examined and compared. Stem cell markers were overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared with non-TNBC samples. Because breast cancer stem cells are known to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and can be the source of metastasis frequently seen in patients with TNBC, our study may provide evidence of molecules promoting the aggressiveness of TNBC. The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful for early detection and better treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20596302

  6. Algorithmic approach to quantifying the hydrophobic force contribution in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Backofen, R; Will, S; Clote, P

    2000-01-01

    Though the electrostatic, ionic, van der Waals, Lennard-Jones, hydrogen bonding, and other forces play an important role in the energy function minimized at a protein's native state, it is widely believed that the hydrophobic force is the dominant term in protein folding. Here we attempt to quantify the extent to which the hydrophobic force determines the positions of the backbone alpha-carbon atoms in PDB data, by applying Monte-Carlo and genetic algorithms to determine the predicted conformation with minimum energy, where only the hydrophobic force is considered (i.e. Dill's HP-model, and refinements using Woese's polar requirement). This is done by computing the root mean square deviation between the normalized distance matrix D = (di,j) (di,j is normalized Euclidean distance between residues ri and rj) for PDB data with that obtained from the output of our algorithms. Our program was run on the database of ancient conserved regions drawn from GenBank 101 generously supplied by W. Gilbert's lab, as well as medium-sized proteins (E. Coli RecA, 2reb, Erythrocruorin, 1eca, and Actinidin 2act). The root mean square deviation (RMSD) between distance matrices derived from the PDB data and from our program output is quite small, and by comparison with RMSD between PDB data and random coils, allows a quantification of the hydrophobic force contribution. A preliminary version of this paper appeared at GCB'99 (http:¿bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/gcb9 9/).

  7. Lateral diffusion of membrane proteins: consequences of hydrophobic mismatch and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Ria; Krasnikov, Victor V; Poolman, Bert

    2010-09-08

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins in model membranes. The trimeric glutamate transporter (GltT) and the monomeric lactose transporter (LacY) were reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of unsaturated phosphocholine lipids of varying acyl chain length (14-22 carbon atoms) and various ratios of DOPE/DOPG/DOPC lipids. The lateral mobility of the proteins and of a fluorescent lipid analog was determined as a function of the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer (h) and lipid composition, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of LacY decreased with increasing thickness of the bilayer, in accordance with the continuum hydrodynamic model of Saffman-Delbrück. For GltT, the mobility had its maximum at diC18:1 PC, which is close to the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer in vivo. The lateral mobility decreased linearly with the concentration of DOPE but was not affected by the fraction of anionic lipids from DOPG. The addition of DOPG and DOPE did not affect the activity of GltT. We conclude that the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer is a major determinant of molecule diffusion in membranes, but protein-specific properties may lead to deviations from the Saffman-Delbrück model.

  8. Computer simulation of protein solvation, hydrophobic mapping, and the oxygen effect in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Hydrophobic effects are central to the structural stability of biomolecules, particularly proteins, in solution but are not understood at a molecular level. This project developed a new theoretical approach to calculation of hydrophobic effects. This information theory approach can be implemented with experimental, including computer simulation-experimental, information. The new theory is consistent with, builds upon, and subsumes previous integral equation and scaled particle statistical thermodynamic modes of hydrophobic effects. the new theory is sufficiently simple to permit application directly to complex biomolecules in solution and to permit further expansion to incorporate more subtle effects.

  9. Frequencies of amino acid strings in globular protein sequences indicate suppression of blocks of consecutive hydrophobic residues

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell; Istrail, Sorin; King, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues play a major role in protein folding and function. Long, predominantly hydrophobic strings of 20–22 amino acids each are associated with transmembrane helices and have been used to identify such sequences. Much less attention has been paid to hydrophobic sequences within globular proteins. In prior work on computer simulations of the competition between on-pathway folding and off-pathway aggregate formation, we found that long sequences of consecutive hydrophobic residues promoted aggregation within the model, even controlling for overall hydrophobic content. We report here on an analysis of the frequencies of different lengths of contiguous blocks of hydrophobic residues in a database of amino acid sequences of proteins of known structure. Sequences of three or more consecutive hydrophobic residues are found to be significantly less common in actual globular proteins than would be predicted if residues were selected independently. The result may reflect selection against long blocks of hydrophobic residues within globular proteins relative to what would be expected if residue hydrophobicities were independent of those of nearby residues in the sequence. PMID:11316883

  10. Protein dynamics and thermodynamics crossover at 10 °C: Different roles of hydration at hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Wu, Yue

    2016-11-01

    Water at hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups interact differently with proteins. Particularly, hydration properties at hydrophobic groups undergo qualitative changes as temperature decreases below 10 °C. The influence of such interfacial changes on protein dynamics and thermodynamics remains largely unexplored. Here, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are investigated by in-situ NMR as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 °C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The influence of water at hydrophilic groups shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 °C.

  11. Novel hydrophobic surface binding protein, HsbA, produced by Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Shinsaku; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Yamagata, Youhei; Hasegawa, Fumihiko; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2006-04-01

    Hydrophobic surface binding protein A (HsbA) is a secreted protein (14.5 kDa) isolated from the culture broth of Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 grown in a medium containing polybutylene succinate-co-adipate (PBSA) as a sole carbon source. We purified HsbA from the culture broth and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. We found a DNA sequence encoding a protein whose N terminus matched that of purified HsbA in the A. ozyzae genomic sequence. We cloned the hsbA genomic DNA and cDNA from A. oryzae and constructed a recombinant A. oryzae strain highly expressing hsbA. Orthologues of HsbA were present in animal pathogenic and entomopathogenic fungi. Heterologously synthesized HsbA was purified and biochemically characterized. Although the HsbA amino acid sequence suggests that HsbA may be hydrophilic, HsbA adsorbed to hydrophobic PBSA surfaces in the presence of NaCl or CaCl(2). When HsbA was adsorbed on the hydrophobic PBSA surfaces, it promoted PBSA degradation via the CutL1 polyesterase. CutL1 interacts directly with HsbA attached to the hydrophobic QCM electrode surface. These results suggest that when HsbA is adsorbed onto the PBSA surface, it recruits CutL1, and that when CutL1 is accumulated on the PBSA surface, it stimulates PBSA degradation. We previously reported that when the A. oryzae hydrophobin RolA is bound to PBSA surfaces, it too specifically recruits CutL1. Since HsbA is not a hydrophobin, A. oryzae may use several types of proteins to recruit lytic enzymes to the surface of hydrophobic solid materials and promote their degradation.

  12. Qgrid: clustering tool for detecting charged and hydrophobic regions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shandar; Sarai, Akinori

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a simple but powerful method and web server to quickly locate charged and hydrophobic clusters in proteins (http://www.netasa.org/qgrid/index.html). For the charged clusters, each atom in the protein is first assigned a charge according to a standard force field. Then a box is created with dimensions corresponding to the range of atomic coordinates. This box is then divided into cubic grids of selected size, which now have one or more charged atoms in them. This leaves each grid with a certain amount of charge. Cubic grids with more than a cutoff charge are then clustered using a hierarchical clustering method based on Euclidean distance. A tree diagram made from the resulting clusters indicates the distribution of charged and hydrophobic regions of the protein. Hydrophobic clusters are developed by grouping the positions of C(alpha) atoms of such residues. We propose that such a tree representation will be helpful in detecting protein-protein interfaces, structure similarity and motif detection.

  13. A model of protein association based on their hydrophobic and electric interactions.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape.

  14. A Model of Protein Association Based on Their Hydrophobic and Electric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape. PMID:25329830

  15. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  16. Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Selection for Use in Protein Purification

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.; Stone, Orrin J.; Anderson, Michelle E.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein 1. The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) 2. As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter 3. Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining which HIC media

  17. Automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column selection for use in protein purification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Stone, Orrin J; Anderson, Michelle E

    2011-09-21

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein (1). The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH(4;))(2;)SO(4;)). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) (2). As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter (3). Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining

  18. Redesigning the hydrophobic core of a four-helix-bundle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1994-01-01

    Rationally redesigned variants of the 4-helix-bundle protein Rop are described. The novel proteins have simplified, repacked, hydrophobic cores and yet reproduce the structure and native-like physical properties of the wild-type protein. The repacked proteins have been characterized thermodynamically and their equilibrium and kinetic thermal and chemical unfolding properties are compared with those of wild-type Rop. The equilibrium stability of the repacked proteins to thermal denaturation is enhanced relative to that of the wild-type protein. The rate of chemically induced folding and unfolding of wild-type Rop is extremely slow when compared with other small proteins. Interestingly, although the repacked proteins are more thermally stable than the wild type, their rates of chemically induced folding and unfolding are greatly increased in comparison to wild type. Perhaps as a consequence of this, their equilibrium stabilities to chemical denaturants are slightly reduced in comparison to the wild type. PMID:7535612

  19. Lipid-protein interactions of hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C in lung surfactant assembly and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gil, J

    2001-01-01

    Phospholipids have the major role in pulmonary surfacant concerning its biophysical function of reducing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to facilitate respiratory mechanics. However, the presence of some specific, highly hydrophobic polypeptides is essential to modulate the physical behavior of phospholipids and to promote rapid formation of stable surface films that are able to produce surface tensions in the range of 0 dynes/cm during cyclic compression. The present review summarizes the available data on the parameters governing lipid-protein interactions of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C with the main surfactant phospholipids. Lipid-protein interactions in surfactant have been studied in vitro using preparations reconstituted with very different methodological procedures. Conclusions concerning the role of hydrophobic surfactant proteins on the assembly of lipid-protein surfactant structures in vivo have been revised in this respect. This review presents the knowledge available on the disposition of SP-B and SP-C in surfactant structures, the mode, extent, selectivity, and stoichiometry of their lipid-protein interactions, and the effect of the proteins on structure and dynamics of surfactant bilayers and monolayers. Some considerations are given to possible concerted actions, under physiological conditions, of both proteins SP-B and SP-C.

  20. PEGylated protein separation using different hydrophobic interaction supports: Conventional and monolithic supports.

    PubMed

    Mayolo-Deloisa, Karla; González-Valdez, José; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Protein hydrophobicity can be modified after a PEGylation process. However, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has been used to separate PEGylation reaction products less frequently than other techniques. In this context, chromatographic monoliths represent a good alternative to continue exploring the separation of PEGylated proteins with HIC. In this work, the separation of PEGylated proteins using C4 A monolith as well as Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose was analyzed. Three proteins were used as models: RNase A, β-lactoglobulin, and lysozyme. All proteins were PEGylated in the N-terminal amino groups with 20 kDa methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) propionaldehyde. The concentration of ammonium sulfate (1 M) used was the same for all stationary phases. The results obtained demonstrated that the C4 A monolith could better resolve all protein PEGylation reaction mixtures, since the peaks of mono- and di-PEGylated proteins can be clearly distinguished in the chromatographic profiles. On the contrary, while using Butyl Sepharose media only the PEGylation reaction mixtures of RNase A could be partially separated at 35 and 45 CVs. PEGylated proteins of β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme could not be resolved when Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose were used. It is then clear that monoliths are an excellent choice to explore the purification process of PEGylated proteins exploiting the advantages of HIC. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:702-707, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa’s notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus to investigate the adhesion of Mfp3 (mussel foot protein 3) slow, a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow like Mfp3 fast adhesion to mica is directly proportional to the mol% of Dopa present in the protein. At pH 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (Ead = −3 mJ/m2). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH-independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives. PMID:23214725

  2. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2013-01-09

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa's notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a surface forces apparatus to investigate the adhesion of mussel foot protein 3 (Mfp3) "slow", a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow, like Mfp3 "fast" adhesion to mica, is directly proportional to the mol % of Dopa present in the protein. At pH of 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH of 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (E(ad) = -3 mJ/m(2)). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives.

  3. Fundamental processes of protein folding: measuring the energetic balance between helix formation and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Xian, Wujing; Connolly, Peter J; Oslin, Marcela; Hausrath, Andrew C; Osterhout, John J

    2006-09-01

    Theories of protein folding often consider contributions from three fundamental elements: loops, hydrophobic interactions, and secondary structures. The pathway of protein folding, the rate of folding, and the final folded structure should be predictable if the energetic contributions to folding of these fundamental factors were properly understood. alphatalpha is a helix-turn-helix peptide that was developed by de novo design to provide a model system for the study of these important elements of protein folding. Hydrogen exchange experiments were performed on selectively 15N-labeled alphatalpha and used to calculate the stability of hydrogen bonds within the peptide. The resulting pattern of hydrogen bond stability was analyzed using a version of Lifson-Roig model that was extended to include a statistical parameter for tertiary interactions. This parameter, x, represents the additional statistical weight conferred upon a helical state by a tertiary contact. The hydrogen exchange data is most closely fit by the XHC model with an x parameter of 9.25. Thus the statistical weight of a hydrophobic tertiary contact is approximately 5.8x the statistical weight for helix formation by alanine. The value for the x parameter derived from this study should provide a basis for the understanding of the relationship between hydrophobic cluster formation and secondary structure formation during the early stages of protein folding.

  4. A pH-sensitive red fluorescent protein compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenyan; Gang, Yadong; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Hongfu; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-02-01

    pH sensitive fluorescent proteins enabling chemical reactivation in resin are useful tools for fluorescence microimaging. EYFP or EGFP improved from GFP in jellyfish are good for such applications. For simultaneous two-color imaging, a suitable red fluorescent protein is of urgent need. Here a pH sensitive red fluorescent protein, pHuji, is selected and verified to be compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding and thus may be promising for dual-colour chemical reactivation imaging in conjunction with EGFP or EYFP.

  5. A molecular model for lipid-protein interaction in membranes: the role of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed

    Fattal, D R; Ben-Shaul, A

    1993-11-01

    The interaction free energy between a hydrophobic, transmembrane, protein and the surrounding lipid environment is calculated based on a microscopic model for lipid organization. The protein is treated as a rigid hydrophobic solute of thickness dP, embedded in a lipid bilayer of unperturbed thickness doL. The lipid chains in the immediate vicinity of the protein are assumed to adjust their length to that of the protein (e.g., they are stretched when dP > doL) in order to bridge over the lipid-protein hydrophobic mismatch (dP-doL). The bilayer's hydrophobic thickness is assumed to decay exponentially to its asymptotic, unperturbed, value. The lipid deformation free energy is represented as a sum of chain (hydrophobic core) and interfacial (head-group region) contributions. The chain contribution is calculated using a detailed molecular theory of chain packing statistics, which allows the calculation of conformational properties and thermodynamic functions (in a mean-field approximation) of the lipid tails. The tails are treated as single chain amphiphiles, modeled using the rotational isometric state scheme. The interfacial free energy is represented by a phenomenological expression, accounting for the opposing effects of head-group repulsions and hydrocarbon-water surface tension. The lipid deformation free energy delta F is calculated as a function of dP-doL. Most calculations are for C14 amphiphiles which, in the absence of a protein, pack at an average area per head-group ao approximately equal to 32 A2 (doL approximately 24.5 A), corresponding to the fluid state of the membrane. When dP = doL, delta F > 0 and is due entirely to the loss of conformational entropy experienced by the chains around the protein. When dP > doL, the interaction free energy is further increased due to the enhanced stretching of the tails. When dP < doL, chain flexibility (entropy) increases, but this contribution to delta F is overcounted by the increase in the interfacial free energy

  6. Dynamic hydration shell restores Kauzmann's 1959 explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L

    2014-09-09

    Kauzmann's explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding is reexamined. His explanation said that hydrocarbon hydration shells are formed, possibly of clathrate water, and they explain why hydrocarbons have uniquely low solubilities in water. His explanation was not universally accepted because of skepticism about the clathrate hydration shell. A revised version is given here in which a dynamic hydration shell is formed by van der Waals (vdw) attraction, as proposed in 1985 by Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470-3473]. The vdw hydration shell is implicit in theories of hydrophobicity that contain the vdw interaction between hydrocarbon C and water O atoms. To test the vdw shell model against the known hydration energetics of alkanes, the energetics should be based on the Ben-Naim standard state (solute transfer between fixed positions in the gas and liquid phases). Then the energetics are proportional to n, the number of water molecules correlated with an alkane by vdw attraction, given by the simulations of Jorgensen et al. The energetics show that the decrease in entropy upon hydration is the root cause of hydrophobicity; it probably results from extensive ordering of water molecules in the vdw shell. The puzzle of how hydrophobic free energy can be proportional to nonpolar surface area when the free energy is unfavorable and the only known interaction (the vdw attraction) is favorable, is resolved by finding that the unfavorable free energy is produced by the vdw shell.

  7. Favorable Influence of Hydrophobic Surfaces on Protein Structure in Porous Organically-modified Silica Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Menaa, Bouzid; Herrero, Mar; Rives, Vicente; Lavrenko, Mayya; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2008-01-01

    Organically-modified siloxanes were used as host materials to examine the influence of surface chemistry on protein conformation in a crowded environment. The sol-gel materials were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and a series of monosubstituted alkoxysilanes, RSi(OR′)3, featuring alkyl groups of increasing chain length in the R-position. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy in the far-UV region, apomyoglobin was found to transit from an unfolded state to a native-like helical state as the content of the hydrophobic precursor increased from 0–15%. At a fixed molar content of 5% RSi(OR’)3, the helical structure of apomyoglobin increased with the chain length of the R-group, i.e. methyl < ethyl < n-propyl < n-butyl < n-hexyl. This trend also was observed for the tertiary structure of ribonuclease A, suggesting that protein folding and biological activity are sensitive to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of neighboring surfaces. The observed changes in protein structure did not correlate with total surface area or the average pore size of the modified glasses, but scanning electron microscopy images revealed an interesting relationship between surface morphology and alkyl chain length. The unexpected benefit of incorporating a low content of hydrophobic groups into a hydrophilic surface may lead to materials with improved biocompatibility for use in biosensors and implanted devices. PMID:18359512

  8. Assay of Protein and Peptide Adducts of Cholesterol Ozonolysis Products by Hydrophobic and Click Enrichment Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods—Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)—were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide–seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and asthma. PMID:25185119

  9. Assay of protein and peptide adducts of cholesterol ozonolysis products by hydrophobic and click enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Katherine; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Stec, Donald F; Kim, Hye-Young H; Tallman, Keri A; Porter, Ned A

    2014-10-20

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods-Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)-were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide-seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and asthma.

  10. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Lomize, Mikhail A; Mosberg, Henry I

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our results demonstrate that

  12. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is −6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il). PMID:27562165

  13. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il).

  14. Effects of Polymer Hydrophobicity on Protein Structure and Aggregation Kinetics in Crowded Milieu.

    PubMed

    Breydo, Leonid; Sales, Amanda E; Frege, Telma; Howell, Mark C; Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-05-19

    We examined the effects of water-soluble polymers of various degrees of hydrophobicity on the folding and aggregation of proteins. The polymers we chose were polyethylene glycol (PEG) and UCON (1:1 copolymer of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol). The presence of additional methyl groups in UCON makes it more hydrophobic than PEG. Our earlier analysis revealed that similarly sized PEG and UCON produced different changes in the solvent properties of water in their solutions and induced morphologically different α-synuclein aggregates [Ferreira, L. A., et al. (2015) Role of solvent properties of aqueous media in macromolecular crowding effects. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn., in press]. To improve our understanding of molecular mechanisms defining behavior of proteins in a crowded environment, we tested the effects of these polymers on secondary and tertiary structure and aromatic residue solvent accessibility of 10 proteins [five folded proteins, two hybrid proteins; i.e., protein containing ordered and disordered domains, and three intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs)] and on the aggregation kinetics of insulin and α-synuclein. We found that effects of both polymers on secondary and tertiary structures of folded and hybrid proteins were rather limited with slight unfolding observed in some cases. Solvent accessibility of aromatic residues was significantly increased for the majority of the studied proteins in the presence of UCON but not PEG. PEG also accelerated the aggregation of protein into amyloid fibrils, whereas UCON promoted aggregation to amyloid oligomers instead. These results indicate that even a relatively small change in polymer structure leads to a significant change in the effect of this polymer on protein folding and aggregation. This is an indication that protein folding and especially aggregation are highly sensitive to the presence of other macromolecules, and an excluded volume effect is insufficient to describe their effect.

  15. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  16. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  17. Acceleration through passive destabilization: protein folding in a weak hydrophobic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew; Baumketner, Andrij; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2004-03-01

    The GroEL chaperonin is a biomolecule which assists the folding of an extremely diverse range of proteins in Eubacteria. Some proteins undergo many rounds of ATP-regulated binding and dissociation from GroEL/ES before folding. It has been proposed that transient stress from ATP-regulated binding and release from GroEL/ES frees frustrated proteins from misfolded conformations. However recent evidence suggests that chaperonin-accelerated protein folding can take place entirely within a mutated GroEL+ES cavity that is unable to open and release the protein. Using molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that static confinement within a weakly hydrophobic (attractive) cavity (similar to the interior of the cavity formed by the GroEL+ES complex) is sufficient to significantly accelerate the folding of a highly frustrated protein-like heteropolymer. Our frustrated molecule benifits kinetically from a static hydrophobic environment that destabilizes misfolded conformations. This may shed light on the mechanisms used by other chaperones which do not depend on ATP.

  18. Charges in Hydrophobic Environments: A Strategy for Identifying Alternative States in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Aaron C; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2017-01-10

    In the V23E variant of staphylococcal nuclease, Glu-23 has a pKa of 7.5. At low pH, Glu-23 is neutral and buried in the hydrophobic interior of the protein. Crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy experiments show that when Glu-23 becomes charged, the protein switches into an open state in which strands β1 and β2 separate from the β-barrel; the remaining structure is unaffected. In the open state the hydrophobic interior of the protein is exposed to bulk water, allowing Glu-23 to become hydrated. This illustrates several key aspects of protein electrostatics: (1) The apparent pKa of an internal ionizable group can reflect the average of the very different pKa values (open ≈4.5, closed ≫7.5) sampled in the different conformational states. (2) The high apparent dielectric constant reported by the pKa value of internal ionizable group reflects conformational reorganization. (3) The apparent pKa of internal groups can be governed by large conformational changes. (4) A single charge buried in the hydrophobic interior of a protein is sufficient to convert what might have been a transient, partially unfolded state into the dominant state in solution. This suggests a general strategy for examining inaccessible regions of the folding landscape and for engineering conformational switches driven by small changes in pH. These data also constitute a benchmark for stringent testing of the ability of computational algorithms to predict pKa values of internal residues and to reproduce pH-driven conformational transitions of proteins.

  19. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  20. Computational design of a sulfoglucuronide derivative fitting into a hydrophobic pocket of dengue virus E protein.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Sando, Ayumi; Teraoka, Fumiteru; Otsubo, Tadamune; Morita, Kouichi; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Hidari, Kazuya I P J

    2014-06-20

    We performed first-principles calculations based on the ab initio fragment molecular orbital method on dengue virus envelope protein with a hydrophobic ligand, octyl-β-D-glucose to develop an entry inhibitor. As several polar amino acid residues are present at the edge of the pocket, the glucose moiety was chemically modified with hydrophilic groups. Introduction of both sulfated and carboxylated groups on glucose enhanced not only binding affinity to the protein but also inhibition of dengue virus entry. Octyl-2-O-sulfo β-D-glucuronic acid may serve as a molecular probe to study the dengue virus entry process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrophobic interaction adsorption of hen egg white proteins albumin, conalbumin, and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Edwin E Garcia; dos Reis Coimbra, Jane S; Minim, Luis A; Saraiva, Sérgio H; da Silva, César A Sodré

    2006-08-18

    Hydrophobic adsorption equilibrium data of the hen egg white proteins albumin, conalbumin, and lysozyme were obtained in batch systems, at 25 degrees C, using the Streamline Phenyl resin as adsorbent. The influence of three types of salt, NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), or (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and their concentration on the equilibrium data were evaluated. The salt Na(2)SO(4) showed the higher interaction with the studied proteins, thus favoring the adsorption of proteins by the adsorbent, even though each type of salt interacted in a distinct manner with each protein. The isotherm models of Langmuir, Langmuir exponential, and Chen and Sun were well fitted to the equilibrium data, with no significant difference being observed at the 5% level of significance. The mass transfer model applied simulated correctly adsorption kinetics of the proteins under the studied conditions.

  2. Charge segregation and low hydrophobicity are key features of ribosomal proteins from different organisms.

    PubMed

    Fedyukina, Daria V; Jennaro, Theodore S; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-03-07

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge.

  3. Charge Segregation and Low Hydrophobicity Are Key Features of Ribosomal Proteins from Different Organisms*

    PubMed Central

    Fedyukina, Daria V.; Jennaro, Theodore S.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge. PMID:24398678

  4. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-12-01

    A long standing problem in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein, given its amino acid sequence. A variety of simplifying models have been proposed abstracting only the {open_quotes}essential physical properties{close_quotes} of real proteins. In these models, the three dimensional space is often represented by a lattice. Residues which are adjacent in the primary sequence (i.e. covalently linked) must be placed at adjacent points in the lattice. A conformation of a protein is simply a self-avoiding walk along the lattice. The protein folding problem STRING-FOLD is that of finding a conformation of the protein sequence on the lattice such that the overall energy is minimized, for some reasonable definition of energy. This formulation leaves open the choices of a lattice and an energy function. Once these choices are made, one may then address the algorithmic complexity of optimizing the energy function for the lattice. For a variety of such simple models, this minimization problem is in fact NP-hard. In this paper, we consider the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) Model introduced by Dill. The HP model abstracts the problem by grouping the 20 amino acids into two classes: hydrophobic (or non-polar) residues and hydrophilic (or polar) residues. For concreteness, we will take our input to be a string from (H,P){sup +}, where P represents polar residues, and H represents hydrophobic residues. Dill et.al. survey the literature analyzing this model. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Identification of a mechanical rheostat in the hydrophobic core of protein L.

    PubMed

    Sadler, David P; Petrik, Eva; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Pullen, James R; Kawakami, Masaru; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2009-10-16

    The ability of proteins and their complexes to withstand or respond to mechanical stimuli is vital for cells to maintain their structural organisation, to relay external signals and to facilitate unfolding and remodelling. Force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope allows the behaviour of single protein molecules under an applied extension to be investigated and their mechanical strength to be quantified. protein L, a simple model protein, displays moderate mechanical strength and is thought to unfold by the shearing of two mechanical sub-domains. Here, we investigate the importance of side-chain packing for the mechanical strength of protein L by measuring the mechanical strength of a series of protein L variants containing single conservative hydrophobic volume deletion mutants. Of the five thermodynamically destabilized variants characterised, only one residue (I60 V) close to the interface between two mechanical sub-domains was found to differ in mechanical properties to wild type (Delta F(I60 V-WT)=-36 pN at 447 nm s(-1), Delta x(uI60V-WT)=0.2 nm). Phi-value analysis of the unfolding data revealed a highly native transition state. To test whether the number of hydrophobic contacts across the mechanical interface does affect the mechanical strength of protein L, we measured the mechanical properties of two further variants. protein L L10F, which increases core packing but does not enhance interfacial contacts, increased mechanical strength by 13+/-11 pN at 447 nm s(-1). By contrast, protein L I60F, which increases both core and cross-interface contacts, increased mechanical strength by 72+/-13 pN at 447 nm s(-1). These data suggest a method by which nature can evolve a varied mechanical response from a limited number of topologies and demonstrate a generic but facile method by which the mechanical strength of proteins can be rationally modified.

  6. Hydrophobically modified alginate hydrogels as protein carriers with specific controlled release properties.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M; De Boisseson, M Rastello; Hubert, P; Dalençon, F; Dellacherie, E

    2004-08-27

    Amphiphilic derivatives of sodium alginate, prepared by chemical covalent binding of long alkyl chains onto the polysaccharide backbone via ester functions, form strong hydrogels in aqueous solutions. The shear-thinning and thixotropic behaviors of these hydrogels have been exploited to prepare particles (millimetric beads or microparticles) by dispersion in sodium chloride solutions. This all-aqueous procedure was used for the encapsulation of model proteins, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human hemoglobin (Hb), or of a vaccine protein (Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) urease). In all cases, the encapsulation yields were very high (70-100%). No release of model proteins was observed in water within several days, in contrast with protein-loaded calcium alginate particles, which exhibit an important release within only a few hours. The controlled release of proteins can, however, be achieved by inducing the dissociation of the physical hydrophobic network. This dissociation has been obtained either by addition of surfactants, acting as disrupting agents of intermolecular hydrophobic junctions, or of esterases such as lipases, which hydrolyze the ester bond between alkyl chains and the polysaccharide backbone. The level of immunization against H. pylori infection in mice, induced by encapsulated urease administrated by either systemic or mucosal routes, was also assessed.

  7. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Kan, Yajing; Rapp, Michael; Danner, Eric; Wei, Wei; Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-09-24

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties therefore is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on atomically smooth gold substrates and the surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different Mfps, Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl (CH3)- and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol (OH)-terminated SAM surfaces between pH 3 and pH 7.5. At acidic pH, all three Mfps adhered strongly to the CH3-terminated SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions (range of adhesive interaction energy = -4 to -9 mJ/m(2)) but only weakly to the OH-terminated SAM surfaces through H- bonding (adhesive interaction energy ≤ -0.5 mJ/m(2)). 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) residues in Mfps mediate binding to both SAM surface types but do so through different interactions: typical bidentate H-bonding by Dopa is frustrated by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs, Dopa in synergy with other nonpolar residues partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in intrinsically unstructured proteins, the distortion of bond geometry between H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes represent important concepts for the design of adhesive and nonfouling surfaces.

  8. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Kan, Yajing; Rapp, Michael; Danner, Eric; Wei, Wei; Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties therefore is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on atomically smooth gold substrates and the surface forces apparatus, we explored the force–distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different Mfps, Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl (CH3)- and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol (OH)-terminated SAM surfaces between pH 3 and pH 7.5. At acidic pH, all three Mfps adhered strongly to the CH3-terminated SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions (range of adhesive interaction energy = −4 to −9 mJ/m2) but only weakly to the OH-terminated SAM surfaces through H- bonding (adhesive interaction energy ≤ −0.5 mJ/m2). 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) residues in Mfps mediate binding to both SAM surface types but do so through different interactions: typical bidentate H-bonding by Dopa is frustrated by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs, Dopa in synergy with other nonpolar residues partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in intrinsically unstructured proteins, the distortion of bond geometry between H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes represent important concepts for the design of adhesive and nonfouling surfaces. PMID:24014592

  9. Importance of hydrophobic cluster formation through long-range contacts in the folding transition state of two-state proteins.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, S; Gromiha, M Michael

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the folding pathways of proteins is a challenging task. The Phi value approach provides a detailed understanding of transition-state structures of folded proteins. In this work, we have computed the hydrophobicity associated with each residue in the folded state of 16 two-state proteins and compared the Phi values of each mutant residue. We found that most of the residues with high Phi value coincide with local maximum in surrounding hydrophobicity, or have nearby residues that show such maximum in hydrophobicity, indicating the importance of hydrophobic interactions in the transition state. We have tested our approach to different structural classes of proteins, such as alpha-helical, SH3 domains of all-beta proteins, beta-sandwich, and alpha/beta proteins, and we observed a good agreement with experimental results. Further, we have proposed a hydrophobic contact network pattern to relate the Phi values with long-range contacts, which will be helpful to understand the transition-state structures of folded proteins. The present approach could be used to identify potential hydrophobic clusters that may form through long-range contacts during the transition state.

  10. Lateral Protein-Protein Interactions at Hydrophobic and Charged Surfaces as a Function of pH and Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Hladílková, Jana; Callisen, Thomas H; Lund, Mikael

    2016-04-07

    Surface adsorption of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL)-a widely used industrial biocatalyst-is studied experimentally and theoretically at different pH and salt concentrations. The maximum achievable surface coverage on a hydrophobic surface occurs around the protein isoelectric point and adsorption is reduced when either increasing or decreasing pH, indicating that electrostatic protein-protein interactions in the adsorbed layer play an important role. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, where proteins are coarse grained to the amino acid level, we estimate the protein isoelectric point in the vicinity of charged surfaces as well as the lateral osmotic pressure in the adsorbed monolayer. Good agreement with available experimental data is achieved and we further make predictions of the protein orientation at hydrophobic and charged surfaces. Finally, we present a perturbation theory for predicting shifts in the protein isoelectric point due to close proximity to charged surfaces. Although this approximate model requires only single protein properties (mean charge and its variance), excellent agreement is found with MC simulations.

  11. High-throughput protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography: salt effects and thermodynamic interrelation.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Beckley K; Hylkema, Nienke N; Wiedhaup, Koenraad R; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Ottens, Marcel

    2011-12-09

    Salt-induced protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) are two widely used methods for protein purification. In this study, salt effects in protein precipitation and HIC were investigated for a broad combination of proteins, salts and HIC resins. Interrelation between the critical thermodynamic salting out parameters in both techniques was equally investigated. Protein precipitation data were obtained by a high-throughput technique employing 96-well microtitre plates and robotic liquid handling technology. For the same protein-salt combinations, isocratic HIC experiments were performed using two or three different commercially available stationary phases-Phenyl Sepharose low sub, Butyl Sepharose and Resource Phenyl. In general, similar salt effects and deviations from the lyotropic series were observed in both separation methods, for example, the reverse Hofmeister effect reported for lysozyme below its isoelectric point and at low salt concentrations. The salting out constant could be expressed in terms of the preferential interaction parameter in protein precipitation, showing that the former is, in effect, the net result of preferential interaction of a protein with water molecules and salt ions in its vicinity. However, no general quantitative interrelation was found between salting out parameters or the number of released water molecules in protein precipitation and HIC. In other words, protein solubility and HIC retention factor could not be quantitatively interrelated, although for some proteins, regular trends were observed across the different resins and salt types.

  12. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms.

  13. Geometric Universality in Brain Allosteric Protein Dynamics: Complex Hydrophobic Transformation Predicts Mutual Recognition by Polypeptides and Proteins,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    example, hen egg white lysozyme (AG =- 350 kcal (AH) - 350 kcal (T’AS) - 0) exemplify the way protein dynamics mirror the hyperbolic stability of aqueous...8217 lie parallel to the given line A,A’, separated by their angle of parallel- ism 46 - f(r) lying between the limit lines of those contained in 0 that...optical rotatory dispersion as percent helix and related in part to the average amino acid hydrophobicity. For examples: lysozyme ,ith an average

  14. Periodic distributions of hydrophobic amino acids allows the definition of fundamental building blocks to align distantly related proteins.

    PubMed

    Baussand, J; Deremble, C; Carbone, A

    2007-05-15

    Several studies on large and small families of proteins proved in a general manner that hydrophobic amino acids are globally conserved even if they are subjected to high rate substitution. Statistical analysis of amino acids evolution within blocks of hydrophobic amino acids detected in sequences suggests their usage as a basic structural pattern to align pairs of proteins of less than 25% sequence identity, with no need of knowing their 3D structure. The authors present a new global alignment method and an automatic tool for Proteins with HYdrophobic Blocks ALignment (PHYBAL) based on the combinatorics of overlapping hydrophobic blocks. Two substitution matrices modeling a different selective pressure inside and outside hydrophobic blocks are constructed, the Inside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix and the Outside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix, and a 4D space of gap values is explored. PHYBAL performance is evaluated against Needleman and Wunsch algorithm run with Blosum 30, Blosum 45, Blosum 62, Gonnet, HSDM, PAM250, Johnson and Remote Homo matrices. PHYBAL behavior is analyzed on eight randomly selected pairs of proteins of >30% sequence identity that cover a large spectrum of structural properties. It is also validated on two large datasets, the 127 pairs of the Domingues dataset with >30% sequence identity, and 181 pairs issued from BAliBASE 2.0 and ranked by percentage of identity from 7 to 25%. Results confirm the importance of considering substitution matrices modeling hydrophobic contexts and a 4D space of gap values in aligning distantly related proteins. Two new notions of local and global stability are defined to assess the robustness of an alignment algorithm and the accuracy of PHYBAL. A new notion, the SAD-coefficient, to assess the difficulty of structural alignment is also introduced. PHYBAL has been compared with Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis and HMMSUM methods. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface.

    PubMed

    Siglioccolo, Alessandro; Paiardini, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Maria; Pascarella, Stefano

    2011-12-22

    Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy) or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy). Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  16. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  17. Regulation of G-protein coupled receptor traffic by an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic signal

    PubMed Central

    Angelotti, Tim; Daunt, David; Shcherbakova, Olga G.; Kobilka, Brian; Hurt, Carl M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) expression of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is required for activation by extracellular ligands; however mechanisms that regulate PM expression of GPCRs are poorly understood. For some GPCRs, such as alpha2c-adrenergic receptors (α2c-ARs), heterologous expression in non-native cells results in limited PM expression and extensive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention. Recently, ER export/retentions signals have been proposed to regulate cellular trafficking of several GPCRs. By utilizing a chimeric α2a/α2c-AR strategy, we identified an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic sequence (ALAAALAAAAA) in the extracellular amino terminal region that is responsible in part for α2c-AR subtype specific trafficking. To our knowledge, this is the first luminal ER retention signal reported for a GPCR. Removal or disruption of the ER retention signal dramatically increased PM expression and decreased ER retention. Conversely, transplantation of this hydrophobic sequence into α2a-ARs reduced their PM expression and increased ER retention. This evolutionary conserved hydrophobic trafficking signal within α2c-ARs serves as a regulator of GPCR trafficking. PMID:20059747

  18. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  19. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Interfacial Packing of Protein Adsorbed to Hydrophobic Surfaces from Surface-Saturating Solution Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ping; Parhi, Purnendu; Krishnan, Anandi; Noh, Hyeran; Haider, Waseem; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Allara, David L.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2010-01-01

    The maximum capacity of a hydrophobic adsorbent is interpreted in terms of square or hexagonal (cubic and face-centered-cubic, FCC) interfacial packing models of adsorbed blood proteins in a way that accommodates experimental measurements by the solution-depletion method and quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM) for the human proteins serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa). A simple analysis shows that adsorbent capacity is capped by a fixed mass/volume (e.g. mg/mL) surface-region (interphase) concentration and not molar concentration. Nearly analytical agreement between the packing models and experiment suggests that, at surface saturation, above-mentioned proteins assemble within the interphase in a manner that approximates a well-ordered array. HSA saturates a hydrophobic adsorbent with the equivalent of a single square-or-hexagonally-packed layer of hydrated molecules whereas the larger proteins occupy two-or-more layers, depending on the specific protein under consideration and analytical method used to measure adsorbate mass (solution depletion or QCM). Square-or-hexagonal (cubic and FCC) packing models cannot be clearly distinguished by comparison to experimental data. QCM measurement of adsorbent capacity is shown to be significantly different than that measured by solution depletion for similar hydrophobic adsorbents. The underlying reason is traced to the fact that QCM measures contribution of both core protein, water of hydration, and interphase water whereas solution depletion measures only the contribution of core protein. It is further shown that thickness of the interphase directly measured by QCM systematically exceeds that inferred from solution-depletion measurements, presumably because the static model used to interpret solution depletion does not accurately capture the complexities of the viscoelastic interfacial environment probed by QCM. PMID:21035180

  20. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  1. Native contact density and nonnative hydrophobic effects in the folding of bacterial immunity proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate.

  2. Impact of organic modifier and temperature on protein denaturation in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bobaly, Balázs; Beck, Alain; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this study was to better understand the chromatographic conditions in which monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of broad hydrophobicity scale and a cysteine conjugated antibody-drug conjugate (ADCs), namely brentuximab-vedotin, could denaturate. For this purpose, some experiments were carried out in HIC conditions using various organic modifier in natures and proportions, different mobile phase temperatures and also different pHs. Indeed, improper analytical conditions in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) may create reversed-phase (RP) like harsh conditions and therefore protein denaturation. In terms of organic solvents, acetonitrile (ACN) and isopropanol (IPA) were tested with proportions ranging from 0 to 40%. It appeared that IPA was a less denaturating solvent than ACN, but should be used in a reasonable range (10-15%). Temperature should also be kept reasonable (below 40°C), to limit denaturation under HIC conditions. However, the combined increase of temperature and organic content induced denaturation of protein biopharmaceuticals in all cases. Indeed, above 30-40°C and 10-15% organic modifier in mobile phase B, heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) fragments dissociated. Mobile phase pH was also particularly critical and denaturation was significant even under moderately acidic conditions (pH of 5.4). Today, HIC is widely used for measuring drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) of ADCs, which is a critical quality attribute of such samples. Here, we demonstrated that the estimation of average DAR can be dependent on the amount of organic modifier in the mobile phase under HIC conditions, due to the better recovery of the most hydrophobic proteins in presence of organic solvent (IPA). So, special care should be taken when measuring the average DAR of ADCs in HIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stable structure-approximating inverse protein folding in 2D hydrophobic-polar-cysteine (HPC) model.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhshi, Alireza Hadj; Manuch, Ján; Rafiey, Arash; Gupta, Arvind

    2009-01-01

    The inverse protein folding problem is that of designing an amino acid sequence which folds into a prescribed conformation/structure. This problem arises in drug design where a particular structure is necessary to ensure proper protein-protein interactions. Gupta et al. (2005) introduced a design in the two-dimensional (2D) hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Dill that can be used to approximate any given (2D) shape. They conjectured that the protein sequences of their design are stable but only proved the stability for an infinite class of very basic structures. We introduce a refinement of the HP model, in which the cysteine and non-cysteine hydrophobic monomers are distinguished and SS-bridges, which two cysteines can form, are taken into account in the energy function. We call this model the HPC model. We consider a subclass of linear structures designed in Gupta et al. (2005) which is rich enough to approximate (although more coarsely) any given structure. We refine these structures for the HPC model by setting approximately a half of H amino acids to cysteine ones and call them snake structures. We first prove that the proteins of the snake structures are stable under the strong HPC model in which we make an additional assumption that non-cysteine amino acids act as cysteine ones, i.e., they can form their own bridges to reduce the energy. Then we consider a subclass of snake structures called wave structures that can still approximate any given shape and prove that their proteins are stable under the proper HPC model. This partially confirms the conjecture stated in Gupta et al. (2005). To prove the above results we developed a computational tool, called 2DHPSolver, which we used to perform large case analysis required for the proofs. We conjecture that the proteins of snake structures are stable under the proper HPC model.

  4. Structure of the hydrophobic protein crambin determined directly from the anomalous scattering of sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    1981-03-01

    The highly ordered crystal structure of crambin has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution directly from the diffraction data of a native crystal at a wavelength remote from the sulphur absorption edge. The molecule has three disulphide bridges among its 46 amino acid residues, of which 46% are in helices and 17% are in a β-sheet. Crambin is shown to be an amphipathic protein, inasmuch as its six charged groups are segregated from hydrophobic surface elements. Phasing methods used here will also apply elsewhere.

  5. The sps Gene Products Affect the Germination, Hydrophobicity, and Protein Adsorption of Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cangiano, Giuseppina; Sirec, Teja; Panarella, Cristina; Isticato, Rachele; Baccigalupi, Loredana; De Felice, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    The multilayered surface of the Bacillus subtilis spore is composed of proteins and glycans. While over 70 different proteins have been identified as surface components, carbohydrates associated with the spore surface have not been characterized in detail yet. Bioinformatic data suggest that the 11 products of the sps operon are involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides present on the spore surface, but an experimental validation is available only for the four distal genes of the operon. Here, we report a transcriptional analysis of the sps operon and a functional study performed by constructing and analyzing two null mutants lacking either all or only the promoter-proximal gene of the operon. Our results show that both sps mutant spores apparently have normal coat and crust but have a small germination defect and are more hydrophobic than wild-type spores. We also show that spores lacking all Sps proteins are highly adhesive and form extensive clumps. In addition, sps mutant spores have an increased efficiency in adsorbing a heterologous enzyme, suggesting that hydrophobic force is a major determinant of spore adsorption and indicating that a deep understanding of the surface properties of the spore is essential for its full development as a surface display platform. PMID:25239894

  6. Detergents as probes of hydrophobic binding cavities in serum albumin and other water-soluble proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U; Hellec, F; de Foresta, B; le Maire, M; Møller, J V

    2001-01-01

    As an extension of our studies on the interaction of detergents with membranes and membrane proteins, we have investigated their binding to water-soluble proteins. Anionic aliphatic compounds (dodecanoate and dodecylsulfate) were bound to serum albumin with high affinity at nine sites; related nonionic detergents (C12E8 and dodecylmaltoside) were bound at seven to eight sites, many in common with those of dodecanoate. The compounds were also bound in the hydrophobic cavity of beta-lactoglobulin, but not to ovalbumin. In addition to the generally recognized role of the Sudlow binding region II of serum albumin (localized at the IIIA subdomain) in fatty acid binding, quenching of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan-214 by 7,8-dibromododecylmaltoside and 12-bromododecanoate also implicate the Sudlow binding region I (subdomain IIA) as a locus for binding of aliphatic compounds. Our data document the usefulness of dodecyl amphipathic compounds as probes of hydrophobic cavities in water-soluble proteins. In conjunction with recent x-ray diffraction analyses of fatty acid binding as the starting point we propose a new symmetrical binding model for the location of nine high-affinity sites on serum albumin for aliphatic compounds. PMID:11371462

  7. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Palma, Rocio; Hirschi, Marscha; Volckova, Erika; Nakuci, Enkeleda; Castro, Jennifer; Chen, Chang-Rung; Chan, Thomas C. K.; France, Dennis S.; Ashwell, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases. PMID:21454610

  8. Soybean Hydrophobic Protein is Present in a Matrix Secreted by the Endocarp Epidermis during Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Enstone, Daryl E.; Peterson, Carol A.; Gijzen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS) is present in soybean dust and is an allergen (Gly m 1) that causes asthma in allergic individuals. Past studies have shown that HPS occurs on the seed surface. To determine the microscopic localization of HPS during seed development, monoclonal antibodies to HPS were used to visualize the protein by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Seed coat and endocarp sections were also examined for pectin, cellulose, callose, starch, and protein by histochemical staining. HPS is present in the endocarp epidermal cells at 18 to 28 days post anthesis. At later stages of seed development, HPS occurs in extracellular secretions that accumulate unevenly on the endocarp epidermis and seed surface. HPS is synthesized by the endocarp epidermis and deposited on the seed surface as part of a heterogeneous matrix. PMID:26455712

  9. Preventing Protein Adsorption and Macrophage Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles via a Hydrophobic Shield

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Timothy A.; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings are widely used to render stealth properties to nanoparticles in biological applications. There is abundant literature on benefits of PEG coatings and their ability to reduce protein adsorption, to diminish non-specific interactions with cells, and to improve pharmacokinetics, but very little discussion of the limitations of PEG coatings. Here, we show that physiological concentrations of cysteine and cystine can displace methoxy-PEG-thiol molecules from the gold nanoparticle (GNP) surface that leads to protein adsorption and cell uptake in macrophages within 24 hours. Furthermore, we address this problem by incorporating an alkyl linker between the PEG and the thiol moieties that provides a hydrophobic shield layer between the gold surface and the hydrophilic outer PEG layer. The mPEG-alkyl-thiol coating greatly reduces protein adsorption on GNPs and their macrophage uptake. This has important implications for the design of GNP for biological systems. PMID:23009596

  10. Optimal Hydrophobicity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Protein Mimics Required for siRNA Internalization.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Posey, Nicholas D; Otter, Ronja; Caffrey, Leah M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-06-13

    Exploring the role of polymer structure for the internalization of biologically relevant cargo, specifically siRNA, is of critical importance to the development of improved delivery reagents. Herein, we report guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs) based on a ring-opening metathesis polymerization scaffold containing tunable hydrophobic moieties that promote siRNA internalization. Structure-activity relationships using Jurkat T cells and HeLa cells were explored to determine how the length of the hydrophobic block and the hydrophobic side chain compositions of these PTDMs impacted siRNA internalization. To explore the hydrophobic block length, two different series of diblock copolymers were synthesized: one series with symmetric block lengths and one with asymmetric block lengths. At similar cationic block lengths, asymmetric and symmetric PTDMs promoted siRNA internalization in the same percentages of the cell population regardless of the hydrophobic block length; however, with 20 repeat units of cationic charge, the asymmetric block length had greater siRNA internalization, highlighting the nontrivial relationships between hydrophobicity and overall cationic charge. To further probe how the hydrophobic side chains impacted siRNA internalization, an additional series of asymmetric PTDMs was synthesized that featured a fixed hydrophobic block length of five repeat units that contained either dimethyl (dMe), methyl phenyl (MePh), or diphenyl (dPh) side chains and varied cationic block lengths. This series was further expanded to incorporate hydrophobic blocks consisting of diethyl (dEt), diisobutyl (diBu), and dicyclohexyl (dCy) based repeat units to better define the hydrophobic window for which our PTDMs had optimal activity. High-performance liquid chromatography retention times quantified the relative hydrophobicities of the noncationic building blocks. PTDMs containing the MePh, diBu, and dPh hydrophobic blocks were shown to have superior

  11. Preservation of protein in marine systems: Hydrophobic and other noncovalent associations as major stabilizing forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Reno T.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2001-05-01

    - The fate of proteins during early diagenesis was investigated in environments with low mineral content to assess preservation mechanisms other than mineral sorption. Preservation was examined in anoxic, organic-rich sediments of Mangrove Lake, a marine environment located in Bermuda, and for particulate material generated during oxic decay of diatoms. N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) treatment tested the hypothesis that proteins may undergo modification reactions with glucose to form advanced-glycation end products (AGEs). A small but significant release (additional 14%) of proteins was observed after PTB treatment in surficial sediments, indicating that some aggregations can proceed through an α-dicarbonyl intermediate of the AGE pathway. Size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography with protein fluorescence, absorbance, and evaporative light-scattering detector measurements under native (phosphate or bicarbonate buffers) and denaturing (guanidine · HCl, urea, or acetonitrile) conditions point to the importance of hydrophobic and other noncovalent interactions in the stabilization of proteinaceous material in the environment. Soluble aggregates of substantial, relative molecular mass ( Mr ≳ 10 6) appear to be formed early in the diagenetic sequence. The preferential preservation of very high Mr, multisubunit phytoplankton proteins in sediments suggests that such aggregations confer resistance to degradation. Alternatively, some of the proteinaceous material may represent that fraction of organic matter that is highly prone to aggregations. Extended incubations (18 h; 37°C) with trypsin and proteinase-K showed that much of the aggregates that could be extracted are receptive to proteolytic cleavage. Buffer-, surfactant-, and NaOH-extractable aggregates comprised most of the acid-hydrolyzable proteinaceous material in detritus and surficial sediments but <35% in 9.7-m-deep sediments, suggesting additional mechanisms for preservation might be in

  12. Prediction of retention times of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography using only their amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J Cristian; Rapaport, Ivan; Asenjo, Juan A

    2005-12-09

    This paper focuses on the prediction of the dimensionless retention time of proteins (DRT) in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) by means of mathematical models based, essentially, only on aminoacidic composition. The results show that such prediction is indeed possible. Our main contribution was the design of models that predict the DRT using the minimal information concerning a protein: its aminoacidic composition. The performance is similar to that observed in models that use much more sophisticated information such as the three-dimensional structure of proteins. Three models that, in addition to the amino acid composition, use different assumptions about the amino acids tendency to be exposed to the solvent, were evaluated in 12 proteins with known experimental DRT. In all the cases analyzed, the model that obtained the best results was the one based on a linear estimation of the aminoacidic surface composition. The models were adjusted using a collection of 74 vectors of aminoacidic properties plus a set of 6388 vectors derived from these using two mathematical tools: k-means and self-organizing maps (SOM) algorithms. The best vector was generated by the SOM algorithm and was interpreted as a hydrophobicity scale based partly on the tendency of the amino acids to be hidden in proteins. The prediction error (MSE(JK)) obtained by this model was almost 35% smaller than that obtained by the model that supposes that all the amino acids are completely exposed and 40% smaller than that obtained by the model that uses a simple correction factor considering the general tendency of each amino acid to be exposed to the solvent. In fact, the performance of the best model based on the aminoacidic composition was 5% better than that observed in the model based on the three-dimensional structure of proteins.

  13. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  14. Scaled interfacial activity of proteins at a hydrophobic solid/aqueous-buffer interface.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Liu, Yi-Hsiu; Cha, Paul; Allara, David; Vogler, Erwin A

    2005-11-01

    Contact-angle goniometry confirms that interfacial energetics of protein adsorption to the hydrophobic solid/aqueous-buffer (solid-liquid, SL) surface is not fundamentally different than adsorption to the aqueous-buffer/air (liquid-vapor, LV) interface measured by pendant-drop tensiometry. Adsorption isotherms of 9 globular blood proteins with molecular weight (MW) spanning from 10 to 1000 kDa on methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces demonstrate that (i) proteins are weak surfactants, reducing contact angles by no more than about 15 degrees at maximum solution concentrations ( approximately 10 mg/mL); (ii) the corresponding dynamic range of spreading pressure Pi(a) < 20 mN/m; and (iii) the maximum spreading pressure Pi(max) (a) for these diverse proteins falls within a relatively narrow 5 mN/m band. As with adsorption to the LV interface, we find that concentration scaling substantially alters perception of protein interfacial activity measured by Pi(a). Proteins appear more similar than dissimilar on a weight/volume basis whereas molarity scaling reveals a systematic ordering by MW, suggesting that adsorption is substantially driven by solution concentration rather than diversity in protein amphilicity. Scaling as a ratio-to-physiological-concentration demonstrates that certain proteins exhibit Pi(max)(a) at-and-well-below physiological concentration whereas others require substantially higher solution concentration to attain Pi(max)(a). Important among this latter category of proteins is blood factor XII, assumed by the classical biochemical mechanism of plasma coagulation to be highly surface active, even in the presence of overwhelming concentrations of other blood constituents such as albumin and immunoglobulin that are shown by this work to be among the class of highly surface-active proteins at physiologic concentration. The overarching interpretation of this work is that water plays a dominant, controlling role in the adsorption of globular

  15. Hydrophobic ice-binding sites confer hyperactivity of an antifreeze protein from a snow mold fungus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Hanada, Yuichi; Miura, Ai; Tsuda, Sakae; Kondo, Hidemasa

    2016-11-01

    Snow mold fungus, Typhula ishikariensis, secretes seven antifreeze protein isoforms (denoted TisAFPs) that assist in the survival of the mold under snow cover. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a hyperactive isoform, TisAFP8, at 1.0 Å resolution is presented. TisAFP8 folds into a right-handed β-helix accompanied with a long α-helix insertion. TisAFP8 exhibited significantly high antifreeze activity that is comparable with other hyperactive AFPs, despite its close structural and sequence similarity with the moderately active isoform TisAFP6. A series of mutations introduced into the putative ice-binding sites (IBSs) in the β-sheet and adjacent loop region reduced antifreeze activity. A double-mutant A20T/A212S, which comprises a hydrophobic patch between the β-sheet and loop region, caused the greatest depression of antifreeze activity of 75%, when compared with that of the wild-type protein. This shows that the loop region is involved in ice binding and hydrophobic residues play crucial functional roles. Additionally, bound waters around the β-sheet and loop region IBSs were organized into an ice-like network and can be divided into two groups that appear to mediate separately TisAFP and ice. The docking model of TisAFP8 with the basal plane via its loop region IBS reveals a better shape complementarity than that of TisAFP6. In conclusion, we present new insights into the ice-binding mechanism of TisAFP8 by showing that a higher hydrophobicity and better shape complementarity of its IBSs, especially the loop region, may render TisAFP8 hyperactive to ice binding.

  16. Molecular dynamics of the "hydrophobic patch" that immobilizes hydrophobin protein HFBII on silicon.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Clara; Thompson, Damien

    2011-09-01

    The experimentally-observed stable, electrically-conducting interface formed between hydrophobin protein HFBII and silicon provides a model system for the Bio/ICT interfaces required for bionanoelectronics. The present work used molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations to investigate the atom-scale details of the assembly and structure of the HFBII/silicon interface, using models on the order of 40,000 atoms to compute energy profiles for the full protein interacting with a bare Si(111) substrate in aqueous solution. Five nanoseconds of free, equilibrated dynamics were performed for six models with initial protein:silicon separations ranging from 1.2 to 0.2 nanometers in steps of 0.2 nm. Three of the models formed extensive protein:silicon van der Waals's interfacial contacts. The model with 0.2 nm starting separation serves as an illustrative example of the dynamic interface created, whereby hydrophobic patch residues cycle between flat and more protruding patch conformations that favor respectively close inter-patch and close patch-surface contacts, with protein:surface separations cycling between 0.2 and 0.4 nm over the 5 ns of dynamics. Analysis of residue-based binding energies at the interface reveal three leucines Leu19, Leu21 and Leu63, together with isoleucine Ile22 and alanine Ala61, as the primary drivers towards adhesion on bare silicon, providing the atom-scale details of HFBII’s hydrophobic patch which in turn provides leads for the engineering of more tightly-coupled interfaces.

  17. Effective protein separation by coupling hydrophobic interaction and reverse phase chromatography for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Lichen; Valeja, Santosh G; Alpert, Andrew J; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2014-08-05

    One of the challenges in proteomics is the proteome's complexity, which necessitates the fractionation of proteins prior to the mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Despite recent advances in top-down proteomics, separation of intact proteins remains challenging. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) appears to be a promising method that provides high-resolution separation of intact proteins, but unfortunately the salts conventionally used for HIC are incompatible with MS. In this study, we have identified ammonium tartrate as a MS-compatible salt for HIC with comparable separation performance as the conventionally used ammonium sulfate. Furthermore, we found that the selectivity obtained with ammonium tartrate in the HIC mobile phases is orthogonal to that of reverse phase chromatography (RPC). By coupling HIC and RPC as a novel two-dimensional chromatographic method, we have achieved effective high-resolution intact protein separation as demonstrated with standard protein mixtures and a complex cell lysate. Subsequently, the separated intact proteins were identified by high-resolution top-down MS. For the first time, these results have shown the high potential of HIC as a high-resolution protein separation method for top-down proteomics.

  18. Disordered water within a hydrophobic protein cavity visualized by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Blaber, M; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Caspar, D L

    1999-01-05

    Water in the hydrophobic cavity of human interleukin 1beta, which was detected by NMR spectroscopy but was invisible by high resolution x-ray crystallography, has been mapped quantitatively by measurement and phasing of all of the low resolution x-ray diffraction data from a single crystal. Phases for the low resolution data were refined by iterative density modification of an initial flat solvent model outside the envelope of the atomic model. The refinement was restrained by the condition that the map of the difference between the electron density distribution in the full unit cell and that of the atomic model be flat within the envelope of the well ordered protein structure. Care was taken to avoid overfitting the diffraction data by maintaining phases for the high resolution data from the atomic model and by a resolution-dependent damping of the structure factor differences between data and model. The cavity region in the protein could accommodate up to four water molecules. The refined solvent difference map indicates that there are about two water molecules in the cavity region. This map is compatible with an atomic model of the water distribution refined by using XPLOR. About 70% of the time, there appears to be a water dimer in the central hydrophobic cavity, which is connected to the outside by two constricted channels occupied by single water molecules approximately 40% of the time on one side and approximately 10% on the other.

  19. PEGMA/MMA copolymer graftings: generation, protein resistance, and a hydrophobic domain.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Volker; Kirmse, Robert; Beyer, Mario; Breitling, Frank; Ludwig, Thomas; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2008-08-05

    We synthesized various graft copolymer films of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) on silicon to examine the dependency of protein-surface interactions on grafting composition. We optimized atom transfer radical polymerizations to achieve film thicknesses from 25 to 100 nm depending on the monomer mole fractions, and analyzed the resulting surfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). As determined by XPS, the stoichiometric ratios of copolymer graftings correlated with the concentrations of provided monomer solutions. However, we found an unexpected and pronounced hydrophobic domain on copolymer films with a molar amount of 10-40% PEGMA, as indicated by advancing contact angles of up to 90 degrees . Nevertheless, a breakdown of the protein-repelling character was only observed for a fraction of 15% PEGMA and lower, far in the hydrophobic domain. Investigation of the structural basis of this exceptional wettability by high-resolution AFM demonstrated the independence of this property from morphological features.

  20. Generic folding and transition hierarchies for surface adsorption of hydrophobic-polar lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior and structural properties of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins interacting with attractive surfaces are studied by means of Wang-Landau sampling. Three benchmark HP sequences (48mer, 67mer, and 103mer) are considered with different types of surfaces, each of which attract either all monomers, only hydrophobic (H) monomers, or only polar (P) monomers, respectively. The diversity of folding behavior in dependence of surface strength is discussed. Analyzing the combined patterns of various structural observables, such as, e.g., the derivatives of the numbers of surface contacts, together with the specific heat, we are able to identify generic categories of folding and transition hierarchies. We also infer a connection between these transition categories and the relative surface strengths, i.e., the ratio of the surface attractive strength to the interchain attraction among H monomers. The validity of our proposed classification scheme is reinforced by the analysis of additional benchmark sequences. We thus believe that the folding hierarchies and identification scheme are generic for HP proteins interacting with attractive surfaces, regardless of chain length, sequence, or surface attraction.

  1. Generic folding and transition hierarchies for surface adsorption of hydrophobic-polar lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior and structural properties of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins interacting with attractive surfaces are studied by means of Wang-Landau sampling. Three benchmark HP sequences (48mer, 67mer, and 103mer) are considered with different types of surfaces, each of which attract either all monomers, only hydrophobic (H) monomers, or only polar (P) monomers, respectively. The diversity of folding behavior in dependence of surface strength is discussed. Analyzing the combined patterns of various structural observables, such as, e.g., the derivatives of the numbers of surface contacts, together with the specific heat, we are able to identify generic categories of folding and transition hierarchies. We also infer a connection between these transition categories and the relative surface strengths, i.e., the ratio of the surface attractive strength to the interchain attraction among H monomers. The validity of our proposed classification scheme is reinforced by the analysis of additional benchmark sequences. We thus believe that the folding hierarchies and identification scheme are generic for HP proteins interacting with attractive surfaces, regardless of chain length, sequence, or surface attraction.

  2. DRESS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Vincent; Ranger-Rogez, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, initially recognized as a serious form of cutaneous drug adverse reaction, is now viewed as a drug-related syndrome that can cause life-threatening organ dysfunctions. Characteristic features include a long time interval from first drug exposure to symptom onset and a prolonged course, often with flares, even after discontinuation of the causal drug. The pathophysiology of DRESS syndrome remains incompletely understood but involves reactivation of herpes viruses (HHV-6, HHV-7, EBV, and CMV), against which the body mounts a strong immune response. The culprit drugs may not only affect epigenetic control mechanisms, thereby promoting viral reactivation, but also induce an antiviral T-cell response by interacting with the major histocompatibility complex receptor in individuals with genetic susceptibility factors. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life-threatening form of cutaneous drug adverse reaction. The severity of this syndrome is related to the systemic manifestations, which can result in multiorgan failure. DRESS syndrome is characterized by highly specific features, most notably regarding the timing of the manifestations. New insights into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms indicate a role for immunogenetic susceptibility factors and for reactivation of human herpes viruses (HHVs), chiefly HHV-6. We report a typical case of DRESS syndrome and discuss recent data about this condition. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics of Membrane Proteins within Synthetic Polymer Membranes with Large Hydrophobic Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Itel, Fabian; Najer, Adrian; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-06-10

    The functioning of biological membrane proteins (MPs) within synthetic block copolymer membranes is an intriguing phenomenon that is believed to offer great potential for applications in life and medical sciences and engineering. The question why biological MPs are able to function in this completely artificial environment is still unresolved by any experimental data. Here, we have analyzed the lateral diffusion properties of different sized MPs within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-containing amphiphilic block copolymer membranes of membrane thicknesses between 9 and 13 nm, which results in a hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane thickness and the size of the proteins of 3.3-7.1 nm (3.5-5 times). We show that the high flexibility of PDMS, which provides membrane fluidities similar to phospholipid bilayers, is the key-factor for MP incorporation.

  4. The contribution of entropy, enthalpy, and hydrophobic desolvation to cooperativity in repeat-protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cooperativity is a defining feature of protein folding, but its thermodynamic and structural origins are not completely understood. By constructing consensus ankyrin repeat protein arrays that have nearly identical sequences, we quantify cooperativity by resolving stability into intrinsic and interfacial components. Heteronuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy show that these constructs adopt ankyrin repeat structures. Applying a one-dimensional Ising model to a series of constructs chosen to maximize information content in unfolding transitions, we quantify stabilities of the terminal capping repeats, and resolve the effects of denaturant into intrinsic and interfacial components. Reversible thermal denaturation resolves interfacial and intrinsic free energies into enthalpic, entropic, and heat capacity terms. Intrinsic folding is entropically disfavored, whereas interfacial interaction is entropically favored and attends a decrease in heat capacity. These results suggest that helix formation and backbone ordering occurs upon intrinsic folding, whereas hydrophobic desolvation occurs upon interfacial interaction, contributing to cooperativity. PMID:21397186

  5. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  6. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  7. A procedure for the automatic determination of hydrophobic cores in protein structures.

    PubMed Central

    Swindells, M. B.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is described for automatically detecting hydrophobic cores in proteins of known structure. Three pieces of information are considered in order to achieve this goal. These are: secondary structure, side-chain accessibility, and side-chain-side-chain contacts. Residues are considered to contribute to a core when they occur in regular secondary structure and have buried side chains that form predominantly nonpolar contacts with one another. This paper describes the algorithm's application to families of proteins with conserved topologies but low sequence similarities. The aim of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of the algorithm as well as to study the extent to which similar cores are identified within a common topology. PMID:7773181

  8. Urea denatured state ensembles contain extensive secondary structure that is increased in hydrophobic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nick Pace, C; Huyghues-Despointes, Beatrice M P; Fu, Hailong; Takano, Kazufumi; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to gain a better understanding of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins through an experimental and computational study of their denaturation by urea. Proteins unfold to different extents in urea and the most hydrophobic proteins have the most compact DSE and contain almost as much secondary structure as folded proteins. Proteins that unfold to the greatest extent near pH 7 still contain substantial amounts of secondary structure. At low pH, the DSE expands due to charge–charge interactions and when the net charge per residue is high, most of the secondary structure is disrupted. The proteins in the DSE appear to contain substantial amounts of polyproline II conformation at high urea concentrations. In all cases considered, including staph nuclease, the extent of unfolding by urea can be accounted for using the data and approach developed in the laboratory of Wayne Bolen (Auton et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 2007; 104:15317–15323). PMID:20198681

  9. Magnitude and spatial orientation of the hydrophobic moments of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruhong; Royyuru, Ajay; Athma, Prasanna; Suits, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of residue hydrophobicity for individual domains as well as for the aggregates of domains on a single chain have been found to exhibit well-defined second-order hydrophobic moment profiles. This indicates that most of the domains do fold into a stable entity with a core composed predominantly of hydrophobic residues as well as a prevalence of hydrophobic residues at the interface between domains. A simple scoring function based upon the relative hydrophobic moment dipole orientations shows that 80% of the dipoles of adjacent domains point to each other, highlighting hydrophobic residue prevalence at the domain interfaces.

  10. Reconciling the understanding of 'hydrophobicity' with physics-based models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-03-02

    The idea that a 'hydrophobic energy' drives protein folding, aggregation, and binding by favoring the sequestration of bulky residues from water into the protein interior is widespread. The solvation free energies (ΔGsolv) of small nonpolar solutes increase with surface area (A), and the free energies of creating macroscopic cavities in water increase linearly with A. These observations seem to imply that there is a hydrophobic component (ΔGhyd) of ΔGsolv that increases linearly with A, and this assumption is widely used in implicit solvent models. However, some explicit-solvent molecular dynamics studies appear to contradict these ideas. For example, one definition (ΔG(LJ)) of ΔGhyd is that it is the free energy of turning on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions between the solute and solvent. However, ΔG(LJ) decreases with A for alanine and glycine peptides. Here we argue that these apparent contradictions can be reconciled by defining ΔGhyd to be a near hard core insertion energy (ΔGrep), as in the partitioning proposed by Weeks, Chandler, and Andersen. However, recent results have shown that ΔGrep is not a simple function of geometric properties of the molecule, such as A and the molecular volume, and that the free energy of turning on the attractive part of the LJ potential cannot be computed from first-order perturbation theory for proteins. The theories that have been developed from these assumptions to predict ΔGhyd are therefore inadequate for proteins.

  11. Finding an upper bound for the number of contacts in hydrophobic-hydrophilic protein structure prediction model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Namsu; Park, Sungsoo

    2010-04-01

    It is believed that the functional properties of the protein are dependent on its structure. Therefore, it is critical to predict the protein's structure to understand the functional properties. One of the most widely studied protein structure prediction models is the hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) model, which abstracts the dominant force in protein folding. That is, to explain the hydrophobic interaction, the HP model tries to maximize the number of contacts among hydrophobic amino acids. Although a number of heuristics have been proposed to find a tight lower bound for the number of contacts, these methods cannot guarantee the quality of the obtained solution since no information on upper bound has been obtained. In this research, we focus on identifying the efficiently computable upper bound. We present a new mathematical formulation of the HP model, which can provide an upper bound using linear relaxation of the formulation. Computational experiments using benchmark problems show that our formulation provides tight upper bound.

  12. Are the interactions between recombinant prion proteins and polymeric surfaces related to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance?

    PubMed

    Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Legeay, Gilbert; Coudreuse, Arnaud; El Moualij, Benaissa; Zorzi, Willy; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Quadrio, Isabelle; Mozetic, Miran; Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne

    2012-06-01

    New non-fouling tubes are developed and their influence on the adhesion of neuroproteins is studied. Recombinant prion proteins are considered as a single component representative of hydrophobic proteins. Samples are stored for 24 h at 4 °C in tubes coated with two different coatings: poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as a hydrophilic surface and a plasma-fluorinated coating as a hydrophobic one. The protein adhesion is monitored by ELISA tests, XPS and confocal microscopy. It appears that the highest recovery of recombinant prion protein in the liquid phase is obtained with the hydrophilic surface while the hydrophobic character of the storage tube induces an important amount of biological loss. However, the recovery is not complete even for tubes coated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).

  13. Effect of subdomain interactions on methyl group dynamics in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Do, Tien; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqianq

    2014-01-01

    Thermostable villin headpiece protein (HP67) consists of the N-terminal subdomain (residues 10–41) and the autonomously folding C-terminal subdomain (residues 42–76) which pack against each other to form a structure with a unified hydrophobic core. The X-ray structures of the isolated C-terminal subdomain (HP36) and its counterpart in HP67 are very similar for the hydrophobic core residues. However, fine rearrangements of the free energy landscape are expected to occur because of the interactions between the two subdomains. We detect and characterize these changes by comparing the µs-ms time scale dynamics of the methyl-bearing side chains in isolated HP36 and in HP67. Specifically, we probe three hydrophobic side chains at the interface of the two subdomains (L42, V50, and L75) as well as at two residues far from the interface (L61 and L69). Solid-state deuteron NMR techniques are combined with computational modeling for the detailed characterization of motional modes in terms of their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The effect of interdomain interactions on side chain dynamics is seen for all residues but L75. Thus, changes in dynamics because of subdomain interactions are not confined to the site of perturbation. One of the main results is a two-to threefold increase in the value of the activation energies for the rotameric mode of motions in HP67 compared with HP36. Detailed analysis of configurational entropies and heat capacities complement the kinetic view of the degree of the disorder in the folded state. PMID:24243806

  14. Thermal compaction of the intrinsically disordered protein tau: entropic, structural, and hydrophobic factors.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anna; Ciasca, Gabriele; Grottesi, Alessandro; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2017-03-28

    Globular denatured proteins have structural properties similar to those of random coils. Experiments on denatured proteins have shown that when the temperature is increased thermal compaction may take place, resulting in a reduction of their radius of gyration Rg to range between 5% and 35% of its initial value. This phenomenon has been attributed to various causes, namely entropic, hydrophobic, and structural factors. The intrinsically disordered protein tau, which helps in nucleating and stabilizing microtubules in the axons of the neurons, also undergoes a relevant compaction process: when its temperature is increased from 293 K to 333 K its gyration radius decreases by 18%. We have performed an atomistic simulation of this molecule, at the lowest and highest temperatures of the mentioned interval, using both standard molecular dynamics and metadynamics, in parallel with small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Using the fit of the experimental data and a genetic algorithm to select the most probable configurations among those produced in both atomistic simulations (standard MD and metadynamics), we were able to compute relevant changes, related to the temperature increase, in the average angles between residues, in the transient secondary structures, in the solvent accessible surface area, and in the number of intramolecular H-bonds. The analysis of the data showed how to decompose the compaction phenomenon into three contributions. An estimate of the entropic contribution to the compaction was obtained using the changes in the mean values of the angles between contiguous residues. The computation of the solvent accessible surface at the two temperatures allowed an estimation of the second factor contributing to the compaction, namely the increase in the hydrophobic interaction. We also measured the change in the average number of residues temporarily being in α-helices, 3-helices, PP II helices, β-sheets and β-turns. Those changes in the secondary

  15. Comparison of entropic contributions to binding in a "hydrophilic" versus "hydrophobic" ligand-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Syme, Neil R; Dennis, Caitriona; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Paesen, Guido C; Homans, Steve W

    2010-06-30

    In the present study we characterize the thermodynamics of binding of histamine to recombinant histamine-binding protein (rRaHBP2), a member of the lipocalin family isolated from the brown-ear tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding pocket of this protein contains a number of charged residues, consistent with histamine binding, and is thus a typical example of a "hydrophilic" binder. In contrast, a second member of the lipocalin family, the recombinant major urinary protein (rMUP), binds small hydrophobic ligands, with a similar overall entropy of binding in comparison with rRaHBP2. Having extensively studied ligand binding thermodynamics for rMUP previously, the data we obtained in the present study for HBP enables a comparison of the driving forces for binding between these classically distinct binding processes in terms of entropic contributions from ligand, protein, and solvent. In the case of rRaHBP2, we find favorable entropic contributions to binding from desolvation of the ligand; however, the overall entropy of binding is unfavorable due to a dominant unfavorable contribution arising from the loss of ligand degrees of freedom, together with the sequestration of solvent water molecules into the binding pocket in the complex. This contrasts with binding in rMUP where desolvation of the protein binding pocket makes a minor contribution to the overall entropy of binding given that the pocket is substantially desolvated prior to binding.

  16. Differential Effects of the Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins on the Formation of Inverse Bicontinuous Cubic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W.; Kumar, Kamlesh; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that the biological mixture of the two hydrophobic surfactant proteins, SP–B and SP–C, produces faster adsorption of the surfactant lipids to an air/water interface, and that they induce 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) to form inverse bicontinuous cubic phases. Previous studies have shown that SP–B has a much greater effect than SP–C on adsorption. If the two proteins induce faster adsorption and formation of the bicontinuous structures by similar mechanisms, then they should also have different abilities to form the cubic phases. To test this hypothesis, we measured small angle X-ray scattering on the individual proteins combined with POPE. SP–B replicated the dose-related ability of the combined proteins to induce the cubic phases at temperatures more than 25°C below the point at which POPE alone forms the curved inverse-hexagonal phase. With SP–C, diffraction from cubic structures was either absent or present at very low intensities only with larger amounts of protein. The correlation between the structural effects of inducing curved structures and the functional effects on the rate of adsorption fits with the model in which SP–B promotes adsorption by facilitating formation of an inversely curved, rate-limiting structure. PMID:23140329

  17. Mia40 targets cysteines in a hydrophobic environment to direct oxidative protein folding in the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koch, Johanna R; Schmid, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    Mia40 catalyses the oxidative folding of disulphide-containing proteins in the mitochondria. The folding pathway is directed by the formation of the first mixed disulphide between Mia40 and its substrate. Here, we employ Cox17 to elucidate the molecular determinants of this reaction. Mia40 engages initially in a dynamic non-covalent enzyme-substrate complex that forms and dissociates within milliseconds. Cys36 of Cox17 forms the mixed disulphide in an extremely rapid reaction that is limited by the preceding complex formation with Mia40. Cys36 reacts much faster than the three other cysteines of Cox17, because it neighbours three hydrophobic residues. Mia40 binds preferentially to hydrophobic regions and the dynamic nature of the non-covalent complex allows rapid reorientation for an optimal positioning of the reactive cysteine. Mia40 thus uses the unique proximity between its substrate-binding site and the catalytic disulphide to select a particular cysteine for forming the critical initial mixed disulphide.

  18. Interplay of Electrostatics and Hydrophobic Effects in the Metamorphic Protein Human Lymphotactin.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Volkman, Brian F; Cui, Qiang

    2015-07-30

    The human lymphotactin (hLtn) is a protein that features two native states both of which are physiologically relevant: it is a monomer (hLtn10) at 10 °C with 200 mM salt and a dimer (hLtn40) at 40 °C and without salt. Here we focus on the networks of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions that display substantial changes upon the conversion from hLtn10 to hLtn40 since they are expected to modulate the relative stability of the two folds. In addition to the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction discussed in previous work, we find several other like-charge pairs that are likely important to the stability of hLtn10. Free energy perturbation calculations are carried out to explicitly evaluate the contribution of the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction to the hLtn10 stability. hLtn40 features a larger number of salt bridges, and a set of hydrophobic residues undergo major changes in the solvent accessible surface area between hLtn10 and hLtn40, pointing to their importance to the relative stability of the two folds. We also discuss the use of explicit and implicit solvent simulations for characterizing the conformational ensembles under different solution conditions.

  19. Concentration-dependent displacement of cholesterol in micelles by hydrophobic rice bran protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Yokoyama, Wallace H; Zhang, Hui

    2012-05-01

    Rice bran, containing about 100-150 g kg(-1) protein, is a by-product of rice milling that has only become an available ingredient in recent years owing to the centralisation of rice milling. Rice bran, but not its protein fraction or hydrolysates, has been shown to have a hypocholesterolaemic effect. Peptides from soy, milk and other foods have been proposed to have hypocholesterolaemic effects based on their ability to lower cholesterol solubility in bile acid/phosphotidyl choline micelles. Rice bran protein hydrolysates (RBPHs) were prepared and investigated for their potential to lower cholesterol concentration in micelles. The RBPHs were produced by digestion using four different peptidases, alcalase 2.4L(®), neutrase 0.8L(®), papaya latex papain and porcine pancreas trypsin, and then fractionated by hydrophobicity using styrene/divinylbeneze resins. Alcalase 2.4L(®) produced the highest degree of hydrolysis, and the resulting hydrolysates had the highest micellar cholesterol inhibition ability in an in vitro hypocholesterolaemic test. The adsorption dynamics of four different macroporous resins, DA201-C, Sepabeads SP207 and SP825 and Diaion HP20, were determined using the Langmuir isotherm model. DA201-C had the highest adsorption capacity with an equilibrium concentration of 220 mg g(-1). The hydrolysates eluted with 25, 50, 75 and 95% (v/v) ethanol lowered the micellar cholesterol concentration by 11.88, 14.76, 19.37 and 7.56% respectively. A hydrophobic fraction of RBPH had the highest inhibitory activity on micellar cholesterol, which suggests that it may have hypocholesterolaemic properties. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Appearance of a stress-response protein, phage-shock protein A, in Escherichia coli exposed to hydrophobic organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Aono, R

    1998-02-01

    A 28 kDa protein associated with the inner membrane was induced strongly in Escherichia coli K-12 cells grown in the presence of a hydrophobic organic solvent, n-hexane or cyclooctane. These organic solvents suppressed the growth (growth rate and yield) of E. coli. A partial amino acid sequence showed that this protein was the phage-shock protein PspA. PspA is known to be induced in E. coli cells under extreme stress conditions. The results suggest that E. coli cells are subject to strong stress in the presence of organic solvents. Introduction of a multi-copy plasmid vector carrying the psp operon into E. coli improved the survival frequency of cells exposed suddenly to n-hexane but not the growth rate of cells growing in the presence of n-hexane.

  1. Polymer monoliths with low hydrophobicity for strong cation-exchange capillary liquid chromatography of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gu, Binghe; Li, Yun; Lee, Milton L

    2007-08-01

    Two polymer monoliths were designed and synthesized from commercially available monomers with an attempt to decrease hydrophobicity for strong cation-exchange chromatography. One was prepared from the copolymerization of sulfoethyl methacrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate, and the other was synthesized from vinylsulfonic acid and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. Both of the monoliths were synthesized inside 75-microm i.d., UV-transparent fused-silica capillaries by photopolymerization. The hydrophobicities of the two monoliths were systematically evaluated using standard synthetic undecapeptides under ion-exchange conditions and propyl paraben under reversed-phase conditions. The poly(sulfoethyl methacrylate) monolith demonstrated similar hydrophobicity as a monolith prepared from copolymerization of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate, and 40% acetonitrile was required to suppress any hydrophobic interactions with peptides under ion-exchange conditions. However, with the use of vinylsulfonic acid as the functional monomer, a monolith with very low hydrophobicity was obtained, making it suitable for strong cation-exchange liquid chromatography of both peptides and proteins. It was found that monolith hydrophobicity could be adjusted by selection of monomers that differ in hydrocarbon content and type of vinyl group. Finally, excellent separations of model protein standards and high-density lipoproteins were achieved using the poly(vinylsulfonic acid) monolith. Five subclasses of high-density lipoproteins were resolved using a simple linear NaCl gradient.

  2. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  3. Efficient Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Modification of Membrane Proteins Requires a C-terminal Anchoring Signal of Marginal Hydrophobicity*

    PubMed Central

    Galian, Carmen; Björkholm, Patrik; Bulleid, Neil; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Many plasma membrane proteins are anchored to the membrane via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety. The GPI anchor is attached to the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum by transamidation, a reaction in which a C-terminal GPI-attachment signal is cleaved off concomitantly with addition of the GPI moiety. GPI-attachment signals are poorly conserved on the sequence level but are all composed of a polar segment that includes the GPI-attachment site followed by a hydrophobic segment located at the very C terminus of the protein. Here, we show that efficient GPI modification requires that the hydrophobicity of the C-terminal segment is “marginal”: less hydrophobic than type II transmembrane anchors and more hydrophobic than the most hydrophobic segments found in secreted proteins. We further show that the GPI-attachment signal can be modified by the transamidase irrespective of whether it is first released into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum or is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. PMID:22431723

  4. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rabenkogo, A; Vigue, M G; Jeziorski, E

    2015-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (drug reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a rare and serious drug toxidermia with potentially multiple organ dysfunctions. This report relates the case of a 9-year-old girl who presented a right cervical and mediastinal adenopathy with a mediastinal lump, fever, and deterioration of the general condition. The hospital assessment concluded in an abscess due to Staphylococcus aureus secreting a Panton-Valentine toxin with nonsevere pleuritis and pericarditis. The outcome was favorable with antibiotic treatment consisting of amoxicillin-acid clavulanic, amikacin, and clindamycin followed by oxacillin, rifampicin, and colchicine. On the 25th day of treatment, she presented recurrence of fever with a generalized rash, moderate hepatic cytolysis, hypereosinophilia, with the presence of activated lymphocytes that were further suggestive of visceral DRESS syndrome. A skin biopsy was performed that confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favorable after stopping all ongoing treatments even though none of the administered treatments were classically responsible for the syndrome. Symptomatic treatments (antihistaminic and topical steroids) were also administered. Patch tests, performed secondarily, were positive to penicillins; amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or oxacillin were then suspected of being responsible for the DRESS syndrome. Potentially serious, the DRESS syndrome should be considered together with atoxic epidermal necrolysis or Stevens-Johnson syndromes in the case of any rash appearing after drug administration, especially in the presence of face and eyelid edema. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermostability of salt bridges versus hydrophobic interactions in proteins probed by statistical potentials.

    PubMed

    Folch, Benjamin; Rooman, Marianne; Dehouck, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the interactions that stabilize protein structures is a long-standing issue, the elucidation of which would enable the prediction and the rational modification of the thermostability of a target protein. It is tackled here by deriving distance-dependent amino acid pair potentials from four datasets of proteins with increasing melting temperatures (Tm). The temperature dependence of the interactions is determined from the differences in the shape of the potentials derived from the four datasets. Note that, here, we use an unusual dataset definition, which is based on the Tm values, rather than on the living temperature of the host organisms. Our results show that the stabilizing weight of hydrophobic interactions (between Ile, Leu, and Val) remains constant as the temperature increases, compared to the other interactions. In contrast, the two minima of the Arg--Glu and Arg--Asp salt bridge potentials show a significant Tm dependence. These two minima correspond to two geometries: the fork--fork geometry, where the side chains point toward each other, and the fork--stick geometry, which involves the N(epsilon) side chain atom of Arg. These two types of salt bridges were determined to be significantly more stabilizing at high temperature. Moreover, a preference for more-compact salt bridges is noticeable in heat-resistant proteins, especially for the fork--fork geometry. The Tm-dependent potentials that have been defined here should be useful for predicting thermal stability changes upon mutation.

  6. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  7. Fluorescence turn-on responses of anionic and cationic conjugated polymers toward proteins: effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Pu, Kan-Yi; Liu, Bin

    2010-03-11

    Cationic and anionic poly(fluorenyleneethynylene-alt-benzothiadiazole)s (PFEBTs) are designed and synthesized via Sonagashira coupling reaction to show light-up signatures toward proteins. Due to the charge transfer character of the excited states, the fluorescence of PFEBTs is very weak in aqueous solution, while their yellow fluorescence can be enhanced by polymer aggregation. PFEBTs show fluorescence turn-on rather than fluorescence quenching upon complexation with proteins. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between PFEBTs and proteins are found to improve the polymer fluorescence, the extent of which is dependent on the nature of the polymer and the protein. Changes in solution pH adjust the net charges of proteins, providing an effective way to manipulate electrostatic interactions and in turn the increment in the polymer fluorescence. In addition, the effect of protein digestion on the fluorescence of polymer/protein complexes is probed. The results indicate that electrostatic interaction induced polymer fluorescence increase cannot be substantially reduced through cleaving protein into peptide fragments. In contrast, hydrophobic interactions, mainly determined by the hydrophobicity of proteins, can be minimized by digestion, imparting a light-off signature for the polymer/protein complexes. This study thus not only highlights the opportunities of exerting nonspecific interactions for protein sensing but also reveals significant implications for biosensor design.

  8. Amphiphilic polybetaines: the effect of side-chain hydrophobicity on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Colak, Semra; Tew, Gregory N

    2012-05-14

    Novel amphiphilic polybetaines were synthesized and used as the base material for nonfouling coatings. The amphiphilicity of these polybetaines was systematically tuned by coupling chains of increasing hydrophobicity to the zwitterionic functionality side at the repeat unit level. An oligoethylene glycol (OEG) moiety was selected to yield the most hydrophilic coating, while octyl (C(8)) and fluorinated (F) groups were used to impart lipophilicity and lipophobicity to the coatings, respectively. This unique design allowed us to investigate the effect of the lipophilicity/lipophobicity of the side chain on the nonfouling properties of these zwitterionic systems. Adsorption studies, performed using six different proteins, showed that the fluorinated polybetaine, Poly[NFZI-co-NSi], resisted nonspecific adsorption as effectively as, and in some cases even better than, the most hydrophilic Poly[NOEGZI-co-NSi] coating. The comparison of Poly[NFZI-co-NSi] to its noncharged analog demonstrated the essential nature of the zwitterionic functionality in imparting nonfouling character to the coating.

  9. Engineering of the E. coli outer membrane protein FhuA to overcome the hydrophobic mismatch in thick polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Noor; Dworeck, Tamara; Fioroni, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2011-03-17

    Channel proteins like the engineered FhuA Δ1-159 often cannot insert into thick polymeric membranes due to a mismatch between the hydrophobic surface of the protein and the hydrophobic surface of the polymer membrane. To address this problem usually specific block copolymers are synthesized to facilitate protein insertion. Within this study in a reverse approach we match the protein to the polymer instead of matching the polymer to the protein. To increase the FhuA Δ1-159 hydrophobic surface by 1 nm, the last 5 amino acids of each of the 22 β-sheets, prior to the more regular periplasmatic β-turns, were doubled leading to an extended FhuA Δ1-159 (FhuA Δ1-159 Ext). The secondary structure prediction and CD spectroscopy indicate the β-barrel folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Ext. The FhuA Δ1-159 Ext insertion and functionality within a nanocontainer polymeric membrane based on the triblock copolymer PIB(1000)-PEG(6000)-PIB(1000) (PIB = polyisobutylene, PEG = polyethyleneglycol) has been proven by kinetic analysis using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine). Identical experiments with the unmodified FhuA Δ1-159 report no kinetics and presumably no insertion into the PIB(1000)-PEG(6000)-PIB(1000) membrane. Furthermore labeling of the Lys-NH(2) groups present in the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext channel, leads to controllability of in/out flux of substrates and products from the nanocontainer. Using a simple "semi rational" approach the protein's hydrophobic transmembrane region was increased by 1 nm, leading to a predicted lower hydrophobic mismatch between the protein and polymer membrane, minimizing the insertion energy penalty. The strategy of adding amino acids to the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext hydrophobic part can be further expanded to increase the protein's hydrophobicity, promoting the efficient embedding into thicker/more hydrophobic block copolymer membranes.

  10. Functional Validation of Hydrophobic Adaptation to Physiological Temperature in the Small Heat Shock Protein αA-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Posner, Mason; Kiss, Andor J.; Skiba, Jackie; Drossman, Amy; Dolinska, Monika B.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) maintain cellular homeostasis by preventing stress and disease-induced protein aggregation. While it is known that hydrophobicity impacts the ability of sHsps to bind aggregation-prone denaturing proteins, the complex quaternary structure of globular sHsps has made understanding the significance of specific changes in hydrophobicity difficult. Here we used recombinant protein of the lenticular sHsp α A-crystallin from six teleost fishes environmentally adapted to temperatures ranging from -2°C to 40°C to identify correlations between physiological temperature, protein stability and chaperone-like activity. Using sequence and structural modeling analysis we identified specific amino acid differences between the warm adapted zebrafish and cold adapted Antarctic toothfish that could contribute to these correlations and validated the functional consequences of three specific hydrophobicity-altering amino acid substitutions in αA-crystallin. Site directed mutagenesis of three residues in the zebrafish (V62T, C143S, T147V) confirmed that each impacts either protein stability or chaperone-like activity or both, with the V62T substitution having the greatest impact. Our results indicate a role for changing hydrophobicity in the thermal adaptation of α A-crystallin and suggest ways to produce sHsp variants with altered chaperone-like activity. These data also demonstrate that a comparative approach can provide new information about sHsp function and evolution. PMID:22479631

  11. Role of long- and short-range hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues contact network in protein's structural organization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dhriti; Kundu, Sudip

    2012-06-21

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be described as a graph where nodes represent residues and the strength of non-covalent interactions between them are edges. These protein contact networks can be separated into long and short-range interactions networks depending on the positions of amino acids in primary structure. Long-range interactions play a distinct role in determining the tertiary structure of a protein while short-range interactions could largely contribute to the secondary structure formations. In addition, physico chemical properties and the linear arrangement of amino acids of the primary structure of a protein determines its three dimensional structure. Here, we present an extensive analysis of protein contact subnetworks based on the London van der Waals interactions of amino acids at different length scales. We further subdivided those networks in hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues networks and have tried to correlate their influence in the overall topology and organization of a protein. The largest connected component (LCC) of long (LRN)-, short (SRN)- and all-range (ARN) networks within proteins exhibit a transition behaviour when plotted against different interaction strengths of edges among amino acid nodes. While short-range networks having chain like structures exhibit highly cooperative transition; long- and all-range networks, which are more similar to each other, have non-chain like structures and show less cooperativity. Further, the hydrophobic residues subnetworks in long- and all-range networks have similar transition behaviours with all residues all-range networks, but the hydrophilic and charged residues networks don't. While the nature of transitions of LCC's sizes is same in SRNs for thermophiles and mesophiles, there exists a clear difference in LRNs. The presence of larger size of interconnected long-range interactions in thermophiles than mesophiles, even at higher interaction strength between amino acids

  12. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  13. Apparent Activation Energies Associated with Protein Dynamics on Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    With the use of single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), the dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human fibrinogen (Fg) at low concentrations were observed at the solid-aqueous interface as a function of temperature on hydrophobic trimethylsilane (TMS) and hydrophilic fused silica (FS) surfaces. Multiple dynamic modes and populations were observed and characterized by their surface residence times and squared-displacement distributions (surface diffusion). Characteristic desorption and diffusion rates for each population/mode were generally found to increase with temperature, and apparent activation energies were determined from Arrhenius analyses. The apparent activation energies of desorption and diffusion were typically higher on FS than on TMS surfaces, suggesting that protein desorption and mobility were hindered on hydrophilic surfaces due to favorable protein-surface and solvent-surface interactions. The diffusion of BSA on TMS appeared to be activationless for several populations, whereas diffusion on FS always exhibited an apparent activation energy. All activation energies were small in absolute terms (generally only a few kBT), suggesting that most adsorbed protein molecules are weakly bound and move and desorb readily under ambient conditions. PMID:22713578

  14. Apparent activation energies associated with protein dynamics on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Blake B; Kastantin, Mark; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2012-06-06

    With the use of single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), the dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human fibrinogen (Fg) at low concentrations were observed at the solid-aqueous interface as a function of temperature on hydrophobic trimethylsilane (TMS) and hydrophilic fused silica (FS) surfaces. Multiple dynamic modes and populations were observed and characterized by their surface residence times and squared-displacement distributions (surface diffusion). Characteristic desorption and diffusion rates for each population/mode were generally found to increase with temperature, and apparent activation energies were determined from Arrhenius analyses. The apparent activation energies of desorption and diffusion were typically higher on FS than on TMS surfaces, suggesting that protein desorption and mobility were hindered on hydrophilic surfaces due to favorable protein-surface and solvent-surface interactions. The diffusion of BSA on TMS appeared to be activationless for several populations, whereas diffusion on FS always exhibited an apparent activation energy. All activation energies were small in absolute terms (generally only a few kBT), suggesting that most adsorbed protein molecules are weakly bound and move and desorb readily under ambient conditions. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein adsorption on a hydrophobic surface: a molecular dynamics study of lysozyme on graphite.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2010-04-20

    Adsorption of human lysozyme on hydrophobic graphite is investigated through atomistic computer simulations with molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The chosen strategy follows a simulation protocol proposed by the authors to model the initial and the final adsorption stage on a bare surface. Adopting an implicit solvent and considering 10 starting molecular orientations so that all the main sides of the protein can face the surface, we first carry out an energy minimization to investigate the initial adsorption stage, and then long MD runs of selected arrangements to follow the surface spreading of the protein maximizing its adsorption strength. The results are discussed in terms of the kinetics of surface spreading, the interaction energy, and the molecular size, considering both the footprint and the final thickness of the adsorbed protein. The structural implications of the final adsorption geometry for surface aggregation and nanoscale structural organization are also pointed out. Further MD runs are carried out in explicit water for the native structure and the most stable adsorption state to assess the local stability of the geometry obtained in implicit solvent, and to calculate the statistical distribution of the water molecules around the whole lysozyme and its backbone.

  16. Isolation of soybean protein P34 from oil bodies using hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Sewekow, Eva; Keßler, Lars Christian; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2008-01-01

    Background Soybeans play a prominent role in allergologic research due to the high incidence of allergic reactions. For detailed studies on specific proteins it is necessary to have access to a large amount of pure substance. Results In this contribution, a method for purifying soybean (Glycine max) protein P34 (also called Gly m Bd 30 K or Gly m 1) using hydrophobic interaction chromatography is presented. After screening experiments using 1 mL HiTrap columns, Butyl Sepharose 4 FF was selected for further systematic investigations. With this stationary phase, suitable operation conditions for two-step gradient elution using ammonium sulphate were determined experimentally. The separation conditions obtained in a small column could be scaled up successfully to column volumes of 7.5 and 75 mL, allowing for high product purities of almost 100% with a yield of 27% for the chromatographic separation step. Conditions could be simplified further using a onestep gradient, which gave comparable purification in a shorter process time. The identity of the purified protein was verified using in-gel digestion and mass spectrometry as well as immunological techniques. Conclusion With the technique presented it is possible to produce, within a short timeframe, pure P34, suitable for further studies where an example antigen is needed. PMID:18334018

  17. Aptamer binding to celiac disease-triggering hydrophobic proteins: a sensitive gluten detection approach.

    PubMed

    Amaya-González, Sonia; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, M Jesús

    2014-03-04

    Celiac disease represents a significant public health problem in large parts of the world. A major hurdle in the effective management of the disease by celiac sufferers is the sensitivity of the current available methods for assessing gluten contents in food. In response, we report a highly sensitive approach for gluten analysis using aptamers as specific receptors. Gliadins, a fraction of gluten proteins, are the main constituent responsible for triggering the disease. However, they are highly hydrophobic and large molecules, regarded as difficult targets for in vitro evolution of aptamers without nucleobase modification. We describe the successful selection of aptamers for these water insoluble prolamins that was achieved choosing the immunodominant apolar peptide from α2-gliadin as a target for selection. All aptamers evolved are able to bind the target in its native environment within the natural protein. The best nonprotein receptor is the basis for an electrochemical competitive enzyme-linked assay on magnetic particles, which allows the measurement of as low as 0.5 ppb of gliadin standard (0.5 ppm of gluten). Reference immunoassay for detecting the same target has a limit of detection of 3 ppm, 6 times less sensitive than this method. Importantly, it also displays high specificity, detecting the other three prolamins toxic for celiac patients and not showing cross-reactivity to nontoxic proteins such as maize, soya, and rice. These features make the proposed method a valuable tool for gluten detection in foods.

  18. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  19. G protein antagonists. A novel hydrophobic peptide competes with receptor for G protein binding.

    PubMed

    Mukai, H; Munekata, E; Higashijima, T

    1992-08-15

    A substance P (SP) analog, [D-Pro4,D-Trp7,9,10] SP4-11, is known to inhibit the actions of various structurally unrelated messenger molecules as well as SP. Our studies on the effects of this peptide on the regulation of purified G proteins by receptor showed that at least some of the biological effects of the peptide can be explained by the ability of the peptide to block the activation of G proteins by receptors. Here we report that a novel truncated SP-related peptide, pGlu-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH2, inhibited the activation of G(i) or G(o) by M2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 mAChR) or of Gs by beta-adrenergic receptor in the reconstituted phospholipid vesicles, assayed by receptor-promoted GTP hydrolysis. The inhibition by the peptide was apparently reversible and competitive with respect to receptor binding to G proteins; the inhibition could be overcome by increasing the concentration of receptor in the vesicles and was not altered by changes in the concentration of G protein. The competing effects of the peptide were used to analyze the effect of agonist on receptor-G protein interaction. The concentration change of muscarinic agonist did not alter the inhibitory effects of the peptide on M2 mAChR-promoted GTPase by G(o), which is consistent with the idea that agonist increases the regulatory efficiency of the receptor but does not alter its affinity for G proteins. This new group of compounds (G protein antagonists) is a promising tool to study receptor-G protein interaction quantitatively.

  20. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 1-2 Å, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point > 140 °C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 Å). PMID:22632833

  1. Two homologous low-temperature-inducible genes from Arabidopsis encode highly hydrophobic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Capel, J; Jarillo, J A; Salinas, J; Martínez-Zapater, J M

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized two related cDNAs (RCI2A and RCI2B) corresponding to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, the expression of which is transiently induced by low, nonfreezing temperatures. RCI2A and RCI2B encode small (54 amino acids), highly hydrophobic proteins that bear two potential transmembrane domains. They show similarity to proteins encoded by genes from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and wheatgrass (Lophophyrum elongatum) that are regulated by different stress conditions. Their high level of sequence homology (78%) and their genomic location in a single restriction fragment suggest that both genes originated as a result of a tandem duplication. However, their regulatory sequences have diverged enough to confer on them different expression patterns. Like most of the cold-inducible plant genes characterized, the expression of RCI2A and RCI2B is also promoted by abscisic acid (ABA) and dehydration but is not a general response to stress conditions, since it is not induced by salt stress or by anaerobiosis. Furthermore, low temperatures are able to induce RCI2A and RCI2B expression in ABA-deficient and -insensitive genetic backgrounds, indicating that both ABA-dependent and -independent pathways regulate the low-temperature responsiveness of these two genes. PMID:9342870

  2. Chemical Synthesis of the Highly Hydrophobic Antiviral Membrane-Associated Protein IFITM3 and Modified Variants.

    PubMed

    Harmand, Thibault J; Pattabiraman, Vijaya R; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2017-10-02

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) is an antiviral transmembrane protein that is thought to serve as the primary factor for inhibiting the replication of a large number of viruses, including West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. Production of this 14.5 kDa, 133-residue transmembrane protein, especially with essential posttranslational modifications, by recombinant expression is challenging. In this report, we document the chemical synthesis of IFTIM3 in multi-milligram quantities (>15 mg) and the preparation of phosphorylated and fluorescent variants. The synthesis was accomplished by using KAHA ligations, which operate under acidic aqueous/organic mixtures that excel at solubilizing even the exceptionally hydrophobic C-terminal region of IFITM3. The synthetic material is readily incorporated into model vesicles and forms the basis for using synthetic, homogenous IFITM3 and its derivatives for further studying its structure and biological mode of action. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Rgg proteins associated with internalized small hydrophobic peptides: a new quorum-sensing mechanism in streptococci.

    PubMed

    Fleuchot, B; Gitton, C; Guillot, A; Vidic, J; Nicolas, P; Besset, C; Fontaine, L; Hols, P; Leblond-Bourget, N; Monnet, V; Gardan, R

    2011-05-01

    We identified a genetic context encoding a transcriptional regulator of the Rgg family and a small hydrophobic peptide (SHP) in nearly all streptococci and suggested that it may be involved in a new quorum-sensing mechanism, with SHP playing the role of a pheromone. Here, we provide further support for this hypothesis by constructing a phylogenetic tree of the Rgg and Rgg-like proteins from Gram-positive bacteria and by studying the shp/rgg1358 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9. We identified the shp1358 gene as a target of Rgg1358, and used it to confirm the existence of the steps of a quorum-sensing mechanism including secretion, maturation and reimportation of the pheromone into the cell. We used surface plasmon resonance to demonstrate interaction between the pheromone and the regulatory protein and performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays to assess binding of the transcriptional regulator to the promoter regions of its target genes. The active form of the pheromone was identified by mass spectrometry. Our findings demonstrate that the shp/rgg1358 locus encodes two components of a novel quorum-sensing mechanism involving a transcriptional regulator of the Rgg family and a SHP pheromone that is detected and reimported into the cell by the Ami oligopeptide transporter. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Designability and cooperative folding in a four-letter hydrophobic-polar model of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Guang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2006-11-01

    The two-letter hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Lau and Dill [Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] has been widely used in theoretical studies of protein folding due to its conceptual and computational simplicity. Despite its success in elucidating various aspects of the sequence-structure relationship, thermodynamic behavior of the model is not in agreement with a sharp two-state folding transition of many single-domain proteins. To gain a better understanding of this discrepancy, we consider an extension of the HP model by including an “antiferromagnetic” (AF) interaction in the contact potential that favors amino acid residues with complementary attributes. With an enlarged four-letter alphabet, the density of states on the low energy side can be significantly decreased. Computational studies of the four-letter HP model are performed on 36-mer sequences on a square lattice. It is found that the designability of folded structures in the extended model exhibits strong correlation with that of the two-letter HP model, while the AF interaction alone selects a very different class of structures that resembles the Greek key motif for beta sheets. A procedure is introduced to select sequences which have the largest energy gap to the native state. Based on density of states and specific heat calculations in the full configuration space, we show that the optimized sequence is able to fold nearly as cooperatively as a corresponding Gō model.

  5. Structure optimisation by thermal cycling for the hydrophobic-polar lattice model of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Florian; Möbius, Arnulf; Schreiber, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The function of a protein depends strongly on its spatial structure. Therefore the transition from an unfolded stage to the functional fold is one of the most important problems in computational molecular biology. Since the corresponding free energy landscapes exhibit huge numbers of local minima, the search for the lowest-energy configurations is very demanding. Because of that, efficient heuristic algorithms are of high value. In the present work, we investigate whether and how the thermal cycling (TC) approach can be applied to the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model of protein folding. Evaluating the efficiency of TC for a set of two- and three-dimensional examples, we compare the performance of this strategy with that of multi-start local search (MSLS) procedures and that of simulated annealing (SA). For this aim, we incorporated several simple but rather efficient modifications into the standard procedures: in particular, a strong improvement was achieved by also allowing energy conserving state modifications. Furthermore, the consideration of ensembles instead of single samples was found to greatly improve the efficiency of TC. In the framework of different benchmarks, for all considered HP sequences, we found TC to be far superior to SA, and to be faster than Wang-Landau sampling.

  6. Predicting the behaviour of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography. 2. Using a statistical description of their surface amino acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J Cristian; Rapaport, Ivan; Asenjo, Juan A

    2006-02-24

    This paper focuses on the prediction of the dimensionless retention time (DRT) of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) by means of mathematical models based on the statistical description of the amino acid surface distribution. Previous models characterises the protein surface as a whole. However, most of the time it is not the whole protein but some of its specific regions that interact with the environment. It seems much more natural to use local measurements of the characteristics of the surface. Therefore, the statistical characterisation of the distribution of an amino acid property on the protein surface was carried out from the systematic calculation of the local average of this property in a neighbourhood placed sequentially on each of the amino acids on the protein surface. This process allowed us to characterise the distribution of this property quantitatively using three main statistics: average, standard deviation and maximum. In particular, if the property considered is a hydrophobicity scale, these statistics allowed us to characterise the average hydrophobicity and the hydrophobic content of the most hydrophobic cluster or hotspot, as well as the heterogeneity of the hydrophobicity distribution on the protein surface. We tested the performance of the DRT predictive models based on these statistics on a set of 15 proteins. We obtained better predictive results with respect to the models previously reported. The best predictive model was a linear model based on the maximum. This statistic was calculated using an index of the mobilities of amino acids in chromatography. The predictive performance of this model (measured as the Jack Knife MSE) was 26.9% better than those obtained by the best model which does not consider the amino acid distribution and 19.5% better than the model based on the hydrophobic imbalance (HI). In addition, the best performance was obtained by a linear multivariable model based on the HI and the maximum. The

  7. Free flow isoelectric focusing : a method for the separation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteins of rat liver peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Islinger, Markus; Weber, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisomes take part in various metabolic pathways related to the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Although detailed information on the enzymes involved in the peroxisomal lipid metabolism was acquired in the past, the mechanisms of metabolic exchange between peroxisomes and the cytosol or other organelles still remain an enigma. Therefore, a detailed analysis of the peroxisomal membrane proteome could help identify potential metabolite transporters. However, because of their highly hydrophobic character, membrane proteins tend to precipitate in aqueous media, making their fractionation still a challenging task. To overcome these obstacles, we have elaborated a protocol for the separation of both hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic proteins using free flow isoelectric focusing (FF-IEF). Similar to traditional gel-based isoelectric focusing, a denaturing electrophoresis buffer containing a mixture of urea, thiourea and detergents is applied to keep highly hydrophobic proteins in solution. Electrophoresis is conducted on a BD Free Flow Electrophoresis System with a linear pH gradient from 3 to 10 and sampled into 96 fractions. As a second dimension, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is used to further separate and visualize the protein pattern of the peroxisomal subfractions of matrix, peripheral and integral membrane proteins. The identification of the known peroxisomal membrane proteins PMP22, PMP70 as well as mGST in the subsequent matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of the 100 most prominent protein bands has documented the suitability of this new technique for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins.

  8. The identification of hydrophobic sites on the surface of proteins using absorption difference spectroscopy of bromophenol blue.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, M; Mayburd, A L; Kassner, R J

    2003-02-15

    Hydrophobic sites on the surface of protein molecules are thought to have important functional roles. The identification of such sites can provide information about the function and mode of interaction with other cellular components. While the fluorescence enhancement of polarity-sensitive dyes has been useful in identifying hydrophobic sites on a number of targets, strong intrinsic quenching of Nile red and ANSA dye fluorescence is observed on binding to a cytochrome c('). Fluorescence quenching is also observed to take place in the presence of a variety of other biologically important molecules which can compromise the quantitative determination of binding constants. Absorption difference spectroscopy is shown not to be sensitive to the presence of fluorescence quenchers but sensitive enough to measure binding constants. The dye BPB is shown to bind to the same hydrophobic sites on proteins as polarity-sensitive fluorescence probes. The absorption spectrum of BPB is also observed to be polarity sensitive. A binding constant of 3x10(6)M(-1) for BPB to BSA has been measured by absorption difference spectroscopy. An empirical correlation is observed between the shape of the absorption difference spectrum of BPB and the polarity of the environment. The results indicate that absorption difference spectroscopy of BPB provides a valuable supplement to fluorescence for determining the presence of hydrophobic sites on the surface of proteins as well as a method for measuring binding constants.

  9. TM Finder: A prediction program for transmembrane protein segments using a combination of hydrophobicity and nonpolar phase helicity scales

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Charles M.; Wang, Chen; Liu, Li-Ping; Prior, Andrew S.; Agrawal, Shuchi; Muskat, Brenda L.; Cuticchia, A. Jamie

    2001-01-01

    Based on the principle of dual prediction by segment hydrophobicity and nonpolar phase helicity, in concert with imposed threshold values of these two parameters, we developed the automated prediction program TM Finder that can successfully locate most transmembrane (TM) segments in proteins. The program uses the results of experiments on a series of host-guest TM segment mimic peptides of prototypic sequence KK AAAXAAAAAXAAWAAXAAAKKKK-amide (where X = each of the 20 commonly occurring amino acids) through which an HPLC-derived hydropathy scale, a hydrophobicity threshold for spontaneous membrane insertion, and a nonpolar phase helical propensity scale were determined. Using these scales, the optimized prediction algorithm of TM Finder defines TM segments by first searching for competent core segments using the combination of hydrophobicity and helicity scales, and then performs a gap-joining operation, which minimizes prediction bias caused by local hydrophilic residues and/or the choice of window size. In addition, the hydrophobicity threshold requirement enables TM Finder to distinguish reliably between membrane proteins and globular proteins, thereby adding an important dimension to the program. A full web version of the TM Finder program can be accessed at http://www.bioinformatics-canada.org/TM/. PMID:11266608

  10. The fungal cerato-platanin protein EPL1 forms highly ordered layers at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bonazza, K; Gaderer, R; Neudl, S; Przylucka, A; Allmaier, G; Druzhinina, I S; Grothe, H; Friedbacher, G; Seidl-Seiboth, V

    2015-03-07

    Cerato-platanin proteins (CPPs) and hydrophobins are two classes of small, secreted proteins that are exclusively found in fungi. CPPs are known as chitin-binding proteins, and were recently also shown to form protein layers at air/water interfaces, but the features of these layers were not investigated on the molecular level yet. In this study, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), EPL1, a member of the CPP family was shown to form highly ordered monolayers at a hydrophobic surface/liquid-interface. Furthermore, two new hydrophobins were analysed, and the influence of EPL1 on hydrophobin layers was studied in situ. Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins that are able to self-assemble at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces, thereby inverting the polarity of the surface. This renders fungal growth structures such as spores water repellent. The combination of AFM data and wettability experiments led to the conclusion that in presence of both, hydrophobins and EPL1, a previously unknown hybrid layer is formed. This mixed protein layer is on one hand not inverting but enhancing the hydrophobicity of HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), typical for EPL1, and on the other hand, it is stable and water insoluble, which is reminiscent of hydrophobin layers.

  11. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  12. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation.

  13. Epitope mapping of imidazolium cations in ionic liquid-protein interactions unveils the balance between hydrophobicity and electrostatics towards protein destabilisation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Micael; Figueiredo, Angelo Miguel; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2014-11-14

    We investigated imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) to discern the level of cation interactions towards protein stability. STD-NMR spectroscopy was used to observe the imidazolium IL protons involved in direct binding and to identify the interactions responsible for changes in Tm as accessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cations influence protein stability less than anions but still significantly. It was found that longer alkyl side chains of imidazolium-based ILs (more hydrophobic) are associated with a higher destabilisation effect on HSA than short-alkyl groups (less hydrophobic). The reason for such destabilisation lies on the increased surface contact area of the cation with the protein, particularly on the hydrophobic contacts promoted by the terminus of the alkyl chain. The relevance of the hydrophobic contacts is clearly demonstrated by the introduction of a polar moiety in the alkyl chain: a methoxy or alcohol group. Such structural modification reduces the degree of hydrophobic contacts with HSA explaining the lesser extent of protein destabilisation when compared to longer alkyl side chain groups: above [C2mim](+). Competition STD-NMR experiments using [C2mim](+), [C4mim](+) and [C2OHmim](+) also validate the importance of the hydrophobic interactions. The combined effect of cation and anion interactions was explored using (35)Cl NMR. Such experiments show that the nature of the cation has no influence on the anion-protein contacts, still the nature of the anion modulates the cation-protein interaction. Herein we propose that more destabilising anions are likely to be a result of a partial contribution from the cation as a direct consequence of the different levels of interaction (cation-anion pair and cation-protein).

  14. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Richard J; Wurch, Louie L; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-08-04

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. As this interaction is thought to be membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins, proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitans proteins. Using this method, we show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. These gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  15. Surface interactions of monoclonal antibodies characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation: impact of hydrophobicity and protein self-interactions.

    PubMed

    Oom, Anna; Poggi, Mark; Wikström, Jennie; Sukumar, Muppalla

    2012-02-01

    Surface adsorption of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb1 and mAb2), with widely different hydrophobicity and self-association behavior in solution, was examined by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to understand how adsorption and protein self-interactions near the surface are impacted by their intrinsic properties. The dependence of mass and viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed protein layer on the type of surface, presence of a surfactant, protein concentration, and pH were examined. Adsorption was significantly reduced in the presence of surfactant for both proteins, but for the more hydrophobic mAb2, residual adsorption remained on polystyrene (PS) and Teflon surfaces. Protein concentration had little impact on the adsorbed protein mass for silicon dioxide surface but had a significant impact for PS and Teflon surfaces. At high protein concentrations, an irreversible layer formed first upon which a reversible layer builds. Reversible adsorption was significantly greater at higher protein concentrations and significantly higher for mAb2, consistent with its higher propensity to reversibly self-associate in solution. The viscoelastic properties suggest that adsorbed protein layer at high protein concentrations is more hydrated. The adsorbed protein layer at lower pH was more hydrated, and possibly more unfolded, consistent with the behavior of the antibody in bulk solution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Adsorption of a Protein Monolayer via Hydrophobic Interactions Prevents Nanoparticle Aggregation under Harsh Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Blankenburg, Jan; Olson, Jana; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We find that citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles aggregate and precipitate in saline solutions below the NaCl concentration of many bodily fluids and blood plasma. Our experiments indicate that this is due to complexation of the citrate anions with Na+ cations in solution. A dramatically enhanced colloidal stability is achieved when bovine serum albumin is adsorbed to the gold nanoparticle surface, completely preventing nanoparticle aggregation under harsh environmental conditions where the NaCl concentration is well beyond the isotonic point. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism of the formation of this albumin ‘corona’ and find that monolayer protein adsorption is most likely ruled by hydrophobic interactions. As for many nanotechnology-based biomedical and environmental applications, particle aggregation and sedimentation are undesirable and could substantially increase the risk of toxicological side-effects, the formation of the BSA corona presented here provides a low-cost bio-compatible strategy for nanoparticle stabilization and transport in highly ionic environments. PMID:23914342

  17. Influence of preadsorbed milk proteins on adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to hydrophobic and hydrophilic silica surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    al-Makhlafi, H; McGuire, J; Daeschel, M

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-casein for 8 h and beta-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin for 1 h at silanized silica surfaces of low and high hydrophobicity, followed by incubation in buffer and contact with Listeria monocytogenes, resulted in different numbers of cells adhered per unit of surface area. Adhesion to both surfaces was greatest when beta-lactoglobulin was present and was lowest when bovine serum albumin was present. Preadsorption of alpha-lactalbumin and beta-casein showed an intermediate effect on cell adhesion. Adsorption of beta-lactoglobulin for 1 h resulted in a generally lower number of cells adhered compared with the 8-h adsorption time, while the opposite result was observed with respect to bovine serum albumin. The adhesion data were explainable in terms of the relative rates of arrival to the surface and postadsorptive conformational change among the proteins, in addition to the extent of surface coverage in each case. PMID:7986033

  18. Hydrophobicity, thermal and micro-structural properties of whey protein concentrate-pullulan-beeswax films.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Khanzadi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Dehnad, Danial; Chegini, Faramarz Khodaian; Maghsoudlou, Yayha

    2015-09-01

    In this research, effects of beeswax (BW) on functional properties of whey protein concentrates (WPC):pullulan (PUL) films were investigated. For this purpose, 0, 10, 20 and 30w/w(glycerol)% BW rates and 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30w/w% WPC:PUL ratios were applied. Films containing 70% WPC:30% PUL (WPC70) and 30% BW (BW30) justified the highest contact angle (92.4°) among all films; SEM micrographs indicated that BW could come toward the surface of films during drying stage and resulted in a higher hydrophobic behavior of bilayer films compared with blend films. WPC70 supplied the lowest T(g) values (36-48 °C) among different proportions of WPC-PUL; the highest melting points were just assured in the absence of BW regardless of combination ratio for WPI:PUL. BW30 films deserved lower roughness rates than BW20 (and even BW10) films, indicating more advantageous microstructure and higher hydrogen connections in BW30 films and justifying similar melting points attained for BW30 films to BW20 or 10 ones. Overall, application of WPC70 and BW30 was recommended to obtain optimum combination of final properties for WPC-PUL-BW bilayer films as SEM exhibited flexible and elastic structures of such films.

  19. Preparation of a novel dual-function strong cation exchange/hydrophobic interaction chromatography stationary phase for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kailou; Yang, Li; Wang, Xuejiao; Bai, Quan; Yang, Fan; Wang, Fei

    2012-08-30

    We have explored a novel dual-function stationary phase which combines both strong cation exchange (SCX) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) characteristics. The novel dual-function stationary phase is based on porous and spherical silica gel functionalized with ligand containing sulfonic and benzyl groups capable of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction functionalities, which displays HIC character in a high salt concentration, and IEC character in a low salt concentration in mobile phase employed. As a result, it can be employed to separate proteins with SCX and HIC modes, respectively. The resolution and selectivity of the dual-function stationary phase were evaluated under both HIC and SCX modes with standard proteins and can be comparable to that of conventional IEC and HIC columns. More than 96% of mass and bioactivity recoveries of proteins can be achieved in both HIC and SCX modes, respectively. The results indicated that the novel dual-function column could replace two individual SCX and HIC columns for protein separation. Mixed retention mechanism of proteins on this dual-function column based on stoichiometric displacement theory (SDT) in LC was investigated to find the optimal balance of the magnitude of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between protein and the ligand on the silica surface in order to obtain high resolution and selectivity for protein separation. In addition, the effects of the hydrophobicity of the ligand of the dual-function packings and pH of the mobile phase used on protein separation were also investigated in detail. The results show that the ligand with suitable hydrophobicity to match the electrostatic interaction is very important to prepare the dual-function stationary phase, and a better resolution and selectivity can be obtained at pH 6.5 in SCX mode. Therefore, the dual-function column can replace two individual SCX and HIC columns for protein separation and be used to set up two-dimensional liquid

  20. Role of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites in the dynamic crossover of the protein-hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Mateus Henrique; Barbosa, Rafael C.; da Silva, Leandro B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the water structure and dynamics in the hydration shell of the globular TS-Kappa protein. The results show that for a wide range of temperatures the diffusion coefficient of water near the protein surface is lower than in bulk. A crossover in the diffusion behavior of hydration water is observed at different temperatures for hydrophilic and hydrophobic vicinities. We have found a correlation between the crossover in the hydrophilic case and the protein dynamical transition. An explanation in terms of the competition between water-water water-protein H-bond formation is provided based on H-bond network analysis.

  1. A short C-terminal tail prevents mis-targeting of hydrophobic mitochondrial membrane proteins to the ER.

    PubMed

    Reithinger, Johannes H; Yim, Chewon; Park, Kwangjin; Björkholm, Patrik; von Heijne, Gunnar; Kim, Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Sdh3/Shh3, a subunit of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase, contains transmembrane domains with a hydrophobicity comparable to that of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins. Here, we show that a C-terminal reporter fusion to Sdh3/Shh3 results in partial mis-targeting of the protein to the ER. This mis-targeting is mediated by the signal recognition particle (SRP) and depends on the length of the C-terminal tail. These results imply that if nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins contain strongly hydrophobic transmembrane domains and a long C-terminal tail, they have the potential to be recognized by SRP and mis-targeted to the ER. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. cDNA cloning and sequence of MAL, a hydrophobic protein associated with human T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, M A; Weissman, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA that is expressed in the intermediate and late stages of T-cell differentiation. The cDNA encodes a highly hydrophobic protein, termed MAL, that lacks a hydrophobic leader peptide sequence and contains four potential transmembrane domains separated by short hydrophilic segments. The predicted configuration of the MAL protein resembles the structure of integral proteins that form pores or channels in the plasma membrane and that are believed to act as transporters of water-soluble molecules and ions across the lipid bilayer. The presence of MAL mRNA in a panel of T-cell lines that express both the T-cell receptor and the T11 antigen suggests that MAL may be involved in membrane signaling in T cells activated via either T11 or T-cell receptor pathways. Images PMID:3494249

  3. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  4. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGES

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; ...

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  5. Hydrophobic and Ionic-Interactions in Bulk and Confined Water with Implications for Collapse and Folding of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Chen, Jie; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-10-01

    Water and water-mediated interactions determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding, protein aggregation and self-assembly in confined spaces. To obtain insights into the role of water in the context of folding problems, we describe computer simulations of a few related model systems. The dynamics of collapse of eicosane shows that upon expulsion of water the linear hydrocarbon chain adopts an ordered helical hairpin structure with 1.5 turns. The structure of dimer of eicosane molecules has two well ordered helical hairpins that are stacked perpendicular to each other. As a prelude to studying folding in confined spaces we used simulations to understand changes in hydrophobic and ionic interactions in nano-sized water droplets. Solvation of hydrophobic and charged species change drastically in nano-scale water droplets. Hydrophobic species are localized at the boundary. The tendency of ions to be at the boundary where water density is low increases as the charge density decreases. The interactions between hydrophobic, polar, and charged residue are also profoundly altered in confined spaces. Using the results of computer simulations and accounting for loss of chain entropy upon confinement we argue and then demonstrate, using simulations in explicit water, that ordered states of generic amphiphilic peptide sequences should be stabilized in cylindrical nanopores.

  6. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-09

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  7. The effect of geometrical presentation of multimodal cation-exchange ligands on selective recognition of hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Brown, Matthew R; Heden, Ryan; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-09-18

    The effects of spatial organization of hydrophobic and charged moieties on multimodal (MM) cation-exchange ligands were examined by studying protein retention behavior on two commercial chromatographic media, Capto™ MMC and Nuvia™ cPrime™. Proteins with extended regions of surface-exposed aliphatic residues were found to have enhanced retention on the Capto MMC system as compared to the Nuvia cPrime resin. The results further indicated that while the Nuvia cPrime ligand had a strong preference for interactions with aromatic groups, the Capto MMC ligand appeared to interact with both aliphatic and aromatic clusters on the protein surfaces. These observations were formalized into a new set of protein surface property descriptors, which quantified the local distribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic potentials as well as distinguishing between aromatic and aliphatic properties. Using these descriptors, high-performing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models (R(2)>0.88) were generated for both the Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime datasets at pH 5 and pH 6. Descriptors of electrostatic properties were generally common across the four models; however both Capto MMC models included descriptors that quantified regions of aliphatic-based hydrophobicity in addition to aromatic descriptors. Retention was generally reduced by lowering the ligand densities on both MM resins. Notably, elution order was largely unaffected by the change in surface density, but smaller and more aliphatic proteins tended to be more affected by this drop in ligand density. This suggests that modulating the exposure, shape and density of the hydrophobic moieties in multimodal chromatographic systems can alter the preference for surface exposed aliphatic or aromatic residues, thus providing an additional dimension for modulating the selectivity of MM protein separation systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Water in Oil Emulsions: A New System for Assembling Water-soluble Chlorophyll-binding Proteins with Hydrophobic Pigments.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Dominika; Noy, Dror

    2016-03-21

    Chlorophylls (Chls) and bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) are the primary cofactors that carry out photosynthetic light harvesting and electron transport. Their functionality critically depends on their specific organization within large and elaborate multisubunit transmembrane protein complexes. In order to understand at the molecular level how these complexes facilitate solar energy conversion, it is essential to understand protein-pigment, and pigment-pigment interactions, and their effect on excited dynamics. One way of gaining such understanding is by constructing and studying complexes of Chls with simple water-soluble recombinant proteins. However, incorporating the lipophilic Chls and BChls into water-soluble proteins is difficult. Moreover, there is no general method, which could be used for assembly of water-soluble proteins with hydrophobic pigments. Here, we demonstrate a simple and high throughput system based on water-in-oil emulsions, which enables assembly of water-soluble proteins with hydrophobic Chls. The new method was validated by assembling recombinant versions of the water-soluble chlorophyll binding protein of Brassicaceae plants (WSCP) with Chl a. We demonstrate the successful assembly of Chl a using crude lysates of WSCP expressing E. coli cell, which may be used for developing a genetic screen system for novel water-soluble Chl-binding proteins, and for studies of Chl-protein interactions and assembly processes.

  9. Single molecule force spectroscopy reveals critical roles of hydrophobic core packing in determining the mechanical stability of protein GB1.

    PubMed

    Bu, Tianjia; Wang, Hui-Chuan Eileen; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-21

    Understanding molecular determinants of protein mechanical stability is important not only for elucidating how elastomeric proteins are designed and functioning in biological systems but also for designing protein building blocks with defined nanomechanical properties for constructing novel biomaterials. GB1 is a small α/β protein and exhibits significant mechanical stability. It is thought that the shear topology of GB1 plays an important role in determining its mechanical stability. Here, we combine single molecule atomic force microscopy and protein engineering techniques to investigate the effect of side chain reduction and hydrophobic core packing on the mechanical stability of GB1. We engineered seven point mutants and carried out mechanical φ-value analysis of the mechanical unfolding of GB1. We found that three mutations, which are across the surfaces of two subdomains that are to be sheared by the applied stretching force, in the hydrophobic core (F30L, Y45L, and F52L) result in significant decrease in mechanical unfolding force of GB1. The mechanical unfolding force of these mutants drop by 50-90 pN compared with wild-type GB1, which unfolds at around 180 pN at a pulling speed of 400 nm/s. These results indicate that hydrophobic core packing plays an important role in determining the mechanical stability of GB1 and suggest that optimizing hydrophobic interactions across the surfaces that are to be sheared will likely be an efficient method to enhance the mechanical stability of GB1 and GB1 homologues.

  10. Perplexing cooperative folding and stability of a low-sequence complexity, polyproline 2 protein lacking a hydrophobic core.

    PubMed

    Gates, Zachary P; Baxa, Michael C; Yu, Wookyung; Riback, Joshua A; Li, Hui; Roux, Benoît; Kent, Stephen B H; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2017-02-28

    The burial of hydrophobic side chains in a protein core generally is thought to be the major ingredient for stable, cooperative folding. Here, we show that, for the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP), stability and cooperativity can occur without a hydrophobic core, and without α-helices or β-sheets. sfAFP has low sequence complexity with 46% glycine and an interior filled only with backbone H-bonds between six polyproline 2 (PP2) helices. However, the protein folds in a kinetically two-state manner and is moderately stable at room temperature. We believe that a major part of the stability arises from the unusual match between residue-level PP2 dihedral angle bias in the unfolded state and PP2 helical structure in the native state. Additional stabilizing factors that compensate for the dearth of hydrophobic burial include shorter and stronger H-bonds, and increased entropy in the folded state. These results extend our understanding of the origins of cooperativity and stability in protein folding, including the balance between solvent and polypeptide chain entropies.

  11. Expression and purification of short hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides with maltose-binding protein as a solubility tag.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Laure; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Hocquellet, Agnès; Cabanne, Charlotte; Bathany, Katell; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Garbay, Bertrand; Garanger, Elisabeth

    2015-06-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are biodegradable polymers with interesting physico-chemical properties for biomedical and biotechnological applications. The recombinant expression of hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides is often difficult because they possess low transition temperatures, and therefore form aggregates at sub-ambient temperatures. To circumvent this difficulty, we expressed in Escherichia coli three hydrophobic ELPs (VPGIG)n with variable lengths (n=20, 40, and 60) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). Fusion proteins were soluble and yields of purified MBP-ELP ranged between 66 and 127mg/L culture. After digestion of the fusion proteins by enterokinase, the ELP moiety was purified by using inverse transition cycling. The purified fraction containing ELP40 was slightly contaminated by traces of undigested fusion protein. Purification of ELP60 was impaired because of co-purification of the MBP tag during inverse transition cycling. ELP20 was successfully purified to homogeneity, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses. The transition temperature of ELP20 was measured at 15.4°C in low salt buffer. In conclusion, this method can be used to produce hydrophobic ELP of low molecular mass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using in situ X-ray reflectivity to study protein adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: benefits and limitations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andrew G; Kuzmenko, Ivan

    2013-04-30

    We have employed in situ X-ray reflectivity (IXRR) to study the adsorption of a variety of proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, myoglobin, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and immunoglobulin G) on model hydrophilic (silicon oxide) and hydrophobic surfaces (octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers), evaluating this recently developed technique for its applicability in the area of biomolecular studies. We report herein the highest resolution depiction of adsorbed protein films, greatly improving on the precision of previous neutron reflectivity (NR) results and previous IXRR studies. We were able to perform complete scans in 5 min or less with the maximum momentum transfer of at least 0.52 Å(-1), allowing for some time-resolved information about the evolution of the protein film structure. The three smallest proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, and myoglobin) were seen to deposit as fully hydrated, nondenatured molecules onto hydrophilic surfaces, with indications of particular preferential orientations. Time evolution was observed for both lysozyme and myoglobin films. The larger proteins were not observed to deposit on the hydrophilic substrates, perhaps because of contrast limitations. On hydrophobic surfaces, all proteins were seen to denature extensively in a qualitatively similar way but with a rough trend that the larger proteins resulted in lower coverage. We have generated high-resolution electron density profiles of these denatured films, including capturing the growth of a lysozyme film. Because the solution interface of these denatured films is diffuse, IXRR cannot unambiguously determine the film extent and coverage, a drawback compared to NR. X-ray radiation damage was systematically evaluated, including the controlled exposure of protein films to high-intensity X-rays and exposure of the hydrophobic surface to X-rays before adsorption. Our analysis showed that standard measuring procedures used for XRR studies may lead to altered protein films

  13. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties. PMID:26497062

  14. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-26

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  15. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  16. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  17. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  18. Properties of a new protein film from bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) and effect of CaCl₂ on its hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Arabestani, Akram; Kadivar, Mahdi; Shahedi, Mohmmad; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Porta, Raffaele

    2013-06-01

    This work was aimed to investigate the potential preparation of an edible film from bitter vetch seed proteins. The film was cast from bitter vetch protein concentrate (BPC) and glycerol. CaCl₂ at the ratio of 0.1-1% (w/w) of the BPC was tested to improve film properties, specially its hydrophobicity. Some physicochemical properties of the films obtained in the absence and presence of CaCl₂ were evaluated. The results indicated that moisture content, total soluble matter, water vapour permeability and contact angle of the films prepared in the presence of CaCl₂ were significantly modified in comparison with the control values, while their mechanical properties did not significantly change. The surface morphology of the films was also considerably affected by the presence of CaCl₂. Therefore, CaCl₂ could improve BPC-films barrier properties especially their hydrophobicity, even though calcium concentration seems to be a crucial factor.

  19. Hydrophobic tendency of polar group hydration as a major force in type I antifreeze protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Sharp, Kim A

    2005-05-01

    The random network model of water quantitatively describes the different hydration heat capacities of polar and apolar solutes in terms of distortions of the water-water hydrogen bonding angle in the first hydration shell (Gallagher and Sharp, JACS 2003;125:9853). The distribution of this angle in pure water is bimodal, with a low-angle population and high-angle population. Polar solutes increase the high-angle population while apolar solutes increase the low-angle population. The ratio of the two populations quantifies the hydrophobicity of the solute and provides a sensitive measure of water structural distortions. This method of analysis is applied to study hydration of type I thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from winter flounder and three quadruple mutants of four threonine residues at positions 2, 13, 24, and 35. Wild-type and two mutants (VVVV and AAAA) have antifreeze (thermal hysteresis) activity, while the other mutant (SSSS) has no activity. The analysis reveals significant differences in the hydration structure of the ice-binding site. For the SSSS mutant, polar groups have a typical polar-like hydration, that is, more high-angle H-bonds than bulk water. For the wild-type and active mutants, polar groups have unusual, very apolar-like hydration, that is, more low-angle H-bonds than bulk water. This pattern of hydration was seen previously in the structurally distinct type III THPs (Yang & Sharp Biophys Chem 2004;109:137), suggesting for the first time a general mechanism for different THP classes. The specific shape, residue size, and clustering of both polar and apoler groups are essential for an active ice binding surface.

  20. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport against its electrochemical gradient in cytochrome oxidase vesicles reconstituted with mitochondrial hydrophobic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosier, R.N.; Tucker, D.A.; Meerdink, S.; Jain, I.; Gunter, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    Control experiments verified that the energization conditions used produced appropriately oriented membrane potentials. Partially purified hydrophobic mitochondria protein complexes were found to be less effective than complex V. The reconstituted system showed cation selectivity since Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, and Rb/sup +/ were transported, while Na/sup +/ was not. Low levels of uncoupler, which did not affect oxidation rates, were found to partially inhibit Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake regardless of the membrane potential polarity. Uncoupling levels of uncoupler markedly inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake in internally negative cytochrome oxidase vesicles; however, inhibition in internally positive cytochrome oxidase vesicles was less relative to that at lower levels of uncoupler. The uncoupling combination of nigericin, valinomycin, and K/sup +/ was inhibitory to uptake regardless of membrane potential polarity. A reconstituted system of oxidative phosphorylation, which contains a hydrophobic protein fraction, energized with cytochrome oxidase similarly accumulated Ca/sup 2 +/ despite formation of an internally positive membrane potential. The results suggest that cytochrome oxidase, when coupled to appropriate hydrophobic mitochondrial proteins, can act as an electrogenic Ca/sup 2 +/ pump deriving its energy directly from electron transport. (JMT)

  1. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Aaron C; Castañeda, Carlos A; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, E Bertrand

    2014-08-12

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu-Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu-Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu-Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations.

  2. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2′-modifications and enhances antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Nichols, Joshua G.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2′-modifications in 2–5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2′-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2′-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2′-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2′-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2′ modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5′-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5′-LNA or 5′-cEt wings, but not with 5′-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  3. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  4. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  5. Preparation of a weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kailou; Yang, Fan; Xia, Hongjun; Wang, Fei; Song, Qingguo; Bai, Quan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 3-diethylamino-1-propyne was covalently bonded to the azide-silica by a click reaction to obtain a novel dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation with a ligand containing tertiary amine and two ethyl groups capable of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction functionalities, which can display hydrophobic interaction chromatography character in a high-salt-concentration mobile phase and weak anion exchange character in a low-salt-concentration mobile phase employed for protein separation. As a result, it can be employed to separate proteins with weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction modes, respectively. The resolution and selectivity of the stationary phase were evaluated in both hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange modes with standard proteins, respectively, which can be comparable to that of conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns. Therefore, the synthesized weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column can be used to replace two corresponding conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns to separate proteins. Based on this mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase, a new off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography technology using only a single dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column was developed. Nine kinds of tested proteins can be separated completely using the developed method within 2.0 h.

  6. Entropy reduction effect imposed by hydrogen bond formation on protein folding cooperativity: Evidence from a hydrophobic minimalist model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.; Garcia, Leandro G.; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F.

    2005-11-01

    Conformational restrictions imposed by hydrogen bond formation during protein folding are investigated by Monte Carlo simulations of a non-native-centric, two-dimensional, hydrophobic model in which the formation of favorable contacts is coupled to an effective reduction in lattice coordination. This scheme is intended to mimic the requirement that polar backbone groups of real proteins must form hydrogen bonds concomitantly to their burial inside the apolar protein core. In addition to the square lattice, with z=3 conformations per monomer, we use extensions in which diagonal step vectors are allowed, resulting in z=5 and z=7 . Thermodynamics are governed by the hydrophobic energy function, according to which hydrophobic monomers tend to make contacts unspecifically while the reverse is true for hydrophilic monomers, with the additional restriction that only contacts between monomers adopting one of zhhydrophobic model of 40 monomers and a more pronounced increase in cooperativity for a native-centric Go-model with the same native conformation, suggesting that this purely entropic effect is not an artifact of dimensionality and is likely to be of fundamental importance in the theoretical understanding of folding cooperativity.

  7. Tracking hydrophobicity state, aggregation behaviour and structural modifications of pork proteins under the influence of assorted heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Bhaskar; Rinnan, Åsmund; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    Structural modifications of pork proteins under an assortment of industrial heat treatments were studied. With raw as control, assorted heat treatments involved were 58, 80, 98 and 160°C for 72min, 118°C for 8min and 58°C for 17h, resembling most common processing procedures. Protein denaturation, surface protein hydrophobicity state and protein aggregation behaviour were investigated. Modifications and molecular chemistry in protein structures were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in order to extract relative proportions of β-sheet, α-helix and residual conformations. In comparison to uncooked samples, cooked ones showed more than two-fold increase in hydrophobicity and larger particles. Thermograms from differential scanning calorimetry showed endothermic transitions (positive enthalpy) indicating a different pattern of protein denaturation as a result of varied cooking temperatures and cooking times. Deconvolution and curve fitting procedures (R(2)=0.99) provided information on rise of the β-sheet to α-helix ratio that further confirmed aggregation with thermal rise and longer cooking time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  9. Application of a pH responsive multimodal hydrophobic interaction chromatography medium for the analysis of glycosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kallberg, K; Becker, K; Bülow, L

    2011-02-04

    Protein glycosylation has significant effects on the structure and function of proteins. The efficient separation and enrichment of glycoproteins from complex biological samples is one key aspect and represents a major bottleneck of glycoproteome research. In this paper, we have explored pH multimodal hydrophobic interaction chromatography to separate glycosylated from non-glycosylated forms of proteins. Three different proteins, ribonuclease, invertase and IgG, have been examined and different glycoforms have been identified. The media itself shows strong responsiveness to small variations in pH, which makes it possible to fine-tune the chromatographic conditions according to the properties of the protein isolated. Optimal glycoprotein separation has been obtained at pH 4. The pH responsive multimodal HIC medium in contrast to conventional HIC media is able to resolve contaminating DNA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption: Partition coefficients, interphase volumes, and free energies of adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A

    2006-12-01

    The solution-depletion method of measuring protein adsorption is implemented using SDS gel electrophoresis as a separation and quantification tool. Experimental method is demonstrated using lysozyme (15kDa), alpha-amylase (51kDa), human serum albumin (66kDa), prothrombin (72kDa), immunoglobulin G (160kDa), and fibrinogen (341kDa) adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to hydrophobic octyl-sepharose and silanized-glass particles. Interpretive mass-balance equations are derived from a model premised on the idea that protein reversibly partitions from bulk solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase volume separating the physical-adsorbent surface from bulk solution. Theory both anticipated and accommodated adsorption of all proteins to the two test surfaces, suggesting that the underlying model is descriptive of the essential physical chemistry of protein adsorption. Application of mass balance equations to experimental data quantify partition coefficients P, interphase volumes V(I), and the number of hypothetical layers M occupied by protein adsorbed within V(I). Partition coefficients quantify protein-adsorption avidity through the equilibrium ratio of interphase and bulk-solution-phase w/v (mg/mL) concentrations W(I) and W(B), respectively, such that P identical withW(I)/W(B). Proteins are found to be weak biosurfactants with 45proteins by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Proteins with molecular weight MW<100kDa occupy a single layer at surface saturation whereas the larger proteins IgG and fibrinogen required two layers.

  11. Interfacial energetics of globular–blood protein adsorption to a hydrophobic interface from aqueous-buffer solution

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anandi; Liu, Yi-Hsiu; Cha, Paul; Allara, David; Vogler, Erwin A

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of nine globular proteins with molecular weight (MW) spanning 10–1000 kDa confirm that interfacial energetics of protein adsorption to a hydrophobic solid/aqueous-buffer (solid–liquid, SL) interface are not fundamentally different than adsorption to the water–air (liquid–vapour, LV) interface. Adsorption dynamics dampen to a steady-state (equilibrium) within a 1 h observation time and protein adsorption appears to be reversible, following expectations of Gibbs' adsorption isotherm. Adsorption isotherms constructed from concentration-dependent advancing contact angles θa of buffered-protein solutions on methyl-terminated, self-assembled monolayer surfaces show that maximum advancing spreading pressure, Πamax, falls within a relatively narrow 10<Πamax<20mNm−1 band characteristic of all proteins studied, mirroring results obtained at the LV surface. Furthermore, Πa isotherms exhibited a ‘Traube-rule-like’ progression in MW similar to the ordering observed at the LV surface wherein molar concentrations required to reach a specified spreading pressure Πa decreased with increasing MW. Finally, neither Gibbs' surface excess quantities [Γsl−Γsv] nor Γlv varied significantly with protein MW. The ratio {[Γsl−Γsv]/Γlv}∼1, implying both that Γsv∼0 and chemical activity of protein at SL and LV surfaces was identical. These results are collectively interpreted to mean that water controls protein adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces and that the mechanism of protein adsorption can be understood from this perspective for a diverse set of proteins with very different composition. PMID:16849238

  12. Immobilizing PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers on hydrophobic surfaces and its effect on protein and platelet: a combined study using QCM-D and DPI.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Huang, Fujian; Hu, Yu; Jiang, Wei; Ji, Xiangling; Liang, Haojun; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-11-01

    Dual polarization interferometry was used to monitor the immobilization dynamics of four Pluronics on hydrophobic surfaces and to elucidate the effect of Pluronic conformation on protein adsorption. The proportion of hydrophobic chain segments and not the length of the hydrophobic chain can influence the chain densities of the Pluronics. The immobilized densities of the Pluronics resulted from competition between the hydration of polyethylene oxide (PEO) in the aqueous solution and the hydrophobic interaction of polypropylene oxide on the substrate. P-123 obtained the largest graft mass (2.89±0.25 ng/mm2) because of the dominant effect of hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic segments of P-123 were anchored slowly and step-wise on the C18 substrate. P-123 exhibited the largest hydrophobic chain segment proportion (propylene oxide/ethylene oxide=3.63) and formed a brush chain conformation, indicating excellent protein and platelet resistance. The result of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation further confirmed that the PEO conformation in P-123 on the substrate exhibited a relatively extended brush chain, and that L-35 showed relatively loose and pancake-like structures. The PEO in P-123 regulated the conformation to maintain the native conformation and resist the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Thus, the hemocompatibilities of the immobilized Pluronics were influenced by the proportion of hydrophobic chain segments and their PEO conformations.

  13. Water structure of a hydrophobic protein at atomic resolution: Pentagon rings of water molecules in crystals of crambin

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The water structure has been analyzed for a model of the protein crambin refined against 0.945-Å x-ray diffraction data. Crystals contain 32% solvent by volume, and 77% of the solvent molecules have been located—i.e., 2 ethanol molecules and 64 water molecules with 10-14 alternate positions. Many water oxygen atoms found form chains between polar groups on the surface of the protein. However, a cluster of pentagonal arrays made up of 16 water molecules sits at a hydrophobic, intermolecular cleft and forms a cap around the methyl group of leucine-18. Several waters in the cluster are hydrogen-bonded directly to the protein. Additional closed circular arrays, which include both protein atoms and other water oxygen atoms, form next to the central cluster. This water array stretches in the b lattice direction between groups of three ionic side chains. Images PMID:16593516

  14. Interactions between hydrophobic and ionic solutes in aqueous guanidinium chloride and urea solutions: lessons for protein denaturation mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward P; Dima, Ruxandra I; Brooks, Bernard; Thirumalai, D

    2007-06-13

    In order to clarify the mechanism of denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins we have calculated the interactions between hydrophobic and ionic species in aqueous guanidinium chloride and urea solutions using molecular dynamics simulations. Hydrophobic association is not significantly changed in urea or guanidinium chloride solutions. The strength of interaction between ion pairs is greatly diminished by the guanidinium ion. Although the changes in electrostatic interactions in urea are small, examination of structures, using appropriate pair functions, of urea and water around the solutes show strong hydrogen bonding between urea's carbonyl oxygen and the positively charged solute. Our results strongly suggest protein denaturation occurs by the direct interaction model according to which the most commonly used denaturants unfold proteins by altering electrostatic interactions either by solvating the charged residues or by engaging in hydrogen bonds with the protein backbone. To further validate the direct interaction model we show that, in urea and guanidinium chloride solutions, unfolding of an unusually stable helix (H1) from mouse PrPC (residues 144-153) occurs by hydrogen bonding of denaturants to charged side chains and backbone carbonyl groups.

  15. Protein-based emulsion electrosprayed micro- and submicroparticles for the encapsulation and stabilization of thermosensitive hydrophobic bioactives.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-03-01

    This work shows the potential of emulsion electrospraying of proteins using food-grade emulsions for the microencapsulation and enhanced protection of a model thermosensitive hydrophobic bioactive. Specifically, gelatin, a whey protein concentrate (WPC) and a soy protein isolate (SPI) were compared as emulsion stabilizers and wall matrices for encapsulation of α-linolenic acid. In a preliminary stage, soy bean oil was used as the hydrophobic component for the implementation of the emulsion electrospraying process, investigating the effect of protein type and emulsion protocol used (i.e. with or without ultrasound treatment) on colloidal stability. This oil was then substituted by the ω-3 fatty acid and the emulsions were processed by electrospraying and spray-drying, comparing both techniques. While the latter resulted in massive bioactive degradation, electrospraying proved to be a suitable alternative, achieving microencapsulation efficiencies (MEE) of up to ∼70%. Although gelatin yielded low MEEs due to the need of employing acetic acid for its processing by electrospraying, SPI and WPC achieved MEEs over 60% for the non-sonicated emulsions. Moreover, the degradation of α-linolenic acid at 80°C was significantly delayed when encapsulated within both matrices. Whilst less than an 8% of its alkene groups were detected after 27h of thermal treatment for free α-linolenic acid, up to 43% and 67% still remained intact within the electrosprayed SPI and WPC capsules, respectively.

  16. The Human Metapneumovirus Small Hydrophobic Protein Has Properties Consistent with Those of a Viroporin and Can Modulate Viral Fusogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Masante, Cyril; El Najjar, Farah; Chang, Andres; Jones, Angela; Moncman, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) encodes three glycoproteins: the glycoprotein, which plays a role in glycosaminoglycan binding, the fusion (F) protein, which is necessary and sufficient for both viral binding to the target cell and fusion between the cellular plasma membrane and the viral membrane, and the small hydrophobic (SH) protein, whose function is unclear. The SH protein of the closely related respiratory syncytial virus has been suggested to function as a viroporin, as it forms oligomeric structures consistent with a pore and alters membrane permeability. Our analysis indicates that both the full-length HMPV SH protein and the isolated SH protein transmembrane domain can associate into higher-order oligomers. In addition, HMPV SH expression resulted in increases in permeability to hygromycin B and alteration of subcellular localization of a fluorescent dye, indicating that SH affects membrane permeability. These results suggest that the HMPV SH protein has several characteristics consistent with a putative viroporin. Interestingly, we also report that expression of the HMPV SH protein can significantly decrease HMPV F protein-promoted membrane fusion activity, with the SH extracellular domain and transmembrane domain playing a key role in this inhibition. These results suggest that the HMPV SH protein could regulate both membrane permeability and fusion protein function during viral infection. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), first identified in 2001, is a causative agent of severe respiratory tract disease worldwide. The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is one of three glycoproteins encoded by all strains of HMPV, but the function of the HMPV SH protein is unknown. We have determined that the HMPV SH protein can alter the permeability of cellular membranes, suggesting that HMPV SH is a member of a class of proteins termed viroporins, which modulate membrane permeability to facilitate critical steps in a viral life cycle. We also demonstrated

  17. A dock and coalesce mechanism driven by hydrophobic interactions governs Cdc42 binding with its effector protein ACK.

    PubMed

    Tetley, George J N; Mott, Helen R; Cooley, R Neil; Owen, Darerca

    2017-07-07

    Cdc42 is a Rho-family small G protein that has been widely studied for its role in controlling the actin cytoskeleton and plays a part in several potentially oncogenic signaling networks. Similar to most other small G proteins, Cdc42 binds to many downstream effector proteins to elicit its cellular effects. These effector proteins all engage the same face of Cdc42, the conformation of which is governed by the activation state of the G protein. Previously, the importance of individual residues in conferring binding affinity has been explored for residues within Cdc42 for three of its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) effectors, activated Cdc42 kinase (ACK), p21-activated kinase (PAK), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). Here, in a complementary study, we have used our structure of Cdc42 bound to ACK via an intrinsically disordered ACK region to guide an analysis of the Cdc42 interface on ACK, creating a panel of mutant proteins with which we can now describe the complete energetic landscape of the Cdc42-binding site on ACK. Our data suggest that the binding affinity of ACK relies on several conserved residues that are critical for stabilizing the quaternary structure. These residues are centered on the CRIB region, with the complete binding region anchored at each end by hydrophobic interactions. These findings suggest that ACK adopts a dock and coalesce binding mechanism with Cdc42. In contrast to other CRIB-family effectors and indeed other intrinsically disordered proteins, hydrophobic residues likely drive Cdc42-ACK binding. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Two hydrophobic residues can determine the specificity of mitogen-activated protein kinase docking interactions.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2015-10-30

    MAPKs bind to many of their upstream regulators and downstream substrates via a short docking motif (the D-site) on their binding partner. MAPKs that are in different families (e.g. ERK, JNK, and p38) can bind selectively to D-sites in their authentic substrates and regulators while discriminating against D-sites in other pathways. Here we demonstrate that the short hydrophobic region at the distal end of the D-site plays a critical role in determining the high selectivity of JNK MAPKs for docking sites in their cognate MAPK kinases. Changing just 1 or 2 key hydrophobic residues in this submotif is sufficient to turn a weak JNK-binding D-site into a strong one, or vice versa. These specificity-determining differences are also found in the D-sites of the ETS family transcription factors Elk-1 and Net. Moreover, swapping two hydrophobic residues between these D-sites switches the relative efficiency of Elk-1 and Net as substrates for ERK versus JNK, as predicted. These results provide new insights into docking specificity and suggest that this specificity can evolve rapidly by changes to just 1 or 2 amino acids. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Two Hydrophobic Residues Can Determine the Specificity of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Docking Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Bardwell, A. Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2015-01-01

    MAPKs bind to many of their upstream regulators and downstream substrates via a short docking motif (the D-site) on their binding partner. MAPKs that are in different families (e.g. ERK, JNK, and p38) can bind selectively to D-sites in their authentic substrates and regulators while discriminating against D-sites in other pathways. Here we demonstrate that the short hydrophobic region at the distal end of the D-site plays a critical role in determining the high selectivity of JNK MAPKs for docking sites in their cognate MAPK kinases. Changing just 1 or 2 key hydrophobic residues in this submotif is sufficient to turn a weak JNK-binding D-site into a strong one, or vice versa. These specificity-determining differences are also found in the D-sites of the ETS family transcription factors Elk-1 and Net. Moreover, swapping two hydrophobic residues between these D-sites switches the relative efficiency of Elk-1 and Net as substrates for ERK versus JNK, as predicted. These results provide new insights into docking specificity and suggest that this specificity can evolve rapidly by changes to just 1 or 2 amino acids. PMID:26370088

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography as a technique to determine protein adsorption onto hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tongtong; Anselme, Karine; Sarrailh, Segolene; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-01-30

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) setup for quantification of adsorbed proteins on various type of plane substrates with limited area (<3 cm(2)). Protein quantification was investigated with a liquid chromatography chain equipped with a size exclusion column or a reversed-phase column. By evaluating the validation of the method according to guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH), all the results obtained by HPLC were reliable. By simple adsorption test at the contact of hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane: PDMS) surfaces, kinetics of adsorption were determined and amounts of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and lysozyme were obtained: as expected for each protein, the amount adsorbed at the plateau on glass (between 0.15 μg/cm(2) and 0.4 μg/cm(2)) is lower than for hydrophobic PDMS surfaces (between 0.45 μg/cm(2) and 0.8 μg/cm(2)). These results were consistent with bicinchoninic acid protein determination. According to ICH guidelines, both Reversed Phase and Size Exclusion HPLC can be validated for quantification of adsorbed protein. However, we consider the size exclusion approach more interesting in this field because additional informations can be obtained for aggregative proteins. Indeed, monomer, dimer and oligomer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were observed in the chromatogram. On increasing the temperature, we found a decrease of peak intensity of bovine serum albumin as well as the fraction of dimer and oligomer after contact with PDMS and glass surface. As the surface can act as a denaturation parameter, these informations can have a huge impact on the elucidation of the interfacial behavior of protein and in particular for aggregation processes in pharmaceutical applications.

  1. Hydrophobic cluster analysis: procedures to derive structural and functional information from 2-D-representation of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Lemesle-Varloot, L; Henrissat, B; Gaboriaud, C; Bissery, V; Morgat, A; Mornon, J P

    1990-08-01

    Hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) [15] is a very efficient method to analyse and compare protein sequences. Despite its effectiveness, this method is not widely used because it relies in part on the experience and training of the user. In this article, detailed guidelines as to the use of HCA are presented and include discussions on: the definition of the hydrophobic clusters and their relationships with secondary and tertiary structures; the length of the clusters; the amino acid classification used for HCA; the HCA plot programs; and the working strategies. Various procedures for the analysis of a single sequence are presented: structural segmentation, structural domains and secondary structure evaluation. Like most sequence analysis methods, HCA is more efficient when several homologous sequences are compared. Procedures for the detection and alignment of distantly related proteins by HCA are described through several published examples along with 2 previously unreported cases: the beta-glucosidase from Ruminococcus albus is clearly related to the beta-glucosidases from Clostridum thermocellum and Hansenula anomala although they display a reverse organization of their constitutive domains; the alignment of the sequence of human GTPase activating protein with that of the Crk oncogene is presented. Finally, the pertinence of HCA in the identification of important residues for structure/function as well as in the preparation of homology modelling is discussed.

  2. Amino acid contacts in proteins adapted to different temperatures: hydrophobic interactions and surface charges play a key role.

    PubMed

    Saelensminde, Gisle; Halskau, Øyvind; Jonassen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Thermophiles, mesophiles, and psychrophiles have different amino acid frequencies in their proteins, probably because of the way the species adapt to very different temperatures in their environment. In this paper, we analyse how contacts between sidechains vary between homologous proteins from species that are adapted to different temperatures, but displaying relatively high sequence similarity. We investigate whether specific contacts between amino acids sidechains is a key factor in thermostabilisation in proteins. The dataset was divided into two subsets with optimal growth temperatures from 0-40 and 35-102 degrees C. Comparison of homologues was made between low-temperature species and high-temperature species within each subset. We found that unspecific interactions like hydrophobic interactions in the core and solvent interactions and entropic effects at the surface, appear to be more important factors than specific contact types like salt bridges and aromatic clusters.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the effect of ligand homogeneity on protein behavior in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) is an adsorption chromatography combining hydrophobic interaction in adsorption with electrostatic repulsion in elution. Ligand density has significant effects on protein adsorption behavior, but little is understood about the effect of ligand homogeneity on surface morphology of ligands, protein conformational transition and dynamics within adsorbent pore due to the lack of microscopic experimental techniques. In the present study, a coarse-grained adsorbent pore model established in an earlier work is used to represent the actual porous adsorbent composed of matrix and immobilized HCIC ligands. Two adsorbent pores with different ligand distributions are constructed by adjusting the coupling sites, denoted as L1 and L2. In L1 the ligands are bonded uniformly while in L2 the ligands are arranged in lines in the axial direction and thus exhibit a heterogeneous distribution. Protein adsorption, desorption, and conformational transition in both L1 and L2 are shown by molecular dynamics simulations of a 46-bead beta-barrel coarse-grained model protein within the adsorbent pore models. The simulations indicate that ligand homogeneity has significant effect on both the irreversibility and the dynamics of adsorption while no obvious effect on protein conformation distribution. In comparison with L1, L2 leads to irreversible and slow adsorption, indicating the strict requirement of a suitable protein orientation to reach stable adsorption. The simulations have provided new insight into the microscopic behavior of HCIC, which would be beneficial to the rational design of adsorbents and parameter optimization for high-performance HCIC.

  4. Physical origin of hydrophobicity studied in terms of cold denaturation of proteins: comparison between water and simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    A clue to the physical origin of the hydrophobicity is in the experimental observations, which show that it is weakened at low temperatures. By considering a solvophobic model protein immersed in water and three species of simple solvents, we analyze the temperature dependence of the changes in free energy, energy, and entropy of the solvent upon protein unfolding. The angle-dependent and radial-symmetric integral equation theories and the morphometric approach are employed in the analysis. Each of the changes is decomposed into two terms, which depend on the excluded volume and on the area and curvature of the solvent-accessible surface, respectively. The excluded-volume term of the entropy change is further decomposed into two components representing the protein-solvent pair correlation and the protein-solvent-solvent triplet and higher-order correlation, respectively. We show that water crowding in the system becomes more serious upon protein unfolding but this effect becomes weaker as the temperature is lowered. If the hydrophobicity originated from the water structuring near a nonpolar solute, it would be strengthened upon lowering of the temperature. Among the three species of simple solvents, considerable weakening of the solvophobicity at low temperatures is observed only for the solvent where the particles interact through a strong attractive potential and the particle size is as small as that of water. Even in the case of this solvent, however, cold denaturation of a protein cannot be reproduced. It would be reproducible if the attractive potential was substantially enhanced, but such enhancement causes the appearance of the metastability limit for a single liquid phase.

  5. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  6. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  7. Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Isolation of a novel Ca2+-binding protein and protein kinase C from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M P; Valentine, K A; Ngai, P K; Carruthers, C A; Hollenberg, M D

    1984-11-15

    Several bovine brain proteins have been found to interact with a hydrophobic chromatography resin (phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These include calmodulin, the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) and a novel Ca2+-binding protein that has now been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. This latter protein is acidic (pI 5.1) and, like calmodulin and some other high-affinity Ca2+-binding proteins, exhibits a Ca2+-dependent mobility shift on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, with an apparent Mr of 22 000 in the absence of Ca2+ and Mr 21 000 in the presence of Ca2+. This novel calciprotein is distinct from known Ca2+-binding proteins on the basis of Mr under denaturing conditions, Cleveland peptide mapping and amino acid composition analysis. It may be a member of the calmodulin superfamily of Ca2+-binding proteins. This calciprotein does not activate two calmodulin-dependent enzymes, namely cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and myosin light-chain kinase, nor does it have any effect on protein kinase C. It may be a Ca2+-dependent regulatory protein of an as-yet-undefined enzymic activity. The Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase is also readily purified by Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography, during which it is easily separated from calmodulin. A preparation of protein kinase C that lacks contaminating kinase or phosphatase activities is thereby obtained rapidly and simply. Such a preparation is ideal for the study of phosphorylation reactions catalysed in vitro by protein kinase C.

  8. Release of antibiotics from collagen dressing.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, J; Antos-Bielska, M; Ołdak, E; Trafny, E A

    1997-01-01

    Our new collagen dressing has been developed recently. Three types (A, B, and C) of the dressing were prepared in this study. Each type contained bacitracin, neomycin or colistin. The antibiotic was input into: i. collagen sponge (CS)--type A, ii. layer of limited hydrophobicity (LLH)--type B, and iii. into both CS and LLH layers--type C. The final concentration of the antibiotic that resulted from the loading level was 2 mg/cm2 for the dressings of type A and B and 4 mg/cm2 for the dressing of type C. The antibiotics were then extracted from the pieces of dressings for two days through dialysis membrane. Susceptibility of 54 bacterial strains (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter) isolated from burn wounds were tested to the three antibiotics used for preparation of the dressings. The results of the study evidenced that efficiency of released of antibiotics into the extracts depended on the kind of antibiotic and on the type of dressing. The concentration of the antibiotics proved to be much higher than MIC90 values of the bacterial isolates tested in respect to their susceptibility. The dressing containing mixture of the three antibiotics in two layers--CS and LLH is now considered as potentially effective for care of infected wounds. It may be useful for the treatment of infected wounds or for profilaxis of contaminated wounds, ensuring: i. sufficient antimicrobial activity in wound, and ii. optimal wound environment for the presence of collagenic biomaterial on the damaged tissue.

  9. Characterization of hydrophobic-ligand-binding proteins of Taenia solium that are expressed specifically in the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Lee, E-G; Kim, S-H; Bae, Y-A; Wang, H; Yang, Y; Kong, Y

    2012-09-01

    Taenia solium, a causative agent of taeniasis and cysticercosis, has evolved a repertoire of lipid uptake mechanisms. Proteome analysis of T. solium excretory-secretory products (TsESP) identified 10 kDa proteins displaying significant sequence identity with cestode hydrophobic-ligand-binding-proteins (HLBPs). Two distinct 362- and 352-bp-long cDNAs encoding 264- and 258-bp-long open reading frames (87 and 85 amino acid polypeptides) were isolated by mining the T. solium expressed sequence tags and a cDNA library screening (TsHLBP1 and TsHLBP2; 94% sequence identity). They clustered into the same clade with those found in Moniezia expansa and Hymenolepis diminuta. Genomic structure analysis revealed that these genes might have originated from a common ancestor. Both the crude TsESP and bacterially expressed recombinant proteins exhibited binding activity toward 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS), which was competitively inhibited by oleic acid. The proteins also bound to cis-parinaric acid (cPnA) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid (16-AP), but showed no binding activity against 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino] undecanoic acid (DAUDA) and dansyl-DL-α-aminocaprylic acid (DACA). Unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) showed greater affinity than saturated FAs. The proteins were specifically expressed in adult worms throughout the strobila. The TsHLBPs might be involved in uptake and/or sequestration of hydrophobic molecules provided by their hosts, thus contributing to host-parasite interface interrelationships.

  10. Chemical studies of viral entry mechanisms: I. Hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions during Sendai virus membrane fusion. II. Kinetics of bacteriophage. lambda. DNA injection

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Sendai virus glycoprotein interactions with target membranes during the early stages of fusion were examined using time-resolved hydrophobic photoaffinity labeling with the lipid-soluble carbene generator 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m({sup 125}I) iodophenyl)diazirine. During Sendai virus fusion with liposomes composed of cardiolipin or phosphatidylserine, the viral fusion (F) protein is preferentially labeled at early time points, supporting the hypothesis that hydrophobic interaction of the fusion peptide at the N-terminus of the F{sub 1} subunit with the target membrane is an initiating event in fusion. Correlation of hydrophobic interactions with independently monitored fusion kinetics further supports this conclusion. The F{sub 1} subunit, containing the putative hydrophobic fusion sequence, is exclusively labeled, and the F{sub 2} subunit does not participate in fusion. Labeling shows temperature and pH dependence consistent with a need for protein conformational mobility and fusion at neutral pH. Higher amounts of labeling during fusion with CL vesicles than during virus-PS vesicle fusion reflects membrane packing regulation of peptide insertion into target membranes. Labeling of the viral hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) at low pH indicates that HN-mediated fusion is triggered by hydrophobic interactions. Controls for diffusional labeling exclude a major contribution from this source. Labeling during reconstituted Sendai virus envelope-liposome fusion shows that functional reconstitution involves protein retention of the ability to undergo hydrophobic interactions. Examination of Sendai virus fusion with erythrocyte membranes indicates that hydrophobic interactions also trigger fusion between biological membranes. The data show that hydrophobic fusion protein interaction with both artificial and biological membranes is a triggering event in fusion.

  11. Hydrophobic domains of mouse polyomavirus minor capsid proteins promote membrane association and virus exit from the ER.

    PubMed

    Huérfano, Sandra; Ryabchenko, Boris; Španielová, Hana; Forstová, Jitka

    2017-03-01

    The minor structural protein VP2 and its shorter variant, VP3, of mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) are essential for virus exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during viral trafficking to the nucleus. Here, we followed the role of putative hydrophobic domains (HD) of the minor proteins in membrane affinity and viral infectivity. We prepared variants of VP2, each mutated to decrease hydrophobicity of one of three predicted hydrophobic domains: VP2-mHD1, VP2-mHD2 or VP2-mHD3 mutated in HD1 (amino acids (aa) 60-101), HD2 (aa 125-165) or HD3 (aa 287-307), respectively. Transient production of the mutated proteins revealed that only VP2-mHD2 lost the affinity for intracellular membranes. Cytotoxicity connected with the ability of VP2/VP3 to perforate membranes decreased markedly for VP2-mHD2, but only slightly for VP2-mHD1. The mutant VP2-mHD3 exhibited properties similar to the wild-type protein. MPyV genomes, each carrying one of the mutations, were prepared for virus production. MPyV-mHD1 and MPyV-mHD2 viruses could be isolated, while the HD3 mutation in VP2/VP3 prevented virus assembly. We found that both MPyV-mHD1 and MPyV-mHD2 viruses arrived at the ER without delay and were processed by ER residential enzymes. However, the ability to associate with ER membranes was decreased in the case of MPyV-mHD1 and practically abolished in the case of MPyV-mHD2. Interestingly, while MPyV-mHD2 was not infectious, infection of MPyV-mHD1 virus was delayed. These findings reveal that HD2, common to both VP2 and VP3, is responsible for the membrane binding properties of the minor proteins, while HD1 of VP2 is likely required to stabilize VP2-membrane association and to enhance viral exit from the ER. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Contribution of the hydrophobic effect to protein stability: analysis based on simulations of the Ile-96----Ala mutation in barnase.

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, M; Wodak, S J; Tidor, B; Karplus, M

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to compute the difference in the unfolding free energy between wild-type barnase and the mutant in which Ile-96 is replaced by alanine. The simulations yield results (-3.42 and -5.21 kcal/mol) that compare favorably with experimental values (-3.3 and -4.0 kcal/mol). The major contributions to the free energy difference arise from bonding terms involving degrees of freedom of the mutated side chain and from nonbonded interactions of that side chain with its environment in the folded protein. By comparison with simulations of an extended peptide in the absence of solvent, used as a reference state, hydration effects are shown to play a minor role in the overall free energy balance for the Ile----Ala transformation. The implications of these results for our understanding of the hydrophobic effect and its contribution to protein stability are discussed. Images PMID:1961758

  13. Protein-surfactant interactions at hydrophobic interfaces studied with total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS).

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Andreas W; Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Elofsson, Ulla M; Callisen, Thomas H; Widengren, Jerker; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work was to study the dynamics of proteins near solid surfaces in the presence or absence of competing surfactants by means of total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). Two different proteins were studied, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL). A nonionic/anionic (C12E6/LAS) surfactant composition was used to mimic a detergent formulation and the surfaces used were C18 terminated glass. It was found that with increasing surfactant concentrations the term in the autocorrelation function (ACF) representing surface binding decreased. This suggested that the proteins were competed off the hydrophobic surface by the surfactant. When fitting the measured ACF to a model for surface kinetics, it was seen that with raised C12E6/LAS concentration, the surface interaction rate increased for both proteins. Under these experimental conditions this meant that the time the protein was bound to the surface decreased. At 10 microM C12E6/LAS the surface interaction was not visible for BSA, whereas it was still distinguishable in the ACF for TLL. This indicated that TLL had a higher affinity than BSA for the C18 surface. The study showed that TIR-FCS provides a useful tool to quantify the surfactant effect on proteins adsorption.

  14. Hydrophobin can prevent secondary protein adsorption on hydrophobic substrates without exchange.

    PubMed

    von Vacano, Bernhard; Xu, Rui; Hirth, Sabine; Herzenstiel, Ines; Rückel, Markus; Subkowski, Thomas; Baus, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    By combining several surface analytical tools, we show that an adsorbed layer of the protein H*Protein B prevents the adsorption of secondary proteins bovine serum albumin, casein, or collagen at low-salinity conditions and at pH 8. H*Protein B is an industrially producible fusion protein of the hydrophobin family, known for its high interfacial activity. While applications of hydrophobin have been reported to facilitate adhesion of proteins under different pH conditions, careful analysis by quartz-crystal microbalance and ellipsometry prove that no additional adsorption can be found on top of the H*Protein B layer in this study. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry proves that the hydrophobin layer stays intact even after hours of exposure to solutions of the secondary proteins and that no exchange of proteins can be detected.

  15. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions differentially tune membrane binding kinetics of the C2 domain of protein kinase Cα.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela M; Antal, Corina E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2013-06-07

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca(2+)-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca(2+)-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes.

  16. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Differentially Tune Membrane Binding Kinetics of the C2 Domain of Protein Kinase Cα*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela M.; Antal, Corina E.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca2+-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca2+-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes. PMID:23589289

  17. Fabrication and functionalization of single asymmetric nanochannels for electrostatic/hydrophobic association of protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mubarak; Bayer, Veronika; Schiedt, Birgitta; Neumann, Reinhard; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a facile and reproducible method for surfactant-controlled track-etching and chemical functionalization of single asymmetric nanochannels in PET (polyethylene terephthalate) membranes. Carboxyl groups present on the channel surface were converted into pentafluorophenyl esters using EDC/PFP (N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/pentafluorophenol) coupling chemistry. The resulting amine-reactive esters were further covalently coupled with ethylenediamine or propylamine in order to manipulate the charge polarity and hydrophilicity of the nanochannels, respectively. Characterization of the modified channels was done by measuring their current-voltage (I-V) curves as well as their permselectivity before and after the chemical modification. The electrostatic/hydrophobic association of bovine serum albumin on the channel surface was observed through the change in rectification behaviour upon the variation of pH values.

  18. Preferential melting of secondary structures during protein unfolding in different solvents: Competition between hydrophobic solvation and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Biman; Roy, Susmita; Ghosh, Rikhia

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous binary mixtures such as water-DMSO, water-urea, and water-ethanol are known to serve as denaturants of a host of proteins, although the detailed mechanism is often not known. Here we combine studies on several proteins in multiple binary mixtures to obtain a unified understanding of the phenomenon. We compare with experiments to support the simulation findings. The proteins considered include (i) chicken villin head piece (HP-36), (ii) immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), (iii) myoglobin and (iv) lysozyme. We find that for amphiphilic solvents like DMSO, the hydrophobic groups and the strong hydrogen bonding ability of the >S =O oxygen atom act together to facilitate the unfolding. However, the hydrophilic solvents like urea, due to the presence of more hydrophilic ends (C =O and two NH2) has a high propensity of forming hydrogen bonds with the side-chain residues and backbone of beta-sheet than the same of alpha helix. Such diversity among the unfolding pathways of a given protein in different chemical environments is especially characterized by the preferential solvation of a particular secondary structure.

  19. Influence of binding pH and protein solubility on the dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Pascal; Baumgartner, Kai; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is one of the most frequently used purification methods in biopharmaceutical industry. A major drawback of HIC, however, is the rather low dynamic binding capacity (DBC) obtained when compared to e.g. ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The typical purification procedure for HIC includes binding at neutral pH, independently of the proteins nature and isoelectric point. Most approaches to process intensification are based on resin and salt screenings. In this paper a combination of protein solubility data and varying binding pH leads to a clear enhancement of dynamic binding capacity. This is shown for three proteins of acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric points. High-throughput solubility screenings as well as miniaturized and parallelized breakthrough curves on Media Scout RoboColumns (Atoll, Germany) were conducted at pH 3-10 on a fully automated robotic workstation. The screening results show a correlation between the DBC and the operational pH, the protein's isoelectric point and the overall solubility. Also, an inverse relationship of DBC in HIC and the binding kinetics was observed. By changing the operational pH, the DBC could be increased up to 30% compared to the standard purification procedure performed at neutral pH. As structural changes of the protein are reported during HIC processes, the applied samples and the elution fractions were proven not to be irreversibly unfolded.

  20. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  1. Semi-automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column scouting used in the two-step purification of recombinant green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Stone, Orrin J; Biette, Kelly M; Murphy, Patrick J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in development other of HIC-compatible protein

  2. Semi-Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Scouting Used in the Two-Step Purification of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Methods and Results Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conclusions Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in

  3. Novel Asymmetric Wettable AgNPs/Chitosan Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Donghui; Lu, Zhong; Yang, Hao; Gao, Jingting; Chen, Rong

    2016-02-17

    A novel silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/chitosan composite dressing with asymmetric wettability surfaces was successfully prepared via a simple two-step method for biomedical applications as wound healing materials. First, AgNPs were assembled into the chitosan sponge which was prepared by lyophilization process. Then one side of the sponge was modified by a thin layer of stearic acid. The incorporation of AgNPs into chitosan dressing could enhance the antibacterial activity against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The asymmetric surface modification endows the dressing with both highly hydrophobic property and inherent hydrophilic nature of chitosan. The hydrophobic surface of the dressing shows waterproof and antiadhesion for contaminant properties, whereas the hydrophilic surface preserves its water-absorbing capability and efficiently inhibits the growth of bacteria. Furthermore, the AgNPs/chitosan composite dressing displays improved moisture retention and blood clotting ability compared to the unmodified dressings. Cytocompatibility test evaluated in vitro and in a wound infection model illustrates the nontoxic nature of the composite dressing. More importantly, the in vivo wound healing model evaluation in mice reveals that the asymmetric AgNPs/chitosan dressing promotes the wound healing and accelerates the reepithelialization and collagen deposition. The silver accumulation in mice body treated by the composite dressing is far lower than that of the clinically used Acasin nanosilver dressing treated mice. This work indicates the huge potential of the novel AgNPs/chitosan wound dressing with asymmetrical wettability for clinical use.

  4. Immunoassay of C-reactive protein by hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence using integrated electrodes with hydrophobic sample confinement.

    PubMed

    Ylinen-Hinkka, T; Niskanen, A J; Franssila, S; Kulmala, S

    2011-09-19

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was determined in the concentration range 0.01-10 mg L(-1) using hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with devices combining both working and counter electrodes and sample confinement on a single chip. The sample area on the electrodes was defined by a hydrophobic ring, which enabled dispensing the reagents and the analyte directly on the electrode. Immunoassay of CRP by HECL using integrated electrodes is a good candidate for a high-sensitivity point-of-care CRP-test, because the concentration range is suitable, miniaturisation of the measurement system has been demonstrated and the assay method with integrated electrodes is easy to use. High-sensitivity CRP tests can be used to monitor the current state of cardiovascular disease and also to predict future cardiovascular problems in apparently healthy people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Improper use of dressings].

    PubMed

    Candas, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Neither nurses nor doctors receive initial training in wounds and the use of dressings. They are however required in their daily practice to provide this type of care. Advances in wound healing techniques and the appearance of "modern" dressings offer a wide range of solutions to caregivers. Professionals must acquire skills in this area and make the best possible use of the dressings at their disposal to optimise the controlled wound healing.

  6. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  7. QID74 Cell wall protein of Trichoderma harzianum is involved in cell protection and adherence to hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Iván V; Rey, Manuel; Codón, Antonio C; Govantes, Javier; Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A; Benítez, Tahía

    2007-10-01

    Trichoderma is widely used as biocontrol agent against phytopathogenic fungi, and as biofertilizer because of its ability to establish mycorriza-like association with plants. The key factor to the ecological success of this genus is the combination of very active mycoparasitic mechanisms plus effective defense strategies induced in plants. This work, different from most of the studies carried out that address the attacking mechanisms, focuses on elucidating how Trichoderma is able to tolerate hostile conditions. A gene from Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413, qid74, was strongly expressed during starvation of carbon or nitrogen sources; it encoded a cell wall protein of 74kDa that plays a significant role in mycelium protection. qid74 was originally isolated and characterized, in a previous work, by a differential hybridization approach under simulated mycoparasitism conditions. Heterologous expression of Qid74 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicated that the protein, located in the cell wall, interfered with mating and sporulation but not with cell integrity. The qid74 gene was disrupted by homologous recombination and it was overexpressed by isolating transformants selected for the amdS gene that carried several copies of qid74 gene under the control of the pki promoter. Disruptants and transformants showed similar growth rate and viability when they were cultivated in different media, temperatures and osmolarities, or were subjected to different abiotic stress conditions. However, disruptants produced about 70% mass yield under any condition and were substantially more sensitive than the wild type to cell wall degradation by different lytic preparations. Transformants had similar mass yield and were more resistant to lytic enzymes but more sensitive to copper sulfate than the wild type. When experiments of adherence to hydrophobic surfaces were carried out, the disruptants had a reduced capacity to adhere, whereas that capacity in the overproducer transformants was

  8. Refined solution structure of type III antifreeze protein: hydrophobic groups may be involved in the energetics of the protein-ice interaction.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; DeLuca, C I; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1996-11-15

    Antifreeze proteins are found in certain fish inhabiting polar sea water. These proteins depress the freezing points of blood and body fluids below that of the surrounding sea water by binding to and inhibiting the growth of seed ice crystals. The proteins are believed to bind irreversibly to growing ice crystals in such a way as to change the curvature of the ice-water interface, leading to freezing point depression, but the mechanism of high-affinity ice binding is not yet fully understood. The solution structure of the type III antifreeze protein was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Twenty-two structures converged and display a root mean square difference from the mean of 0.26 A for backbone atoms and 0.62 A for all non-hydrogen atoms. The protein exhibits a compact fold with a relatively large hydrophobic core, several short and irregular beta sheets and one helical turn. The ice-binding site, which encompasses parts of the C-terminal sheet and a loop, is planar and relatively nonpolar. The site is further characterized by the low solvent accessibilities and the specific spatial arrangement of the polar side-chain atoms of the putative ice-binding residues Gln9, Asn14, Thr15, Thr18 and Gln44. In agreement with the adsorption-inhibition mechanism of action, interatomic distances between active polar protein residues match the spacing of water molecules in the prism planes (¿10&1macr;0¿) of the hexagonal ice crystal. The particular side-chain conformations, however, limit the number and strength of possible proten-ice hydrogen bonds. This suggests that other entropic and enthalpic contributions, such as those arising from hydrophobic groups, could play a role in the high-affinity protein-ice adsorption.

  9. Hydrophobic charge-induction resin with 5-aminobenzimidazol as the functional ligand: preparation, protein adsorption and immunoglobulin G purification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Tong, Hong-Fei; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-07-01

    A new hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography resin was prepared with 5-aminobenzimidazol as functional ligand and polyacrylic ester beads as matrix. Adsorption isotherms and adsorption in columns were investigated using human immunoglobulin G and bovine serum albumin as model proteins, and the influence of pH and NaCl concentration was discussed. Results showed that the ligand density was 195 μmol/mL gel, and protein selectivity can be improved by controlling pH and salt addition. An optimized purification process (sample loading at pH 8.0 with 0.2 M NaCl and elution at pH 5.0) was performed to purify human immunoglobulin G from bovine serum albumin containing feedstock, which resulted in human immunoglobulin G purity of 99.7% and recovery of 94.6%. A similar process was applied for the purification of monoclonal antibody from cell culture supernatant, which showed antibody purity of 94.9% and recovery of 92.5%. The results indicated that the new resin developed had comparable performance as Protein A chromatography and would be suitable for antibody purification from complex feedstock. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. 2D-IR spectroscopy of the sulfhydryl band of cysteines in the hydrophobic core of proteins.

    PubMed

    Koziński, M; Garrett-Roe, S; Hamm, P

    2008-06-26

    We investigate the sulfhydryl band of cysteines as a new chromophore for two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) studies of the structure and dynamics of proteins. Cysteines can be put at almost any position in a protein by standard methods of site-directed mutagenesis and, hence, have the potential to be an extremely versatile local probe. Although being a very weak absorber in aqueous environment, the sulfhydryl group gets strongly polarized when situated in an alpha-helix inside the hydrophobic core of a protein because of a strong hydrogen bond to the backbone carbonyl group. The extinction coefficient (epsilon=150 M(-1) cm(-1)) then is sufficiently high to perform detailed 2D-IR studies even at low millimolar concentrations. Using porcine (carbonmonoxy)hemoglobin as an example, which contains two such cysteines in its wild-type form, we demonstrate that spectral diffusion deduced from the 2D-IR line shapes reports on the overall-breathing of the corresponding alpha-helix. The vibrational lifetime of the sulfhydryl group (T1 approximately 6 ps) is considerably longer than that of the much more commonly used amide I mode (approximately 1.0 ps), thereby significantly extending the time window in which spectral diffusion processes can be observed. The experiments are accompanied by molecular dynamics simulations revealing a good overall agreement.

  11. Global human frequencies of predicted nuclear pathogenic variants and the role played by protein hydrophobicity in pathogenicity potential

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro; Triska, Petr; Rito, Teresa; van der Waerden, Agnes; Li, Biao; Radivojac, Predrag; Samuels, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are coded by nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genes, implying a complex cross-talk between the two genomes. Here we investigated the diversity displayed in 104 nuclear-coded mitochondrial proteins from 1,092 individuals from the 1000 Genomes dataset, in order to evaluate if these genes are under the effects of purifying selection and how that selection compares with their mitochondrial encoded counterparts. Only the very rare variants (frequency < 0.1%) in these nDNA genes are indistinguishable from a random set from all possible variants in terms of predicted pathogenicity score, but more frequent variants display distinct signs of purifying selection. Comparisons of selection strength indicate stronger selection in the mtDNA genes compared to this set of nDNA genes, accounted for by the high hydrophobicity of the proteins coded by the mtDNA. Most of the predicted pathogenic variants in the nDNA genes were restricted to a single continental population. The proportion of individuals having at least one potential pathogenic mutation in this gene set was significantly lower in Europeans than in Africans and Asians. This difference may reflect demographic asymmetries, since African and Asian populations experienced main expansions in middle Holocene, while in Europeans the main expansions occurred earlier in the post-glacial period. PMID:25412673

  12. Displacement chromatography of proteins using a retained pH front in a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Pinto, N D S; Frey, Douglas D

    2015-03-27

    The chromatographic separation of two proteins into a displacement train of two adjoined rectangular bands was accomplished using a novel method for hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) which employs a self-sharpening pH front as the displacer. This method exploits the fact that protein elution in HCIC is promoted by a pH change, but is relatively independent of salt effects, so that a retained pH front can be used in place of a traditional displacer in displacement chromatography. The retained pH front was produced using the two adsorbed buffering species tricine and acetic acid. The separation of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A into adjoined, rectangular bands was accomplished with overall recoveries based on the total mass injected greater than 90 and 70%, respectively. The addition of urea to the buffer system increased the sharpness of the pH front by 36% while the yields of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A based on the total mass eluted increased from 76% to 99% and from 37% to 85%, respectively, when the purities of both proteins in their product fractions were fixed at 85%. The results demonstrate that the method developed in this study is a useful variant of HCIC and is also a useful alternative to other displacement chromatography methods.

  13. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  14. Characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment via measuring contact angle of a water nanodroplet on planar peptide network

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chongqin; Gao, Yurui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobicity of macroscopic planar surface is conventionally characterized by the contact angle of water droplets. However, this engineering measurement cannot be directly extended to surfaces of proteins, due to the nanometer scale of amino acids and inherent nonplanar structures. To measure the hydrophobicity of side chains of proteins quantitatively, numerous parameters were developed to characterize behavior of hydrophobic solvation. However, consistency among these parameters is not always apparent. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative way of characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment by constructing a monolayer of amino acids (i.e., artificial planar peptide network) according to the primary and the β-sheet secondary structures of protein so that the conventional engineering measurement of the contact angle of a water droplet can be brought to bear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, contact angles θ of a water nanodroplet on the planar peptide network, together with excess chemical potentials of purely repulsive methane-sized Weeks−Chandler−Andersen solute, are computed. All of the 20 types of amino acids and the corresponding planar peptide networks are studied. Expectedly, all of the planar peptide networks with nonpolar amino acids are hydrophobic due to θ > 90°, whereas all of the planar peptide networks of the polar and charged amino acids are hydrophilic due to θ < 90°. Planar peptide networks of the charged amino acids exhibit complete-wetting behavior due to θ = 0°. This computational approach for characterization of hydrophobicity can be extended to artificial planar networks of other soft matter. PMID:27803319

  15. Characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment via measuring contact angle of a water nanodroplet on planar peptide network.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Gao, Yurui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-15

    Hydrophobicity of macroscopic planar surface is conventionally characterized by the contact angle of water droplets. However, this engineering measurement cannot be directly extended to surfaces of proteins, due to the nanometer scale of amino acids and inherent nonplanar structures. To measure the hydrophobicity of side chains of proteins quantitatively, numerous parameters were developed to characterize behavior of hydrophobic solvation. However, consistency among these parameters is not always apparent. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative way of characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment by constructing a monolayer of amino acids (i.e., artificial planar peptide network) according to the primary and the β-sheet secondary structures of protein so that the conventional engineering measurement of the contact angle of a water droplet can be brought to bear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, contact angles θ of a water nanodroplet on the planar peptide network, together with excess chemical potentials of purely repulsive methane-sized Weeks-Chandler-Andersen solute, are computed. All of the 20 types of amino acids and the corresponding planar peptide networks are studied. Expectedly, all of the planar peptide networks with nonpolar amino acids are hydrophobic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°, whereas all of the planar peptide networks of the polar and charged amino acids are hydrophilic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°. Planar peptide networks of the charged amino acids exhibit complete-wetting behavior due to θ [Formula: see text] 0°. This computational approach for characterization of hydrophobicity can be extended to artificial planar networks of other soft matter.

  16. An ant colony optimisation algorithm for the 2D and 3D hydrophobic polar protein folding problem

    PubMed Central

    Shmygelska, Alena; Hoos, Holger H

    2005-01-01

    Background The protein folding problem is a fundamental problems in computational molecular biology and biochemical physics. Various optimisation methods have been applied to formulations of the ab-initio folding problem that are based on reduced models of protein structure, including Monte Carlo methods, Evolutionary Algorithms, Tabu Search and hybrid approaches. In our work, we have introduced an ant colony optimisation (ACO) algorithm to address the non-deterministic polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) combinatorial problem of predicting a protein's conformation from its amino acid sequence under a widely studied, conceptually simple model – the 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) hydrophobic-polar (HP) model. Results We present an improvement of our previous ACO algorithm for the 2D HP model and its extension to the 3D HP model. We show that this new algorithm, dubbed ACO-HPPFP-3, performs better than previous state-of-the-art algorithms on sequences whose native conformations do not contain structural nuclei (parts of the native fold that predominantly consist of local interactions) at the ends, but rather in the middle of the sequence, and that it generally finds a more diverse set of native conformations. Conclusions The application of ACO to this bioinformatics problem compares favourably with specialised, state-of-the-art methods for the 2D and 3D HP protein folding problem; our empirical results indicate that our rather simple ACO algorithm scales worse with sequence length but usually finds a more diverse ensemble of native states. Therefore the development of ACO algorithms for more complex and realistic models of protein structure holds significant promise. PMID:15710037

  17. Adamantane-based amphiphiles (ADAs) for membrane protein study: importance of a detergent hydrophobic group in membrane protein solubilisation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Pil Seok; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Das, Manabendra

    2014-10-21

    We prepared adamantane-containing amphiphiles and evaluated them using a large membrane protein complex in terms of protein solubilisation and stabilization efficacy. These agents were superior to conventional detergents, especially in terms of the membrane protein solubilisation efficiency, implying a new detergent structure-property relationship.

  18. Protein Aggregation/Folding: The Role of Deterministic Singularities of Sequence Hydrophobicity as Determined by Nonlinear Signal Analysis of Acylphosphatase and Aβ(1–40)

    PubMed Central

    Zbilut, Joseph P.; Colosimo, Alfredo; Conti, Filippo; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Manetti, Cesare; Valerio, MariaCristina; Webber, Charles L.; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    The problem of protein folding vs. aggregation was investigated in acylphosphatase and the amyloid protein Aβ(1–40) by means of nonlinear signal analysis of their chain hydrophobicity. Numerical descriptors of recurrence patterns provided the basis for statistical evaluation of folding/aggregation distinctive features. Static and dynamic approaches were used to elucidate conditions coincident with folding vs. aggregation using comparisons with known protein secondary structure classifications, site-directed mutagenesis studies of acylphosphatase, and molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid protein, Aβ(1–40). The results suggest that a feature derived from principal component space characterized by the smoothness of singular, deterministic hydrophobicity patches plays a significant role in the conditions governing protein aggregation. PMID:14645049

  19. Concentration-dependent displacement of cholesterol in micelles by hydrophobic rice bran protein hydrolysates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent production of rice bran oil in Asia and the U.S. has resulted in large quantities of defatted rice bran as a low-value byproduct. Peptides from soy, milk, and other foods have been shown to have the potential hypocholesterolemic property and rice bran protein (RBP) may also contain bioact...

  20. The Dress Mess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1990-01-01

    Any restrictions on student dress must have a legitimate educational rationale. Standards of attire for school employees are also permissible. A dress-code policy that calls for reasonable restrictions and is enforced with common sense can create a better school environment. Restrictive measures can lead to costly lawsuits. Cites advantages of…

  1. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  2. Protein Denaturants at Aqueous–Hydrophobic Interfaces: Self-Consistent Correlation between Induced Interfacial Fluctuations and Denaturant Stability at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The notion of direct interaction between denaturing cosolvent and protein residues has been proposed in dialogue relevant to molecular mechanisms of protein denaturation. Here we consider the correlation between free energetic stability and induced fluctuations of an aqueous–hydrophobic interface between a model hydrophobically associating protein, HFBII, and two common protein denaturants, guanidinium cation (Gdm+) and urea. We compute potentials of mean force along an order parameter that brings the solute molecule close to the known hydrophobic region of the protein. We assess potentials of mean force for different relative orientations between the protein and denaturant molecule. We find that in both cases of guanidinium cation and urea relative orientations of the denaturant molecule that are parallel to the local protein–water interface exhibit greater stability compared to edge-on or perpendicular orientations. This behavior has been observed for guanidinium/methylguanidinium cations at the liquid–vapor interface of water, and thus the present results further corroborate earlier findings. Further analysis of the induced fluctuations of the aqueous–hydrophobic interface upon approach of the denaturant molecule indicates that the parallel orientation, displaying a greater stability at the interface, also induces larger fluctuations of the interface compared to the perpendicular orientations. The correlation of interfacial stability and induced interface fluctuation is a recurring theme for interface-stable solutes at hydrophobic interfaces. Moreover, observed correlations between interface stability and induced fluctuations recapitulate connections to local hydration structure and patterns around solutes as evidenced by experiment (Cooper et al., J. Phys. Chem. A2014, 118, 5657.) and high-level ab initio/DFT calculations (Baer et al., Faraday Discuss2013, 160, 89). PMID:25536388

  3. Comparative studies on the effect of growth conditions on adhesion, hydrophobicity, and extracellular protein profile of Streptococcus sanguis G9B.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, K W; Hardy, L N; Markevics, L J; Evans, J D; Wicken, A J

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguis G9B was grown in continuous culture at different generation times and pH values in media containing either glucose or fructose and differing in the concentrations of Na+ and K+. The growth pH, carbohydrate, and cation concentration each affected the yield of organisms, their ability to adhere to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads, and their hydrophobicity, as measured by adhesion to hexadecane. There was no correlation between adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads and hydrophobicity, the values for hydrophobicity varying between 44 and 83% for organisms that adhered poorly and between 24 and 75% for those that adhered effectively. For organisms grown in batch culture at pH 6.0 or 7.0 there was similarly no correlation between adhesion and hydrophobicity. The growth conditions also had a considerable influence on the production of extracellular protein. The total amount was greater at pH 7.5 than at other pH values, and there were also differences in the individual components in response to changes in generation time, pH, carbohydrate source, and cation concentration. Two protein bands were identified, namely, glucosyltransferase and protein P1 (also called antigen B or I/II). However, there was no correlation between a particular protein component and adhesion. Images PMID:4055033

  4. The chaplins: a family of hydrophobic cell-surface proteins involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Marie A.; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Huang, Jianqiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Kao, Camilla M.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor differentiates by forming specialized, spore-bearing aerial hyphae that grow into the air. Using microarrays, we identified genes that are down-regulated in a mutant unable to erect aerial hyphae. Through this route, we identified a previously unknown layer of aerial mycelium surface proteins (the “chaplins”). The chaplins share a hydrophobic domain of ∼40 residues (the “chaplin domain”), and all have a secretion signal. The five short chaplins (ChpD,E,F,G,H) have one chaplin domain, whereas the three long chaplins (ChpA,B,C) have two chaplin domains and a C-terminal “sorting signal” that targets them for covalent attachment to the cell wall by sortase enzyme. Expression of the two chaplin genes examined (chpE, chpH) depended on aerial hyphae formation but not sporulation, and egfp fusions showed their expression localized to aerial structures. Mass spectrometry of cell wall extracts confirmed that the short chaplins localized to the cell surface. Deletion of chaplin genes caused severe delays in aerial hyphae formation, a phenotype rescued by exogenous application of chaplin proteins. These observations implicate the chaplins in aerial mycelium formation, and suggest that coating of the envelope by the chaplins is required for aerial hyphae to grow out of the aqueous environment of the substrate mycelium into the air. PMID:12832397

  5. A key hydrophobic patch identified in an AAA⁺ protein essential for its in trans inhibitory regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Simpson, Timothy; Lawton, Edward; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Joly, Nicolas; Burrows, Patricia; Buck, Martin

    2013-08-09

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are a subclass of the AAA(+) (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) protein family. They are responsible for σ(54)-dependent transcription activation during infection and function under many stressful growth conditions. The majority of bEBPs are regulated in their formation of ring-shaped hexameric self-assemblies via an amino-terminal domain through its phosphorylation or ligand binding. In contrast, the Escherichia coli phage shock protein F (PspF) is negatively regulated in trans by phage shock protein A (PspA). Up to six PspA subunits suppress PspF hexamer action. Here, we present biochemical evidence that PspA engages across the side of a PspF hexameric ring. We identify three key binding determinants located in a surface-exposed 'W56 loop' of PspF, which form a tightly packed hydrophobic cluster, the 'YLW' patch. We demonstrate the profound impact of the PspF W56 loop residues on ATP hydrolysis, the σ(54) binding loop 1, and the self-association interface. We infer from single-chain studies that for complete PspF inhibition to occur, more than three PspA subunits need to bind a PspF hexamer with at least two binding to adjacent PspF subunits. By structural modelling, we propose that PspA binds to PspF via its first two helical domains. After PspF binding-induced conformational changes, PspA may then share structural similarities with a bEBP regulatory domain.

  6. Salts employed in hydrophobic interaction chromatography can change protein structure - insights from protein-ligand interaction thermodynamics, circular dichroism spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Komaromy, Andras Z; Kulsing, Chadin; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-03-01

    Key requirements of protein purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) are preservation of the tertiary/quaternary structure, maintenance of biological function, and separation of the correctly folded protein from its unfolded forms or aggregates. This study examines the relationship between the HIC retention behavior of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in high concentrations of several kosmotropic salts and its conformation, assessed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Further, the physicochemical properties of HEWL in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and magnesium chloride were investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at different temperatures. Radii of gyration were extrapolated from Guinier approximations and the indirect transform program GNOM with protein-protein interaction and contrast variation taken into account. A bead model simulation provided information on protein structural changes using ab initio reconstruction with GASBOR. These results correlated to the secondary structure content obtained from CD spectroscopy of HEWL. These changes in SAXS and CD data were consistent with heat capacity ΔCp -values obtained from van't Hoff plot analyses of the retention data. Collectively, these insights enable informed decisions to be made on the choice of chromatographic conditions, leading to improved separation selectivity and opportunities for innovative column-assisted protein refolding methods.

  7. A hydrophobic loop in acyl-CoA binding protein is functionally important for binding to palmitoyl-coenzyme A: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F G; Grigera, J Raúl; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2008-04-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in lipid metabolism, interacting via a partly unknown mechanism with high affinity with long chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs). At present there is no study of the microscopic way ligand binding is accomplished. We analyzed this process by molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations. We proposed a computational model of ligand, able to reproduce some evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, quantitative time resolved fluorometry and X-ray crystallography. We found that a hydrophobic loop, not in the active site, is important for function. Besides, multiple sequence alignment shows hydrophobicity (and not the residues itselves) conservation.

  8. Design and construction of glutamine binding proteins with a self-adhering capability to unmodified hydrophobic surfaces as reagentless fluorescence sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akira; Mie, Masayasu; Aizawa, Masuo; Lahoud, Pedro; Cass, Anthony E G; Kobatake, Eiry

    2003-12-31

    The chemically and genetically remodeling of proteins with ligand binding specificities can be utilized to synthesize various protein-based microsensors for detecting single biomolecules. Here, we describe the construction and characterization of fluorophore-labeled glutamine binding proteins (QBP) and derivatives coupled to the independently designed hydrophobic polypeptide (E12) that can adhere onto solid surfaces via hydrophobic interactions. The single cysteine mutant (N160C QBP) modified with the three environmentally sensitive fluorescent dyes (IAANS, acrylodan, and IANBD ester) showed increased changes in fluorescence intensity induced by glutamine binding. The use of these conjugates as reagentless fluorescence sensors enables us to determine the glutamine concentrations (0.1-50 microM) in homogeneous solution. The fusion of N160C QBP with E12, (Gly4-Ser)n spacers (GSn), and IANBD resulted in the novel fluorescence sensing elements having an adhering capability to hydrophobic surfaces of unmodified microplates. In ELISA and fluorescence experiments for the microplates treated with a series of the conjugates, IANBD-labeled N160C QBP-GS1-E12 displayed the best reproducibility in adhesion onto the hydrophobic surfaces and the precise correlation between fluorescence changes and glutamine concentrations. The performance of the biosensor-attached microplate for glutamine titrations demonstrated that the hydrophobic interaction of E12 with solid surfaces is useful for effective immobilization of proteins that need specific conformational movements in recognizing particular biomolecules. Therefore, the technique using E12 as a surface-linking domain for protein adhesion onto unmodified substrates could be applied effectively to prepare microplates/arrays for a wide variety of high-throughput assays on chemical and biological samples.

  9. Hydrophobic-domain-dependent protein-protein interactions mediate the localization of GPAT enzymes to ER subdomains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic network that consists of numerous regions or subdomains with discrete morphological features and functional properties, including those involved in protein and oil-body formation, anterograde transport of secretory proteins, the exchange of macromolecules ...

  10. Destabilizing polymorphism in cervid prion protein hydrophobic core determines prion conformation and conversion efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hannaoui, Samia; Amidian, Sara; Cheng, Yo Ching; Duque Velásquez, Camilo; Law, Sampson; Telling, Glenn; Stepanova, Maria; McKenzie, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals caused by misfolded forms of the cellular prion protein PrPC. Prions cause disease by converting PrPC into aggregation-prone PrPSc. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the most contagious prion disease with substantial lateral transmission, affecting free-ranging and farmed cervids. Although the PrP primary structure is highly conserved among cervids, the disease phenotype can be modulated by species-specific polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. How the resulting amino-acid substitutions impact PrPC and PrPSc structure and propagation is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of the cervid 116A>G substitution, located in the most conserved PrP domain, on PrPC structure and conversion and on 116AG-prion conformation and infectivity. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed structural de-stabilization of 116G-PrP, which enhanced its in vitro conversion efficiency when used as recombinant PrP substrate in real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). We demonstrate that 116AG-prions are conformationally less stable, show lower activity as a seed in RT-QuIC and exhibit reduced infectivity in vitro and in vivo. Infectivity of 116AG-prions was significantly enhanced upon secondary passage in mice, yet conformational features were retained. These findings indicate that structurally de-stabilized PrPC is readily convertible by cervid prions of different genetic background and results in a prion conformation adaptable to cervid wild-type PrP. Conformation is an important criterion when assessing transmission barrier, and conformational variants can target a different host range. Therefore, a thorough analysis of CWD isolates and re-assessment of species-barriers is important in order to fully exclude a zoonotic potential of CWD. PMID:28800624

  11. Role of hydrophobic core on the thermal stability of proteins - molecular dynamics simulations on a single point mutant of Sso7d abstract.

    PubMed

    Priyakumar, U Deva

    2012-01-01

    The role of salt bridges in chromatin protein Sso7d, from S. solfataricus has previously been shown to be crucial for its unusual high thermal stability. Experimental studies have shown that single site mutation of Sso7d (F31A) leads to a substantial decrease in the thermal stability of this protein due to distortion of the hydrophobic core. In the present study, we have performed a total of 0.2 s long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on F31A at room temperature, and at 360 K, close to the melting temperature of the wild type (WT) protein to investigate the role of hydrophobic core on protein stability. Sso7d-WT was shown to be stable at both 300 and 360 K; however, F31A undergoes denaturation at 360 K, consistent with experimental results. The structural and energetic properties obtained using the analysis of MD trajectories indicate that the single mutation results in high flexibility of the protein, and loosening of intramolecular interactions. Correlation between the dynamics of the salt bridges with the structural transitions and the unfolding pathway indicate the importance of both salt bridges and hydrophobic in effecting thermal stability of proteins in general.

  12. Cerato-populin and cerato-platanin, two non-catalytic proteins from phytopathogenic fungi, interact with hydrophobic inanimate surfaces and leaves.

    PubMed

    Martellini, Federica; Faoro, Franco; Carresi, Lara; Pantera, Barbara; Baccelli, Ivan; Maffi, Dario; Tiribilli, Bruno; Sbrana, Francesca; Luti, Simone; Comparini, Cecilia; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Cappugi, Gianni; Scala, Aniello; Pazzagli, Luigia

    2013-09-01

    Based on sequence homology, several fungal Cys-rich secreted proteins have been grouped in the cerato-platanin (CP) family, which comprises at least 40 proteins involved mainly in eliciting defense-related responses. The core member of this family is cerato-platanin, a moderately hydrophobic protein with a double ψ-β barrel fold. CP and the recently identified orthologous cerato-populin (Pop1) are involved in host-fungus interaction, and can be considered non-catalytic fungal PAMPs. CP is more active in inducing defense when in an aggregated conformation than in its native form, but little is known about other CP-orthologous proteins. Here, we cloned, expressed, and purified recombinant Pop1, which was used to characterize the protein aggregates. Our results suggest that the unfolded, self-assembled Pop1 is more active in inducing defense, and that the unfolding process can be induced by interaction with hydrophobic inanimate surfaces such as Teflon, treated mica, and gold sheets. In vivo, we found that both CP and Pop1 interact with the hydrophobic cuticle of leaves. Therefore, we propose that the interaction of these proteins with host cuticle waxes could induce unfolding and consequently trigger their PAMP-like activity.

  13. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  14. Relevance of structural segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A; de Araújo, Antônio F Pereira

    2003-05-01

    The relevance of inside-outside segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model is probed by complete enumeration of two-dimensional chains of up to 18 monomers in the square lattice. The exact computation of Z scores for uniquely designed sequences confirms that Z tends to decrease linearly with sigma square root of N, as previously suggested by theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations, where sigma, the standard deviation of the number of contacts made by different monomers in the target structure, is a measure of structural segregation and N is the chain length. The probability that the target conformation is indeed the unique global energy minimum of the designed sequence is found to increase dramatically with sigma, approaching unity at maximal segregation. However, due to the huge number of conformations with sub-maximal values of sigma, which correspond to intermediate, only mildly discriminative, values of Z, in addition to significant oscillations of Z around its estimated value, the probability that a correctly designed sequence corresponds to a maximally segregated conformation is small. This behavior of Z also explains the observed relation between sigma and different measures of folding cooperativity of correctly designed sequences.

  15. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  16. The cost of living in the membrane: A case study of hydrophobic mismatch for the multi-segment protein LeuT

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sayan; Khelashvili, George; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2013-01-01

    Many observations of the role of the membrane in the function and organization of transmembrane (TM) proteins have been explained in terms of hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane and the inserted protein. For a quantitative investigation of this mechanism in the lipid-protein interactions of functionally relevant conformations adopted by a multi-TM segment protein, the bacterial Leucine Transporter (LeuT), we employed a novel method, Continuum-Molecular Dynamics (CTMD), that quantifies the energetics of hydrophobic mismatch by combining the elastic continuum theory of membrane deformations with an atomistic level description of the radially asymmetric membrane-protein interface from MD simulations. LeuT has been serving as a model for structure-function studies of the mammalian Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs), such as the dopamine and serotonin transporters, which are the subject of intense research in the field of neurotransmission. The membrane models in which LeuT was embedded for these studies were composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid, or 3:1 mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) lipids. The results show that deformation of the host membrane alone is not sufficient to alleviate the hydrophobic mismatch at specific residues of LeuT. The calculations reveal significant membrane thinning and water penetration due to the specific local polar environment produced by the charged K288 of TM7 in LeuT, that is membrane-facing deep inside the hydrophobic milieu of the membrane. This significant perturbation is shown to result in unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at neighboring hydrophobic residues in TM1a and TM7. We show that all the effects attributed to the K288 residue (membrane thinning, water penetration, and the unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at TM1a and TM7), are abolished in calculations with the

  17. The cost of living in the membrane: a case study of hydrophobic mismatch for the multi-segment protein LeuT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sayan; Khelashvili, George; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2013-04-01

    Many observations of the role of the membrane in the function and organization of transmembrane (TM) proteins have been explained in terms of hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane and the inserted protein. For a quantitative investigation of this mechanism in the lipid-protein interactions of functionally relevant conformations adopted by a multi-TM segment protein, the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), we employed a novel method, Continuum-Molecular Dynamics (CTMD), that quantifies the energetics of hydrophobic mismatch by combining the elastic continuum theory of membrane deformations with an atomistic level description of the radially asymmetric membrane-protein interface from MD simulations. LeuT has been serving as a model for structure-function studies of the mammalian neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs), such as the dopamine and serotonin transporters, which are the subject of intense research in the field of neurotransmission. The membrane models in which LeuT was embedded for these studies were composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid, or 3:1 mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) lipids. The results show that deformation of the host membrane alone is not sufficient to alleviate the hydrophobic mismatch at specific residues of LeuT. The calculations reveal significant membrane thinning and water penetration due to the specific local polar environment produced by the charged K288 of TM7 in LeuT, that is membrane-facing deep inside the hydrophobic milieu of the membrane. This significant perturbation is shown to result in unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at neighboring hydrophobic residues in TM1a and TM7. We show that all the effects attributed to the K288 residue (membrane thinning, water penetration, and the unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at TM1a and TM7), are abolished in calculations with the

  18. Ion-specific induced fluctuations and free energetics of aqueous protein hydrophobic interfaces: toward connecting to specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Peters, Eric; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-05-01

    We explore anion-induced interface fluctuations near protein-water interfaces using coarse-grained representations of interfaces as proposed by Willard and Chandler ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2010 , 114 , 1954 - 1958 ). We use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics to compute potentials of mean force along a reaction coordinate bridging the state where the anion is fully solvated and one where it is biased via harmonic restraints to remain at the protein-water interface. Specifically, we focus on fluctuations of an interface between water and a hydrophobic region of hydrophobin-II (HFBII), a 71 amino acid residue protein expressed by filamentous fungi and known for its ability to form hydrophobically mediated self-assemblies at interfaces such as a water/air interface. We consider the anions chloride and iodide that have been shown previously by simulations as displaying specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces. We find that as in the case of a pure liquid-vapor interface, at the hydrophobic protein-water interface, the larger, less charge-dense iodide anion displays a marginal interfacial stability compared with that of the smaller, more charge-dense chloride anion. Furthermore, consistent with the results at aqueous liquid-vapor interfaces, we find that iodide induces larger fluctuations of the protein-water interface than chloride.

  19. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining.

  20. NPPD: A Protein-Protein Docking Scoring Function Based on Dyadic Differences in Networks of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Amino Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Edward S. C.; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking (PPD) predictions usually rely on the use of a scoring function to rank docking models generated by exhaustive sampling. To rank good models higher than bad ones, a large number of scoring functions have been developed and evaluated, but the methods used for the computation of PPD predictions remain largely unsatisfactory. Here, we report a network-based PPD scoring function, the NPPD, in which the network consists of two types of network nodes, one for hydrophobic and the other for hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the nodes are connected when the residues they represent are within a certain contact distance. We showed that network parameters that compute dyadic interactions and those that compute heterophilic interactions of the amino acid networks thus constructed allowed NPPD to perform well in a benchmark evaluation of 115 PPD scoring functions, most of which, unlike NPPD, are based on some sort of protein-protein interaction energy. We also showed that NPPD was highly complementary to these energy-based scoring functions, suggesting that the combined use of conventional scoring functions and NPPD might significantly improve the accuracy of current PPD predictions. PMID:25811640

  1. Potential of mean force between hydrophobic solutes in the Jagla model of water and implications for cold denaturation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Weiner, Saul; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Stanley, H Eugene; Sastry, Srikanth

    2012-01-28

    Using the Jagla model potential we calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) between hard sphere solutes immersed in a liquid displaying water-like properties. Consistent estimates of the PMF are obtained by (a) umbrella sampling, (b) calculating the work done by the mean force acting on the hard spheres as a function of their separation, and (c) determining the position dependent chemical potential after calculating the void space in the liquid. We calculate the PMF for an isobar along which cold denaturation of a model protein has previously been reported. We find that the PMF at contact varies non-monotonically, which is consistent with the observed cold denaturation. The Henry constant also varies non-monotonically with temperature. We find, on the other hand, that a second (solvent separated) minimum of the PMF becomes deeper as temperature decreases. We calculate the solvent-solvent pair correlation functions for solvents near the solute and in the bulk, and show that, as temperature decreases, the two pair correlation functions become indistinguishable, suggesting that the perturbation of solvent structure by the solute diminishes as temperature decreases. The solvent-solute pair correlation function at contact grows as the temperature decreases. We calculate the cavity correlation function and show the development of a solvent-separated peak upon decrease of temperature. These observations together suggest that cold denaturation occurs when the solvent penetrates between hydrophobic solutes in configurations with favorable free energy. Our results thus suggest that cold denatured proteins are structured and that cold denaturation arises from strong solvent-solute interactions, rather than from entropic considerations as in heat denaturation. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  2. Hydrophobic drug-triggered self-assembly of nanoparticles from silk-elastin-like protein polymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Ming; Lin, Yinan; Xu, Qiaobing; Kaplan, David L

    2014-03-10

    Silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs) combine the mechanical and biological properties of silk and elastin. These properties have led to the development of various SELP-based materials for drug delivery. However, SELPs have rarely been developed into nanoparticles, partially due to the complicated fabrication procedures, nor assessed for potential as an anticancer drug delivery system. We have recently constructed a series of SELPs (SE8Y, S2E8Y, and S4E8Y) with various ratios of silk to elastin blocks and described their capacity to form micellar-like nanoparticles upon thermal triggering. In this study, we demonstrate that doxorubicin, a hydrophobic antitumor drug, can efficiently trigger the self-assembly of SE8Y (SELPs with silk to elastin ratio of 1:8) into uniform micellar-like nanoparticles. The drug can be loaded in the SE8Y nanoparticles with an efficiency around 6.5% (65 ng doxorubicin/μg SE8Y), S2E8Y with 6%, and S4E8Y with 4%, respectively. In vitro studies with HeLa cell lines demonstrate that the protein polymers are not cytotoxic (IC50 > 200 μg/mL), while the doxorubicin-loaded SE8Y nanoparticles showed a 1.8-fold higher cytotoxicity than the free drug. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry indicate significant uptake of the SE8Y nanoparticles by the cells and suggest internalization of the nanoparticles through endocytosis. This study provides an all-aqueous, facile method to prepare nanoscale, drug-loaded SELPs packages with potential for tumor cell treatments.

  3. Dress Codes for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Second Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding right of school boards to adopt "reasonable" regulations governing teacher dress or hairstyle. Case offers the most exhaustive judicial examination of the issue to date. (Author/PKP)

  4. Altering Hydrophobic Sequence Lengths Shows That Hydrophobic Mismatch Controls Affinity for Ordered Lipid Domains (Rafts) in the Multitransmembrane Strand Protein Perfringolysin O*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that mismatch between transmembrane (TM) length and bilayer width controls TM protein affinity for ordered lipid domains (rafts) was tested using perfringolysin O (PFO), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin. PFO forms a multimeric barrel with many TM segments. The properties of PFO mutants with lengthened or shortened TM segments were compared with that of PFO with wild type TM sequences. Both mutant and wild type length PFO exhibited cholesterol-dependent membrane insertion. Maximal PFO-induced pore formation occurred in vesicles with wider bilayers for lengthened TM segments and in thinner bilayers for shortened TM segments. In diC18:0 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/diC14:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which form ordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer, affinity for ordered domains was greatest with lengthened TM segments and least with shortened TM segments as judged by FRET. Similar results were observed by microscopy in giant vesicles containing sphingomyelin in place of diC18:0 PC. In contrast, in diC16:0 PC/diC14:0 PC/diC20:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which should form ordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer, relative affinity for ordered domains was greatest with shortened TM segments and least with lengthened TM segments. The inability of multi-TM segment proteins (unlike single TM segment proteins) to adapt to mismatch by tilting may explain the sensitivity of raft affinity to mismatch. The difference in width sensitivity for single and multi-TM helix proteins may link raft affinity to multimeric state and thus control the assembly of multimeric TM complexes in rafts. PMID:23150664

  5. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation=0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  6. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  7. The fuzzy oil drop model, based on hydrophobicity density distribution, generalizes the influence of water environment on protein structure and function.

    PubMed

    Banach, Mateusz; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we show that the fuzzy oil drop model represents a general framework for describing the generation of hydrophobic cores in proteins and thus provides insight into the influence of the water environment upon protein structure and stability. The model has been successfully applied in the study of a wide range of proteins, however this paper focuses specifically on domains representing immunoglobulin-like folds. Here we provide evidence that immunoglobulin-like domains, despite being structurally similar, differ with respect to their participation in the generation of hydrophobic core. It is shown that β-structural fragments in β-barrels participate in hydrophobic core formation in a highly differentiated manner. Quantitatively measured participation in core formation helps explain the variable stability of proteins and is shown to be related to their biological properties. This also includes the known tendency of immunoglobulin domains to form amyloids, as shown using transthyretin to reveal the clear relation between amyloidogenic properties and structural characteristics based on the fuzzy oil drop model.

  8. Conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP/β-sheet domain of cyclase-associated protein are involved in actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2017-09-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a multidomain protein that promotes actin filament dynamics. The C-terminal region of CAP contains a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 protein (CARP) domain (or a β-sheet domain), which binds to actin monomer and is essential for enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. However, how the CARP domain binds to actin is not clearly understood. Here, we report that conserved hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain play important roles in the function of CAP to regulate actin dynamics. Single mutations of three conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic residues in the CARP domain of CAS-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans CAP, significantly reduce its binding to actin monomers and suppress its nucleotide exchange activity on actin. As a result, these mutants are weaker than wild-type to compete with ADF/cofilin to promote recycling of actin monomers for polymerization. A double mutation (V367A/I373A) eliminates these actin-regulatory functions of CAS-2. These hydrophobic residues and previously identified functional residues are scattered on a concave β-sheet of the CARP domain, suggesting that a wide area of the β-sheet is involved in binding to actin. These observations suggest that the CARP domain of CAP binds to actin in a distinct manner from other known actin-binding proteins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH OF BIOLOGICAL DRESSING].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Hao, Jianbo; Zhang, Jinpeng; Luo, Bo; Liu, Peng

    2015-02-01

    To review the research progress of modern biological dressings. The related literature at home and abroad was reviewed, analyzed, and summarized in the progress of biological dressing situation and various types of biological dressing research. Compared with the traditional dressing, the biological dressing can greatly promote wound healing. Biological dressings are mainly divided into the natural materials, artificial synthetic materials, and drug loaded dressings. The natural material dressings are mainly the alginate dressing, this kind of dressing can promote wound healing, which has been confirmed by a large number of studies. The artificial synthetic materials include film dressings, liquid, water colloids, gels, and foam, each has its own advantages and disadvantages, which can be chosen according to need. The drug dressing can play the role of drug loading, and further promote the wound healing; using microcapsule technology to construct the dressing and choosing Chinese medicine as drugs is the research direction of load. The experiment and clinical application of biological dressing are many types, clinical application prospect is wide, but each has its own advantages and disadvantages, further study is needed to improve its efficacy.

  10. Hydrophobic clustering in nonnative states of a protein: Interpretation of chemical shifts in NMR spectra of denatured states of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, P.A.; Topping, K.D.; Woolfson, D.N.; Dobson, C.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Chemical shifts of resonances of specific protons in the 1H NMR spectrum of thermally denatured hen lysozyme have been determined by exchange correlation with assigned native state resonances in 2D NOESY spectra obtained under conditions where the two states are interconverting. There are subtle but widespread deviations of the measured shifts from the values which would be anticipated for a random coil; in the case of side chain protons these are virtually all net upfield shifts and it is shown that this may be the averaged effect of interactions with aromatic rings in a partially collapsed denatured state. In a very few cases, notably that of two sequential tryptophan residues, it is possible to interpret these effects in terms of specific, local interresidue interactions. Generally, however, there is no correlation with either native state shift perturbations or with sequence proximity to aromatic groups. Diminution of most of the residual shift perturbations on reduction of the disulfide cross-links confirms that they are not simply effects of residues adjacent in the sequence. Similar effects of chemical denaturants, with the disulfides intact, demonstrate that the shift perturbations reflect an enhanced tendency to side chain clustering in the thermally denatured state. The temperature dependences of the shift perturbations suggest that this clustering is noncooperative and is driven by small, favorable enthalpy changes. While the extent of conformational averaging is clearly much greater than that observed for a homologous protein, alpha-lactalbumin, in its partially folded molten globule state, the results clearly show that thermally denatured lysozyme differs substantially from a random coil, principally in that it is partially hydrophobically collapsed.

  11. Localization of Membrane-Associated Proteins in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Use of Hydrophobic Membrane Probes and Cross-Linking Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Zakowski, Jack J.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of membrane-associated proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus was investigated by using two monofunctional and three bifunctional probes that differ in the degree to which they partition into membranes and in their specific group reactivity. Two hydrophobic aryl azide probes, [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide and [3H]pyrenesulfonylazide, readily partitioned into virion membrane and, when activated to nitrenes by UV irradiation, formed stable covalent adducts to membrane constituents. Both of these monofunctional probes labeled the glyco-protein G and matrix M proteins, but [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide also labeled the nucleocapsid N protein and an unidentified low-molecular-weight component. Protein labeling of intact virions was unaffected by the presence of cytochrome c or glutathione, but disruption of membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate greatly enhanced the labeling of all viral proteins except G. Labeling of G protein was essentially restricted to the membrane-embedded, thermolysin-resistant tail fragment. Three bifunctional reagents, tartryl diazide, dimethylsuberimidate, and 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide, were tested for their capacity to cross-link proteins to membrane phospholipids of virions grown in the presence of [3H]palmitate. Only G and M proteins of intact virions were labeled with 3H-phospholipid by these cross-linkers; the reactions were not affected by cytochrome c but were abolished by disruption of virus with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Dimethylsuberimidate, which reacts with free amino groups, cross-linked 3H-phospholipid to both G and M protein. In contrast, the hydrophilic tartryl diazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the M protein, whereas the hydrophobic 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the intrinsic G protein. These data support the hypothesis that the G protein traverses the virion membrane and that the M protein is membrane associated but does not penetrate very deeply, if at all. PMID:6255216

  12. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: Insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation = 0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. PMID:24519901

  13. Impaired Secretion of a Hydrophobic Cutinase by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Correlates with an Increased Association with Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Binding Protein (BiP)

    PubMed Central

    Sagt, C. M. J.; Müller, W. H.; Boonstra, J.; Verkleij, A. J.; Verrips, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    This study focuses on the different efficiencies of secretion of two fungal cutinases by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a wild-type cutinase (CY000) and a hydrophobic mutant cutinase (CY028). Both cutinases are placed under control of the GAL7 promoter, by which the expression levels can be regulated. Wild-type cutinase was secreted at up to 25 mg per g (dry weight), while CY028 was secreted at a level of 2 mg per g (dry weight); this difference is nearly independent of the expression level. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that whereas CY000 cutinase is secreted, CY028 is irreversibly retained in the cell. Immunogold labelling followed by electron microscopy revealed colocalization of CY028 with immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The increase of wild-type cutinase expression did not result in higher levels of the molecular chaperone BiP, but BiP levels are raised by increased induction of the hydrophobic mutant cutinase. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that in contrast to the wild-type cutinase, the hydrophobic mutant cutinase interacts with BiP. These results indicate that the introduction of two exposed hydrophobic patches in cutinase results in a higher affinity for BiP which might cause the retention of this mutant cutinase in the ER. PMID:9435084

  14. Preparation of a novel hydrophobic affinity cryogel for adsorption of lipase and its utilization as a chromatographic adsorbent for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ünlüer, Özlem Biçen; Özcan, Ayça; Uzun, Lokman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have prepared a hydrophobic cryogel for the chromatographic separation of lipase from its aqueous solutions including single protein and protein mixture and also Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract. N-methacryloyl-(l)-phenylalanine methyl ester was used as a monomer to provide the hydrophobic character to the prepared cryogels. The highest adsorption capacity was observed at pH 5.0 at 0.5 mL min(-1) flow rate. The chromatographic separation of lipase was achieved from a binary mixture of lipase:bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipase:lysozyme, and was also achieved from triple-mixture of lipase:lysozyme:BSA by using fast protein liquid chromatography. Finally, lipase purification was performed from Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract used as a natural source. These studies have shown that the hydrophobic cryogel has good chromatographic performance for the separation and purification of lipase not only from aqueous solution, but also from cell extract as a natural source of lipase. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  16. Wound dressings for a proteolytic-rich environment.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-04-01

    Wound dressings have experienced continuous and significant changes over the years based on the knowledge of the biochemical events associated with chronic wounds. The development goes from natural materials used to just cover and conceal the wound to interactive materials that can facilitate the healing process, addressing specific issues in non-healing wounds. These new types of dressings often relate with the proteolytic wound environment and the bacteria load to enhance the healing. Recently, the wound dressing research is focusing on the replacement of synthetic polymers by natural protein materials to delivery bioactive agents to the wounds. This article provides an overview on the novel protein-based wound dressings such as silk fibroin keratin and elastin. The improved properties of these dressings, like the release of antibiotics and growth factors, are discussed. The different types of wounds and the effective parameters of healing process will be reviewed. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  17. Wet to dry dressing changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... warm water before and after each dressing change. Put on a pair of non-sterile gloves. Carefully ... pads or packing tape from inside your wound. Put the old dressing, packing material, and your gloves ...

  18. Hydrogel-impregnated dressings for graft fixation: a case series.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-S; Lee, J-H; Kim, S-M; Kim, Y-J; Choi, J-Y; Jun, Y-J

    2015-07-01

    Infection is the second most common cause of graft loss after skin grafting. Cutimed Sorbact is a range of dressings coated with a hydrophobic fatty acid that irreversibly binds to the bacterial surface and mechanically removes bacteria from the wound. The dressing is a hydrogel-impregnated material, which prevents wounds from drying. Here, we report on cases in which we used the gel instead of the widely used petrolatum gauze or paraffin gauze in a tie-over dressing for the fixation of grafted skin. Patients treated for skin grafting between March 2013 and July 2013 were treated with the hydrogel-impregnated dressings and a tie over dressing. The wounds were opened five days after treatment. In total seven patients were treated with an age range of 23-86 years old. No infections were seen and the method was effective regardless of wound size, the thickness of the skin harvested and condition of the defect. Using this hydrogel-impregnated dressings, provide antibacterial and moisturising effects simultaneously, which a petrolatum or paraffin gauze cannot provide. There were no external sources of funding for this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

  19. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  20. The role of plastic β-hairpin and weak hydrophobic core in the stability and unfolding of a full sequence design protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Duan, Yong

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the thermal stability of a designed α/β protein FSD (full sequence design) was studied by explicit solvent simulations at three moderate temperatures, 273 K, 300 K, and 330 K. The average properties of the ten trajectories at each temperature were analyzed. The thermal unfolding, as judged by backbone root-mean-square deviation and percentage of native contacts, was displayed with increased sampling outside of the native basin as the temperature was raised. The positional fluctuation of the hairpin residues was significantly higher than that of the helix residues at all three temperatures. The hairpin segment displayed certain plasticity even at 273 K. Apart from the terminal residues, the highest fluctuation was shown in the turn residues 7-9. Secondary structure analysis manifested the structural heterogeneity of the hairpin segment. It was also revealed by the simulation that the hydrophobic core was vulnerable to thermal denaturation. Consistent with the experiment, the I7Y mutation in the double mutant FSD-EY (FSD with mutations Q1E and I7Y) dramatically increased the protein stability in the simulation, suggesting that the plasticity of the hairpin can be partially compensated by a stronger hydrophobic core. As for the unfolding pathway, the breathing of the hydrophobic core and the separation of the two secondary structure elements (α helix and β hairpin) was the initiation step of the unfolding. The loss of global contacts from the separation further destabilized the hairpin structure and also led to the unwinding of the helix.

  1. Magnetization transfer from laser-polarized xenon to protons located in the hydrophobic cavity of the wheat nonspecific lipid transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Céline; Berthault, Patrick; Vovelle, Françoise; Desvaux, Hervé

    2001-01-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer protein from wheat is studied by liquid-state NMR in the presence of xenon. The gas–protein interaction is indicated by the dependence of the protein proton chemical shifts on the xenon pressure and formally confirmed by the first observation of magnetization transfer from laser-polarized xenon to the protein protons. Twenty-six heteronuclear nOes have allowed the characterization of four interaction sites inside the wheat ns-LTP cavity. Their locations are in agreement with the variations of the chemical shifts under xenon pressure and with solvation simulations. The richness of the information obtained by the noble gas with a nuclear polarization multiplied by ∼12,000 makes this approach based on dipolar cross-relaxation with laser-polarized xenon promising for probing protein hydrophobic pockets at ambient pressure. PMID:11274467

  2. Restricting Student Dress in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Kimberly

    1994-01-01

    Addresses the authority of school officials to regulate student dress by examining school dress codes, first with respect to communicative dress--or dress that communicates speech--and then with respect to noncommunicative dress. Provides a summary of the law on dress codes and a basic set of rules to assist school officials in drafting…

  3. Restricting Student Dress in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Kimberly

    1994-01-01

    Addresses the authority of school officials to regulate student dress by examining school dress codes, first with respect to communicative dress--or dress that communicates speech--and then with respect to noncommunicative dress. Provides a summary of the law on dress codes and a basic set of rules to assist school officials in drafting…

  4. Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acid residues is more important for proteins encoded by GC-poor genes.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids has been studied by the way of analysis of pentapeptide fragments from twelve partial bacterial proteomes. PDB files describing structures of proteins from species with extremely high and low genomic GC-content, as well as with average G + C were included in the study. Amino acid residues in 78,009 pentapeptides from alpha helices, beta strands and coil regions were classified into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. The common propensity scale for 32 possible combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues in pentapeptide has been created: specific pentapeptides for helix, sheet and coil were described. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming alpha helices is decreasing in alpha helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the increase of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming beta strands is increasing in coil regions and in helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the growth of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. Due to these circumstances the probability of coil-sheet and helix-sheet transitions should be increased in proteins encoded by GC-rich genes making them prone to form amyloid in certain conditions. Possible causes of the described fact that importance of alpha helix and coil stabilization by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids is growing with the decrease of genomic GC-content have been discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Dress Codes. Legal Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    As illustrated by two recent decisions, the courts in the past decade have demarcated wide boundaries for school officials considering dress codes, whether in the form of selective prohibitions or required uniforms. Administrators must warn the community, provide legitimate justification and reasonable clarity, and comply with state law. (MLH)

  6. Dress Codes. Legal Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    As illustrated by two recent decisions, the courts in the past decade have demarcated wide boundaries for school officials considering dress codes, whether in the form of selective prohibitions or required uniforms. Administrators must warn the community, provide legitimate justification and reasonable clarity, and comply with state law. (MLH)

  7. Student Dress Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.

    School officials see a need for regulations that prohibit disruptive and inappropriate forms of expression and attire; students see these regulations as unwanted restrictions on their freedom. This paper reviews court litigation involving constitutional limitations on school authority, dress and hair codes, state law constraints, and school…

  8. Telaprevir-induced DRESS.

    PubMed

    Kesar, Vivek; Kesar, Varun; Khaitova, Viktoriya; Motamed, David; Schiano, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Telaprevir, a protease inhibitor, was recently approved for management of Chronic Hepatits C (CHC) due to HCV genotype 1. Various RCTs have demonstarted increased incidence of cutaneous adverse effects with use of Telaprevir. Herein, we report two cases of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) secondary to Telaprevir use.

  9. Effects of salt or cosolvent addition on solubility of a hydrophobic solute in water: Relevance to those on thermal stability of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shota; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    The solubility of a nonpolar solute in water is changed upon addition of a salt or cosolvent. Hereafter, "solvent" is formed by water molecules for pure water, by water molecules, cations, and anions for water-salt solution, and by water and cosolvent molecules for water-cosolvent solution. Decrease and increase in the solubility, respectively, are ascribed to enhancement and reduction of the hydrophobic effect. Plenty of experimental data are available for the change in solubility of argon or methane arising from the addition. We show that the integral equation theory combined with a rigid-body model, in which the solute and solvent particles are modeled as hard spheres with different diameters, can reproduce the data for the following items: salting out by an alkali halide and salting in by tetramethylammonium bromide, increase in solubility by a monohydric alcohol, and decrease in solubility by sucrose or urea. The orders of cation or anion species in terms of the power of decreasing the solubility can also be reproduced for alkali halides. With the rigid-body model, the analyses are focused on the roles of entropy originating from the translational displacement of solvent particles. It is argued by decomposing the solvation entropy of a nonpolar solute into physically insightful constituents that the solvent crowding in the bulk is a pivotal factor of the hydrophobic effect: When the solvent crowding in the bulk becomes more serious, the effect is strengthened, and when it becomes less serious, the effect is weakened. It is experimentally known that the thermal stability of a protein is also influenced by the salt or cosolvent addition. The additions which decrease and increase the solubility of a nonpolar solute, respectively, usually enhance and lower the thermal stability. This suggests that the enhanced or reduced hydrophobic effect is also a principal factor governing the stability change. However, urea decreases the solubility but lowers the stability

  10. Dresses Make the Girl: Gender and Identity from "The Hundred Dresses" to "10,000 Dresses"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulders, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a close reading of two works, Eleanor Estes' "The Hundred Dresses" (1944) and Marcus Ewert's "10,000 Dresses" (2008), that feature in current anti-bullying campaigns. Starting with "The Hundred Dresses," this essay examines how Estes' use of the school story not only exposes the social dynamics of…

  11. Dresses Make the Girl: Gender and Identity from "The Hundred Dresses" to "10,000 Dresses"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulders, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a close reading of two works, Eleanor Estes' "The Hundred Dresses" (1944) and Marcus Ewert's "10,000 Dresses" (2008), that feature in current anti-bullying campaigns. Starting with "The Hundred Dresses," this essay examines how Estes' use of the school story not only exposes the social dynamics of…

  12. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  13. Ion-Specific Induced Fluctuations and Free Energetics of Aqueous Protein Hydrophobic Interfaces: Toward Connecting to Specific-Ion Behaviors at Aqueous Liquid–Vapor Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We explore anion-induced interface fluctuations near protein–water interfaces using coarse-grained representations of interfaces as proposed by Willard and Chandler (J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 1954−195820055377). We use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics to compute potentials of mean force along a reaction coordinate bridging the state where the anion is fully solvated and one where it is biased via harmonic restraints to remain at the protein–water interface. Specifically, we focus on fluctuations of an interface between water and a hydrophobic region of hydrophobin-II (HFBII), a 71 amino acid residue protein expressed by filamentous fungi and known for its ability to form hydrophobically mediated self-assemblies at interfaces such as a water/air interface. We consider the anions chloride and iodide that have been shown previously by simulations as displaying specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces. We find that as in the case of a pure liquid–vapor interface, at the hydrophobic protein–water interface, the larger, less charge-dense iodide anion displays a marginal interfacial stability compared with that of the smaller, more charge-dense chloride anion. Furthermore, consistent with the results at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces, we find that iodide induces larger fluctuations of the protein–water interface than chloride. PMID:24701961

  14. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  15. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: From Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water.

  16. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: from Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-28

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water.

  17. Molecular Orbital Study of the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding of a Ligand Molecule in a Protein Aromatic Hydrophobic Pocket.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Jun; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The natural product argadin is a cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor that binds to chitinase B (ChiB) from the pathogenic bacteria Serratia marcescens. N(ω)-Acetyl-L-arginine and L-aminoadipic acid of argadin form intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB. We performed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations to elucidate the role of this intramolecular hydrogen bonding on intermolecular interactions between argadin and ChiB. We found that argadin accrues large stabilization energies from the van der Waals dispersion interactions, such as CH-π, π-π, and π-lone pair interactions, in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB, although intramolecular hydrogen bonding within argadin might result in loss of entropy. The intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonding formation canceled local molecular charges and provided good van der Waals interactions with surrounding aromatic residues.

  18. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  19. Spot morphology of non-contact printed protein molecules on non-porous substrates with a range of hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-01-21

    Non-contact inkjet printing technology is one of the most promising tools for producing microarrays. The quality of the microarray depends on the type of the substrate used for printing biomolecules. Various porous and non-porous substrates have been used in the past, but due to low production cost and easy availability, non-porous substrates like glass and plastic are preferred over porous substrates. On these non-porous substrates, obtaining spot uniformity and a high signal to noise ratio is a big challenge. In our research work, we have modified pristine glass slides using various silanes to produce a range of hydrophobic glass substrates. The hydrophobicities of the slides expressed in the contact angle (θ) of a sessile drop of water were 49°, 61°, 75°, 88° and 103°. Using a non-contact inkjet printer, microarrays of biotinylated biomolecules (BSA and IgG) were produced on these modified glass substrates, pristine (untreated) glass and also on HTA polystyrene slides. The uniformity of the spots, reflecting the distribution of the biomolecules in the spots, was analyzed and compared using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The quality of the spots was superior on the glass slide with a contact angle of ∼75°. We also investigated the influence of the hydrophobicity of the substrate on a two-step, real diagnostic antibody assay. This nucleic acid microarray immunoassay (NAMIA) for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus showed that on highly hydrophilic (θ < 10°) and hydrophobic substrates (θ > 100°) the assay signal was low, whereas an excellent signal was obtained on the substrates with intermediate contact angles, θ ∼ 61° and θ ∼ 75°, respectively.

  20. Cell wall protein and glycoprotein constituents of Aspergillus fumigatus that bind to polystyrene may be responsible for the cell surface hydrophobicity of the mycelium.

    PubMed

    Peñalver, M C; Casanova, M; Martínez, J P; Gil, M L

    1996-07-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Aspergillus fumigatus grown both in complex medium (yeast extract/peptone/dextrose; YPD) and minimal (Vogel's N) medium was monitored by assessing attachment of polystyrene microspheres to the cell surface. It was found that mature mycelium was hydrophobic. Treatment of intact mycelium with beta-mercaptoethanol (beta ME) abolished binding of the microspheres to hyphal elements, and coating of the microspheres with beta ME extracts from mycelium inhibited their attachment to intact mycelial cells. A. fumigatus mycelium was tagged in vivo with biotin and treated with beta ME. The beta ME extracts were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting with both peroxidase-conjugated-ExtrAvidin and concanavalin A (ConA). This procedure allowed identification of cell wall surface proteins and glycoproteins. Rabbit polyclonal antisera were raised against beta ME extracts obtained from cells grown in YPD and Vogel's N media. These antisera defined some major cell-wall-bound antigens. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis of the cell wall material released by beta ME and adsorbed on polystyrene microspheres revealed about 19 protein species with apparent molecular masses ranging from 20 to 70 kDa, and two high-molecular-mass glycoproteins of 115 and 210 kDa. Treatment of cells grown in YPD, but not those grown in Vogel's N medium, with beta ME released a 55 kDa polypeptide able to adsorb to polystyrene microspheres that was detectable with the antisera. The ability to bind to polystyrene particles exhibited by several protein and glycoprotein species released by beta ME treatment suggested that these cell wall moieties possess exposed hydrophobic domains that could be responsible for the CSH of mycelium.

  1. Three dimensional liquid chromatography coupling ion exchange chromatography/hydrophobic interaction chromatography/reverse phase chromatography for effective protein separation in top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Valeja, Santosh G; Xiu, Lichen; Gregorich, Zachery R; Guner, Huseyin; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To address the complexity of the proteome in mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down proteomics, multidimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) strategies that can effectively separate proteins with high resolution and automation are highly desirable. Although various MDLC methods that can effectively separate peptides from protein digests exist, very few MDLC strategies, primarily consisting of 2DLC, are available for intact protein separation, which is insufficient to address the complexity of the proteome. We recently demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) utilizing a MS-compatible salt can provide high resolution separation of intact proteins for top-down proteomics. Herein, we have developed a novel 3DLC strategy by coupling HIC with ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and reverse phase chromatography (RPC) for intact protein separation. We demonstrated that a 3D (IEC-HIC-RPC) approach greatly outperformed the conventional 2D IEC-RPC approach. For the same IEC fraction (out of 35 fractions) from a crude HEK 293 cell lysate, a total of 640 proteins were identified in the 3D approach (corresponding to 201 nonredundant proteins) as compared to 47 in the 2D approach, whereas simply prolonging the gradients in RPC in the 2D approach only led to minimal improvement in protein separation and identifications. Therefore, this novel 3DLC method has great potential for effective separation of intact proteins to achieve deep proteome coverage in top-down proteomics.

  2. MALDI/MS peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification of hydrophobic proteins attached to eucaryote keratinocyte cytoplasmic membrane using different matrices in concert

    PubMed Central

    Gonnet, Florence; Lemaître, Gilles; Waksman, Gilles; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2003-01-01

    Background MALDI-TOF-MS has become an important analytical tool in the identification of proteins and evaluation of their role in biological processes. A typical protocol consists of sample purification, separation of proteins by 2D-PAGE, enzymatic digestion and identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprint. Unfortunately, this approach is not appropriate for the identification of membrane or low or high pI proteins. An alternative technique uses 1D-PAGE, which results in a mixture of proteins in each gel band. The direct analysis of the proteolytic digestion of this mixture is often problematic because of poor peptide detection and consequent poor sequence coverage in databases. Sequence coverage can be improved through the combination of several matrices. Results The aim of this study was to trust the MALDI analysis of complex biological samples, in order to identify proteins that interact with the membrane network of keratinocytes. Peptides obtained from protein trypsin digestions may have either hydrophobic or hydrophilic sections, in which case, the direct analysis of such a mixture by MALDI does not allow desorbing of all peptides. In this work, MALDI/MS experiments were thus performed using four different matrices in concert. The data were analysed with three algorithms in order to test each of them. We observed that the use of at least two matrices in concert leads to a twofold increase of the coverage of each protein. Considering data obtained in this study, we recommend the use of HCCA in concert with the SA matrix in order to obtain a good coverage of hydrophilic proteins, and DHB in concert with the SA matrix to obtain a good coverage of hydrophobic proteins. Conclusion In this work, experiments were performed directly on complex biological samples, in order to see systematic comparison between different matrices for real-life samples and to show a correlation that will be applicable to similar studies. When 1D gel is needed, each band may

  3. MALDI/MS peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification of hydrophobic proteins attached to eucaryote keratinocyte cytoplasmic membrane using different matrices in concert.

    PubMed

    Gonnet, Florence; Lemaître, Gilles; Waksman, Gilles; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2003-05-06

    BACKGROUND: MALDI-TOF-MS has become an important analytical tool in the identification of proteins and evaluation of their role in biological processes. A typical protocol consists of sample purification, separation of proteins by 2D-PAGE, enzymatic digestion and identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprint. Unfortunately, this approach is not appropriate for the identification of membrane or low or high pI proteins. An alternative technique uses 1D-PAGE, which results in a mixture of proteins in each gel band. The direct analysis of the proteolytic digestion of this mixture is often problematic because of poor peptide detection and consequent poor sequence coverage in databases. Sequence coverage can be improved through the combination of several matrices. RESULTS: The aim of this study was to trust the MALDI analysis of complex biological samples, in order to identify proteins that interact with the membrane network of keratinocytes. Peptides obtained from protein trypsin digestions may have either hydrophobic or hydrophilic sections, in which case, the direct analysis of such a mixture by MALDI does not allow desorbing of all peptides. In this work, MALDI/MS experiments were thus performed using four different matrices in concert. The data were analysed with three algorithms in order to test each of them. We observed that the use of at least two matrices in concert leads to a twofold increase of the coverage of each protein. Considering data obtained in this study, we recommend the use of HCCA in concert with the SA matrix in order to obtain a good coverage of hydrophilic proteins, and DHB in concert with the SA matrix to obtain a good coverage of hydrophobic proteins. CONCLUSION: In this work, experiments were performed directly on complex biological samples, in order to see systematic comparison between different matrices for real-life samples and to show a correlation that will be applicable to similar studies. When 1D gel is needed, each band may

  4. Prevalence of DRESS syndrome.

    PubMed

    López-Rocha, Eunice; Blancas, Lizbeth; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen; Gaspar-López, Arturo; O'Farrill-Romanillos, Patricia; Amaya-Mejía, Adela; Galindo-Pacheco, Lucy; Campos-Romero, Freya; Aguilar-Hinojosa, Nadia; Suárez, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is an idiosyncratic reaction (type B), characterized by peripheral eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, such as fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, atypical lymphocytes and elevation of liver enzymes at least twice its normal level or increase of alanine amino transferase (ALT) >100 U/L. Its incidence is of 1/1,000 to 10,000 exposures and its mortality is of 10%-20%. Treatment is based on steroids and on the suspension of the suspect drug. This paper reports the cases of six patients with DRESS syndrome attended at Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Mexico City, from September 2012 to September 2013, which accounted for 12.5% of patients attended with adverse reactions to drugs.

  5. DRESS and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cahyanur, Rahmat; Oktavia, Dina; Koesno, Sukamto

    2012-07-01

    DRESS (drug rash eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a life threatening condition characterized by skin rash, fever, leucocytosis with eosinophilia or atypical lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. This case report would like to describe an interesting case of DRESS coincidence with ischemic stroke. A 38 year old woman had been admitted with skin rash and fever since four days before. Four weeks before admission she received antibiotic and multivitamin for one week. The patient looked ill, with body temperature 38.0°C. Marked physical findings were cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Dermatological examination finding was generalized exanthema. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, eosinophilia, and increased level of ALT and AST. During hospitalization the patient also suffered from ischemic stroke. Treatments administered in this patient were oxygen, adequate intravenous fluid, parenteral nutrition, methyl prednisolone, cethirizin bid, ranitidin bid, and antibiotic. The antibiotic treatment in this case was performed with graded challenge or test dosing.

  6. Sequence-specific transitions of the torsion angle gamma change the polar-hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves: implication for indirect protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhitnikova, Mariia Yu; Boryskina, Olena P; Shestopalova, Anna V

    2014-01-01

    Variations of the shape and polarity of the DNA grooves caused by changes of the DNA conformation play an important role in the DNA readout. Despite the fact that non-canonical trans and gauche- conformations of the DNA backbone angle γ (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') are frequently found in the DNA crystal structures, their possible role in the DNA recognition has not been studied systematically. In order to fill in this gap, we analyze the available high-resolution crystal structures of the naked and complexed DNA. The analysis shows that the non-canonical γ angle conformations are present both in the naked and bound DNA, more often in the bound vs. naked DNA, and in the nucleotides with the A-like vs. the B-like sugar pucker. The alternative angle γ torsions are more frequently observed in the purines with the A-like sugar pucker and in the pyrimidines with the B-like sugar conformation. The minor groove of the nucleotides with non-canonical γ angle conformation is more polar, while the major groove is more hydrophobic than in the nucleotides with the classical γ torsions due to variations in exposure of the polar and hydrophobic groups of the DNA backbone. The propensity of the nucleotides with different γ angle conformations to participate in the protein-nucleic acid contacts in the minor and major grooves is connected with their sugar pucker and sequence-specific. Our findings imply that the angle γ transitions contribute to the process of the protein-DNA recognition due to modification of the polar/hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves.

  7. Draconian dress act repealed.

    PubMed

    Mhone, C

    1994-01-01

    The Dress Act was put into place in Malawi by the government of President Kamuzu Banda after the long period of direct colonialism. The act made it illegal for women in Malawi to be seen publicly wearing dresses which did not completely cover their knees or wearing pants; men had to wear their hair short. Police officers even scrutinized women's attire at private house parties and in homes. The autocratic political structure established by Banda, however, was voted out in a referendum June 14, 1993. Pressure by opposition forces such as the United Democratic Front forced a repeal of the act on November 16 of the same year. The repeal was vigorously attacked by female Parliament members as a move which would result in moral degradation and an increase in the level of sexual harassment against women. Other citizens and tourists have generally detested the act. The act has most certainly kept many potential visitors from vacationing in Malawi. Some expert observers think that repeals of the Dress Act, the Forfeiture Act, and legislation which allowed the government to detain opposition figures without trial were done to garner support from the Paris Club for the resumption of balance of payments support suspended due to the country's poor human rights record.

  8. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  9. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  10. Physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Yamdech, Rungnapha; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-04-01

    The physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin that we have developed previously were performed to evaluate its efficacy for clinical applications. The absorption ability and dehydration rate of the dressing were assessed using the split-thickness skin graft and leg ulcer wound bed models. The bioactivities of the bilayered wound dressing were evaluated. The bilayered dressing showed continuous absorption rate of wound exudate, providing the suitability for the wound with extended inflammation phase. The dehydration rate of the bilayered dressing was comparable to the commercially available dressing of which the moisture maintenance capability is claimed. The bilayered dressing showed good conformability, as can be seen by the homogeneous distribution pattern of bromophenol blue absorbed. In terms of biological activities, the bilayered dressing was less toxic to skin cells than the commercially available dressing. The bilayered dressing was also shown to promote cell migration and collagen production due to the bioactive protein components. We here concluded that the superior properties of the bilayered dressing over the commercially available dressing were the conformability and biological activities to accelerate the wound healing, while the other properties were comparable to those of commercially available dressing. The data obtained in this study would be very useful for the further evaluation of the bilayered dressing in clinical trial.

  11. DRESS syndrome in ophthalmic patients.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jacqueline Martins de; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed. We were unable to identify the causal drug owing to the large number of medications concurrently administered. The second case presented with DRESS syndrome symptoms during ocular toxoplasmosis treatment. In this case, a clearer association with pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine was observed. As a result of the regular prescription of pharmacological agents associated with DRESS syndrome, ophthalmologists should be aware of the potentially serious complications of DRESS syndrome.

  12. Dress syndrome induced by levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Eleni, K

    2015-02-01

    The tremendous increase in the use of drugs has considerably increased their side effects. The aim of this work is to demonstrate Dress syndrome induced by levetiracetam an anti-epileptic drug. We describe a skin eruption observed in an-hospitalized in an intensive care unit patient who received levetiracetam. According to morphology of the rash and the laboratory findings the rash fulfills the criteria for Dress syndrome. Levetiracetam may induce Dress syndrome. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  14. Preparative electrophoretic method for the purification of a hydrophobic membrane protein: subunit c of the mitochondrial ATP synthase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, K

    1999-09-10

    A method is described for the purification of subunit c of ATP synthase from rat liver mitochondria. After sample preparation and solvent extraction, the protein was purified to homogeneity by a single-step preparative electrophoretic procedure, using aqueous buffer and containing lithium dodecyl sulfate. The subunit is an extremely hydrophobic and insoluble protein and all solubilization attempts, using a variety of detergents, were unsuccessful except for lithium dodecyl sulfate. Buffer exchange and FPLC gel filtration removed the detergent from the purified sample, leaving the protein in a soluble form. The mammalian protein is composed of 75 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 7602 Da and is classified as a proteolipid. Subunit c accounts for 25 and 85% of the intralysosomal accumulation, within neurons, of storage material in juvenile and late-infantile forms of Batten's disease, respectively. This purification procedure allows access to a continuous supply of pure subunit c from a conventional source such as rat liver and preserves precious autopsy materials. The protein could be used as substrate in future proteolytic studies involving pepstatin-insensitive lysosomal proteases and for raising of more specific antibodies. The procedure could also be adapted/modified and used as a model for purifying other extremely insoluble proteins.

  15. Two variables dominating the retention of intact proteins under gradient elution with simultaneous ultrafast high-resolution separation by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xindu; Jia, Xiaodan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Fei; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-07

    The retention of intact proteins under gradient elution in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) was found to be governed by two variables, the steady region (SR) and the migration region (MR). In the SR, the proteins are immobilized by the strong interactions with the stationary phase such that the retention time is independent of the column length. In the MR, the proteins also interact with the stationary phase, but they move normally, thus the retention time depends on their partition coefficients and the column length. The SR can be used as an operation space (OP) for high-throughput protein analysis by 1D-LC using short columns at high flow rates to maintain a high resolution. The OP can also be employed for all assisted operations in online 2D-LC. Based on the steady region/migration region optimization strategy developed in this study, five successive complete separations of seven intact proteins were performed in a HIC cake in less than 5 min, and a crude extract of ribonuclease A from bovine pancreas was purified using online 2D-LC to 95.8% purity with 93.2% mass recovery in 45 min. This approach can be used to expedite the purification of drug-target proteins and should therefore be of interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

  16. Charged and Hydrophobic Surfaces on the A Chain of Shiga-Like Toxin 1 Recognize the C-Terminal Domain of Ribosomal Stalk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, Andrew J.; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Jarvik, Nick; Chen, Gang; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Gariépy, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Shiga-like toxins are ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) produced by pathogenic E. coli strains that are responsible for hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The catalytic A1 chain of Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1), a representative RIP, first docks onto a conserved peptide SD[D/E]DMGFGLFD located at the C-terminus of all three eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins and halts protein synthesis through the depurination of an adenine base in the sarcin-ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Here, we report that the A1 chain of SLT-1 rapidly binds to and dissociates from the C-terminal peptide with a monomeric dissociation constant of 13 µM. An alanine scan performed on the conserved peptide revealed that the SLT-1 A1 chain interacts with the anionic tripeptide DDD and the hydrophobic tetrapeptide motif FGLF within its sequence. Based on these 2 peptide motifs, SLT-1 A1 variants were generated that displayed decreased affinities for the stalk protein C-terminus and also correlated with reduced ribosome-inactivating activities in relation to the wild-type A1 chain. The toxin-peptide interaction and subsequent toxicity were shown to be mediated by cationic and hydrophobic docking surfaces on the SLT-1 catalytic domain. These docking surfaces are located on the opposite face of the catalytic cleft and suggest that the docking of the A1 chain to SDDDMGFGLFD may reorient its catalytic domain to face its RNA substrate. More importantly, both the delineated A1 chain ribosomal docking surfaces and the ribosomal peptide itself represent a target and a scaffold, respectively, for the design of generic inhibitors to block the action of RIPs. PMID:22355345

  17. An isothermal titration calorimetry study on the binding of four volatile general anesthetics to the hydrophobic core of a four-alpha-helix bundle protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Johansson, Jonas S

    2003-11-01

    A molecular understanding of volatile anesthetic mechanisms of action will require structural descriptions of anesthetic-protein complexes. Previous work has demonstrated that the halogenated alkane volatile anesthetics halothane and chloroform bind to the hydrophobic core of the four-alpha-helix bundle (Aalpha(2)-L38M)(2) (Johansson et al., 2000, 2003). This study shows that the halogenated ether anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and enflurane are also bound to the hydrophobic core of the four-alpha-helix bundle, using isothermal titration calorimetry. Isoflurane and sevoflurane both bound to the four-alpha-helix bundle with K(d) values of 140 +/- 10 micro M, whereas enflurane bound with a K(d) value of 240 +/- 10 micro M. The DeltaH degrees values associated with isoflurane, sevoflurane, and enflurane binding were -7.7 +/- 0.1 kcal/mol, -8.2 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol, and -7.2 +/- 0.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The DeltaS degrees values accompanying isoflurane, sevoflurane, and enflurane binding were -8.5 cal/mol K, -10.4 cal/mol K, and -8.0 cal/mol K, respectively. The results indicate that the hydrophobic core of (Aalpha(2)-L38M)(2) is able to accommodate three modern ether anesthetics with K(d) values that approximate their clinical EC(50) values. The DeltaH degrees values point to the importance of polar interactions for volatile general anesthetic binding, and suggest that hydrogen bonding to the ether oxygens may be operative.

  18. Overexpression and refolding of the hydrophobic ribosomal P0 protein from Trypanosoma cruzi: a component of the P1/P2/P0 complex.

    PubMed

    Juri Ayub, M; Levin, M J; Aguilar, C F

    2001-07-01

    The P0 protein is part of the ribosomal eukaryotic stalk, which is an elongated lateral protuberance of the large ribosomal subunit involved in the translocation step of protein synthesis. P0 is the minimal portion of the stalk that is able to support accurate protein synthesis. The P0 C-terminal peptide is highly antigenic and a major target of the antibody response in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and patients suffering chronic heart disease produced by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite. The T. cruzi P0 (TcP0) protein was cloned into the pRSET A vector and expressed in Escherichia coli fused to a His-tag. The identity of the protein was confirmed by immunoblotting. Due to the formation of inclusion bodies the protein was purified using the following steps: (i) differential centrifugation to separate the inclusion bodies from soluble proteins and (ii) affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. TcP0 showed high tendency to aggregation during refolding assays. However, TcP0 could be efficiently folded in the presence of a low concentration of SDS. The folding of the protein was confirmed using urea gradient electrophoresis, limited proteolysis, circular dichroism, and tryptophan fluorescence. Native electrophoresis showed that the folded TcP0 (and not a folding intermediate) was the cause of aggregation in the absence of SDS. The protocol described here permitted us to obtain large amounts (up to 30 mg per culture liter) of pure and folded TcP0, a very hydrophobic protein with a high tendency to aggregation.

  19. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc.

  20. DrwH, a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, protects enzymatic activity under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shijie; Wang, Jin; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Yingying; Guo, Cui; Zhang, Liwen; Han, Jiahui; Wu, Xiaoli; Xue, Dong; Gomaa, Ahmed E; Feng, Shuai; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Yun; Ping, Shuzhen; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Li, Liang; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zuo, Kaijing; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi; Lin, Min

    2017-08-24

    Water stress and hypersensitive response (WHy) domain is typically found as a component of atypical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins closely associated with resistance to multiple stresses in numerous organisms. Several putative LEA proteins have been identified in Deinococcus bacteria; however their precise function remains unclear. This work reports the characterization of a Deinococcus-specific gene encoding a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein (named DrwH) in D. radiodurans R1. The expression of the drwH gene was induced by oxidative and salinity stresses. Inactivation of this gene resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative and salinity stresses as well as reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. The WHy domain of the DrwH protein differs structurally from that of a previously studied bacterial LEA5C protein, dWHy1, identified as a gene product from an Antarctic desert soil metagenome library. Further analysis indicated that in E. coli, the function of DrwH is related to oxidative stress tolerance, whereas dWHy1 is associated with freezing-thawing stress tolerance. Under oxidative stress induced by H2O2, DrwH protected the enzymatic activities of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These findings provide new insight into the evolutionary and survival strategies of Deinococcus bacteria under extreme environmental conditions.

  1. Real-time monitoring of hydrophobic aggregation reveals a critical role of cooperativity in hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liguo; Cao, Siqin; Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yao, Shuhuai; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-05-01

    The hydrophobic interaction drives nonpolar solutes to aggregate in aqueous solution, and hence plays a critical role in many fundamental processes in nature. An important property intrinsic to hydrophobic interaction is its cooperative nature, which is originated from the collective motions of water hydrogen bond networks surrounding hydrophobic solutes. This property is widely believed to enhance the formation of hydrophobic core in proteins. However, cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions has not been successfully characterized by experiments. Here, we quantify cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions by real-time monitoring the aggregation of hydrophobic solute (hexaphenylsilole, HPS) in a microfluidic mixer. We show that association of a HPS molecule to its aggregate in water occurs at sub-microsecond, and the free energy change is -5.8 to -13.6 kcal mol-1. Most strikingly, we discover that cooperativity constitutes up to 40% of this free energy. Our results provide quantitative evidence for the critical role of cooperativity in hydrophobic interactions.

  2. Preparation of a novel weak cation exchange/hydrophobic interaction chromatography dual-function polymer-based stationary phase for protein separation using "thiol-ene click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Bai, Quan; Zhao, Kailou; Gao, Dong; Tian, Lei

    2015-02-01

    A novel dual-function mixed-mode stationary phase based on poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) microspheres was synthesized by thiol-ene click chemistry and characterized by infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The new system displays both hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) character in a high salt concentration mobile phase, and weak cation exchange (WCX) chromatography character in a low salt concentration mobile phase. It can be used to separate proteins in both ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) mode and HIC mode. The resolution and selectivity of the stationary phase were evaluated in both HIC mode and IEC mode using protein standards. In comparison with the conventional WCX and HIC columns, the results were satisfactory and acceptable. Protein mass and bioactivity recoveries of more than 96% can be achieved in both HIC mode and IEC mode using this column. The results indicate that the novel dual-function mixed-mode column in many cases can replace the use of two individual WCX and HIC columns. In addition, the effects on protein separation of different ligand structures in the dual-function stationary phase and the pH of the mobile phase used were also investigated in detail. The results show that electrostatic interaction of the ligand with proteins must match the hydrophobicity of the ligand, which is an important factor to prepare the dual-function stationary phase. On the basis of this dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column, a new two-dimensional liquid chromatography technology with a single column system was also developed in this study, and was used to renature and purify recombinant human interferon-γ from inclusion bodies. The mass recovery, purity, and specific bioactivity obtained for the purified recombinant human interferon-γ were 87.2%, 92.4%, and 2.8 × 10(7) IU/mg, respectively, in IEC mode, and 83.4%, 95.2%, and 4.3 × 10(7) IU/mg, respectively, in HIC mode. The results indicate that the

  3. The Overriding Roles of Concentration and Hydrophobic Effect on Structure and Stability of Heme Protein Induced by Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Jha, Indrani; Kumar, Awanish; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-07-02

    Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations were carried out to characterize the effect of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) with varying chain length of the cation on the thermal stability as well as spectroscopic behavior of heme protein hemoglobin (Hb). The goal of this work is to investigate the role of concentration of ILs, the effect of alkyl chain length of the cation, and the related Hofmeister series on the structure of Hb. To achieve this goal, a series of ILs possessing same Cl(-) anion and a set of cation [Cnmim](+) with increasing chain length such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Emim][Cl]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Hmim][Cl]), and 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Dmim][Cl]) were used in this study. It was observed that the stability of the protein was concentration dependent as well as the hydrophobic interactions between [Cnmim](+) of ILs, and the amino acid residues in the protein played a major role in protein unfolding. As a consequence, the destabilization tendency of the ILs toward the Hb increases with increasing chain length of the cation of ILs. Additionally, the cations of the ILs obeyed the Hofmeister series when arranged in the order of providing stability to Hb structure.

  4. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  5. Assembly of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins with native hydrophobic chlorophylls in water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Dominika; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Noy, Dror

    2015-03-01

    The challenges involved in studying cofactor binding and assembly, as well as energy- and electron transfer mechanisms in the large and elaborate transmembrane protein complexes of photosynthesis and respiration have prompted considerable interest in constructing simplified model systems based on their water-soluble protein analogs. Such analogs are also promising templates and building blocks for artificial bioinspired energy conversion systems. Yet, development is limited by the challenge of introducing the essential cofactors of natural proteins that are highly water-insoluble into the water-soluble protein analogs. Here we introduce a new efficient method based on water-in-oil emulsions for overcoming this challenge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the assembly of native chlorophylls with four recombinant variants of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Brassicaceae plants. We use the method to gain new insights into the protein-chlorophyll assembly process, and demonstrate its potential as a fast screening system for developing novel chlorophyll-protein complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary structural studies of the hydrophobic ribosomal P0 protein from Trypanosoma cruzi, a part of the P0/P1/P2 complex.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Barroso, Juan A; Levin, Mariano J; Aguilar, Carlos F

    2005-08-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P0 protein (TcP0) is part of the ribosomal stalk, which is an elongated lateral protuberance of the large ribosomal subunit involved in the translocation step of protein synthesis. The TcP0 C-terminal peptide is highly antigenic and a major target of the antibody response in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and patients suffering chronic heart disease produced by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. The structural properties of TcP0 have been explored by circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence and limited proteolysis experiments. These studies were complemented by secondary structure consensus prediction analysis. The results suggest that the tertiary structure of TcP0 could be described as a compact, stable, trypsin-resistant, 200 residues long N-terminal domain belonging to the alpha/beta class and a more flexible, degradable, helical, 123 residues long C-terminal domain which could be involved in the formation of an unusual hydrophobic zipper with the ribosomal P1/P2 proteins to form the P0/P1/P2 complex.

  7. Characterization of the Tupaia Rhabdovirus Genome Reveals a Long Open Reading Frame Overlapping with P and a Novel Gene Encoding a Small Hydrophobic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses. PMID:15890917

  8. The Bactofilin Cytoskeleton Protein BacM of Myxococcus xanthus Forms an Extended β-Sheet Structure Likely Mediated by Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefang; Engelhardt, Harald; Bosch, Jürgen; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are novel cytoskeleton proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, an important predatory soil bacterium, possesses four bactofilins of which one, BacM (Mxan_7475) plays an important role in cell shape maintenance. Electron and fluorescence light microscopy, as well as studies using over-expressed, purified BacM, indicate that this protein polymerizes in vivo and in vitro into ~3 nm wide filaments that further associate into higher ordered fibers of about 10 nm. Here we use a multipronged approach combining secondary structure determination, molecular modeling, biochemistry, and genetics to identify and characterize critical molecular elements that enable BacM to polymerize. Our results indicate that the bactofilin-determining domain DUF583 folds into an extended β-sheet structure, and we hypothesize a left-handed β-helix with polymerization into 3 nm filaments primarily via patches of hydrophobic amino acid residues. These patches form the interface allowing head-to-tail polymerization during filament formation. Biochemical analyses of these processes show that folding and polymerization occur across a wide variety of conditions and even in the presence of chaotropic agents such as one molar urea. Together, these data suggest that bactofilins are comprised of a structure unique to cytoskeleton proteins, which enables robust polymerization. PMID:25803609

  9. Pathogenic Mutations within the Hydrophobic Domain of the Prion Protein Lead to the Formation of Protease-Sensitive Prion Species with Increased Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Bradley M.; Harrison, Christopher F.; Guo, Belinda; Masters, Colin L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Lawson, Victoria A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases are a group of fatal and incurable neurodegenerative diseases affecting both humans and animals. The principal mechanism of these diseases involves the misfolding the host-encoded cellular prion protein, PrPC, into the disease-associated isoform, PrPSc. Familial forms of human prion disease include those associated with the mutations G114V and A117V, which lie in the hydrophobic domain of PrP. Here we have studied the murine homologues (G113V and A116V) of these mutations using cell-based and animal models of prion infection. Under normal circumstances, the mutant forms of PrPC share similar processing, cellular localization, and physicochemical properties with wild-type mouse PrP (MoPrP). However, upon exposure of susceptible cell lines expressing these mutants to infectious prions, very low levels of protease-resistant aggregated PrPSc are formed. Subsequent mouse bioassay revealed high levels of infectivity present in these cells. Thus, these mutations appear to limit the formation of aggregated PrPSc, giving rise to the accumulation of a relatively soluble, protease sensitive, prion species that is highly neurotoxic. Given that these mutations lie next to the glycine-rich region of PrP that can abrogate prion infection, these findings provide further support for small, protease-sensitive prion species having a significant role in the progression of prion disease and that the hydrophobic domain is an important determinant of PrP conversion. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases associated with an infectious agent called a prion. Prions are comprised of an abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrP) that is normally resistant to enzymes called proteases. In humans, prion disease can occur in individuals who inherited mutations in the prion protein gene. Here we have studied the effects of two of these mutations and show that they influence the properties of the prions that can be formed. We show that

  10. An introduction to absorbent dressings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Menna Lloyd

    2014-12-01

    Exudate bathes the wound bed with a serous fluid that contains essential components that promote wound healing. However, excess exudate is often seen as a challenge for clinicians. Absorbent dressings are often used to aid in the management of exudate, with the aim of providing a moist but unmacerated environment. With so many different types of absorbent dressings available today-alongside making a holistic assessment-it is essential that clinicians also have the knowledge and skill to select the most appropriate absorbent dressing for a given patient.

  11. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R.; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants. PMID:26938884

  12. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants.

  13. Localization of Proteins to the 1,2-Propanediol Utilization Microcompartment by Non-native Signal Sequences Is Mediated by a Common Hydrophobic Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jakobson, Christopher M.; Kim, Edward Y.; Slininger, Marilyn F.; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs. PMID:26283792

  14. Localization of proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment by non-native signal sequences is mediated by a common hydrophobic motif.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-02

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs.

  15. An Information Theory of Hydrophobic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1998-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a central concept in rationalizing the structure and stability of proteins in solution. However, a consensus has not been achieved on a molecular scale physical theory explaining the broad array of hydrophobic effects. Here we present an information theory designed to achieve consensus by identifying and limiting the physical information and assumptions sufficient to predict hydrophobic effects. The information theory is based upon the study of the probabilities of occupancy by water molecule centers of molecular scale volumes observed in neat liquid water. Predictions for hydrophobic effects can be extracted from this probability distribution. Simulation results show that this probability distribution is accurately predicted by a maximum entropy model using the two moments that are obtained from the experimental liquid density and the experimental radial distribution of oxygen atoms. We show the role of solvent molecule correlation functions of higher order than pairs. We show that this two moment model predicts known atomic scale hydrophobic effects: hydrophobic solubilities, potentials of mean force, and hydrophobic effects on conformational equilibria. We comment on the kinship between the two moment maximum entropy model and the earlier Pratt-Chandler theory of hydrophobic effects. We show that the model predicts the entropy convergence emphasized by high sensitivity calorimetry on the thermal denaturation of globular proteins and explains why this entropy convergence is insensitive to solute molecular details within the broad category of hydrophobic solutes. Finally, we consider the pressure denaturation of globular proteins and discuss the perspective that emerges from the information theory treatment: increasing pressure squeezes water molecules into the protein globule eventually separating hydrophobic components analogously to the separation of hydrophobic solutes in formation of clathrate hydrates.

  16. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  17. Paralogous proteins comprising the 150 kDa hydrophobic-ligand-binding-protein complex of the Taenia solium metacestode have evolved non-overlapped binding affinities toward fatty acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Hee; Bae, Young-An; Yang, Yichao; Hong, Sung-Tae; Kong, Yoon

    2011-09-01

    We previously identified a hydrophobic-ligand-binding protein (HLBP) of the Taenia solium metacestode (TsM), which might be involved in the uptake of fatty acids (FAs) from host environments. The TsM 150kDa HLBP was a hetero-oligomeric complex composed of multiple 7kDa (RS1) and 10kDa (CyDA, b1 and m13h) subunits, and displayed a wide spectrum of binding affinities toward various FA analogs. In this study, we analysed biochemical properties and phylogenetic relationships of the individual subunits. Despite the low sequence identity (average 26.5%), these subunit proteins conserved an α-helix-rich structural domain and the first introns inserted in each of the respective chromosomal genes were found to be orthologous to one another, suggesting their common evolutionary origin. The recombinant RS1 protein bound strongly to all of the FA analogs examined including 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)amino]undecanoic acid (DAUDA), but not to 16-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitic acid (16-AP). The interactive binding between RS1 and FA analogs was specifically interfered with by the addition of non-fluorescent FA molecules or antibodies specific to the 150kDa protein. Conversely, the 10kDa members reacted only with the palmitic acid-derived 16-AP, whose interactive force was strengthened by the presence of other FA molecules. The use of mutagenic RS1 proteins demonstrated that a structural/electrostatic integrity around the second α-helix, rather than the conventional Trp residue, was the major factor governing the hydrophobic interaction. The 7 and 10kDa proteins exhibited distinctive immunoreactive patterns against sera from neurocysticercosis patients. These collective data suggest that the paralogous protein family have gained diverse functions during their evolution, to ensure the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and survival of TsMs in hostile host environments.

  18. Teacher Dress Codes in Employee Handbooks: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.; Freeburg, Beth Winfrey

    2010-01-01

    This study used role theory to analyze dress codes for teachers to discern what dress items expressed role embracement and role distance. Inductive content analysis of teacher dress codes in 103 U.S. K-12 school handbooks revealed three categories of dress: (a) conventional dress (mentioned in 97.1% of the dress codes); (b) casual dress (mentioned…

  19. Teacher Dress Codes in Employee Handbooks: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.; Freeburg, Beth Winfrey

    2010-01-01

    This study used role theory to analyze dress codes for teachers to discern what dress items expressed role embracement and role distance. Inductive content analysis of teacher dress codes in 103 U.S. K-12 school handbooks revealed three categories of dress: (a) conventional dress (mentioned in 97.1% of the dress codes); (b) casual dress (mentioned…

  20. T cell immunomonitoring and tumor responses in patients immunized with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan (CHP) and NY-ESO-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Uenaka, Akiko; Wada, Hisashi; Isobe, Midori; Saika, Takashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Sato, Eiichi; Sato, Shuichiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Kawabata, Ryohei; Yasuda, Takushi; Doki, Yuichiro; Kumon, Hiromi; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Shiku, Hiroshi; Monden, Morito; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Murphy, Roger; Hoffman, Eric; Old, Lloyd J; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2007-04-19

    We recently showed that vaccination with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan and NY-ESO-1 protein (CHP-NY-ESO-1) elicited antibody responses in 9 of 9 patients vaccinated in a clinical trial. In this study, we performed T cell immunomonitoring and analyzed tumor responses in these patients. To evaluate CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, an IFN-gamma secretion assay was used. The assay showed low background and was sensitive for detecting antigen-specific T cells. An increase in the CD4 T cell response was observed in 2 of 2 initially sero-positive and 5 of 7 initially sero-negative patients after vaccination. An increase in the CD8 T cell response was also observed in 2 of 2 sero-positive and 5 of 7 sero-negative patients after vaccination. Analysis of peptides recognized by CD4 and CD8 T cells revealed two dominant NY-ESO-1 regions, 73-114 and 121-144. Tumor responses were observed in 3 esophageal cancer patients and a malignant melanoma patient. In 3 of 4 prostate cancer patients, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values stabilized during the course of vaccination. The use of whole protein, containing multiple CD4 and CD8 epitopes, may be beneficial for cancer vaccines to prevent tumors from evading the immune response.

  1. Cardiac involvement in DRESS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thongsri, Tomon; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Pichler, Werner J

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac involvement in drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome varies considerably between 4% and 21%. Here we present our case and review literatures for its diagnosis and management. An algorithm for diagnosis of cardiac involvement in DRESS syndrome is proposed in this article. Data regarding DRESS-associated myocarditis and eosinophilic myocarditis were gather primarily from MEDLINE database. DRESS syndrome is a hypersensitivity reaction which is due to massive T cell stimulation resulting in cytotoxicity and eosinophil activation and recruitment. It is characterized by fever, morbilliform rash, and various systemic symptoms, in particular hepatitis. Hypersensitivity myocarditis (acute eosinophilic myocarditis) which is typically related to a drug reaction can lead to acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis, cardiac thrombosis and fibrotic stage. Cardiac symptoms range from no symptoms to cardiogenic shock. Diagnosis is based on history, clinical findings, cardiac biomarkers and cardiac imaging techniques. Endomyocardial biopsy is done in a minority of patients for definite diagnosis. If suspected, drug discontinuation and suppression of immune reactions are the first therapies. Corticosteroids are the cornerstone of systemic treatments and should be initiated at the time of diagnosis of DRESS syndrome. Additional therapy and ventricular assist devices could be considered in refractory cases. According to its high morbidity and mortality, patients with DRESS syndrome should be carefully monitored or screened for cardiac involvement. Multidisciplinary care is important for a successful treatment outcome.

  2. Effect of a buried ion pair in the hydrophobic core of a protein: An insight from constant pH molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup K

    2015-03-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) is a commonly used sampling method, which incorporates the coupling of conformational flexibility and protonation state of a protein during the simulation by using pH as an external parameter. The effects on the structure and stability of a hyperstable variant of staphylococcal nuclease (Δ+PHS) protein of an artificial charge pair buried in its hydrophobic core are investigated by applying both CpHMD and accelerated molecular dynamics coupled with constant pH (CpHaMD) methods. Generalized Born electrostatics is used to model the solvent water. Two sets of starting coordinates of V23E/L36K variant of Δ+PHS, namely, Maestro generated coordinates from Δ+PHS and crystal structure coordinates of the same are considered for detail investigations. On the basis of root mean square displacement (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) calculations, it is observed that this variant is stable over a wide range of pH. The calculated pKa values for aspartate and glutamate residues based on both CpHMD and CpHaMD simulations are consistent with the reported experimental values (within ± 0.5 to ± 1.5 pH unit), which clearly indicates that the local chemical environment of the carboxylic acids in V23E/L36K variant are comparable to the parent form. The strong salt bridge interaction between the mutated pair, E23/K36 and additional hydrogen bonds formed in the V23E/L36K variant, may help to compensate for the unfavorable self-energy experienced by the burial of these residues in the hydrophobic core. However, from RMSD, RMSF, and pKa analysis, no significant change in the global conformation of V23E/L36K variant with respect to the parent form, Δ+PHS is noticed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Complexes of native Ubiquitin and dodecyl sulfate illustrate the nature of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the binding of proteins and surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Bryan F.; Schneider, Grégory F.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Moustakas, Demetri; Durazo, Armando; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    A previous study, using capillary electrophoresis (CE), reported that six discrete complexes of ubiquitin (UBI) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) form at different concentrations of SDS along the pathway to unfolding of UBI in solutions of SDS. One complex (which formed between 0.8 and 1.8 mM SDS) consisted of native UBI associated with approximately 11 molecules of SDS. The current study used CE and 15N/13C-1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectroscopy to identify residues in folded UBI that associate specifically with SDS at 0.8-1.8 mM SDS, and to correlate these associations with established biophysical and structural properties of this well-characterized protein. The ability of the surface charge and hydrophobicity of folded UBI to affect the association with SDS (at concentrations below the CMC) was studied, using CE, by converting lys-ε-NH3+ to lys-ε-NHCOCH3 groups. According to CE, the acetylation of lysine residues inhibited the binding of 11 SDS ([SDS] < 2 mM) and decreased the number of complexes of composition UBI-(NHAc)8·SDSn that formed on the pathway of unfolding of UBI-(NHAc)8 in SDS. A comparison of 15N-1H HSQC spectra at 0 mM and 1 mM SDS with calculated electrostatic surface potentials of folded UBI (e.g., solutions to the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation) suggested, however, that SDS binds preferentially to native UBI at hydrophobic residues that are formally neutral (i.e., Leu and Ile), but that have positive electrostatic surface potential (as predicted from solutions to non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equations); SDS did not uniformly interact with residues that have formal positive charge (e.g., Lys or Arg). Cationic functional groups, therefore, promote the binding of SDS to folded UBI because these groups exert long-range effects on the positive electrostatic surface potential (which extend beyond their own van der Waal’s radii, as predicted from PB theory), and not because cationic groups are necessarily the

  4. The respective roles of polar/nonpolar binary patterns and amino acid composition in protein regular secondary structures explored exhaustively using hydrophobic cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Rebehmed, Joseph; Quintus, Flavien; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have highlighted the leading role of the sequence periodicity of polar and nonpolar amino acids (binary patterns) in the formation of regular secondary structures (RSS). However, these were based on the analysis of only a few simple cases, with no direct mean to correlate binary patterns with the limits of RSS. Here, HCA-derived hydrophobic clusters (HC) which are conditioned binary patterns whose positions fit well those of RSS, were considered. All the HC types, defined by unique binary patterns, which were commonly observed in three-dimensional (3D) structures of globular domains, were analyzed. The 180 HC types with preferences for either α-helices or β-strands distinctly contain basic binary units typical of these RSS. Therefore a general trend supporting the "binary pattern preference" assumption was observed. HC for which observed RSS are in disagreement with their expected behavior (discordant HC) were also examined. They were separated in HC types with moderate preferences for RSS, having "weak" binary patterns and versatile RSS and HC types with high preferences for RSS, having "strong" binary patterns and then displaying nonpolar amino acids at the protein surface. It was shown that in both cases, discordant HC could be distinguished from concordant ones by well-differentiated amino acid compositions. The obtained results could, thus, help to complement the currently available methods for the accurate prediction of secondary structures in proteins from the only information of a single amino acid sequence. This can be especially useful for characterizing orphan sequences and for assisting protein engineering and design. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. New ruthenium(II) arene complexes of anthracenyl-appended diazacycloalkanes: effect of ligand intercalation and hydrophobicity on DNA and protein binding and cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ganeshpandian, Mani; Loganathan, Rangasamy; Suresh, Eringathodi; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2014-01-21

    A series of half-sandwich Ru(II) arene complexes of the type [Ru(η(6)-arene)(L)Cl](PF6) 1-4, where arene is benzene (1, 2) or p-cymene (3, 4) and L is N-methylhomopiperazine (L1) or 1-(anthracen-10-ylmethyl)-4-methylhomopiperazine (L2), has been isolated and characterized by using spectral methods. The X-ray crystal structures of 2, 3 and 4 reveal that the compounds possess a pseudo-octahedral "piano-stool" structure equipped with the arene ligand as the seat and the bidentate ligand and the chloride ion as the legs of the stool. The DNA binding affinity determined using absorption spectral titrations with CT DNA and competitive DNA binding studies varies as 4 > 2 > 3 > 1, depending upon both the arene and diazacycloalkane ligands. Complexes 2 and 4 with higher DNA binding affinities show strong hypochromism (56%) and a large red-shift (2, 10; 4, 11 nm), which reveals that the anthracenyl moiety of the ligand is stacked into the DNA base pairs and that the arene ligand hydrophobicity also dictates the DNA binding affinity. In contrast, the monocationic complexes 1 and 3 are involved in electrostatic binding in the minor groove of DNA. The enhancement in viscosities of CT DNA upon binding to 2 and 4 are higher than those for 1 and 3 supporting the DNA binding modes of interaction inferred. All the complexes cleave DNA effectively even in the absence of an external agent and the cleavage ability is enhanced in the presence of an activator like H2O2. Tryptophan quenching measurements suggest that the protein binding affinity of the complexes varies as 4 > 2 > 3 > 1, which is the same as that for DNA binding and that the fluorescence quenching of BSA occurs through a static mechanism. The positive ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) values for BSA binding of complexes indicate that the interaction between the complexes and BSA is mainly hydrophobic in nature and the energy transfer efficiency has been analysed according to the Förster non-radiative energy transfer theory. The

  6. Independent of Their Localization in Protein the Hydrophobic Amino Acid Residues Have No Effect on the Molten Globule State of Apomyoglobin and the Disulfide Bond on the Surface of Apomyoglobin Stabilizes This Intermediate State

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Tatiana N.; Majorina, Maria A.; Larina, Daria S.; Kashparov, Ivan A.; Samatova, Ekaterina N.; Glukhov, Anatoly S.; Melnik, Bogdan S.

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to “strengthen” the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  7. Independent of their localization in protein the hydrophobic amino acid residues have no effect on the molten globule state of apomyoglobin and the disulfide bond on the surface of apomyoglobin stabilizes this intermediate state.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Majorina, Maria A; Larina, Daria S; Kashparov, Ivan A; Samatova, Ekaterina N; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to "strengthen" the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin.

  8. Dialkylcarbamoyl Chloride Dressings in the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections after Nonimplant Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bua, Nelson; Smith, George E; Totty, Joshua P; Pan, Daniel; Wallace, Tom; Carradice, Daniel; Chetter, Ian C

    2017-10-01

    Dressings coated with dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC) are highly hydrophobic and irreversibly bind multiple types of bacteria, trapping them in the dressing and reducing the number of organisms at the wound surface. We aimed to assess the impact of DACC-coated postoperative dressings on the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) in nonimplant vascular surgery patients. Two hundred patients undergoing nonimplant vascular surgery were prospectively recruited at a single vascular center. The initial 100 patients had their operative wounds dressed with conventional dressings followed by 100 patients who received DACC-coated postoperative dressings. Wounds were reviewed at day 5 and day 30 to determine the presence of SSI using the ASEPSIS scoring system. The variation in outcomes between groups was assessed using chi-squared test and logistic regression analysis to assess the effects of other variables, which may affect healing. Between August 1, 2015 and February 29, 2016, a total of 120 men and 80 women were recruited. The mean age was 63 (range 27-97) years, 92% were current or ex-smokers and 45.5% were diabetic. Rate of SSI at 5 days was significantly lower in the DACC group compared with standard dressings (1% vs. 10%, P < 0.05). There was no difference in the rates of SSI at 30 days. Logistic regression suggested that the type of dressing used was the most prominent predictor variable for the presence of early SSI (P = 0.028, odds ratio = 0.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.77). DACC-coated dressings were associated with a significant reduction in SSI rates in the early postoperative period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Hillyer, Matthew B.

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses in papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state-of-the-art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the Hydrophobic effect. To highlight this a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes are presented. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities including idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins. PMID:27215816

  10. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyer, Matthew B.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins.

  11. Protection and mechanism of action of a novel human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine candidate based on the extracellular domain of small hydrophobic protein.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Bert; Sedeyn, Koen; Vande Ginste, Liesbeth; De Baets, Sarah; Schotsaert, Michael; Roose, Kenny; Houspie, Lieselot; Van Ranst, Marc; Gilbert, Brian; van Rooijen, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Piedra, Pedro; Saelens, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Infections with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) occur globally in all age groups and can have devastating consequences in young infants. We demonstrate that a vaccine based on the extracellular domain (SHe) of the small hydrophobic (SH) protein of HRSV, reduced viral replication in challenged laboratory mice and in cotton rats. We show that this suppression of viral replication can be transferred by serum and depends on a functional IgG receptor compartment with a major contribution of FcγRI and FcγRIII. Using a conditional cell depletion method, we provide evidence that alveolar macrophages are involved in the protection by SHe-specific antibodies. HRSV-infected cells abundantly express SH on the cell surface and are likely the prime target of the humoral immune response elicited by SHe-based vaccination. Finally, natural infection of humans and experimental infection of mice or cotton rats does not induce a strong immune response against HRSV SHe. Using SHe as a vaccine antigen induces immune protection against HRSV by a mechanism that differs from the natural immune response and from other HRSV vaccination strategies explored to date. Hence, HRSV vaccine candidates that aim at inducing protective neutralizing antibodies or T-cell responses could be complemented with a SHe-based antigen to further improve immune protection.

  12. Protection and mechanism of action of a novel human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine candidate based on the extracellular domain of small hydrophobic protein

    PubMed Central

    Schepens, Bert; Sedeyn, Koen; Vande Ginste, Liesbeth; De Baets, Sarah; Schotsaert, Michael; Roose, Kenny; Houspie, Lieselot; Van Ranst, Marc; Gilbert, Brian; van Rooijen, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Piedra, Pedro; Saelens, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Infections with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) occur globally in all age groups and can have devastating consequences in young infants. We demonstrate that a vaccine based on the extracellular domain (SHe) of the small hydrophobic (SH) protein of HRSV, reduced viral replication in challenged laboratory mice and in cotton rats. We show that this suppression of viral replication can be transferred by serum and depends on a functional IgG receptor compartment with a major contribution of FcγRI and FcγRIII. Using a conditional cell depletion method, we provide evidence that alveolar macrophages are involved in the protection by SHe-specific antibodies. HRSV-infected cells abundantly express SH on the cell surface and are likely the prime target of the humoral immune response elicited by SHe-based vaccination. Finally, natural infection of humans and experimental infection of mice or cotton rats does not induce a strong immune response against HRSV SHe. Using SHe as a vaccine antigen induces immune protection against HRSV by a mechanism that differs from the natural immune response and from other HRSV vaccination strategies explored to date. Hence, HRSV vaccine candidates that aim at inducing protective neutralizing antibodies or T-cell responses could be complemented with a SHe-based antigen to further improve immune protection. PMID:25298406

  13. Syntheses and self-assembly of novel asparagine-derived amphiphiles: Applications in the encapsulation of proteins, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic drug models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mfuh, Adelphe Mbufung

    This thesis focuses mainly on the synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of a novel series of asparagine-derived amphiphiles and their use in the preparation and stabilization of nano and microcapsules for the encapsulation of proteins, and hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug models. Chapter 1 gives a brief literature overview of lipid molecular assembly, which covers some aspects of morphological analyses, encapsulation of chemical entity and some reported characterization techniques of supramolecular assemblies. It introduces the scope of this dissertation and contains some information on stimulus responsive liposomal systems for controlled release of drug models. Chapter 2 introduces a novel asparagine-derived lipid bearing two fatty chains (C11 and C17) and a tetrahydropyrimidinone head group. It presents information on the synthesis and characterization of this lipid and describes the self-assembly and effects of this lipid in distearoyl phosphatidyl choline bilayer. Chapter 3 presents the synthesis and characterization of a series of ALAn,m (where n and m represent the length of the hydrocarbon chains on the asparagine-derived, heterocyclic head group). It contains data on the effect of chain length, solvent media and head group ionization on the conformational equilibrium about a tertiary amide bond in ALAn,m. The chapter also examines the influence of chain length on ALAn,m on the colloidal stability of DSPC liposomes. Chapter 4 presents the first example of an N,N-acetal linkage in a novel pH responsive nanocarrier system obtained from the cyclocondensation of dodecanal with sodium asparaginate. Data is presented on the spontaneous self-assembly, encapsulation studies and morphological characterization of the nano-systems with the inclusion of cholesterol as additive. Chapter 5 presents the development of a photoresponsive nanocarrier via the self- assembly of an asparagine-derived lipid containing a coumarin unit in the hydrophobic domain. The

  14. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  15. 15N CSA tensors and 15N-1H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static 15N NMR techniques for the determination of the 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and 15N-1H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone 15N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the 15N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the 15N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the ;magic sandwich; SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the 15N-1H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  16. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D [Albuquerque, NM; Shah, Pratik B [Albuquerque, NM; Singh, Seema [Rio Rancho, NM; Brinker, C Jeffrey [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  17. In vivo tests of a novel wound dressing based on biomaterials with tissue adhesion controlled through external stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, C; Barcellos, L; Ferreira, M D; Moura, S A L; Soares, I A; Oréfice, R L

    2011-05-01

    The high incidence of wounds by second intention and the high costs associated with their treatment give rise to the need for the development of wound dressings that protect not only the wounds themselves but that are also able to promote cell proliferation and skin regeneration. Moreover, it is also very important that no damage to the new regenerated tissue is generated while removing the dressing. In this work, a novel wound dressing, which would be able to favor tissue repair and be removed at an appropriate scheduled moment by means of an external stimulus without promoting extensive damage to the new tissue, was produced and tested. Polyurethane membranes were modified by grafting polymers based on poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) (P-N-IPAAm). P-N-IPAAm undergoes a phase transition at approximately 32°C, which changes its behavior from hydrophilic (below 32°C) to hydrophobic. It was hypothesized that, by reducing the temperature near the wound dressing to values lower than 32°C, the detachment of the dressing would become more effective. The wound dressings containing P-N-IPAAm grafts were tested in vivo by covering excisional wounds produced in mice. The produced dressings were placed in direct contact with the lesions for 3 days. Results showed that the hypothermia due to anesthesia required to remove the dressings from mice lowered the local temperature to 28°C and favored the detachment of the wound dressings containing P-N-IPAAm grafts. Histological analyses showed that lesions covered by dressings presented less intense inflammatory events and denser connective tissue than did the wounds without dressings. The wounds covered by polyurethane membranes with P-N-IPAAm grafts showed signs of more intense re-epithelization and angiogenesis than did the lesions covered by polyurethane without grafts.

  18. Unusual hydrophobic interactions in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanning; Xu, Jianqing; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-05-21

    Hydrophobic interaction, which is believed to be a primary driving force for many fundamental chemical and biological processes such as nanostructure self-assembly, micelle formation, and protein folding, is different in acidic aqueous solutions compared to salt solutions. In this study, the aggregation/dispersion behavior of nonpolar hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solutions with varying acid (HCl) concentrations is investigated using novel molecular dynamics simulations and compared to the hydrophobic behavior in corresponding salt (NaCl) solutions. The formation of unusual weakly bound hydrophobe-hydrated proton solvation structures is observed and can be attributed to the unique "amphiphilic" characteristic of hydrated protons. This molecular-level mechanism for the acid-enhanced dissolution of hydrophobic particles also provides a novel interpretation for the apparent anomaly of the hydronium cation in the Hofmeister series.

  19. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called “unhappy water” molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  20. DRESS Syndrome Presents as Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tonekaboni, Seyed Hasan; Jafari, Narjes; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome, which reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, presenting by generalized skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, atypical lymphocytosis, and internal organ involvement. Herein a 21-month old male infant with DRESS and Encephalopathy syndrome is presented who complicated after phenobarbital usage that persisted due to phenytoin cream usage. The case received phenobarbital after a seizure disorder presented as "status epilepticus". He developed drug eruption, fever, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver enzymes, encephalopathy and progressive loss of consciousness with extensive hyperintense white matter lesions in brain MRI. After discontinuation of phenobarbital and phenytoin, all symptoms were resolved, while brain MRI became normal after two months. To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case that developed leukoencephalopathy along with DRESS syndrome.

  1. DRESS syndrome with cerebral vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sola, Daniele; Rossi, Luca; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo; Pirisi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    DRESS (drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome is a severe reaction triggered by drugs that manifests as pyrexia and eosinophilia with involvement of the skin and internal organs. We herein describe the case of a patient who developed hyperuricemia after receiving treatment for tuberculosis, then took allpurinol and developed DRESS syndrome with a contextual coma and right hemisyndrome. This report describes for the first time the presence of vasculitic cerebral involvement in a patient with DRESS syndrome. The cerebral vasculitis responded to treatment, showing clinical and instrumental remission. In cases such as this, allergic cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis because it can be treated if recognized early, thus leading to remission without the development of any sequelae.

  2. Wound dressings: selecting the most appropriate type.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Karen C; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner

    2013-12-01

    Appropriate wound dressing selection is guided by an understanding of wound dressing properties and an ability to match the level of drainage and depth of a wound. Wounds should be assessed for necrosis and infection, which need to be addressed prior to selecting an ideal dressing. Moisture-retentive dressings include films, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, alginates, and hydrofibers and are useful in a variety of clinical settings. Antimicrobial-impregnated dressings can be useful in wounds that are superficially infected or are at higher risk for infection. For refractory wounds that need more growth stimulation, tissue-engineered dressings have become a viable option in the past few decades, especially those that have been approved for burns, venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers. As wounds heal, the ideal dressing type may change, depending on the amount of exudate and depth of the wound; thus success in wound dressing selection hinges on recognition of the changing healing environment.

  3. Behavior of Solvent-Exposed Hydrophobic Groove in the Anti-Apoptotic Bcl-XL Protein: Clues for Its Ability to Bind Diverse BH3 Ligands from MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-XL is a member of Bcl-2 family of proteins involved in the regulation of intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Its overexpression in many human cancers makes it an important target for anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-XL interacts with the BH3 domain of several pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 partners. This helical bundle protein has a pronounced hydrophobic groove which acts as a binding region for the BH3 domains. Eight independent molecular dynamics simulations of the apo/holo forms of Bcl-XL were carried out to investigate the behavior of solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove. The simulations used either a twin-range cut-off or particle mesh Ewald (PME) scheme to treat long-range interactions. Destabilization of the BH3 domain-containing helix H2 was observed in all four twin-range cut-off simulations. Most of the other major helices remained stable. The unwinding of H2 can be related to the ability of Bcl-XL to bind diverse BH3 ligands. The loss of helical character can also be linked to the formation of homo- or hetero-dimers in Bcl-2 proteins. Several experimental studies have suggested that exposure of BH3 domain is a crucial event before they form dimers. Thus unwinding of H2 seems to be functionally very important. The four PME simulations, however, revealed a stable helix H2. It is possible that the H2 unfolding might occur in PME simulations at longer time scales. Hydrophobic residues in the hydrophobic groove are involved in stable interactions among themselves. The solvent accessible surface areas of bulky hydrophobic residues in the groove are significantly buried by the loop LB connecting the helix H2 and subsequent helix. These observations help to understand how the hydrophobic patch in Bcl-XL remains stable in the solvent-exposed state. We suggest that both the destabilization of helix H2 and the conformational heterogeneity of loop LB are important factors for binding of diverse ligands in the hydrophobic groove of Bcl-XL. PMID:23468841

  4. Behavior of solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein: clues for its ability to bind diverse BH3 ligands from MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Lama, Dilraj; Modi, Vivek; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2013-01-01

    Bcl-XL is a member of Bcl-2 family of proteins involved in the regulation of intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Its overexpression in many human cancers makes it an important target for anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-XL interacts with the BH3 domain of several pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 partners. This helical bundle protein has a pronounced hydrophobic groove which acts as a binding region for the BH3 domains. Eight independent molecular dynamics simulations of the apo/holo forms of Bcl-XL were carried out to investigate the behavior of solvent-exposed hydrophobic groove. The simulations used either a twin-range cut-off or particle mesh Ewald (PME) scheme to treat long-range interactions. Destabilization of the BH3 domain-containing helix H2 was observed in all four twin-range cut-off simulations. Most of the other major helices remained stable. The unwinding of H2 can be related to the ability of Bcl-XL to bind diverse BH3 ligands. The loss of helical character can also be linked to the formation of homo- or hetero-dimers in Bcl-2 proteins. Several experimental studies have suggested that exposure of BH3 domain is a crucial event before they form dimers. Thus unwinding of H2 seems to be functionally very important. The four PME simulations, however, revealed a stable helix H2. It is possible that the H2 unfolding might occur in PME simulations at longer time scales. Hydrophobic residues in the hydrophobic groove are involved in stable interactions among themselves. The solvent accessible surface areas of bulky hydrophobic residues in the groove are significantly buried by the loop LB connecting the helix H2 and subsequent helix. These observations help to understand how the hydrophobic patch in Bcl-XL remains stable in the solvent-exposed state. We suggest that both the destabilization of helix H2 and the conformational heterogeneity of loop LB are important factors for binding of diverse ligands in the hydrophobic groove of Bcl-XL.

  5. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Fournier's Gangrene: Conventional Dressings versus Dressings with Dakin's Solution

    PubMed Central

    Altunoluk, Bülent; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Eren, Mustafa; Benlioglu, Can; Kankilic, Nazim; Baykan, Halit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fournier's gangrene is a fulminant and destructive inflammation of the scrotum, penis, and perineum. The objective of this study was to compare 2 different approaches to wound management after aggressive surgical debridement. Methods. Data from 14 patients with Fournier's gangrene were retrospectively collected (2005–2011). Once the patients were stabilized following surgery, they were treated with either daily antiseptic (povidone iodine) dressings (group I, n = 6) or dressings with dakin's solution (sodium hypochloride) (group II, n = 8). Results. The mean age of the patients was 68.2 ± 7.8 (55–75) years in group I and 66.9 ± 10.2 (51–79) years in group II. Length of hospital stay was 13 ± 3.5 (7–16) days in group I and 8.9 ± 3.0 (4–12) days in group II (P < 0.05). The number and rate of mortality was 1/6 (16.7%) in group I, and 1/8 (12.5%) in group II. Conclusions. The hospitalization time can be reduced with the use of dakin's solution for the dressings in the treatment of FG. Also, dressings with dakin's solution seems to have favorable effects on morbidity and mortality. Consequently dakin's solution may alter the treatment of this disastrous disease by reducing cost, morbidity and mortality. PMID:22567424

  7. Polymer-xerogel composites for controlled release wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Costache, Marius C; Qu, Haibo; Ducheyne, Paul; Devore, David I

    2010-08-01

    Many polymers and composites have been used to prepare active wound dressings. These materials have typically exhibited potentially toxic burst release of the drugs within the first few hours followed by a much slower, potentially ineffective drug release rate thereafter. Many of these materials also degraded to produce inflammatory and cytotoxic products. To overcome these limitations, composite active wound dressings were prepared here from two fully biodegradable and tissue compatible components, silicon oxide sol-gel (xerogel) microparticles that were embedded in tyrosine-poly(ethylene glycol)-derived poly(ether carbonate) copolymer matrices. Sustained, controlled release of drugs from these composites was demonstrated in vitro using bupivacaine and mepivacaine, two water-soluble local anesthetics commonly used in clinical applications. By systematically varying independent compositional parameters of the composites, including the hydrophilic:hydrophobic balance of the tyrosine-derived monomers and poly(ethylene glycol) in the copolymers and the porosity, weight ratio and drug content of the xerogels, drug release kinetics approaching zero-order were obtained. Composites with xerogel mass fractions up to 75% and drug payloads as high as 13% by weight in the final material were fabricated without compromising the physical integrity or the controlled release kinetics. The copolymer-xerogel composites thus provided a unique solution for the sustained delivery of therapeutic agents from tissue compatible wound dressings. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. School Dress Codes and Uniform Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell

    2002-01-01

    Opinions abound on what students should wear to class. Some see student dress as a safety issue; others see it as a student-rights issue. The issue of dress codes and uniform policies has been tackled in the classroom, the boardroom, and the courtroom. This Policy Report examines the whole fabric of the debate on dress codes and uniform policies…

  9. Wetting: Intrinsically robust hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-04-01

    Ceramic surfaces can be rendered hydrophobic by using polymeric modifiers, but these are not robust to harsh environments. A known family of rare-earth oxide ceramics is now found to exhibit intrinsic hydrophobicity, even after exposure to high temperatures and abrasive wear.

  10. 'Crystal lattice engineering,' an approach to engineer protein crystal contacts by creating intermolecular symmetry: crystallization and structure determination of a mutant human RNase 1 with a hydrophobic interface of leucines.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidenori; Tamada, Taro; Kosaka, Megumi; Miyata, Kohei; Fujiki, Shinya; Tano, Masaru; Moriya, Masayuki; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Honjo, Eijiro; Tada, Hiroko; Ino, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Futami, Junichiro; Seno, Masaharu; Nomoto, Takashi; Hirata, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Motonobu; Kuroki, Ryota

    2007-07-01

    A protein crystal lattice consists of surface contact regions, where the interactions of specific groups play a key role in stabilizing the regular arrangement of the protein molecules. In an attempt to control protein incorporation in a crystal lattice, a leucine zipper-like hydrophobic interface (comprising four leucine residues) was introduced into a helical region (helix 2) of the human pancreatic ribonuclease 1 (RNase 1) that was predicted to form a suitable crystallization interface. Although crystallization of wild-type RNase 1 has not yet been reported, the RNase 1 mutant having four leucines (4L-RNase 1) was successfully crystallized under several different conditions. The crystal structures were subsequently determined by X-ray crystallography by molecular replacement using the structure of bovine RNase A. The overall structure of 4L-RNase 1 is quite similar to that of the bovine RNase A, and the introduced leucine residues formed the designed crystal interface. To characterize the role of the introduced leucine residues in crystallization of RNase 1 further, the number of leucines was reduced to three or two (3L- and 2L-RNase 1, respectively). Both mutants crystallized and a similar hydrophobic interface as in 4L-RNase 1 was observed. A related approach to engineer crystal contacts at helix 3 of RNase 1 (N4L-RNase 1) was also evaluated. N4L-RNase 1 also successfully crystallized and formed the expected hydrophobic packing interface. These results suggest that appropriate introduction of a leucine zipper-like hydrophobic interface can promote intermolecular symmetry for more efficient protein crystallization in crystal lattice engineering efforts.