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Sample records for protein hydrophobic dressing

  1. Compatibility of a protein topical gel with wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Ji, Junyan A; Borisov, Oleg; Ingham, Erika; Ling, Victor; Wang, Y John

    2009-02-01

    The compatibility between several dressing materials and a recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) topical methylcellulose gel formulation was investigated. The dressings being studied were Adaptic, Non-stick Dressing, Conformant 2, Opsite and Tegapore. The criteria to select a compatible dressing include protein stability, absence of leachables from the dressing, and ability to retain gel on wound. An LC-MS method with sample treatment using cellulase was developed to determine protein oxidation in gel formulations. Results showed that rhVEGF was significantly oxidized by Adaptic dressing in 24 h. Protein oxidation was likely due to the peroxides, as determined by FOX assay, released into the protein solution from the dressing. Furthermore, Adaptic dressing caused protein adsorption loss, formation of high MW protein adducts, and released leachables as determined by RP-HPLC, LC-MS, and SEC. No protein oxidation or loss was observed after exposure to the other four alternative dressings. However, unknown leachables were detected in the presence of Opsite and Non-stick Dressing. The pore sizes of the Conformant 2 and Non-stick dressings were too large to hold the topical gel within the wound area, making them unsuitable for patient use. No rhVEGF bioactivity loss was observed in the presence of Tegapore. In conclusion, Tegapore was considered suitable for the rhVEGF topical gel.

  2. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  3. Charges in the hydrophobic interior of proteins.

    PubMed

    Isom, Daniel G; Castañeda, Carlos A; Cannon, Brian R; Velu, Priya D; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2010-09-14

    Charges are inherently incompatible with hydrophobic environments. Presumably for this reason, ionizable residues are usually excluded from the hydrophobic interior of proteins and are found instead at the surface, where they can interact with bulk water. Paradoxically, ionizable groups buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins play essential roles, especially in biological energy transduction. To examine the unusual properties of internal ionizable groups we measured the pK(a) of glutamic acid residues at 25 internal positions in a stable form of staphylococcal nuclease. Two of 25 Glu residues titrated with normal pK(a) near 4.5; the other 23 titrated with elevated pK(a) values ranging from 5.2-9.4, with an average value of 7.7. Trp fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism were used to monitor the effects of internal charges on conformation. These data demonstrate that although charges buried in proteins are indeed destabilizing, charged side chains can be buried readily in the hydrophobic core of stable proteins without the need for specialized structural adaptations to stabilize them, and without inducing any major conformational reorganization. The apparent dielectric effect experienced by the internal charges is considerably higher than the low dielectric constants of hydrophobic matter used to represent the protein interior in electrostatic continuum models of proteins. The high thermodynamic stability required for proteins to withstand the presence of buried charges suggests a pathway for the evolution of enzymes, and it underscores the need to mind thermodynamic stability in any strategy for engineering novel or altered enzymatic active sites in proteins. PMID:20798341

  4. Chronic Wound Dressings Based on Collagen-Mimetic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cereceres, Stacy; Touchet, Tyler; Browning, Mary Beth; Smith, Clayton; Rivera, Jose; Höök, Magnus; Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan; Russell, Brooke; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Chronic wounds are projected to reach epidemic proportions due to the aging population and the increasing incidence of diabetes. There is a strong clinical need for an improved wound dressing that can balance wound moisture, promote cell migration and proliferation, and degrade at an appropriate rate to minimize the need for dressing changes. Approach: To this end, we have developed a bioactive, hydrogel microsphere wound dressing that incorporates a collagen-mimetic protein, Scl2GFPGER, to promote active wound healing. A redesigned Scl2GFPGER, engineered collagen (eColGFPGER), was created to reduce steric hindrance of integrin-binding motifs and increase overall stability of the triple helical backbone, thereby resulting in increased cell adhesion to substrates. Results: This study demonstrates the successful modification of the Scl2GFPGER protein to eColGFPGER, which displayed enhanced stability and integrin interactions. Fabrication of hydrogel microspheres provided a matrix with adaptive moisture technology, and degradation rates have potential for use in human wounds. Innovation: This collagen-mimetic wound dressing was designed to permit controlled modulation of cellular interactions and degradation rate without impact on other physical properties. Its fabrication into uniform hydrogel microspheres provides a bioactive dressing that can readily conform to irregular wounds. Conclusion: Overall, this new eColGFPGER shows strong promise in the generation of bioactive hydrogels for wound healing as well as a variety of tissue scaffolds. PMID:26244101

  5. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  6. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Strongly Induce Negative Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  7. Converting a marginally hydrophobic soluble protein into a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nørholm, Morten H H; Cunningham, Fiona; Deber, Charles M; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2011-03-18

    δ-Helices are marginally hydrophobic α-helical segments in soluble proteins that exhibit certain sequence characteristics of transmembrane (TM) helices [Cunningham, F., Rath, A., Johnson, R. M. & Deber, C. M. (2009). Distinctions between hydrophobic helices in globular proteins and TM segments as factors in protein sorting. J. Biol. Chem., 284, 5395-402]. In order to better understand the difference between δ-helices and TM helices, we have studied the insertion of five TM-like δ-helices into dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Using model constructs in which an isolated δ-helix is engineered into a bona fide membrane protein, we find that, for two δ-helices originating from secreted proteins, at least three single-nucleotide mutations are necessary to obtain efficient membrane insertion, whereas one mutation is sufficient in a δ-helix from the cytosolic protein P450BM-3. We further find that only when the entire upstream region of the mutated δ-helix in the intact cytochrome P450BM-3 is deleted does a small fraction of the truncated protein insert into microsomes. Our results suggest that upstream portions of the polypeptide, as well as embedded charged residues, protect δ-helices in globular proteins from being recognized by the signal recognition particle-Sec61 endoplasmic-reticulum-targeting machinery and that δ-helices in secreted proteins are mutationally more distant from TM helices than δ-helices in cytosolic proteins.

  8. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  13. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  14. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  15. Hydrophobicity – Shake Flasks, Protein Folding and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are some of the most important interactions in nature. They are the primary driving force in a number of phenomena. This is mostly an entropic effect and can account for a number of biophysical events such as protein-protein or protein-ligand binding that are of immense importance in drug design. The earliest studies on this phenomenon can be dated back to the end of the 19th century when Meyer and Overton independently correlated the hydrophobic nature of gases to their anesthetic potency. Since then, significant progress has been made in this realm of science. This review briefly traces the history of hydrophobicity research along with the theoretical estimation of partition coefficients. Finally, the application of hydrophobicity estimation methods in the field of drug design and protein folding is discussed. PMID:19929828

  16. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  17. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  18. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Frederic N R; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2009-10-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid<-->gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  19. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Frederic N.R.; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Helix

    2009-10-02

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6 kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid {r_reversible} gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  20. Use and application of hydrophobic interaction chromatography for protein purification.

    PubMed

    McCue, Justin T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this section is to provide the reader with guidelines and background on the use and experimental application of Hydrophobic Interaction chromatography (HIC) for the purification of proteins. The section will give step by step instructions on how to use HIC in the laboratory to purify proteins. General guidelines and relevant background information is also provided.

  1. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. PMID:26467442

  2. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  3. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed

    Tanford, C

    1997-06-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  4. Protein folding, stability, and solvation structure in osmolyte solutions hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect between solutes in aqueous solutions plays a central role in our understanding of recognition and folding of proteins and self assembly of lipids. Hydrophobicity induces nonideal solution behavior which plays a role in many aspects of biophysics. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. This effect has recently been restudied and new mechanisms proposed for its origins in terms of transfer free energies and hydrophobicity.

  5. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition). PMID:26658743

  6. A comprehensive study to protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baca, Martyna; De Vos, Jelle; Bruylants, Gilles; Bartik, Kristin; Liu, Xiaodong; Cook, Ken; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of different kosmotropic/chaotropic salt systems on retention characteristics of intact proteins has been examined in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The performance was assessed using different column chemistries, i.e., polyalkylamide, alkylamine incorporating hydrophobic moieties, and a butyl chemistry. Selectivity in HIC is mainly governed by the salt concentration and by the molal surface tension increment of the salt. Typically, a linear relationship between the natural logarithm of the retention factor and the salt concentration is obtained. Using a 250mm long column packed with 5μm polyalkylamide functionalized silica particles and applying a 30min linear salt gradient, a peak capacity of 78 was achieved, allowing the baseline separation of seven intact proteins. The hydrophobicity index appeared to be a good indicator to predict the elution order of intact proteins in HIC mode. Furthermore, the effect of adding additives in the mobile phase, such as calcium chloride (stabilizing the 3D conformation of α-lactalbumin) and isopropanol, on retention properties has been assessed. Results indicate that HIC retention is also governed by conformational in the proteins which affect the number of accessible hydrophobic moieties. PMID:27237734

  7. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  8. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  9. Temperature dependence of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R L

    1986-01-01

    Accurate calorimetric data for the thermodynamics of transfer of six liquid hydrocarbons to water have been combined with solubility data to provide a model for the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. The model applies at temperatures for which the change in heat capacity (delta Cp) is constant. The extrapolated value of the temperature (Ts) at which the entropy of transfer (delta S degrees) reaches zero is strikingly similar (Ts = 112.8 degrees C +/- 2.2 degrees C) for the six hydrocarbons. This finding provides an interpretation for the empirical relation discovered by Sturtevant: the ratio delta S degrees/delta Cp measured at 25 degrees C is constant for the transfer of nonpolar substances from nonaqueous media to water. Constancy of this ratio is equivalent to Ts = constant. When applied to protein folding, the hydrocarbon model gives estimates of the contributions of the hydrophobic interaction to the entropy and enthalpy changes on unfolding and, by difference, estimates of the residual contributions from other sources. The major share of the large enthalpy change observed on unfolding at high temperatures comes from the hydrophobic interaction. The hydrophobic interaction changes from being entropy-driven at 22 degrees C to being enthalpy-driven at 113 degrees C. Finally, the hydrocarbon model predicts that plots of the specific entropy change on unfolding versus temperature should nearly intersect close to 113 degrees C, as observed by Privalov. PMID:3464944

  10. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces.

  11. Solvent and temperature effects on crambin, a hydrophobic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Llinas, M.; Lecomte, J.T.J.; De Marco, A.

    1980-10-01

    Crambin, a 5000-mol. wt. water-insoluble protein found in crambe abyssinica seeds is presently being studied by x-ray diffraction to 0.9 A resolution and /sup 1/H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR data at 250 and 600 MHz have suggested that this hydrophobic protein retains a similar globular conformation in both glacial acetic acid (AA), a Bronsted acid, and dimethylformamide (DMF), a Lewis base. These observations suggest that the globular conformation observed in these organic solvents is most likely the native structure present in the crystalline state. As suggested by the high intrinsic resolution of the crystallographic x-ray diffraction pattern, and demonstrated by the NMR data, crambin is a very rigid protein. Work is in progress to assign the /sup 1/H-resonances and to correlate H and /sup 13/C NMR dynamic data with the crystallographic model. It is hoped that unravelling conformational features of this hydrophobic protein will provide clues to help us understand other membrane-bound functional proteins.

  12. Consistent Treatment of Hydrophobicity in Protein Lattice Models Accounts for Cold Denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Erik; Varilly, Patrick; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-02-01

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavorable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here, we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  13. Neutron structure of the hydrophobic plant protein crambin

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, M.M.; Kossiakoff, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Crystals of the small hydrophobic protein crambin have been shown to diffract to a resolution of at least 0.88 A. This means that crambin presents a rare opportunity to study a protein structure at virtually atomic resolution. The high resolution of the diffraction pattern coupled with the assets of neutron diffraction present the distinct possibility that crambin's analysis may surpass that of any other protein system in degree and accuracy of detail. The neutron crambin structure is currently being refined at 1.50 A (44.9% of the data to 1.2 A has also been included). It is expected that a nominal resolution of 1.0 A can be achieved. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  15. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Induce a Phosphatidylethanolamine to Form Cubic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Khoojinian, Hamed; Schulwitz, Leonard E.; Biswas, Samares C.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C promote rapid adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air/water interface. Previous evidence suggests that they achieve this effect by facilitating the formation of a rate-limiting negatively curved stalk between the vesicular bilayer and the interface. To determine whether the proteins can alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, we used x-ray diffraction to investigate how the physiological mixture of these proteins affects structures formed by 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, which by itself undergoes the lamellar-to-inverse hexagonal phase transition at 71°C. In amounts as low as 0.03% (w:w) and at temperatures as low as 57°C, the proteins induce formation of bicontinuous inverse cubic phases. The proteins produce a dose-related shift of diffracted intensity to the cubic phases, with minimal evidence of other structures above 0.1% and 62°C, but no change in the lattice-constants of the lamellar or cubic phases. The induction of the bicontinuous cubic phases, in which the individual lipid leaflets have the same saddle-shaped curvature as the hypothetical stalk-intermediate, supports the proposed model of how the surfactant proteins promote adsorption. PMID:20409474

  16. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  17. Hydrophobic and Basic Domains Target Proteins to Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Ingelmo-Torres, Mercedes; González-Moreno, Elena; Kassan, Adam; Hanzal-Bayer, Michael; Tebar, Francesc; Herms, Albert; Grewal, Thomas; Hancock, John F.; Enrich, Carlos; Bosch, Marta; Gross, Steven P.; Parton, Robert G.; Pol, Albert

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, progress in the study of the lateral organization of the plasma membrane has led to the proposal that mammalian cells use two different organelles to store lipids: intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) and plasma membrane caveolae. Experimental evidence suggests that caveolin (CAV) may act as a sensitive lipid-organizing molecule that physically connects these two lipid-storing organelles. Here, we determine the sequences necessary for efficient sorting of CAV to LDs. We show that targeting is a process cooperatively mediated by two motifs. CAV's central hydrophobic domain (Hyd) anchors CAV to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Next, positively charged sequences (Pos-Seqs) mediate sorting of CAVs into LDs. Our findings were confirmed by identifying an equivalent, non-conserved but functionally interchangeable Pos-Seq in ALDI, a bona fide LD-resident protein. Using this information, we were able to retarget a cytosolic protein and convert it to an LD-resident protein. Further studies suggest three requirements for targeting via this mechanism: the positive charge of the Pos-Seq, physical proximity between Pos-Seq and Hyd and a precise spatial orientation between both motifs. The study uncovers remarkable similarities with the signals that target proteins to the membrane of mitochondria and peroxisomes PMID:19874557

  18. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  19. Proteins immobilization on the surface of modified plant viral particles coated with hydrophobic polycations.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Nikolai A; Malinin, Andrei S; Trifonova, Ekaterina A; Rakhnyanskaya, Anna A; Yaroslavov, Aleksandr A; Karpova, Olga V; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    Two hydrophobic cations based on poly-N-ethyl-vinylpyridine were used to produce biologically active complexes. The complexes obtained from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) spherical particles (SPs), hydrophobic polycation, and a model protein were stable and did not aggregate in solution, particularly at high ionic strengths. The nucleic acid-free SPs were generated by thermal remodeling of the TMV (helical rod-shaped plant virus). The model protein preserved its antigenic activity in the ternary complex (SP-polycation-protein). Immobilization of proteins on the surface of SPs coated with hydrophobic cation is a promising approach to designing biologically active complexes used in bionanotechnologies. PMID:25121344

  20. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  1. Revisiting the Myths of Protein Interior: Studying Proteins with Mass-Fractal Hydrophobicity-Fractal and Polarizability-Fractal Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Anirban; Ghosh, Indira

    2009-01-01

    A robust marker to describe mass, hydrophobicity and polarizability distribution holds the key to deciphering structural and folding constraints within proteins. Since each of these distributions is inhomogeneous in nature, the construct should be sensitive in describing the patterns therein. We show, for the first time, that the hydrophobicity and polarizability distributions in protein interior follow fractal scaling. It is found that (barring ‘all-α’) all the major structural classes of proteins have an amount of unused hydrophobicity left in them. This amount of untapped hydrophobicity is observed to be greater in thermophilic proteins, than that in their (structurally aligned) mesophilic counterparts. ‘All-β’(thermophilic, mesophilic alike) proteins are found to have maximum amount of unused hydrophobicity, while ‘all-α’ proteins have been found to have minimum polarizability. A non-trivial dependency is observed between dielectric constant and hydrophobicity distributions within (α+β) and ‘all-α’ proteins, whereas absolutely no dependency is found between them in the ‘all-β’ class. This study proves that proteins are not as optimally packed as they are supposed to be. It is also proved that origin of α-helices are possibly not hydrophobic but electrostatic; whereas β-sheets are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Significance of this study lies in protein engineering studies; because it quantifies the extent of packing that ensures protein functionality. It shows that myths regarding protein interior organization might obfuscate our knowledge of actual reality. However, if the later is studied with a robust marker of strong mathematical basis, unknown correlations can still be unearthed; which help us to understand the nature of hydrophobicity, causality behind protein folding, and the importance of anisotropic electrostatics in stabilizing a highly complex structure named ‘proteins’. PMID:19834622

  2. Production of hydrophobic amino acids from biobased resources: wheat gluten and rubber seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Widyarani; Sari, Yessie W; Ratnaningsih, Enny; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2016-09-01

    Protein hydrolysis enables production of peptides and free amino acids that are suitable for usage in food and feed or can be used as precursors for bulk chemicals. Several essential amino acids for food and feed have hydrophobic side chains; this property may also be exploited for subsequent separation. Here, we present methods for selective production of hydrophobic amino acids from proteins. Selectivity can be achieved by selection of starting material, selection of hydrolysis conditions, and separation of achieved hydrolysate. Several protease combinations were applied for hydrolysis of rubber seed protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). High degree of hydrolysis (>50 %) could be achieved. Hydrophobic selectivity was influenced by the combination of proteases and by the extent of hydrolysis. Combination of Pronase and Peptidase R showed the highest selectivity towards hydrophobic amino acids, roughly doubling the content of hydrophobic amino acids in the products compared to the original substrates. Hydrophobic selectivity of 0.6 mol-hydrophobic/mol-total free amino acids was observed after 6 h hydrolysis of wheat gluten and 24 h hydrolysis of rubber seed proteins and BSA. The results of experiments with rubber seed proteins and wheat gluten suggest that this process can be applied to agro-industrial residues.

  3. Globular-disorder transition in proteins: a compromise between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions?

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2016-08-17

    The charge-hydrophobicity correlation of globular and disordered proteins is explored using a generalized self-consistent field theoretical method combined with Monte Carlo simulations. Globular and disordered protein sequences with varied mean net charge and mean hydrophobicity are designed by theory, while Metropolis Monte Carlo generates a suitable ensemble of conformations. Results imply a transition of the dominant interactions between globular and disordered proteins across the charge-hydrophobicity boundary. It is observed that the charge-hydrophobicity boundary actually represents a trade-off between the repulsive and attractive interactions in a protein sequence. The attractive interactions predominate on the globular side of the boundary, while the repulsive interactions prevail on the disordered side. For globular proteins, core forming hydrophobic interactions are dominant leading to a minimally frustrated native conformation. For disordered proteins, the repulsive electrostatic interactions prevail yielding a minimally frustrated region comprising of an expanded, dynamic conformational ensemble. Thus, protein disorder, like protein folding, satisfies the principle of minimal frustration. All results are compared to real globular and disordered proteins. Thus this algorithm may be useful to probe the conformational characteristics of disordered proteins. PMID:27498593

  4. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  5. Hydrophobic effect in protein folding and other noncovalent processes involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Spolar, R S; Ha, J H; Record, M T

    1989-01-01

    Large negative standard heat capacity changes (delta CP degree much less than 0) are the hallmark of processes that remove nonpolar surface from water, including the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to a nonaqueous phase and the folding, aggregation/association, and ligand-binding reactions of proteins [Sturtevant, J. M. (1977) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 2236-2240]. More recently, Baldwin [Baldwin, R. L. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8069-8072] proposed that the delta CP degree of protein folding could be used to quantify the contribution of the burial of nonpolar surface (the hydrophobic effect) to the stability of a globular protein. We demonstrate that identical correlations between the delta CP degree and the change in water-accessible nonpolar surface area (delta Anp) are obtained for both the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to the pure liquid phase and the folding of small globular proteins: delta CP degree/delta Anp = -(0.28 +/- 0.05) (where delta Anp is expressed in A2 and delta CP degree is expressed in cal.mol-1.K-1; 1 cal = 4.184 J). The fact that these correlations are identical validates the proposals by both Sturtevant and Baldwin that the hydrophobic effect is in general the dominant contributor to delta CP degree and provides a straightforward means of estimating the contribution of the hydrophobic driving force (delta Ghyd degree) to the standard free energy change of a noncovalent process characterized by a large negative delta CP degree in the physiological temperature range: delta Ghyd degree congruent to (80 +/- 10)delta CP degree. PMID:2813394

  6. Topology and cellular localization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type II integral membrane protein that is packaged into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses including metapneumovirus. In addition to a highly divergent primary sequence, SH proteins vary significantly in size among the different viruses. Hu...

  7. Tolerance of a protein to multiple polar-to-hydrophobic surface substitutions.

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, M. H.; Sauer, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrophobic substitutions at solvent-exposed positions in two alpha-helical regions of the bacteriophage P22 Arc repressor were introduced by combinatorial mutagenesis. In helix A, hydrophobic residues were tolerated individually at each of the five positions examined, but multiple substitutions were poorly tolerated as shown by the finding that mutants with more than two additional hydrophobic residues were biologically inactive. Several inactive helix A variants were purified and found to have reduced thermal stability relative to wild-type Arc, with a rough correlation between the number of polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions and the magnitude of the stability defect. Quite different results were obtained in helix B, where variants with as many as five polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions were found to be biologically active and one variant with three hydrophobic substitutions had a t(m) 6 degrees C higher than wild-type. By contrast, a helix A mutant with three similar polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions was 23 degrees C less stable than wild-type. Also, one set of three polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions in helix B was tolerated when introduced into the wild-type background but not when introduced into an equally active mutant having a nearly identical structure. Context effects occur both when comparing different regions of the same protein and when comparing the same region in two different homologues. PMID:10048325

  8. Tolerance of a protein to multiple polar-to-hydrophobic surface substitutions.

    PubMed

    Cordes, M H; Sauer, R T

    1999-02-01

    Hydrophobic substitutions at solvent-exposed positions in two alpha-helical regions of the bacteriophage P22 Arc repressor were introduced by combinatorial mutagenesis. In helix A, hydrophobic residues were tolerated individually at each of the five positions examined, but multiple substitutions were poorly tolerated as shown by the finding that mutants with more than two additional hydrophobic residues were biologically inactive. Several inactive helix A variants were purified and found to have reduced thermal stability relative to wild-type Arc, with a rough correlation between the number of polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions and the magnitude of the stability defect. Quite different results were obtained in helix B, where variants with as many as five polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions were found to be biologically active and one variant with three hydrophobic substitutions had a t(m) 6 degrees C higher than wild-type. By contrast, a helix A mutant with three similar polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions was 23 degrees C less stable than wild-type. Also, one set of three polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions in helix B was tolerated when introduced into the wild-type background but not when introduced into an equally active mutant having a nearly identical structure. Context effects occur both when comparing different regions of the same protein and when comparing the same region in two different homologues. PMID:10048325

  9. Morphology and phase separation of hydrophobic clusters of soy globular protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuzhi Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhang, Lu; Mo, Xiaoqun; Zhu, Li; Bolye, Dan

    2008-04-01

    Protein hydrophobic interaction has been considered the most important factor dominating protein folding, aggregation, gelling, self-assembly, adhesion, and cohesion properties. In this paper, morphology and phase separation of hydrophobic clusters, networks, and aggregates of soy globular protein polymers, induced by using a reducing agent (NaHSO3), are studied using microscopic instruments. The morphology and phase separation of these hydrophobic clusters are sensitive to protein structure and composition, pH, and ionic-strength (I(m)). Most of the clusters are in spherical-shape architecture and mainly consist of hydrophobic polypeptides. Rod-shape clusters were also observed at higher ionic strength, and mainly consist of hydrophilic polypeptides. The ratio of hydrophobic/hydrophilic (HB/HL) polypeptides is important to facilitate the formation of clusters in an environment with a certain pH value and ionic strength. At HB/HL 0.8, uniform spherical clusters were observed and diameters ranged from 30 to 70 nm. At HB/HL <0.8, large spherical clusters were formed with diameters ranging from 100 to 1,000 nm, and at HB/HL >or=1.8, large hydrophobic aggregates formed, and size of aggregates can be up to 2 500 nm. When solid content increased from 3% to 38%, at I(m) or= 0.115 mol x L(-1), HB/HL ratio >or=1.8, the large aggregates became very cohesive and viscoelastic. Clear phase separation was observed during curing between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein polymers. Phase-separation degree increased as HB/HL ratio increased.

  10. Protein folding in hydrophobic-polar lattice model: a flexible ant-colony optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Jing; Li, Yun

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a flexible ant colony (FAC) algorithm for solving protein folding problems based on the hydrophobic-polar square lattice model. Collaborations of novel pheromone and heuristic strategies in the proposed algorithm make it more effective in predicting structures of proteins compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:18537736

  11. Non-invasive high throughput approach for protein hydrophobicity determination based on surface tension.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Sven; Bauer, Katharina Christin; Galm, Lara; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The surface hydrophobicity of a protein is an important factor for its interactions in solution and thus the outcome of its production process. Yet most of the methods are not able to evaluate the influence of these hydrophobic interactions under natural conditions. In the present work we have established a high resolution stalagmometric method for surface tension determination on a liquid handling station, which can cope with accuracy as well as high throughput requirements. Surface tensions could be derived with a low sample consumption (800 μL) and a high reproducibility (<0.1‰ for water) within a reasonable time (3.5 min per sample). This method was used as a non-invasive HTP compatible approach to determine surface tensions of protein solutions dependent on protein content. The protein influence on the solutions' surface tension was correlated to the hydrophobicity of lysozyme, human lysozyme, BSA, and α-lactalbumin. Differences in proteins' hydrophobic character depending on pH and species could be resolved. Within this work we have developed a pH dependent hydrophobicity ranking, which was found to be in good agreement with literature. For the studied pH range of 3-9 lysozyme from chicken egg white was identified to be the most hydrophilic. α-lactalbumin at pH 3 exhibited the most pronounced hydrophobic character. The stalagmometric method occurred to outclass the widely used spectrophotometric method with bromophenol blue sodium salt as it gave reasonable results without restrictions on pH and protein species.

  12. Fluorescence based assessment of SDS induced hydrophobic collapse in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunath, S.; Makani, Venkata Krishna Kanth; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Bhat, Gopalkrishna; Kanth, Akriti Baby; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of interaction between SDS and proteins is not clearly understood so far. According to the current knowledge SDS is known to interact with the hydrophobic regions of the proteins. Tryptophan and tyrosine are hydrophobic and hydrophilic aromatic amino acids respectively, which are also known for their intrinsic fluorescence nature in proteins. By observing the autofluorescence of both these hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids upon SDS treatment, information about SDS-protein interactions could be obtained. In the present study we have recorded the autofluorescence spectra of five globular proteins [Bovine serum albumin (BSA), Human serum albumin (HSA), Ribonuclease A (RNase A), Lysozyme and Trypsin] by the sequential excitation from 260nm to 295nm at every 5nm intervals. The results obtained clearly indicated BSA and HSA undergone hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties due to the increased folding of their secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment. Trypsin on the other hand showed complete unfolding upon treatment with SDS. Lysozyme and RNase A did not show any difference in their autofluorescence upon SDS treatment may be due to the stability and fluorophores composition in them. The above results obtained with specific UV excitations clearly shown the tertiary folding and ensembles of the secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment is governed by their stability and bonds stabilizing the proteins.

  13. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated gold surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.

  14. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated goldmore » surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.« less

  15. A comparative study of the second-order hydrophobic moments for globular proteins: the consensus scale of hydrophobicity and the CHARMM partial atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Lee, Kuei-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the second-order hydrophobic moment for fifteen globular proteins in 150 nonhomologous protein chains was performed in a comparative study involving two sets of hydrophobicity: one selected from the consensus scale and the other derived from the CHARMM partial atomic charges. These proteins were divided into three groups, based on their number of residues (N) and the asphericity (δ). Proteins in Group I were spherical and those in Groups II and III were prolate. The size of the proteins is represented by the mean radius of gyration (R(g) ), which follows the Flory scaling law, R(g) ∝ N(ν). The mean value of v was 0.35, which is similar to a polymer chain in a poor solvent. The spatial distributions of the second-order moment for each of the proteins, obtained from the two sets of hydrophobicity, were compared using the Pearson correlation coefficient; the results reveal that there is a strong correlation between the two data sets for each protein structure when the CHARMM partial atomic charges, |q(i)| ≥ 0.3, assigned for polar atoms, are used. The locations at which these distributions vanish and approach a negative value are at approximately 50% of the percentage of solvent accessibility, indicating that there is a transition point from hydrophobic interior to hydrophilic exterior in the proteins. This may suggest that there is a position for the proteins to determine the residues at exposed sites beyond this range.

  16. Role of solvation in the energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Merz, Kenneth M

    2006-08-17

    There are many forces that contribute to the stability of a protein; among these are dispersion interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation effects. In a recent work, Vondrasek et al. estimated the in vacuo stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin using high level ab initio methods (Vondrasek, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2615). In this work, we evaluate the effects of solvation on the stability of the hydrophobic core of this protein. Solvation calculations are made using the polarizable continuum method at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. It is found that, in a protein-like environment (mimicked by a continuum solvent with a dielectric constant of approximately 4), the stability of rubredoxin's hydrophobic core is decreased by 40-50%. We also observed that the stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core is only slightly lower in a protein-like medium than in an aqueous one (DeltaGether-DeltaGwater approximately 1.0-3.5 kcal/mol).

  17. Structural Reorganization Triggered by Charging of Lys Residues in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chimenti M. S.; Heroux A.; Khangulov, V. S.; Robinson, A. C.; Majumdar, A.; Schlessman, J. L.; Garcia-Moreno, B.

    2012-06-06

    Structural consequences of ionization of residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins were examined systematically in 25 proteins with internal Lys residues. Crystal structures showed that the ionizable groups are buried. NMR spectroscopy showed that in 2 of 25 cases studied, the ionization of an internal Lys unfolded the protein globally. In five cases, the internal charge triggered localized changes in structure and dynamics, and in three cases, it promoted partial or local unfolding. Remarkably, in 15 proteins, the ionization of the internal Lys had no detectable structural consequences. Highly stable proteins appear to be inherently capable of withstanding the presence of charge in their hydrophobic interior, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. The extent of structural reorganization paralleled loosely with global thermodynamic stability, suggesting that structure-based pK{sub a} calculations for buried residues could be improved by calculation of thermodynamic stability and by enhanced conformational sampling.

  18. Structural reorganization triggered by charging of Lys residues in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Michael S; Khangulov, Victor S; Robinson, Aaron C; Heroux, Annie; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    Structural consequences of ionization of residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins were examined systematically in 25 proteins with internal Lys residues. Crystal structures showed that the ionizable groups are buried. NMR spectroscopy showed that in 2 of 25 cases studied, the ionization of an internal Lys unfolded the protein globally. In five cases, the internal charge triggered localized changes in structure and dynamics, and in three cases, it promoted partial or local unfolding. Remarkably, in 15 proteins, the ionization of the internal Lys had no detectable structural consequences. Highly stable proteins appear to be inherently capable of withstanding the presence of charge in their hydrophobic interior, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. The extent of structural reorganization paralleled loosely with global thermodynamic stability, suggesting that structure-based pK(a) calculations for buried residues could be improved by calculation of thermodynamic stability and by enhanced conformational sampling.

  19. Hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces: definition based on hydration shell structure and a quick method for their computation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaber, F; Argos, P

    1996-12-01

    The hydrophobic part of the solvent-accessible surface of a typical monomeric globular protein consists of a single, large interconnected region formed from faces of apolar atoms and constituting approximately 60% of the solvent-accessible surface area. Therefore, the direct delineation of the hydrophobic surface patches on an atom-wise basis is impossible. Experimental data indicate that, in a two-state hydration model, a protein can be considered to be unified with its first hydration shell in its interaction with bulk water. We show that, if the surface area occupied by water molecules bound at polar protein atoms as generated by AUTOSOL is removed, only about two-thirds of the hydrophobic part of the protein surface remains accessible to bulk solvent. Moreover, the organization of the hydrophobic part of the solvent-accessible surface experiences a drastic change, such that the single interconnected hydrophobic region disintegrates into many smaller patches, i.e. the physical definition of a hydrophobic surface region as unoccupied by first hydration shell water molecules can distinguish between hydrophobic surface clusters and small interconnecting channels. It is these remaining hydrophobic surface pieces that probably play an important role in intra- and intermolecular recognition processes such as ligand binding, protein folding and protein-protein association in solution conditions. These observations have led to the development of an accurate and quick analytical technique for the automatic determination of hydrophobic surface patches of proteins. This technique is not aggravated by the limiting assumptions of the methods for generating explicit water hydration positions. Formation of the hydrophobic surface regions owing to the structure of the first hydration shell can be computationally simulated by a small radial increment in solvent-accessible polar atoms, followed by calculation of the remaining exposed hydrophobic patches. We demonstrate that a

  20. Quality Matters: Extension of Clusters of Residues with Good Hydrophobic Contacts Stabilize (Hyper)Thermophilic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying determinant(s) of protein thermostability is key for rational and data-driven protein engineering. By analyzing more than 130 pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins, we identified the quality (residue-wise energy) of hydrophobic interactions as a key factor for protein thermostability. This distinguishes our study from previous ones that investigated predominantly structural determinants. Considering this key factor, we successfully discriminated between pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins (discrimination accuracy: ∼80%) and searched for structural weak spots in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (classification accuracy: 70%). PMID:24437522

  1. Quality matters: extension of clusters of residues with good hydrophobic contacts stabilize (hyper)thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Höffken, Hans Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger

    2014-02-24

    Identifying determinant(s) of protein thermostability is key for rational and data-driven protein engineering. By analyzing more than 130 pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins, we identified the quality (residue-wise energy) of hydrophobic interactions as a key factor for protein thermostability. This distinguishes our study from previous ones that investigated predominantly structural determinants. Considering this key factor, we successfully discriminated between pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins (discrimination accuracy: ∼80%) and searched for structural weak spots in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (classification accuracy: 70%).

  2. Inflammatory inert poly(ethylene glycol)--protein wound dressing improves healing responses in partial- and full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Shingel, Kirill I; Di Stabile, Liliana; Marty, Jean-Paul; Faure, Marie-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a novel soft hydrogel system based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was evaluated as an occlusive wound dressing material. The hydrogel material, referred by the name of BioAquacare, contains up to 96% of the liquid and is formulated with phosphate-buffered saline and safe preservative to control bacterial load in the open wounds. Performance of the BioAquacare as a wound dressing material was assessed in partial- and full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wound analysis comprised macroscopic determination of the wound size, histological examination of the healing tissues and biochemical characterisation of wound exudates. The wounds treated with BioAquacare healed without any signs of inflammation, skin irritation, oedema or erythema. Cellular composition of the reepithelialised wounds was very similar to that of the normal skin, with a well-developed stratum corneum and epithelial layer. It was observed that BioAquacare plays the role of a liquid compartment, which provides pronounced hydration effect and helps maintain a natural moist environment of the healing tissues. BioAquacare showed relatively low protein-absorbing activity, absorbing predominantly low-molecular-weight molecules, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta1 and products of haemoglobin degradation. It is concluded that application of the moist BioAquacare dressing promotes fast reepithelialisation by creating favourable environment for keratinocytes proliferation and it also reduces scarring. The results show that BioAquacare can be considered as a safe, biocompatible and inflammatory inert wound dressing material.

  3. Inflammatory inert poly(ethylene glycol)--protein wound dressing improves healing responses in partial- and full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Shingel, Kirill I; Di Stabile, Liliana; Marty, Jean-Paul; Faure, Marie-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a novel soft hydrogel system based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was evaluated as an occlusive wound dressing material. The hydrogel material, referred by the name of BioAquacare, contains up to 96% of the liquid and is formulated with phosphate-buffered saline and safe preservative to control bacterial load in the open wounds. Performance of the BioAquacare as a wound dressing material was assessed in partial- and full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wound analysis comprised macroscopic determination of the wound size, histological examination of the healing tissues and biochemical characterisation of wound exudates. The wounds treated with BioAquacare healed without any signs of inflammation, skin irritation, oedema or erythema. Cellular composition of the reepithelialised wounds was very similar to that of the normal skin, with a well-developed stratum corneum and epithelial layer. It was observed that BioAquacare plays the role of a liquid compartment, which provides pronounced hydration effect and helps maintain a natural moist environment of the healing tissues. BioAquacare showed relatively low protein-absorbing activity, absorbing predominantly low-molecular-weight molecules, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta1 and products of haemoglobin degradation. It is concluded that application of the moist BioAquacare dressing promotes fast reepithelialisation by creating favourable environment for keratinocytes proliferation and it also reduces scarring. The results show that BioAquacare can be considered as a safe, biocompatible and inflammatory inert wound dressing material. PMID:17199768

  4. Towards a structural biology of the hydrophobic effect in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Camilloni, Carlo; Bonetti, Daniela; Morrone, Angela; Giri, Rajanish; Dobson, Christopher M.; Brunori, Maurizio; Gianni, Stefano; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a major driving force in protein folding. A complete understanding of this effect requires the description of the conformational states of water and protein molecules at different temperatures. Towards this goal, we characterise the cold and hot denatured states of a protein by modelling NMR chemical shifts using restrained molecular dynamics simulations. A detailed analysis of the resulting structures reveals that water molecules in the bulk and at the protein interface form on average the same number of hydrogen bonds. Thus, even if proteins are ‘large’ particles (in terms of the hydrophobic effect, i.e. larger than 1 nm), because of the presence of complex surface patterns of polar and non-polar residues their behaviour can be compared to that of ‘small’ particles (i.e. smaller than 1 nm). We thus find that the hot denatured state is more compact and richer in secondary structure than the cold denatured state, since water at lower temperatures can form more hydrogen bonds than at high temperatures. Then, using Φ-value analysis we show that the structural differences between the hot and cold denatured states result in two alternative folding mechanisms. These findings thus illustrate how the analysis of water-protein hydrogen bonds can reveal the molecular origins of protein behaviours associated with the hydrophobic effect. PMID:27461719

  5. Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii proteins after Triton X-114 solubilization and hydrophobic chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Simone, S G; Guedes, H C; Bendet, I

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of the surface proteins of Toxoplasma gondii radiodinated were studied using the phase separation technique and ability of binding in the phenyl-Sepharose column. Eight polypeptides with Mr 22 to 180 distributed exclusively in the detergent rich-phase, while six polypeptides with mol. wt. 15,000 to 76,000 distributed exclusively in the detergent poor-phase. Two polypeptides with 15,000 and 70,000 distributed in both phase. All the polypeptides present in the detergent rich-phase binding in the phenyl-Sepharose column, and can be isolated in two peak according with their relative hydrophobicities. Two polypeptides hydrophobic with Mr 60 and 66 recognized by human serum were isolated by the association of the two technique. Our result showed that the surface proteins of T. gondii present different degrees of hydrophobicity and that the use of hydrophobic interaction chromatography after Triton X-114 extraction may be an important isolation method of membrane proteins.

  6. Computer simulation of protein solvation, hydrophobic mapping, and the oxygen effect in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Hydrophobic effects are central to the structural stability of biomolecules, particularly proteins, in solution but are not understood at a molecular level. This project developed a new theoretical approach to calculation of hydrophobic effects. This information theory approach can be implemented with experimental, including computer simulation-experimental, information. The new theory is consistent with, builds upon, and subsumes previous integral equation and scaled particle statistical thermodynamic modes of hydrophobic effects. the new theory is sufficiently simple to permit application directly to complex biomolecules in solution and to permit further expansion to incorporate more subtle effects.

  7. Proteomic analysis of mouse liver plasma membrane: use of differential extraction to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Jinyun; Wang, Xi'e; Liu, Xiaohui; Tang, Xinke; Cao, Rui; Hu, Weijun; Nie, Song; Fan, Chunming; Liang, Songping

    2005-11-01

    To comprehensively identify proteins of liver plasma membrane (PM), we isolated PMs from mouse liver by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. An optimized extraction method for whole PM proteins and several methods of differential extraction expected to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins were tested. The extracted PM proteins were separated by 2-DE, and were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS, and ESI-quadrupole-TOF MS. As the complementary method, 1-DE-MS/MS was also used to identify PM proteins. The optimized lysis buffer containing urea, thiourea, CHAPS and NP-40 was able to extract more PM proteins, and treatment of PM samples with chloroform/methanol and sodium carbonate led to enrichment of more hydrophobic PM proteins. From the mouse liver PM fraction, 175 non-redundant gene products were identified, of which 88 (about 50%) were integral membrane proteins with one to seven transmembrane domains. The remaining products were probably membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins. The function distribution of all the identified liver PM proteins was analyzed; 40% represented enzymes, 12% receptors and 9% proteins with unknown function.

  8. Mode matches in hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions predict peptide-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mandell, A J; Owens, M J; Selz, K A; Morgan, W N; Shlesinger, M F; Nemeroff, C B

    1998-08-01

    The dominant statistical hydrophobic free energy inverse frequencies amino acid wavelengths as hydrophobic modes, of neurotensin (NT), cholescystokinin (CCK), the human dopamine D2 receptor [(DA)D2], and the human dopamine transporter (DAT) were determined using orthogonal decomposition of the autocovariance matrices of their amino acid sequences as hydrophobic free energy equivalents in kcal/mol. The leading eigenvalues-associated eigenvectors were convolved with the original series to construct eigenfunctions. Eigenfunctions were further analyzed using discrete trigonometric wavelet and all poles, maximum entropy power spectral transformations. This yielded clean representations of the dominant hydrophobic free energy modes, most of which are otherwise lost in the smoothing of hydropathy plots or contaminated by end effects and multimodality in conventional Fourier transformations. Mode matches were found between NT and (DA)D2 and between CCK and DAT, but not the converse. These mode matches successfully predicted the nonlinear kinetic interactions of NT-(DA)D2 in contrast with CCK-(DA) D2 on 3H-spiperone binding to (DA) D2, and by CCK-DAT but not NT-DAT on [N-methyl-3H]-WIN 35,428 binding to DAT in (DA)D2 and DAT cDNA stably transfected cell lines without known NT or CCK receptors. Computation of the dominant modes of hydrophobic free energy eigenfunctions may help predict functionally relevant peptide-membrane protein interactions, even across neurotransmitter families. PMID:9664843

  9. How hydrophobicity and the glycosylation site of glycans affect protein folding and stability: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Diannan; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-12

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in the biosynthesis of protein, but its effect on the protein conformational transitions underpinning folding and stabilization is poorly understood. In this study, we present a coarse-grained off-lattice 46-β barrel model protein glycosylated by glycans with different hydrophobicity and glycosylation sites to examine the effect of glycans on protein folding and stabilization using a Langevin dynamics simulation, in which an H term was proposed as the index of the hydrophobicity of glycan. Compared with its native counterpart, introducing glycans of suitable hydrophobicity (0.1 < H < 0.4) at flexible peptide residues of this model protein not only facilitated folding of the protein but also increased its conformation stability significantly. On the contrary, when glycans were introduced at the restricted peptide residues of the protein, only those hydrophilic (H = 0) or very weak hydrophobic (H < 0.2) ones contributed slightly to protein stability but hindered protein folding due to increased free energy barriers. The glycosylated protein retained the two-step folding mechanism in terms of hydrophobic collapse and structural rearrangement. Glycan chains located in a suitable site with an appropriate hydrophobicity facilitated both collapse and rearrangement, whereas others, though accelerating collapse, hindered rearrangement. In addition to entropy effects, that is, narrowing the space of the conformations of the unfolded state, the presence of glycans with suitable hydrophobicity at suitable glycosylation site strengthened the folded state via hydrophobic interaction, that is, the enthalpy effect. The simulations have shown both the stabilization and the destabilization effects of glycosylation, as experimentally reported in the literature, and provided molecular insight into glycosylated proteins. The understanding of the effects of glycans with different hydrophobicities on the folding

  10. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  11. Redesigning the hydrophobic core of a four-helix-bundle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1994-01-01

    Rationally redesigned variants of the 4-helix-bundle protein Rop are described. The novel proteins have simplified, repacked, hydrophobic cores and yet reproduce the structure and native-like physical properties of the wild-type protein. The repacked proteins have been characterized thermodynamically and their equilibrium and kinetic thermal and chemical unfolding properties are compared with those of wild-type Rop. The equilibrium stability of the repacked proteins to thermal denaturation is enhanced relative to that of the wild-type protein. The rate of chemically induced folding and unfolding of wild-type Rop is extremely slow when compared with other small proteins. Interestingly, although the repacked proteins are more thermally stable than the wild type, their rates of chemically induced folding and unfolding are greatly increased in comparison to wild type. Perhaps as a consequence of this, their equilibrium stabilities to chemical denaturants are slightly reduced in comparison to the wild type. PMID:7535612

  12. Automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column selection for use in protein purification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Stone, Orrin J; Anderson, Michelle E

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein (1). The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH(4;))(2;)SO(4;)). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) (2). As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter (3). Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining

  13. Hydrophobicity and subunit interactions of rod outer segment proteins investigated using Triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Justice, J M; Murtagh, J J; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1995-07-28

    Triton X-114 phase partitioning, a procedure used for purifying integral membrane proteins, was used to study protein components of the mammalian visual transduction cascade. An integral membrane protein, rhodopsin, and two isoprenylated protein complexes, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase and Gt beta gamma, partitioned into the detergent-rich phase. Arrestin, a soluble protein, accumulated in the aqueous phase. Gt alpha distributed about equally between phases whether GDP (Gt alpha.GDP) or GTP (Gt alpha.GTP) was bound. Gt beta gamma increased recovery of Gt alpha.GDP but not Gt alpha.GTP in the detergent phase. Trypsin-treated Gt alpha, which lacks the fatty acylated amino-terminal 2-kDa region, accumulated to a greater extent in the aqueous phase than did intact Gt alpha. Trypsinized cGMP phosphodiesterase, which lacks the isoprenyl group, partitioned into the aqueous phase. A carboxyl-terminal truncated mutant (Val-331 stop) of Gt alpha accumulated more in the aqueous phase then did recombinant full-length Gt alpha, supporting the role of the carboxyl terminus in increasing its hydrophobicity. N-Myristoylated recombinant Go alpha was more hydrophobic than recombinant Go alpha without myristate. ADP-ribosylation of Gt alpha catalyzed by NAD:arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase, but not by pertussis toxin, increased hydrophilicity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning can thus semiquantify the hydrophobic nature of proteins and protein domains. It may aid in evaluating changes associated with post-translational protein modification and protein-protein interactions in a defined system.

  14. Polar interactions trump hydrophobicity in stabilizing the self-inserting membrane protein Mistic.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Jana; Fiedler, Sebastian; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    Canonical integral membrane proteins are attached to lipid bilayers through hydrophobic transmembrane helices, whose topogenesis requires sophisticated insertion machineries. By contrast, membrane proteins that, for evolutionary or functional reasons, cannot rely on these machineries need to resort to driving forces other than hydrophobicity. A striking example is the self-inserting Bacillus subtilis protein Mistic, which is involved in biofilm formation and has found application as a fusion tag supporting the recombinant production and bilayer insertion of other membrane proteins. Although this unusual protein contains numerous polar and charged residues and lacks characteristic membrane-interaction motifs, it is tightly bound to membranes in vivo and membrane-mimetic systems in vitro. Therefore, we set out to quantify the contributions from polar and nonpolar interactions to the coupled folding and insertion of Mistic. To this end, we defined conditions under which the protein can be unfolded completely and reversibly from various detergent micelles by urea in a two-state equilibrium and where the unfolded state is independent of the detergent used for solubilizing the folded state. This enabled equilibrium unfolding experiments previously used for soluble and β-barrel membrane proteins, revealing that polar interactions with ionic and zwitterionic headgroups and, presumably, the interfacial dipole potential stabilize the protein much more efficiently than nonpolar interactions with the micelle core. These findings unveil the forces that allow a protein to tightly interact with a membrane-mimetic environment without major hydrophobic contributions and rationalize the differential suitability of detergents for the extraction and solubilization of Mistic-tagged membrane proteins.

  15. PEGylated protein separation using different hydrophobic interaction supports: Conventional and monolithic supports.

    PubMed

    Mayolo-Deloisa, Karla; González-Valdez, José; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Protein hydrophobicity can be modified after a PEGylation process. However, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has been used to separate PEGylation reaction products less frequently than other techniques. In this context, chromatographic monoliths represent a good alternative to continue exploring the separation of PEGylated proteins with HIC. In this work, the separation of PEGylated proteins using C4 A monolith as well as Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose was analyzed. Three proteins were used as models: RNase A, β-lactoglobulin, and lysozyme. All proteins were PEGylated in the N-terminal amino groups with 20 kDa methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) propionaldehyde. The concentration of ammonium sulfate (1 M) used was the same for all stationary phases. The results obtained demonstrated that the C4 A monolith could better resolve all protein PEGylation reaction mixtures, since the peaks of mono- and di-PEGylated proteins can be clearly distinguished in the chromatographic profiles. On the contrary, while using Butyl Sepharose media only the PEGylation reaction mixtures of RNase A could be partially separated at 35 and 45 CVs. PEGylated proteins of β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme could not be resolved when Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose were used. It is then clear that monoliths are an excellent choice to explore the purification process of PEGylated proteins exploiting the advantages of HIC. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:702-707, 2016. PMID:26918888

  16. A molecular model for lipid-protein interaction in membranes: the role of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, D R; Ben-Shaul, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction free energy between a hydrophobic, transmembrane, protein and the surrounding lipid environment is calculated based on a microscopic model for lipid organization. The protein is treated as a rigid hydrophobic solute of thickness dP, embedded in a lipid bilayer of unperturbed thickness doL. The lipid chains in the immediate vicinity of the protein are assumed to adjust their length to that of the protein (e.g., they are stretched when dP > doL) in order to bridge over the lipid-protein hydrophobic mismatch (dP-doL). The bilayer's hydrophobic thickness is assumed to decay exponentially to its asymptotic, unperturbed, value. The lipid deformation free energy is represented as a sum of chain (hydrophobic core) and interfacial (head-group region) contributions. The chain contribution is calculated using a detailed molecular theory of chain packing statistics, which allows the calculation of conformational properties and thermodynamic functions (in a mean-field approximation) of the lipid tails. The tails are treated as single chain amphiphiles, modeled using the rotational isometric state scheme. The interfacial free energy is represented by a phenomenological expression, accounting for the opposing effects of head-group repulsions and hydrocarbon-water surface tension. The lipid deformation free energy delta F is calculated as a function of dP-doL. Most calculations are for C14 amphiphiles which, in the absence of a protein, pack at an average area per head-group ao approximately equal to 32 A2 (doL approximately 24.5 A), corresponding to the fluid state of the membrane. When dP = doL, delta F > 0 and is due entirely to the loss of conformational entropy experienced by the chains around the protein. When dP > doL, the interaction free energy is further increased due to the enhanced stretching of the tails. When dP < doL, chain flexibility (entropy) increases, but this contribution to delta F is overcounted by the increase in the interfacial free energy

  17. Hydrophobic Variations of N-Oxide Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Manipulation: Importance of Non-hydrocarbon Groups in the Hydrophobic Portion

    PubMed Central

    Aiman, Sadaf; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces several N-oxide amphiphiles evaluated for a large membrane protein assembly. Among these N-oxide amphiphiles, cholate-based agents (CAO and CAO-1) displayed the most favorable behaviors for membrane protein stabilization. This result raises the possibility that the identity and number of non-hydrocarbon groups present in the hydrophobic region plays a critical role in determining detergent properties. PMID:24347070

  18. Impact of silver-containing wound dressings on bacterial biofilm viability and susceptibility to antibiotics during prolonged treatment.

    PubMed

    Kostenko, Victoria; Lyczak, Jeffrey; Turner, Katherine; Martinuzzi, Robert John

    2010-12-01

    The long-term antimicrobial efficacy of silver dressings against bacterial biofilms was investigated in a 7-day treatment in vitro model where the protein-rich medium was refreshed daily in order to mimic the conditions found in a wound bed. The use of plate-to-plate transfer assays demonstrated measurable differences in the effectiveness of several silver dressings on the viability of biofilm bacteria and their susceptibility to antibiotics. Whereas after the first day of treatment, all dressings used resulted in a significant reduction in the number of viable cells in the biofilms and disruption of the biofilm colonies, during prolonged treatment, the efficacy of dressings with hydrophilic base materials diminished with daily transfers, and bacterial populations recovered. For dressings with hydrophobic base materials, the level of efficacy correlated with the silver species loaded. Biofilm bacteria, which survived the initial silver treatment, were susceptible to tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, in contrast to untreated biofilms, which were highly tolerant to the same antibiotics. This acquired susceptibility was unaffected by the longevity of pretreatment with the silver dressings but depended on the dressing used. The antimicrobial efficacy of the dressings correlated with the type of the dressing base material and silver species loaded.

  19. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Lomize, Mikhail A; Mosberg, Henry I

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our results demonstrate that

  20. MtsB, a hydrophobic membrane protein of Streptococcus iniae, is an effective subunit vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Jun; Huang, Baofeng; Xie, Mingquan; Li, Anxing

    2011-01-10

    Streptococcus iniae is a major bacterium that causes invasive disease in cultured fish worldwide. The protection relies mainly on anti-microbial compounds and vaccines, and there is much interest in developing S. iniae vaccine based on conserved protein immunogens. Subcellular localization of protein has important influence on its immunogenicity. The surface and extracellular proteins of pathogenic bacteria can be easily recognized by the infected host compare to intracellular proteins, which are the feasible vaccine development targets. However, a putative hydrophobic membrane protein (designated MtsB) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system was found to be protective against S. iniae HD-1 infection when used as an injection vaccine administered intraperitoneally into tilapia. The MtsB protein is present on the cytoplasmic membrane and is expressed in vivo during Kunming mice infection by S. iniae HD-1. This is believed to be the first report on the use of a hydrophobic membrane protein of the ABC system as an S. iniae subunit vaccine.

  1. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  2. Assay of Protein and Peptide Adducts of Cholesterol Ozonolysis Products by Hydrophobic and Click Enrichment Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods—Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)—were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide–seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and asthma. PMID:25185119

  3. Transport of an export-defective protein by a highly hydrophobic signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Rusch, S L; Kendall, D A

    1994-01-14

    We have examined the sequence constraints on the amino-terminal region of the mature portion of alkaline phosphatase that are important for its efficient transport in Escherichia coli. Using a homopolymeric sequence of serines to replace 6 residues in this region, a transport-incompetent mutant was produced. Reintroduction of residues from the native sequence which restore charge and beta-turn potential resulted in little improvement. However, by replacing the hydrophobic core of the signal peptide with a homopolymeric series of leucines, not only was transport restored but precursor processing was more efficient than for the wild type and was insensitive to disruption of the protonmotive force. Moreover, we have titrated the signal peptide with leucine to alanine substitutions (Doud, S. K., Chou, M. M., and Kendall, D. A. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 1251-1256) and determined the minimum level of hydrophobicity necessary to achieve transport of the mutant protein. The results indicate that signal peptide hydrophobicity can completely override possible requirements for negatively charged residues and strong beta-turn forming potential in the mature protein and that the polyleucine-containing signal peptide may act as a generic signal sequence for the transport of non-native proteins in E. coli.

  4. Prediction of Water's Mobility and Disorder in Protein Crystals Using Novel Local Hydrophobic Descriptors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuzhu; Lv, Fenglin; Tian, Feifei; Luo, Xiaoli; Kong, Xiangjun; Li, Yuanchao; Yang, Qingwu

    2010-03-15

    The B-factors of crystal structures reflect the atomic fluctuations about their average positions and provide important information about molecular dynamics. Although numerous works have been addressed on theoretical and computational studies of B-factor profile of protein atoms, the methods used for predicting B-factor values of water molecules in protein crystals still remain unexploited. In this article, we describe a new approach that we named local hydrophobic descriptors (LHDs) to characterize the hydrophobic landscapes of protein hydration sites. Using this approach coupled with partial least squares (PLS) regression and least-squares squares support vector machine (LSSVM), we perform a systematic investigation on the linear and nonlinear relationships between the LHDs and water B-factors. Based upon an elaborately selected, large-scale dataset of crystal water molecules, our method predicts B-factor profile with coefficient of determination rpred of 0.554. We demonstrate that (i) the dynamics of water molecules is primarily governed by the local features of hydrophobic potential landscapes, and (ii) the accuracy of predicted B-factor values depends on water packing density.

  5. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il). PMID:27562165

  6. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il).

  7. Adhesion and structure properties of protein nanomaterials containing hydrophobic and charged amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Mo, Xiaoqun; Moore, Robyn; Frazier, Shawnalea J; Iwamoto, Takeo; Tomich, John M; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2006-03-01

    Protein polymers are being used or considered for biobased adhesives and coating materials. Most adhesives derived from macro protein molecules work through receptors or cross-links to bring about adhesion. The adhesion mechanism of protein polymers would lead to better understanding of adhesives and the discovery of new practical properties of protein polymers at both nano- and macro-scales. The objective of this research work was to study adhesion properties of protein polymers at nanoscale (a peptide adhesive with nanometer-scale units that range in size of several nanometers, defined as protein nanomaterial). Seven protein nanomaterial samples with different degrees of adhesive strength were designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All protein nanomaterials contain a common hydrophobic core flanked by charged amino acid sequences. The adhesion properties of the protein nanomaterials were investigated at different pH values and curing temperatures. The protein nanomaterials self aggregate and interact with the wood surface. The protein nanomaterial KKK-FLIVIGSII-KKK identified in this study had high adhesive strength toward wood. It had the highest shear strength at pH 12, with an amino acid sequence that was very hydrophobic and uncharged. This protein nanomaterial underwent structural analyses using circular dichroism, laser-Fourier transform infrared, and laser desorption mass spectrometry. At pH 12 this peptide adopted a pH-induced beta-like conformation. Adhesive strength reflects contributions of both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Ionic and covalent bonds do not appear to be significant factors for adhesion in this study.

  8. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  9. Towards Accurate Residue-Residue Hydrophobic Contact Prediction for Alpha Helical Proteins Via Integer Linear Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Rajgaria, R.; McAllister, S. R.; Floudas, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    A new optimization-based method is presented to predict the hydrophobic residue contacts in α-helical proteins. The proposed approach uses a high resolution distance dependent force field to calculate the interaction energy between different residues of a protein. The formulation predicts the hydrophobic contacts by minimizing the sum of these contact energies. These residue contacts are highly useful in narrowing down the conformational space searched by protein structure prediction algorithms. The proposed algorithm also offers the algorithmic advantage of producing a rank ordered list of the best contact sets. This model was tested on four independent α-helical protein test sets and was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) obtained using the presented method was approximately 66% for single domain proteins. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each protein test set and they are 8.87 Å and 14.67 Å respectively. PMID:18767158

  10. Acceleration through passive destabilization: protein folding in a weak hydrophobic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew; Baumketner, Andrij; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2004-03-01

    The GroEL chaperonin is a biomolecule which assists the folding of an extremely diverse range of proteins in Eubacteria. Some proteins undergo many rounds of ATP-regulated binding and dissociation from GroEL/ES before folding. It has been proposed that transient stress from ATP-regulated binding and release from GroEL/ES frees frustrated proteins from misfolded conformations. However recent evidence suggests that chaperonin-accelerated protein folding can take place entirely within a mutated GroEL+ES cavity that is unable to open and release the protein. Using molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that static confinement within a weakly hydrophobic (attractive) cavity (similar to the interior of the cavity formed by the GroEL+ES complex) is sufficient to significantly accelerate the folding of a highly frustrated protein-like heteropolymer. Our frustrated molecule benifits kinetically from a static hydrophobic environment that destabilizes misfolded conformations. This may shed light on the mechanisms used by other chaperones which do not depend on ATP.

  11. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  12. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  13. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    PubMed Central

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent elution of detached columns in parallel, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Further low-abundance, physiologically active proteins could be highly enriched and detected by ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22740472

  14. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode.

    PubMed

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2012-07-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately 20 years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low-abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent elution of detached columns in parallel, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Further low-abundance, physiologically active proteins could be highly enriched and detected by ESI-MS/MS.

  15. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  16. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-12-01

    A long standing problem in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein, given its amino acid sequence. A variety of simplifying models have been proposed abstracting only the {open_quotes}essential physical properties{close_quotes} of real proteins. In these models, the three dimensional space is often represented by a lattice. Residues which are adjacent in the primary sequence (i.e. covalently linked) must be placed at adjacent points in the lattice. A conformation of a protein is simply a self-avoiding walk along the lattice. The protein folding problem STRING-FOLD is that of finding a conformation of the protein sequence on the lattice such that the overall energy is minimized, for some reasonable definition of energy. This formulation leaves open the choices of a lattice and an energy function. Once these choices are made, one may then address the algorithmic complexity of optimizing the energy function for the lattice. For a variety of such simple models, this minimization problem is in fact NP-hard. In this paper, we consider the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) Model introduced by Dill. The HP model abstracts the problem by grouping the 20 amino acids into two classes: hydrophobic (or non-polar) residues and hydrophilic (or polar) residues. For concreteness, we will take our input to be a string from (H,P){sup +}, where P represents polar residues, and H represents hydrophobic residues. Dill et.al. survey the literature analyzing this model. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography in dual salt system increases protein binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Senczuk, Anna M; Klinke, Ralph; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Vedantham, Ganesh; Yigzaw, Yinges

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uses weakly hydrophobic resins and requires a salting-out salt to promote protein-resin interaction. The salting-out effects increase with protein and salt concentration. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) is dependent on the binding constant, as well as on the flow characteristics during sample loading. DBC increases with the salt concentration but decreases with increasing flow rate. Dynamic and operational binding capacity have a major raw material cost/processing time impact on commercial scale production of monoclonal antibodies. In order to maximize DBC the highest salt concentration without causing precipitation is used. We report here a novel method to maintain protein solubility while increasing the DBC by using a combination of two salting-out salts (referred to as dual salt). In a series of experiments, we explored the dynamic capacity of a HIC resin (TosoBioscience Butyl 650M) with combinations of salts. Using a model antibody, we developed a system allowing us to increase the dynamic capacity up to twofold using the dual salt system over traditional, single salt system. We also investigated the application of this novel approach to several other proteins and salt combinations, and noted a similar protein solubility and DBC increase. The observed increase in DBC in the dual salt system was maintained at different linear flow rates and did not impact selectivity.

  18. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Kan, Yajing; Rapp, Michael; Danner, Eric; Wei, Wei; Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-09-24

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties therefore is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on atomically smooth gold substrates and the surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different Mfps, Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl (CH3)- and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol (OH)-terminated SAM surfaces between pH 3 and pH 7.5. At acidic pH, all three Mfps adhered strongly to the CH3-terminated SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions (range of adhesive interaction energy = -4 to -9 mJ/m(2)) but only weakly to the OH-terminated SAM surfaces through H- bonding (adhesive interaction energy ≤ -0.5 mJ/m(2)). 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) residues in Mfps mediate binding to both SAM surface types but do so through different interactions: typical bidentate H-bonding by Dopa is frustrated by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs, Dopa in synergy with other nonpolar residues partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in intrinsically unstructured proteins, the distortion of bond geometry between H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes represent important concepts for the design of adhesive and nonfouling surfaces.

  19. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Kan, Yajing; Rapp, Michael; Danner, Eric; Wei, Wei; Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties therefore is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on atomically smooth gold substrates and the surface forces apparatus, we explored the force–distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different Mfps, Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl (CH3)- and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol (OH)-terminated SAM surfaces between pH 3 and pH 7.5. At acidic pH, all three Mfps adhered strongly to the CH3-terminated SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions (range of adhesive interaction energy = −4 to −9 mJ/m2) but only weakly to the OH-terminated SAM surfaces through H- bonding (adhesive interaction energy ≤ −0.5 mJ/m2). 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) residues in Mfps mediate binding to both SAM surface types but do so through different interactions: typical bidentate H-bonding by Dopa is frustrated by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs, Dopa in synergy with other nonpolar residues partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in intrinsically unstructured proteins, the distortion of bond geometry between H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes represent important concepts for the design of adhesive and nonfouling surfaces. PMID:24014592

  20. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  1. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Interfacial Packing of Protein Adsorbed to Hydrophobic Surfaces from Surface-Saturating Solution Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ping; Parhi, Purnendu; Krishnan, Anandi; Noh, Hyeran; Haider, Waseem; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Allara, David L.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2010-01-01

    The maximum capacity of a hydrophobic adsorbent is interpreted in terms of square or hexagonal (cubic and face-centered-cubic, FCC) interfacial packing models of adsorbed blood proteins in a way that accommodates experimental measurements by the solution-depletion method and quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM) for the human proteins serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa). A simple analysis shows that adsorbent capacity is capped by a fixed mass/volume (e.g. mg/mL) surface-region (interphase) concentration and not molar concentration. Nearly analytical agreement between the packing models and experiment suggests that, at surface saturation, above-mentioned proteins assemble within the interphase in a manner that approximates a well-ordered array. HSA saturates a hydrophobic adsorbent with the equivalent of a single square-or-hexagonally-packed layer of hydrated molecules whereas the larger proteins occupy two-or-more layers, depending on the specific protein under consideration and analytical method used to measure adsorbate mass (solution depletion or QCM). Square-or-hexagonal (cubic and FCC) packing models cannot be clearly distinguished by comparison to experimental data. QCM measurement of adsorbent capacity is shown to be significantly different than that measured by solution depletion for similar hydrophobic adsorbents. The underlying reason is traced to the fact that QCM measures contribution of both core protein, water of hydration, and interphase water whereas solution depletion measures only the contribution of core protein. It is further shown that thickness of the interphase directly measured by QCM systematically exceeds that inferred from solution-depletion measurements, presumably because the static model used to interpret solution depletion does not accurately capture the complexities of the viscoelastic interfacial environment probed by QCM. PMID:21035180

  2. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  3. Protein Adsorption Alters Hydrophobic Surfaces Used for Suspension Culture of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Steven J.; Stieg, Adam Z.; Richardson, Wade; Guo, Shuling; Powers, David N.; Wohlschlegel, James; Dunn, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This Letter examines the physical and chemical changes that occur at the interface of methyl-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) after exposure to cell culture media used to derive embryoid bodies (EBs) from pluripotent stem cells. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of the SAMs indicates that protein components within the EB cell culture medium preferentially adsorb at the hydrophobic interface. In addition, we examined the adsorption process using surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy. These studies identify the formation of a porous, mat-like adsorbed protein film with an approximate thickness of 2.5 nm. Captive bubble contact angle analysis reveals a shift toward superhydrophilic wetting behavior at the cell culture interface due to adsorption of these proteins. These results show how EBs are able to remain in suspension when derived on hydrophobic materials, which carries implications for the rational design of suspension culture interfaces for lineage specific stem-cell differentiation. PMID:26261952

  4. Interactions between the Conserved Hydrophobic Region of the Prion Protein and Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles*

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Simon; Buijs, Daniel; Gingras, Geneviève; Aubin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of PrP110–136, a peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region of the human prion protein, has been determined at high resolution in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by NMR. The results support the conclusion that the CtmPrP, a transmembrane form of the prion protein, adopts a different conformation than the reported structures of the normal prion protein determined in solution. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement studies with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid indicated that the conserved hydrophobic region peptide is not inserted symmetrically in the micelle, thus suggesting the presence of a guanidium-phosphate ion pair involving the side chain of the terminal arginine and the detergent headgroup. Titration of dodecylphosphocholine into a solution of PrP110–136 revealed the presence of a surface-bound species. In addition, paramagnetic probes located the surface-bound peptide somewhere below the micelle-water interface when using the inserted helix as a positional reference. This localization of the unknown population would allow a similar ion pair interaction. PMID:22128151

  5. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  6. Preservation of protein in marine systems: Hydrophobic and other noncovalent associations as major stabilizing forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Reno T.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2001-05-01

    - The fate of proteins during early diagenesis was investigated in environments with low mineral content to assess preservation mechanisms other than mineral sorption. Preservation was examined in anoxic, organic-rich sediments of Mangrove Lake, a marine environment located in Bermuda, and for particulate material generated during oxic decay of diatoms. N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) treatment tested the hypothesis that proteins may undergo modification reactions with glucose to form advanced-glycation end products (AGEs). A small but significant release (additional 14%) of proteins was observed after PTB treatment in surficial sediments, indicating that some aggregations can proceed through an α-dicarbonyl intermediate of the AGE pathway. Size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography with protein fluorescence, absorbance, and evaporative light-scattering detector measurements under native (phosphate or bicarbonate buffers) and denaturing (guanidine · HCl, urea, or acetonitrile) conditions point to the importance of hydrophobic and other noncovalent interactions in the stabilization of proteinaceous material in the environment. Soluble aggregates of substantial, relative molecular mass ( Mr ≳ 10 6) appear to be formed early in the diagenetic sequence. The preferential preservation of very high Mr, multisubunit phytoplankton proteins in sediments suggests that such aggregations confer resistance to degradation. Alternatively, some of the proteinaceous material may represent that fraction of organic matter that is highly prone to aggregations. Extended incubations (18 h; 37°C) with trypsin and proteinase-K showed that much of the aggregates that could be extracted are receptive to proteolytic cleavage. Buffer-, surfactant-, and NaOH-extractable aggregates comprised most of the acid-hydrolyzable proteinaceous material in detritus and surficial sediments but <35% in 9.7-m-deep sediments, suggesting additional mechanisms for preservation might be in

  7. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  8. Optimal Hydrophobicity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Protein Mimics Required for siRNA Internalization.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Posey, Nicholas D; Otter, Ronja; Caffrey, Leah M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-06-13

    Exploring the role of polymer structure for the internalization of biologically relevant cargo, specifically siRNA, is of critical importance to the development of improved delivery reagents. Herein, we report guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs) based on a ring-opening metathesis polymerization scaffold containing tunable hydrophobic moieties that promote siRNA internalization. Structure-activity relationships using Jurkat T cells and HeLa cells were explored to determine how the length of the hydrophobic block and the hydrophobic side chain compositions of these PTDMs impacted siRNA internalization. To explore the hydrophobic block length, two different series of diblock copolymers were synthesized: one series with symmetric block lengths and one with asymmetric block lengths. At similar cationic block lengths, asymmetric and symmetric PTDMs promoted siRNA internalization in the same percentages of the cell population regardless of the hydrophobic block length; however, with 20 repeat units of cationic charge, the asymmetric block length had greater siRNA internalization, highlighting the nontrivial relationships between hydrophobicity and overall cationic charge. To further probe how the hydrophobic side chains impacted siRNA internalization, an additional series of asymmetric PTDMs was synthesized that featured a fixed hydrophobic block length of five repeat units that contained either dimethyl (dMe), methyl phenyl (MePh), or diphenyl (dPh) side chains and varied cationic block lengths. This series was further expanded to incorporate hydrophobic blocks consisting of diethyl (dEt), diisobutyl (diBu), and dicyclohexyl (dCy) based repeat units to better define the hydrophobic window for which our PTDMs had optimal activity. High-performance liquid chromatography retention times quantified the relative hydrophobicities of the noncationic building blocks. PTDMs containing the MePh, diBu, and dPh hydrophobic blocks were shown to have superior

  9. An Anionic Phospholipid Enables the Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins to Alter Spontaneous Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, greatly accelerate the adsorption of the surfactant lipids to an air/water interface. Previous studies of factors that affect curvature suggest that vesicles may adsorb via a rate-limiting structure with prominent negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the lipid leaflets is concave. To determine if SP-B and SP-C might promote adsorption by inducing negative curvature, we used small-angle x-ray scattering to test whether the physiological mixture of the two proteins affects the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the inverse hexagonal phase. With dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine alone, the proteins had no effect on the hexagonal lattice constant, suggesting that the proteins fail to insert into the cylindrical monolayers. The surfactant lipids also contain ∼10% anionic phospholipids, which might allow incorporation of the cationic proteins. With 10% of the anionic dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol added to dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, the proteins induced a dose-related decrease in the hexagonal lattice constant. At 30°C, the reduction reached a maximum of 8% relative to the lipids alone at ∼1% (w/w) protein. Variation of NaCl concentration tested whether the effect of the protein represented a strictly electrostatic effect that screening by electrolyte would eliminate. With concentrations up to 3 M NaCl, the dose-related change in the hexagonal lattice constant decreased but persisted. Measurements at different hydrations determined the location of the pivotal plane and proved that the change in the lattice constant produced by the proteins resulted from a shift in spontaneous curvature. These results provide the most direct evidence yet that the surfactant proteins can induce negative curvature in lipid leaflets. This finding supports the model in which the proteins promote adsorption by facilitating the formation of a negatively curved, rate-limiting structure. PMID:23442910

  10. Evaluation of a new type of wound dressing made from recombinant spider silk protein using rat models.

    PubMed

    Baoyong, Lu; Jian, Zheng; Denglong, Chen; Min, Li

    2010-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of recombinant spider silk protein as a wound-dressing material for coverage of deep second-degree burn wounds using an animal model. Sixty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups (15 rats in each group). Two types of recombinant spider silk proteins, pNSR-16 and pNSR-32, as well as collagen (as a control) were applied on the wound; the fourth group was left untreated as a negative control. Each group was evaluated on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 14th and 21st days for wound-healing rate, histological test, levels of hydroxyproline synthesis and the samples were stained for immunohistochemical detection of the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The results of implantation testing showed that wound healing in the treatment groups--recombinant spider silk protein pNSR-16 and pNSR-32--was much better than that in the control group (p<0.01). On the 7th, 14th and 21st days, higher expression of bFGF and the increase of hydroxyproline content of the skin indicated good regeneration of wound skin in the treatment groups. Preliminarily, we conclude that the recombinant spider silk protein membrane promotes the recovery of wound skin by increasing the expression and secretion of the growth factor bFGF and hydroxyproline.

  11. Mechanical and microstructural properties of hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)-soy protein hydrogels for wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Snyders, Rony; Shingel, Kirill I; Zabeida, Oleg; Roberge, Christophe; Faure, Marie-Pierre; Martinu, Ludvik; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta E

    2007-10-01

    Biomimetic hydrogel made of poly(ethylene glycol) and soy protein with a water content of 96% has been developed for moist wound dressing applications. In this study, such hybrid hydrogels were investigated by both tensile and unconfined compression measurements in order to understand the relationships between structural parameters of the network, its mechanical properties and protein absorption in vitro. Elastic moduli were found to vary from 1 to 17 kPa depending on the composition, while the Poisson's ratio (approximately 0.18) and deformation at break (approximately 300%) showed no dependence on this parameter. Further calculations yielded the crosslinking concentration, the average molecular weight between crosslinks (M(C)) and the mesh size. The results show that reactions between PEG and protein create polymeric chains comprising molecules of PEG and protein fragments between crosslinks. M(C) is three times higher than that expected for a "theoretical network." On the basis of this data, we propose a model for the 3D network of the hydrogel, which is found to be useful for understanding drug release properties and biomedical potential of the studied material. PMID:17380500

  12. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  13. Dynamical transition, hydrophobic interface, and the temperature dependence of electrostatic fluctuations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebard, David N.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have revealed a dramatic increase, with increasing temperature, of the amplitude of electrostatic fluctuations caused by water at the active site of metalloprotein plastocyanin. The increased breadth of electrostatic fluctuations, expressed in terms of the reorganization energy of changing the redox state of the protein, is related to the formation of the hydrophobic protein-water interface, allowing large-amplitude collective fluctuations of the water density in the protein’s first solvation shell. On top of the monotonic increase of the reorganization energy with increasing temperature, we have observed a spike at ≃220K also accompanied by a significant slowing of the exponential collective Stokes shift dynamics. In contrast to the local density fluctuations of the hydration-shell waters, these spikes might be related to the global property of the water solvent crossing the Widom line or undergoing a weak first-order transition.

  14. Carbohydrate-protein interactions investigated on plastic chips statically coated with hydrophobically modified hydroxyethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fuquan; Maeda, Eiki; Osafune, Tomo; Nakajima, Kazuki; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2009-12-15

    We developed a novel method for rapid screening of carbohydrate-protein interactions using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) channels statically coated with hydrophobically modified hydroxyethylcellulose (HM-HEC). We found that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of HM-HEC on a PMMA surface intact by water allows rapid and reproducible separations of glycan samples using a 20 mM phosphate without HM-HEC. The underlying mechanism for dynamic and static coatings on the PMMA surface is discussed. Simultaneous analysis of the molecular interaction between a complex mixture of carbohydrates from alpha1-acid glycoprotein and proteins has been successfully achieved in PMMA channels statically coated with a SAM of HM-HEC.

  15. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    PubMed

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  16. Expression of recombinant small hydrophobic protein for serospecific detection of avian pneumovirus subgroup C.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhong; Sabara, Marta I; Li, Yan

    2005-01-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus (APV) Colorado isolate (CO), which belongs to subgroup C (APV/C), was expressed with a baculovirus vector. The recombinant SH protein was evaluated as a potential subgroup-specific diagnostic reagent in order to differentiate infections resulting from APV/C from those induced by APV/A, APV/B, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). When the recombinant baculovirus was used to infect insect cells, a 31- to 38-kDa glycosylated form of the SH protein was produced and subsequently tested for reactivity with antibodies specific for APV/A, APV/B, APV/C, and hMPV. Western blot analysis showed that the expressed recombinant SH protein could only be recognized by APV/C-specific antibodies. This result was consistent with sequence analysis of the APV/C SH protein, which had very low (24%) amino acid identity with the corresponding protein of hMPV and no discernible identity with the SH protein of APV/A or APV/B. A recombinant SH protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, and it further confirmed the lack of reactivity of this protein with antisera raised to APV/A, APV/B, and hMPV and supported its designation as a subgroup-specific antigen. This finding indicated that the recombinant SH protein was a suitable antigen for ELISA-based detection of subgroup-specific antibodies in turkeys and could be used for serologically based differential diagnosis of APV and hMPV infections.

  17. Expression of Recombinant Small Hydrophobic Protein for Serospecific Detection of Avian Pneumovirus Subgroup C

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lizhong; Sabara, Marta I.; Li, Yan

    2005-01-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus (APV) Colorado isolate (CO), which belongs to subgroup C (APV/C), was expressed with a baculovirus vector. The recombinant SH protein was evaluated as a potential subgroup-specific diagnostic reagent in order to differentiate infections resulting from APV/C from those induced by APV/A, APV/B, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). When the recombinant baculovirus was used to infect insect cells, a 31- to 38-kDa glycosylated form of the SH protein was produced and subsequently tested for reactivity with antibodies specific for APV/A, APV/B, APV/C, and hMPV. Western blot analysis showed that the expressed recombinant SH protein could only be recognized by APV/C-specific antibodies. This result was consistent with sequence analysis of the APV/C SH protein, which had very low (24%) amino acid identity with the corresponding protein of hMPV and no discernible identity with the SH protein of APV/A or APV/B. A recombinant SH protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, and it further confirmed the lack of reactivity of this protein with antisera raised to APV/A, APV/B, and hMPV and supported its designation as a subgroup-specific antigen. This finding indicated that the recombinant SH protein was a suitable antigen for ELISA-based detection of subgroup-specific antibodies in turkeys and could be used for serologically based differential diagnosis of APV and hMPV infections. PMID:15643005

  18. Constructing Fluorogenic Bacillus Spores (F-Spores) via Hydrophobic Decoration of Coat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferencko, Linda; Rotman, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacterial spores are protected by a coat consisting of about 60 different proteins assembled as a biochemically complex structure with intriguing morphological and mechanical properties. Historically, the coat has been considered a static structure providing rigidity and mainly acting as a sieve to exclude exogenous large toxic molecules, such as lytic enzymes. Over recent years, however, new information about the coat's architecture and function have emerged from experiments using innovative tools such as automated scanning microscopy, and high resolution atomic force microscopy. Principal Findings Using thin-section electron microscopy, we found that the coat of Bacillus spores has topologically specific proteins forming a layer that is identifiable because it spontaneously becomes decorated with hydrophobic fluorogenic probes from the milieu. Moreover, spores with decorated coat proteins (termed F-spores) have the unexpected attribute of responding to external germination signals by generating intense fluorescence. Fluorescence data from diverse experimental designs, including F-spores constructed from five different Bacilli species, indicated that the fluorogenic ability of F-spores is under control of a putative germination-dependent mechanism. Conclusions This work uncovers a novel attribute of spore-coat proteins that we exploited to decorate a specific layer imparting germination-dependent fluorogenicity to F-spores. We expect that F-spores will provide a model system to gain new insights into structure/function dynamics of spore-coat proteins. PMID:20174569

  19. Interplay of Electrostatics and Hydrophobic Effects in the Metamorphic Protein Human Lymphotactin.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Volkman, Brian F; Cui, Qiang

    2015-07-30

    The human lymphotactin (hLtn) is a protein that features two native states both of which are physiologically relevant: it is a monomer (hLtn10) at 10 °C with 200 mM salt and a dimer (hLtn40) at 40 °C and without salt. Here we focus on the networks of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions that display substantial changes upon the conversion from hLtn10 to hLtn40 since they are expected to modulate the relative stability of the two folds. In addition to the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction discussed in previous work, we find several other like-charge pairs that are likely important to the stability of hLtn10. Free energy perturbation calculations are carried out to explicitly evaluate the contribution of the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction to the hLtn10 stability. hLtn40 features a larger number of salt bridges, and a set of hydrophobic residues undergo major changes in the solvent accessible surface area between hLtn10 and hLtn40, pointing to their importance to the relative stability of the two folds. We also discuss the use of explicit and implicit solvent simulations for characterizing the conformational ensembles under different solution conditions.

  20. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases which are serious neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals occur in various of species. Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases affected by amyloid, prion diseases can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in many species. In humans, prion diseases include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Kuru etc. In animals, prion diseases are related to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) found in deer and elk, and scrapie seen in sheep and goats, etc. More seriously, the fact that transmission of the prion diseases across the species barrier to other species such as humans has caused a major public health concern worldwide. For example, the BSE in Europe, the CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK. Fortunately, it is discovered that the hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions (PrP(Sc)), which provide some clues in control of such diseases. This article provides a detailed survey of recent studies with respect to the PrP hydrophobic region of human PrP(110-136) using molecular dynamics studies. PMID:25373387

  1. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  2. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  3. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  4. Protein adsorption on a hydrophobic surface: a molecular dynamics study of lysozyme on graphite.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2010-04-20

    Adsorption of human lysozyme on hydrophobic graphite is investigated through atomistic computer simulations with molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The chosen strategy follows a simulation protocol proposed by the authors to model the initial and the final adsorption stage on a bare surface. Adopting an implicit solvent and considering 10 starting molecular orientations so that all the main sides of the protein can face the surface, we first carry out an energy minimization to investigate the initial adsorption stage, and then long MD runs of selected arrangements to follow the surface spreading of the protein maximizing its adsorption strength. The results are discussed in terms of the kinetics of surface spreading, the interaction energy, and the molecular size, considering both the footprint and the final thickness of the adsorbed protein. The structural implications of the final adsorption geometry for surface aggregation and nanoscale structural organization are also pointed out. Further MD runs are carried out in explicit water for the native structure and the most stable adsorption state to assess the local stability of the geometry obtained in implicit solvent, and to calculate the statistical distribution of the water molecules around the whole lysozyme and its backbone.

  5. Aptamer binding to celiac disease-triggering hydrophobic proteins: a sensitive gluten detection approach.

    PubMed

    Amaya-González, Sonia; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, M Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Celiac disease represents a significant public health problem in large parts of the world. A major hurdle in the effective management of the disease by celiac sufferers is the sensitivity of the current available methods for assessing gluten contents in food. In response, we report a highly sensitive approach for gluten analysis using aptamers as specific receptors. Gliadins, a fraction of gluten proteins, are the main constituent responsible for triggering the disease. However, they are highly hydrophobic and large molecules, regarded as difficult targets for in vitro evolution of aptamers without nucleobase modification. We describe the successful selection of aptamers for these water insoluble prolamins that was achieved choosing the immunodominant apolar peptide from α2-gliadin as a target for selection. All aptamers evolved are able to bind the target in its native environment within the natural protein. The best nonprotein receptor is the basis for an electrochemical competitive enzyme-linked assay on magnetic particles, which allows the measurement of as low as 0.5 ppb of gliadin standard (0.5 ppm of gluten). Reference immunoassay for detecting the same target has a limit of detection of 3 ppm, 6 times less sensitive than this method. Importantly, it also displays high specificity, detecting the other three prolamins toxic for celiac patients and not showing cross-reactivity to nontoxic proteins such as maize, soya, and rice. These features make the proposed method a valuable tool for gluten detection in foods.

  6. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  7. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  8. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins. PMID:25375531

  9. Thermodynamic effects of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins on the early adsorption of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Schram, V; Hall, S B

    2001-09-01

    We determined the influence of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, on the thermodynamic barriers that limit adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to the air-water interface. We compared the temperature and concentration dependence of adsorption, measured by monitoring surface tension, between calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and the complete set of neutral and phospholipids (N&PL) without the proteins. Three stages generally characterized the various adsorption isotherms: an initial delay during which surface tension remained constant, a fall in surface tension at decreasing rates, and, for experiments that reached approximately 40 mN/m, a late acceleration of the fall in surface tension to approximately 25 mN/m. For the initial change in surface tension, the surfactant proteins accelerated adsorption for CLSE relative to N&PL by more than ten-fold, reducing the Gibbs free energy of transition (DeltaG(O)) from 119 to 112 kJ/mole. For the lipids alone in N&PL, the enthalpy of transition (DeltaH(O), 54 kJ/mole) and entropy (-T. DeltaS, 65 kJ/mole at 37 degrees C) made roughly equal contributions to DeltaG(O). The proteins in CLSE had little effect on -T. DeltaS(O) (68 kJ/mole), but lowered DeltaG(O) for CLSE by reducing DeltaH(O) (44 kJ/mole). Models of the detailed mechanisms by which the proteins facilitate adsorption must meet these thermodynamic constraints.

  10. Designability and cooperative folding in a four-letter hydrophobic-polar model of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Guang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2006-11-01

    The two-letter hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Lau and Dill [Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] has been widely used in theoretical studies of protein folding due to its conceptual and computational simplicity. Despite its success in elucidating various aspects of the sequence-structure relationship, thermodynamic behavior of the model is not in agreement with a sharp two-state folding transition of many single-domain proteins. To gain a better understanding of this discrepancy, we consider an extension of the HP model by including an “antiferromagnetic” (AF) interaction in the contact potential that favors amino acid residues with complementary attributes. With an enlarged four-letter alphabet, the density of states on the low energy side can be significantly decreased. Computational studies of the four-letter HP model are performed on 36-mer sequences on a square lattice. It is found that the designability of folded structures in the extended model exhibits strong correlation with that of the two-letter HP model, while the AF interaction alone selects a very different class of structures that resembles the Greek key motif for beta sheets. A procedure is introduced to select sequences which have the largest energy gap to the native state. Based on density of states and specific heat calculations in the full configuration space, we show that the optimized sequence is able to fold nearly as cooperatively as a corresponding Gō model.

  11. Modeling protein density of states: additive hydrophobic effects are insufficient for calorimetric two-state cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Chan, H S

    2000-09-01

    A well-established experimental criterion for two-state thermodynamic cooperativity in protein folding is that the van't Hoff enthalpy DeltaH(vH) around the transition midpoint is equal, or very nearly so, to the calorimetric enthalpy DeltaH(cal) of the entire transition. This condition is satisfied by many small proteins. We use simple lattice models to provide a statistical mechanical framework to elucidate how this calorimetric two-state picture may be reconciled with the hierarchical multistate scenario emerging from recent hydrogen exchange experiments. We investigate the feasibility of using inverse Laplace transforms to recover the underlying density of states (i.e., enthalpy distribution) from calorimetric data. We find that the constraint imposed by DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1 on densities of states of proteins is often more stringent than other "two-state" criteria proposed in recent theoretical studies. In conjunction with reasonable assumptions, the calorimetric two-state condition implies a narrow distribution of denatured-state enthalpies relative to the overall enthalpy difference between the native and the denatured conformations. This requirement does not always correlate with simple definitions of "sharpness" of a transition and has important ramifications for theoretical modeling. We find that protein models that assume capillarity cooperativity can exhibit overall calorimetric two-state-like behaviors. However, common heteropolymer models based on additive hydrophobic-like interactions, including highly specific two-dimensional Gō models, fail to produce proteinlike DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1. A simple model is constructed to illustrate a proposed scenario in which physically plausible local and nonlocal cooperative terms, which mimic helical cooperativity and environment-dependent hydrogen bonding strength, can lead to thermodynamic behaviors closer to experiment. Our results suggest that proteinlike thermodynamic

  12. [Bioactive dressings].

    PubMed

    Grasset, N; Raffoul, W; Bigliardi, P

    2010-02-17

    Wound healing is a complex process involving several cell types (keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, etc.) as well as many growth factors (PDGF, TGF-betas, FGFs, VEGF, etc.). It can be challenging when wounds are deep or very large (third degree burn, ulceration after cutaneous tumor resection) or in presence of peripheral vascular disease, metabolic disturbances or peripheral neuropathy (chronic vascular or diabetic wounds). In order to promote skin regeneration, numerous bioactive dressings combining cells, matrices and growth factors are available on the market. This article provides a general overview of the various product categories and presents their main indications. The principal axes of the biomedical research in this area are also discussed.

  13. The fungal cerato-platanin protein EPL1 forms highly ordered layers at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bonazza, K; Gaderer, R; Neudl, S; Przylucka, A; Allmaier, G; Druzhinina, I S; Grothe, H; Friedbacher, G; Seidl-Seiboth, V

    2015-03-01

    Cerato-platanin proteins (CPPs) and hydrophobins are two classes of small, secreted proteins that are exclusively found in fungi. CPPs are known as chitin-binding proteins, and were recently also shown to form protein layers at air/water interfaces, but the features of these layers were not investigated on the molecular level yet. In this study, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), EPL1, a member of the CPP family was shown to form highly ordered monolayers at a hydrophobic surface/liquid-interface. Furthermore, two new hydrophobins were analysed, and the influence of EPL1 on hydrophobin layers was studied in situ. Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins that are able to self-assemble at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces, thereby inverting the polarity of the surface. This renders fungal growth structures such as spores water repellent. The combination of AFM data and wettability experiments led to the conclusion that in presence of both, hydrophobins and EPL1, a previously unknown hybrid layer is formed. This mixed protein layer is on one hand not inverting but enhancing the hydrophobicity of HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), typical for EPL1, and on the other hand, it is stable and water insoluble, which is reminiscent of hydrophobin layers.

  14. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  15. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation.

  16. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation. PMID:25497915

  17. Enrichment of hydrophobic proteins via Triton X-114 phase partitioning and hydroxyapatite column chromatography for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wissing, J; Heim, S; Flohé, L; Bilitewski, U; Frank, R

    2000-07-01

    Membrane proteins are the starting point of several signal transduction pathways. Therefore, the separation and identification of these proteins are of great interest in proteome analysis. However, the specific properties of membrane proteins seriously impede their analysis. We present an effective and highly reproducible method for the two-dimensional separation of extremely hydrophobic proteins and demonstrate the advantages of special preseparation procedures for the identification of proteins which have very similar Mr and p/. Using the example of the integral membrane protein very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor (NCBI Acc. # 1730111) and the soluble heat shock protein (HSP) 90 (NCBI Acc. # 386786) we present the applicability of a phase-separation system with Triton X-114. Using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of the protein spots after 2-D separation of the hydrophilic and the strongly hydrophobic protein fraction of human endothelial cells (ECV cell line), we were able to distinguish both proteins.

  18. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGES

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  19. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  20. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera’s OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  1. Hydrophobicity, thermal and micro-structural properties of whey protein concentrate-pullulan-beeswax films.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Khanzadi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Dehnad, Danial; Chegini, Faramarz Khodaian; Maghsoudlou, Yayha

    2015-09-01

    In this research, effects of beeswax (BW) on functional properties of whey protein concentrates (WPC):pullulan (PUL) films were investigated. For this purpose, 0, 10, 20 and 30w/w(glycerol)% BW rates and 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30w/w% WPC:PUL ratios were applied. Films containing 70% WPC:30% PUL (WPC70) and 30% BW (BW30) justified the highest contact angle (92.4°) among all films; SEM micrographs indicated that BW could come toward the surface of films during drying stage and resulted in a higher hydrophobic behavior of bilayer films compared with blend films. WPC70 supplied the lowest T(g) values (36-48 °C) among different proportions of WPC-PUL; the highest melting points were just assured in the absence of BW regardless of combination ratio for WPI:PUL. BW30 films deserved lower roughness rates than BW20 (and even BW10) films, indicating more advantageous microstructure and higher hydrogen connections in BW30 films and justifying similar melting points attained for BW30 films to BW20 or 10 ones. Overall, application of WPC70 and BW30 was recommended to obtain optimum combination of final properties for WPC-PUL-BW bilayer films as SEM exhibited flexible and elastic structures of such films.

  2. Adsorption of a Protein Monolayer via Hydrophobic Interactions Prevents Nanoparticle Aggregation under Harsh Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Blankenburg, Jan; Olson, Jana; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We find that citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles aggregate and precipitate in saline solutions below the NaCl concentration of many bodily fluids and blood plasma. Our experiments indicate that this is due to complexation of the citrate anions with Na+ cations in solution. A dramatically enhanced colloidal stability is achieved when bovine serum albumin is adsorbed to the gold nanoparticle surface, completely preventing nanoparticle aggregation under harsh environmental conditions where the NaCl concentration is well beyond the isotonic point. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism of the formation of this albumin ‘corona’ and find that monolayer protein adsorption is most likely ruled by hydrophobic interactions. As for many nanotechnology-based biomedical and environmental applications, particle aggregation and sedimentation are undesirable and could substantially increase the risk of toxicological side-effects, the formation of the BSA corona presented here provides a low-cost bio-compatible strategy for nanoparticle stabilization and transport in highly ionic environments. PMID:23914342

  3. The effect of geometrical presentation of multimodal cation-exchange ligands on selective recognition of hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Brown, Matthew R; Heden, Ryan; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-09-18

    The effects of spatial organization of hydrophobic and charged moieties on multimodal (MM) cation-exchange ligands were examined by studying protein retention behavior on two commercial chromatographic media, Capto™ MMC and Nuvia™ cPrime™. Proteins with extended regions of surface-exposed aliphatic residues were found to have enhanced retention on the Capto MMC system as compared to the Nuvia cPrime resin. The results further indicated that while the Nuvia cPrime ligand had a strong preference for interactions with aromatic groups, the Capto MMC ligand appeared to interact with both aliphatic and aromatic clusters on the protein surfaces. These observations were formalized into a new set of protein surface property descriptors, which quantified the local distribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic potentials as well as distinguishing between aromatic and aliphatic properties. Using these descriptors, high-performing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models (R(2)>0.88) were generated for both the Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime datasets at pH 5 and pH 6. Descriptors of electrostatic properties were generally common across the four models; however both Capto MMC models included descriptors that quantified regions of aliphatic-based hydrophobicity in addition to aromatic descriptors. Retention was generally reduced by lowering the ligand densities on both MM resins. Notably, elution order was largely unaffected by the change in surface density, but smaller and more aliphatic proteins tended to be more affected by this drop in ligand density. This suggests that modulating the exposure, shape and density of the hydrophobic moieties in multimodal chromatographic systems can alter the preference for surface exposed aliphatic or aromatic residues, thus providing an additional dimension for modulating the selectivity of MM protein separation systems. PMID:26292626

  4. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  5. Enthalpic barriers to the hydrophobic binding of oligosaccharides to phage P22 tailspike protein.

    PubMed

    Baxa, U; Cooper, A; Weintraub, A; Pfeil, W; Seckler, R

    2001-05-01

    The structural thermodynamics of the recognition of complex carbohydrates by proteins are not well understood. The recognition of O-antigen polysaccharide by phage P22 tailspike protein is a highly suitable model for advancing knowledge in this field. The binding to octa- and dodecasaccharides derived from Salmonella enteritidis O-antigen was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry. At room temperature, the binding reaction is enthalpically driven with an unfavorable change in entropy. A large change of -1.8 +/- 0.2 kJ mol(-1) K(-1) in heat capacity suggests that the hydrophobic effect and water reorganization contribute substantially to complex formation. As expected from the large heat-capacity change, we found enthalpy-entropy compensation. The calorimetrically measured binding enthalpies were identical within error to van't Hoff enthalpies determined from fluorescence titrations. Binding kinetics were determined at temperatures ranging from 10 to 30 degrees C. The second-order association rate constant varied from 1 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for dodecasaccharide at 10 degrees C to 7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for octasaccharide at 30 degrees C. The first-order dissociation rate constants ranged from 0.2 to 3.8 s(-1). The Arrhenius activation energies were close to 50 and 100 kJ mol(-1) for the association and dissociation reactions, respectively, indicating mainly enthalpic barriers. Despite the fact that this system is quite complex due to the flexibility of the saccharide, both the thermodynamic and kinetic data are compatible with a simple one-step binding model.

  6. Hydrophobic and Ionic-Interactions in Bulk and Confined Water with Implications for Collapse and Folding of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Chen, Jie; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-10-01

    Water and water-mediated interactions determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding, protein aggregation and self-assembly in confined spaces. To obtain insights into the role of water in the context of folding problems, we describe computer simulations of a few related model systems. The dynamics of collapse of eicosane shows that upon expulsion of water the linear hydrocarbon chain adopts an ordered helical hairpin structure with 1.5 turns. The structure of dimer of eicosane molecules has two well ordered helical hairpins that are stacked perpendicular to each other. As a prelude to studying folding in confined spaces we used simulations to understand changes in hydrophobic and ionic interactions in nano-sized water droplets. Solvation of hydrophobic and charged species change drastically in nano-scale water droplets. Hydrophobic species are localized at the boundary. The tendency of ions to be at the boundary where water density is low increases as the charge density decreases. The interactions between hydrophobic, polar, and charged residue are also profoundly altered in confined spaces. Using the results of computer simulations and accounting for loss of chain entropy upon confinement we argue and then demonstrate, using simulations in explicit water, that ordered states of generic amphiphilic peptide sequences should be stabilized in cylindrical nanopores.

  7. Expression and purification of short hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides with maltose-binding protein as a solubility tag.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Laure; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Hocquellet, Agnès; Cabanne, Charlotte; Bathany, Katell; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Garbay, Bertrand; Garanger, Elisabeth

    2015-06-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are biodegradable polymers with interesting physico-chemical properties for biomedical and biotechnological applications. The recombinant expression of hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides is often difficult because they possess low transition temperatures, and therefore form aggregates at sub-ambient temperatures. To circumvent this difficulty, we expressed in Escherichia coli three hydrophobic ELPs (VPGIG)n with variable lengths (n=20, 40, and 60) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). Fusion proteins were soluble and yields of purified MBP-ELP ranged between 66 and 127mg/L culture. After digestion of the fusion proteins by enterokinase, the ELP moiety was purified by using inverse transition cycling. The purified fraction containing ELP40 was slightly contaminated by traces of undigested fusion protein. Purification of ELP60 was impaired because of co-purification of the MBP tag during inverse transition cycling. ELP20 was successfully purified to homogeneity, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses. The transition temperature of ELP20 was measured at 15.4°C in low salt buffer. In conclusion, this method can be used to produce hydrophobic ELP of low molecular mass.

  8. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  9. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  10. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  11. Properties of a new protein film from bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) and effect of CaCl₂ on its hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Arabestani, Akram; Kadivar, Mahdi; Shahedi, Mohmmad; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Porta, Raffaele

    2013-06-01

    This work was aimed to investigate the potential preparation of an edible film from bitter vetch seed proteins. The film was cast from bitter vetch protein concentrate (BPC) and glycerol. CaCl₂ at the ratio of 0.1-1% (w/w) of the BPC was tested to improve film properties, specially its hydrophobicity. Some physicochemical properties of the films obtained in the absence and presence of CaCl₂ were evaluated. The results indicated that moisture content, total soluble matter, water vapour permeability and contact angle of the films prepared in the presence of CaCl₂ were significantly modified in comparison with the control values, while their mechanical properties did not significantly change. The surface morphology of the films was also considerably affected by the presence of CaCl₂. Therefore, CaCl₂ could improve BPC-films barrier properties especially their hydrophobicity, even though calcium concentration seems to be a crucial factor.

  12. Fusion protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5: nucleotide sequence of mRNA predicts a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Harris, T J; Lamb, R A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA coding for the fusion glycoprotein (F) of the paramyxovirus, simian virus 5, has been obtained. There is a single large open reading frame on the mRNA that encodes a protein of 529 amino acids with a molecular weight of 56,531. The proteolytic cleavage/activation site of F, to yield F2 and F1, contains five arginine residues. Six potential glycosylation sites were identified in the protein, two on F2 and four on F1. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that F is extensively hydrophobic over the length of the polypeptide chain. Three regions are very hydrophobic and could interact directly with membranes: these are the NH2-terminal putative signal peptide, the COOH-terminal putative membrane anchorage domain, and the NH2-terminal region of F1. Images PMID:6093114

  13. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  14. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  15. Evaluation of gaseous transmission (O2 and CO2) through burn wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Queen, D; Gaylor, J D; Evans, J H; Courtney, J M; Reid, W H

    1987-10-01

    The rates of transmission of oxygen and carbon dioxide through various burn wound dressing materials were determined. The British Standard Vacuum technique was used to determine the Gas Transmission Rate (GTR) of hydrophobic dressings. A Gas to Liquid technique was used to determine the GTR of hydrophilic (water containing) dressings. All the materials tested showed greater GTR values for carbon dioxide than for oxygen. The role of the transmission characteristics of the dressings to influence the wound healing environment is discussed.

  16. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Aaron C; Castañeda, Carlos A; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, E Bertrand

    2014-08-12

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu-Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu-Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu-Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations.

  17. Preparation of a weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kailou; Yang, Fan; Xia, Hongjun; Wang, Fei; Song, Qingguo; Bai, Quan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 3-diethylamino-1-propyne was covalently bonded to the azide-silica by a click reaction to obtain a novel dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation with a ligand containing tertiary amine and two ethyl groups capable of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction functionalities, which can display hydrophobic interaction chromatography character in a high-salt-concentration mobile phase and weak anion exchange character in a low-salt-concentration mobile phase employed for protein separation. As a result, it can be employed to separate proteins with weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction modes, respectively. The resolution and selectivity of the stationary phase were evaluated in both hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange modes with standard proteins, respectively, which can be comparable to that of conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns. Therefore, the synthesized weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column can be used to replace two corresponding conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns to separate proteins. Based on this mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase, a new off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography technology using only a single dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column was developed. Nine kinds of tested proteins can be separated completely using the developed method within 2.0 h.

  18. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtech; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-03-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core of globular proteins is believed to be the consequence of exterior hydrophobic forces of entropic nature. This, together with the low occurrence of hydrogen bonds in the protein core, leads to the opinion that the energy contribution of core formation to protein folding and stability is negligible. We show that stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of a small protein, rubredoxin, determined by means of high-level correlated ab initio calculations (complete basis set limit of MP2 stabilization energy + CCSD(T) correction term), amounted to approximately 50 kcal/mol. These results clearly demonstrate strong attraction inside a hydrophobic core. This finding may lead to substantial changes in the current view of protein folding. We also point out the inability of the DFT/B3LYP method to describe a strong attraction between studied amino acids.

  19. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography as a technique to determine protein adsorption onto hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tongtong; Anselme, Karine; Sarrailh, Segolene; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-01-30

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) setup for quantification of adsorbed proteins on various type of plane substrates with limited area (<3 cm(2)). Protein quantification was investigated with a liquid chromatography chain equipped with a size exclusion column or a reversed-phase column. By evaluating the validation of the method according to guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH), all the results obtained by HPLC were reliable. By simple adsorption test at the contact of hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane: PDMS) surfaces, kinetics of adsorption were determined and amounts of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and lysozyme were obtained: as expected for each protein, the amount adsorbed at the plateau on glass (between 0.15 μg/cm(2) and 0.4 μg/cm(2)) is lower than for hydrophobic PDMS surfaces (between 0.45 μg/cm(2) and 0.8 μg/cm(2)). These results were consistent with bicinchoninic acid protein determination. According to ICH guidelines, both Reversed Phase and Size Exclusion HPLC can be validated for quantification of adsorbed protein. However, we consider the size exclusion approach more interesting in this field because additional informations can be obtained for aggregative proteins. Indeed, monomer, dimer and oligomer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were observed in the chromatogram. On increasing the temperature, we found a decrease of peak intensity of bovine serum albumin as well as the fraction of dimer and oligomer after contact with PDMS and glass surface. As the surface can act as a denaturation parameter, these informations can have a huge impact on the elucidation of the interfacial behavior of protein and in particular for aggregation processes in pharmaceutical applications.

  1. Two hydrophobic residues can determine the specificity of mitogen-activated protein kinase docking interactions.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2015-10-30

    MAPKs bind to many of their upstream regulators and downstream substrates via a short docking motif (the D-site) on their binding partner. MAPKs that are in different families (e.g. ERK, JNK, and p38) can bind selectively to D-sites in their authentic substrates and regulators while discriminating against D-sites in other pathways. Here we demonstrate that the short hydrophobic region at the distal end of the D-site plays a critical role in determining the high selectivity of JNK MAPKs for docking sites in their cognate MAPK kinases. Changing just 1 or 2 key hydrophobic residues in this submotif is sufficient to turn a weak JNK-binding D-site into a strong one, or vice versa. These specificity-determining differences are also found in the D-sites of the ETS family transcription factors Elk-1 and Net. Moreover, swapping two hydrophobic residues between these D-sites switches the relative efficiency of Elk-1 and Net as substrates for ERK versus JNK, as predicted. These results provide new insights into docking specificity and suggest that this specificity can evolve rapidly by changes to just 1 or 2 amino acids.

  2. Physical origin of hydrophobicity studied in terms of cold denaturation of proteins: comparison between water and simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    A clue to the physical origin of the hydrophobicity is in the experimental observations, which show that it is weakened at low temperatures. By considering a solvophobic model protein immersed in water and three species of simple solvents, we analyze the temperature dependence of the changes in free energy, energy, and entropy of the solvent upon protein unfolding. The angle-dependent and radial-symmetric integral equation theories and the morphometric approach are employed in the analysis. Each of the changes is decomposed into two terms, which depend on the excluded volume and on the area and curvature of the solvent-accessible surface, respectively. The excluded-volume term of the entropy change is further decomposed into two components representing the protein-solvent pair correlation and the protein-solvent-solvent triplet and higher-order correlation, respectively. We show that water crowding in the system becomes more serious upon protein unfolding but this effect becomes weaker as the temperature is lowered. If the hydrophobicity originated from the water structuring near a nonpolar solute, it would be strengthened upon lowering of the temperature. Among the three species of simple solvents, considerable weakening of the solvophobicity at low temperatures is observed only for the solvent where the particles interact through a strong attractive potential and the particle size is as small as that of water. Even in the case of this solvent, however, cold denaturation of a protein cannot be reproduced. It would be reproducible if the attractive potential was substantially enhanced, but such enhancement causes the appearance of the metastability limit for a single liquid phase.

  3. Identification of a minimal hydrophobic domain in the herpes simplex virus type 1 scaffolding protein which is required for interaction with the major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z; Beaudet-Miller, M; Durkin, J; Zhang, R; Kwong, A D

    1996-01-01

    Recent biochemical and genetic studies have demonstrated that an essential step of the herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid assembly pathway involves the interaction of the major capsid protein (VP5) with either the C terminus of the scaffolding protein (VP22a, ICP35) or that of the protease (Pra, product of UL26). To better understand the nature of the interaction and to further map the sequence motif, we expressed the C-terminal 30-amino-acid peptide of ICP35 in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (GST/CT). Purified GST/CT fusion proteins were then incubated with 35S-labeled herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cell lysates containing VP5. The interaction between GST/CT and VP5 was determined by coprecipitation of the two proteins with glutathione Sepharose beads. Our results revealed that the GST/CT fusion protein specifically interacts with VP5, suggesting that the C-terminal domain alone is sufficient for interaction with VP5. Deletion analysis of the GST/CT binding domain mapped the interaction to a minimal 12-amino-acid motif. Substitution mutations further revealed that the replacement of hydrophobic residues with charged residues in the core region of the motif abolished the interaction, suggesting that the interaction is a hydrophobic one. A chaotropic detergent, 0.1% Nonidet P-40, also abolished the interaction, further supporting the hydrophobic nature of the interaction. Computer analysis predicted that the minimal binding motif could form a strong alpha-helix structure. Most interestingly, the alpha-helix model maximizes the hydropathicity of the minimal domain so that all of the hydrophobic residues are centered around a Phe residue on one side of the alpha-helix. Mutation analysis revealed that the Phe residue is absolutely critical for the binding, since changes to Ala, Tyr, or Trp abrogated the interaction. Finally, in a peptide competition experiment, the C-terminal 25-amino-acid peptide, as well as a minimal peptide

  4. Identification of a minimal hydrophobic domain in the herpes simplex virus type 1 scaffolding protein which is required for interaction with the major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z; Beaudet-Miller, M; Durkin, J; Zhang, R; Kwong, A D

    1996-01-01

    Recent biochemical and genetic studies have demonstrated that an essential step of the herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid assembly pathway involves the interaction of the major capsid protein (VP5) with either the C terminus of the scaffolding protein (VP22a, ICP35) or that of the protease (Pra, product of UL26). To better understand the nature of the interaction and to further map the sequence motif, we expressed the C-terminal 30-amino-acid peptide of ICP35 in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (GST/CT). Purified GST/CT fusion proteins were then incubated with 35S-labeled herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cell lysates containing VP5. The interaction between GST/CT and VP5 was determined by coprecipitation of the two proteins with glutathione Sepharose beads. Our results revealed that the GST/CT fusion protein specifically interacts with VP5, suggesting that the C-terminal domain alone is sufficient for interaction with VP5. Deletion analysis of the GST/CT binding domain mapped the interaction to a minimal 12-amino-acid motif. Substitution mutations further revealed that the replacement of hydrophobic residues with charged residues in the core region of the motif abolished the interaction, suggesting that the interaction is a hydrophobic one. A chaotropic detergent, 0.1% Nonidet P-40, also abolished the interaction, further supporting the hydrophobic nature of the interaction. Computer analysis predicted that the minimal binding motif could form a strong alpha-helix structure. Most interestingly, the alpha-helix model maximizes the hydropathicity of the minimal domain so that all of the hydrophobic residues are centered around a Phe residue on one side of the alpha-helix. Mutation analysis revealed that the Phe residue is absolutely critical for the binding, since changes to Ala, Tyr, or Trp abrogated the interaction. Finally, in a peptide competition experiment, the C-terminal 25-amino-acid peptide, as well as a minimal peptide

  5. Genetic analysis of a hydrophobic domain of coxsackie B3 virus protein 2B: a moderate degree of hydrophobicity is required for a cis-acting function in viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    van Kuppeveld, F J; Galama, J M; Zoll, J; Melchers, W J

    1995-01-01

    Coxsackie B virus protein 2B contains near its C terminus a hydrophobic domain with an amino acid composition that is characteristic for transmembrane regions. A molecular genetic approach was followed to define the role of this domain in virus reproduction and to study the structural and hydrophobic requirements of the domain. Nine substitution mutations were introduced in an infectious cDNA clone of coxsackie B3 virus. The effects of the mutations were studied in vivo by transfection of Buffalo green monkey cells with copy RNA transcripts. The results reported here suggest that a critical degree of hydrophobicity of the domain is essential for virus growth. The mutations S77M, C75M, I64S, and V66S, which caused either a small increase or decrease in mean hydrophobicity, yielded viable viruses. The double mutations S77M/C75M and I64S/V6-6S, which caused a more pronounced increase or decrease in hydrophobicity, were nonviable. Negatively charged residues (mutations A71E, I73E, and A71E/I73E) abolished virus growth. The mutations had no effect on the synthesis and processing of the viral polyprotein. Replication and complementation were studied by using a subgenomic coxsackievirus replicon containing the luciferase gene in place of the capsid coding region. Analysis of luciferase accumulation demonstrated that the mutations cause primary defects in viral RNA synthesis that cannot be complemented by wild-type protein 2B provided in trans. The hydrophobic domain is predicted by computer analysis to form a multimeric transmembrane helix. The proposed interaction with the membrane and the implications of the mutations on this interaction are discussed. PMID:7494289

  6. Dressings for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner; Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2013-01-01

    Covering wounds, acute and chronic, is one of the most fundamental activities of any medical practitioner. Although wound dressings primarily serve to contain the "good" and keep out the "bad," research has characterized more specifically the sophisticated interaction between the human wound bed and its dressing counterpart. Wound dressings for today's chronic wounds come in many flavors, ranging from the classic types of moisture-retentive dressings to silver-coated varieties to biologic dressings serving as skin substitutes. Moisture-retentive dressing types include foams, films, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and alginates. Appropriate use of these dressings can help to keep the wound bed moist, which allows for epithelial migration, angiogenesis, retention of growth factors, autolytic debridement, and maintenance of electrical gradients. PMID:23742280

  7. Characterization of hydrophobic-ligand-binding proteins of Taenia solium that are expressed specifically in the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Lee, E-G; Kim, S-H; Bae, Y-A; Wang, H; Yang, Y; Kong, Y

    2012-09-01

    Taenia solium, a causative agent of taeniasis and cysticercosis, has evolved a repertoire of lipid uptake mechanisms. Proteome analysis of T. solium excretory-secretory products (TsESP) identified 10 kDa proteins displaying significant sequence identity with cestode hydrophobic-ligand-binding-proteins (HLBPs). Two distinct 362- and 352-bp-long cDNAs encoding 264- and 258-bp-long open reading frames (87 and 85 amino acid polypeptides) were isolated by mining the T. solium expressed sequence tags and a cDNA library screening (TsHLBP1 and TsHLBP2; 94% sequence identity). They clustered into the same clade with those found in Moniezia expansa and Hymenolepis diminuta. Genomic structure analysis revealed that these genes might have originated from a common ancestor. Both the crude TsESP and bacterially expressed recombinant proteins exhibited binding activity toward 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS), which was competitively inhibited by oleic acid. The proteins also bound to cis-parinaric acid (cPnA) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid (16-AP), but showed no binding activity against 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino] undecanoic acid (DAUDA) and dansyl-DL-α-aminocaprylic acid (DACA). Unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) showed greater affinity than saturated FAs. The proteins were specifically expressed in adult worms throughout the strobila. The TsHLBPs might be involved in uptake and/or sequestration of hydrophobic molecules provided by their hosts, thus contributing to host-parasite interface interrelationships.

  8. Selective Membrane Permeabilization by the Rotavirus VP5* Protein Is Abrogated by Mutations in an Internal Hydrophobic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, William; Denisova, Evgeniya; LaMonica, Rachel; Mackow, Erich R.

    2000-01-01

    Rotavirus infectivity is dependent on the proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into VP8* and VP5* proteins. Proteolytically activated virus, as well as expressed VP5*, permeabilizes membranes, suggesting that cleavage exposes a membrane-interactive domain of VP5* which effects rapid viral entry. The VP5* protein contains a single long hydrophobic domain (VP5*-HD, residues 385 to 404) at an internal site. In order to address the role of the VP5*-HD in permeabilizing cellular membranes, we analyzed the entry of o-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG) into cells induced to express VP5* or mutated VP5* polypeptides. Following IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) induction, VP5* and VP5* truncations containing the VP5*-HD permeabilized cells to the entry and cleavage of ONPG, while VP8* and control proteins had no effect on cellular permeability. Expression of VP5* deletions containing residues 265 to 474 or 265 to 404 permeabilized cells; however, C-terminal truncations which remove the conserved GGA (residues 399 to 401) within the HD abolished membrane permeability. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP5-HD further demonstrated a requirement for residues within the HD for VP5*-induced membrane permeability. Functional analysis of mutant VP5*s indicate that conserved glycines within the HD are required and suggest that a random coiled structure rather than the strictly hydrophobic character of the domain is required for permeability. Expressed VP5* did not alter bacterial growth kinetics or lyse bacteria following induction. Instead, VP5*-mediated size-selective membrane permeability, releasing 376-Da carboxyfluorescein but not 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran from preloaded liposomes. These findings suggest that the fundamental role for VP5* in the rotavirus entry process may be to expose triple-layered particles to low [Ca]i, which uncoats the virus, rather than to effect the detergent-like lysis of early endosomal membranes. PMID:10864647

  9. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction.

  10. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  11. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  12. Antimicrobial activity and hydrophobicity of edible whey protein isolate films formulated with nisin and/or glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Martínez, María M; Tello-Solís, Salvador R; García-Sánchez, Miguel A; Ponce-Alquicira, Edith

    2013-04-01

    The use of edible antimicrobial films has been reported as a means to improve food shelf life through gradual releasing of antimicrobial compounds on the food surface. This work reports the study on the incorporation of 2 antimicrobial agents, nisin (N), and/or glucose oxidase (GO), into the matrix of Whey protein isolate (WPI) films at pH 5.5 and 8.5. The antimicrobial activity of the edible films was evaluated against Listeria innocua (ATCC 33090), Brochothrix thermosphacta (NCIB10018), Escherichia coli (JMP101), and Enterococcus faecalis (MXVK22). In addition, the antimicrobial activity was related to the hydrophobicity and water solubility of the WPI films. The greatest antibacterial activity was observed in WPI films containing only GO. The combined addition of N and GO resulted in films with lower antimicrobial activity than films with N or GO alone. In most cases, a pH effect was observed as greater antimicrobial response at pH 5.5 as well as higher film matrix hydrophobicity. WPI films supplemented with GO can be used in coating systems suitable for food preservation.

  13. Novel Asymmetric Wettable AgNPs/Chitosan Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Donghui; Lu, Zhong; Yang, Hao; Gao, Jingting; Chen, Rong

    2016-02-17

    A novel silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/chitosan composite dressing with asymmetric wettability surfaces was successfully prepared via a simple two-step method for biomedical applications as wound healing materials. First, AgNPs were assembled into the chitosan sponge which was prepared by lyophilization process. Then one side of the sponge was modified by a thin layer of stearic acid. The incorporation of AgNPs into chitosan dressing could enhance the antibacterial activity against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The asymmetric surface modification endows the dressing with both highly hydrophobic property and inherent hydrophilic nature of chitosan. The hydrophobic surface of the dressing shows waterproof and antiadhesion for contaminant properties, whereas the hydrophilic surface preserves its water-absorbing capability and efficiently inhibits the growth of bacteria. Furthermore, the AgNPs/chitosan composite dressing displays improved moisture retention and blood clotting ability compared to the unmodified dressings. Cytocompatibility test evaluated in vitro and in a wound infection model illustrates the nontoxic nature of the composite dressing. More importantly, the in vivo wound healing model evaluation in mice reveals that the asymmetric AgNPs/chitosan dressing promotes the wound healing and accelerates the reepithelialization and collagen deposition. The silver accumulation in mice body treated by the composite dressing is far lower than that of the clinically used Acasin nanosilver dressing treated mice. This work indicates the huge potential of the novel AgNPs/chitosan wound dressing with asymmetrical wettability for clinical use. PMID:26800283

  14. Rigid porous polyacrylamide-based monolithic columns containing butyl methacrylate as a separation medium for the rapid hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Svec, F; Fréchet, J M

    1997-07-18

    Macroporous poly(acrylamide-co-butyl methacrylate-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) monoliths containing up to 15% butyl methacrylate units have been prepared by direct polymerization within the confines of HPLC columns. The hydrodynamic and chromatographic properties of these 50 mm x 8 mm I.D. columns-such as back pressure at different flow-rates, effect of percentage of hydrophobic component in the polymerization mixture, effect of salt concentration on the retention of proteins, dynamic loading capacity, and recovery-were determined under conditions typical of hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Using the monolithic column, five proteins were easily separated within only 3 min.

  15. Global human frequencies of predicted nuclear pathogenic variants and the role played by protein hydrophobicity in pathogenicity potential

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro; Triska, Petr; Rito, Teresa; van der Waerden, Agnes; Li, Biao; Radivojac, Predrag; Samuels, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are coded by nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genes, implying a complex cross-talk between the two genomes. Here we investigated the diversity displayed in 104 nuclear-coded mitochondrial proteins from 1,092 individuals from the 1000 Genomes dataset, in order to evaluate if these genes are under the effects of purifying selection and how that selection compares with their mitochondrial encoded counterparts. Only the very rare variants (frequency < 0.1%) in these nDNA genes are indistinguishable from a random set from all possible variants in terms of predicted pathogenicity score, but more frequent variants display distinct signs of purifying selection. Comparisons of selection strength indicate stronger selection in the mtDNA genes compared to this set of nDNA genes, accounted for by the high hydrophobicity of the proteins coded by the mtDNA. Most of the predicted pathogenic variants in the nDNA genes were restricted to a single continental population. The proportion of individuals having at least one potential pathogenic mutation in this gene set was significantly lower in Europeans than in Africans and Asians. This difference may reflect demographic asymmetries, since African and Asian populations experienced main expansions in middle Holocene, while in Europeans the main expansions occurred earlier in the post-glacial period. PMID:25412673

  16. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  17. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  18. A new thermodynamic model describes the effects of ligand density and type, salt concentration and protein species in hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Deitcher, R.W.; Rome, J.E.; Gildea, P.A.; O’Connell, J.P.; Fernandez, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    A new thermodynamic model is derived that describes both loading and pulse-response behavior of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The model describes adsorption in terms of protein and solvent activities, and water displacement from hydrophobic interfaces, and distinguishes contributions from ligand density, ligand type and protein species. Experimental isocratic response and loading data for a set of globular proteins on Sepharose™ resins of various ligand types and densities are described by the model with a limited number of parameters. The model is explicit in ligand density and may provide insight into the sensitivity of protein retention to ligand density in HIC as well as the limited reproducibility of HIC data. PMID:19695574

  19. An ant colony optimisation algorithm for the 2D and 3D hydrophobic polar protein folding problem

    PubMed Central

    Shmygelska, Alena; Hoos, Holger H

    2005-01-01

    Background The protein folding problem is a fundamental problems in computational molecular biology and biochemical physics. Various optimisation methods have been applied to formulations of the ab-initio folding problem that are based on reduced models of protein structure, including Monte Carlo methods, Evolutionary Algorithms, Tabu Search and hybrid approaches. In our work, we have introduced an ant colony optimisation (ACO) algorithm to address the non-deterministic polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) combinatorial problem of predicting a protein's conformation from its amino acid sequence under a widely studied, conceptually simple model – the 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) hydrophobic-polar (HP) model. Results We present an improvement of our previous ACO algorithm for the 2D HP model and its extension to the 3D HP model. We show that this new algorithm, dubbed ACO-HPPFP-3, performs better than previous state-of-the-art algorithms on sequences whose native conformations do not contain structural nuclei (parts of the native fold that predominantly consist of local interactions) at the ends, but rather in the middle of the sequence, and that it generally finds a more diverse set of native conformations. Conclusions The application of ACO to this bioinformatics problem compares favourably with specialised, state-of-the-art methods for the 2D and 3D HP protein folding problem; our empirical results indicate that our rather simple ACO algorithm scales worse with sequence length but usually finds a more diverse ensemble of native states. Therefore the development of ACO algorithms for more complex and realistic models of protein structure holds significant promise. PMID:15710037

  20. Concentration-dependent displacement of cholesterol in micelles by hydrophobic rice bran protein hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent production of rice bran oil in Asia and the U.S. has resulted in large quantities of defatted rice bran as a low-value byproduct. Peptides from soy, milk, and other foods have been shown to have the potential hypocholesterolemic property and rice bran protein (RBP) may also contain bioact...

  1. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  2. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces.

  3. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  4. Microsecond Rearrangements of Hydrophobic Clusters in an Initially Collapsed Globule Prime Structure Formation during the Folding of a Small Protein.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-07-31

    Determining how polypeptide chain collapse initiates structure formation during protein folding is a long standing goal. It has been challenging to characterize experimentally the dynamics of the polypeptide chain, which lead to the formation of a compact kinetic molten globule (MG) in about a millisecond. In this study, the sub-millisecond events that occur early during the folding of monellin from the guanidine hydrochloride-unfolded state have been characterized using multiple fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The kinetic MG is shown to form in a noncooperative manner from the unfolded (U) state as a result of at least three different processes happening during the first millisecond of folding. Initial chain compaction completes within the first 37μs, and further compaction occurs only after structure formation commences at a few milliseconds of folding. The transient nonnative and native-like hydrophobic clusters with side chains of certain residues buried form during the initial chain collapse and the nonnative clusters quickly disassemble. Subsequently, partial chain desolvation occurs, leading to the formation of a kinetic MG. The initial chain compaction and subsequent chain rearrangement appear to be barrierless processes. The two structural rearrangements within the collapsed globule appear to prime the protein for the actual folding transition. PMID:27370109

  5. Solution structure of a hydrophobic analogue of the winter flounder antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, Edvards; Otting, Gottfried; Harding, Margaret M; Ward, Leanne G; Mackay, Joel P; Haymet, A D J

    2002-02-01

    The solution structure of a synthetic mutant type I antifreeze protein (AFP I) was determined in aqueous solution at pH 7.0 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The mutations comprised the replacement of the four Thr residues by Val and the introduction of two additional Lys-Glu salt bridges. The antifreeze activity of this mutant peptide, VVVV2KE, has been previously shown to be similar to that of the wild type protein, HPLC6 (defined here as TTTT). The solution structure reveals an alphahelix bent in the same direction as the more bent conformer of the published crystal structure of TTTT, while the side chain chi1 rotamers of VVVV2KE are similar to those of the straighter conformer in the crystal of TTTT. The Val side chains of VVVV2KE assume the same orientations as the Thr side chains of TTTT, confirming the conservative nature of this mutation. The combined data suggest that AFP I undergoes an equilibrium between straight and bent helices in solution, combined with independent equilibria between different side chain rotamers for some of the amino acid residues. The present study presents the first complete sequence-specific resonance assignments and the first complete solution structure determination by NMR of any AFP I protein.

  6. An in-gel digestion procedure that facilitates the identification of highly hydrophobic proteins by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Ramos, Yassel; Huerta, Vivian

    2005-07-01

    A procedure is described for in-gel tryptic digestion of proteins that allows the direct analysis of eluted peptides in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometers without the need of a postdigestion desalting step. It is based on the following principles: (a) a thorough desalting of the protein in-gel before digestion that takes advantage of the excellent properties of acrylamide polymers for size exclusion separations, (b) exploiting the activity of trypsin in water, in the absence of inorganic buffers, and (c) a procedure for peptide extraction using solvents of proven efficacy with highly hydrophobic peptides. Quality of spectra and sequence coverage are equivalent to those obtained after digestion in ammonium bicarbonate for hydrophilic proteins detected with Coomassie blue, mass spectrometry-compatible silver or imidazole-zinc but are significantly superior for highly hydrophobic proteins, such as membrane proteins with several transmembrane domains. ATPase subunit 9 (GRAVY 1.446) is a membrane protein channel, lipid-binding protein for which both the conventional in-gel digestion protocol and in solution digestion failed. It was identified with very high sequence coverage. Sample handling after digestion is notably simplified as peptides are directly loaded into the ESI source without postdigestion processing, increasing the chances for the identification of hydrophobic peptides. PMID:15952229

  7. Hydrophobic-domain-dependent protein-protein interactions mediate the localization of GPAT enzymes to ER subdomains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic network that consists of numerous regions or subdomains with discrete morphological features and functional properties, including those involved in protein and oil-body formation, anterograde transport of secretory proteins, the exchange of macromolecules ...

  8. A hydrophobic loop in acyl-CoA binding protein is functionally important for binding to palmitoyl-coenzyme A: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F G; Grigera, J Raúl; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2008-04-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in lipid metabolism, interacting via a partly unknown mechanism with high affinity with long chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs). At present there is no study of the microscopic way ligand binding is accomplished. We analyzed this process by molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations. We proposed a computational model of ligand, able to reproduce some evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, quantitative time resolved fluorometry and X-ray crystallography. We found that a hydrophobic loop, not in the active site, is important for function. Besides, multiple sequence alignment shows hydrophobicity (and not the residues itselves) conservation.

  9. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  10. [Healing "booster" dressings].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Téot, Luc; Meaume, Sylvie

    2011-09-01

    The relationship between the dressing and the wound is vital to clinical effectiveness. The more-or-less standard wound-surface coverings have been replaced with initial dressings, referred to as modern dressings, which contain an oily and sticky compound. They provide a moist medium by applying the basic mechanistic principles (liquid absorption and release). Other types of products and techniques modify the behaviour of wound cells by acting directly through irritation, biochemical stimulation or genetic modification of the cells, which accelerates the healing process.

  11. Identification of a cell envelope protein (MtrF) involved in hydrophobic antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Veal, Wendy L; Shafer, William M

    2003-01-01

    The mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides gonococci with a mechanism to resist structurally diverse antimicrobial hydrophobic agents (HAs). Strains of N. gonorrhoeae that display hypersusceptibility to HAs often contain mutations in the efflux pump genes, mtrCDE. Such strains frequently contain a phenotypically suppressed mutation in mtrR, a gene that encodes a repressor (MtrR) of mtrCDE gene expression, and one that would normally result in HA resistance. We have recently examined HA-hypersusceptible clinical isolates of gonococci that contain such phenotypically suppressed mtrR mutations, in order to determine whether genes other than mtrCDE are involved in HA resistance. These studies led to the discovery of a gene that we have designated mtrF, located downstream of the mtrR gene, that is predicted to encode a 56.1 kDa cytoplasmic membrane protein containing 12 transmembrane domains. Expression of mtrF was enhanced in a strain deficient in MtrR production, indicating that this gene, together with the closely linked mtrCDE operon, is subject to MtrR-dependent transcriptional control. Orthologues of mtrF were identified in a number of diverse bacteria. Except for the AbgT protein of Escherichia coli, their products have been identified as hypothetical proteins with unknown function(s). Genetic evidence is presented that MtrF is important in the expression of high-level detergent resistance by gonococci. We propose that MtrF acts in conjunction with the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump, to confer on gonococci high-level resistance to certain HAs. PMID:12493784

  12. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining.

  13. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining. PMID:14595675

  14. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  15. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model. PMID:24329293

  16. Hydrophobic drug-triggered self-assembly of nanoparticles from silk-elastin-like protein polymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Ming; Lin, Yinan; Xu, Qiaobing; Kaplan, David L

    2014-03-10

    Silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs) combine the mechanical and biological properties of silk and elastin. These properties have led to the development of various SELP-based materials for drug delivery. However, SELPs have rarely been developed into nanoparticles, partially due to the complicated fabrication procedures, nor assessed for potential as an anticancer drug delivery system. We have recently constructed a series of SELPs (SE8Y, S2E8Y, and S4E8Y) with various ratios of silk to elastin blocks and described their capacity to form micellar-like nanoparticles upon thermal triggering. In this study, we demonstrate that doxorubicin, a hydrophobic antitumor drug, can efficiently trigger the self-assembly of SE8Y (SELPs with silk to elastin ratio of 1:8) into uniform micellar-like nanoparticles. The drug can be loaded in the SE8Y nanoparticles with an efficiency around 6.5% (65 ng doxorubicin/μg SE8Y), S2E8Y with 6%, and S4E8Y with 4%, respectively. In vitro studies with HeLa cell lines demonstrate that the protein polymers are not cytotoxic (IC50 > 200 μg/mL), while the doxorubicin-loaded SE8Y nanoparticles showed a 1.8-fold higher cytotoxicity than the free drug. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry indicate significant uptake of the SE8Y nanoparticles by the cells and suggest internalization of the nanoparticles through endocytosis. This study provides an all-aqueous, facile method to prepare nanoscale, drug-loaded SELPs packages with potential for tumor cell treatments.

  17. A fast method for the quantitative estimation of the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in alpha-helices of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Luzhkov, V B; Surkov, N F

    2000-01-01

    The work presents a fast quantitative approach for estimating the orientations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions in the helical wheels of membrane-spanning alpha-helices of transmembrane proteins. The common hydropathy analysis provides an estimate of the integral hydrophobicity in a moving window which scans an amino acid sequence. The new parameter, orientation hydrophobicity, is based on the estimate of hydrophobicity of the angular segment that scans the helical wheel of a given amino acid sequence. The corresponding procedure involves the treatment of transmembrane helices as cylinders with equal surface elements for each amino acid residue. The orientation hydrophobicity, P(phi), phi = 0-360 degrees, of a helical cylinder is given as a sum of hydrophobicities of individual amino acids which are taken as the S-shaped functions of the angle between the centre of amino acid surface element and the centre of the segment. Non-zero contribution to P(phi) comes only from the amino acids belonging to the angular segment for a given angle phi. The size of the angular segment is related to the size of the channel pore. The amplitudes of amino acid S-functions are calibrated in the way that their maximum values (reached when the amino acid is completely exposed into the pore) are equal to the corresponding hydropathy index in the selected scale (here taken as Goldman-Engelman-Steitz hydropathy scale). The given procedure is applied in the studies of three ionic channels with well characterized three-dimensional structures where the channel pore is formed by a bundle of alpha-helices: cholera toxin B, nicotinic acetylcholine homopentameric alpha7 receptor, and phospholamban. The estimated maximum of hydrophilic properties at the helical wheels are in a good agreement with the spatial orientations of alpha-helices in the corresponding channel pores.

  18. Wound dressings for a proteolytic-rich environment.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-04-01

    Wound dressings have experienced continuous and significant changes over the years based on the knowledge of the biochemical events associated with chronic wounds. The development goes from natural materials used to just cover and conceal the wound to interactive materials that can facilitate the healing process, addressing specific issues in non-healing wounds. These new types of dressings often relate with the proteolytic wound environment and the bacteria load to enhance the healing. Recently, the wound dressing research is focusing on the replacement of synthetic polymers by natural protein materials to delivery bioactive agents to the wounds. This article provides an overview on the novel protein-based wound dressings such as silk fibroin keratin and elastin. The improved properties of these dressings, like the release of antibiotics and growth factors, are discussed. The different types of wounds and the effective parameters of healing process will be reviewed.

  19. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  20. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: Insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation = 0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. PMID:24519901

  1. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  2. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a 'holding trap' rather than a 'folding trap' mechanism. PMID:27343349

  3. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  4. Dresses Make the Girl: Gender and Identity from "The Hundred Dresses" to "10,000 Dresses"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulders, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a close reading of two works, Eleanor Estes' "The Hundred Dresses" (1944) and Marcus Ewert's "10,000 Dresses" (2008), that feature in current anti-bullying campaigns. Starting with "The Hundred Dresses," this essay examines how Estes' use of the school story not only exposes the social dynamics of…

  5. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  6. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  7. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  8. Enhancement of the thermostability of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c(552) through introduction of an extra methylene group into its hydrophobic protein interior.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Irie, Kiyofumi; Mikami, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-19

    Careful scrutiny of the protein interior of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c(552) (HT) on the basis of its X-ray structure [Travaglini-Allocatelli, C., Gianni, S., Dubey, V. K., Borgia, A., Di Matteo, A., Bonivento, D., Cutruzzola, F., Bren, K. L., and Brunori, M. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 25729-25734] indicated that a void space, which is large enough to accommodate a methyl group, exists in the hydrophobic protein interior near the heme. We tried to reduce the void space through the replacement of a Val by Ile or Leu (Val/Ile or Val/Leu mutation), and then the structural and functional consequences of these two mutations were characterized in order to elucidate the relationship between the nature of the packing of hydrophobic residues and the functional properties of the protein. The study demonstrated striking differences in the structural and functional consequences between the two mutations. The Val/Ile mutation was found to cause further enhancement of the thermostability of the oxidized HT, as reflected in the increase of the denaturation temperature (T(m)) value by ∼ 3 deg, whereas the thermostability of the reduced form was essentially unaffected. As a result, the redox potential (E(m)) of the Val/Ile mutant exhibited a negative shift of ∼ 50 mV relative to that of the wild-type protein in an enthalpic manner, this being consistent with our previous finding that a protein with higher stability in its oxidized form exhibits a lower E(m) value [Terui, N., Tachiiri, N., Matsuo, H., Hasegawa, J., Uchiyama, S., Kobayashi, Y., Igarashi, Y., Sambongi, Y., and Yamamoto, Y. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 13650-13651]. In contrast, the Val/Leu mutation led to a decrease in thermostability of both the redox forms of the protein, as reflected in the decreases of the T(m) values of the oxidized and reduced proteins by ∼ 3 and ∼ 5 deg, respectively, and the E(m) value of the Val/Leu mutant happened to be similar to that of the Val/Ile one. The E

  9. Ion-Specific Induced Fluctuations and Free Energetics of Aqueous Protein Hydrophobic Interfaces: Toward Connecting to Specific-Ion Behaviors at Aqueous Liquid–Vapor Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We explore anion-induced interface fluctuations near protein–water interfaces using coarse-grained representations of interfaces as proposed by Willard and Chandler (J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 1954−195820055377). We use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics to compute potentials of mean force along a reaction coordinate bridging the state where the anion is fully solvated and one where it is biased via harmonic restraints to remain at the protein–water interface. Specifically, we focus on fluctuations of an interface between water and a hydrophobic region of hydrophobin-II (HFBII), a 71 amino acid residue protein expressed by filamentous fungi and known for its ability to form hydrophobically mediated self-assemblies at interfaces such as a water/air interface. We consider the anions chloride and iodide that have been shown previously by simulations as displaying specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces. We find that as in the case of a pure liquid–vapor interface, at the hydrophobic protein–water interface, the larger, less charge-dense iodide anion displays a marginal interfacial stability compared with that of the smaller, more charge-dense chloride anion. Furthermore, consistent with the results at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces, we find that iodide induces larger fluctuations of the protein–water interface than chloride. PMID:24701961

  10. A simple system for the identification of fluorescent dyes capable of reporting differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity among amyloidogenic protein oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Thioflavin T and Congo Red are fluorescent dyes that are commonly used to identify the presence of amyloid structures, ordered protein aggregates. Despite the ubiquity of their use, little is known about their mechanism of interaction with amyloid fibrils, or whether other dyes, whose photophysics indicate that they may be more responsive to differences in macromolecular secondary structure and hydrophobicity, would be better suited to the identification of pathologically relevant oligomeric species in amyloid diseases. In order to systematically address this question, we have designed a strategy that discretely introduces differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity amidst otherwise identical polyamino acids. This strategy will enable us to quantify and compare the affinities of Thioflavin T, Congo Red, and other, incompletely explored, fluorescent dyes for different secondary structural elements and hydrophobic motifs. With this information, we will identify dyes that give the most robust and quantitative information about structural differences among the complex population of oligomeric species present along an aggregation pathway between soluble monomers and amyloid fibrils, and correlate the resulting structural information with differential oligomeric toxicity.

  11. Molecular Orbital Study of the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding of a Ligand Molecule in a Protein Aromatic Hydrophobic Pocket.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Jun; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The natural product argadin is a cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor that binds to chitinase B (ChiB) from the pathogenic bacteria Serratia marcescens. N(ω)-Acetyl-L-arginine and L-aminoadipic acid of argadin form intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB. We performed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations to elucidate the role of this intramolecular hydrogen bonding on intermolecular interactions between argadin and ChiB. We found that argadin accrues large stabilization energies from the van der Waals dispersion interactions, such as CH-π, π-π, and π-lone pair interactions, in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB, although intramolecular hydrogen bonding within argadin might result in loss of entropy. The intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonding formation canceled local molecular charges and provided good van der Waals interactions with surrounding aromatic residues.

  12. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: from Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-28

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water. PMID:24182086

  13. Physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Yamdech, Rungnapha; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-04-01

    The physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin that we have developed previously were performed to evaluate its efficacy for clinical applications. The absorption ability and dehydration rate of the dressing were assessed using the split-thickness skin graft and leg ulcer wound bed models. The bioactivities of the bilayered wound dressing were evaluated. The bilayered dressing showed continuous absorption rate of wound exudate, providing the suitability for the wound with extended inflammation phase. The dehydration rate of the bilayered dressing was comparable to the commercially available dressing of which the moisture maintenance capability is claimed. The bilayered dressing showed good conformability, as can be seen by the homogeneous distribution pattern of bromophenol blue absorbed. In terms of biological activities, the bilayered dressing was less toxic to skin cells than the commercially available dressing. The bilayered dressing was also shown to promote cell migration and collagen production due to the bioactive protein components. We here concluded that the superior properties of the bilayered dressing over the commercially available dressing were the conformability and biological activities to accelerate the wound healing, while the other properties were comparable to those of commercially available dressing. The data obtained in this study would be very useful for the further evaluation of the bilayered dressing in clinical trial.

  14. DRESS syndrome in ophthalmic patients.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jacqueline Martins de; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed. We were unable to identify the causal drug owing to the large number of medications concurrently administered. The second case presented with DRESS syndrome symptoms during ocular toxoplasmosis treatment. In this case, a clearer association with pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine was observed. As a result of the regular prescription of pharmacological agents associated with DRESS syndrome, ophthalmologists should be aware of the potentially serious complications of DRESS syndrome. PMID:27463633

  15. A requirement of hydrophobic and basic amino acid residues for substrate recognition by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J C; Kwon, Y G; Lawrence, D S; Edelman, A M

    1994-01-01

    The substrate recognition determinants of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia were investigated by using peptide analogues based on the amino acid sequence around Ser-9 of synapsin I. The Km and Vmax for the synthetic peptide Leu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ser-Asp-Ala-Asn-Phe are 3.9 microM and 18.5 mumol/(min.mg), respectively. Deletion of Leu at the -5 position lowers the Vmax/Km by 470-fold. The requirement for a hydrophobic residue at -5 was confirmed by the 90- to 2400-fold reduction in Vmax/Km produced by Arg, Ala, or Asp substitutions, but only 2.6-fold decrease after Phe substitution at this position. A hydrophobic residue is similarly required at the +4 position. Deletion of Phe at this position produces a 67-fold reduction, and substitution of Ala for Phe a 43-fold reduction in Vmax/Km. In contrast, substitution with Leu increases Vmax/Km by 1.8-fold. Arg at -3 is also required for recognition as shown by an approximately 240-fold decrease in Vmax/Km after Ala substitution at this position. Positions -2, -4, and +1 appear to play secondary roles in substrate recognition. Arg at -2 and -4 are positive determinants, since Ala substitution at these positions decreases Vmax/Km by 4.7- and 11-fold, respectively. Asp at +1 is a negative influence, since Ala and Leu substitutions at this position increase Vmax/Km by 2.3- and 6.3-fold, respectively. Substitution of Ala for Leu at -1 or Thr for Ser at the 0 position has little effect on phosphorylation kinetics. Thus, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia has the minimal substrate recognition motif of Hyd-Xaa-Arg-Xaa-Xaa-(Ser*/Thr*)-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Hyd, where Hyd represents a hydrophobic amino acid residue. PMID:8022798

  16. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  17. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  18. [DRESS syndrome to sulfasalzine].

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, R; Piérrard-Franchimont, C; Paquet, P; Piérard, G E

    2006-09-01

    We report a case of drug hypersensibility syndrome (DRESS syndrome) developed one month after initiation of a treatment by sulfasalazine. Due to the severity of the cytolytic hepatic damages as observed in this case, we emphasize the importance of suggesting this diagnosis in any patient developing a cutaneous rash and an alteration of the general health status after initiation of a new treatment. The hematologic alterations which represent a key feature for the diagnosis may rash. develop only a few days after the cutaneous rash. PMID:17112165

  19. [Modern dressings. Hydrogels].

    PubMed

    Sedlarik, K M; Vacik, J; Wichterle, O; Hájek, M

    1995-02-01

    Hydrogels are occlusive types of dressings. They are three-dimensional nets made up of hydrophil polymers. They can be produced from synthetic or semisynthetic materials or a combination of the two. Hydrogels retain different percentages of water but are themselves insoluble in water. This is why they maintain on the wound surface their structure and do not dissolve. They are suited for the dressing of wounds with low secretion such as grade I and II burns, grade I and II bedsores and above all epithelial defects, major skin abrasions and areas after collection of epithelial grafts. Their use is contraindicated in infected wounds, in wounds with a massive secretion and ulcers of arterial origin. Although the domain of their clinical use are clean granulating or already epithelizing wounds, they are very well suited also for rehydration of dry and black skin necroses. Their advantages include minimal pain in the wound as well as the fact that they can be left on the wound without redressing till complete healing. This is made possible also by the fact that they are translucent. PMID:7777948

  20. Proper processing of dengue virus nonstructural glycoprotein NS1 requires the N-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence and the downstream nonstructural protein NS2a.

    PubMed

    Falgout, B; Chanock, R; Lai, C J

    1989-05-01

    Expression of dengue virus gene products involves specific proteolytic cleavages of a precursor polyprotein. To study the flanking sequences required for expression of the dengue virus nonstructural glycoprotein NS1, we constructed a series of recombinant vaccinia viruses that contain the coding sequence for NS1 in combination with various lengths of upstream and downstream sequences. The NS1 products expressed by these viruses in infected CV-1 cells were immune precipitated and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data show that the 24-residue hydrophobic sequence preceding NS1 was necessary and sufficient for the production of glycosylated NS1 and that this sequence was cleaved from NS1 in the absence of most dengue virus proteins. This finding is consistent with previous proposals that this hydrophobic sequence serves as an N-terminal signal sequence that is cleaved by signal peptidase. The cleavage between the C terminus of NS1 and the downstream protein NS2a occurred when the complete NS2a was present. Recombinant viruses containing NS1 plus 15 or 49% of NS2a produced proteins larger than authentic NS1, indicating that the cleavage between NS1 and NS2a had not occurred. Failure of cleavage was not corrected by coinfection with a recombinant virus capable of cleavage. These results suggest that NS2a may be a cis-acting protease that cleaves itself from NS1, or NS2a may provide sequences for recognition by a specific cellular protease that cleaves at the NS1-NS2a junction.

  1. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  2. Subtype B avian metapneumovirus resembles subtype A more closely than subtype C or human metapneumovirus with respect to the phosphoprotein, and second matrix and small hydrophobic proteins.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Janet Ashley; Njenga, M Kariuki; Alvarez, Rene; Mawditt, Karen; Britton, Paul; Cavanagh, Dave; Seal, Bruce S

    2003-04-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype B (aMPV/B) nucleotide sequences were obtained for the phosphoprotein (P), second matrix protein (M2), and small hydrophobic protein (SH) genes. By comparison with sequences from other metapneumoviruses, aMPV/B was most similar to subtype A aMPV (aMPV/A) relative to the US subtype C isolates (aMPV/C) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). Strictly conserved residues common to all members of the Pneumovirinae were identified in the predicted amino acid sequences of the P and M2 protein-predicted amino acid sequences. The Cys(3)-His(1) motif, thought to be important for binding zinc, was also present in the aMPV M2 predicted protein sequences. For both the P and M2-1 protein-predicted amino acid sequences, aMPV/B was most similar to aMPV/A (72 and 89% identity, respectively), having only approximately 52 and 70% identity, respectively, relative to aMPV/C and hMPV. Differences were more marked in the M2-2 proteins, subtype B having 64% identity with subtype A but < or = 25% identity with subtype C and hMPV. The A and B subtypes of aMPV had predicted amino acid sequence identities for the SH protein of 47%, and less than 20% with that of hMPV. An SH gene was not detected in the aMPV/C. Phylogenetically, aMPV/B clustered with aMPV/A, while aMPV/C grouped with hMPV.

  3. Structural analysis of the STING adaptor protein reveals a hydrophobic dimer interface and mode of cyclic di-GMP binding.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Songying; Song, Xianqiang; Wang, Yaya; Ru, Heng; Shaw, Neil; Jiang, Yan; Niu, Fengfeng; Zhu, Yanping; Qiu, Weicheng; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Li, Yang; Zhang, Rongguang; Cheng, Genhong; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-06-29

    STING is an essential signaling molecule for DNA and cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-mediated type I interferon (IFN) production via TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) pathway. It contains an N-terminal transmembrane region and a cytosolic C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, we describe crystal structures of STING CTD alone and complexed with c-di-GMP in a unique binding mode. The strictly conserved aa 153-173 region was shown to be cytosolic and participated in dimerization via hydrophobic interactions. The STING CTD functions as a dimer and the dimerization was independent of posttranslational modifications. Binding of c-di-GMP enhanced interaction of a shorter construct of STING CTD (residues 139-344) with TBK1. This suggests an extra TBK1 binding site, other than serine 358. This study provides a glimpse into the unique architecture of STING and sheds light on the mechanism of c-di-GMP-mediated TBK1 signaling.

  4. Effect of a buried ion pair in the hydrophobic core of a protein: An insight from constant pH molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup K

    2015-03-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) is a commonly used sampling method, which incorporates the coupling of conformational flexibility and protonation state of a protein during the simulation by using pH as an external parameter. The effects on the structure and stability of a hyperstable variant of staphylococcal nuclease (Δ+PHS) protein of an artificial charge pair buried in its hydrophobic core are investigated by applying both CpHMD and accelerated molecular dynamics coupled with constant pH (CpHaMD) methods. Generalized Born electrostatics is used to model the solvent water. Two sets of starting coordinates of V23E/L36K variant of Δ+PHS, namely, Maestro generated coordinates from Δ+PHS and crystal structure coordinates of the same are considered for detail investigations. On the basis of root mean square displacement (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) calculations, it is observed that this variant is stable over a wide range of pH. The calculated pKa values for aspartate and glutamate residues based on both CpHMD and CpHaMD simulations are consistent with the reported experimental values (within ± 0.5 to ± 1.5 pH unit), which clearly indicates that the local chemical environment of the carboxylic acids in V23E/L36K variant are comparable to the parent form. The strong salt bridge interaction between the mutated pair, E23/K36 and additional hydrogen bonds formed in the V23E/L36K variant, may help to compensate for the unfavorable self-energy experienced by the burial of these residues in the hydrophobic core. However, from RMSD, RMSF, and pKa analysis, no significant change in the global conformation of V23E/L36K variant with respect to the parent form, Δ+PHS is noticed. PMID:25363335

  5. Osmotic pressure driven protein release from viscous liquid, hydrophobic polymers based on 5-ethylene ketal ε-caprolactone: potential and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Babasola, Iyabo Oladunni; Zhang, Wei; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the potential of low molecular weight, viscous liquid polymers based on 5-ethylene ketal ε-caprolactone for localized delivery of proteins via an osmotic pressure release mechanism was investigated. Furthermore, the osmotic release mechanism from viscous liquid polymers was elucidated. 5-Ethylene ketal ε-caprolactone was homopolymerized or copolymerized with D,L-lactide (DLLA) by ring-opening polymerization. Polymer hydrophobicity was adjusted by choice of initiator; hydrophobic polymers were prepared by initiating with octan-1-ol, while more hydrophilic polymers were prepared by initiating with 350 g/mol methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Particles consisting of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein drug were co-lyophilized with trehalose at 50:50 and 10:90 (w/w) ratios and were mixed into the polymers at 1% and/or 5% (w/w) particle loading. The release and mechanism of release of BSA from the polymers were assessed in vitro. BSA was released in a sustained manner, with a near zero-order release profile and with minimal burst effect for 5-80 days depending on the polymer's hydrophilicity; the release was faster from the PEG initiated polymers than from the octan-1-ol initiated polymers. Increasing the particle loading from 1% to 5% (w/w) resulted in a more noticeable burst effect, but did not significantly increase the mass fraction release rate. This release behavior was determined to proceed as follows. Release from the polymer was triggered by the water activity gradient between the surrounding aqueous medium and the saturated solution, which forms when water is absorbed from the surrounding medium to dissolve a given particle. The generated pressure initiates swelling around the particle/polymer interface and creates a superhydrated polymer region through which the solute is transported by convection, at a rate determined by the osmotic pressure generated. PMID:23665446

  6. Assembly of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins with native hydrophobic chlorophylls in water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Dominika; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Noy, Dror

    2015-03-01

    The challenges involved in studying cofactor binding and assembly, as well as energy- and electron transfer mechanisms in the large and elaborate transmembrane protein complexes of photosynthesis and respiration have prompted considerable interest in constructing simplified model systems based on their water-soluble protein analogs. Such analogs are also promising templates and building blocks for artificial bioinspired energy conversion systems. Yet, development is limited by the challenge of introducing the essential cofactors of natural proteins that are highly water-insoluble into the water-soluble protein analogs. Here we introduce a new efficient method based on water-in-oil emulsions for overcoming this challenge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the assembly of native chlorophylls with four recombinant variants of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Brassicaceae plants. We use the method to gain new insights into the protein-chlorophyll assembly process, and demonstrate its potential as a fast screening system for developing novel chlorophyll-protein complexes.

  7. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878.4022 Section 878.4022 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile...

  8. Changes in solvent exposure reveal the kinetics and equilibria of adsorbed protein unfolding in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deitcher, R W; O'Connell, J P; Fernandez, E J

    2010-08-27

    Hydrogen exchange has been a useful technique for studying the conformational state of proteins, both in bulk solution and at interfaces, for several decades. Here, we propose a physically based model of simultaneous protein adsorption, unfolding and hydrogen exchange in HIC. An accompanying experimental protocol, utilizing mass spectrometry to quantify deuterium labeling, enables the determination of both the equilibrium partitioning between conformational states and pseudo-first order rate constants for folding and unfolding of adsorbed protein. Unlike chromatographic techniques, which rely on the interpretation of bulk phase behavior, this methodology utilizes the measurement of a molecular property (solvent exposure) and provides insight into the nature of the unfolded conformation in the adsorbed phase. Three model proteins of varying conformational stability, alpha-chymotrypsinogen A, beta-lactoglobulin B, and holo alpha-lactalbumin, are studied on Sepharose HIC resins possessing assorted ligand chemistries and densities. alpha-Chymotrypsinogen, conformationally the most stable protein in the set, exhibits no change in solvent exposure at all the conditions studied, even when isocratic pulse-response chromatography suggests nearly irreversible adsorption. Apparent unfolding energies of adsorbed beta-lactoglobulin B and holo alpha-lactalbumin range from -4 to 3 kJ/mol and are dependent on resin properties and salt concentration. Characteristic pseudo-first order rate constants for surface-induced unfolding are 0.2-0.9 min(-1). While poor protein recovery in HIC is often associated with irreversible unfolding, this study documents that non-eluting behavior can occur when surface unfolding is reversible or does not occur at all. Further, this hydrogen exchange technique can be used to assess the conformation of adsorbed protein under conditions where the protein is non-eluting and chromatographic methods are not applicable.

  9. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  10. Molecular mechanisms of enhanced wound healing by copper oxide-impregnated dressings.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey; Dardik, Rima; Eidelman, Arthur I; Lavie, Yossi; Grunfeld, Yona; Ikher, Sergey; Huszar, Monica; Zatcoff, Richard C; Marikovsky, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Copper plays a key role in angiogenesis and in the synthesis and stabilization of extracellular matrix skin proteins, which are critical processes of skin formation. We hypothesized that introducing copper into wound dressings would enhance wound repair. Application of wound dressings containing copper oxide to wounds inflicted in genetically engineered diabetic mice (C57BL/KsOlaHsd-Lepr(db)) resulted in increased gene and in situ up-regulation of proangiogenic factors (e.g., placental growth factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, and vascular endothelial growth factor), increased blood vessel formation (p<0.05), and enhanced wound closure (p<0.01) as compared with control dressings (without copper) or commercial wound dressings containing silver. This study proves the capacity of copper oxide-containing wound dressings to enhance wound healing and sheds light onto the molecular mechanisms by which copper oxide-impregnated dressings stimulate wound healing. PMID:20409151

  11. Characterization of the Tupaia Rhabdovirus Genome Reveals a Long Open Reading Frame Overlapping with P and a Novel Gene Encoding a Small Hydrophobic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses. PMID:15890917

  12. The Bactofilin Cytoskeleton Protein BacM of Myxococcus xanthus Forms an Extended β-Sheet Structure Likely Mediated by Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefang; Engelhardt, Harald; Bosch, Jürgen; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are novel cytoskeleton proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, an important predatory soil bacterium, possesses four bactofilins of which one, BacM (Mxan_7475) plays an important role in cell shape maintenance. Electron and fluorescence light microscopy, as well as studies using over-expressed, purified BacM, indicate that this protein polymerizes in vivo and in vitro into ~3 nm wide filaments that further associate into higher ordered fibers of about 10 nm. Here we use a multipronged approach combining secondary structure determination, molecular modeling, biochemistry, and genetics to identify and characterize critical molecular elements that enable BacM to polymerize. Our results indicate that the bactofilin-determining domain DUF583 folds into an extended β-sheet structure, and we hypothesize a left-handed β-helix with polymerization into 3 nm filaments primarily via patches of hydrophobic amino acid residues. These patches form the interface allowing head-to-tail polymerization during filament formation. Biochemical analyses of these processes show that folding and polymerization occur across a wide variety of conditions and even in the presence of chaotropic agents such as one molar urea. Together, these data suggest that bactofilins are comprised of a structure unique to cytoskeleton proteins, which enables robust polymerization. PMID:25803609

  13. Characterization of the Tupaia rhabdovirus genome reveals a long open reading frame overlapping with P and a novel gene encoding a small hydrophobic protein.

    PubMed

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses.

  14. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R.; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants. PMID:26938884

  15. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants. PMID:26938884

  16. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants.

  17. Complexes of native ubiquitin and dodecyl sulfate illustrate the nature of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the binding of proteins and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Bryan F; Schneider, Grégory F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Moustakas, Demetri; Durazo, Armando; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2011-11-01

    A previous study, using capillary electrophoresis (CE) [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 17384-17393], reported that six discrete complexes of ubiquitin (UBI) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) form at different concentrations of SDS along the pathway to unfolding of UBI in solutions of SDS. One complex (which formed between 0.8 and 1.8 mM SDS) consisted of native UBI associated with approximately 11 molecules of SDS. The current study used CE and (15)N/(13)C-(1)H heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectroscopy to identify residues in folded UBI that associate specifically with SDS at 0.8-1.8 mM SDS, and to correlate these associations with established biophysical and structural properties of this well-characterized protein. The ability of the surface charge and hydrophobicity of folded UBI to affect the association with SDS (at concentrations below the CMC) was studied, using CE, by converting lys-ε-NH(3)(+) to lys-ε-NHCOCH(3) groups. According to CE, the acetylation of lysine residues inhibited the binding of 11 SDS ([SDS] < 2 mM) and decreased the number of complexes of composition UBI-(NHAc)(8)·SDS(n) that formed on the pathway of unfolding of UBI-(NHAc)(8) in SDS. A comparison of (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectra at 0 mM and 1 mM SDS with calculated electrostatic surface potentials of folded UBI (e.g., solutions to the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation) suggested, however, that SDS binds preferentially to native UBI at hydrophobic residues that are formally neutral (i.e., Leu and Ile), but that have positive electrostatic surface potential (as predicted from solutions to nonlinear PB equations); SDS did not uniformly interact with residues that have formal positive charge (e.g., Lys or Arg). Cationic functional groups, therefore, promote the binding of SDS to folded UBI because these groups exert long-range effects on the positive electrostatic surface potential (which extend beyond their own van der Waals radii, as predicted from PB theory), and not

  18. Independent of their localization in protein the hydrophobic amino acid residues have no effect on the molten globule state of apomyoglobin and the disulfide bond on the surface of apomyoglobin stabilizes this intermediate state.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Majorina, Maria A; Larina, Daria S; Kashparov, Ivan A; Samatova, Ekaterina N; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to "strengthen" the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  19. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  20. New ruthenium(II) arene complexes of anthracenyl-appended diazacycloalkanes: effect of ligand intercalation and hydrophobicity on DNA and protein binding and cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ganeshpandian, Mani; Loganathan, Rangasamy; Suresh, Eringathodi; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2014-01-21

    A series of half-sandwich Ru(II) arene complexes of the type [Ru(η(6)-arene)(L)Cl](PF6) 1-4, where arene is benzene (1, 2) or p-cymene (3, 4) and L is N-methylhomopiperazine (L1) or 1-(anthracen-10-ylmethyl)-4-methylhomopiperazine (L2), has been isolated and characterized by using spectral methods. The X-ray crystal structures of 2, 3 and 4 reveal that the compounds possess a pseudo-octahedral "piano-stool" structure equipped with the arene ligand as the seat and the bidentate ligand and the chloride ion as the legs of the stool. The DNA binding affinity determined using absorption spectral titrations with CT DNA and competitive DNA binding studies varies as 4 > 2 > 3 > 1, depending upon both the arene and diazacycloalkane ligands. Complexes 2 and 4 with higher DNA binding affinities show strong hypochromism (56%) and a large red-shift (2, 10; 4, 11 nm), which reveals that the anthracenyl moiety of the ligand is stacked into the DNA base pairs and that the arene ligand hydrophobicity also dictates the DNA binding affinity. In contrast, the monocationic complexes 1 and 3 are involved in electrostatic binding in the minor groove of DNA. The enhancement in viscosities of CT DNA upon binding to 2 and 4 are higher than those for 1 and 3 supporting the DNA binding modes of interaction inferred. All the complexes cleave DNA effectively even in the absence of an external agent and the cleavage ability is enhanced in the presence of an activator like H2O2. Tryptophan quenching measurements suggest that the protein binding affinity of the complexes varies as 4 > 2 > 3 > 1, which is the same as that for DNA binding and that the fluorescence quenching of BSA occurs through a static mechanism. The positive ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) values for BSA binding of complexes indicate that the interaction between the complexes and BSA is mainly hydrophobic in nature and the energy transfer efficiency has been analysed according to the Förster non-radiative energy transfer theory. The

  1. Protection and mechanism of action of a novel human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine candidate based on the extracellular domain of small hydrophobic protein

    PubMed Central

    Schepens, Bert; Sedeyn, Koen; Vande Ginste, Liesbeth; De Baets, Sarah; Schotsaert, Michael; Roose, Kenny; Houspie, Lieselot; Van Ranst, Marc; Gilbert, Brian; van Rooijen, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Piedra, Pedro; Saelens, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Infections with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) occur globally in all age groups and can have devastating consequences in young infants. We demonstrate that a vaccine based on the extracellular domain (SHe) of the small hydrophobic (SH) protein of HRSV, reduced viral replication in challenged laboratory mice and in cotton rats. We show that this suppression of viral replication can be transferred by serum and depends on a functional IgG receptor compartment with a major contribution of FcγRI and FcγRIII. Using a conditional cell depletion method, we provide evidence that alveolar macrophages are involved in the protection by SHe-specific antibodies. HRSV-infected cells abundantly express SH on the cell surface and are likely the prime target of the humoral immune response elicited by SHe-based vaccination. Finally, natural infection of humans and experimental infection of mice or cotton rats does not induce a strong immune response against HRSV SHe. Using SHe as a vaccine antigen induces immune protection against HRSV by a mechanism that differs from the natural immune response and from other HRSV vaccination strategies explored to date. Hence, HRSV vaccine candidates that aim at inducing protective neutralizing antibodies or T-cell responses could be complemented with a SHe-based antigen to further improve immune protection. PMID:25298406

  2. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyer, Matthew B.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins.

  3. DRESS Syndrome Presents as Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tonekaboni, Seyed Hasan; Jafari, Narjes; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome, which reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, presenting by generalized skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, atypical lymphocytosis, and internal organ involvement. Herein a 21-month old male infant with DRESS and Encephalopathy syndrome is presented who complicated after phenobarbital usage that persisted due to phenytoin cream usage. The case received phenobarbital after a seizure disorder presented as "status epilepticus". He developed drug eruption, fever, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver enzymes, encephalopathy and progressive loss of consciousness with extensive hyperintense white matter lesions in brain MRI. After discontinuation of phenobarbital and phenytoin, all symptoms were resolved, while brain MRI became normal after two months. To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case that developed leukoencephalopathy along with DRESS syndrome. PMID:27411428

  4. Syntheses and self-assembly of novel asparagine-derived amphiphiles: Applications in the encapsulation of proteins, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic drug models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mfuh, Adelphe Mbufung

    This thesis focuses mainly on the synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of a novel series of asparagine-derived amphiphiles and their use in the preparation and stabilization of nano and microcapsules for the encapsulation of proteins, and hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug models. Chapter 1 gives a brief literature overview of lipid molecular assembly, which covers some aspects of morphological analyses, encapsulation of chemical entity and some reported characterization techniques of supramolecular assemblies. It introduces the scope of this dissertation and contains some information on stimulus responsive liposomal systems for controlled release of drug models. Chapter 2 introduces a novel asparagine-derived lipid bearing two fatty chains (C11 and C17) and a tetrahydropyrimidinone head group. It presents information on the synthesis and characterization of this lipid and describes the self-assembly and effects of this lipid in distearoyl phosphatidyl choline bilayer. Chapter 3 presents the synthesis and characterization of a series of ALAn,m (where n and m represent the length of the hydrocarbon chains on the asparagine-derived, heterocyclic head group). It contains data on the effect of chain length, solvent media and head group ionization on the conformational equilibrium about a tertiary amide bond in ALAn,m. The chapter also examines the influence of chain length on ALAn,m on the colloidal stability of DSPC liposomes. Chapter 4 presents the first example of an N,N-acetal linkage in a novel pH responsive nanocarrier system obtained from the cyclocondensation of dodecanal with sodium asparaginate. Data is presented on the spontaneous self-assembly, encapsulation studies and morphological characterization of the nano-systems with the inclusion of cholesterol as additive. Chapter 5 presents the development of a photoresponsive nanocarrier via the self- assembly of an asparagine-derived lipid containing a coumarin unit in the hydrophobic domain. The

  5. Sushi hand roll dressing for thumb polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Hung; Ho, Pak-Cheong; Hung, Leung-Kim

    2012-06-12

    Surgery for thumb polydactyly is a commonly performed orthopaedic procedure in Asia Pacific region. Despite extensive publications on topical dressing methods and dressing materials in paediatric wounds, there is no single design that affords a secure and yet comfortable post-operative wound dressing for thumb polydactyly. We have devised a new dressing method, which can easily be fabricated for such purpose from readily available materials in operation theatre.

  6. Fournier's Gangrene: Conventional Dressings versus Dressings with Dakin's Solution

    PubMed Central

    Altunoluk, Bülent; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Eren, Mustafa; Benlioglu, Can; Kankilic, Nazim; Baykan, Halit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fournier's gangrene is a fulminant and destructive inflammation of the scrotum, penis, and perineum. The objective of this study was to compare 2 different approaches to wound management after aggressive surgical debridement. Methods. Data from 14 patients with Fournier's gangrene were retrospectively collected (2005–2011). Once the patients were stabilized following surgery, they were treated with either daily antiseptic (povidone iodine) dressings (group I, n = 6) or dressings with dakin's solution (sodium hypochloride) (group II, n = 8). Results. The mean age of the patients was 68.2 ± 7.8 (55–75) years in group I and 66.9 ± 10.2 (51–79) years in group II. Length of hospital stay was 13 ± 3.5 (7–16) days in group I and 8.9 ± 3.0 (4–12) days in group II (P < 0.05). The number and rate of mortality was 1/6 (16.7%) in group I, and 1/8 (12.5%) in group II. Conclusions. The hospitalization time can be reduced with the use of dakin's solution for the dressings in the treatment of FG. Also, dressings with dakin's solution seems to have favorable effects on morbidity and mortality. Consequently dakin's solution may alter the treatment of this disastrous disease by reducing cost, morbidity and mortality. PMID:22567424

  7. School Dress Codes and Uniform Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell

    2002-01-01

    Opinions abound on what students should wear to class. Some see student dress as a safety issue; others see it as a student-rights issue. The issue of dress codes and uniform policies has been tackled in the classroom, the boardroom, and the courtroom. This Policy Report examines the whole fabric of the debate on dress codes and uniform policies…

  8. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Waldner, Birgit J; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-09-13

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called "unhappy water" molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  9. Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a key role in a vast variety of biological processes, ranging from the formation of cells to protein folding and ligand binding. Hydrophobicity scales simplify the complex process of hydration by assigning a value describing the averaged hydrophobic character to each amino acid. Previously published scales were not able to calculate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the hydrophobicity directly. We present a new method, based on Molecular Dynamics simulations and Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, that calculates hydrophobicity from enthalpic and entropic contributions. Instead of deriving these quantities from the temperature dependence of the free energy of hydration or as residual of the free energy and the enthalpy, we directly obtain these values from the phase space occupied by water molecules. Additionally, our method is able to identify regions with specific enthalpic and entropic properties, allowing to identify so-called “unhappy water” molecules, which are characterized by weak enthalpic interactions and unfavorable entropic constraints. PMID:27442443

  10. Redressing Cross-Dressed Shakespeare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Thomas L.; Pesta, Duke

    2003-01-01

    Gender critics obsess over the boy actors who played female roles on the Elizabethan stage. But, in their far-fetched interpretation of Shakespearean drama as a spectacle of cross dressing, these new historicists lose sight of a fundamental principle of theater. Thomas Martin and Duke Pesta argue that with their prurient chatter of "the…

  11. Production of recombinant non-structural protein-3 hydrophobic domain deletion (NS3ΔHD) protein of bluetongue virus from prokaryotic expression system as an efficient diagnostic reagent.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Nihar Nalini; Chacko, Nirmal; Biswas, Sanchay Kumar; Chand, Karam; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Mondal, Bimalendu; Hemadri, Divakar; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2016-09-01

    Serological diagnostics for bluetongue (BT), which is an infectious, non-contagious and arthropod-borne virus disease of ruminants, are primarily dependent on availability of high quality native or recombinant antigen(s) based on either structural/non-structural proteins in sufficient quantity. Non-structural proteins (NS1-NS4) of BT virus are presumed candidate antigens in development of DIVA diagnostics. In the present study, NS3 fusion gene encoding for NS3 protein containing the N- and C-termini with a deletion of two hydrophobic domains (118A to S141 aa and 162S to A182 aa) and intervening variable central domain (142D to K161 aa) of bluetongue virus 23 was constructed, cloned and over-expressed using prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant NS3ΔHD fusion protein (∼38 kDa) including hexa-histidine tag on its both termini was found to be non-cytotoxic to recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified rNS3ΔHD fusion protein was found to efficiently detect BTV-NS3 specific antibodies in indirect-ELISA format with diagnostic sensitivity (DSn = 94.4%) and specificity (DSp = 93.9%). The study indicated the potential utility of rNS3ΔHD fusion protein as candidate diagnostic reagent in developing an indirect-ELISA for sero-surveillance of animals for BTV antibodies under DIVA strategy, wherever monovalent/polyvalent killed BT vaccine formulations devoid of NS proteins are being practiced for immunization. PMID:27448505

  12. Production of recombinant non-structural protein-3 hydrophobic domain deletion (NS3ΔHD) protein of bluetongue virus from prokaryotic expression system as an efficient diagnostic reagent.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Nihar Nalini; Chacko, Nirmal; Biswas, Sanchay Kumar; Chand, Karam; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Mondal, Bimalendu; Hemadri, Divakar; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2016-09-01

    Serological diagnostics for bluetongue (BT), which is an infectious, non-contagious and arthropod-borne virus disease of ruminants, are primarily dependent on availability of high quality native or recombinant antigen(s) based on either structural/non-structural proteins in sufficient quantity. Non-structural proteins (NS1-NS4) of BT virus are presumed candidate antigens in development of DIVA diagnostics. In the present study, NS3 fusion gene encoding for NS3 protein containing the N- and C-termini with a deletion of two hydrophobic domains (118A to S141 aa and 162S to A182 aa) and intervening variable central domain (142D to K161 aa) of bluetongue virus 23 was constructed, cloned and over-expressed using prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant NS3ΔHD fusion protein (∼38 kDa) including hexa-histidine tag on its both termini was found to be non-cytotoxic to recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified rNS3ΔHD fusion protein was found to efficiently detect BTV-NS3 specific antibodies in indirect-ELISA format with diagnostic sensitivity (DSn = 94.4%) and specificity (DSp = 93.9%). The study indicated the potential utility of rNS3ΔHD fusion protein as candidate diagnostic reagent in developing an indirect-ELISA for sero-surveillance of animals for BTV antibodies under DIVA strategy, wherever monovalent/polyvalent killed BT vaccine formulations devoid of NS proteins are being practiced for immunization.

  13. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D.; Shah, Pratik B.; Singh, Seema; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  14. Novel silk fibroin/elastin wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-08-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) and elastin (EL) scaffolds were successfully produced for the first time for the treatment of burn wounds. The self-assembly properties of SF, together with the excellent chemical and mechanical stability and biocompatibility, were combined with elastin protein to produce scaffolds with the ability to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Porous scaffolds were obtained by lyophilization and were further crosslinked with genipin (GE). Genipin crosslinking induces the conformational transition from random coil to β-sheet of SF chains, yielding scaffolds with smaller pore size and reduced swelling ratios, degradation and release rates. All results indicated that the composition of the scaffolds had a significant effect on their physical properties, and that can easily be tuned to obtain scaffolds suitable for biological applications. Wound healing was assessed through the use of human full-thickness skin equivalents (EpidermFT). Standardized burn wounds were induced by a cautery and the best re-epithelialization and the fastest wound closure was obtained in wounds treated with 50SF scaffolds; these contain the highest amount of elastin after 6 days of healing in comparison with other dressings and controls. The cytocompatibility demonstrated with human skin fibroblasts together with the healing improvement make these SF/EL scaffolds suitable for wound dressing applications.

  15. [Study of transport properties of the polymeric membranous dressing with silver ions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Andrzej; Kucharzewski, Marek; Grzegorczyn, Sławomir; Slezak, Izabella H

    2005-01-01

    The transport properties of polymeric membraneous dresing silver ion containing Textus Bioactive were studied. This dressing is made of three types of theromoplastic polymeric fibers, formed into two-layers membrane. In first layer occure the polymeric fiber, which the core is hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces contain a silver zeolite. These fibers neighborours with hydrophilic super absorbing polymers. Third type of polymeric fibers occur in the second layer of membrane and is arranged parallel to surface's skin, creating a net preventing stick of membraneous dressing to treated wound. Using of the Kedem-Katchalsky equations the transport model of this membrane and the temporal and concentration characteristics of transport parameters (hydraulic permeability, refection and solute permeability) were determined. Experimental results show that the polymeric membranous dressing contain the silver ions posses non-linear transport properties, which are consequence of structure and physicochemical properties of polymeric membranes.

  16. High hydrophobic amino acid exposure is responsible of the neurotoxic effects induced by E200K or D202N disease-related mutations of the human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Thellung, Stefano; Bucciarelli, Tonino; Scotti, Luca; Chiovitti, Katia; Villa, Valentina; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in prion protein are thought to be causative of inherited prion diseases favoring the spontaneous conversion of the normal prion protein into the scrapie-like pathological prion protein. We previously reported that, by controlled thermal denaturation, human prion protein fragment 90-231 acquires neurotoxic properties when transformed in a β-rich conformation, resembling the scrapie-like conformation. In this study we generated prion protein fragment 90-231 bearing mutations identified in familial prion diseases (D202N and E200K), to analyze their role in the induction of a neurotoxic conformation. Prion protein fragment 90-231(wild type) and the D202N mutant were not toxic in native conformation but induced cell death only after thermal denaturation. Conversely, prion protein fragment 90-231(E200K) was highly toxic in its native structure, suggesting that E200K mutation per se favors the acquisition of a peptide neurotoxic conformation. To identify the structural determinants of prion protein fragment 90-231 toxicity, we show that while the wild type peptide is structured in α-helix, hPrP90-231 E200K is spontaneously refolded in a β-structured conformer characterized by increased proteinase K resistance and propensity to generate fibrils. However, the most significant difference induced by E200K mutation in prion protein fragment 90-231 structure in native conformation we observed, was an increase in the exposure of hydrophobic amino-acids on protein surface that was detected in wild type and D202N proteins only after thermal denaturation. In conclusion, we propose that increased hydrophobicity is one of the main determinants of toxicity induced by different mutations in prion protein-derived peptides.

  17. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  18. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  19. Designing a hydrophobic barrier within biomimetic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Trick, Jemma L; Wallace, E Jayne; Bayley, Hagan; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-11-25

    Nanopores in membranes have a range of potential applications. Biomimetic design of nanopores aims to mimic key functions of biological pores within a stable template structure. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to test whether a simple β-barrel protein nanopore can be modified to incorporate a hydrophobic barrier to permeation. Simulations have been used to evaluate functional properties of such nanopores, using water flux as a proxy for ionic conductance. The behavior of these model pores has been characterized as a function of pore size and of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chains lining the narrow central constriction of the pore. Potential of mean force calculations have been used to calculate free energy landscapes for water and for ion permeation in selected models. These studies demonstrate that a hydrophobic barrier can indeed be designed into a β-barrel protein nanopore, and that the height of the barrier can be adjusted by modifying the number of consecutive rings of hydrophobic side chains. A hydrophobic barrier prevents both water and ion permeation even though the pore is sterically unoccluded. These results both provide insights into the nature of hydrophobic gating in biological pores and channels, and furthermore demonstrate that simple design features may be computationally transplanted into β-barrel membrane proteins to generate functionally complex nanopores.

  20. Recombinant human basic-fibroblastic growth factor: different medical dressings for clinical application in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Finetti, G; Farina, M

    1992-06-01

    Recombinant human basic-Fibroblastic Growth Factor (rhb-FGF) is a basic single-chain protein showing high activity as mitogenetic and angiogenetic agent. The application of rhb-FGF in wound healing as stimulator of the tissue repair process is strictly connected with the covering of the wound by means of a proper dressing. A wide number of synthetic occlusive or non-occlusive wound dressings has been developed. Owing to the delicate proteic structure of rhb-FGF, and generally of all the Growth Factors, compatibility with the dressings has to be every time tested, to avoid its inactivation and consequent loss of tissue repair properties.

  1. Wound Management: The Occlusive Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Rheinecker, Scot B.

    1995-01-01

    Superficial wounds resulting from athletic injury are common in sports medicine. Although such wounds can be quite painful, they are usually merely inconvenient to the athlete. If improperly managed, however, superficial wounds may heal slowly and cause unnecessary scar tissue proliferation at the wound site. Scar formation causes the wound to break open frequently and puts the athlete at risk of cross-contamination by pathogenic organisms. New advances in the science of wound management strongly favor the use of occlusive dressings to increase patient comfort, increase patient compliance, decrease the risk of infection, and decrease overall healing time. Occlusion has clearly been proven to aid in the healing of superficial wounds and should be considered as a treatment alternative for wounds in the sports medicine setting. In this paper, I discuss three of the most widely used types of occlusive dressings: 1) films, 2) hydrogels, and 3) hydrocolloids. PMID:16558325

  2. Temperature, stability, and the hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Schellman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in free energy are normally used to track the effect of temperature on the stability of proteins and hydrophobic interactions. Use of this procedure on the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons, a standard representation of the hydrophobic effect, leads to the conclusion that the hydrophobic effect increases in strength as the temperature is raised to approximately 140 degrees C. Acceptance of this interpretation leads to a number of far-reaching conclusions that are at variance with the original conception of the hydrophobic effect and add considerably to the complexity of interpretation. There are two legitimate thermodynamic functions that can be used to look at stability as a function of temperature: the standard Gibbs free energy change, deltaG degrees, and deltaG degrees/T. The latter is proportional to the log of the equilibrium constant and is sometimes called the Massieu-Planck function. Arguments are presented for using deltaG degrees/T rather than deltaG degrees for variations in stability with temperature. This makes a considerable difference in the interpretation of the hydrophobic interaction, but makes little change in the stability profile of proteins. Protein unfolding and the aqueous solubility of benzene are given as examples. The contrast between protein unfolding and the hydration of nonpolar molecules provides a rough estimate of the contribution of other factors that stabilize and destabilize protein structure. PMID:9414210

  3. Wound dressings. Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Horncastle, J

    1995-01-01

    The discovery that "moist" dressings can promote faster healing has led to a number of innovations in wound care. Modern dressings are playing an active part in the healing process and, in the future, will be condition-specific rather than offering off-the-shelf solutions. Focusing on hydrocolloids and alginates, which are used in bioactive dressings, this article reviews the developments that have been made to date, and includes discussion of the demands being made on the manufacturing process.

  4. Electrohydrodynamics Near Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduar, S. R.; Belyaev, A. V.; Lobaskin, V.; Vinogradova, O. I.

    2015-03-01

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  5. Electrohydrodynamics near hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maduar, S R; Belyaev, A V; Lobaskin, V; Vinogradova, O I

    2015-03-20

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Water on hydrophobic surfaces: Mechanistic modeling of hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-23

    Mechanistic models are successfully used for protein purification process development as shown for ion-exchange column chromatography (IEX). Modeling and simulation of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) in the column mode has been seldom reported. As a combination of these two techniques is often encountered in biopharmaceutical purification steps, accurate modeling of protein adsorption in HIC is a core issue for applying holistic model-based process development, especially in the light of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. In this work, a new mechanistic isotherm model for HIC is derived by consideration of an equilibrium between well-ordered water molecules and bulk-like ordered water molecules on the hydrophobic surfaces of protein and ligand. The model's capability of describing column chromatography experiments is demonstrated with glucose oxidase, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme on Capto™ Phenyl (high sub) as model system. After model calibration from chromatograms of bind-and-elute experiments, results were validated with batch isotherms and prediction of further gradient elution chromatograms. PMID:27575919

  7. Dressed spin of {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Esler, A.; Peng, J. C.; Chandler, D.; Howell, D.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Liu, C. Y.; Torgerson, J. R.

    2007-11-15

    We report a measurement of dressed spin effects of polarized {sup 3}He atoms from a cold atomic source traversing a region of a constant magnetic field B{sub 0} and a transverse oscillatory dressing field B{sub d}cos{omega}{sub d}t. The observed effects are compared with a numerical simulation using the Bloch equation as well as a calculation based on the dressed atom formalism. An application of the dressed spin of {sup 3}He for a proposed neutron electric dipole moment measurement is also discussed.

  8. Fluid handling properties of hydrogel dressings.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Hay, P

    1995-04-01

    The fluid handling properties of four hydrogel dressings were examined in a laboratory-based study to determine their ability to absorb liquid from or donate liquid to a range of standard test substrates simulating wound tissue in various states of hydration. The tests suggest that three of the dressings are likely to be effective fluid-donating agents, and one of the dressings has a dual ability to donate or absorb liquid depending upon moisture content and nature of the substrate to which it is applied. These observations are discussed in the context of the clinical use of hydrogel dressings.

  9. Dressed qubits in nuclear spin baths

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao

    2010-04-15

    We present a method to encode a dressed qubit into the product state of an electron spin localized in a quantum dot and its surrounding nuclear spins via a dressing transformation. In this scheme, the hyperfine coupling and a portion of a nuclear dipole-dipole interaction become logic gates, while they are the sources of decoherence in electron-spin qubit proposals. We discuss errors and corrections for the dressed qubits. Interestingly, the effective Hamiltonian of nuclear spins is equivalent to a pairing Hamiltonian, which provides the microscopic mechanism to protect dressed qubits against decoherence.

  10. [Negative pressure wound therapy dressings].

    PubMed

    Téot, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There are many different forms of negative pressure wound therapy dressings and it is important to distinguish clearly between each type. They enable the treatment to be adapted to the shape and depth of the wound, its degree of exudation and the persistence of the fibrinous areas on the surface. The machine's traction capacity, measured in mm of mercury (Hg), must be controlled to establish the healing profile: the more powerful the machine and the more contact there is between the foam and the wound, the faster the formation of the granulation tissue. There are many different solutions which are implemented in accordance with the clinical assessment of the wound.

  11. Acemannan hydrogel dressing versus saline dressing for pressure ulcers. A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D R; Goode, P S; LaMaster, K; Tennyson, T

    1998-10-01

    Aloe vera has been used for centuries as a topical treatment for various conditions and as a cathartic. An amorphous hydrogel dressing derived from the aloe plant (Carrasyn Gel Wound Dressing, Carrington Laboratories, Inc., Irving, TX) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of Stages I through IV pressure ulcers. To evaluate effectiveness of this treatment, 30 patients were randomized to receive either daily topical application of the hydrogel study dressing (acemannan hydrogel wound dressing) or a moist saline gauze dressing. Complete healing of the study ulcer occurred in 19 of 30 subjects (63%) during the 10-week observation period. No difference was observed in complete healing between the experimental and the control groups (odds ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.16, 5.2). This study indicates that the acemannan hydrogel dressing is as effective as, but is not superior to, a moist saline gauze wound dressing for the management of pressure ulcers.

  12. Role Conflict and Conformity in Dress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasper, Cynthia R.; Roach-Higgins, Mary Ellen

    1988-01-01

    Examined conflict regarding what form of dress is appropriate for Roman Catholic priest. Data from 5,475 American Catholic priests revealed that priests who conformed to church regulations regarding dress differed from nonconformists in beliefs about their roles as priests and in their opinions of church reform, commitment to the priesthood,…

  13. The many colours of 'the dress'.

    PubMed

    Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Bloj, Marina; Toscani, Matteo

    2015-06-29

    There has been an intense discussion among the public about the colour of a dress, shown in a picture posted originally on Tumblr (http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and; accessed on 10:56 am GMT on Tue 24 Mar 2015). Some people argue that they see a white dress with golden lace, while others describe the dress as blue with black lace. Here we show that the question "what colour is the dress?" has more than two answers. In fact, there is a continuum of colour percepts across different observers. We measured colour matches on a calibrated screen for two groups of observers who had reported different percepts of the dress. Surprisingly, differences between the two groups arose mainly from differences in lightness, rather than chromaticity of the colours they adjusted to match the dress. We speculate that the ambiguity arises in the case of this particular image because the distribution of colours within the dress closely matches the distribution of natural daylights. This makes it more difficult to disambiguate illumination changes from those in reflectance. PMID:25981790

  14. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  15. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them. PMID:26061489

  16. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them.

  17. Preparation and evaluation of biocomposites as wound dressing material.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, V; Sekar, S; Sankar, S; Sankaranarayanan, C; Sastry, T P

    2012-12-01

    Collagen was isolated from the chrome containing leather waste (CCLW) which is a major solid waste in leather industry. Composite films were made using sago starch (SG), soya protein (SY), and collagen (C) and were cross linked with glutaraldehyde (G).The films prepared were characterized for their physico chemical properties like tensile strength, infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, surface morphology, and water absorption studies. Better mechanical properties and surface morphology were observed for SG-SY-G-C films compared to other films prepared using collagen. The composite films prepared were used as wound dressing material on the experimental wounds of rats and healing pattern was evaluated using planimetric, biochemical, and histopathological studies. These studies have revealed better wound healing capacity of SG-SY-G-C film and utilization of CCLW in the preparation of value added product like wound dressing material.

  18. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  19. Comparative Dynamics of Leucine Methyl Groups in FMOC-Leucine and in a Protein Hydrophobic Core Probed by Solid-State Deuteron Nuclear Magnetic Resonance over 7-324 K Temperature Range

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Moses, Mark; Ford, Joseph J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina; Vold, Robert L.

    2010-12-09

    Quantitative dynamics of methyl groups in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-leucine (FMOC-leu) have been analyzed and compared with earlier studies of methyl dynamics in chicken villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) labeled at L69, a key hydrophobic core position. A combination of deuteron solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments over the temperature range of 7-324 K and computational modeling indicated that while the two compounds show the same modes of motions, there are marked differences in the best-fit parameters of these motions. One of the main results is that the crossover observed in the dynamics of the methyl groups in the HP36 sample at 170 K is absent in FMOC-leu. A second crossover at around 95-88 K is present in both samples. The differences in the behavior of the two compounds suggest that some of the features of methyl dynamics reflect the complexity of the protein hydrophobic core and are not determined solely by local interactions.

  20. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  1. Online Capillary IsoElectric Focusing-ElectroSpray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIEF-ESI MS) in Glycerol-Water Media for the Separation and Characterization of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mokaddem, Meriem; d'Orlyé, Fanny; Varenne, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a high-resolution technique for the separation of ampholytes, such as proteins, according to their isoelectric point. CIEF coupled online with MS is regarded as a promising alternative to 2-D PAGE for fast proteome analysis with high-resolving capabilities and enhanced structural information without the drawbacks of conventional slab-gel electrophoresis. However, online coupling has been rarely described, as it presents some difficulties. A new methodology for the online coupling of CIEF with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been developed in glycerol-water media. This new integrated methodology provides a mean for the characterization of a large number of hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteins. PMID:27473481

  2. The effect of Ringer's solution within a dressing to elicit pain relief.

    PubMed

    Colegrave, M; Rippon, M G; Richardson, C

    2016-04-01

    Clinical studies suggest that dressings containing Ringer's solution, such as the TenderWet and HydroClean families, provide relief from wound pain. This report reviews the available evidence and possible mechanisms for the relief of wound pain by these dressings. The ability of dressings containing Ringer's solution to provide pain relief is likely to be through providing a moist environment that is favourable for wound healing; furthermore, the dressing augments the protective barrier function by having additional fluid under the dressing, which covers exposed nerve endings and protects against friction damage. Ringer's solution will have a dilution effect and an influence on the pH of exudate. Diluting cytokines within the exudate would be expected to decrease inflammation in chronic wounds and reduce the influence of caustic components such as matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Altering the pH of the wound bed could inactivate proteins and glycoproteins implicated in the pain response such as MMPs and sodium and calcium channels. The moist environment may also be better at recruiting leukocytes that release natural painkillers at areas of injury. These mechanisms are likely to act in combination to explain why dressings containing Ringer's solution can have analgesic effects. PMID:27064367

  3. [Study on the volume flows through polymeric membranous dressing with silver ions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Andrzej; Grzegorczyn, Sławomir; Slezak, Izabella H; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The volume flows through double-layer polymeric membranous dressing, formed by three types of theromoplastic polymeric fibers called Textus Bioactive were studied. The first layer contains two types of fibers: the polymeric fibers containing hydrophobic core and hydrophilic surfaces with silver zeolite and hydrophilic super absorbing polymers (SAP). The second layer of membrane contains third type of polymeric fibers, arranged parallel to surface's skin, creating a net, which prevents membranous dressing from sticking to treated wound. The pressure characteristics of the volume flux were determined and it was stated that the value of this flux is dependent on the value of hydrostatic pressure difference (deltaP) and the concentration difference (deltaC) of solutions separated by membrane. Experimental results show that the membranous dressing Textus Bioactive posses the rectifying properties with reference to volume flows. These properties occurs above a threshold value of deltaC. Using the Kedem-Katchalsky equations, the model of the volume flows through membranous dressing Textus Bioactive was made.

  4. Chitosan-aluminum monostearate composite sponge dressing containing asiaticoside for wound healing and angiogenesis promotion in chronic wound.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Yodkhum, Kotchamon; Charoenteeraboon, Juree; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    There are many factors that delay healing in chronic wounds including lowering level of growth factors and increasing exudate level comprising high amount of tissue destructive enzymes. Asiaticoside possesses interesting wound healing and angiogenic activities that are employed to stimulate tissue regeneration in wound healing application. This study attempted to develop chitosan-aluminum monostearate (Alst) composite sponge containing asiaticoside for use as an absorbent medical dressing in chronic wound. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was used to enhance homogeneity of asiaticoside in the polymer composite matrix. The sponge dressings were prepared by lyophilization and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT). Functional group interaction, crystallinity, and morphology of the prepared sponges were investigated using FT-IR, PXRD, and SEM, respectively. Physicochemical properties, porosity, hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties and mechanical property, were evaluated. Wound dressing properties, water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), fluid absorbency, oxygen permeation (OP), and bio-adhesive property, were investigated. In vitro asiaticoside release study was conducted using immersion method. Cytotoxicity was studied in normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK). Angiogenic activity of asiaticoside was evaluated using chick-chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. FT-IR and PXRD results revealed the amidation after DHT to enhance the crystallinity of the prepared sponges. The prepared sponges had high porosity comprising high Alst-loaded amount that exhibited more compact structure. Alst enhanced hydrophobicity therefore it reduced the fluid absorption and WVTR together with bio-adhesion of the prepared sponge dressings. Porosity of all sponges was more than 85% therefore resulting in their high OP. Enhancing hydrophobicity of the material by Alst and more homogeneity caused by NMP eventually retarded the asiaticoside release for 7 days. The

  5. Chitosan-aluminum monostearate composite sponge dressing containing asiaticoside for wound healing and angiogenesis promotion in chronic wound.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Yodkhum, Kotchamon; Charoenteeraboon, Juree; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    There are many factors that delay healing in chronic wounds including lowering level of growth factors and increasing exudate level comprising high amount of tissue destructive enzymes. Asiaticoside possesses interesting wound healing and angiogenic activities that are employed to stimulate tissue regeneration in wound healing application. This study attempted to develop chitosan-aluminum monostearate (Alst) composite sponge containing asiaticoside for use as an absorbent medical dressing in chronic wound. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was used to enhance homogeneity of asiaticoside in the polymer composite matrix. The sponge dressings were prepared by lyophilization and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT). Functional group interaction, crystallinity, and morphology of the prepared sponges were investigated using FT-IR, PXRD, and SEM, respectively. Physicochemical properties, porosity, hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties and mechanical property, were evaluated. Wound dressing properties, water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), fluid absorbency, oxygen permeation (OP), and bio-adhesive property, were investigated. In vitro asiaticoside release study was conducted using immersion method. Cytotoxicity was studied in normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK). Angiogenic activity of asiaticoside was evaluated using chick-chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. FT-IR and PXRD results revealed the amidation after DHT to enhance the crystallinity of the prepared sponges. The prepared sponges had high porosity comprising high Alst-loaded amount that exhibited more compact structure. Alst enhanced hydrophobicity therefore it reduced the fluid absorption and WVTR together with bio-adhesion of the prepared sponge dressings. Porosity of all sponges was more than 85% therefore resulting in their high OP. Enhancing hydrophobicity of the material by Alst and more homogeneity caused by NMP eventually retarded the asiaticoside release for 7 days. The

  6. Alginate dressing as a donor site haemostat.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, A. R.; Lawrence, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An alginate fibre dressing has been used to reduce blood loss from skin graft donor sites. Significant haemostasis has been achieved in the immediate post surgery phase and no adverse reactions observed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3511833

  7. Colour Vision: Understanding #TheDress.

    PubMed

    Brainard, David H; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2015-06-29

    A widely-viewed image of a dress elicits striking individual variation in colour perception. Experiments with multiple variants of the image suggest that the individual differences may arise through the action of visual mechanisms that normally stabilise object colour.

  8. A dressed spin qubit in silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Laucht, Arne; Kalra, Rachpon; Simmons, Stephanie; Dehollain, Juan P.; Muhonen, Juha T.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; et al

    2016-10-17

    Coherent dressing of a quantum two-level system provides access to a new quantum system with improved properties—a different and easily tunable level splitting, faster control and longer coherence times. In our work we investigate the properties of the dressed, donor-bound electron spin in silicon, and assess its potential as a quantum bit in scalable architectures. The two dressed spin-polariton levels constitute a quantum bit that can be coherently driven with an oscillating magnetic field, an oscillating electric field, frequency modulation of the driving field or a simple detuning pulse. We measure coherence times of T*2p = 2.4 ms and THahn2pmore » = 9 ms, one order of magnitude longer than those of the undressed spin. Moreover, the use of the dressed states enables coherent coupling of the solid-state spins to electric fields and mechanical oscillations.« less

  9. Hydrophobic sugar holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2008-02-01

    The sugar matrix is used to record of phase holograms; it was modified with the purpose of obtaining a hydrophobic material to improve the stability of the registered image and to stimulate the photosensitivity of the sugar. The new material is formed by a sugar, pectin and vanillin dissolution. The diffraction efficiency parameter increases in comparison with only the sugar matrix, obtaining already of 10%.

  10. [Hydrocellular dressings, 25 years of evolution].

    PubMed

    Lurton, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocellular dressings have evolved considerably over the last 25 years. Manufacturers have worked to increase their absorbency, to make them easier for caregivers to use and to improve their comfort for the patients. This class now comprises a diverse range of dressings. Their inclusion on the list of products and services approved for reimbursement, given the low level of evidence provided by the clinical studies currently available, depends on their technical characteristics assessed in vitro. PMID:26763563

  11. Electrospun zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) for nonadherent, superabsorbent, and antimicrobial wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Reza; Liu, Lingyun

    2012-06-11

    Zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) has been well studied for its superhydrophilic and ultralow biofouling properties, making it a promising material for superabsorbent and nonadherent wound dressings. Electrospinning provides multiple desirable features for wound dressings, including high absorptivity due to high surface-area-to-volume ratio, high gas permeation, and conformability to contour of the wound bed. The goal of this work is to develop a fibrous membrane of PSBMA via electrospinning and evaluate its properties related to wound dressing applications. Being superhydrophilic, PSBMA fibers fabricated by a conventional electrospinning method would readily dissolve in water, whereas if cross-linker is added, the formation of hydrogel would prevent electrospinning. A three-step polymerization-electrospinning-photo-cross-linking process was developed in this work to fabricate the cross-linked electrospun PSBMA fibrous membrane. Such electrospun membrane was stable in water and exhibited high water absorption of 353% (w/w), whereas the PSBMA hydrogel only absorbed 81% water. The electrospun membrane showed strong resistance to protein adsorption and cell attachment. Bacterial adhesion studies using Gram negative P. aeruginosa and Gram positive S. epidermidis showed that the PSBMA electrospun membrane was also highly resistant to bacterial adhesion. The Ag(+)-impregnated electrospun PSBMA membrane was shown microbicidal, against both S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Such electrospun PSBMA membrane is ideal for a novel type of nonadherent, superabsorbent, and antimicrobial wound dressing. The superior water absorption aids in fluid removal from highly exudating wounds while keeping the wound hydrated to support healing. Because of the resistance to protein, cell, and bacterial adhesion, the dressing removal will neither cause patients' pain nor disturb the newly formed tissues. The dressing also prevents the attachment of environmental bacteria

  12. Electrospun zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) for nonadherent, superabsorbent, and antimicrobial wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Reza; Liu, Lingyun

    2012-06-11

    Zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) has been well studied for its superhydrophilic and ultralow biofouling properties, making it a promising material for superabsorbent and nonadherent wound dressings. Electrospinning provides multiple desirable features for wound dressings, including high absorptivity due to high surface-area-to-volume ratio, high gas permeation, and conformability to contour of the wound bed. The goal of this work is to develop a fibrous membrane of PSBMA via electrospinning and evaluate its properties related to wound dressing applications. Being superhydrophilic, PSBMA fibers fabricated by a conventional electrospinning method would readily dissolve in water, whereas if cross-linker is added, the formation of hydrogel would prevent electrospinning. A three-step polymerization-electrospinning-photo-cross-linking process was developed in this work to fabricate the cross-linked electrospun PSBMA fibrous membrane. Such electrospun membrane was stable in water and exhibited high water absorption of 353% (w/w), whereas the PSBMA hydrogel only absorbed 81% water. The electrospun membrane showed strong resistance to protein adsorption and cell attachment. Bacterial adhesion studies using Gram negative P. aeruginosa and Gram positive S. epidermidis showed that the PSBMA electrospun membrane was also highly resistant to bacterial adhesion. The Ag(+)-impregnated electrospun PSBMA membrane was shown microbicidal, against both S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Such electrospun PSBMA membrane is ideal for a novel type of nonadherent, superabsorbent, and antimicrobial wound dressing. The superior water absorption aids in fluid removal from highly exudating wounds while keeping the wound hydrated to support healing. Because of the resistance to protein, cell, and bacterial adhesion, the dressing removal will neither cause patients' pain nor disturb the newly formed tissues. The dressing also prevents the attachment of environmental bacteria

  13. Multifunctional polypeptide-PEO nanoreactors via the hydrophobic switch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuzhou; Wang, Tao; Ng, David Y W; Weil, Tanja

    2012-09-14

    We prepare various protein-derived amphiphilic polymers. By modifying the polypeptide backbone with a few (5-8) hydrophilic or lipophilic substituents, we are able to switch the hydrophobicity of the polymer and control the formation of stable nano-sized micelles. In the hydrophobic interior of these micelles, ethynyl groups are introduced to provide a nanoreactor environment for click reactions with lipophilic cargo molecules, such as 3-azidocoumarin, a hydrophobic fluorophore, and the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin. These protein-derived amphiphilic polymers reported herein offer a promising potential to design a delivery platform for biomedical applications.

  14. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878.4022 Section 878.4022 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878.4022 Section 878.4022 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878.4022 Section 878.4022 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878.4022 Section 878.4022 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  18. Choosing a Wound Dressing Based on Common Wound Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Phillips, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden.The practitioner should have an appropriate understanding of both the etiology of the wound as well as the optimal type of dressings to use. Fundamental wound characteristics may be used to guide the practitioner's choice of dressings. The identification of optimal dressings to use for a particular wound type is an important element in facilitating wound healing. Recent Advances: Researchers have sought to design wound dressings that aim to optimize each stage in the healing process. In addition, dressings have been designed to target and kill infection-causing bacteria, with the incorporation of antimicrobial agents. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are frequently dynamic in presentation, and the numerous wound dressings available make dressing selection challenging for the practitioner. Choosing the correct dressing decreases time to healing, provides cost-effective care, and improves patient quality of life. Future Directions: Research into the mechanisms of wound healing has enhanced our ability to heal chronic wounds at a faster rate through the use of moisture-retentive dressings. Newer dressings are incorporating the use of nanotechnology by incorporating miniature electrical sensors into the dressing. These dressings are engineered to detect changes in a wound environment and alert the patient or practitioner by altering the color of the dressing or sending a message to a smartphone. Additional investigations are underway that incorporate biologic material such as stem cells into dressings. PMID:26858913

  19. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  20. sup 1 H NMR study of the influence of hydrophobic contacts on protein-prosthetic group recognition in bovine and rat ferricytochrome b sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K-B.; La Mar, G.N.; Kehres, L.A.; Fujinari, E.M.; Smith, K.M. ); Pochapsky, T.C.; Sligar, S.G. )

    1990-10-01

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the soluble fragment of native bovine and genetically engineered wild-type rat ferricytochrome b{sub 5} reconstituted with a wide variety of hemes chemically modified at 2- and/or 4-positions have been recorded and analyzed. While all but one nonsymmetric heme yielded comparable amounts of the two heme orientations immediately after reconstitution, the relative proportion of the two orientations at equilibrium varied widely. The unpaired spin density distribution in the heme {pi} system leads to substituent hyperfine shift patterns in these paramagnetic complexes that are completely diagnostic of the heme orientation in the protein matrix. An empirical assignment strategy is outlined and applied which allows unequivocal assignment of the absolute orientation of a derivatized heme within the protein matrix. Using a series of hemes lacking 2-fold symmetry solely due to a single substitution, the preferences for localized site occupation of vinyls, methyls, and hydrogens are developed. The differences in this heme orientational preference among bovine, rat, and chicken ferricytochromes b{sub 5} could be correlated with the relative steric bulk of the residues at positions 23 and 25. Detailed thermodynamic analysis of the orientational preferences of native protoheme reveals that, while the same orientation as found in X-ray crystal structures of bovine cytochrome b{sub 5} predominate at 25{degree}C in both proteins, the preference in the bovine protein is primarily for enthalpic reasons while in the rat protein the preference is due to entropic factors.

  1. Investigation on hydrophobic films from a hydrophobic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liqun; Hao, Guofang; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yizhi

    2012-11-01

    A hydrophobic powder was prepared based mainly on an organosiloxane and a corrosion inhibitor with the addition of a reaction promoter. Structure and thermal stability of the hydrophobic powder were characterized by FTIR and TG/DSC, respectively. Hydrophobic property and corrosion resistance of the hydrophobic film formed on phosphatized steel by immersion in 3 wt% NaCl aqueous solution were evaluated together with the electrochemical behavior. Results showed that the skeleton of the hydrophobic powder was composed mainly of sbnd Sisbnd Osbnd Sisbnd which comprises longer and more hydrophobic groups of sbnd Sisbnd R compared with the conventional BH-102 water-repellent agent. A thin hydrophobic film with a thickness of 15-20 μm was formed on surface of the phosphatized steel after immersion in the solution of 5 g/L of the hydrophobic powder in ethanol for 5 min. The hydrophobic film exhibited excellent stability at a temperature below 135 °C. Water contact angle on the film is about 117-132° and it was until 30 h later when a corrosion spot occurred on the film covered on steel which revealed better water-repellent and corrosion resistant properties compared to that of the BH-102.

  2. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein, Part I: Affordances and Limitations of Ribbon Diagrams, Vines, and Hydrophobic/Polar Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This project focuses on students' understanding of three external representations of the potassium ion channel protein. This is part I of a two-part study, which focuses on the affordances and…

  3. Control of photodetachment spectra through laser dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Nathan; Greene, Chris

    2013-05-01

    Photodetachment and photoionization spectra often display rich resonance structures. The properties of these spectra can be modified through dressing with intense laser fields, providing control over photon absorption and the emitted electron. We present a Floquet R-matrix method for calculating photodetachment cross sections in the presence of a dressing laser. The full wave functions in the Floquet formalism for bound and escaping electrons are found by solving the Schrödinger equation near the atomic core and applying analytic boundary conditions outside of the interaction region. These calculations are used to investigate the modification of existing resonances, such as modifying the shape, or q parameter, of Feshbach resonances. We also investigate the creation of new resonances in cases where high-lying bound states become autoionizing through the absorption of dressing laser photons. This work was supported by the DOE.

  4. Wound Dressings and Comparative Effectiveness Data

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Aditya; Granick, Mark S.; Tomaselli, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Injury to the skin provides a unique challenge, as wound healing is a complex and intricate process. Acute wounds have the potential to move from the acute wound to chronic wounds, requiring the physician to have a thorough understanding of outside interventions to bring these wounds back into the healing cascade. Recent Advances: The development of new and effective interventions in wound care remains an area of intense research. Negative pressure wound therapy has undoubtedly changed wound care from this point forward and has proven beneficial for a variety of wounds. Hydroconductive dressings are another category that is emerging with studies underway. Other modalities such as hyperbaric oxygen, growth factors, biologic dressings, skin substitutes, and regenerative materials have also proven efficacious in advancing the wound-healing process through a variety of mechanisms. Critical Issues: There is an overwhelming amount of wound dressings available in the market. This implies the lack of full understanding of wound care and management. The point of using advanced dressings is to improve upon specific wound characteristics to bring it as close to “ideal” as possible. It is only after properly assessing the wound characteristics and obtaining knowledge about available products that the “ideal” dressing may be chosen. Future Directions: The future of wound healing at this point remains unknown. Few high-quality, randomized controlled trials evaluating wound dressings exist and do not clearly demonstrate superiority of many materials or categories. Comparative effectiveness research can be used as a tool to evaluate topical therapy for wound care moving into the future. Until further data emerge, education on the available products and logical clinical thought must prevail. PMID:25126472

  5. Adsorption of Rotavirus, MS2 Bacteriophage and Surface-Modified Silica Nanoparticles to Hydrophobic Matter.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Kata; Varsani, Arvind; Pang, Liping

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption to aquifer media is an important process in the removal of viruses from groundwater. Even though hydrophobic interactions have been shown to contribute to adsorption, little is known about the hydrophobicity of viruses found in groundwater. In this study, the hydrophobicity of rotavirus, MS2 bacteriophage and DNA-labelled silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) coated with glycoprotein, protein A and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) was investigated. The hydrophobicity was experimentally determined by using a modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The results were compared with the theoretical hydrophobicity of the viral capsid proteins and the proteins used to coat the nanoparticles, and with the results of adsorption tests with unmodified and organosilane-coated (hydrophobic) silica sand. While most theoretical protein hydrophobicity values were similar, the results of the MATH assay suggested fundamental differences in the hydrophobicity of the viruses and the SiNPs. MS2 was found to be highly hydrophobic as based on the MATH hydrophobicity and a significantly enhanced adsorption to hydrophobic sand, whereas rotavirus was relatively hydrophilic. The MATH assay revealed that protein-coating of SiNP introduced some degree of hydrophobicity to hydrophilic SiNPs, enabling them to more closely mimic viral hydrophobicity. Our study also demonstrated that the protein-coated SiNPs better mimicked rotavirus adsorption to sand media (coated or not coated with hydrophobic organic matter) than the MS2. This further supports previous findings that these surface-modified SiNPs are useful surrogates in mimicking rotavirus retention and transport in porous media.

  6. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  7. Tiny patients, tiny dressings: a guide to the neonatal PICC dressing change.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Elizabeth L

    2008-06-01

    Advances in neonatology now support the survival of the tiniest of infants. The peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) has now become an integral part of routine practice in neonatal intensive care units around the world. Keen attention to safe maintenance of these devices is essential. A properly applied and maintained PICC dressing is the first line of defense to minimize the risk of complications such as dislodgement, migration, and infection. This article describes a neonatal PICC dressing change and discusses the frequently encountered quandaries surrounding this important procedure, including dressing materials, frequency, site preparation, barrier precautions, and other relevant concerns.

  8. Both the hydrophobicity and a positively charged region flanking the C-terminal region of the transmembrane domain of signal-anchored proteins play critical roles in determining their targeting specificity to the endoplasmic reticulum or endosymbiotic organelles in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Lee, Hyunkyung; Kim, Jinho; Lee, Sumin; Kim, Dae Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Hwang, Inhwan

    2011-04-01

    Proteins localized to various cellular and subcellular membranes play pivotal roles in numerous cellular activities. Accordingly, in eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis of organellar proteins is an essential process requiring their correct localization among various cellular and subcellular membranes. Localization of these proteins is determined by either cotranslational or posttranslational mechanisms, depending on the final destination. However, it is not fully understood how the targeting specificity of membrane proteins is determined in plant cells. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which signal-anchored (SA) proteins are differentially targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or endosymbiotic organelles using in vivo targeting, subcellular fractionation, and bioinformatics approaches. For targeting SA proteins to endosymbiotic organelles, the C-terminal positively charged region (CPR) flanking the transmembrane domain (TMD) is necessary but not sufficient. The hydrophobicity of the TMD in CPR-containing proteins also plays a critical role in determining targeting specificity; TMDs with a hydrophobicity value >0.4 on the Wimley and White scale are targeted primarily to the ER, whereas TMDs with lower values are targeted to endosymbiotic organelles. Based on these data, we propose that the CPR and the hydrophobicity of the TMD play a critical role in determining the targeting specificity between the ER and endosymbiotic organelles.

  9. Occlusive Dressings and the Healing of Standardized Abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    Context: Acute skin trauma during sport participation, resulting in partial-thickness abrasions, is common. The limited investigations focusing on the acute wound environment and dressing techniques and the subsequent lack of evidence-based standards complicate clinical wound care decisions. Objective: To examine the effects of occlusive dressings on healing of standardized, partial-thickness abrasions. Design: Controlled, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy women (n  =  10) and men (n  =  6). Intervention(s): Four standardized, partial-thickness abrasions were inflicted. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings and no dressing (control) were applied. Participants returned on postwound days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 for digital imaging. Wound healing time was measured by change in wound contraction (cm2) and change in wound color (chromatic red) and luminance in red, green, and blue color values. Main Outcome Measure(s): Wound contraction, color (chromatic red), and luminance. Results: A day-by-dressing interaction was found for wound contraction, color, and luminance. Post hoc testing indicated that the film and hydrocolloid dressings produced greater wound contraction than the hydrogel and no dressing on days 7 and 10. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in greater wound contraction than the control on day 14. Hydrocolloid dressings produced smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance than no dressing on day 7. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance compared with no dressing on days 10 and 14. Conclusions: When compared with the control (no dressing), the film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings were associated with a faster healing rate of partial-thickness abrasions across time measured by wound contraction, color, and luminance

  10. Dressing of Cognitively Impaired Nursing Home Residents: Description and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Creedon, Michael A.; Malone, Thomas; Parpura-Gill, Aleksandra; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Heasly, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Getting dressed is an activity that is of particular difficulty for many persons with dementia, given the need for hand-eye coordination, fine motor skills, and overall planning skills. Despite several studies concerning interventions to improve dressing behavior, very little is known about the dressing process as it is currently…

  11. Exploring Hydrophobic Binding Surfaces Using Comfa and Flexible Hydrophobic Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Sanchez, Rosa. I.; Bhuveneswaran, Chidambaram; Compadre, Cesar M.

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are a very important group of enzymes involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In this investigation we used 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques to model the binding of a variety of substrates to two cysteine proteinases, papain, and cathepsin B. The analysis was performed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). The molecules were constructed using standard bond angles and lengths, minimized and aligned. Charges were calculated using the PM3 method in MOPAC. The CoMFA models derived for the binding of the studied substrates to the two proteinases were compared with the expected results from the experimental X-ray crystal structures of the same proteinases. The results showed the value of CoMFA modeling of flexible hydrophobic ligands to analyze ligand binding to protein receptors, and could also serve as the basis to design specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases with potential therapeutic value.

  12. Interconnection of salt-induced hydrophobic compaction and secondary structure formation depends on solution conditions: revisiting early events of protein folding at single molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-03-30

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea.

  13. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  14. Collagen Dressing Versus Conventional Dressings in Burn and Chronic Wounds: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Onkar; Gupta, Shilpi Singh; Soni, Mohan; Moses, Sonia; Shukla, Sumit; Mathur, Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Biological dressings like collagen are impermeable to bacteria, and create the most physiological interface between the wound surface and the environment. Collagen dressings have other advantages over conventional dressings in terms of ease of application and being natural, non-immunogenic, non-pyrogenic, hypo-allergenic, and pain-free. This study aims to compare the efficacy of collagen dressing in treating burn and chronic wounds with that of conventional dressing materials. Materials and Methods: The records of 120 patients with chronic wounds of varied aetiologies and with mean age 43.7 years were collected and analyzed. The patients had been treated either with collagen or other conventional dressing materials including silver sulfadiazine, nadifloxacin, povidone iodine, or honey (traditional dressing material). Patients with co-morbidities that could grossly affect the wound healing like uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, chronic liver or renal disease, or major nutritional deprivation were not included. For the purpose of comparison the patients were divided into two groups; ‘Collagen group’ and ‘Conventional group’, each having 60 patients. For assessment the wound characteristics (size, edge, floor, slough, granulation tissue, and wound swab or pus culture sensitivity results) were recorded. With start of treatment, appearance of granulation tissue, completeness of healing, need for skin grafting, and patients’ satisfaction was noted for each patient in both groups. Results: With two weeks of treatment, 60% of the ‘collagen group’ wounds and only 42% of the ‘conventional group’ wounds were sterile (P=0.03). Healthy granulation tissue appeared earlier over collagen-dressed wounds than over conventionally treated wounds (P=0.03). After eight weeks, 52 (87%) of ‘collagen group’ wounds and 48 (80%) of ‘conventional group’ wounds were >75% healed (P=0.21). Eight patients in the ‘collagen group’ and 12 in the

  15. "Posh Music Should Equal Posh Dress": An Investigation into the Concert Dress and Physical Appearance of Female Soloists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Noola K.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of concert dress and physical appearance on perceptions of female classical soloists' musical abilities over a range of genres. Four female violinists were recorded playing three pieces, in four styles of dress of varying formality. Each combination of performer, piece and dress was recorded twice, once as the…

  16. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and

  17. Surgical instruments and dressings: an information service.

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, M H; McElroy, A R

    1975-01-01

    A regional information service on surgical equipment, instruments, and dressings is proposed that would be staffed by information scientists. It would appreciably reduce the time spent on administration and make the buying of equipment more efficient. Such a service could be extended to all health service staff. PMID:1192114

  18. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-11-01

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions u and w. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution w(0)=0 is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalized ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cutoff goes to infinity, u(0){yields}{infinity}, w(0){yields}-{infinity} such that u(0)+w(0){yields}-1. Furthermore w and u are not multiplicatively renormalizable. Relaxing the gap equation allows w(0)=0 with u(0){yields}-1. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, F(0,{lambda}), goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cutoff. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the F(0,{lambda})=3 solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cutoffs lie in the range 1-3 GeV{sup -1}. We show that the renormalized ghost dressing function should be finite and nonzero at zero momentum and can be reliably estimated on the lattice up to powers of the lattice spacing; from published data on a 80{sup 4} lattice at {beta}=5.7 we obtain F{sub R}(0,{mu}=1.5 GeV){approx_equal}2.2.

  19. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... emulsified viscous fluid food prepared from vegetable oil(s) and one or both of the acidifying ingredients... this section may also be used. The vegetable oil(s) used may contain an optional crystallization... vegetable oil. French dressing may be mixed and packed in an atmosphere in which air is replaced in whole...

  20. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... emulsified viscous fluid food prepared from vegetable oil(s) and one or both of the acidifying ingredients... this section may also be used. The vegetable oil(s) used may contain an optional crystallization... vegetable oil. French dressing may be mixed and packed in an atmosphere in which air is replaced in whole...

  1. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... emulsified viscous fluid food prepared from vegetable oil(s) and one or both of the acidifying ingredients... this section may also be used. The vegetable oil(s) used may contain an optional crystallization... vegetable oil. French dressing may be mixed and packed in an atmosphere in which air is replaced in whole...

  2. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... emulsified viscous fluid food prepared from vegetable oil(s) and one or both of the acidifying ingredients... this section may also be used. The vegetable oil(s) used may contain an optional crystallization... vegetable oil. French dressing may be mixed and packed in an atmosphere in which air is replaced in whole...

  3. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... emulsified viscous fluid food prepared from vegetable oil(s) and one or both of the acidifying ingredients... this section may also be used. The vegetable oil(s) used may contain an optional crystallization... vegetable oil. French dressing may be mixed and packed in an atmosphere in which air is replaced in whole...

  4. Colour Vision: Understanding #TheDress.

    PubMed

    Brainard, David H; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2015-06-29

    A widely-viewed image of a dress elicits striking individual variation in colour perception. Experiments with multiple variants of the image suggest that the individual differences may arise through the action of visual mechanisms that normally stabilise object colour. PMID:26126278

  5. Student Dress Codes and Uniforms. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard

    2009-01-01

    According to an Education Commission of the States "Policy Report", research on the effects of dress code and school uniform policies is inconclusive and mixed. Some researchers find positive effects; others claim no effects or only perceived effects. While no state has legislatively mandated the wearing of school uniforms, 28 states and the…

  6. A Dressed Spin Qubit in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laucht, Arne; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha; Mohiyaddin, Fahd; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay; Itoh, Kohei; Jamieson, David; McCallum, Jeff; Dzurak, Andrew; Morello, Andrea

    Coherent dressing of a quantum two-level system has been demonstrated on a variety of systems, including atoms, self-assembled quantum dots, and superconducting quantum bits, and can be demonstrated by measuring Rabi oscillations, or a Mollow triplet in the spectrum. It can be used to gain access to a new quantum system with improved properties - a different and tunable level splitting, faster and easier control, and longer coherence times. In our work we investigate the properties of the dressed, donor-bound electron spin in silicon, and probe its potential for the use as quantum bit in scalable architectures. Here, the two dressed spin-polariton levels constitute the quantum bit. The dressed qubit can be coherently driven with an oscillating magnetic field, an oscillating electric field, by frequency modulating the driving field, or by a simple detuning pulse. We measure coherence times of T2* = 2.4 ms and T2 = 9 ms (Hahn echo), one order of magnitude longer than those of the undressed qubit. This research was funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (Project Number CE110001027) and the US Army Research Office (W911NF-13-1-0024).

  7. Scattering of dressed nucleons in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    1998-11-01

    The scattering of dressed nucleons in nuclear matter is studied. By casting the conventional asymptotic analysis of scattering in free space in the language of the two-body propagator, it becomes possible to develop modifications of this analysis due to the dressing of the scattering nucleons in the medium. While the scattering energy singles out a unique (on-shell) momentum characterizing the relative wave function of free or mean-field nucleons, this uniqueness is no longer maintained for dressed nucleons. The resulting distribution of momenta in the relative wave function leads to a localization in coordinate space of the influence of the scattering process which can be expressed as a healing of the wave function to the noninteracting one. An analytic approximation to the noninteracting propagator of the dressed nucleons is utilized to illustrate these points. The localization of the scattered wave implies that the particles no longer ``remember'' their scattering event beyond some finite distance. This feature suggests that the strict notion of a cross section in the medium is a tenuous concept. Approximate expressions are developed to characterize the strength of the interaction in the medium in terms of phase shifts and cross sections to facilitate comparisons with results of calculations involving mean-field nucleons.

  8. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  9. In vitro and in vivo assays on egg white/polyvinyl alcohol/clay nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Sirousazar, Mohammad; Jahani-Javanmardi, Azinsadat; Kheiri, Farshad; Hassan, Zuhair Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Novel nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings on the basis of egg white and polyvinyl alcohol, as matrix, and natural Na-montmorillonite clay, as reinforcing agent, were prepared and their performances on wound healing investigated in vitro and in vivo. In vitro cytotoxicity assay revealed non-cytotoxic activity and excellent biocompatibility level of prepared nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings. The bacterial penetration assay showed the prepared nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings are excellent barriers against microorganisms and could protect the wound from infection during the wound healing. In vivo animal study showed that the wound healing process was considerably faster in wounds covered with nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings compared to the conventional wound dressing, i.e. sterile gauze, due to creation of a moist environment on the wound surface and faster migration rate of the epidermal cells. The mechanical properties of healed wounds with nanocomposite hydrogel wound dressings were better than those control wounds covered with sterile gauze due to their better collagen formation ability as a result of created moist healing condition as well as the presence of egg white, as a source of proteins, in their structures. PMID:27472819

  10. Expression of the chaplin and rodlin hydrophobic sheath proteins in Streptomyces venezuelae is controlled by σ(BldN) and a cognate anti-sigma factor, RsbN.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Maureen J; Domonkos, Agota; Chandra, Govind; Buttner, Mark J

    2012-06-01

    The chaplin and rodlin proteins together constitute the major components of the hydrophobic sheath that coats the aerial hyphae and spores in Streptomyces, and mutants lacking the chaplins are unable to erect aerial hyphae and differentiate on minimal media. We have gained insight into the developmental regulation of the chaplin (chp) and rodlin (rdl) genes by exploiting a new model species, Streptomyces venezuelae, which sporulates in liquid culture. Using microarrays, the chaplin and rodlin genes were found to be highly induced during submerged sporulation in a bldN-dependent manner. Using σ(BldN) ChIP-chip, we show that this dependence arises because the chaplin and rodlin genes are direct biochemical targets of σ(BldN) . sven3186 (here named rsbN for regulator of sigma BldN), the gene lying immediately downstream of bldN, was also identified as a target of σ(BldN) . Disruption of rsbN causes precocious sporulation and biochemical experiments demonstrate that RsbN functions as a σ(BldN) -specific anti-sigma factor.

  11. Case study of hydrogen bonding in a hydrophobic cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Cheng, Chao-Sheng; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Sue, Shih-Che

    2014-12-18

    Protein internal hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity determine protein folding and structure stabilization, and the introduction of a hydrogen bond has been believed to represent a better interaction for consolidating protein structure. We observed an alternative example for chicken IL-1β. The native IL-1β contains a hydrogen bond between the Y157 side-chain OηH and I133 backbone CO, whereby the substitution from Tyr to Phe abolishes the connection and the mutant without the hydrogen bond is more stable. An attempt to explain the energetic view of the presence of the hydrogen bond fails when only considering the nearly identical X-ray structures. Here, we resolve the mechanism by monitoring the protein backbone dynamics and interior hydrogen bond network. IL-1β contains a hydrophobic cavity in the protein interior, and Y157 is one of the surrounding residues. The Y157 OηH group introduces an unfavorable energy in the hydrophobic cavity, therefore sequestering itself by forming a hydrogen bond with the proximate residue I133. The hydrogen bonding confines Y157 orientation but exerts a force to disrupt the hydrogen bond network surrounding the cavity. The effect propagates over the entire protein and reduces the stability, as reflected in the protein backbone dynamics observed by an NMR hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange experiment. We describe the particular case in which a hydrogen bond does not necessarily confer enhanced protein stability while the disruption of hydrophobicity must be integrally considered.

  12. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  13. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase C-theta activation loop and hydrophobic motif regulates its kinase activity, but only activation loop phosphorylation is critical to in vivo nuclear-factor-kappaB induction.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Graham, Caroline; Li, Aiqun; Fisher, Robert J; Shaw, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-theta, a member of the 'novel' subfamily of PKC isoforms, is of singular importance in transducing signals in T-lymphocytes. Since understanding of regulatory phosphorylation of novel PKCs is fragmentary and inconsistent with findings for 'classical' PKC isoforms, we investigated three potential phosphorylation sites on PKC-theta; in the activation loop (Thr(538)), turn motif (Ser(676)) and hydrophobic motif (Ser(695)). Combined evidence from phospho-specific antisera and MS demonstrates phosphorylation at all three sites. Unlike its closest paralogue, PKC-delta, lack of negative charge in the activation loop of PKC-theta results in a profound catalytic defect (>100-fold reduction in the T538A mutant); the high sequence similarity between PKC-theta and -delta assists in the formulation of structural hypotheses to account for this major difference. In contrast with mechanisms proposed for other PKC isoforms, phosphorylation at the other two sites does not reconstitute catalytic activity. Activation loop phosphorylation is critical in vivo, since the T538A mutant completely lost its capacity to mediate T-cell receptor-stimulation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in Jurkat T-cells. Hydrophobic motif phosphorylation also substantially influences PKC-theta catalytic activity (5-fold reduction in the S695A mutant), but does not impair NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. Its mechanism is independent of secondary effects on activation loop phosphorylation and cannot be explained by thermal instability. Turn motif phosphorylation has a limited effect on kinase activity, but negatively regulates other aspects of PKC-theta function, since the S676A mutant is more efficient than wild-type in inducing NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. These findings expand our understanding of the roles of phosphorylation in novel PKCs, and indicate that PKC-theta is a constitutively competent kinase as a consequence of constitutive

  14. Functional analysis of FarA transcription factor in the regulation of the genes encoding lipolytic enzymes and hydrophobic surface binding protein for the degradation of biodegradable plastics in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Sharon Marie; Kitamoto, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Akira; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2012-05-01

    FarA is a Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) transcription factor which upregulates genes required for growth on fatty acids in filamentous fungi like Aspergillus nidulans. FarA is also highly similar to the cutinase transcription factor CTF1α of Fusarium solani which binds to the cutinase gene promoter in this plant pathogen. This study determines whether FarA transcriptional factor also works in the regulation of genes responsible for the production of cutinase for the degradation of a biodegradable plastic, poly-(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA), in Aspergillus oryzae. The wild-type and the farA gene disruption strains were grown in minimal agar medium with emulsified PBSA, and the wild-type showed clear zone around the colonies while the disruptants did not. Western blot analysis revealed that the cutinase protein CutL1 and a hydrophobic surface binding protein such as HsbA were produced by the wild-type but not by the disruptants. In addition, the expressions of cutL1, triacylglycerol lipase (tglA), and mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase (mdlB) genes as well as the hsbA gene were significantly lower in the disruptants compared to the wild-type. These results indicated that the FarA transcriptional factor would be implicated in the expression of cutL1 and hsbA genes that are required for the degradation of PBSA as well as lipolytic genes such as mdlB and tglA for lipid hydrolysis.

  15. Hydrophobic Association in Mixed Urea-TMAO Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Pritam; van der Vegt, Nico F A; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-08-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core is key to the folding and resulting function of most proteins in the cell. In several organisms, as well as in many in vitro experiments, protein folding is modulated by the presence of osmolytes, but the mechanism by which hydrophobic association occurs is not well understood. We present a study of the solvation thermodynamics of hydrophobic self-association in mixed-osmolyte urea-TMAO solutions, with neopentane as a model hydrophobic molecule. Using molecular dynamics simulations and the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions, we show that a sensitive balance between the TMAO-water and the TMAO-urea interactions governs the osmolyte-induced changes in hydrophobic association in mixed urea-TMAO solutions. This balance must be correctly incorporated in force-field parametrization because hydrophobic association can be either enhanced or prevented all together by slightly increasing or decreasing the osmolyte-water affinity and osmolyte-osmolyte self-affinity of TMAO molecules. PMID:27440555

  16. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

  17. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  18. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms.

    PubMed

    Sinuco-León, German A; Burrows, Kathryn A; Arnold, Aidan S; Garraway, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the 'dressing' of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, (7)Li and (87)Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control. PMID:25348163

  19. Quantum complex sine-Gordon dressed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowcock, P.; Umpleby, J. M.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the quantum reflection factor for the CSG dressed boundary, previously constructed by dressing the Dirichlet boundary with the integrable CSG defect [1]. We analyse classical bound states and use semi-classical methods to investigate the quantum boundary spectrum. We conjecture a fully quantum reflection matrix for a particle reflecting from an unexcited boundary. By using the reflection and boundary bootstrap equations, the reflection matrix for a charge Q = +n soliton reflecting from the mth excited boundary is constructed. Evidence supporting our conjecture is given by checking that the bootstrap closes and that the reflection matrices agrees with known results in the classical limit. A partial analysis of the poles in the reflection matrices which arise from Coleman-Thun diagrams is given.

  20. [Diabetic, neuropathic, arteriopathic foot and dressing choice].

    PubMed

    Lowe, S; Kayoumi, M

    2012-11-14

    The definition for the diabetic foot is infection, ulceration or destruction of deep tissues of the foot associated with neuropathy or peripheral vascular disease in the lower extremity of people with diabetes. Non-diabetic patients may suffer the same risks when neuropathy and arteriopathy are present. Knowing that 85% of amputations are preceded by foot ulcers, prevention is primordial. At the onset of an ulcer, immediate treatment must be undertaken and preferably by an interdisciplinary team. Delayed healing and increased risk of infection are often due to an associated vascular disease. While the array of dressings is expansive there is no «gold standard» treatment or «miracle dressing» described for foot ulcers. The management consists of wound analysis, debridement, woundcare and especially offloading.

  1. Efficacy of Dressing with Absorbent Foam versus Dressing with Gauze in Prevention of Tracheostomy Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinegad, Mehdi; Lashkarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghahreman, Minoo; Shabani, Mohammad; Mokhtare, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheostomy site infection can cause numerous problems. Absorbent foam dressing may be able to prevent proliferation of infectious microorganisms by absorbing the tracheostomy stoma exudate. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of absorbent foam with gauze dressing for prevention of tracheostomy site infection. Materials and Methods In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 80 patients (18 to 60 years) hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to severe head injury were randomly divided into two groups and early tracheostomy was done for them during the first 2 days. In the first group, gauze was used as tracheostomy site dressing, while in the second, absorbent foam, was placed. Tracheostomy site was checked daily for any sign of infection and samples were taken from the stoma for culture in case of presence of any sign of infection. Results Of a total of 80, 11 had tracheostomy site infection (13.75%), including 7 (17.5%) in the gauze group and 4 (10%) in the foam group. The difference in this regard between the two groups was not significant (P=0.051). Also, the dominant strains in the culture of gauze group were hospital-acquired Gram-negative bacteria (particularly Acinetobacter), while in the foam group, Gram-positives and more commonly Staphylococcus epidermidis were found. Conclusion Absorbent foam dressing is not superior to gauze dressings for prevention of tracheostomy site infection. PMID:25506371

  2. Estimation of atomic hydrophobicities using molecular dynamics simulation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Marie; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrophobic force is one of the main driving forces in protein folding and binding. However, its nature is not yet well understood and consequently there are more than 80 different scales published trying to quantify it. Most of the hydrophobicity scales are amino acid-based, but the interaction between the molecular surface of the proteins (and DNA) and surfaces they are immobilized on, e.g., on biomedical micro/nanodevices, occurs on fractions of, rather than whole amino acids. This fragmented structure of the biomolecular surface requires the derivation of atom-level hydrophobicity. Most attempts for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities are derived from amino acid-based values, which ignore dynamic and steric factors. This contribution reports on the Molecular Dynamics simulations that aim to overcome this simplification. The calculations examine various tripeptides in an aqueous solution and the analysis focuses on the distance of the nearest water molecules to the individual atoms in the peptides. Different environments result in a variation of average distances for similar atoms in different tripeptides. Comparison with the atomic hydrophobicities derived from the amino acid-based hydrophobicity obtained from peptide partition in water-octanol (Dgoct) and transport through the membrane interface (Dgwif) shows a similar trend to the calculated distances. The variations are likely due to the steric differences of similar types of atoms in different geometric contexts. Therefore, Molecular Dynamics simulations proved convenient for the evaluation of atomic hydrophobicities and open new research avenues. The atomic hydrophobicities can be used to design surfaces that mimic the biomolecular surfaces and therefore elicit an expected biomolecular activity from the immobilized biomolecules.

  3. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in

  4. DRESS syndrome: à propos de trois observations

    PubMed Central

    Chebbi, Wafa; Souissi, Jihed; Chelli, Jihène; Larbi, Fatma; Zantour, Baha; Habib Sfar, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome d'hypersensibilité médicamenteuse ou Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) est une toxidermie rare mais sévère. Nous rapportons trois observations de DRESS syndromes secondaires à la prise de carbamazipine dans deux cas et de salazopyrine dans un cas. Le délai moyen entre la prise médicamenteuse et la survenue du DRESS syndrome était de six semaines. Le médicament incriminé était arrêté d'une façon définitive dans tous les cas. Une corticothérapie par voie générale était instaurée chez tous les patients devant l'atteinte hépatique sévère. L’évolution était favorable avec disparation des lésions cutanées et normalisation du bilan hépatique. Le diagnostic du syndrome DRESS doit être évoqué devant un tableau associant une éruption fébrile et des signes systémiques faisant suite à une prise médicamenteuse. La précocité du diagnostic est fondamentale pour l'arrêt définitif des médicaments suspects. Le traitement n'est pas bien codifié mais repose actuellement sur la corticothérapie générale. PMID:25810802

  5. Quantum dress for a naked singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casals, Marc; Fabbri, Alessandro; Martínez, Cristián; Zanelli, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    We investigate semiclassical backreaction on a conical naked singularity space-time with a negative cosmological constant in (2 + 1)-dimensions. In particular, we calculate the renormalized quantum stress-energy tensor for a conformally coupled scalar field on such naked singularity space-time. We then obtain the backreacted metric via the semiclassical Einstein equations. We show that, in the regime where the semiclassical approximation can be trusted, backreaction dresses the naked singularity with an event horizon, thus enforcing (weak) cosmic censorship.

  6. Sauces and dressings: a review of properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Marek; Badrie, Neela; Deisingh, Anil K; Kowalski, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive review of sauces and salad dressings covers the literature over the last decade with respect to physical and chemical properties and the applications of these products. As such, texturizing and structural systems (especially hydrocolloids) are described in detail and the application of polysaccharide thickeners as texture providers is described. Microbiological aspects of sauces are covered with relevant sections discussing the factors affecting microbiological activity and microbial spoilage and/or enhancement of a range of sauces. In addition, the use of carbohydrates and proteins as emulsifiers in many sauces is described. Quality aspects are given prominence in this review with sections being devoted to rheological and textural properties, chromatographic approaches and sensory aspects. Healthy sauces such as those having low sodium, reduced fat and cholesterol or containing inulin or microcrystalline cellulose are reviewed. Finally, for various sections the trends of the main findings as well as suggestions for future research are presented.

  7. Dressed active particles in spherical crystals.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the dynamics of an active particle in two-dimensional spherical crystals, which provide an ideal environment to illustrate the interplay between active particles and crystallographic defects. A moving active particle is observed to be surrounded by localized topological defects, becoming a dressed active particle. Such a physical picture characterizes both the lattice distortion around the moving particle and the healing of the distorted lattice in its trajectory. We find that the dynamical behaviors of an active particle in both random and ballistic motions uniformly conform to this featured scenario, whether the particle is initially a defect or not. We further observe that the defect pattern around a dressed ballistic active particle randomly oscillates between two well-defined wing-like defect motifs regardless of its speed. The established physical picture of dressed active particles in this work partially deciphers the complexity of the intriguing nonequilibrium behaviors in active crystals, and opens the promising possibility of introducing the activity to engineer defects, which has strong connections with the design of materials.

  8. A tightly packed hydrophobic cluster directs the formation of an off-pathway sub-millisecond folding intermediate in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase, a TIM barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Vadrevu, Ramakrishna; Kathuria, Sagar; Yang, Xiaoyan; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-03-01

    Protein misfolding is now recognized as playing a crucial role in both normal and pathogenic folding reactions. An interesting example of misfolding at the earliest state of a natural folding reaction is provided by the alpha-subunit of tryptophan synthase, a (beta/alpha)(8) TIM barrel protein. The molecular basis for the formation of this off-pathway misfolded intermediate, I(BP), and a subsequent on-pathway intermediate, I1, was probed by mutational analysis of 20 branched aliphatic side-chains distributed throughout the sequence. The elimination of I(BP) and the substantial destabilization of I1 by replacement of a selective set of the isoleucine, leucine or valine residues (ILV) with alanine in a large ILV cluster external-to-the-barrel and spanning the N and C termini (cluster 2) implies tight-packing at most sites in both intermediates. Differential effects on I(BP) and I1 for replacements in alpha3, beta4 and alpha8 at the boundaries of cluster 2 suggest that their incorporation into I1 but not I(BP) reflects non-native folds at the edges of the crucial (beta/alpha)(1-2)beta(3) core in I(BP). The retention of I(BP) and the smaller and consistent destabilization of both I(BP) and I1 by similar replacements in an internal-to-the-barrel ILV cluster (cluster 1) and a second external-to-the-barrel ILV cluster (cluster 3) imply molten globule-like packing. The tight packing inferred, in part, for I(BP) or for all of I1 in cluster 2, but not in clusters 1 and 3, may reflect the larger size of cluster 2 and/or the enhanced number of isoleucine, leucine and valine self-contacts in and between contiguous elements of secondary structure. Tightly packed ILV-dominated hydrophobic clusters could serve as an important driving force for the earliest events in the folding and misfolding of the TIM barrel and other members of the (beta/alpha)(n) class of proteins.

  9. Protease inhibition by oleic acid transfer from chronic wound dressings to albumin.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel; Mashchak, Andrew; Goheen, Steven C

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds to inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of oleic acid by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. The mechanism of oleic acid uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-oleic acid complexes under liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-oleic acid complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:oleic acid. Liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of oleic acid per mole albumin. Comparing oleic acid formulated wound dressings for dose dependent ability to lower elastase activity, we found cotton gauze>hydrogel>hydrocolloid. In contrast, the cationic serine protease cathepsin G was inhibited by oleic acid within a narrow range of oleic acid-cotton formulations. 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of oleic acid necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Oleic acid bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the selective lowering of cationic serine protease activity useful in topical application for chronic inflammatory pathogenesis.

  10. Role of Surgical Dressings in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Beaver, Walter B; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Odum, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare efficacy of an occlusive antimicrobial barrier dressing and a standard surgical dressing in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty. Two hundred sixty-two patients were randomized to receive either an occlusive dressing or a standard dressing. Wounds were closed in identical fashion. Outcomes included wound complications, dressing changes, and patient satisfaction. With use of occlusive dressing (vs standard dressing), wound complications (including skin blistering) were significantly (P = 0.15) reduced; there were significantly (P < .0001) fewer dressing changes; and patient satisfaction was significantly (P < .0001) higher. Use of occlusive dressings can reduce wound complications and promote wound healing after total joint arthroplasty.

  11. Gentamicin-loaded wound dressing with polyvinyl alcohol/dextran hydrogel: gel characterization and in vivo healing evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ma-Ro; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Yong Il; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Chang, Sun Woo; Jin, Sung Gju; Kim, Jung Ae; Lyoo, Won Seok; Han, Sung Soo; Ku, Sae Kwang; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2010-09-01

    To develop a gentamicin-loaded wound dressing, cross-linked hydrogel films were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and dextran using the freezing-thawing method. Their gel properties such as gel fraction, swelling, water vapor transmission test, morphology, tensile strength, and thermal property were investigated. In vitro protein adsorption test, in vivo wound healing test, and histopathology were performed. Dextran decreased the gel fraction, maximum strength, and thermal stability of hydrogels. However, it increased the swelling ability, water vapor transmission rate, elasticity, porosity, and protein adsorption. The drug gave a little positive effect on the gel properties of hydrogels. The gentamicin-loaded wound dressing composed of 2.5% PVA, 1.13% dextran, and 0.1% drug was more swellable, flexible, and elastic than that with only PVA because of its cross-linking interaction with PVA. In particular, it could provide an adequate level of moisture and build up the exudates on the wound area. From the in vivo wound healing and histological results, this gentamicin-loaded wound dressing enhanced the healing effect more compared to conventional product because of the potential healing effect of gentamicin. Thus, this gentamicin-loaded wound dressing would be used as a potential wound dressing with excellent forming and improved healing effect in wound care.

  12. A vapour-permeable film dressing used on superficial wounds.

    PubMed

    Meuleneire, Frans

    2014-08-12

    Films are an extremely versatile dressing type that can be effectively used in the treatment of many superficial wounds, such as skin grafts, surgical wounds and superficial burns; they provide an optimal moist environment to promote healing, act as a barrier to bacteria, and afford protection from urine and faecal contamination. Unfortunately, many film dressings are difficult to handle and use traditional adhesives, which can cause trauma to the wound and surrounding skin, as well as increased wound pain at dressing removal. Mepitel® Film is a new, easy-to-use wound dressing designed with Safetac® technology that helps to minimise dressing-related trauma and pain and assist undisturbed wound healing. This article presents case studies that examine Mepitel Film's use on a variety of wounds, and reviews the findings of research that was undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using this recently developed dressing.

  13. The local treatment and available dressings designed for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Czemplik, Magdalena; Kulma, Anna; Szopa, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The great diversity of wounds and the broad range of available dressings complicate the selection of proper chronic wound treatment. Choosing the right treatment is the essential step in the healing process. In this review, we focus on chronic nonhealing ulcers, which are a critical problem in clinical practice, and current knowledge about persistent wound care. Here, we present the objectives of local treatment with description of several types of dressings and their ingredients, features, indications, and contraindications. These include hydrocolloid, alginate, hydrogel, and dextranomer dressings; polyurethane foam and membrane dressings; semipermeable polyurethane membrane dressings; and TenderWet (Hartmann, Rock Hill, SC) and flax dressings. There is also a brief section on the use of other alternative wound-healing accelerators, such as platelet-rich plasma and light-emitting diode therapy. PMID:21982060

  14. Evaluation of an alginate dressing for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, E; Papen, J C

    1991-08-01

    Pressure ulcers that secrete moderate to large amounts of fluid often cause leakage from under dressings, odor, staining of clothing, denuding of the skin, and pain. Two highly absorbent dressings derived from seaweed have been introduced into the U.S. market for use in the management of exuding wounds. Severely debilitated patients with full-thickness pressure ulcers were treated for one week to three months with one of these alginate dressings (Kaltostat). The handling and performance characteristics of the dressing are discussed.

  15. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration. PMID:27523773

  16. Redoable tie-over dressing using multiple loop silk threads.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyeon Jong; Kim, Jun Sik; Kim, Nam Gyun; Lee, Kyung Suk; Choi, Jae Hoon

    2013-05-01

    After skin grafting, to prevent hematoma or seroma collection at the graft site, a tie-over dressing has been commonly used. However, although the conventional tie-over dressing by suture is a useful method for securing a graft site, refixation is difficult when repeated tie-over dressing is needed. Therefore, we recommend a redoable tie-over dressing technique with multiple loops threads and connecting silk threads. After the raw surface of each of our cases was covered with a skin graft, multiple loop silk thread attached with nylon at the skin graft margin. We applied the ointment gauze and wet cotton/fluffy gauze over the skin graft, then fixed the dressing by connecting cross-counter multiple loop thread with connecting silk threads. When we opened the tie-over dressing by cutting the connecting silk threads, we repeated the tie-over dressing with the same method. The skin graft was taken successfully without hematoma or seroma collection or any other complications. In conclusion, we report a novel tie-over dressing enabling simple fixation of the dressing to maintain proper tension for wounds that require repetitive fixation. Further, with this reliable method, the skin grafts were well taken.

  17. Constructing medical social authority on dress in Victorian Canada.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    During the late-Victorian period, campaigns to "reform" middle-class women's dress were grounded in discourses on health, eugenics, declining birth rates, comfort, and aesthetics. In Britain, the United States and Germany, organized "dress reform" movements emerged in the latter half of the 19th century, while in Canada the campaign was led primarily by physicians through public health education. This article explores the discussion on women's dress in public health literature in Canadian circulation between 1860-1900 and interprets findings within a feminist poststructuralist framework that posits the understanding of women's bodies and gender regulation to be central to knowledge construction on women's dress.

  18. Dress Nicer = Know More? Young Children’s Knowledge Attribution and Selective Learning Based on How Others Dress

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kyla P.; Ma, Lili

    2015-01-01

    This research explored whether children judge the knowledge state of others and selectively learn novel information from them based on how they dress. The results indicated that 4- and 6-year-olds identified a formally dressed individual as more knowledgeable about new things in general than a casually dressed one (Study 1). Moreover, children displayed an overall preference to seek help from a formally dressed individual rather than a casually dressed one when learning about novel objects and animals (Study 2). These findings are discussed in relation to the halo effect, and may have important implications for child educators regarding how instructor dress might influence young students’ knowledge attribution and learning preferences. PMID:26636980

  19. Experimental study of reparative regeneration processes in the wound treated with bioactive dressings.

    PubMed

    Chekmareva, I A

    2002-02-01

    Quantitative and structural functional analysis of granulation tissue cells during treatment with protein-polysaccharide dressing Collahit F was carried out. The preparation effectively cleansed the wound from detritus, prevented secondary infection due to stimulation of the functional activity of macrophages and due to the effect of its antiseptic component (furagin), and stimulated proliferative activity of fibroblasts and granulation tissue microvessels on day 5 of treatment, thus promoting repair processes in the wound.

  20. Prototype Development of a Responsive Emotive Sensing System (DRESS) to aid older persons with dementia to dress independently

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Burleson, Winslow; Lozano, Cecil; Ravishankar, Vijay; Mahoney, Edward Leo

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior research has critiqued the lack of attention to the stressors associated with dementia related dressing issues, stigmatizing patient clothing, and wearable technology challenges. This paper describes the conceptual development and feasibility testing of an innovative ‘smart dresser’ context aware affective system (DRESS) to enable dressing by people with moderate memory loss through individualized audio and visual task prompting in real time. Methods Mixed method feasibility study involving qualitative focus groups with 25 Alzheimer’s family caregivers experiencing dressing difficulties to iteratively inform system design and a quantitative usability trial with 10 healthy subjects in a controlled laboratory setting to assess validity of technical operations. Results Caregivers voiced the need for tangible dressing assistance to reduce their frustration from time spent in repetitive cueing and power struggles over dressing. They contributed 6 changes that influenced the prototype development, most notably adding a dresser top iPad to mimic a familiar ‘TV screen’ for the audio and visual cueing. DRESS demonstrated promising overall functionality, however the validity of identification of dressing status ranged from 0% for the correct pants dressing to 100% for all shirts dressing scenarios. Adjustments were made to the detection components of the system raising the accuracy of detection of all acted dressing scenarios for pants from 50% to 82%. Conclusions Findings demonstrate family caregiver acceptability of the proposed system, the successful interoperability of the built system’s components, and the system’s ability to interpret correct and incorrect dressing actions in controlled laboratory simulations. Future research will advance the system to the alpha stage and subsequent testing with end users in real world settings. PMID:26321895

  1. Hybrid Nanoscale Architecture of Wound Dressing with Super Hydrophilic, Antimicrobial, and Ultralow Fouling Attributes.

    PubMed

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2015-02-01

    Currently available wound dressings to heal thermal and chronic wounds are unable to respond to the challenges of resistance to bacterial infection, protein adsorption, and increased levels of wound exudates. To this end, we have conceived the fabrication of a new and ideal wound dressing with a number of key attributes. They include effective antimicrobial activity in a controlled manner, ultralow fouling property that provides resistance to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, maintain a moist but not saturated environment to promote healing, and is non-adherent and effective in the presence of heavy wound exudate. The novel approach to reduce infection and bacterial colonization involves incorporation of a unique silver-clay nanohybrid architecture in zwitterionic polymer, poly(sulfobetaine). The innovative concept of silver-clay hybrid structure enables us to obtain high, sustained, and diffusion-controlled antimicrobial activity of silver eluting polymer. The sustained and diffusion-controlled high antimicrobial efficiency is obtained through a process involving in situ precipitation of silver nanoparticles with large surface area on the surface of clay platelets. Furthermore, the use of recently developed zwitterionic polymer, poly(sulfobetaine) [poly(SB)] for wound dressing, provides antifouling property, which resists protein adsorption. PMID:26349306

  2. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  3. Economics of pressure-ulcer care: review of the literature on modern versus traditional dressings.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, L; Torra i Bou, J E; Verdú Soriano, J

    2007-01-01

    Published evidence suggests that some of the benefits of modern dressings--longer wear times and less frequent dressing changes--make them more cost-effective than traditional gauze dressings in pressure ulcer management.

  4. One Dress, Two Dress: Dialectal Influence on Spelling of English Words among Kindergarten Children in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, L. Quentin; Zhao, Jing; Joshi, R. Malatesha

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of Singapore Colloquial English (SCE) on Standard English word spelling through a plural formation task of four words ("man", "tooth", "dress" and "child") among 168 Singaporean bilingual children with Chinese background. It was found that "dropping the plural" was the most prevalent type of error. Poor…

  5. An Inexpensive Bismuth-Petrolatum Dressing for Treatment of Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Chang, Kathleen; Nguyen, Khoa; Galvez, Michael G.; Legrand, Anais; Davis, Christopher; McGoldrick, Rory; Long, Chao; Pham, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xeroform remains the current standard for treating superficial partial-thickness burns but can be prohibitively expensive in developing countries with prevalent burn injuries. This study (1) describes the production of an alternative low-cost dressing and (2) compares the alternative dressing and Xeroform using the metrics of cost-effectiveness, antimicrobial activity, and biocompatibility in vitro, and wound healing in vivo. Methods: To produce the alternative dressing, 3% bismuth tribromophenate powder was combined with petroleum jelly by hand and applied to Kerlix gauze. To assess cost-effectiveness, the unit costs of Xeroform and components of the alternative dressing were compared. To assess antimicrobial properties, the dressings were placed on agar plated with Escherichia coli and the Kirby-Bauer assay performed. To assess biocompatibility, the dressings were incubated with human dermal fibroblasts and cells stained with methylene blue. To assess in vivo wound healing, dressings were applied to excisional wounds on rats and the rate of re-epithelialization calculated. Results: The alternative dressing costs 34% of the least expensive brand of Xeroform. Antimicrobial assays showed that both dressings had similar bacteriostatic effects. Biocompatibility assays showed that there was no statistical difference (P < 0.05) in the cytotoxicity of Xeroform, alternative dressing, and Kerlix gauze. Finally, the in vivo healing model showed no statistical difference (P < 0.05) in mean re-epithelialization time between Xeroform (13.0 ± 1.6 days) and alternative dressing (13.5 ± 1.0 days). Conclusions: Xeroform is biocompatible, reduces infection, and enhances healing of burn wounds by preventing desiccation and mechanical trauma. Handmade petrolatum gauze may be a low-cost replacement for Xeroform. Future studies will focus on clinical trials in burn units. PMID:27482485

  6. Large energy superpositions via Rydberg dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazali, Mohammadsadegh; Lau, Hon Wai; Humeniuk, Adam; Simon, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We propose to create superposition states of over 100 strontium atoms in a ground state or metastable optical clock state using the Kerr-type interaction due to Rydberg state dressing in an optical lattice. The two components of the superposition can differ by an order of 300 eV in energy, allowing tests of energy decoherence models with greatly improved sensitivity. We take into account the effects of higher-order nonlinearities, spatial inhomogeneity of the interaction, decay from the Rydberg state, collective many-body decoherence, atomic motion, molecular formation, and diminishing Rydberg level separation for increasing principal number.

  7. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  8. [Hydrophobic membrane chromatography for fast purification of biological macromolecules].

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Chen, X; Jia, L; Zou, H; Zhang, Y

    1999-07-01

    Cellulose membrane bonded with four commonly used hydrophobic groups, octyl, butyl, phenyl and polyethylene glycol was first investigated for their binding and purification characteristics of protein and enzyme with octyl- and phenyl-Sepharose CL-4 B as controls. Hydrophobic membranes bound BSA effectively by hydrophobic interaction in high salt solution. Their binding capacities were not notably affected by significantly increasing the flow mass rate or decreasing the mass concentration of protein solution, but were much lower than those of octyl- and phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B. 11.8 fold of purification with an approximately 100% recovery of bovine liver catalase was achieved by step gradient elution on the phenyl cellulose membrane cartridge in a single step in only ten mins or a little more. Increase of the flow mass rate had no effect on the purification of catalase, however, the processing time was shortened greatly. Hydrophobic membrane chromatography here reported exibits a potential of fast processing of the protein solution in large volume with low mass concentration of the target protein, such as genetic engineering culture solution. PMID:12552843

  9. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  10. Porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix film with antimicrobial activities for wound dressing application.

    PubMed

    Chitrattha, Sasiprapa; Phaechamud, Thawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is polymeric biomaterial that has been used for wound dressing due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. However, PLA has some limitations including poor toughness, low degradation rate and high hydrophobicity. The aim of this study is to develop an antibiotic drug-loaded PLA porous film as wound dressing with antibacterial activity. PLA porous film was fabricated by temperature change technique using solvent casting method. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was added for improving the pore interconnectivity of film. Gentamicin sulfate (GS) or metronidazole (MZ) was incorporated into PLA porous films. PLA containing PEG 400 exhibited the more amorphous form than plain PLA film and contained 55.31 ± 2.85% porosity and 20 μm of the pore size which significantly improved the water vapor transmission rate, oxygen transmission rate, degradation rate and percentage of drug release, respectively. Drug-loaded porous films efficiently inhibited the bacteria growth. GS-loaded film inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas MZ-loaded film inhibited Bacteroides fragilis and the sustainable antibacterial activity was attained for 7 days.

  11. Porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix film with antimicrobial activities for wound dressing application.

    PubMed

    Chitrattha, Sasiprapa; Phaechamud, Thawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is polymeric biomaterial that has been used for wound dressing due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. However, PLA has some limitations including poor toughness, low degradation rate and high hydrophobicity. The aim of this study is to develop an antibiotic drug-loaded PLA porous film as wound dressing with antibacterial activity. PLA porous film was fabricated by temperature change technique using solvent casting method. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was added for improving the pore interconnectivity of film. Gentamicin sulfate (GS) or metronidazole (MZ) was incorporated into PLA porous films. PLA containing PEG 400 exhibited the more amorphous form than plain PLA film and contained 55.31 ± 2.85% porosity and 20 μm of the pore size which significantly improved the water vapor transmission rate, oxygen transmission rate, degradation rate and percentage of drug release, respectively. Drug-loaded porous films efficiently inhibited the bacteria growth. GS-loaded film inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas MZ-loaded film inhibited Bacteroides fragilis and the sustainable antibacterial activity was attained for 7 days. PMID:26478412

  12. Identification of Workplace Dress by Low-Income Job Seekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiki, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The author examined how low-income job seekers participating in a workplace dress program identified traditional business and business casual dress. Seventy low-income job seekers identified clothing items as traditional business (e.g., suits, ties), similar to identifications made by professionals and image consultants in previous literature.…

  13. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  14. Moral Crisis in Higher Institutions and the Dress Code Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayokun, K. O.; Adedeji, S. O.; Oyebade, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviewed the case of indecent dressing among the youth of today especially on the universities campuses, which has forced the authorities of those institutions to enact dress codes to stem the tide and restore high moral standards, integrity and decency. Whether this bid was successful or not was another thing which was a function of…

  15. Fashion as Argument: Nineteenth-Century Dress Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrens, Kathleen M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the place of the body in the dress-reform movement, a social movement that focused on fashion as a vehicle for achieving social and political equality. Discusses how fashion became one arena in which definitions of gender were contested. Suggests the dress-reform movement's failure in redefining femininity indicates the depth of…

  16. The disc dressing for local irrigation of experimental burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, T; Levin, M; Eichenlaub, E H; Hurwitz, D J; Futrell, J W

    1984-12-01

    The newly designed disc dressing permits the surface of experimental burn wounds to be irrigated with liquid therapeutic agents without the need for frequent dressing changes. This approach is simple to handle, reduces the risk of trauma or contamination of the wound, and is not time consuming.

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing.

  18. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  19. Umbilical Negative Pressure Dressing for Transumbilical Appendectomy in Childern

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Neilendu; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Garland, Mary M.; Gaffley, Michaela W. G.; Worley, Sarah; Knight, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted appendectomy (TULAA) carries a high risk for surgical site infection. We investigated the effect of a bio-occlusive umbilical vacuum dressing on wound infection rates after TULAA for patients with acute appendicitis and compared to it with a conventional 3-port appendectomy with a nonvacuum dressing. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of 1377 patients (2–20 years) undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis in 2 tertiary care referral centers from January 2007 through December 2012. Twenty-two different operative technique/dressing variations were documented. The 6 technique/dressing groups with >50 patients were assessed, including a total of 1283 patients. Results: The surgical site infection rate of the 220 patients treated with TULAA and application of an umbilical vacuum dressing with dry gauze is 1.8% (95% CI, 0.0–10.3%). This compares to an infection rate of 4.1% (95% CI, 1.3–10.5%) in 97 patients with dry dressing without vacuum. In the 395 patients who received an umbilical vacuum dressing with gauze and bacitracin, the surgical site infection rate was found to be 4.3% (95% CI, 2.7–6.8%). Conclusions: Application of an umbilical negative-pressure dressing with dry gauze lowers the rate of umbilical site infections in patients undergoing transumbilical laparoscopic-assisted appendectomy for acute appendicitis. PMID:27807398

  20. Civil Behavior, Safe-School Planning, and Dress Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studak, Cathryn M.; Workman, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined news reports in order to identify incidents that precipitated dress code revisions. News reports were examined within the framework of rules for civil behavior. Using key words "school dress codes" and "violence," LEXIS/NEXIS was used to access 104 articles from 44 U.S. newspapers from December 3, 2004 to December 2, 2005.…

  1. Molecular docking using the molecular lipophilicity potential as hydrophobic descriptor: impact on GOLD docking performance.

    PubMed

    Nurisso, Alessandra; Bravo, Juan; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Daina, Antoine

    2012-05-25

    GOLD is a molecular docking software widely used in drug design. In the initial steps of docking, it creates a list of hydrophobic fitting points inside protein cavities that steer the positioning of ligand hydrophobic moieties. These points are generated based on the Lennard-Jones potential between a carbon probe and each atom of the residues delimitating the binding site. To thoroughly describe hydrophobic regions in protein pockets and properly guide ligand hydrophobic moieties toward favorable areas, an in-house tool, the MLP filter, was developed and herein applied. This strategy only retains GOLD hydrophobic fitting points that match the rigorous definition of hydrophobicity given by the molecular lipophilicity potential (MLP), a molecular interaction field that relies on an atomic fragmental system based on 1-octanol/water experimental partition coefficients (log P(oct)). MLP computations in the binding sites of crystallographic protein structures revealed that a significant number of points considered hydrophobic by GOLD were actually polar according to the MLP definition of hydrophobicity. To examine the impact of this new tool, ligand-protein complexes from the Astex Diverse Set and the PDB bind core database were redocked with and without the use of the MLP filter. Reliable docking results were obtained by using the MLP filter that increased the quality of docking in nonpolar cavities and outperformed the standard GOLD docking approach.

  2. Connective tissue response to periodontal dressing.

    PubMed

    Nezwek, R A; Caffesse, R G; Bergenholtz, A; Nasjleti, C E

    1980-09-01

    The effects of three periodontal dressings (Coe-Pak, PPC, Perio Putty) upon subcutaneous tissues in 26 Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. The three dressings, and a control (Teflon), were placed into polyethylene tubes. Two tubes per animal were implanted on either side of the dorsal midline area. After 14 days the specimens were retrieved and prepared for histological examination. Three methods of scoring were utilized for evaluation. First, a system evaluating the overall number of inflammatory cells, connective tissue capsule thickness, and the vascular changes produced; second, an inflammatory cell count, the Inflammatory Index (I.I), computing the inflammatory cells in a particular field of view for each material; and third, a Reaction Spread Index (R.S.I.) comparing the distance of the spread of the inflammatory reaction into the connective tissues. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out utilizing the Chi-square test and analysis of variance. While the three scoring systems utilized did result in some comparative variation in reactions, the overall order of decreasing severity was always PPC, Coe-Pak, Perio Putty, and Teflon.

  3. IV 3000 Dressing for Fingertip Injury: Management and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Susan; Davis, Meghan; Fazi, Alyssa; McClellan, W Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An active, right hand dominant. 86-year-old male presented with transverse amputation of the right ring finger just distal to the DIP joint. Conservative management was recommended in order to preserve digit length, mobility, and the DIP joint. The IV3000 semipermeable dressing was utilized as the primary treatment. The clear adhesive dressing has a high moisture vapor transmission rate that facilitates creation of a suitable wound microenvironment. The digit showed significant epithelialization and mobility at two weeks post-injury and was healed with full range of motion at both the DIP and PIP joints by week six. There were no complications from use of the IV3000 dressing, and both healing time and pain during dressing change are improved over alternative dressings like gauze.

  4. A new postoperative otoplasty dressing technique using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Miriam; Foehn, Matthias; Wedler, Volker

    2010-04-01

    There are many techniques for cosmetic surgery of the ears and also many different procedures for postoperative treatment. The postoperative dressing is described as important for a successful outcome. We present our method of postoperative dressing in the form of liquid bonding. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives as liquid bonding agents are used for fixation of the pinna at the mastoid area. After 10-14 days the bonding can be easily removed. No huge dressings, tapes, or plasters are necessary. The patients are satisfied with the light dressing; they do not feel ashamed to appear in public. We have found this dressing technique to be simple and economical, especially because of the use of the bonding for skin closure before. It can be used after otoplasty with an anterior or a posterior approach.

  5. The analgesic effect of odour and music upon dressing change.

    PubMed

    Kane, F M A; Brodie, E E; Coull, A; Coyne, L; Howd, A; Milne, A; Niven, C C; Robbins, R

    Vascular wounds may require frequent dressing changes over a long period of time, often involving pain, which may not be adequately controlled with conventional analgesia. Complementary analgesia may be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy. This pilot study presented eight patients with two odour therapies, lavender and lemon, two music therapies, relaxing and preferred music and a control condition, during vascular wound dressing changes. Although the therapies did not reduce the pain intensity during the dressing change there was a significant reduction in pain intensity for the lavender therapy and a reduction in pain intensity for the relaxing music therapy after the dressing change. This supports the use of these complementary therapies, which are inexpensive, easy to administer and have no known side effects, as adjunctive analgesia in this patient population. Earlier administration before dressing change may enhance these effects. Further research is required to ascertain why certain complementary therapies are more effective than others at relieving pain.

  6. Liquid, injectable, hydrophobic and biodegradable polymers as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Brian G

    2010-08-11

    New delivery approaches to achieve minimally invasive, sustained and local release of drugs are needed for more effective treatment of conditions such as cancer and ischemia. Hydrophobic, biodegradable, liquid injectable polymers possess a number of potential advantages for this purpose. This review examines various approaches that have been explored for the preparation of these types of polymers, their ability to control the release of various drugs ranging from low-molecular-weight hydrophobic compounds to protein therapeutics, and finally their degradation rates and the tissue response to them upon implantation. PMID:20480512

  7. Development of clindamycin-loaded wound dressing with polyvinyl alcohol and sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Jun Young; Park, Jung Kil; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Jin, Sung Giu; Chang, Sun Woo; Li, Dong Xun; Hwang, Ma-Ro; Woo, Jong Soo; Kim, Jung-Ae; Lyoo, Won Seok; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2008-12-01

    To develop a clindamycin-loaded wound dressing, cross-linked hydrogel films were prepared using freeze-thawing method with various mixtures of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate (SA). The physicochemical properties such as swelling ratio, tensile strength and elongation of hydrogels were evaluated. The drug release from this clindamycin-loaded hydrogel, in vitro protein adsorption test and in vivo wound healing observations in rats were then performed. Increased SA concentration decreased the gelation %, maximum strength and break elongation, but it resulted into an increment in the swelling ability, elasticity and thermal stability of hydrogel film. However, SA had insignificant effect on the release of clindamycin. This hydrogel improved the healing rate of artificial wounds in rats. Thus, a clindamycin-loaded wound dressing with PVA and SA hydrogel should be a candidate for wound care.

  8. Cargo surface hydrophobicity is sufficient to overcome the nuclear pore complex selectivity barrier.

    PubMed

    Naim, Bracha; Zbaida, David; Dagan, Shlomi; Kapon, Ruti; Reich, Ziv

    2009-09-16

    To fulfil their function, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) must discriminate between inert proteins and nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), admitting only the latter. This specific permeation is thought to depend on interactions between hydrophobic patches on NTRs and phenylalanine-glycine (FG) or related repeats that line the NPC. Here, we tested this premise directly by conjugating different hydrophobic amino-acid analogues to the surface of an inert protein and examining its ability to cross NPCs unassisted by NTRs. Conjugation of as few as four hydrophobic moieties was sufficient to enable passage of the protein through NPCs. Transport of the modified protein proceeded with rates comparable to those measured for the innate protein when bound to an NTR and was relatively insensitive both to the nature and density of the amino acids used to confer hydrophobicity. The latter observation suggests a non-specific, small, and plant interaction network between cargo and FG repeats.

  9. Single water entropy: hydrophobic crossover and application to drug binding.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Wilbee D; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2014-09-11

    Entropy of water plays an important role in both chemical and biological processes e.g. hydrophobic effect, molecular recognition etc. Here we use a new approach to calculate translational and rotational entropy of the individual water molecules around different hydrophobic and charged solutes. We show that for small hydrophobic solutes, the translational and rotational entropies of each water molecule increase as a function of its distance from the solute reaching finally to a constant bulk value. As the size of the solute increases (0.746 nm), the behavior of the translational entropy is opposite; water molecules closest to the solute have higher entropy that reduces with distance from the solute. This indicates that there is a crossover in translational entropy of water molecules around hydrophobic solutes from negative to positive values as the size of the solute is increased. Rotational entropy of water molecules around hydrophobic solutes for all sizes increases with distance from the solute, indicating the absence of crossover in rotational entropy. This makes the crossover in total entropy (translation + rotation) of water molecule happen at much larger size (>1.5 nm) for hydrophobic solutes. Translational entropy of single water molecule scales logarithmically (Str(QH) = C + kB ln V), with the volume V obtained from the ellipsoid of inertia. We further discuss the origin of higher entropy of water around water and show the possibility of recovering the entropy loss of some hypothetical solutes. The results obtained are helpful to understand water entropy behavior around various hydrophobic and charged environments within biomolecules. Finally, we show how our approach can be used to calculate the entropy of the individual water molecules in a protein cavity that may be replaced during ligand binding.

  10. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-11-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  11. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  12. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  13. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  14. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  15. Intrinsic Hydrophobicity of Rammed Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, M.; Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Grul, R.

    2015-11-01

    Rammed earth is well known for its vapour diffusion properties, its ability to regulate humidity within the built environment. Rammed earth is also an aesthetically iconic material such as marble or granite and therefore is preferably left exposed. However exposed rammed earth is often coated with silane/siloxane water repellents or the structure is modified architecturally (large roof overhangs) to accommodate for the hydrophilic nature of the material. This paper sets out to find out optimal hydrophobicity for rammed earth based on natural composite fibres and surface coating without adversely affecting the vapour diffusivity of the material. The material is not required to be waterproof, but should resist at least driving rain. In order to evaluate different approaches to increase hydrophobicity of rammed earth surface, peat fibres and four types of repellents were used.

  16. Nanodisks: hydrophobic drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2008-03-01

    Members of the class of exchangeable apolipoproteins possess the unique capacity to transform phospholipid vesicle substrates into nanoscale disk-shaped bilayers. This reaction can proceed in the presence of exogenous hydrophobic biomolecules, resulting in the formation of novel transport vehicles termed nanodisks (NDs). The objective of this study is to describe the structural organization of NDs and evaluate the utility of these complexes as hydrophobic biomolecule transport vehicles. The topics presented focus on two distinct water insoluble drugs, amphotericin B (AMB) and all trans retinoic acid (ATRA). In vitro and in vivo studies reveal that AMB-ND display potent anti-fungal and anti-protozoal activity, while ATRA-ND show promise in the treatment of cancer. The versatility conferred by the presence of a polypeptide component provides opportunities for targeted delivery of ND to cells.

  17. A Dressing Solution for Burn Wounds: Antibacterial and Low-Adherent Wound Dressings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Tianyun

    Considering the infection and second trauma caused by dressing changes, development of antibacterial and low-adherent wound dressings is urgently needed. Silver ion is a widely used antimicrobial agent, but its cytotoxicity remains a problem. In this study, low-adherent PAM (polyacrylamide) hydrogel incorporated with less toxic AgNP (silver nanoparticle), was immobilized onto PET (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) substrates by an IPN (interpenetrating polymer network) method. The modified PET is effectively antibacterial and the surface is significantly less adherent than untreated PET. However, silver-resistant bacteria become a potential problem. Thus, ionic 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH) analogues containing either a quaternary ammonium moiety or a phosphonate functional group were designed and synthesized. The DMH analogues were converted to antibacterial N-chloramine counterparts through chlorination to serve as potential alternatives to AgNP. The N-chloramine with a structural cation exhibited distinctly enhanced antibacterial functions both in solution and after immobilization on fabrics.

  18. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  19. Predicting enzyme adsorption to lignin films by calculating enzyme surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Yarbrough, John M; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J; Hobdey, Sarah E; Decker, Stephen R; Taylor, Larry E; Resch, Michael G; Bozell, Joseph J; Himmel, Michael E; Vinzant, Todd B; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-07-25

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  20. Predicting Enzyme Adsorption to Lignin Films by Calculating Enzyme Surface Hydrophobicity*

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Yarbrough, John M.; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Resch, Michael G.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  1. Protease Inhibition by Oleic Acid Transfer From Chronic Wound Dressings to Albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel M.; Mashchak, Andrew D.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds. These levels can inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid (18:1) is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor with some potential for redressing the imbalance of elastase activity found in chronic wounds. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of 18:1 by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. 18:1-treated cotton was examined for its ability to bind and release the fatty acid in the presence of albumin. The mechanism of 18:1 uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-18:1 complexes under liquid-liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-18:1 complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:18:1. Cotton chromatography under liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of 18:1 per mole albumin. Cotton was contrasted with hydrogel, and hydrocolloid wound dressing for its comparative ability to lower elastase activity. Each dressing material evaluated was found to release 18:1 in the presence of albumin with significant inhibition of elastase activity. The 18:1-formulated wound dressings lowered elastase activity in a dose dependent manner in the order cotton gauze > hydrogel > hydrocolloid. In contrast the cationic serine protease Cathepsin G was inihibited by 18:1 within a narrow range of 18:1-cotton formulations. Four per cent Albumin solutions were most effective in binding cotton bound-18:1. However, 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of 18:1 necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Formulations with 128 mg 18:1/g cotton gauze had equivalent elastase lowering with 1 - 4% albumin. 18:1 bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the

  2. An observational evaluation of a new foam adhesive dressing.

    PubMed

    Merlin-Manton, Elizabeth; Greenwood, Michelle; Linthwaite, Adele

    Following the work of Winter demonstrating the benefits of moist wound healing, there has been a constant stream of wound care products launched into the market to support this concept. This article will describe the findings of an observational evaluation to observe, document and analyse the clinical effectiveness of a new foam adhesive dressing, UrgoTul® Absorb Border (Urgo Medical). The main objective of the evaluation was to define the parameters to allow data capture that would demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of the dressing. Parameters studied and analysed included atraumatic pain-free dressing changes; ease of dressing application; comfort and conformability; exudate management; ability of the dressing to stay in place; and peri-wound skin management. A total of 25 patients with wounds suitable to be dressed using the evaluation product were recruited following a full documented wound assessment by the tissue viability nurse. Participants were selected across the organisation from acute hospital wards and outpatient departments, care homes, wound care clinics and the participants' own homes. Digital photography was used to demonstrate improvement or deterioration of the wound bed and surrounding skin, and images were assessed by non-participating clinicians to confirm documented observations made within the evaluation. The dressing was found to be clinically effective in both chronic and acute wound types, and had an excellent level of participant acceptance. PMID:26266560

  3. An observational evaluation of a new foam adhesive dressing.

    PubMed

    Merlin-Manton, Elizabeth; Greenwood, Michelle; Linthwaite, Adele

    Following the work of Winter demonstrating the benefits of moist wound healing, there has been a constant stream of wound care products launched into the market to support this concept. This article will describe the findings of an observational evaluation to observe, document and analyse the clinical effectiveness of a new foam adhesive dressing, UrgoTul® Absorb Border (Urgo Medical). The main objective of the evaluation was to define the parameters to allow data capture that would demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of the dressing. Parameters studied and analysed included atraumatic pain-free dressing changes; ease of dressing application; comfort and conformability; exudate management; ability of the dressing to stay in place; and peri-wound skin management. A total of 25 patients with wounds suitable to be dressed using the evaluation product were recruited following a full documented wound assessment by the tissue viability nurse. Participants were selected across the organisation from acute hospital wards and outpatient departments, care homes, wound care clinics and the participants' own homes. Digital photography was used to demonstrate improvement or deterioration of the wound bed and surrounding skin, and images were assessed by non-participating clinicians to confirm documented observations made within the evaluation. The dressing was found to be clinically effective in both chronic and acute wound types, and had an excellent level of participant acceptance.

  4. Effects of wound dressings on cultured primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Vives, Roger; Young, Matthew T; Ziembicki, Jenny; Corcos, Alain; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2016-02-01

    Autologous cell-spray grafting of non-cultured epidermal cells is an innovative approach for the treatment of severe second-degree burns. After treatment, wounds are covered with dressings that are widely used in wound care management; however, little is known about the effects of wound dressings on individually isolated cells. The sprayed cells have to actively attach, spread, proliferate, and migrate in the wound for successful re-epithelialization, during the healing process. It is expected that exposure to wound dressing material might interfere with cell survival, attachment, and expansion. Two experiments were performed to determine whether some dressing materials have a negative impact during the early phases of wound healing. In one experiment, freshly isolated cells were seeded and cultured for one week in combination with eight different wound dressings used during burn care. Cells, which were seeded and cultured with samples of Adaptic(®), Xeroform(®), EZ Derm(®), and Mepilex(®) did not attach, nor did they survive during the first week. Mepitel(®), N-Terface(®), Polyskin(®), and Biobrane(®) dressing samples had no negative effect on cell attachment and cell growth when compared to the controls. In a second experiment, the same dressings were exposed to pre-cultured cells in order to exclude the effects of attachment and spreading. The results confirm the above findings. This study could be of interest for establishing skin cell grafting therapies in burn medicine and also for wound care in general.

  5. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Burrows, Kathryn A.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the ‘dressing’ of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, 7Li and 87Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control.

  6. Supersymmetry in Rydberg-dressed lattice fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, Hendrik; Huijse, Liza; Gorshkov, Alexey; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter; Lukin, Mikhail; Demler, Eugene

    2012-06-01

    Supersymmetry is a powerful tool that allows the characterization of strongly correlated many-body systems, in particular in the case of supersymmetric extensions of the fermionic Hubbard model [1]. At the same time, these models can exhibit rich and exotic physics on their own, such as flat bands with a vanishing dispersion relation. We show that such lattice models can be realized with Rydberg-dressed fermions in optical lattices. Strong interactions within the ground state manifold of the atoms can be realized by admixing a weak contribution of a highly excited Rydberg state [2]. We discuss the unique possbilities of ultracold atoms for the detection of supersymmetry and the effects of tuning the system away from the supersymmetric point.[4pt] [1] P. Fendley, K. Schoutens, J. de Boer, PRL 90, 120402 (2003).[0pt] [2] J. Honer, H. Weimer, T. Pfau, H. P. B"uchler, PRL 105, 160404 (2010).

  7. Toxicity assessment of nanosilver wound dressing in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Mahdavi, Moujan; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Korani, Mitra; Amani, Amir; Ziarati, Parisa

    2013-05-07

    Antibiotic resistance to microorganisms is one of the major problems faced in the field of wound care in burns patients. Silver nanoparticles have come up as potent antimicrobial agent and are being evaluated in diverse medical applications ranging from silver based dressings to silver coated medical devices. We aimed in present study to test the release of nanosilver from nanosilver wound dressing and compare the dermal and systemic toxicity of nanosilver dressings in a repeated dose (21 days) model. Under general anesthesia, a limited standard 2nd degree burns were provided on the back of each rat in all treatment, negative control (simple dressing) and 5% silver nitrate groups, each contained 5 male wistar rats. According to the analysis made by atomic absorption spectrometry, the wound dressings released 0.599 ± 0.083 ppm of nanosilver during first 24 hrs of study. Daily observations were recoded and wounds were covered with new dressings each 24 hrs. Burn healing was observed in nanosilver wound dressing group in shorter time periods than the control groups. In toxicity assessment, this dressing didn't cause any hematological and histopathological abnormalities in treatment group but biochemical studies showed significant rise of plasma transaminase (ALT) at the endpoint (21 days) of the study (P=0.027). Portal mononuclear lymphoid and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltrations in three to four adjacent foci were recognized around the central hepatic vein in treatment group. Mild hepatotoxic effects of nanosilver wound dressing in wistar rat emphasize the necessity of more studies on toxicity potentials of low dose nanosilver by dermal applications.

  8. Conservative management of exomphalos major with silver dressings: are they safe?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola; Kolimarala, Vinod; Lander, Anthony

    2010-12-01

    Historically, some dressings used in exomphalos major were associated with toxicity. These have been abandoned in favor of safer dressings. Silver toxicity has not been described following the use of silver dressings in infants. We, however, found disconcerting serum silver levels in 2 consecutive patients during treatment with silver salt containing dressings.

  9. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  10. Dressed spin of polarized {sup 3}He in a cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.-H.; Esler, A. M.; Peng, J. C.; Beck, D. H.; Chandler, D. E.; Clayton, S.; Williamson, S.; Yoder, J.; Hu, B.-Z.; Ngan, S. Y.; Sham, C. H.; So, L. H.

    2011-08-15

    We report a measurement of the modification of the effective precession frequency of polarized {sup 3}He atoms in response to a dressing field in a room-temperature cell. The {sup 3}He atoms were polarized using the metastability spin-exchange method. An oscillating dressing field was then applied perpendicular to the constant magnetic field. Modification of the {sup 3}He effective precession frequency was observed over a broad range of the amplitude and frequency of the dressing field. The observed effects are compared with calculations based on quantum optics formalism.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of biosynthetic wound dressings Biocol.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, A G; Gavriluk, V B; Pogorelova, V N; Gavriluk, B K

    2012-11-01

    The surface of wound dressing Biocol was studied by scanning electron microscopy. This composite system consists of latex matrix with incorporated water-soluble polysaccharide. The peculiarities of the surface are important for manufacturing of the dressing and for modification of its surface upon contact with fluids, e.g. during de novo tissue reconstruction. The method for studying the fine structure of the polymeric film surface was developed. The relief of the wound dressing changes during interaction with the fluid and nanopores appear on the surface. Thus, scanning electron microscopy is an informative method for studying the surface of biosynthetic films. PMID:23330116

  12. Triple-mode squeezing with dressed six-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Li, Zepei; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Che, Junling; Che, Junling; Abdulkhaleq, Hasan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Wang, Hongxing

    2016-05-12

    The theory of proof-of-principle triple-mode squeezing is proposed via spontaneous parametric six-wave mixing process in an atomic-cavity coupled system. Special attention is focused on the role of dressed state and nonlinear gain on triple-mode squeezing process. Using the dressed state theory, we find that optical squeezing and Autler-Towns splitting of cavity mode can be realized with nonlinear gain, while the efficiency and the location of maximum squeezing point can be effectively shaped by dressed state in atomic ensemble. Our proposal can find applications in multi-channel communication and multi-channel quantum imaging.

  13. Dressed solitons in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roy, Kaushik; Mondal, Ganesh; Muniandy, S. V.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear propagation of quantum ion acoustic waves in a dense quantum plasma whose constituents are electrons, positrons, and positive ions is investigated using a quantum hydrodynamic model. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived using reductive perturbation technique. The higher order inhomogeneous differential equation is obtained for the dressed soliton. The dynamical equation for dressed soliton is solved using the renormalization method. The conditions for the validity of the higher order correction are described. The effects of quantum parameter, positron concentration, electron to positron Fermi temperature ratio, and soliton velocity on the amplitude and width of the dressed soliton are studied.

  14. Triple-mode squeezing with dressed six-wave mixing

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Li, Zepei; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Che, Junling; Che, Junling; Abdulkhaleq, Hasan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Wang, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    The theory of proof-of-principle triple-mode squeezing is proposed via spontaneous parametric six-wave mixing process in an atomic-cavity coupled system. Special attention is focused on the role of dressed state and nonlinear gain on triple-mode squeezing process. Using the dressed state theory, we find that optical squeezing and Autler-Towns splitting of cavity mode can be realized with nonlinear gain, while the efficiency and the location of maximum squeezing point can be effectively shaped by dressed state in atomic ensemble. Our proposal can find applications in multi-channel communication and multi-channel quantum imaging. PMID:27169878

  15. Adiabatic control of atomic dressed states for transport and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe forms of adiabatic transport that arise for dressed-state atoms in optical lattices. Focusing on the limit of weak tunnel-coupling between nearest-neighbor lattice sites, we explain how adiabatic variation of optical dressing allows control of atomic motion between lattice sites: allowing adiabatic particle transport in a direction that depends on the internal state, and force measurements via spectroscopic preparation and readout. For uniformly filled bands these systems display topologically quantized particle transport. An implementation of the dressing scheme using optical transitions in alkaline-earth atoms is discussed as well as its favorable features for precise force sensing.

  16. [Care of the non-tunneled central venous catheter. Literature search on disinfectants, dressings and intervals between dressing changes].

    PubMed

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Fritz, Elfriede; Them, Christa

    2008-08-01

    Patient care in hospitals often involves insertion of a non-tunneled central venous catheter for administering drugs, intravenous solutions, or total parenteral nutrition. Every change of dressing must be carried out in an appropriate fashion in order to reduce the risk of bacterial infection. We reviewed the existent literature in order to make a listof recommended disinfectants, type of dressings and intervals between dressing changes of a central venous catheter. A comparison was drawn between the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Robert Koch-Institut (RKI) issued in 2002 with those more recently published. Our search showed that chlorhexidine gluconate (from 0.5 to 2 percent), povidone-iodine (from 5 to 10 percent) or alcohol (70 percent) are the recommended disinfecting agents. The recommended dressing is gauze or transparent steam-permeable polyurethane dressings. Intervals between dressing changes varied between once a day and once in seven days, depending on the nature of the dressing applied.

  17. De novo design of the hydrophobic core of ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, G. A.; Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported the development and evaluation of a computational program to assist in the design of hydrophobic cores of proteins. In an effort to investigate the role of core packing in protein structure, we have used this program, referred to as Repacking of Cores (ROC), to design several variants of the protein ubiquitin. Nine ubiquitin variants containing from three to eight hydrophobic core mutations were constructed, purified, and characterized in terms of their stability and their ability to adopt a uniquely folded native-like conformation. In general, designed ubiquitin variants are more stable than control variants in which the hydrophobic core was chosen randomly. However, in contrast to previous results with 434 cro, all designs are destabilized relative to the wild-type (WT) protein. This raises the possibility that beta-sheet structures have more stringent packing requirements than alpha-helical proteins. A more striking observation is that all variants, including random controls, adopt fairly well-defined conformations, regardless of their stability. This result supports conclusions from the cro studies that non-core residues contribute significantly to the conformational uniqueness of these proteins while core packing largely affects protein stability and has less impact on the nature or uniqueness of the fold. Concurrent with the above work, we used stability data on the nine ubiquitin variants to evaluate and improve the predictive ability of our core packing algorithm. Additional versions of the program were generated that differ in potential function parameters and sampling of side chain conformers. Reasonable correlations between experimental and predicted stabilities suggest the program will be useful in future studies to design variants with stabilities closer to that of the native protein. Taken together, the present study provides further clarification of the role of specific packing interactions in protein structure and

  18. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  19. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Water repellency in hydrophobic nanocapsules--molecular view on dewetting.

    PubMed

    Müller, Achim; Garai, Somenath; Schäffer, Christian; Merca, Alice; Bögge, Hartmut; Al-Karawi, Ahmed Jasim M; Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri

    2014-05-26

    The hydrophobic effect plays a major role in a variety of important phenomena in chemistry, materials science and biology, for instance in protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. Studies--performed within cavities of the unique metal oxide based porous capsules of the type {(pentagon)12(linker)30}≡{(W)W5}12{Mo2(ligand)}30 with different acetate/water ligand ratios--have provided unprecedented results revealing segregation/repellency of the encapsulated "water" from the internal hydrophobic ligand walls of the capsules, while the disordered water molecules, interacting strongly with each other via hydrogen bonding, form in all investigated cases the same type of spherical shell. The present results can be (formally) compared--but only regarding the repellency effect--with the amazing "action" of the (super)hydrophobic Lotus (Nelumbo) leaves, which are self-cleaning based on water repellency resulting in the formation of water droplets picking up dirt. The present results were obtained by constructing deliberately suitable hydrophobic interiors within the mentioned capsules. PMID:24782303

  1. Water repellency in hydrophobic nanocapsules--molecular view on dewetting.

    PubMed

    Müller, Achim; Garai, Somenath; Schäffer, Christian; Merca, Alice; Bögge, Hartmut; Al-Karawi, Ahmed Jasim M; Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri

    2014-05-26

    The hydrophobic effect plays a major role in a variety of important phenomena in chemistry, materials science and biology, for instance in protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. Studies--performed within cavities of the unique metal oxide based porous capsules of the type {(pentagon)12(linker)30}≡{(W)W5}12{Mo2(ligand)}30 with different acetate/water ligand ratios--have provided unprecedented results revealing segregation/repellency of the encapsulated "water" from the internal hydrophobic ligand walls of the capsules, while the disordered water molecules, interacting strongly with each other via hydrogen bonding, form in all investigated cases the same type of spherical shell. The present results can be (formally) compared--but only regarding the repellency effect--with the amazing "action" of the (super)hydrophobic Lotus (Nelumbo) leaves, which are self-cleaning based on water repellency resulting in the formation of water droplets picking up dirt. The present results were obtained by constructing deliberately suitable hydrophobic interiors within the mentioned capsules.

  2. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  3. Nanolayered siRNA dressing for sustained localized knockdown.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Steven; Wang, Mary; Hammond, Paula T

    2013-06-25

    The success of RNA interference (RNAi) in medicine relies on the development of technology capable of successfully delivering it to tissues of interest. Significant research has focused on the difficult task of systemic delivery of RNAi; however its local delivery could be a more easily realized approach. Localized delivery is of particular interest for many medical applications, including the treatment of localized diseases, the modulation of cellular response to implants or tissue engineering constructs, and the management of wound healing and regenerative medicine. In this work we present an ultrathin electrostatically assembled coating for localized and sustained delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). This film was applied to a commercially available woven nylon dressing commonly used for surgical applications and was demonstrated to sustain significant knockdown of protein expression in multiple cell types for more than one week in vitro. Significantly, this coating can be easily applied to a medically relevant device and requires no externally delivered transfection agents for effective delivery of siRNA. These results present promising opportunities for the localized administration of RNAi. PMID:23672676

  4. DRESS syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis from strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Crocè, Lory; Tiribelli, Claudio; Trevisan, Giusto

    2016-05-01

    Strontium ranelate, which is used for postmenopausal osteoporosis, has been associated with drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, a severe, acute, potentially fatal, multisystem adverse drug reaction characterized by skin rash, fever, hematological abnormalities, and lymphadenopathy with involvement of several internal organs. We report the case of a woman who developed DRESS syndrome with a generalized maculopapular rash, eosinophilia, dyspnea, bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy, and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with liver damage 3 weeks after administration of strontium ranelate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Approximately 6 months after total remission of cutaneous symptoms, the patient developed autoimmune hepatitis. This case confirms that strontium ranelate should be considered as a possible factor in the etiopathology of DRESS syndrome as well as in the subsequent development of autoimmune hepatitis. The possibility of developing autoimmune hepatitis as a part of DRESS syndrome related to strontium ranelate use can occur months after the acute episode. PMID:27274555

  5. 9. View to west of Tropic Dressing Room (typical). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View to west of Tropic Dressing Room (typical). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  6. Seed dressings to control slug damage in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Simms, Louise C; Mullins, Christopher E; Wilson, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    Slugs are major pests of oilseed rape that are poorly controlled by conventional bait pellets. A series of laboratory experiments investigated the potential of seed-dressings to control slug damage in this crop. Four compounds: metaldehyde, methiocarb, cinnamamide and 3,5-dimethoxycinnamic acid (DMCA) were tested at a range of doses for phytotoxicity and ability to reduce damage by Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). Metaldehyde and methiocarb were not phytotoxic at any doses, whereas all doses of cinnamamide and DMCA were. All compounds reduced slug damage, but metaldehyde and methiocarb consistently performed better than cinnamamide and DMCA. Metaldehyde and methiocarb seed-dressings were compared with baited pellets containing the same active ingredients at recommended field doses. The seed-dressings protected plants from damage by D reticulatum and Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud) as well as, or better than, baited pellets. We therefore recommend that metaldehyde and methiocarb should be field-tested as seed dressings to control slugs in oilseed rape.

  7. 12. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING DRESSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING DRESSING FROM AND WORK/CHAMBER ROOM - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  8. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY FOR HYDROTHERAPY AREA AT RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  9. [Design of a Special Shaped Foam Dressing Based on Anatomy].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunming; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Siyu; Zhang, Keping; Zheng, Kun

    2015-07-01

    As the dressings currently used in clinic settings unflat shape in general, they can't be fitted completely on occiput, heel, elbow, knee and other body parts unflat. This paper developed one kind of foam dressing of special shape based on local anatomy. The foam dressing is waterproof and air permeable, it can cover the wound closely enough to prevent bacteria from invasion and infection. With a saturated absorption ratio of 1: 8 or higher, it can keep the wound clean and moisture by absorbing large amounts of wound inflammatory secretions and is almost completely permeable to oxygen and carbon dioxide. Assuring safety and effect meanwhile, it has better outcomes than common dressings in the same application settings. PMID:26665946

  10. [THE ROLE OF WOUND DRESSING IN BIOFILM DESTRUCTION AND REFORMATION].

    PubMed

    Tunuković, Suzana

    2016-03-01

    Application of supportive wound dressing is an important segment for successful result of modern treatment of chronic ulcers. The right choice of dressing is the key to faster, better, and ultimately more cost-effective treatment outcome. Due to the extremely large number of generic types and variants, the main element for proper dressing selection is to know the mechanisms of action and clinical evidence of the effectiveness because of many local factors that delay ulcer healing. The advent of wound dressing that is efficient at the three clinically identified key local factors that largely impede the healing of ulcers, i.e. exudate, infection and biofilm, has made a significant step forward in the creation of optimal conditions for faster healing of chronic ulcers. The complexity of the effects of new technologies, which integrate hidrofiber technology and Ag + technology, provides effective antimicrobial control while at the same time preventing biofilm reformation.

  11. 9. VIEW OF SOUTHERN ROCKFACED DRESSED AND MORTARED STONE ABUTMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SOUTHERN ROCKFACED DRESSED AND MORTARED STONE ABUTMENT, SHOWING STEEL CROSSBEAMS, TORSIONAL DIAGONAL STRUTS, AND WOODEN STRINGERS. FACING SOUTHWEST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEXT-GENERATION ANTIMICROBIAL WOUND DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel; Parsons, David; Bowler, I Philip

    2016-03-01

    Delayed wound healing due to infection is a burden on healthcare systems, and the patient and caregiver alike. An emerging factor in infection and delayed healing is the presence development of biofilm in wounds. Biofilm is communities of microorganisms, protected by an extracellular matrix of slime in the wound, which can tolerate host defences and applied antimicrobials such as antibiotics or antimicrobial dressings. A growing evidence base exists suggesting that biofilm exists in a majority of chronic wounds, and can be a precursor to infection while causing delayed healing itself. In vivo models have demonstrated that the inflammatory, granulation and epithelialization processes of normal wound healing are impaired by biofilm presence. The challenge in the development of a new antimicrobial wound dressing was to make standard antimicrobial agents more effective against biofilm, and this was answered following extensive biofilm research and testing. A combination of metal chelator, surfactant and pH control displayed highly synergistic anti-biofilm action with 1.2% ionic silver in a carboxymethylcellulose dressing. Its effectiveness was challenged and proven in complex in vitro and in vivo wound biofilm models, followed by clinical safety and performance demonstrations in a 42-patient study and 113 clinical evaluations. Post-market surveillance was conducted on the commercially available dressing, and in a 112-case evaluation, the dressing was shown to effectively manage exudate and suspected biofilm while shifting difficult-to-heal wounds onto healing trajectories, after an average of 4 weeks of new dressing use in otherwise standard wound care protocols. This was accompanied by a low frequency of dressing related adverse events. In a second evaluation, clinical signs of infection and wound dimension data, before and after the evaluations, were also available. Following an average of 5.4 weeks of dressing use, all signs of clinical infection were reduced, from

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEXT-GENERATION ANTIMICROBIAL WOUND DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel; Parsons, David; Bowler, I Philip

    2016-03-01

    Delayed wound healing due to infection is a burden on healthcare systems, and the patient and caregiver alike. An emerging factor in infection and delayed healing is the presence development of biofilm in wounds. Biofilm is communities of microorganisms, protected by an extracellular matrix of slime in the wound, which can tolerate host defences and applied antimicrobials such as antibiotics or antimicrobial dressings. A growing evidence base exists suggesting that biofilm exists in a majority of chronic wounds, and can be a precursor to infection while causing delayed healing itself. In vivo models have demonstrated that the inflammatory, granulation and epithelialization processes of normal wound healing are impaired by biofilm presence. The challenge in the development of a new antimicrobial wound dressing was to make standard antimicrobial agents more effective against biofilm, and this was answered following extensive biofilm research and testing. A combination of metal chelator, surfactant and pH control displayed highly synergistic anti-biofilm action with 1.2% ionic silver in a carboxymethylcellulose dressing. Its effectiveness was challenged and proven in complex in vitro and in vivo wound biofilm models, followed by clinical safety and performance demonstrations in a 42-patient study and 113 clinical evaluations. Post-market surveillance was conducted on the commercially available dressing, and in a 112-case evaluation, the dressing was shown to effectively manage exudate and suspected biofilm while shifting difficult-to-heal wounds onto healing trajectories, after an average of 4 weeks of new dressing use in otherwise standard wound care protocols. This was accompanied by a low frequency of dressing related adverse events. In a second evaluation, clinical signs of infection and wound dimension data, before and after the evaluations, were also available. Following an average of 5.4 weeks of dressing use, all signs of clinical infection were reduced, from

  14. Mutation of single hydrophobic residue I27, L35, F39, L58, L65, L67, or L71 in the N terminus of VP5 abolishes interaction with the scaffold protein and prevents closure of herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid shells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jewell N; Sexton, Gerry L; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant

    2003-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive the assembly of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid. A key interaction occurs between the C-terminal tail of the scaffold protein (pre-22a) and the major capsid protein (VP5). Previously (Z. Hong, M. Beaudet-Miller, J. Durkin, R. Zhang, and A. D. Kwong, J. Virol. 70:533-540, 1996) it was shown that the minimal domain in the scaffold protein necessary for this interaction was composed of a hydrophobic amphipathic helix. The goal of this study was to identify the hydrophobic residues in VP5 important for this bimolecular interaction. Results from the genetic analysis of second-site revertant virus mutants identified the importance of the N terminus of VP5 for the interaction with the scaffold protein. This allowed us to focus our efforts on a small region of this large polypeptide. Twenty-four hydrophobic residues, starting at L23 and ending at F84, were mutated to alanine. All the mutants were first screened for interaction with pre-22a in the yeast two-hybrid assay. From this in vitro assay, seven residues, I27, L35, F39, L58, L65, L67, and L71, that eliminated the interaction when mutated were identified. All 24 mutants were introduced into the virus genome with a genetic marker rescue/marker transfer system. For this system, viruses and cell lines that greatly facilitated the introduction of the mutants into the genome were made. The same seven mutants that abolished interaction of VP5 with pre-22a resulted in an absolute requirement for wild-type VP5 for growth of the viruses. The viruses encoding these mutations in VP5 were capable of forming capsid shells comprised of VP5, VP19C, VP23, and VP26, but the closure of these shells into an icosahedral structure was prevented. Mutation at L75 did not affect the ability of this protein to interact with pre-22a, as judged from the in vitro assay, but this mutation specified a lethal effect for virus growth and abolished the formation of any detectable assembled structure

  15. [DRESS in intensive care unit: a challenging diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Derlon, V; Audibert, G; Barbaud, A; Mertes, P M

    2014-12-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia ans systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe medication-induced adverse reaction, which can threaten patient's life. Clinical symptoms and organ failures present wide variability. Furthermore, the latency period is long, so that diagnosis could be a real challenge in the intensive care unit. We report the case of a woman developing a DRESS after neurosurgery complicated by a nosocomial infection. PMID:25450727

  16. 5. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG DRESSING AREA ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG DRESSING AREA ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING WEST; WORKERS STOOD ON RAISED PLATFORMS TO EVISCERATE AND WASH CARCASSES; EXPANDED STEEL GRATING PROVIDED NON-SLIP WORKING SURFACE; STAINLESS-STEEL BAFFLES BETWEEN PLATFORMS HELPED TO CONTAIN STEAM AND WATER SPRAY; METAL TROUGHS BELOW PLATFORMS AND CONCRETE GUTTERS IN FLOOR HELPED CHANNEL WASTE WATER TO DRAINS - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  17. Dressed soliton in quantum dusty pair-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Roy, Kaushik

    2009-11-15

    Nonlinear propagation of a quantum ion-acoustic dressed soliton is studied in a dusty pair-ion plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived using reductive perturbation technique. A higher order inhomogeneous differential equation is obtained for the higher order correction. The expression for a dressed soliton is calculated using a renormalization method. The expressions for higher order correction are determined using a series solution technique developed by Chatterjee et al. [Phys. Plasmas 16, 072102 (2009)].

  18. An overview of Acticoat dressing in wound management.

    PubMed

    Dowsett, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    This article reviews the in vitro and in vivo studies available on a new nanocrystalline silver dressing, Acticoat (Smith & Nephew), and discusses their relevance to the availability of this product on the Drug Tariff. The addition of nanocrystalline silver dressings will make a valuable contribution to wound care in the community, in terms of providing continuity of care for patients who are discharged from hospital and also in preventing admission to hospital with non-manageable wound infection.

  19. Fabrication of Corona-Free Nanoparticles with Tunable Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A protein corona is formed at the surface of nanoparticles in the presence of biological fluids, masking the surface properties of the particle and complicating the relationship between chemical functionality and biological effects. We present here a series of zwitterionic NPs of variable hydrophobicity that do not adsorb proteins at moderate levels of serum protein and do not form hard coronas at physiological serum concentrations. These particles provide platforms to evaluate nanobiological behavior such as cell uptake and hemolysis dictated directly by chemical motifs at the nanoparticle surface. PMID:24971670

  20. Behavior of aqueous solutions in hydrophobic confinement studied using molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit

    Biological processes, such as formation of cell membranes, vesicles and folding of protein molecules, entail formation of a predominantly hydrophobic interior devoid of water. These processes occur in crowded aqueous environments comprising of amino acids, carbohydrates, ionic species, protein molecules, etc. Kinetics of these processes involve drying of hydrophobic pockets. Previous studies reveal that the kinetics of evaporation of water in hydrophobic confinement significantly slow down as the confinement gap increases. Presumably, the constituents of aqueous environment in biological systems modulate the kinetics of evaporation of confined water. In this work, we employ forward flux sampling in molecular dynamics simulations to study the role of solutes at different concentrations in modulating the kinetics and mechanism of evaporation of water under hydrophobic confinement. The results of these simulations will be useful for understanding optimum conditions for protein folding and other biological self-assembly processes.

  1. Application of wound dressings in dermatology laser procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Hoskins, Greg

    1995-05-01

    High powered lasers have been used in dermatological procedures such as tattoo removal. This use is associated with a potential, biological hazard of high speed tissue particles from the laser field. It has been proposed that by applying a clear dermatological would dressing directly over the laser treatment site, it may be possible to completely trap the potentially airborne tissue particles from the procedure. Some important questions must be addressed prior to the implementation of such a technique. While the use of a wound dressing may significantly reduce the airborne materials during the laser procedures, new problems may arise: 1 . The wound dressing or some of its components may absorb excessive amount of light energy. This would result in a very localized temperature rise which may be harmful to the patient; 2. The smooth surface of the wound dressing material could induce specular reflection of the incident laser beam, thus introducing a laser hazard to the staff and patient. To address these possible problems, we studied a series of ClearSite Wound Dressings which have been reportedly tested for such laser procedures. The objective of the studies were, to determine if the use of ClearSite in conjunction with laser procedures poses a possible hazard to either the patient or to the Operating Room personnel, and to determine the effect of the ClearSite dressing on the optical characteristics of the light beam. The latter includes light absorption and transmittance for various wavelengths.

  2. Biomedical evaluation of a novel nitrogen oxides releasing wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Dave, Rachna N; Joshi, Hiren M; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2012-12-01

    Chronic wounds are a major cause for both suffering and economical losses. Management of chronic non-healing wounds requires multipronged approach. They are polymicrobial and agonizing for the patient due to associated pain. Moist dressing providing antimicrobial action is a highly desirable chronic wound management option. Here we report a hydrogel based dressing that possesses the antimicrobial properties of acidified sodium nitrite and the homeostatic property of a hydrogel. The dressing was developed by combining citric acid cross-linked cotton gauze and sodium nitrite loaded gelatin. The cotton gauze was cross-linked with citric acid by pad-dry-curing in presence of nano-titania catalyst. The cotton gauze-gelatin hydrogel combination was gamma-irradiated and freeze-dried. At the time of application, the freeze-dried dressing is wetted by sodium nitrite solution. The dressing has a fluid uptake ability of 90 % (w/v) and the water vapour evaporation rate was estimated to be 2,809 ± 20 g/m(2)/day. The dressing showed significant antimicrobial activity against both planktonic and biofilm forms and was effective during consecutive re-uses. Cytotoxicity study showed inhibition of fibroblasts, but to a lesser extent than clinically administered concentrations of antiseptic like povidone iodine. Storage at 37 °C over a 3 month period resulted in no significant loss of its antimicrobial activity.

  3. Evaluation of a new liquid occlusive dressing for excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Nable, Maria; Cameau, Paul; Singer, Daniel D; McClain, Steve A

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated a novel octylcyanoacrylate-based liquid occlusive dressing for partial-thickness wounds. One hundred and fifteen standardized wounds were created with an electric dermatome set at a depth of 600 micro on the flanks of three pigs and randomly treated with liquid occlusive dressing, a hydrocolloid dressing, or gauze. In one pig, wounds were swabbed with Staphylococcus aureus. Biopsies were taken after 4, 5, 6, and 21 days. Hemostasis was obtained in all wounds treated with the liquid occlusive. The percent reepithelialization of wounds treated with the liquid occlusive and hydrocolloid dressings were significantly greater at days 4 and 5 than control wounds (78% and 82% vs. 40%, p < 0.001 and 99% and 100% vs. 72%, p < 0.001, respectively). None of the liquid occlusive-treated wounds challenged with bacteria became infected. Foreign body reactions were least common in wounds treated with the liquid occlusive (p < 0.001). Scar depth was less for liquid occlusive- and hydrocolloid-treated wounds than controls (285 micro and 303 micro vs. 490 micro, p < 0.001). We conclude that excisional wounds treated with the liquid occlusive dressing reepithelialize as quickly as hydrocolloid-treated wounds. The liquid occlusive dressing is an effective microbial barrier and hemostatic agent resulting in fewer foreign body reactions than hydrocolloid-treated wounds or controls.

  4. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  5. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2007-11-06

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  6. The brain's dress code: How The Dress allows to decode the neuronal pathway of an optical illusion.

    PubMed

    Schlaffke, Lara; Golisch, Anne; Haag, Lauren M; Lenz, Melanie; Heba, Stefanie; Lissek, Silke; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Eysel, Ulf T; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Optical illusions have broadened our understanding of the brain's role in visual perception. A modern day optical illusion emerged from a posted photo of a striped dress, which some perceived as white and gold and others as blue and black. Here we show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), that those who perceive The Dress as white/gold have higher activation in response to the image of The Dress in brain regions critically involved in higher cognition (frontal and parietal brain areas). These results are consistent with theories of top-down modulation and present a neural signature associated with the differences in perceiving The Dress as white/gold or blue/black. Furthermore the results support recent psychophysiological data on this phenomenon and provide a fundamental building block to study interindividual differences in visual processing. PMID:26478963

  7. Dry layer formation? Solvent polarity at hydrophobic solid-liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robert; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Esenturk, Okan

    2002-03-01

    From low-wear, "friction-free" materials to reverse phase chromatography columns to specific protein domains, hydrophobic surfaces are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry and biology. Our efforts to understand how hydrophobic surfaces influence the solvating properties of an adjacent solvent have led us to investigate solvent polarity at a number of weakly associating, solid-liquid interfaces. Second-order nonlinear optical spectroscopy enables experiments to probe the solvent-sensitive excitation energies of adsorbed probe molecules. Comparisons to probe behavior in bulk solution allow us to infer how hydrophobic surfaces have altered properties inside of the solute cavity. Boundaries formed between hydrophobic surfaces and associating or hydrogen bonding solvents show significantly reduced solvent polarity, consistent with proposed models of dry-layer formation. Polar, aprotic liquid-hydrophobic solid interfaces show no evidence of this effect. We can understand this behavior based on the relative imbalance in forces between the solid and liquid phases.

  8. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms

    PubMed Central

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Burrows, Kathryn A.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the ‘dressing’ of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, 7Li and 87Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control. PMID:25348163

  9. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  10. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  11. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  12. A displaced-solvent functional analysis of model hydrophobic enclosures

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Robert; Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities continues to be a hotbed of research. Although many techniques for computing protein-ligand binding affinities have been introduced--ranging from computationally very expensive approaches, such as free energy perturbation (FEP) theory; to more approximate techniques, such as empirically derived scoring functions, which, although computationally efficient, lack a clear theoretical basis--there remains pressing need for more robust approaches. A recently introduced technique, the displaced-solvent functional (DSF) method, was developed to bridge the gap between the high accuracy of FEP and the computational efficiency of empirically derived scoring functions. In order to develop a set of reference data to test the DSF theory for calculating absolute protein-ligand binding affinities, we have pursued FEP theory calculations of the binding free energies of a methane ligand with 13 different model hydrophobic enclosures of varying hydrophobicity. The binding free energies of the methane ligand with the various hydrophobic enclosures were then recomputed by DSF theory and compared with the FEP reference data. We find that the DSF theory, which relies on no empirically tuned parameters, shows excellent quantitative agreement with the FEP. We also explored the ability of buried solvent accessible surface area and buried molecular surface area models to describe the relevant physics, and find the buried molecular surface area model to offer superior performance over this dataset. PMID:21135914

  13. Hydrophobic chitosan sponges modified by aluminum monostearate and dehydrothermal treatment as sustained drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yodkhum, Kotchamon; Phaechamud, Thawatchai

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop hydrophobic chitosan sponges by using novel simple preparation technique in which hydrophobicity of chitosan was modified by aluminum monostearate (Alst) and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT). Alst was able to dissociate and to cleave stearate ion in 2% w/v lactic acid. Composite dispersion of chitosan and Alst (CLA) could be easily prepared by simple mixing at room temperature. The pH value of the CLA dispersions and particle size of the chitosan-Alst complex in the system comprising low chitosan concentration significantly increased by mixing time. The dispersions were further fabricated into sponges by using lyophilization technique and DHT. FT-IR spectra analysis indicated amidation between amino group of chitosan and carboxyl group of stearate side chain after DHT. Contact angle measurement was applied to evaluate hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of the prepared sponges. Swelling behavior of the sponges was investigated in three different medium namely acetate buffer (pH4.0), phosphate buffer (pH7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH10.0). Drug release study was conducted in phosphate buffer pH7.4 at 37°C by using asiaticoside as a model drug. Contact angle measurement revealed that addition of Alst and DHT enhanced the hydrophobicity of the materials. Swelling of the sponges decreased as Alst amount increased. Swelling behavior of the sponges was coincident with the release of asiaticoside in which the sponge containing higher Alst amount apparently exhibited the sustained release character. Release of asiaticoside from CLA sponges fitted well with first-order kinetic and the exponent value (n) in power law model indicated that the main release mechanism was Fickian diffusion. From this study, we found the potential of the prepared hydrophobic chitosan sponges for further application as drug-sustained-release, porous wound dressing.

  14. Hydrophobic coatings for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doms, M.; Feindt, H.; Kuipers, W. J.; Shewtanasoontorn, D.; Matar, A. S.; Brinkhues, S.; Welton, R. H.; Mueller, J.

    2008-05-01

    Different kinds of thin-film coatings were investigated with regard to their applicability as hydrophobic coatings for MEMS. The films were deposited onto silicon and borosilicate glass substrates by spincoating of Dyneon™ PTFE and PFA, plasmapolymerization of HMDS-N and C4F8 as well as liquid-phase and vapor-phase coating of SAMs from DDMS, FDTS, FOTS and Geleste Aquaphobe™ CM. The layer properties were analyzed using profilometry, FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. Furthermore, the adhesion of the layers to the substrates was determined in an acetone ultrasonic bath. The influence of various deposition process parameters on the properties of the films was investigated. As these layers can be used in microfluidic systems, as water-repellent layers and as anti-stiction coatings, they are suited for versatile fields of application.

  15. Comparison between Free and Immobilized Ion Effects on Hydrophobic Interactions: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Gast, Sebastian; Ma, C Derek; Abbott, Nicholas L; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2015-10-15

    Fundamental studies of the effect of specific ions on hydrophobic interactions are driven by the need to understand phenomena such as hydrophobically driven self-assembly or protein folding. Using β-peptide-inspired nanorods, we investigate the effects of both free ions (dissolved salts) and proximally immobilized ions on hydrophobic interactions. We find that the free ion effect is correlated with the water density fluctuation near a nonpolar molecular surface, showing that such fluctuation can be an indicator of hydrophobic interactions in the case of solution additives. In the case of immobilized ion, our results demonstrate that hydrophobic interactions can be switched on and off by choosing different spatial arrangements of proximal ions on a nanorod. For globally amphiphilic nanorods, we find that the magnitude of the interaction can be further tuned using proximal ions with varying ionic sizes. In general, univalent proximal anions are found to weaken hydrophobic interactions. This is in contrast to the effect of free ions, which according to our simulations strengthen hydrophobic interactions. In addition, immobilized anions of increasing ionic size do not follow the same ordering (Hofmeister-like ranking) as free ions when it comes to their impact on hydrophobic interactions. The immobilized ion effect is not simply correlated with the water density fluctuation near the nonpolar side of the amphiphilic nanorod. We propose a molecular picture that explains the contrasting effects of immobilized versus free ions.

  16. Dehydration-Driven Solvent Exposure of Hydrophobic Surfaces as a Driving Force in Peptide Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Ulmschneider, Martin; DiNola, Alfredo; Amadei, Andrea; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the nature of hydration of pure hydrophobic surfaces changes with the length scale considered: water hydrogen-bonding networks adapt to small exposed hydrophobic species, hydrating or 'wetting' them at relatively high densities, whereas larger hydrophobic areas are 'dewetted' [Chandler D (2005), Nature 29:640-647]. Here we determine whether this effect is also present in peptides by examining the folding of a {beta}-hairpin (the 14-residue amyloidogenic prion protein H1 peptide), using microsecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Two simulation models are compared, one explicitly including the water molecules, which may thus adapt locally to peptide configurations, and the other using a popular continuum approximation, the generalized Born/surface area implicit solvent model. The results obtained show that, in explicit solvent, peptide conformers with high solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area indeed also have low hydration density around hydrophobic residues, whereas a concomitant higher hydration density around hydrophilic residues is observed. This dewetting effect stabilizes the fully folded {beta}-hairpin state found experimentally. In contrast, the implicit solvent model destabilizes the fully folded hairpin, tending to cluster hydrophobic residues regardless of the size of the exposed hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the rate of the conformational transitions in the implicit solvent simulation is almost doubled with respect to that of the explicit solvent. The results suggest that dehydration-driven solvent exposure of hydrophobic surfaces may be a significant factor determining peptide conformational equilibria.

  17. Oligomerization of the hydrophobic heptad repeat of gp41.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, H B; Tucker, S P; Kar, S R; McPherson, S A; McPherson, D T; Dubay, J W; Lebowitz, J; Compans, R W; Hunter, E

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contains a leucine zipper-like (hydrophobic heptad) repeat which has been predicted to form an amphipathic alpha helix. To evaluate the potential of the hydrophobic heptad repeat to induce protein oligomerization, this region of gp41 has been cloned into the bacterial expression vector pRIT2T. The resulting plasmid, pRIT3, expresses a fusion protein consisting of the Fc binding domain of monomeric protein A, a bacterial protein, and amino acids 538 to 593 of HIV-1 gp41. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of oligomeric forms of the fusion protein, and analytical centrifugation studies confirmed that the chimeric protein formed a higher-order multimer that was greater than a dimer. Thus, we have identified a region of HIV-1 gp41 which is capable of directing the oligomerization of a fusion protein containing monomeric protein A. Point mutations, previously shown to inhibit the biological activity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, have been engineered into the segment of gp41 contained in the fusion protein, and expressed mutant proteins were purified and analyzed via fast protein liquid chromatography. A point mutation in the heptad repeat, which changed the central isoleucine to an alanine, caused a significant (> 60%) decrease in oligomerization, whereas changing the central isoleucine to aspartate or proline resulted in almost a complete loss of oligomerization. Deletions of one, two, or three amino acids following the first isoleucine also resulted in a profound decrease in oligomerization. The inhibitory effects of the mutations on oligomer formation correlated with the effects of the same mutations on envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion. A possible role of the leucine zipper-like region in the fusion process and in an oligomerization event distinct from assembly of the envelope glycoprotein complex is discussed. PMID:7707497

  18. Effects of wound dressings on cultured primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Vives, Roger; Young, Matthew T; Ziembicki, Jenny; Corcos, Alain; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2016-02-01

    Autologous cell-spray grafting of non-cultured epidermal cells is an innovative approach for the treatment of severe second-degree burns. After treatment, wounds are covered with dressings that are widely used in wound care management; however, little is known about the effects of wound dressings on individually isolated cells. The sprayed cells have to actively attach, spread, proliferate, and migrate in the wound for successful re-epithelialization, during the healing process. It is expected that exposure to wound dressing material might interfere with cell survival, attachment, and expansion. Two experiments were performed to determine whether some dressing materials have a negative impact during the early phases of wound healing. In one experiment, freshly isolated cells were seeded and cultured for one week in combination with eight different wound dressings used during burn care. Cells, which were seeded and cultured with samples of Adaptic(®), Xeroform(®), EZ Derm(®), and Mepilex(®) did not attach, nor did they survive during the first week. Mepitel(®), N-Terface(®), Polyskin(®), and Biobrane(®) dressing samples had no negative effect on cell attachment and cell growth when compared to the controls. In a second experiment, the same dressings were exposed to pre-cultured cells in order to exclude the effects of attachment and spreading. The results confirm the above findings. This study could be of interest for establishing skin cell grafting therapies in burn medicine and also for wound care in general. PMID:26678326

  19. Type II transmembrane domain hydrophobicity dictates the cotranslational dependence for inversion

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Dan; da Silva, Diogo V.; Nordholm, Johan; Wang, Hao; Daniels, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Membrane insertion by the Sec61 translocon in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is highly dependent on hydrophobicity. This places stringent hydrophobicity requirements on transmembrane domains (TMDs) from single-spanning membrane proteins. On examining the single-spanning influenza A membrane proteins, we found that the strict hydrophobicity requirement applies to the Nout-Cin HA and M2 TMDs but not the Nin-Cout TMDs from the type II membrane protein neuraminidase (NA). To investigate this discrepancy, we analyzed NA TMDs of varying hydrophobicity, followed by increasing polypeptide lengths, in mammalian cells and ER microsomes. Our results show that the marginally hydrophobic NA TMDs (ΔGapp > 0 kcal/mol) require the cotranslational insertion process for facilitating their inversion during translocation and a positively charged N-terminal flanking residue and that NA inversion enhances its plasma membrane localization. Overall the cotranslational inversion of marginally hydrophobic NA TMDs initiates once ∼70 amino acids past the TMD are synthesized, and the efficiency reaches 50% by ∼100 amino acids, consistent with the positioning of this TMD class in type II human membrane proteins. Inversion of the M2 TMD, achieved by elongating its C-terminus, underscores the contribution of cotranslational synthesis to TMD inversion. PMID:25165139

  20. Biofilm hydrogel dressing: a clinical evaluation in the treatment of pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Darkovich, S L; Brown-Etris, M; Spencer, M

    1990-01-01

    A new dressing for chronic wounds, BioFilm hydrogel dressing, was compared to a hydrocolloid dressing (HCD) control in a clinical trial involving 90 patients and 129 Stage I and II wounds (defined by Enis and Sarmienti). The testing sites included both acute care and extended care facilities. A comparison of healing response and functional characteristics of both dressings was part of this assessment. Biofilm dressings demonstrated a healing advantage over the HCD. In addition, clinicians judged that the hydrogel dressings were easier to use and had superior fluid management capability and product integrity with minimal disruption to the healing wounds.

  1. Groin dressing after cardiac catheterization. Comparison between light dressing with thin transparent tape (Tegaderm) and conventional tight/pressure dressing with an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast).

    PubMed

    Boonbaichaiyapruck, S; Hutayanon, P; Chanthanamatta, P; Dumrongwatana, T; Intarayotha, N; Krisdee, V; Yamvong, S

    2001-12-01

    Post cardiac catheterization puncture site care is usually done with a tight pressure dressing by an elastic adhesive bandage (Tensoplast) due to the belief that it should prevent bleeding. The practice is uncomfortable to the patients. The authors compared a new way of dressing using light transparent tape (Tegaderm) to the conventional tight pressure one. 126 post coronary angiography patients were randomized to have their groins dressed either with Tensoplast or with Tegaderm. Patients ambulated 8 hours after the procedures. The groin was evaluated for pain, discomfort and bleeding complications. 49 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 26.9 per cent in the Tegaderm group experienced pain (p value of 0.01). 55.5 per cent in the Tensoplast group vs 11.1 per cent in the Tegaderm group reported discomfort. 4.7 per cent in the Tensoplast vs 1.6 per cent in the Tegaderm group developed bleeding or hematoma. Dressing of the puncture site after cardiac catheterization with Tegaderm was more comfortable than the conventional Tensoplast without any difference in bleeding complications.

  2. Effects of limited access dressing in chronic wounds: A biochemical and histological study

    PubMed Central

    Honnegowda, Thittamaranahalli Muguregowda; Kumar, Pramod; Padmanabha Udupa, E G; Sharan, Anurag; Singh, Rekha; Prasad, Hemanth K.; Rao, Pragna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Negative pressure wound therapy has emerged as an attractive treatment modality for the management and healing of chronic ulcers. Though numerous clinical studies are available, there is a lack of biochemical and histological studies evaluating the healing of chronic wounds. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a total 60 patients were divided into two groups: Limited access dressing (LAD) group (n = 30) and conventional dressing group (n = 30). Various biochemical parameters such as hydroxyproline, total protein and antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and oxidative biomarker malondialdhyde (MDA) are measured in the granulation tissue. Histologically amount of inflammatory infiltrate, angiogenesis, and collagen deposition are studied to assess wound healing. Results: Patients treated with LAD have shown significant increase in the mean (±standard deviation) hydroxyproline (77.3 ± 30.1 vs. 32.3 ± 16.18; P = 0.026), total protein (13.89 ± 9.0 vs. 8.9 ± 4.59; P = 0.004), GSH (7.4 ± 1.91 vs. 5.1 ± 1.28; P = 0.039), GPx (122.3 ± 59.3 vs. 88.7 ± 34.11; P = 0.030), CAT (1.80 ± 1.14 vs. 0.9 ± 0.71; P = 0.002) and decrease in MDA (13.4 ± 5.5 vs. 8.6 ± 3.8; P = 0.004). Histological study showed comparatively fewer inflammatory cells, increased and well organised collagen bundles, and more angiogenesis in the LAD group when compared with that with conventional dressing after 10 days of treatment. Conclusion: In the present study, we have found beneficial effect of newer intermittent negative pressure therapy in combination with moist environment (LAD) on chronic wound healing by increasing collagen deposition and angiogenesis; and reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:25991881

  3. Structural and energetic consequences of mutations in a solvated hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamek, D. H.; Guerrero, L.; Blaber, M.; Caspar, D. L. D.

    2005-01-01

    The structural and energetic consequences of modifications to the hydrophobic cavity of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta) are described. Previous reports demonstrated that the entirely hydrophobic cavity of IL-1beta contains positionally disordered water. To gain a better understanding of the nature of this cavity and the water therein, a number of mutant proteins were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, designed to result in altered hydrophobicity of the cavity. These mutations involve the replacement of specific phenylalanine residues, which circumscribe the cavity, with tyrosine, tryptophan, leucine and isoleucine. Using differential scanning calorimetry to determine the relative stabilities of the wild-type and mutant proteins, we found all of the mutants to be destabilizing. X-ray crystallography was used to identify the structural consequences of the mutations. No clear correlation between the hydrophobicities of the specific side-chains introduced and the resulting stabilities was found.

  4. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  5. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, N. V. Fomenko, A. N. Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  6. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care.

  7. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  8. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  9. Effect of Hydrofiber wound dressings on bacterial ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Hobot, Jan; Walker, Michael; Newman, Geoffrey; Bowler, Philip

    2008-04-01

    Ionic silver has well-proven bactericidal properties, and silver-containing wound dressings are now widely used to aid in the creation of an antimicrobial environment in wounds. The effect of silver ions on bacterial ultrastructure can best be studied by viewing bacterial cells under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Bacterial cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were incubated within a control dressing (e.g. a non-antimicrobial Hydrofiber dressing) (Hydrofiber is a registered trademark of E.R. Squibb and Sons, L.L.C.) and a silver-containing Hydrofiber dressing, followed by processing for TEM. Liquid cultures, with and without silver, were prepared for comparison. The addition of silver to growing bacterial cultures stopped growth of the cells very quickly. Ultrastructurally, the presence of silver was found to affect both the shape of the bacterial nucleoid and the organization of bacterial DNA. X-ray microanalysis of bacteria from liquid cultures showed the presence of silver within silver-treated cells and the absence of calcium. It is suggested that the presence of available silver ions within the Hydrofiber dressing could lead to the loss of cellular ions, vital for maintaining the structural integrity of the nuclear area.

  10. Novel wound models for characterizing ibuprofen release from foam dressings.

    PubMed

    Steffansen, Bente; Herping, Sofie P K

    2008-11-19

    The purpose of the present study was to design and characterize low exudate level wound (LEW) and high exudate level wound (HEW) in vitro models by means of investigating therapeutic substance release from exudate-absorbing formulations. Biatain Ibu foam dressing was used to characterize in vitro release of ibuprofen within the models and also for in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) studies. Ibuprofen release was described by zero order rate constants of 0.0147 for 1 day and 0.0038 mg/cm(2) h for 3 days in HEW and LEW models, respectively. The release is suggested to be controlled by ibuprofen diffusion from the dressing in the HEW model, whereas fluid absorption is rate-limiting in the LEW model. Ibuprofen release, from Biatain Ibu foam dressings in vivo, is within the same ranges as in vitro. Thus, it is suggested that, depending on the level of exudate, the in vivo release of ibuprofen depends on ibuprofen diffusion from and absorption of exudates to the dressings. Consequently, both the HEW and LEW in vitro models should be applied in order to fully characterize ibuprofen release from Biatain Ibu foam dressings. Future studies may show whether these in vitro models can be used to characterize therapeutic substance release from exudate-absorbing formulations in general.

  11. Development of antimicrobial and scar preventive chitosan hydrogel wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Sadiya; Arora, Abha; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-07-11

    Antimicrobial and scar preventive wound dressings were developed by coating a blend of chitosan (CS), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrolidone (PVP) on the cotton fabric and subsequent freeze drying. The miscibility of blend systems and functional group interaction were investigated by attenuated total reflectance-infra red spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy of the coated fabric revealed porous structure. The porosity of the material was 54-70% and the pore size was in the range of 75-120μm depending on the blend composition. The air permeability diminished as the PVP content increased. The water vapour transmission rate was in the range of 2000-3500g/m(2)day which may offer to be proper material for the wound dressing with moderate exudate absorption. Tetracycline hydrochloride was used as model drug within the hydrogel matrix. The cumulative release of drug was found to be ∼80% of the total loading after ∼48h. The drug loaded dressings showed good antimicrobial nature against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. In vivo wound healing and tissue compatibility studies were carried out over a period of 21 days on full-thickness skin wounds created on male Wistar rats. Fast healing was observed in drug loaded dressing treated wounds with minimum scarring, as compared to the other groups. These results suggest that drug loaded dressing could provide scar preventive wound healing.

  12. [Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS): a review].

    PubMed

    Ständer, S; Metze, D; Luger, T; Schwarz, T

    2013-08-01

    DRESS (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms), also known as hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), is a severe and potentially life-threatening drug reaction. The worldwide rate of mortality is about 10 %, its incidence is increasing. Drugs that most frequently induce DRESS are aromatic anticonvulsive drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenobarbital), and more recently new retroviral therapies. The pathogenesis of DRESS is not yet fully understood, but is certainly multifactorial involving a combination of immune reactions, ethnic predisposition, genetically determined enzyme deficiencies and reactivation of herpes viruses (HHV-6, HHV-7, EBV, CMV). Because of the involvement of the skin and internal organs, the clinical picture can be very variable. No specific clinical, histologic or laboratory parameter is available, so the diagnosis has to rely on the clinical appearance. The long latency period between start of drug intake and the initial manifestation of DRESS and the successive onset of skin and organ involvement complicates the early diagnosis. Although or even because DRESS represents a diagnostic challenge, detailed knowledge about this disease is of utmost importance to enable early therapeutic actions.

  13. Review of new topical hemostatic dressings for combat casualty care.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Littlejohn, Lanny

    2014-05-01

    This review analyzes the new (2008-2013) hemostatic agents and dressings for enhanced efficacy in preclinical studies, and investigates supportive findings among case reports of effectiveness and safety in hospital and prehospital literature. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, National Library of Medicine using key words and phrases. The search revealed a total of 16 articles that fit the criteria established for third-generation hemostatic dressings. There were a total of 9 preclinical, 5 clinical, and 2 prehospital studies evaluated. Evaluation of these third-generation studies reveals that mucoadhesive (chitosan) dressings, particularly Celox Gauze and ChitoGauze, clearly show equal efficacy to Combat Gauze across many dependent variables. Chitosan-based products are ideal prehospital dressings because they are shown to work independently from the physiological clotting mechanisms. Many first-, second-, and third-generation chitosan-based dressings have been in use for years by the United States and other NATO militaries at the point of injury, and during tactical evacuation, in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom without reported complications or side effects. Based on the reported efficacy and long-term safety of chitosan-based products, increased use of Celox Gauze and ChitoGauze within the Department of Defense and civilian venues merits further consideration and open debate. PMID:24806495

  14. Assessing the effect of an antimicrobial wound dressing on biofilms.

    PubMed

    Percival, Steven L; Bowler, Phil; Woods, Emma J

    2008-01-01

    To date the effect of silver-containing wound dressings on biofilms, known to be present in chronic wounds, has not been determined or documented. In this current study, we aimed to determine the antimicrobial effect of a silver-containing dressing on biofilms grown in a chambered slide model. Before the addition of a wound dressing onto a 24-hour biofilm, composed of either Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus aureus, or a mixed bacterial community, a fluorescent dye was applied. This enabled the viability of sessile bacteria to be monitored in real-time, using a rapid form of confocal laser scanning microscopy over a contact time period of 48 hours. By analyzing all the three-dimensional data generated from the confocal time-lapse sequences, 90% of all sessile bacteria within the biofilm were observed to progressively turn red (i.e., died) within 24 hours. Total bacterial kill in the biofilm was achieved after 48 hours. This research has shown that the dressing was effective in killing the tested bacteria evident in both the tested mono and polymicrobial biofilms, which provides valuable evidence that this dressing may have an effect on biofilms found in recalcitrant chronic wounds.

  15. Development of antimicrobial and scar preventive chitosan hydrogel wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Sadiya; Arora, Abha; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-07-11

    Antimicrobial and scar preventive wound dressings were developed by coating a blend of chitosan (CS), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrolidone (PVP) on the cotton fabric and subsequent freeze drying. The miscibility of blend systems and functional group interaction were investigated by attenuated total reflectance-infra red spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy of the coated fabric revealed porous structure. The porosity of the material was 54-70% and the pore size was in the range of 75-120μm depending on the blend composition. The air permeability diminished as the PVP content increased. The water vapour transmission rate was in the range of 2000-3500g/m(2)day which may offer to be proper material for the wound dressing with moderate exudate absorption. Tetracycline hydrochloride was used as model drug within the hydrogel matrix. The cumulative release of drug was found to be ∼80% of the total loading after ∼48h. The drug loaded dressings showed good antimicrobial nature against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. In vivo wound healing and tissue compatibility studies were carried out over a period of 21 days on full-thickness skin wounds created on male Wistar rats. Fast healing was observed in drug loaded dressing treated wounds with minimum scarring, as compared to the other groups. These results suggest that drug loaded dressing could provide scar preventive wound healing. PMID:27163526

  16. Wound dressing with sustained anti-microbial capability.

    PubMed

    Loke, W K; Lau, S K; Yong, L L; Khor, E; Sum, C K

    2000-01-01

    To overcome current limitations in wound dressings for treating mustard-burn induced septic wound injuries, a nonadherent wound dressing with sustained anti-microbial capability has been developed. The wound dressing consists of two layers: the upper layer is a carboxymethyl-chitin hydrogel material, while the lower layer is an anti-microbial impregnated biomaterial. The hydrogel layer acts as a mechanical and microbial barrier, and is capable of absorbing wound exudate. In physiological fluid, the carboxymethylated-chitin hydrogel swells considerably, imbibing up to 4 times its own weight of water and is also highly porous to water vapor. The moisture permeability of the dressing prevents the accumulation of fluid in heavily exudating wounds seen in second-degree burns. The lower layer, fabricated from chitosan acetate foam, is impregnated with chlorhexidine gluconate. From the in vitro release studies, the loading concentration was optimized to deliver sufficient anti-microbial drug into the wound area to sustain the anti-microbial activity for 24 h. The anti-microbial activity of the dressing against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was tested using the Bauer-Kirby Disk Diffusion Test.

  17. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  18. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  19. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  20. Biotechnologically produced microbial alginate dressings show enhanced gel forming capacity compared to commercial alginate dressings of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Dirk; Schnepf, Julia K; Hammer, Timo R; Fischer, Melissa; Marquardt, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Marine alginate fibre dressings are well established in wound management. Alginate fibres can absorb plenty of wound exudate due to their gel forming abilities and ion exchange. Alginates from bacteria have never been studied for medical applications so far, although the microbial polymer raises expectations for improved gelling capacity due to its unique O-acetylation. To prove the gelling capacity of bacterial alginate, we extracted the co-polymer from fermentation of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC 9046, cultivated on crude glycerol as an alternative carbon source. Bacterial alginate was isolated in high purity and extruded by a wet spinning method. Fibre structure and properties were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, NMR, GPC, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing. The fibres could be processed into biocompatible needle web dressings, which showed more than twice the gel formation in saline compared to commercial dressings made of marine alginates. Gelled dressings of bacterial alginate formed stable hydrogels of sufficient shape and strength for wound healing applications. This work suggests that the increased gel formation of bacterial alginate from A. vinelandii may be optimal for the preparation of novel wound dressings.

  1. Wound-dressing materials with antibacterial activity from electrospun polyurethane-dextran nanofiber mats containing ciprofloxacin HCl.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh R; Barakat, Nasser A M; Pichiah, P B Tirupathi; Gnanasekaran, Gopalsamy; Nirmala, R; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jung, Che-Hun; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Kim, Hak Yong

    2012-11-01

    Dextran is a versatile biomacromolecule for preparing electrospun nanofibrous membranes by blending with either water-soluble bioactive agents or hydrophobic biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications. In this study, an antibacterial electrospun scaffold was prepared by electrospinning of a solution composed of dextran, polyurethane (PU) and ciprofloxacin HCl (CipHCl) drug. The obtained nanofiber mats have good morphology. The mats were characterized by various analytical techniques. The interaction parameters between fibroblasts and the PU-dextran and PU-dextran-drug scaffolds such as viability, proliferation, and attachment were investigated. The results indicated that the cells interacted favorably with the scaffolds especially the drug-containing one. Moreover, the composite mat showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, our results conclude that the introduced scaffold might be an ideal biomaterial for wound dressing applications.

  2. Co-Trimoxazole-Induced DRESS Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Paitorn, Limvorraphan

    2016-02-01

    Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS syndrome) is a severe adverse drug reaction. The drugs, which most commonly induce this condition, are anti-convulsants and sulfonamides. A 15-year-old Thai woman with no known underlying disease was prescribed co-trimoxazole, and two months after initiation, DRESS was diagnosed by RegiSCAR's score. Her clinical symptoms were fever laboratory abnormalities and maculopapular rash on her face, trunk and extremities. She was treated with antipyretics, antihistamines and steroid therapy, and her clinical and laboratory findings were restored to normal by the 10th day of treatment. Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the culprit drug, and management with steroids therapy can reduce the severity of DRESS syndrome. PMID:27266243

  3. Cross-dressing: an alternative mechanism for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Cross-dressing involves the transfer of preformed functional peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of donor cells to recipient cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). These cross-dressed cells might eventually present the intact, unprocessed peptide-MHC complexes to T lymphocytes. In this review we will discuss some recent findings concerning the intercellular transfer of preformed MHC complexes and the possible mechanisms by which the transfer may occur. We will report evidences showing that both MHC class I and MHC class II functional complexes might be transferred, highlighting the physiological relevance of these cross-dressed cells for the presentation of exogenous antigens to both cytotoxic and helper T lymphocytes.

  4. Expanding Dress Code Requirements in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Cynthia A; Schweiger, Teresa A; Angelo, Lauren B; Lea Bonner, C; Dhing, Conrad W; Farley, Joel F

    2016-06-25

    Although the use of a professional dress code is standard practice across colleges and schools of pharmacy during introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences, requiring professional attire is not applied consistently during the didactic portion of students' education. There are arguments for and against the adoption of a professional dress code throughout the entire doctor of pharmacy program, including the classroom setting. Given uncertainty regarding the potential benefits and challenges that may arise from adopting a professional dress code in the didactic portion of a student pharmacist's education, it is perhaps not surprising that programs adopt disparate policies regarding its use. This exploration was conducted as part of a series of debates held in conjunction with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's (AACP) Academic Leadership Fellows Program (ALFP) and was presented at the 2015 AACP Interim Meeting on February 7, 2015. PMID:27402977

  5. Expanding Dress Code Requirements in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Teresa A.; Angelo, Lauren B.; Lea Bonner, C.; Dhing, Conrad W.; Farley, Joel F.

    2016-01-01

    Although the use of a professional dress code is standard practice across colleges and schools of pharmacy during introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences, requiring professional attire is not applied consistently during the didactic portion of students’ education. There are arguments for and against the adoption of a professional dress code throughout the entire doctor of pharmacy program, including the classroom setting. Given uncertainty regarding the potential benefits and challenges that may arise from adopting a professional dress code in the didactic portion of a student pharmacist’s education, it is perhaps not surprising that programs adopt disparate policies regarding its use. This exploration was conducted as part of a series of debates held in conjunction with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy’s (AACP) Academic Leadership Fellows Program (ALFP) and was presented at the 2015 AACP Interim Meeting on February 7, 2015. PMID:27402977

  6. Dust acoustic dressed soliton with dust charge fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2010-06-15

    Modeling of dust acoustic solitons observed in dusty plasma experiment [Bandyopadhyay et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 065006 (2008)] using the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation showed significant discrepancies in the regime of large amplitudes (or high soliton speed). In this paper, higher order perturbation corrections to the standard KdV soliton are proposed and the resulting dressed soliton is shown to describe the experimental data better, in particular, at high soliton speed. The effects of dust charge fluctuations on the dust acoustic dressed soliton in a dusty plasma system are also investigated. The KdV equation and a linear inhomogeneous equation, governing the evolution of first and second order potentials, respectively, are derived for the system by using reductive perturbation technique. Renormalization procedure is used to obtain nonsecular solutions of these coupled equations. The characteristics of dust acoustic dressed solitons with and without dust charge fluctuations are discussed.

  7. Dressing ignition and facial burns following orbital exenteration.

    PubMed

    Bajnrauh, Robert; Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Reifler, David M; Wilcox, Richard M

    2007-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with type II diabetes mellitus and a history of smoking underwent partial eyelid-sparing exenteration of the right orbit and antifungal therapy for zygomycosis. The medial orbital wall healed with a 7-mm fistula to the ethmoid sinus and a moist granulating apex required daily dressing changes for several months. Eighteen weeks following surgery, the patient cleaned her face with an alcohol wipe and then lit a cigarette, igniting the dressing covering the exenterated eye socket. This caused severe burns to the periorbital regions of both eyes requiring debridement, allografts, and then split-thickness skin grafting. Factors predisposing to this unusual and serious complication of orbital exenteration are reviewed and the subjects of treatment and prevention are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dressing ignition with serious facial burns in a postexenteration patient.

  8. Use of fibre dressings in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Denyer, Jacqueline; Gibson, Elaine

    This non-comparative study explored the benefits of a natural gelling fibre dressing in 10 children with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). The clinical challenge in managing these children is that they often present with recalcitrant wounds that are perpetuated by critical colonisation, presence of biofilms and infection. KytoCel® (Aspen Medical) is a highly absorbent dressing composed of natural, biodegradable acylated chitosan. These fibres bond with wound exudate to form a clear gel that locks in fluid absorbs pathogens and is conformable to the wound bed. It also has haemostatic properties. ( Dutta PK et al, 2004 ; Lee et al, 2009 ; Stephen Haynes et al, 2014 ). Factors considered were whether the dressing could aid healing, reduce bleeding, reduce bioburden, be atraumatic and comfortable during wear time and removal.

  9. [Skin reaction to carbamazepine or DRESS syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fundora, Emigdio Jesús; Cabrera Osorio, Yuliet; Cabrera Osorio, Claudia

    2016-02-25

    Carbamazepine is a frequently used drug that can produce adverse reactions like vertigo, somnolence and severe skin reactions like Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Syndrome (DRESS Syndrome). This syndrome is characterized by a late-appearing, slow-progressing cutaneous eruption accompanied by atypical lymphocytes, eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms such as fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatic compromise, and renal dysfunction that can be severe enough to cause death. We present a case that aims to highlight the importance of an early diagnosis of DRESS syndrome to adjust therapy and improve survival. The patient is a female patient prescribed carbamazepine for trigeminal neuralgia who presented with skin lesions, which were initially attributed to a hypersensitivity reaction. The lesions worsened in spite of treatment and systemic symptoms ensued. A diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was proposed and steroid treatment was initiated with rapid improvement.

  10. Analysis of energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Berka, Karel; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrásek, Jirí

    2009-02-23

    The hydrophobic core of globular proteins is responsible for major stabilization of the protein tertiary structure. The prevailing amino-acid residues in the core are of aliphatic or aromatic character, and therefore, the core in a folded protein structure is mostly stabilized by noncovalent interactions of van der Waals origin between the amino-acid side chains. Herein, we present a theoretical analysis of the interaction energy between the amino acids of the hydrophobic core of the small globular protein rubredoxin (Rd) based on the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) method. The results show uniform proportions between the second-order dispersion and first-order electrostatic energy terms in favor of dispersion interaction, which plays a major role in the stabilization of this important structural element. To demonstrate the contrast between systems stabilized by different mechanisms, we perform a SAPT analysis of the typical hydrogen bonds involved in the formation of protein secondary structure elements in Rd, where dispersion still plays a non-negligible role but electrostatic energy is the major stabilizing factor.

  11. Dissipationless electron transport in photon-dressed nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kibis, O V

    2011-09-01

    It is shown that the electron coupling to photons in field-dressed nanostructures can result in the ground electron-photon state with a nonzero electric current. Since the current is associated with the ground state, it flows without the Joule heating of the nanostructure and is nondissipative. Such a dissipationless electron transport can be realized in strongly coupled electron-photon systems with the broken time-reversal symmetry--particularly, in quantum rings and chiral nanostructures dressed by circularly polarized photons. PMID:21981519

  12. Speeding up Adiabatic Quantum State Transfer by Using Dressed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Hugo; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2016-06-01

    We develop new pulse schemes to significantly speed up adiabatic state transfer protocols. Our general strategy involves adding corrections to an initial control Hamiltonian that harness nonadiabatic transitions. These corrections define a set of dressed states that the system follows exactly during the state transfer. We apply this approach to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage protocols and show that a suitable choice of dressed states allows one to design fast protocols that do not require additional couplings, while simultaneously minimizing the occupancy of the "intermediate" level.

  13. An alternative buildup material: combine dressing and liquid paraffin.

    PubMed

    Rykers, K; Trenkner, S

    1998-01-01

    A tissue substitute of combine dressing (gauze and cottonwool) soaked with liquid paraffin was found to be a practical, easily manufactured and inexpensive buildup material for use in treating radiation therapy patients with electron and photon beams. Tissue equivalence was measured for electron energies of 6, 9, 12, and 16 MeV and photon energies of 6 MV and 10 MV delivered by a Varian 2100C linear accelerator. The solid water equivalence of the combine dressing/liquid paraffin material was approximately 1.2 times the geometric thickness of tissue substitute material across all energies.

  14. Evaluation of a flexible new liquid polymer wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Sherry H; Robins, Perry

    2005-01-01

    Occlusive dressings are the foundation of wound care and have been shown to speed epithelialization and healing of surgical sites. Many different dressings have been introduced over the years including antibacterial ointments with gauze and adhesive, hydrocolloid bandages, and liquid adhesives. All of these have their limitations and advantages. We introduce our experience with a new organic polymer in solvent which when applied to a wound forms a flexible occlusive bandage. The material has been shown to have antimicrobial properties and be well-tolerated by patients.

  15. Leflunomide-induced DRESS syndrome with renal involvement and vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Dhir, Varun; Krishnan, Sabari; Nada, Ritambhra

    2013-05-01

    DRESS or drug reaction (or rash) with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms belongs to the severe cutaneous adverse reaction group and is characterized by hematological abnormalities and visceral organ involvement. Although most often related with anticonvulsant and sulfonamide use, it is reported with numerous other drugs. We report an unusual case of DRESS syndrome due to Leflunomide, also complicated by renal involvement in the form of granulomatous interstitial nephritis and vasculitis. On a review of the literature, eight similar cases were found, and these are discussed.

  16. Hemicellulose dressing versus rayon dressing in the re-epithelialization of split-thickness skin graft donor sites: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lydia M; Blanes, Leila; Gragnani, Alfredo; Veiga, Daniela F; Veiga, Frederico P; Nery, Gilka B; Rocha, Gustavo Henrique H R; Gomes, Heitor C; Rocha, Mario G; Okamoto, Regina

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a hemicellulose dressing with that of rayon dressing in the healing of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Twenty-eight patients were selected from five different hospitals and randomized into two groups: hemicellulose dressing group and rayon dressing group. All patients underwent split-thickness skin grafting for various reasons, and the skin graft donor site wounds were covered with hemicellulose dressing (n=14) or rayon dressing (n=14). The donor site was assessed on postoperative days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 for hyperemia, pruritus, pain, exudate level, and adherence of the wound dressing. At the 60-day follow-up visit, the donor site was assessed again for pruritus and pain. Touch-pressure, thermal, and pain sensibility tests were performed preoperatively and on postoperative day 60 together with the assessment of color and texture of the re-epithelialized area. In all patients, re-epithelialization was completed between 14 and 21 days after surgery. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to pain, hyperemia, pruritus, exudate, and final appearance (color and texture) of the skin graft donor site. The rayon dressing provided significantly better adherence than the hemicellulose dressing, and both dressings showed similar results with regard to the parameters evaluated when used in the treatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites.

  17. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  18. Effects of hydrophobic macromolecular crowders on amyloid β (16-22) aggregation.

    PubMed

    Latshaw, David C; Hall, Carol K

    2015-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregates in the brain to form progressively larger oligomers, fibrils, and plaques. The aggregation process is strongly influenced by the presence of other macromolecular species, called crowders, that can exert forces on the proteins. One very common attribute of macromolecular crowders is their hydrophobicity. We examined the effect of hydrophobic crowders on protein aggregation by using discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations in combination with an intermediate resolution protein model, PRIME20. The systems considered contained 48 Aβ (16-22) peptides and crowders with diameters of 5 Å, 20 Å, and 40 Å, represented by hard spheres or spheres with square-well/square-shoulder interactions, at a crowder volume fraction of ϕ = 0.10. Results show that low levels of crowder hydrophobicity are capable of increasing the fibrillation lag time and high levels of crowder hydrophobicity can fully prevent the formation of fibrils. The types of structures that remain during the final stages of the simulations are summarized in a global phase diagram that shows fibril, disordered oligomer, or β-sheet phases in the space spanned by crowder size and crowder hydrophobicity. In particular, at high levels of hydrophobicity, simulations with 5 Å crowders result in only disordered oligomers and simulations with 40 Å crowders result in only β-sheets. The presence of hydrophobic crowders reduces the antiparallel β-sheet content of fibrils, whereas hard sphere crowders increase it. Finally, strong hydrophobic crowders alter the secondary structure of the Aβ (16-22) monomers, bending them into a shape that is incapable of forming ordered β-sheets or fibrils. These results qualitatively agree with previous theoretical and experimental work.

  19. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  20. Similarities between Students Receiving Dress Code Violations and Discipline Referrals at Newport Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Nikki

    2007-01-01

    Background: Looking at dress code violations and demographics surrounding kids breaking the rules. Purpose: To see if there is a connection between dress code violations and discipline referrals. Setting: Jr. High School; Study Sample: Students with dress code violations for one week; Intervention: N/A; Research Design: Correlational; and Control…