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Sample records for protein mutant r234w

  1. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  2. Mutant chaperonin proteins: new tools for nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Paavola, C. D.; Kagawa, H.; Chan, S. L.; Trent, J. D.

    2007-11-01

    Much effort has gone into finding peptides that bind potentially useful nanoparticles, but relatively little effort has focused on the scaffolds that organize these peptides into useful nanostructures. Chaperonins are protein complexes with 14-18 protein subunits that self-assemble into double-ring complexes and function as scaffolds for peptides or amino acids that bind metallic and semiconductor quantum dots. The utility of chaperonins as scaffolds depends on their structure and their ability to self-assemble into double-rings and higher-order structures, such as filaments and two-dimensional arrays. To better understand the structure of chaperonins, we constructed a model of a group II chaperonin and, based on this model, genetically constructed five mutant subunits with significant deletions. We expressed these mutants as recombinant proteins and observed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that they all self-assembled into double rings. Our model predicted and TEM confirmed that these deletions did not significantly change the 17 nm diameter of the wild-type double rings, but decreased their height and opened their central cavities. Four of the five mutants formed higher-order structures: chains of rings, bundles of chains or filaments, and two-dimensional arrays, which we suggest can be useful nanostructures.

  3. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  4. Mutant Proteins--Enzymes to Hydrolyze Toxic Organophosphates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-15

    strains of infectious bacteria and the serine protease’ lytic protease. We also employ novel chemical modifications of ; mutant proteins to achieve...mutant RTEM -1 8-lactamase. We have previously generated and characterized mutants of RTEM -1 .- lactamase with all possible amino acid substitutions (site...denaturation than wild-type -lactamase. Uniquely among class A B- lactamases, the RTEM -1 (and RTEM -2) enzymes contain a single disulfide bond between Cys

  5. Conformational stability of adrenodoxin mutant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burova, T. V.; Beckert, V.; Uhlmann, H.; Ristau, O.; Bernhardt, R.; Pfeil, W.

    1996-01-01

    Adrenodoxin and the mutants at the positions T54, H56, D76, Y82, and C95, as well as the deletion mutants 4-114 and 4-108, were studied by high-sensitivity scanning microcalorimetry, limited proteolysis, and absorption spectroscopy. The mutants show thermal transition temperatures ranging from 46 to 56 degrees C, enthalpy changes from 250 to 370 kJ/mol, and heat capacity change delta Cp = 7.28 +/- 0.67 kJ/mol/K, except H56R. The amino acid replacement H56R produces substantial local changes in the region around positions 56 and Y82, as indicated by reduced heat capacity change (delta Cp = 4.29 +/- 0.37 kJ/mol/K) and enhanced fluorescence. Deletion mutant 4-108 is apparently more stable than the wild type, as judged by higher specific denaturation enthalpy and resistance toward proteolytic degradation. No simple correlation between conformational stability and functional properties could be found. PMID:8880913

  6. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-08

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction.

  7. Human Cellular Retinaldehyde-Binding Protein Has Secondary Thermal 9-cis-Retinal Isomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bolze, Christin S.; Helbling, Rachel E.; Owen, Robin L.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R.; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/VIS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding-pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity towards 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  8. Cellular retinaldehyde binding protein-different binding modes and micro-solvation patterns for high-affinity 9-cis- and 11-cis-retinal substrates.

    PubMed

    Helbling, Rachel E; Bolze, Christin S; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stocker, Achim; Cascella, Michele

    2013-09-19

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the binding properties of different retinoid species to cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP). The complexes formed by 9-cis-retinal or 11-cis-retinal bound to both the native protein and the R234W mutant, associated to Bothnia-retina dystrophy, are investigated. The presented studies are also complemented by analysis of the binding structures of the CRALBP/9-cis-retinol and CRALBP/9,13-dicis-retinal complexes. We find that the poor X-ray scattering properties of the polyene tail of the ligand in all wild-type complexes can be attributed to a high mobility of this region, which does not localize in a single binding conformation even at very low temperatures. Our simulations report a clear difference in the residual solvation pattern in CRALBP complexes with either 9-cis- or 9,13-dicis-retinal. The reported structures indicate that the microsolvation properties of the ligand are the key structural element triggering the very recently discovered isomerase activity of this protein. The binding geometries obtained by MD simulations are validated by calculation of the respective optical spectra by the ZINDO/S semiempirical method, which can reproduce with good qualitative agreement the different red-shifts of the first absorption band of the different complexes.

  9. Purification of recombinant C-reactive protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Avinash; Singh, Sanjay K.; Hammond, David J.; Gang, Toh B.; Ngwa, Donald N.; Pathak, Asmita; Agrawal, Alok

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an evolutionarily conserved protein, a component of the innate immune system, and an acute phase protein in humans. In addition to its raised level in blood in inflammatory states, CRP is also localized at sites of inflammation including atherosclerotic lesions, arthritic joints and amyloid plaque deposits. Results of in vivo experiments in animal models of inflammatory diseases indicate that CRP is an anti-pneumococcal, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-arthritic and an anti-amyloidogenic molecule. The mechanisms through which CRP functions in inflammatory diseases are not fully defined; however, the ligand recognition function of CRP in its native and non-native pentameric structural conformations and the complement-activating ability of ligand-complexed CRP have been suggested to play a role. One tool to understand the structure-function relationships of CRP and determine the contributions of the recognition and effector functions of CRP in host defense is to employ site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants for experimentation. For example, CRP mutants incapable of binding to phosphocholine are generated to investigate the importance of the phosphocholine-binding property of CRP in mediating host defense. Recombinant CRP mutants can be expressed in mammalian cells and, if expressed, can be purified from the cell culture media. While the methods to purify wild-type CRP are well established, different purification strategies are needed to purify various mutant forms of CRP if the mutant does not bind to either calcium or phosphocholine. In this article, we report the methods used to purify pentameric recombinant wild-type and mutant CRP expressed in and secreted by mammalian cells. PMID:1460031

  10. Cuticle surface proteins of wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M L

    1993-03-25

    The molecular components of the surface of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have been identified by surface-specific radioiodination. Four compartments were defined by fractionation of labeled wild type (N2 strain) adult hermaphrodites. Organic solvents extracted cuticular lipids. Homogenization in detergents released a single, non-collagenous, hydrophobic protein. This is not glycosylated and is a heterodimer of 6.5- and 12-kDa subunits. The third compartment, proteins solubilized by reducing agents, included both the cuticular collagens and the heterodimer. Residual material corresponds to the cuticlin fraction. Larval stages showed a similar pattern, except that the dauer larva had an additional 37-kDa detergent-soluble protein. Other species of rhabditid nematodes displayed similar profiles, and comparison with parasitic species suggests that this simple pattern may be primitive in the Nematoda. A C. elegans strain mutant in cuticular collagen (rol-6) had a pattern identical to that of wild type, but another morphological mutant (dpy-3) [corrected] and several mutants that differ in surface reactivity to antibody and lectins (srf mutants) also had striking differences in surface labeling patterns.

  11. Yeast mutants affecting possible quality control of plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Kane, T; Tipper, C; Spatrick, P; Jenness, D D

    1999-05-01

    Mutations gef1, stp22, STP26, and STP27 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified as suppressors of the temperature-sensitive alpha-factor receptor (mutation ste2-3) and arginine permease (mutation can1(ts)). These suppressors inhibited the elimination of misfolded receptors (synthesized at 34 degrees C) as well as damaged surface receptors (shifted from 22 to 34 degrees C). The stp22 mutation (allelic to vps23 [M. Babst and S. Emr, personal communication] and the STP26 mutation also caused missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, and ste2-3 was suppressed by mutations vps1, vps8, vps10, and vps28 but not by mutation vps3. In the stp22 mutant, both the mutant and the wild-type receptors (tagged with green fluorescent protein [GFP]) accumulated within an endosome-like compartment and were excluded from the vacuole. GFP-tagged Stp22p also accumulated in this compartment. Upon reaching the vacuole, cytoplasmic domains of both mutant and wild-type receptors appeared within the vacuolar lumen. Stp22p and Gef1p are similar to tumor susceptibility protein TSG101 and voltage-gated chloride channel, respectively. These results identify potential elements of plasma membrane quality control and indicate that cytoplasmic domains of membrane proteins are translocated into the vacuolar lumen.

  12. [Proteasome degradation of protein C and plasmin inhibitor mutants: molecular mechanism of congenital protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Miwako; Koyama, Takatoshi; Hirosawa, Shinsaku

    2009-08-01

    In many inherited disorders, protein deficiency is one of the major aetiologies, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the intracellular degradation of mutant proteins, using naturally occurring PC and PI mutants that lead to congenital deficiencies. We have shown that proteasomes are very important for the degradation of PC and PI mutants, irrespective of the presence or absence of N-glycosylation moieties. Furthermore, mannose trimming after glucose removal is very important for initiation of the degradation. Inhibition of glucose trimming of the mutant proteins accelerated degradation by the proteasomes, and initiation of the degradation occurs after mannose trimming of the middle chain of N-linked glycosylation by mannosidase I. The binding of molecular chaperons influenced by the presence of N-glycosylation moieties may affect the efficient degradation of the mutant proteins. Cotransfection of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing alpha-mannosidase like protein (EDEM) accelerated the degradation of N-glycosylated PC. The mutant PC or PI molecules were ubiquitin-independently degraded by proteasomes. Autophagy does not appear to contribute to the degradation of PC and PI mutants. These findings might help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential treatments of congenital deficiencies of proteins in a system of coagulation and fibrinolysis.

  13. Rhes, a Striatal Specific Protein, Mediates Mutant-Huntingtin Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Srinivasa; Sixt, Katherine M.; Barrow, Roxanne; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a polyglutamine repeat in the protein huntingtin (Htt) with mutant Htt (mHtt) expressed throughout the body and similarly in all brain regions. Yet, HD neuropathology is largely restricted to the corpus striatum. We report that the small guanine nucleotide–binding protein Rhes, which is localized very selectively to the striatum, binds physiologically to mHtt. Using cultured cells, we found Rhes induces sumoylation of mHtt, which leads to cytotoxicity. Thus, Rhes-mHtt interactions can account for the localized neuropathology of HD. PMID:19498170

  14. Mechanisms of mutant PDE6 proteins underlying retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Kota N; Boyd, Kimberly; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2017-09-01

    Mutations in PDE6 genes encoding the effector enzymes in rods and cones underlie severe retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (adCSNB), and achromatopsia (ACHM). Here we examined a spectrum of pathogenic missense mutations in PDE6 using the system based on co-expression of cone PDE6C with its specialized chaperone AIPL1 and the regulatory Pγ subunit as a potent co-chaperone. We uncovered two mechanisms of PDE6C mutations underlying ACHM: (a) folding defects leading to expression of catalytically inactive proteins and (b) markedly diminished ability of Pγ to co-chaperone mutant PDE6C proteins thereby dramatically reducing the levels of functional enzyme. The mechanism of the Rambusch adCSNB associated with the H258N substitution in PDE6B was probed through the analysis of the model mutant PDE6C-H262N. We identified two interrelated deficits of PDE6C-H262N: disruption of the inhibitory interaction of Pγ with mutant PDE6C that markedly reduced the ability of Pγ to augment the enzyme folding. Thus, we conclude that the Rambusch adCSNB is triggered by low levels of the constitutively active PDE6. Finally, we examined PDE6C-L858V, which models PDE6B-L854V, an RP-linked mutation that alters the protein isoprenyl modification. This analysis suggests that the type of prenyl modifications does not impact the folding of PDE6, but it modulates the enzyme affinity for its trafficking partner PDE6D. Hence, the pathogenicity of PDE6B-L854V likely arises from its trafficking deficiency. Taken together, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the PDE6C expression system to evaluate pathogenicity and elucidate the mechanisms of PDE6 mutations in retinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unpeaceful roles of mutant PAX proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, Marco; Schäfer, Beat W

    2015-08-01

    PAX transcription factors are key players in the development of different tissues and organs. At the cellular level they are involved in regulating lineage commitment and differentiation. Interference with these tightly regulated functions of PAX proteins is associated with developmental abnormalities and tumorigenesis of several types of cancer. As a result of aberrant PAX protein activity, either by gain- or loss of function mechanisms, affected cells are kept in a proliferative state by blocking their terminal differentiation. PAX proteins with a gain-of-function role in cancer are active in the proliferative state of cells and have to be downregulated before they can complete the differentiation process. Such PAX proteins are usually activated in malignancies by chromosomal translocations generating fusions with strong transcriptional activators. PAX proteins with tumor suppressor activity are actively driving the differentiation process and are necessary for the exit from the proliferative state. In cancer, a diverse set of mutational mechanisms is involved in reducing their activity. Here, we discuss the characteristics of mutant PAX proteins in different types of cancer including alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, thyroid cancer and leukemia, with special focus on their role in interference with normal differentiation pathways of the cell lineage involved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutant analysis, protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis B sister (ABS) protein.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Kerstin; Anfang, Nicole; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2005-09-01

    Recently, close relatives of class B floral homeotic genes, termed B(sister) genes, have been identified in both angiosperms and gymnosperms. In contrast to the B genes themselves, B(sister) genes are exclusively expressed in female reproductive organs, especially in the envelopes or integuments surrounding the ovules. This suggests an important ancient function in ovule or seed development for B(sister) genes, which has been conserved for about 300 million years. However, investigation of the first loss-of-function mutant for a B(sister) gene (ABS/TT16 from Arabidopsis) revealed only a weak phenotype affecting endothelium formation. Here, we present an analysis of two additional mutant alleles, which corroborates this weak phenotype. Transgenic plants that ectopically express ABS show changes in the growth and identity of floral organs, suggesting that ABS can interact with floral homeotic proteins. Yeast-two-hybrid and three-hybrid analyses indicated that ABS can form dimers with SEPALLATA (SEP) floral homeotic proteins and multimeric complexes that also include the AGAMOUS-like proteins SEEDSTICK (STK) or SHATTERPROOF1/2 (SHP1, SHP2). These data suggest that the formation of multimeric transcription factor complexes might be a general phenomenon among MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins in angiosperms. Heterodimerization of ABS with SEP3 was confirmed by gel retardation assays. Fusion proteins tagged with CFP (Cyan Fluorescent Protein) and YFP (Yellow Fluorescent Protein) in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that ABS is localized in the nucleus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a structurally deviant, but closely related, paralogue of ABS in the Arabidopsis genome. Thus the evolutionary developmental genetics of B(sister) genes can probably only be understood as part of a complex and redundant gene network that may govern ovule formation in a conserved manner, which has yet to be fully explored.

  17. Photophysics and optical switching in green fluorescent protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Creemers, T. M. H.; Lock, A. J.; Subramaniam, V.; Jovin, T. M.; Völker, S.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate by using low-temperature high-resolution spectroscopy that red-shifted mutants of green fluorescent protein are photo-interconverted among three conformations and are, therefore, not photostable “one-color” systems as previously believed. From our experiments we have further derived the energy-level schemes governing the interconversion among the three forms. These results have significant implications for the molecular and cell biological applications of the green fluorescent protein family; for example, in fluorescence resonant energy transfer experiments, a change in “color” on irradiation may not necessarily be due to energy transfer but can also arise from a photo-induced conversion between conformers of the excited species. PMID:10716703

  18. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-07

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  19. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  20. Azide-resistant mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 are defective in protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-02-15

    Azide, an inhibitor of ATPase, and a specific inhibitor of protein export was used in order to select for protein secretion mutants in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2. Two such mutants were isolated that were azide-resistant and defective in the general protein transport system. The mutation also conferred additional phenotypic changes, including an inability to grow on minimal media or at 40 degrees C. The existence of protein secretion mutants with a selectable phenotype may be useful for the genetic study of protein export.

  1. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; ...

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  2. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J; Talipov, Narat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S; Kutty, Rman G; Jensen, David; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  3. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  4. Increased expression of the maize immunoglobulin binding protein homolog b-70 in three zein regulatory mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boston, R S; Fontes, E B; Shank, B B; Wrobel, R L

    1991-01-01

    Plants carrying floury-2, Defective endosperm-B30, or Mucronate mutations overproduce b-70, a maize homolog of the mammalian immunoglobulin binding protein. During endosperm development in these mutants, levels of both b-70 protein and RNA increase dramatically between 14 days and 20 days after pollination. At later stages, b-70 RNA levels decline while protein levels remain high. The increase in b-70 RNA levels is endosperm specific and dependent on gene dosage in the floury-2 mutant. In all three mutants, the increases in b-70 RNA and protein levels are inversely proportional to changes in zein synthesis. Although b-70 polypeptides can be extracted from purified protein bodies, they carry a carboxy-terminal endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, HDEL. We propose that induction of b-70 in these mutants is a cellular response to abnormally folded or improperly assembled storage proteins and probably reflects its role as a polypeptide chain binding protein. PMID:1840924

  5. The global translation profile in a ribosomal protein mutant resembles that of an eIF3 mutant.

    PubMed

    Tiruneh, Bayu Sisay; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Gallie, Daniel R; Roy, Bijoyita; von Arnim, Albrecht G

    2013-12-30

    Genome-wide assays performed in Arabidopsis and other organisms have revealed that the translation status of mRNAs responds dramatically to different environmental stresses and genetic lesions in the translation apparatus. To identify additional features of the global landscape of translational control, we used microarray analysis of polysomal as well as non-polysomal mRNAs to examine the defects in translation in a poly(A) binding protein mutant, pab2 pab8, as well as in a mutant of a large ribosomal subunit protein, rpl24b/shortvalve1. The mutation of RPL24B stimulated the ribosome occupancy of mRNAs for nuclear encoded ribosomal proteins. Detailed analysis yielded new insights into the translational regulon containing the ribosomal protein mRNAs. First, the ribosome occupancy defects in the rpl24b mutant partially overlapped with those in a previously analyzed initiation factor mutant, eif3h. Second, a group of mRNAs with incomplete coding sequences appeared to be uncoupled from the regulon, since their dependence on RPL24B differed from regular mRNAs. Third, different sister paralogs of the ribosomal proteins differed in their translation state in the wild-type. Some sister paralogs also differed in their response to the rpl24b mutation. In contrast to rpl24b, the pab2 pab8 mutant revealed few gene specific translational defects, but a group of seed storage protein mRNAs were stimulated in their ribosome occupancy. In the course of this work, while optimizing the statistical analysis of ribosome occupancy data, we collected 12 biological replicates of translation states from wild-type seedlings. We defined 20% of mRNAs as having a high variance in their translation state. Many of these mRNAs were functionally associated with responses to the environment, suggesting that subtle variation in the environmental conditions is sensed by plants and transduced to affect the translational efficiency of hundreds of mRNAs. These data represent the first genome

  6. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  7. Multiple classes of yeast mutants are defective in vacuole partitioning yet target vacuole proteins correctly.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y X; Zhao, H; Harding, T M; Gomes de Mesquita, D S; Woldringh, C L; Klionsky, D J; Munn, A L; Weisman, L S

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the vacuoles are partitioned from mother cells to daughter cells in a cell-cycle-coordinated process. The molecular basis of this event remains obscure. To date, few yeast mutants had been identified that are defective in vacuole partitioning (vac), and most such mutants are also defective in vacuole protein sorting (vps) from the Golgi to the vacuole. Both the vps mutants and previously identified non-vps vac mutants display an altered vacuolar morphology. Here, we report a new method to monitor vacuole inheritance and the isolation of six new non-vps vac mutants. They define five complementation groups (VAC8-VAC12). Unlike mutants identified previously, three of the complementation groups exhibit normal vacuolar morphology. Zygote studies revealed that these vac mutants are also defective in intervacuole communication. Although at least four pathways of protein delivery to the vacuole are known, only the Vps pathway seems to significantly overlap with vacuole partitioning. Mutants defective in both vacuole partitioning and endocytosis or vacuole partitioning and autophagy were not observed. However, one of the new vac mutants was additionally defective in direct protein transport from the cytoplasm to the vacuole. Images PMID:8885233

  8. Molecular interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Butera, Giovanna; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Donadelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies highlight the role of mutant p53 proteins in cancer cell growth and in the worsening of cancer patients' clinical outcome. Autophagy has been widely recognized as a main biological event involved in both the regulation of cancer cell proliferation and in the response of several anticancer drugs. A thorough analysis of scientific literature underlines the reciprocal interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy regulation. In this review, we analytically summarize recent findings, which indicate that gain-of-function (GOF) mutant p53 proteins counteract the autophagic machinery by various molecular mechanisms including the regulation of AMPK and Akt/mTOR pathways, autophagy-related genes (ATGs), HIF-1α target genes, and the mitochondrial citrate carrier CIC. Moreover, we report that mutant p53 protein stability is affected by lysosome-mediated degradation through macroautophagy or chaperone-mediated autophagy, suggesting the use of autophagy stimulators to counteract mutant p53 oncogenic activity. Finally, we discuss the functional role of the interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy in cancer progression, a fundamental knowledge to design more effective therapies against cancers bearing mutant TP53 gene.

  9. Accelerated Disease Onset with Stabilized Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked Mutant TDP-43 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shoji; Kaneko, Kumi; Yamanaka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal protein accumulation is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dominant mutations in the TDP-43 gene are causative for familial ALS; however, the relationship between mutant protein biochemical phenotypes and disease course and their significance to disease pathomechanism are not known. Here, we found that longer half-lives of mutant proteins correlated with accelerated disease onset. Based on our findings, we established a cell model in which chronic stabilization of wild-type TDP-43 protein provoked cytotoxicity and recapitulated pathogenic protein cleavage and insolubility to the detergent Sarkosyl, TDP-43 properties that have been observed in sporadic ALS lesions. Furthermore, these cells showed proteasomal impairment and dysregulation of their own mRNA levels. These results suggest that chronically increased stability of mutant or wild-type TDP-43 proteins results in a gain of toxicity through abnormal proteostasis. PMID:23235148

  10. The level of Yop proteins secreted by Yersinia enterocolitica is changed in maltose mutants.

    PubMed

    Brzostek, K; Raczkowska, A

    2001-10-16

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains express a set of plasmid-encoded proteins called Yops, involved in pathogenicity. We studied the influence of the maltose system on the production of Yop proteins and found that the level of Yop proteins of Y. enterocolitica O:9 was reduced in the presence of maltose. Transposon insertion mutants impaired with the maltose transport activity showed a decreased level in the production of Yop proteins. The transcription of the yopH gene for YopH phosphatase in these maltose mutants was unchanged and revealed a maltose mutation impaired in the secretion of Yop proteins instead of their expression.

  11. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  12. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kyla J; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R

    2016-03-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  14. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  15. Mutant p53 proteins counteract autophagic mechanism sensitizing cancer cells to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Oppici, Elisa; Dando, Ilaria; Butturini, Elena; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Mariotto, Sofia; Cellini, Barbara; Blandino, Giovanni; Palmieri, Marta; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in TP53 gene play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and cancer development. Here, we report that gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins inhibit the autophagic pathway favoring antiapoptotic effects as well as proliferation of pancreas and breast cancer cells. We found that mutant p53 significantly counteracts the formation of autophagic vesicles and their fusion with lysosomes throughout the repression of some key autophagy-related proteins and enzymes as BECN1 (and P-BECN1), DRAM1, ATG12, SESN1/2 and P-AMPK with the concomitant stimulation of mTOR signaling. As a paradigm of this mechanism, we show that atg12 gene repression was mediated by the recruitment of the p50 NF-κB/mutant p53 protein complex onto the atg12 promoter. Either mutant p53 or p50 NF-κB depletion downregulates atg12 gene expression. We further correlated the low expression levels of autophagic genes (atg12, becn1, sesn1, and dram1) with a reduced relapse free survival (RFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) of breast cancer patients carrying TP53 gene mutations conferring a prognostic value to this mutant p53-and autophagy-related signature. Interestingly, the mutant p53-driven mTOR stimulation sensitized cancer cells to the treatment with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. All these results reveal a novel mechanism through which mutant p53 proteins promote cancer cell proliferation with the concomitant inhibition of autophagy.

  16. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  17. Comparative analysis of HSV-1 temperature mutants proteins and their reactivity.

    PubMed

    Litwińska, B; Biesiadecka, A; Gut, W; Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Protein's characteristic of temperature sensitive (ts 28 degrees C) and temperature resistant (tr 39 degrees C) mutants and native HSV-1 strain was performed. Electrophoretic and Western-blott analysis of virus proteins and their reactivity tested by immunoenzymatic staining was the main subject of the presented paper. There were found no significant differences in the protein structure between native strain and its temperature clones in electrophoresis. It is important that slight differences observed in protein's antigenic reactivity of ts 28 degrees C (54 kDa) and tr 39 degrees C (99-100; 160 kDa), do not influence on the possible application of the mutants for immunization and challenging.

  18. Expression of alcohol-soluble endosperm proteins in maize single and double mutants.

    PubMed

    Paulis, J W; Bietz, J A; Bogyo, T P; Darrah, L L; Zuber, M S

    1990-05-01

    Many maize (Zea mays L.) mutant genes exist. Some affect protein content or composition, while others modify carbohydrates or kernel phenotype. In doublemutant lines, two mutant genes are present. We know little about interactions of such genes, however. We therefore examined a normal maize inbred, B37, 10 near-isogenic single mutants and 46 double mutants to analyze quantitative effects on alcohol-soluble endosperm proteins. Proteins were extracted with 70% ethanol0.5% sodium acetate-5% mercaptoethanol, and fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Early peaks were alcohol-soluble glutelin (ASG) subunits, while late peaks contained zein. Results were quantified and statistically analyzed. In many double mutants, protein compositions differed significantly from averages of compositions of corresponding single mutants. For example, a high-methionine, water-insoluble ASG is absent when the opaque-2 (o2) gene combines with shrunken-1 (sh1) or surgary-1 (su1). Another water-insoluble ASG nearly doubled when floury-2 (fl2) andsu1 combined. A high-proline, high-histidine, water-soluble ASG nearly doubled in combinations offl2 witho2,su1 and sugary-2 (su2). Zein was about half its expected value wheno2 combined with amylose-extender (ae), floury-1 (fl1), soft-starch (h),sh1 andsu1. Thus, rapid protein extraction and quantitative RP-HPLC showed major new epistatic and synergistic effects of several mutant genes on protein composition. Unexpectedly, these effects often involve genes that primarily affect starch composition or kernel phenotype. Alcohol-soluble proteins often vary in amount, as ino2 lines. They also differ in nutritional value. Thus, RP-HPLC analysis of these proteins can identify nutritionally superior genotypes, and may help explain the basis of such quality.

  19. The effect of Mutant p53 Proteins on Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Matilda; Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Ouchida, Amanda Tomie; Queiroz, Andre Lima; Smith, Dominique; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Muller, Patricia A; Norberg, Erik; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin

    2017-10-09

    TP53 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers. Unlike other tumor suppressors that are frequently deleted or acquire loss-of-function mutations, the majority of TP53 mutations in tumors are missense substitutions, which lead to the expression of full-length mutant proteins that accumulate in cancer cells and may confer unique gain-of-function (GOF) activities to promote tumorigenic events. Recently, mutant p53 proteins have been shown to mediate metabolic changes as a novel GOF to promote tumor development. There is a strong rationale that the GOF activities, including alterations in cellular metabolism, might vary between the different p53 mutants. Accordingly, the effect of different mutant p53 proteins on cancer cell metabolism is largely unknown. In this study, we have metabolically profiled several individual frequently occurring p53 mutants in cancers, focusing on glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Our investigation highlights the diversity of different p53 mutants in terms of their effect on metabolism for the development of more effective targeted pharmacological approaches towards variants of mutant p53. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. microRNAs: short non-coding bullets of gain of function mutant p53 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donzelli, Sara; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    TP53 gene mutations are present in more than half of all human cancers. The resulting proteins are mostly full-length with a single aminoacid change and are abundantly present in cancer cells. Some of mutant p53 proteins gain oncogenic activities through which actively contribute to the aberrant cell proliferation, increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli and ability to metastatize of cancer cells. Gain of function mutant p53 proteins can transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large plethora of target genes. This mainly occurs through the formation of oncogenic transcriptional competent complexes that include mutant p53 protein, known transcription factors, posttranslational modifiers and scaffold proteins. Mutant p53 protein can also transcriptionally regulate the expression of microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Each microRNA can putatively target the expression of hundred mRNAs and consequently impact on many cellular functions. Thus, gain of function mutant p53 proteins can exert their oncogenic activities through the modulation of both non-coding and coding regions of human genome. PMID:25594041

  1. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  2. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in the farnesylation of Ras proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, L E; Judd, S R; Farnsworth, C C; Powers, S; Gelb, M H; Glomset, J A; Tamanoi, F

    1990-01-01

    Ras proteins are post-translationally modified by farnesylation. In the present investigation, we identified an activity in crude soluble extracts of yeast cells that catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl moiety from farnesyl pyrophosphate to yeast RAS2 protein. RAS2 proteins having a C-terminal Cys-Ali-Ali-Xaa sequence (where Ali is an aliphatic amino acid and Xaa is the unspecified C-terminal amino acid) served as substrates for this reaction, whereas RAS2 proteins with an altered or deleted Cys-Ali-Ali-Xaa sequence did not. A yeast mutant, dpr1/ram1, originally isolated as a Ras-processing mutant was shown to be defective in farnesyltransferase activity. In addition, another mutant, ram2, also was defective in the transferase activity. These results demonstrate that at least two genes, DPR1/RAM1 and RAM2, are required for the farnesyltransferase activity in yeast. Images PMID:2124698

  3. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  4. Nuclear inheritance of erythromycin resistance in human cells: New class of mitochondrial protein synthesis mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The characterization of two new erythromycin-resistant mutants of HeLa cells is described. The strains ERY2305 and ERY2309 both exhibited resistance to erythromycin in growth assays and cell-free mitochondrial protein synthesis assays. The erythromycin resistance phenotype could not be transferred by cybridization. The mutation appeared to be encoded in the nucleus and inherited as a recessive trait. These two mutants, therefore, represent a new class of erythromycin-resistant mutants in human cells that is distinct from the cytoplasmically inherited mutation in strain ERY2301 described previously.

  5. Engineered antibody therapies to counteract mutant huntingtin and related toxic intracellular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butler, David C.; McLear, Julie A.; Messer, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The engineered antibody approach to Huntington's disease (HD) therapeutics is based on the premise that significantly lowering the levels of the primary misfolded mutant protein will reduce abnormal protein interactions and direct toxic effects of the misfolded huntingtin (HTT). This will in turn reduce the pathologic stress on cells, and normalize intrinsic proteostasis. Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are single-chain (scFv) and single-domain (dAb; nanobody) variable fragments that can retain the affinity and specificity of full-length antibodies, but can be selected and engineered as genes. Functionally, they represent a protein-based approach to the problem of aberrant mutant protein folding, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and aggregation. Several intrabodies that bind on either side of the expanded polyglutamine tract of mutant HTT have been reported to improve the mutant phenotype in cell and organotypic cultures, fruit flies, and mice. Further refinements to the difficult challenges of intraneuronal delivery, cytoplasmic folding, and long-term efficacy are in progress. This review covers published studies and emerging approaches on the choice of targets, selection and engineering methods, gene and protein delivery options, and testing of candidates in cell and animal models. The resultant antibody fragments can be used as direct therapeutics and as target validation/drug discovery tools for HD, while the technology is also applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative and other diseases that are triggered by toxic proteins. PMID:22120646

  6. Ribosomal protein alterations in thiostrepton- and Micrococcin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wienen, B; Ehrlich, R; Stöffler-Meilicke, M; Stöffler, G; Smith, I; Weiss, D; Vince, R; Pestka, S

    1979-08-25

    Ribosomal proteins of parental thiostrepton- and micrococcin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis cysA14 and thiostrepton-and micrococcin-resistant mutants were compared. Several electrophoretic and immunochemical techniques showed unambiguously that BS-L11 was not present on 50 S ribosomal subunits from the six thiostrepton-resistant mutants. Protein BS-L11 reappeared in all six revertants from thiostrepton resistance to thiostrepton sensitivity. No definitive protein alteration could be ascribed to the mutation from micrococcin sensitivity to resistance. It was also demonstrated that B. subtilis protein BS-L11 is homologous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L11. The finding that ribosomes from thiostrepton-resistant mutants do not contain protein L11 suggests that L11 not only is involved in binding of thiostrepton, but also, when mutationally altered, confers resistance to this antibiotic. Although the ribosomes of these strains do not contain protein L11, all thiostrepton-resistant mutants showed the same viability as the parental strain. Thus protein L11 cannot be obligatory for the structure and function of the ribosome.

  7. Protein kinase PKR mutants resistant to the poxvirus pseudosubstrate K3L protein.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Joo; Liu, Furong; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Ung, Tekly L; Cao, Chune; Dar, Arvin C; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2008-11-04

    As part of the mammalian cell innate immune response, the double-stranded RNA activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha to inhibit protein synthesis and thus block viral replication. Poxviruses including vaccinia and smallpox viruses express PKR inhibitors such as the vaccinia virus K3L protein that resembles the N-terminal substrate-targeting domain of eIF2alpha. Whereas high-level expression of human PKR was toxic in yeast, this growth inhibition was suppressed by coexpression of the K3L protein. We used this yeast assay to screen for PKR mutants that are resistant to K3L inhibition, and we identified 12 mutations mapping to the C-terminal lobe of the PKR kinase domain. The PKR mutations specifically conferred resistance to the K3L protein both in yeast and in vitro. Consistently, the PKR-D486V mutation led to nearly a 15-fold decrease in K3L binding affinity yet did not impair eIF2alpha phosphorylation. Our results support the identification of the eIF2alpha-binding site on an extensive face of the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain, and they indicate that subtle changes to the PKR kinase domain can drastically impact pseudosubstrate inhibition while leaving substrate phosphorylation intact. We propose that these paradoxical effects of the PKR mutations on pseudosubstrate vs. substrate interactions reflect differences between the rigid K3L protein and the plastic nature of eIF2alpha around the Ser-51 phosphorylation site.

  8. Viable transmembrane region mutants of bacteriophage M13 coat protein prepared by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deber, C M

    1991-10-31

    Bacteriophage M13 coat protein - a 50-residue protein located at the E. coli host membrane during phage reproduction - is subjected to cytoplasmic, membrane-bound, and DNA-interactive environments during the phage life cycle. In research to examine the specific features of primary/secondary structure in the effective transmembrane (TM) region of the protein (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI) which modulate its capacity to respond conformationally to the progressive influences of these varying environments, we have prepared over two dozen viable mutant phages with alterations in their coat protein TM regions. Mutants were obtained through use of site-directed mutagenesis techniques in combination with three "randomized" oligonucleotides which spanned the TM region. No subcloning was required. Among mutations observed were those in which each of the four TM Val residues was changed to Ala, and several with increased Ser or Thr content, including one double Ser mutant (G23S-A25S). Polar substitutions arising at Gly23 and Tyr24-including G23D, Y24H, Y24D and Y24N-suggested that this local segment resides external to the host membrane. Milligram quantities of mutant coat proteins are obtained by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, with isotopic (e.g., 13C) labelling at desired sites, for subsequent characterization and conformational analysis in membrane-mimetic media.

  9. Developmental Defects in Mutants of the PsbP Domain Protein 5 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Roose, Johnna L.; Frankel, Laurie K.; Bricker, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    Plants contain an extensive family of PsbP-related proteins termed PsbP-like (PPL) and PsbP domain (PPD) proteins, which are localized to the thylakoid lumen. The founding member of this family, PsbP, is an established component of the Photosystem II (PS II) enzyme, and the PPL proteins have also been functionally linked to other photosynthetic processes. However, the functions of the remaining seven PPD proteins are unknown. To elucidate the function of the PPD5 protein (At5g11450) in Arabidopsis, we have characterized a mutant T-DNA insertion line (SALK_061118) as well as several RNAi lines designed to suppress the expression of this gene. The functions of the photosynthetic electron transfer reactions are largely unaltered in the ppd5 mutants, except for a modest though significant decrease in NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH) activity. Interestingly, these mutants show striking plant developmental and morphological defects. Relative to the wild-type Col-0 plants, the ppd5 mutants exhibit both increased lateral root branching and defects associated with axillary bud formation. These defects include the formation of additional rosettes originating from axils at the base of the plant as well as aerial rosettes formed at the axils of the first few nodes of the shoot. The root-branching phenotype is chemically complemented by treatment with the synthetic strigolactone, GR24. We propose that the developmental defects observed in the ppd5 mutants are related to a deficiency in strigolactone biosynthesis. PMID:22174848

  10. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  11. TATA-Binding Protein Mutants That Increase Transcription from Enhancerless and Repressed Promoters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geisberg, Joseph V.; Struhl, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Using a genetic screen, we isolated three TATA-binding protein (TBP) mutants that increase transcription from promoters that are repressed by the Cyc8-Tup1 or Sin3-Rpd3 corepressors or that lack an enhancer element, but not from an equivalently weak promoter with a mutated TATA element. Increased transcription is observed when the TBP mutants are expressed at low levels in the presence of wild-type TBP. These TBP mutants are unable to support cell viability, and they are toxic in strains lacking Rpd3 histone deacetylase or when expressed at higher levels. Although these mutants do not detectably bind TATA elements in vitro, genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that they act directly at promoters and do not increase transcription by titration of a negative regulatory factor(s). The TBP mutants are mildly defective for associating with promoters responding to moderate or strong activators; in addition, they are severely defective for RNA polymerase (Pol) III but not Pol I transcription. These results suggest that, with respect to Pol II transcription, the TBP mutants specifically increase expression from core promoters. Biochemical analysis indicates that the TBP mutants are unaffected for TFIID complex formation, dimerization, and interactions with either the general negative regulator NC2 or the N-terminal inhibitory domain of TAF130. We speculate that these TBP mutants have an unusual structure that allows them to preferentially access TATA elements in chromatin templates. These TBP mutants define a criterion by which promoters repressed by Cyc8-Tup1 or Sin3-Rpd3 resemble enhancerless, but not TATA-defective, promoters; hence, they support the idea that these corepressors inhibit the function of activator proteins rather than the Pol II machinery. PMID:10669725

  12. Accumulation of the PX domain mutant Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 in aggresomes.

    PubMed

    Ádám, Csaba; Fekete, Anna; Bőgel, Gábor; Németh, Zsuzsanna; Tőkési, Natália; Ovádi, Judit; Liliom, Károly; Pesti, Szabolcs; Geiszt, Miklós; Buday, László

    2015-07-17

    Cells deploy quality control mechanisms to remove damaged or misfolded proteins. Recently, we have reported that a mutation (R43W) in the Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 resulted in aberrant intracellular localization. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of Tks4(R43W) depends on the intact microtubule network. Detergent-insoluble Tks4 mutant colocalizes with the centrosome and its aggregate is encaged by the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Both the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A inhibit markedly the aggresome formation in cells expressing Tks4(R43W). Finally, pretreatment of cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 markedly increases the level of aggresomes formed by Tks4(R43W). Furthermore, two additional mutant Tks4 proteins (Tks4(1-48) or Tks4(1-341)) have been investigated. Whereas the shorter Tks4 mutant, Tks4(1-48), shows no expression at all, the longer Tks4 truncation mutant accumulates in the nuclei of the cells. Our results suggest that misfolded Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4(R43W) is transported via the microtubule system to the aggresomes. Lack of expression of Tks4(1-48) or aberrant intracellular expressions of Tks4(R43W) and Tks4(1-341) strongly suggest that these mutations result in dysfunctional proteins which are not capable of operating properly, leading to the development of FTHS.

  13. Limited temperature-sensitive transactivation by mutant adenovirus type 2 E1a proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fahnestock, M L; Lewis, J B

    1989-01-01

    A series of linker-scanning and deletion mutations was generated in the transactivating domain of the larger, 289-amino-acid-residue E1a protein of adenovirus type 2. Mutant genes were recombined into virus to assay the ability of the variant E1a proteins to activate expression of an E1a-dependent viral gene during infection. Results of assays performed at 32, 37, and 40 degrees C indicated that at least 2 of the 10 mutants tested showed limited temperature sensitivity for transactivation. Images PMID:2523001

  14. Conditionally lethal ribosomal protein mutants: characterization of a locus required for modification of 50S subunit proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, S R; Maples, V F; Champney, W S

    1977-01-01

    Mutagenized P1 bacteriophage were used to transduce a marker (aroE) adjacent to the cluster or ribosomal protein genes located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Linked temperature-sensitive transductants were isolated and characterized. A mutant unable to grow at 44 degrees was found to be defective in protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. At the restrictive temperature mutant cells lost all polyribosomes. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins revealed alterations in at least four 50S subunit proteins. The mutation (called rimE1, ribosomal protein modification) mapped between rpsE and aroE. It is suggested that the rimE locus is the structural gene for an activity that modifies a selected number of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:322127

  15. Understanding protein lids: kinetic analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    1999-08-31

    In previous work we tested what three amino acid sequences could serve as a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase [Sun, J., and Sampson, N. S. (1998) Protein Sci. 7, 1495-1505]. We generated a genetic library encoding all 8000 possible 3 amino acid combinations at the C-terminal hinge and selected for those combinations of amino acids that formed active mutants. These mutants were classified into six phylogenetic families. Two families resembled wild-type hinges, and four families represented new types of hinges. In this work, the kinetic characteristics and thermal stabilities of mutants representing each of these families were determined in order to understand what properties make an efficient protein hinge, and why all of the families are not observed in nature. From a steady-state kinetic analysis of our mutants, it is clear that the partitioning between protonation of intermediate to form product and intermediate release from the enzyme surface to form methylglyoxal (a decomposition product) is not affected. The two most impaired mutants undergo a change in rate-limiting step from enediol formation to dihydroxyacetone phosphate binding. Thus, it appears that k(cat)/K(m)'s are reduced relative to wild type as a result of slower Michaelis complex formation and dissociation, rather than increased loop opening speed.

  16. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  17. Enhanced Priming of Adaptive Immunity by Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants with High-Level Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie; Bahunde, Faith; Thompson, Afton; Yu, Jae-Sung; Jacobs, William R.; Letvin, Norm L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteria have features that make them attractive as potential vaccine vectors. The nonpathogenic and rapidly growing Mycobacterium smegmatis can express both Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and heterologous antigens from other pathogens, and it has been used as a viable vector for the development of live vaccines. In order to further improve antigen-specific immunogenicity of M. smegmatis, we screened a random transposon mutant library for mutants displaying enhanced efficiency of protein secretion (“high secretors”) and isolated 61 mutants showing enhanced endogenic and transgenic protein secretion. Sequence analysis identified a total of 54 genes involved in optimal secretion of insert proteins, as well as multiple independent transposon insertions localized within the same genomic loci and operons. The majority of transposon insertions occurred in genes that have no known protein secretion function. These transposon mutants were shown to prime antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses better than the parental strain. Specifically, upon introducing the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag gene into these transposon mutant strains, we observed that they primed SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses significantly better than the control prime immunization in a heterologous prime/boost regimen. Our results reveal a dependence on bacterial secretion of mycobacterial and foreign antigens for the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in vivo. The data also suggest that these M. smegmatis transposon mutants could be used as novel live attenuated vaccine strains to express foreign antigens, such as those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and induce strong antigen-specific T cell responses. PMID:22787192

  18. Hsp90 prevents interaction between CHIP and HERG proteins to facilitate maturation of wild-type and mutant HERG proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Chisato; Li, Peili; Kurata, Yasutaka; Hoshikawa, Yoshiko; Morikawa, Kumi; Maharani, Nani; Higaki, Katsumi; Sasano, Tetsuro; Notsu, Tomomi; Ishido, Yuko; Miake, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Nakai, Akira; Murata, Shigeo; Yoshida, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2013-12-01

    We examined the role of Hsp90 in expression and maturation of wild-type (WT) and mutant ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) proteins by using Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol, and Hsp90 overexpression. The proteins were expressed in HEK293 cells or collected from HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes, and analysed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. GA and radicicol suppressed maturation of HERG-FLAG proteins and increased their immature forms. Co-expression of Hsp90 counteracted the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors and suppressed ubiquitination of HERG proteins. Overexpressed Hsp90 also inhibited the binding of endogenous C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) to HERG-FLAG proteins. Hsp90-induced increase of functional HERG proteins was verified by their increased expression on the cell surface and enhanced HERG channel currents. CHIP overexpression decreased both mature and immature forms of HERG-FLAG proteins in cells treated with GA. Hsp90 facilitated maturation of endogenous ERG proteins, whereas CHIP decreased both forms of ERG proteins in HL-1 cells. Mutant HERG proteins harbouring disease-causing missense mutations were mainly in the immature form and had a higher binding capacity to CHIP than the WT; Hsp90 overexpression suppressed this association. Overexpressed Hsp90 increased the mature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins, reduced its ubiquitinated form, increased its immunoreactivity in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the plasma membrane, and increased the mutant-mediated membrane current. CHIP overexpression decreased the immature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins. Enhancement of HERG protein expression through Hsp90 inhibition of CHIP binding might be a novel therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome 2 caused by trafficking abnormalities of HERG proteins.

  19. Distinct tumor protein p53 mutants in breast cancer subgroups.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Anne; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Wittmer, Evelyne; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Bertheau, Philippe; Espié, Marc; Plassa, Louis-François; Cottu, Paul; Marty, Michel; André, Fabrice; Sotiriou, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-03-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is mutated in approximately 30% of breast cancers, but this frequency fluctuates widely between subclasses. We investigated the p53 mutation status in 572 breast tumors, classified into luminal, basal and molecular apocrine subgroups. As expected, the lowest mutation frequency was observed in luminal (26%), and the highest in basal (88%) tumors. Luminal tumors showed significantly higher frequency of substitutions (82 vs. 65%), notably A/T to G/C transitions (31 vs. 15%), whereas molecular apocrine and basal tumors presented much higher frequencies of complex mutations (deletions/insertions) (36 and 33%, respectively, vs. 18%). Accordingly, missense mutations were significantly more frequent in luminal tumors (75 vs. 54%), whereas basal tumors displayed significantly increased rates of TP53 truncations (43 vs. 25%), resulting in loss of function and/or expression. Interestingly, as basal tumors, molecular apocrine tumors presented with a high rate of complex mutations, but paradoxically, these were not associated with increased frequency of p53 truncation. As in luminal tumors, this could reflect a selective pressure for p53 gain of function, possibly through P63/P73 inactivation. Collectively, these observations point not only to different mechanisms of TP53 alterations, but also to different functional consequences in the different breast cancer subtypes. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  20. The first mutant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that forms a red chromophore.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Alexander S; Subach, Fedor V; Yampolsky, Ilia V; King, William; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2008-04-22

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, and its mutants are widely used in biomedical studies as fluorescent markers. In spite of the enormous efforts of academia and industry toward generating its red fluorescent mutants, no GFP variants with emission maximum at more than 529 nm have been developed during the 15 years since its cloning. Here, we used a new strategy of molecular evolution aimed at generating a red-emitting mutant of GFP. As a result, we have succeeded in producing the first GFP mutant that substantially matures to the red-emitting state with excitation and emission maxima at 555 and 585 nm, respectively. A novel, nonoxidative mechanism for formation of the red chromophore in this mutant that includes a dehydration of the Ser65 side chain has been proposed. Model experiments showed that the novel dual-color GFP mutant with green and red emission is suitable for multicolor flow cytometry as an additional color since it is clearly separable from both green and red fluorescent tags.

  1. The First Mutant of the Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein That Forms a Red Chromophore†

    PubMed Central

    Mishin, Alexander S.; Subach, Fedor V.; Yampolsky, Ilia V.; King, William; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, and its mutants are widely used in biomedical studies as fluorescent markers. In spite of the enormous efforts of academia and industry toward generating its red fluorescent mutants, no GFP variants with emission maximum at more than 529 nm have been developed during the 15 years since its cloning. Here, we used a new strategy of molecular evolution aimed at generating a red-emitting mutant of GFP. As a result, we have succeeded in producing the first GFP mutant that substantially matures to the red-emitting state with excitation and emission maxima at 555 and 585 nm, respectively. A novel, nonoxidative mechanism for formation of the red chromophore in this mutant that includes a dehydration of the Ser65 side chain has been proposed. Model experiments showed that the novel dual-color GFP mutant with green and red emission is suitable for multicolor flow cytometry as an additional color since it is clearly separable from both green and red fluorescent tags. PMID:18366185

  2. Phenylarsine Oxide Can Induce the Arsenite-Resistance Mutant PML Protein Solubility Changes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Han; Chen, Ye Jia; Wang, Chao; Lan, Yong Fei; Yang, Chang; Wang, Qian Qian; Hussain, Liaqat; Maimaitiying, Yasen; Islam, Khairul; Naranmandura, Hua

    2017-01-25

    Arsenic trioxide (As₂O₃) has recently become one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and its molecular mechanism has also been largely investigated. However, it has been reported that As₂O₃ resistant patients are frequently found in relapsed APL after consolidation therapy, which is due to the point mutations in B-box type 2 motifs of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene. In the present study, we for the first time establish whether organic arsenic species phenylarsine oxide (PAO) could induce the mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation. Here, three different PML protein variants (i.e., PML-IV, PML-V and mutant PML-A216V) were overexpressed in HEK293T cells and then exposed to PAO in time- and dose-dependent manners. Interestingly, PAO is found to have potential effect on induction of mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation, but no appreciable effects were found following exposure to high concentrations of iAs(III), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) and adriamycin (doxorubicin), even though they cause cell death. Our current data strongly indicate that PAO has good effects on the mutant PML protein solubility changes, and it may be helpful for improving the therapeutic strategies for arsenic-resistant APL treatments in the near future.

  3. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  4. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  5. Phenylarsine Oxide Can Induce the Arsenite-Resistance Mutant PML Protein Solubility Changes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu Han; Chen, Ye Jia; Wang, Chao; Lan, Yong Fei; Yang, Chang; Wang, Qian Qian; Hussain, Liaqat; Maimaitiying, Yasen; Islam, Khairul; Naranmandura, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently become one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and its molecular mechanism has also been largely investigated. However, it has been reported that As2O3 resistant patients are frequently found in relapsed APL after consolidation therapy, which is due to the point mutations in B-box type 2 motifs of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene. In the present study, we for the first time establish whether organic arsenic species phenylarsine oxide (PAO) could induce the mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation. Here, three different PML protein variants (i.e., PML-IV, PML-V and mutant PML-A216V) were overexpressed in HEK293T cells and then exposed to PAO in time- and dose-dependent manners. Interestingly, PAO is found to have potential effect on induction of mutant PML-IV (A216V) protein solubility changes and degradation, but no appreciable effects were found following exposure to high concentrations of iAsIII, dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) and adriamycin (doxorubicin), even though they cause cell death. Our current data strongly indicate that PAO has good effects on the mutant PML protein solubility changes, and it may be helpful for improving the therapeutic strategies for arsenic-resistant APL treatments in the near future. PMID:28125064

  6. Characterization of Conserved Region 2-Deficient Mutants of the Cytomegalovirus Egress Protein pM53

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, Madlen; Bosse, Jens B.; Wagner, Felicia M.; Schauflinger, Martin; Walther, Paul; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2012-01-01

    Dominant-negative (DN) mutants are powerful tools for studying essential protein-protein interactions. A systematic genetic screen of the essential murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) protein pM53 identified the accumulation of inhibitory mutations within conserved region 2 (CR2) and CR4. The strong inhibitory potential of these CR4 mutants is characterized by a particular phenotype. The DN effect of the small insertion mutations in CR2 was too weak to analyze (M. Popa, Z. Ruzsics, M. Lötzerich, L. Dölken, C. Buser, P. Walther, and U. H. Koszinowski, J. Virol. 84:9035–9046, 2010); therefore, the present study describes the construction of M53 alleles lacking CR2 (either completely or partially) and subsequent examination of the DN effect on MCMV replication upon conditional expression. Overexpression of CR2-deficient pM53 inhibited virus production by about 10,000-fold. This was due to interference with capsid export from the nucleus and viral genome cleavage/packaging. In addition, the fate of the nuclear envelopment complex in the presence of DN pM53 overexpression was analyzed. The CR2 mutants were able to bind to pM50, albeit to a lesser extent than the wild-type protein, and relocalized the wild-type nuclear envelope complex in infected cells. Unlike the CR4 DN, the CR2 DN mutants did not affect the stability of pM50. PMID:22993161

  7. Antigenic Structure of Outer Membrane Protein E of Moraxella catarrhalis and Construction and Characterization of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Yuskiw, Norine; Hiltke, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which possesses several characteristics indicating that the protein will be an effective vaccine antigen. To study the antigenic structure of OMP E, eight monoclonal antibodies were developed and characterized. Three of the antibodies recognized epitopes which are present on the bacterial surface. Fusion peptides corresponding to overlapping regions of OMP E were constructed, and immunoblot assays were performed to localize the areas of the molecule bound by the monoclonal antibodies. These studies identified a surface-exposed epitope in the region of amino acids 80 through 180. To further study the protein, two mutants which lack OMP E were constructed. In bactericidal assays, the mutants were more readily killed by normal human serum compared to the isogenic parent strains. These results indicate that OMP E is involved in the expression of serum resistance of M. catarrhalis. PMID:11035732

  8. Elongation factor Tu mutants expand amino acid tolerance of protein biosynthesis system.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yoshio; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Takuya; Sisido, Masahiko

    2007-11-21

    Nonnatural amino acids have been introduced into proteins using expanded protein biosynthesis systems. However, some nonnatural amino acids, especially those containing large aromatic groups, are not efficiently incorporated into proteins. Reduced binding efficiency of aminoacylated tRNAs to elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is likely to limit incorporation of large amino acids. Our previous studies suggested that tRNAs carrying large nonnatural amino acids are bound less tightly to EF-Tu than natural amino acids. To expand the availability of nonnatural mutagenesis, EF-Tu from the E. coli translation system was improved to accept such large amino acids. We synthesized EF-Tu mutants, in which the binding pocket of the aminoacyl moiety of aminoacyl-tRNA was enlarged. L-1-Pyrenylalanine, L-2-pyrenylalanine, and DL-2-anthraquinonylalanine, which are hardly or only slightly incorporated with the wild-type EF-Tu, were successfully incorporated into a protein using these EF-Tu mutants.

  9. Glycolipid analyses of light-harvesting chlorosomes from envelope protein mutants of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Thweatt, Jennifer; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Chlorosomes are large and efficient light-harvesting organelles in green photosynthetic bacteria, and they characteristically contain large numbers of bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e molecules. Self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll pigments are surrounded by a monolayer envelope membrane comprised of glycolipids and Csm proteins. Here, we analyzed glycolipid compositions of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum mutants lacking one, two, or three Csm proteins by HPLC equipped with an evaporative light-scattering detector. The ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglyceride (MGDG) to rhamnosylgalactosyldiacylglyceride (RGDG) was smaller in chlorosomes from mutants lacking two or three proteins in CsmC/D/H motif family than in chlorosomes from the wild-type, whereas chlorosomes lacking CsmIJ showed relatively less RGDG than MGDG. The results suggest that the CsmC, CsmD, CsmH, and other chlorosome proteins are involved in organizing MGDG and RGDG and thereby affect the size and shape of the chlorosome.

  10. Accessibility and dynamics of Cys residues in Bacteriophage IKe and M13 major coat protein mutants.

    PubMed

    Khan, A R; Williams, K A; Boggs, J M; Deber, C M

    1995-09-26

    The filamentous bacteriophage major coat protein occurs as a membrane-spanning assembly intermediate prior to incorporation into the lipid-free virion. To gain insight into how this small, multifunctional protein is able to be stably incorporated into both of these distinct environments, the reactive sulfhydryl group of IKe and M13 coat protein Cys mutants was exploited to probe the mobility and environment of this residue at several loci within the hydrophobic domain of these proteins. IKe mutants P30C, G39C, and G39C-V36A and M13 mutant Y24C-V31A, each previously obtained from randomized mutagenesis, were characterized in the intact virion, the intermediate spheroidal S-form, and in membrane-mimetic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. The accessibility of the Cys sulfhydryl in the virion was examined by reaction with [14C]iodoacetamide (14C-IAN) and other alkylating agents. The IKe mutants G39C and G39C-V36A were found to be the most reactive with 14C-IAN and thus the most accessible, although this accessibility was subject to strict steric constraints since only the smallest sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents were able to modify the Cys39 locus. The spin probe proxyliodoacetamide (PIAN) was used to characterize Cys side chain mobility by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The M13 mutant Y24C-V31A Cys side chain in the phage was observed to be the most mobile, with slightly less mobility for IKe mutant P30C and considerably less for G39C mutants. The SDS micelle-bound forms of the Cys mutants all exhibited enhanced side chain mobility compared to the virion form, with the extent of mobility dependent upon the specific location of the Cys residue. EPR and fluorescence quenching results show that the Cys side chain in the Y24C-V31A S-form is largely immobilized and inaccessible in comparison to the virion and micelle-solubilized forms. The overall results are interpreted in terms of the structural changes accompanying disassembly and

  11. Random Screening for Dominant-Negative Mutants of the Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Protein M50▿

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Brigitte; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Buser, Christopher; Adler, Barbara; Walther, Paul; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of gene products by dominant-negative (DN) mutants is a powerful tool to assign functions to proteins. Here, we present a two-step procedure to establish a random screen for DN alleles, using the essential murine cytomegalovirus gene M50 as an example. First, loss-of-function mutants from a linker-scanning library were tested for inhibition of virus reconstitution with the help of FLP-mediated ectopic insertion of the mutants into the viral genome. Second, DN candidates were confirmed by conditional expression of the inhibitory proteins in the virus context. This allowed the quantification of the inhibitory effect, the identification of the morphogenesis block, and the construction of DN mutants with improved activity. Based on these observations a DN mutant of the homologous gene (UL50) in human cytomegalovirus was predicted and constructed. Our data suggest that a proline-rich sequence motif in the variable region of M50/UL50 represents a new functional site which is essential for nuclear egress of cytomegalovirus capsids. PMID:17376929

  12. Random screening for dominant-negative mutants of the cytomegalovirus nuclear egress protein M50.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Brigitte; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Buser, Christopher; Adler, Barbara; Walther, Paul; Koszinowski, Ulrich H

    2007-06-01

    Inactivation of gene products by dominant-negative (DN) mutants is a powerful tool to assign functions to proteins. Here, we present a two-step procedure to establish a random screen for DN alleles, using the essential murine cytomegalovirus gene M50 as an example. First, loss-of-function mutants from a linker-scanning library were tested for inhibition of virus reconstitution with the help of FLP-mediated ectopic insertion of the mutants into the viral genome. Second, DN candidates were confirmed by conditional expression of the inhibitory proteins in the virus context. This allowed the quantification of the inhibitory effect, the identification of the morphogenesis block, and the construction of DN mutants with improved activity. Based on these observations a DN mutant of the homologous gene (UL50) in human cytomegalovirus was predicted and constructed. Our data suggest that a proline-rich sequence motif in the variable region of M50/UL50 represents a new functional site which is essential for nuclear egress of cytomegalovirus capsids.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Pediocin AcH Chimeric Protein Mutants with Altered Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kurt W.; Schamber, Robin; Osmanagaoglu, Ozlem; Ray, Bibek

    1998-01-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14–20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to ∼60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed ∼2.8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin. PMID:9603806

  14. Transforming mutant v-mos protein kinases that are deficient in in vitro autophosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R S; Donoghue, D J

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the importance of specific serine residues for autophosphorylation and transformation by serine-threonine protein kinase p37mos. When either serine 326 or 358 was replaced with alanine, the resulting mutant protein retained the ability to transform NIH 3T3 cells but failed to autophosphorylate in vitro. These studies represent the first functional uncoupling of these two activities for p37mos. Images PMID:2528689

  15. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3)

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production. PMID:28338018

  16. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3).

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J; Heipieper, Hermann J; Nørholm, Morten H H; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-03-24

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production.

  17. Suppressors of the Chloroplast Protein Import Mutant tic40 Reveal a Genetic Link between Protein Import and Thylakoid Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Jocelyn; Trösch, Raphael; Wu, Feijie; Ling, Qihua; Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Töpel, Mats; Nawaz, Fahim; Jarvis, Paul

    2017-07-01

    To extend our understanding of chloroplast protein import and the role played by the import machinery component Tic40, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of chlorotic tic40 knockout mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants. As a result, two suppressor of tic40 loci, stic1 and stic2, were identified and characterized. The stic1 locus corresponds to the gene ALBINO4 (ALB4), which encodes a paralog of the well-known thylakoid protein targeting factor ALB3. The stic2 locus identified a previously unknown stromal protein that interacts physically with both ALB4 and ALB3. Genetic studies showed that ALB4 and STIC2 act together in a common pathway that also involves cpSRP54 and cpFtsY. Thus, we conclude that ALB4 and STIC2 both participate in thylakoid protein targeting, potentially for a specific subset of thylakoidal proteins, and that this targeting pathway becomes disadvantageous to the plant in the absence of Tic40. As the stic1 and stic2 mutants both suppressed tic40 specifically (other TIC-related mutants were not suppressed), we hypothesize that Tic40 is a multifunctional protein that, in addition to its originally described role in protein import, is able to influence downstream processes leading to thylakoid biogenesis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  19. The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci.

  20. Two novel CRX mutant proteins causing autosomal dominant Leber congenital amaurosis interact differently with NRL.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Lorenzo L; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Boobalan, Elangovan; Sergeev, Yuri V; Caruso, Rafael C; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand; Johnson, Mary A; Brooks, Brian P

    2010-06-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a congenital retinal dystrophy characterized by severe visual loss in infancy and nystagmus. Although most often inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, rare individuals with mutations in the cone-rod homeobox gene, CRX, have dominant disease. CRX is critical for photoreceptor development and acts synergistically with the leucine-zipper transcription factor, NRL. We report on the phenotype of two individuals with LCA due to novel, de novo CRX mutations, c.G264T(p.K74N) and c.413delT(p.I138fs48), that reduce transactivation in vitro to 10% and 30% of control values, respectively. Whereas the c.413delT(p.I138fs48) mutant allows co-expressed NRL to transactivate independently at its normal, baseline level, the c.G264T(p.K74N) mutant reduces co-expressed NRL transactivation and reduces steady state levels of both proteins. Although both mutant proteins predominantly localize normally to the nucleus, they also both show variable cytoplasmic localization. These observations suggest that some CRX-mediated LCA may result from effects beyond haploinsufficiency, such as the mutant protein interefering with other transcription factors' function. Such patients would therefore not likely benefit from a simple, gene-replacement strategy for their disease.

  1. Conformational states of mutant M13 coat proteins are regulated by transmembrane residues.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Glibowicka, M; Joensson, C; Deber, C M

    1993-03-05

    Mutational and structural analysis of the 28 viable bacteriophage M13 mutants obtained by randomized mutagenesis of the effective transmembrane (TM) segment of the 50-residue major coat (gene VIII) protein (residues 21-39) demonstrated that M13 coat protein functionality, as reflected by phage viability, is incompatible with an increase in Gly + beta-branched residue content in its TM core. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy performed in membrane environments on purified mutant coat proteins revealed that these proteins exist in a range of state(s), identified as helical monomers and dimers and polymeric (alpha-helical and/or beta-sheet) species, of which relative populations, and thermally induced conformational transitions, were dependent uniquely upon mutation type and locus. Mutations to relatively polar residues (e.g. G23D, Y24D, Y24H, A27E, I32T, and T36S) stabilized principally monomeric species, while mutants with decreased beta-branched content in the protein TM hydrophobic core (e.g. V29A, V30A, V31A, V31L, and V33A) displayed mainly dimeric species. Mutation of Ile37-->Thr within a "Sternberg-Gullick" consensus sequence of the coat protein TM segment led to a highly oligomerized/polymerized protein. The overall results suggest that TM residues in M13 coat protein are not universal components of a hydrophobic anchor segment per se, but are further selected (i) to impart conformational flexibility to the TM segment through helix destabilization and (ii) to retain the capacity to regulate protein-protein association and packing motifs within membranes.

  2. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C; Neff, N

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous mutations in a large number of loci. Mutations in two of the recessive loci, van1-18 and van2-93, resulted in alterations in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins. The mutant van1-18 gene also showed an increase in plasma membrane ATPase activity in vitro and a lowered basal phosphatase activity under alkaline conditions. Cells containing the van2-93 mutant allele had normal levels of plasma membrane ATPase activity, but this activity was not inhibited by vanadate. Both of these mutants failed to enter stationary phase, were heat shock sensitive, showed lowered long-term viability, and sporulated on rich medium in the presence of 2% glucose. The wild-type VAN1 gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 522 amino acids, with no significant homology to any genes that have been identified. Diploid cells that contained two mutant alleles of this gene demonstrated defects in spore viability. These data suggest that the VAN1 gene product is involved in regulation of the phosphorylation of a number of proteins, some of which appear to be important in cell growth control. Images PMID:2137555

  3. Fuzzy oil drop model to interpret the structure of antifreeze proteins and their mutants.

    PubMed

    Banach, Mateusz; Prymula, Katarzyna; Jurkowski, Wiktor; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in proteins introduce structural changes and influence biological activity: the specific effects depend on the location of the mutation. The simple method proposed in the present paper is based on a two-step model of in silico protein folding. The structure of the first intermediate is assumed to be determined solely by backbone conformation. The structure of the second one is assumed to be determined by the presence of a hydrophobic center. The comparable structural analysis of the set of mutants is performed to identify the mutant-induced structural changes. The changes of the hydrophobic core organization measured by the divergence entropy allows quantitative comparison estimating the relative structural changes upon mutation. The set of antifreeze proteins, which appeared to represent the hydrophobic core structure accordant with "fuzzy oil drop" model was selected for analysis.

  4. An improved reversibly dimerizing mutant of the FK506-binding protein FKBP

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, Juan J.; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Casler, Jason C.; Day, Kasey J.; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FK506-binding protein (FKBP) is a monomer that binds to FK506, rapamycin, and related ligands. The F36M substitution, in which Phe36 in the ligand-binding pocket is changed to Met, leads to formation of antiparallel FKBP dimers, which can be dissociated into monomers by ligand binding. This FKBP(M) mutant has been employed in the mammalian secretory pathway to generate aggregates that can be dissolved by ligand addition to create cargo waves. However, when testing this approach in yeast, we found that dissolution of FKBP(M) aggregates was inefficient. An improved reversibly dimerizing FKBP formed aggregates that dissolved more readily. This FKBP(L,V) mutant carries the F36L mutation, which increases the affinity of ligand binding, and the I90V mutation, which accelerates ligand-induced dissociation of the dimers. The FKBP(L,V) mutant expands the utility of reversibly dimerizing FKBP. PMID:27738551

  5. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of mutant p53 protein in small-cell lung cancer: relationship to treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gemba, K; Ueoka, H; Kiura, K; Tabata, M; Harada, M

    2000-07-01

    We investigated the expression of mutant p53 proteins in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) immunohistochemically, by identification of stabilized mutant p53 proteins with a much longer half-life than the wild-type protein. Of 103 tumor specimens obtained by transbronchial tumor biopsy for histologic diagnosis, 52 (50%) showed positive staining for p53 protein with a p53 monoclonal antibody, DO-1. Positive staining for p53 protein was not correlated with age, sex, performance status, lifetime cigarette consumption, serum concentration of neuron-specific enolase and extent of disease. Complete response rates in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly lower than those in p53-negative patients (25% versus 59%; P=0.0005, by chi-square test). Similarly, survival periods in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly shorter than those in mutant p53-protein-negative patients (10.8 months versus 20.6 months; P=0.0001, by generalized Wilcoxon test). Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards model revealed that the presence of mutant p53 protein is an independent factor associated with differences in overall survival (hazards ratio=2.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-4.34; P=0.0001). These observations suggest that the expression of mutant p53 proteins in SCLC may be an important factor predicting poor prognosis.

  7. Requirements for Mutant and Wild-Type Prion Protein Misfolding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Geoffrey P.; Walsh, Daniel J.; Miller, Michael B.; Jackson, Walker S.; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of infectious, sporadic, and inherited prion diseases. Here we use a chemically defined prion propagation system to study misfolding of the pathogenic PrP mutant D177N in vitro. This mutation causes PrP to misfold spontaneously in the absence of cofactor molecules in a process dependent on time, temperature, pH, and intermittent sonication. Spontaneously misfolded mutant PrP is able to template its unique conformation onto wild-type PrP substrate in a process that requires a phospholipid activity distinct from that required for the propagation of infectious prions. Similar results were obtained with a second pathogenic PrP mutant, E199K, but not with the polymorphic substitution M128V. Moreover, wild-type PrP inhibits mutant PrP misfolding in a dose-dependent manner, and cofactor molecules can antagonize this effect. These studies suggest that interactions between mutant PrP, wild-type PrP, and other cellular factors may control the rate of PrP misfolding in inherited prion diseases. PMID:25584902

  8. Death-associated protein kinase 1 promotes growth of p53-mutant cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Dekuang; Poage, Graham M; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Zhang, Yun; Hill, Jamal L; Hartman, Zachary C; Savage, Michelle I; Mills, Gordon B; Brown, Powel H

    2015-07-01

    Estrogen receptor-negative (ER-negative) breast cancers are extremely aggressive and associated with poor prognosis. In particular, effective treatment strategies are limited for patients diagnosed with triple receptor-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which also carries the worst prognosis of all forms of breast cancer; therefore, extensive studies have focused on the identification of molecularly targeted therapies for this tumor subtype. Here, we sought to identify molecular targets that are capable of suppressing tumorigenesis in TNBCs. Specifically, we found that death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) is essential for growth of p53-mutant cancers, which account for over 80% of TNBCs. Depletion or inhibition of DAPK1 suppressed growth of p53-mutant but not p53-WT breast cancer cells. Moreover, DAPK1 inhibition limited growth of other p53-mutant cancers, including pancreatic and ovarian cancers. DAPK1 mediated the disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex, resulting in activation of the mTOR pathway. Our studies demonstrated that high DAPK1 expression causes increased cancer cell growth and enhanced signaling through the mTOR/S6K pathway; evaluation of multiple breast cancer patient data sets revealed that high DAPK1 expression associates with worse outcomes in individuals with p53-mutant cancers. Together, our data support targeting DAPK1 as a potential therapeutic strategy for p53-mutant cancers.

  9. Stromal protein degradation is incomplete in Arabidopsis thaliana autophagy mutants undergoing natural senescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Travis A; Vande Wetering, Scott W; Brusslan, Judy A

    2013-01-17

    Degradation of highly abundant stromal proteins plays an important role in the nitrogen economy of the plant during senescence. Lines of evidence supporting proteolysis within the chloroplast and outside the chloroplast have been reported. Two extra-plastidic degradation pathways, chlorophagy and Rubisco Containing Bodies, rely on cytoplasmic autophagy. In this work, levels of three stromal proteins (Rubisco large subunit, chloroplast glutamine synthetase and Rubisco activase) and one thylakoid protein (the major light harvesting complex protein of photosystem II) were measured during natural senescence in WT and in two autophagy T-DNA insertion mutants (atg5 and atg7). Thylakoid-localized protein decreased similarly in all genotypes, but stromal protein degradation was incomplete in the two atg mutants. In addition, degradation of two stromal proteins was observed in chloroplasts isolated from mid-senescence leaves. These data suggest that autophagy does contribute to the complete proteolysis of stromal proteins, but does not play a major degenerative role. In addition, support for in organello degradation is provided.

  10. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant non-derepressible for orthophosphate-regulated proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G L; Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1981-01-01

    Using a rapid screening assay based on the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine, we isolated several mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in the production of phospholipase C. One, designated strain A50N, was also markedly deficient in the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase and several unidentified extracellular proteins. Because strain A50N produces these proteins under conditions of derepression at levels equal to those produced by the parental strain PAO1 grown in medium containing excess phosphate, it appears to have a mutation in a genetic element involved in the derepression of phosphate-repressible proteins. Images PMID:6790519

  11. IBMPFD Disease-Causing Mutant VCP/p97 Proteins Are Targets of Autophagic-Lysosomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Oznur; Oral, Ozlem; Kocaturk, Nur Mehpare; Akkoc, Yunus; Eberhart, Karin; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades soluble proteins and small aggregates, whereas macroautophagy (autophagy herein) eliminates larger protein aggregates, tangles and even whole organelles in a lysosome-dependent manner. VCP/p97 was implicated in both pathways. VCP/p97 mutations cause a rare multisystem disease called IBMPFD (Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia). Here, we studied the role IBMPFD-related mutants of VCP/p97 in autophagy. In contrast with the wild-type VCP/p97 protein or R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant was aggregate-prone. We showed that, unlike commonly studied R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant protein stimulated both autophagosome and autolysosome formation. Moreover, P137L mutant protein itself was a substrate of autophagy. Starvation- and mTOR inhibition-induced autophagy led to the degradation of the P137L mutant protein, while preserving the wild-type and functional VCP/p97. Strikingly, similar to the P137L mutant, other IBMPFD-related VCP/p97 mutants, namely R93C and G157R mutants induced autophagosome and autolysosome formation; and G157R mutant formed aggregates that could be cleared by autophagy. Therefore, cellular phenotypes caused by P137L mutant expression were not isolated observations, and some other IBMPFD disease-related VCP/p97 mutations could lead to similar outcomes. Our results indicate that cellular mechanisms leading to IBMPFD disease may be various, and underline the importance of studying different disease-associated mutations in order to better understand human pathologies and tailor mutation-specific treatment strategies.

  12. IBMPFD Disease-Causing Mutant VCP/p97 Proteins Are Targets of Autophagic-Lysosomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Oznur; Akkoc, Yunus; Eberhart, Karin; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades soluble proteins and small aggregates, whereas macroautophagy (autophagy herein) eliminates larger protein aggregates, tangles and even whole organelles in a lysosome-dependent manner. VCP/p97 was implicated in both pathways. VCP/p97 mutations cause a rare multisystem disease called IBMPFD (Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget’s Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia). Here, we studied the role IBMPFD-related mutants of VCP/p97 in autophagy. In contrast with the wild-type VCP/p97 protein or R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant was aggregate-prone. We showed that, unlike commonly studied R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant protein stimulated both autophagosome and autolysosome formation. Moreover, P137L mutant protein itself was a substrate of autophagy. Starvation- and mTOR inhibition-induced autophagy led to the degradation of the P137L mutant protein, while preserving the wild-type and functional VCP/p97. Strikingly, similar to the P137L mutant, other IBMPFD-related VCP/p97 mutants, namely R93C and G157R mutants induced autophagosome and autolysosome formation; and G157R mutant formed aggregates that could be cleared by autophagy. Therefore, cellular phenotypes caused by P137L mutant expression were not isolated observations, and some other IBMPFD disease-related VCP/p97 mutations could lead to similar outcomes. Our results indicate that cellular mechanisms leading to IBMPFD disease may be various, and underline the importance of studying different disease-associated mutations in order to better understand human pathologies and tailor mutation-specific treatment strategies. PMID:27768726

  13. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  14. Co-occurence of filamentation defects and impaired biofilms in Candida albicans protein kinase mutants.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidou, Nina; Morrissey, John Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is linked with its developmental stages, notably the capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth, and to form biofilms on surfaces. To better understand the cellular processes involved in C. albicans development, a collection of 63 C. albicans protein kinase mutants was screened for biofilm formation in a microtitre plate assay. Thirty-eight mutants displayed some degree of biofilm impairment, with 20 categorised as poor biofilm formers. All the poor biofilm formers were also defective in the switch from yeast to hyphae, establishing it as a primary defect. Five genes, VPS15, IME2, PKH3, PGA43 and CEX1, encode proteins not previously reported to influence hyphal development or biofilm formation. Network analysis established that individual components of some processes, most interestingly MAP kinase pathways, are not required for biofilm formation, most likely indicating functional redundancy. Mutants were also screened for their response to bacterial supernatants and it was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa supernatants inhibited biofilm formation in all mutants, regardless of the presence of homoserine lactones (HSLs). In contrast, Candida morphology was only affected by supernatant containing HSLs. This confirms the distinct HSL-dependent inhibition of filamentation and the HSL-independent impairment of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Genomic polymorphism and protein changes of soybean mutant induced by space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Gao, Y.; Sun, Y.

    Soybean 194 4126 of excellent agricultural qualities such as high yield and rounder and wider leaf was selected in six generation after abroad recoverable satellite 15 days in 1996 from Soybean 72163 featured with long-leaf white-blossom grey-hair and infinitude-poding To explore the mechanisms of plant mutation induced by space environment we have experimented at genome and proteome level on Soybean 194 4126 and its control Soybean 72163 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism AFLP was used to identify mutated sits and the result shows that 36 polymorphic bands varying between 100 and 900 bp in 2022 DNA bands varying between 100 and 1500 bp have been amplified out of 64 pairs of primer combinations between mutant Soybean 194 4126 and the control plant So the mutation degree of DNA is 3 56 The protein two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE and peptide mass fingerprint PMF assays were used to investigate the difference of proteins in fruits and leaves between Soybean 194 4126 and its control Results indicate that 62 protein dots specially appear in Soybean 72163 and 39 dots specially in the mutant Soybean 194 4126 by image analysis software PDQuest in the 2-DE maps of soybean seeds Using PMF assay and protein data-base searching to investigate two distinct protein dots we found that the protein specially expressed in the seed of mutant Soybean 194 4126 may be Dehydrin and the other protein specially expressed in the seed of the control Soybean 72163 may be maturation-associated protein MAT1 Because Dehydrin and MAT1 are

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion.

  17. Substantially elevating the levels of αB-crystallin in spinal motor neurons of mutant SOD1 mice does not significantly delay paralysis or attenuate mutant protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guilian; Fromholt, Susan; Ayers, Jacob I; Brown, Hilda; Siemienski, Zoe; Crosby, Keith W; Mayer, Christopher A; Janus, Christopher; Borchelt, David R

    2015-05-01

    There has been great interest in enhancing endogenous protein maintenance pathways such as the heat-shock chaperone response, as it is postulated that enhancing clearance of misfolded proteins could have beneficial disease modifying effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative disorders. In cultured cell models of mutant SOD1 aggregation, co-expression of αB-crystallin (αB-crys) has been shown to inhibit the formation of detergent-insoluble forms of mutant protein. Here, we describe the generation of a new line of transgenic mice that express αB-crys at > 6-fold the normal level in spinal cord, with robust increases in immunoreactivity throughout the spinal cord grey matter and, specifically, in spinal motor neurons. Surprisingly, spinal cords of mice expressing αB-crys alone contained 20% more motor neurons per section than littermate controls. Raising αB-crys by these levels in mice transgenic for either G93A or L126Z mutant SOD1 had no effect on the age at which paralysis developed. In the G93A mice, which showed the most robust degree of motor neuron loss, the number of these cells declined by the same proportion as in mice expressing the mutant SOD1 alone. In paralyzed bigenic mice, the levels of detergent-insoluble, misfolded, mutant SOD1 were similar to those of mice expressing mutant SOD1 alone. These findings indicate that raising the levels of αB-crys in spinal motor neurons by 6-fold does not produce the therapeutic effects predicted by cell culture models of mutant SOD1 aggregation. Enhancing the protein chaperone function may present a therapeutic approach to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutations in SOD1, and other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cytosolic protein aggregation. Previous studies in cell models suggested that the chaperone known as αB-crystallin (αB-crys) can prevent mutant SOD1 aggregation. We report that transgenic expression of αB-crys at > 6-fold the normal level in spinal

  18. A highly digestible sorghum mutant cultivar exhibits a unique folded structure of endosperm protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Oria, Maria P.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Axtell, John D.; Huang, Chia-Ping

    2000-01-01

    The endosperm of a sorghum mutant cultivar, with high in vitro uncooked and cooked protein digestibilities, was examined by transmission electron microscopy and α-, β-, and γ-kafirins (storage proteins) were localized within its protein bodies. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs revealed that these protein bodies had a unique microstructure related to high protein digestibility. They were irregular in shape and had numerous invaginations, often reaching to the central area of the protein body. Protein bodies from normal cultivars, such as P721N studied here, with much lower uncooked and cooked digestibilities are spherical and contain no invaginations. Immunocytochemistry results showed that the relative location of α- and β-kafirins within the protein bodies of the highly digestible genotype were similar to the normal cultivar, P721N. γ-Kafirin, however, was concentrated in dark-staining regions at the base of the folds instead of at the protein body periphery, as is typical of normal cultivars. The resulting easy accessibility of digestive enzymes to α-kafirin, the major storage protein, in addition to the increased surface area of the protein bodies of the highly digestible cultivar appear to account for its high in vitro protein digestibility. PMID:10792028

  19. Functional rescue of mutant ABCA1 proteins by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate[S

    PubMed Central

    Sorrenson, Brie; Suetani, Rachel J.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Bickley, Vivienne M.; George, Peter M.; Jones, Gregory T.; McCormick, Sally P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) are a major cause of decreased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), which infers an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Many ABCA1 mutants show impaired localization to the plasma membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the chemical chaperone, sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) could improve cellular localization and function of ABCA1 mutants. Nine different ABCA1 mutants (p.A594T, p.I659V, p.R1068H, p.T1512M, p.Y1767D, p.N1800H, p.R2004K, p.A2028V, p.Q2239N) expressed in HEK293 cells, displaying different degrees of mislocalization to the plasma membrane and discrete impacts on cholesterol efflux, were subject to treatment with 4-PBA. Treatment restored localization to the plasma membrane and increased cholesterol efflux function for the majority of mutants. Treatment with 4-PBA also increased ABCA1 protein expression in all transfected cell lines. In fibroblast cells obtained from low HDL-C subjects expressing two of the ABCA1 mutants (p.R1068H and p.N1800H), 4-PBA increased cholesterol efflux without any increase in ABCA1 expression. Our study is the first to investigate the effect of the chemical chaperone, 4-PBA on ABCA1 and shows that it is capable of restoring plasma membrane localization and enhancing the cholesterol efflux function of mutant ABCA1s both in vitro and ex vivo. These results suggest 4-PBA may warrant further investigation as a potential therapy for increasing cholesterol efflux and HDL-C levels. PMID:23087442

  20. Purification and characterization of a mutant DnaB protein specifically defective in ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Shrimankar, P; Stordal, L; Maurer, R

    1992-01-01

    The dnaB gene of Escherichia coli encodes an essential DNA replication enzyme. Fueled by the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP+P(i), this enzyme unwinds double-stranded DNA in advance of the DNA polymerase. While doing so, it intermittently stimulates primase to synthesize an RNA primer for an Okazaki fragment. To better understand the structural basis of these and other aspects of DnaB function, we have initiated a study of mutant DnaB proteins. Here, we report the purification and characterization of a mutant DnaB protein (RC231) containing cysteine in place of arginine at residue 231. The mutant protein attains a stable, properly folded structure that allows association of six promoters to form a hexamer, as is also true for wild-type DnaB. Further, the mutant protein interacts with ATP, the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog adenosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S), ADP, and poly(dT), and it stimulates primase action. It is, however, profoundly deficient in ATP hydrolysis, helicase activity, and replication activity at the chromosomal origin of replication. In addition, while general priming reactions with wild-type DnaB and ATP elicited the synthesis of short primers, reactions with DnaB and ATP gamma S or with RC231 and either ATP or ATP gamma S stimulated the synthesis of significantly longer primers. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that primase interacts directly with DnaB throughout primer synthesis during general priming, until dissociation of DnaB from DNA or ATP hydrolysis by DnaB disrupts the interaction and leads to primer termination. Images PMID:1332941

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  2. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 Modulate Insoluble Mutant Huntingtin Protein Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Jacqueline Gire; Gareau, Jaclyn R.; Ochaba, Joseph; Song, Wan; Raskó, Tamás; Reverter, David; Lee, John; Monteys, Alex Mas; Pallos, Judit; Mee, Lisa; Vashishtha, Malini; Apostol, Barbara L.; Nicholson, Thomas Peter; Illes, Katalin; Zhu, Ya-Zhen; Dasso, Mary; Bates, Gillian P.; Difiglia, Marian; Davidson, Beverly; Wanker, Erich E.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Lima, Christopher D.; Steffan, Joan S.; Thompson, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A key feature in Huntington disease (HD) is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT) protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression. PMID:23871671

  3. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 modulate insoluble mutant huntingtin protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline Gire; Gareau, Jaclyn R; Ochaba, Joseph; Song, Wan; Raskó, Tamás; Reverter, David; Lee, John; Monteys, Alex Mas; Pallos, Judit; Mee, Lisa; Vashishtha, Malini; Apostol, Barbara L; Nicholson, Thomas Peter; Illes, Katalin; Zhu, Ya-Zhen; Dasso, Mary; Bates, Gillian P; Difiglia, Marian; Davidson, Beverly; Wanker, Erich E; Marsh, J Lawrence; Lima, Christopher D; Steffan, Joan S; Thompson, Leslie M

    2013-07-25

    A key feature in Huntington disease (HD) is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT) protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of protein damage in yeast frataxin mutant exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hee; Sedlak, Miroslav; Gao, Qiang; Riley, Catherine P; Regnier, Fred E; Adamec, Jiri

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress and protein carbonylation is implicated in aging and various diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Therefore, the accurate identification and quantification of protein carbonylation may lead to the discovery of new biomarkers. We have developed a new method that combines avidin affinity selection of carbonylated proteins with iTRAQ labeling and LC fractionation of intact proteins. This simple LC-based workflow is an effective technique to reduce sample complexity, minimize technical variation, and enable simultaneous quantification of four samples. This method was used to determine protein oxidation in an iron accumulating mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to oxidative stress. Overall, 31 proteins were identified with 99% peptide confidence, and of those, 27 proteins were quantified. Most of the identified proteins were associated with energy metabolism (32.3%), and cellular defense, transport, and folding (38.7%), suggesting a drop in energy production and reducing power of the cells due to the damage of glycolytic enzymes and decrease in activity of enzymes involved in protein protection and regeneration. In addition, the oxidation sites of seven proteins were identified and their estimated position also indicated a potential impact on the enzymatic activities. Predicted 3D structures of peroxiredoxin (TSA1) and thioredoxin II (TRX2) revealed close proximity of all oxidized amino acid residues to the protein active sites.

  5. Cysteine oxidation within N-terminal mutant huntingtin promotes oligomerization and delays clearance of soluble protein.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jonathan H; Connor, Teal; Stiles, Megan; Kama, Jibrin; Lu, Zhen; Dorsey, Kathryn; Lieberman, Gregory; Liebermann, Gregory; Sapp, Ellen; Cherny, Robert A; Banks, Mary; Volitakis, Irene; DiFiglia, Marian; Berezovska, Oksana; Bush, Ashley I; Hersch, Steven M

    2011-05-20

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expression of polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt). Most evidence indicates that soluble mhtt species, rather than insoluble aggregates, are the important mediators of HD pathogenesis. However, the differential roles of soluble monomeric and oligomeric mhtt species in HD and the mechanisms of oligomer formation are not yet understood. We have shown previously that copper interacts with and oxidizes the polyglutamine-containing N171 fragment of huntingtin. In this study we report that oxidation-dependent oligomers of huntingtin form spontaneously in cell and mouse HD models. Levels of these species are modulated by copper, hydrogen peroxide, and glutathione. Mutagenesis of all cysteine residues within N171 blocks the formation of these oligomers. In cells, levels of oligomerization-blocked mutant N171 were decreased compared with native N171. We further show that a subset of the oligomerization-blocked form of glutamine-expanded N171 huntingtin is rapidly depleted from the soluble pool compared with "native " mutant N171. Taken together, our data indicate that huntingtin is subject to specific oxidations that are involved in the formation of stable oligomers and that also delay removal from the soluble pool. These findings show that inhibiting formation of oxidation-dependent huntingtin oligomers, or promoting their dissolution, may have protective effects in HD by decreasing the burden of soluble mutant huntingtin.

  6. Enamel Protein Regulation and Dental and Periodontal Physiopathology in Msx2 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Molla, Muriel; Descroix, Vianney; Aïoub, Muhanad; Simon, Stéphane; Castañeda, Beatriz; Hotton, Dominique; Bolaños, Alba; Simon, Yohann; Lezot, Frédéric; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Signaling pathways that underlie postnatal dental and periodontal physiopathology are less studied than those of early tooth development. Members of the muscle segment homeobox gene (Msx) family encode homeoproteins that show functional redundancy during development and are known to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that lead to crown morphogenesis and ameloblast cell differentiation. This study analyzed the MSX2 protein during mouse postnatal growth as well as in the adult. The analysis focused on enamel and periodontal defects and enamel proteins in Msx2-null mutant mice. In the epithelial lifecycle, the levels of MSX2 expression and enamel protein secretion were inversely related. Msx2+/− mice showed increased amelogenin expression, enamel thickness, and rod size. Msx2−/− mice displayed compound phenotypic characteristics of enamel defects, related to both enamel-specific gene mutations (amelogenin and enamelin) in isolated amelogenesis imperfecta, and cell-cell junction elements (laminin 5 and cytokeratin 5) in other syndromes. These effects were also related to ameloblast disappearance, which differed between incisors and molars. In Msx2−/− roots, Malassez cells formed giant islands that overexpressed amelogenin and ameloblastin that grew over months. Aberrant expression of enamel proteins is proposed to underlie the regional osteopetrosis and hyperproduction of cellular cementum. These enamel and periodontal phenotypes of Msx2 mutants constitute the first case report of structural and signaling defects associated with enamel protein overexpression in a postnatal context. PMID:20934968

  7. Preparation of multiple site-specific mutant proteins for NMR studies by PCR-directed cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Qi, Ruhu

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) offers a fast and inexpensive approach to selectively label proteins with isotopes that can then be detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy directly in the translation mixture. We describe a PCR-based approach for production of protein-coding circularized DNA templates that can be expressed in Escherichia coli extract in CFPS dialysis system. This approach typically yields target protein concentrations close to 1 mg/mL, which is sufficient for subsequent analysis by 2D (1)H,(15)N-NMR. Furthermore, this PCR-based technique also enables parallel preparation of mutant proteins in a high-throughput mode, enabling rapid assignments of NMR signals. This chapter describes the general CFPS protocol that we used to rapidly assign residue-specific cross peaks from 2D (1)H,(15 N-NMR) spectra obtained from 12 Ile/Ala substituted mutants of the 40 kDa protein complex, αCTS:τc16.

  8. Escherichia coli pleiotropic mutant that reduces amounts of several periplasmic and outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, B L; Sarthy, A; Beckwith, J

    1979-01-01

    We have isolated a mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 that is reduced from 6- to 10-fold in the amount of alkaline phosphatase found in the periplasmic space. The reduced synthesis is not due to effects at the level of transcription regulation of the phoA gene, the structural gene for the enzyme. In addition, the mutation (termed perA) responsible for this phenotype results in reduced amounts of possibly six or more other periplasmic proteins and at least three outer membrane proteins. One of the outer membrane proteins affected is protein IA (D. L. Diedrich, A. O. Summers, and C. A. Schnaitman, J. Bacteriol. 131:598-607, 1977). Although other possibilities exist, one explanation for the phenotype of the perA mutation is that it affects the cell's secretory apparatus. Images PMID:387722

  9. Peripheral neuropathy via mutant tRNA synthetases: Inhibition of protein translation provides a possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of protein translation may be a common pathogenic mechanism for peripheral neuropathy associated with mutant tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). aaRSs are enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNA, thus catalyzing the first step of translation. Dominant mutations in five distinct aaRSs cause Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy, characterized by length‐dependent degeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. Surprisingly, loss of aminoacylation activity is not required for mutant aaRSs to cause CMT. Rather, at least for some mutations, a toxic‐gain‐of‐function mechanism underlies CMT‐aaRS. Interestingly, several mutations in two distinct aaRSs were recently shown to inhibit global protein translation in Drosophila models of CMT‐aaRS, by a mechanism independent of aminoacylation, suggesting inhibition of translation as a common pathogenic mechanism. Future research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the translation defect induced by CMT‐mutant aaRSs should provide novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these incurable diseases. PMID:27352040

  10. Epilepsy, Behavioral Abnormalities, and Physiological Comorbidities in Syntaxin-Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1) Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Marchese, Maria; Hamling, Kyla R.; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Krasniak, Christopher S.; Sicca, Federico; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Patel, Manisha; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the synaptic machinery gene syntaxin-binding protein 1, STXBP1 (also known as MUNC18-1), are linked to childhood epilepsies and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Zebrafish STXBP1 homologs (stxbp1a and stxbp1b) have highly conserved sequence and are prominently expressed in the larval zebrafish brain. To understand the functions of stxbp1a and stxbp1b, we generated loss-of-function mutations using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and studied brain electrical activity, behavior, development, heart physiology, metabolism, and survival in larval zebrafish. Homozygous stxbp1a mutants exhibited a profound lack of movement, low electrical brain activity, low heart rate, decreased glucose and mitochondrial metabolism, and early fatality compared to controls. On the other hand, homozygous stxbp1b mutants had spontaneous electrographic seizures, and reduced locomotor activity response to a movement-inducing “dark-flash” visual stimulus, despite showing normal metabolism, heart rate, survival, and baseline locomotor activity. Our findings in these newly generated mutant lines of zebrafish suggest that zebrafish recapitulate clinical phenotypes associated with human syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutations. PMID:26963117

  11. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes from Euglena gracilis and Mutants Deficient in Chlorophyll b: II. Polypeptide Composition.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F X; Schiff, J A

    1986-01-01

    Chlorophyll-protein complexes (CPs) obtained from thylakoids of Euglena gracilis Klebs var bacillaris Cori contain the following polypeptides (listed in parentheses in order of prominence after Coomassie R-250 staining of polyacrylamide gels): CP Ia (66, 18, 22, 22.5, 27.5, 21, 28, 24, 25.5, and 26 kilodaltons [kD]); CP I (66 kD); CPx (41 kD); LHCP(2) (an oligomer of LHCP) (26.5, 28, and 26 kD); CPy (27 and 19 kD); CPa (54 kD); and LHCP (26.5, 28, and 26 kD). Mutants of bacillaris low in chlorophyll b (Gr(1)BSL, G(1)BU, and O(4)BSL; Chl a/b [mol/mol] = 50-100) which lack CP Ia, LHCP(2), and LHCP also lack or are deficient in polypeptides associated with these complexes in wild-type cells. Mutants G(1) and O(4), which also lack CPy, lack the CPy-associated polypeptides found in wild-type and Gr(1). Using an antiserum which was elicited by and reacts strongly and selectively with the SDS-treated major polypeptide (26.5 kD) of the LHCP complexes of wild-type, this polypeptide is undetectable in the mutants (<0.25% of the level in wild-type on a cell basis); the antiserum does not react with the SDS-treated 28 kD polypeptide of the Euglena LHCP complexes and cross-reacts only very weakly with components in SDS-treated cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard and chloroplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. cv Winter Bloomsdale. Rates of photosynthesis of the wild-type and mutant cells of Euglena are approximately equal on a cell basis when measured at light saturation, consistent with the selective loss of major antenna components but not CP I or CPa from the mutants.

  12. Differential protein stability of EGFR mutants determines responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Paramita; Tan, Yee Sun; Somnay, Vishal; Mehta, Ranjit; Sitto, Merna; Ahsan, Aarif; Nyati, Shyam; Naughton, John P.; Bridges, Alexander; Zhao, Lili; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ray, Dipankar; Nyati, Mukesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carrying specific EGFR kinase activating mutations (L858R, delE746-A750) respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, drug resistance develops within a year. In about 50% of such patients, acquired drug resistance is attributed to the enrichment of a constitutively active point mutation within the EGFR kinase domain (T790M). To date, differential drug-binding and altered ATP affinities by EGFR mutants have been shown to be responsible for differential TKI response. As it has been reported that EGFR stability plays a role in the survival of EGFR driven cancers, we hypothesized that differential TKI-induced receptor degradation between the sensitive L858R and delE746-A750 and the resistant T790M may also play a role in drug responsiveness. To explore this, we have utilized an EGFR-null CHO overexpression system as well as NSCLC cell lines expressing various EGFR mutants and determined the effects of erlotinib treatment. We found that erlotinib inhibits EGFR phosphorylation in both TKI sensitive and resistant cells, but the protein half-lives of L858R and delE746-A750 were significantly shorter than L858R/T790M. Third generation EGFR kinase inhibitor (AZD9291) inhibits the growth of L858R/T790M-EGFR driven cells and also induces EGFR degradation. Erlotinib treatment induced polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, primarily in a c-CBL-independent manner, in TKI sensitive L858R and delE746-A750 mutants when compared to the L858R/T790M mutant, which correlated with drug sensitivity. These data suggest an additional mechanism of TKI resistance, and we postulate that agents that degrade L858R/T790M-EGFR protein may overcome TKI resistance. PMID:27612423

  13. Food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 mutant protein using Cry1Ac as a control Bt protein.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Santos, Vanessa Olinto; Pinto, Clidia Eduarda Moreira; Viana, Daniel Araújo; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2015-07-01

    Cry8Ka5 is a mutant protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that has been proposed for developing transgenic plants due to promising activity against coleopterans, like Anthonomus grandis (the major pest of Brazilian cotton culture). Thus, an early food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 protein could provide valuable information to support its use as a harmless biotechnological tool. This study aimed to evaluate the food safety of Cry8Ka5 protein following the two-tiered approach, based on weights of evidence, proposed by ILSI. Cry1Ac protein was used as a control Bt protein. The history of safe use revealed no convincing hazard reports for Bt pesticides and three-domain Cry proteins. The bioinformatics analysis with the primary amino acids sequence of Cry8Ka5 showed no similarity to any known toxic, antinutritional or allergenic proteins. The mode of action of Cry proteins is well understood and their fine specificity is restricted to insects. Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins were rapidly degraded in simulated gastric fluid, but were resistant to simulated intestinal fluid and heat treatment. The LD50 for Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac was >5000 mg/kg body weight when administered by gavage in mice. Thus, no expected relevant risks are associated with the consumption of Cry8Ka5 protein.

  14. Do damaged proteins accumulate in Caenorhabditis elegans L-isoaspartate methyltransferase (pcm-1) deletion mutants?

    PubMed

    Niewmierzycka, A; Clarke, S

    1999-04-15

    The protein l-isoaspartate (d-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (E.C. 2. 1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of isomerized and racemized aspartyl residues to their normal l-aspartyl forms and has therefore been hypothesized to function as a repair enzyme, responsible for helping to limit the accumulation of damaged proteins in aging organisms. In this study, the effect of a disruption in the pcm-1 gene encoding the l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase was investigated in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. It was found that damaged proteins recognized by this enzyme accumulated to significant levels during long-term incubation of both pcm-1+ and pcm-1- nematodes in a specialized larval stage called the dauer. The l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase-deficient mutants accumulated about twice the level of damaged proteins as the control nematodes during dauer aging. The mutants also accumulated higher levels of damage when both strains were incubated at 30 degrees C for up to 3 days. However, when nonviable nematodes were removed in a Percoll separation, similar levels of damage were measured between the two strains following both dauer aging and 30 degrees C incubation. Both strains were able to effectively eliminate damaged proteins recognized by the methyltransferase after recovery from dauer. Characterization of the methyl-accepting polypeptide substrates which accumulate in aged dauers revealed that although substrates of all molecular weights are present, the majority of substrates are peptides not precipitated by acetone. These results suggest that protein degradation, rather than repair, may be the major mechanism by which C. elegans eliminates damaged proteins containing l-isoaspartyl residues. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Spaceflight results in increase of thick filament but not thin filament proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, R.; Takaya, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Higashibata, A.; Ishioka, N.; Kagawa, H.

    We have investigated the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on body-wall muscle fiber size and muscle proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both mutant and wild-type strains were subjected to 10 days of microgravity during spaceflight and compared to ground control groups. No significant change in muscle fiber size or quantity of the protein was observed in wild-type worms; where as atrophy of body-wall muscle and an increase in thick filament proteins were observed in the paramyosin mutant unc-15(e73) animals after spaceflight. We conclude that the mutant with abnormal muscle responded to microgravity by increasing the total amount of muscle protein in order to compensate for the loss of muscle function.

  16. Role of Vaccinia Virus A20R Protein in DNA Replication: Construction and Characterization of Temperature-Sensitive Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Koji; Moss, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Previous analyses of randomly generated, temperature-sensitive vaccinia virus mutants led to the mapping of DNA synthesis negative complementation groups to the B1R, D4R, D5R, and E9L genes. Evidence from the yeast two-hybrid system that the D4R and D5R proteins can interact with the A20R protein suggested that A20R was also involved in DNA replication. We found that the A20R gene was transcribed early after infection, consistent with such a role. To investigate the function of the A20R protein, targeted mutations were made by substituting alanines for charged amino acids occurring in 11 different clusters. Four mutants were not isolated, suggesting that they were lethal, two mutants exhibited no temperature sensitivity, two mutants exhibited partial temperature sensitivity, and two mutants formed no plaques or infectious virus at 39°C. The two mutants with stringent phenotypes were further characterized. Temperature shift-up experiments indicated that the crucial period was between 6 and 12 h after infection, making it unlikely that the defect was in virus entry, early gene expression, or a late stage of virus assembly. Similar patterns of metabolically labeled viral early proteins were detected at permissive and nonpermissive temperatures, but one mutant showed an absence of late proteins under the latter conditions. Moreover, no viral DNA synthesis was detected when cells were infected with either stringent mutant at 39°C. The previous yeast two-hybrid analysis together with the present characterization of A20R temperature-sensitive mutants suggested that the A20R, D4R, and D5R proteins are components of a multiprotein DNA replication complex. PMID:11160663

  17. Atypical parkinsonism–associated retromer mutant alters endosomal sorting of specific cargo proteins

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Kirsty J.; Gallon, Matthew; Jellett, Adam P.; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Tilley, Frances C.; Danson, Chris M.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.; Collins, Brett M.

    2016-01-01

    The retromer complex acts as a scaffold for endosomal protein complexes that sort integral membrane proteins to various cellular destinations. The retromer complex is a heterotrimer of VPS29, VPS35, and VPS26. Two of these paralogues, VPS26A and VPS26B, are expressed in humans. Retromer dysfunction is associated with neurodegenerative disease, and recently, three VPS26A mutations (p.K93E, p.M112V, and p.K297X) were discovered to be associated with atypical parkinsonism. Here, we apply quantitative proteomics to provide a detailed description of the retromer interactome. By establishing a comparative proteomic methodology, we identify how this interactome is perturbed in atypical parkinsonism-associated VPS26A mutants. In particular, we describe a selective defect in the association of VPS26A (p.K297X) with the SNX27 cargo adaptor. By showing how a retromer mutant leads to altered endosomal sorting of specific PDZ ligand–containing cargo proteins, we reveal a new mechanism for perturbed endosomal cargo sorting in atypical parkinsonism. PMID:27528657

  18. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  19. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of a polynuclear iron-sulfur center with a mutant FNR protein enhances DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshilova, N; Beinert, H; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli, the transcription factor FNR (fumarate nitrate reduction) regulates gene expression in response to oxygen deprivation. To investigate how the activity of FNR is regulated by oxygen availability, two mutant proteins, DA154 and LH28-DA154, which have enhanced in vivo activity in the presence of oxygen, were purified and compared. Unlike other previously examined FNR preparations, the absorption spectrum of LH28-DA154 had two maxima at 324 nm and 419 nm, typical of iron-sulfur (Fe-S)-containing proteins. Consistent with these data, metal analysis showed that only the LH28-DA154 protein contained a significant amount of iron and acid-labile sulfide, and, by low temperature EPR spectroscopy, a signal typical of a [3Fe-4S]+ cluster was detected. The LH28-DA154 protein that contained the Fe-S cluster also contained a higher proportion of dimers and had a 3- to 4-fold higher apparent affinity for the target DNA than the DA154 protein. In agreement with this, we found that when the LH28-DA154 protein was treated with an iron chelator (alpha,alpha'-dipyridyl), it lost its characteristic absorption and the apparent affinity for DNA was reduced 6-fold. However, increased DNA binding and the characteristic absorption spectrum could be restored by in vitro reconstitution of the Fe-S center. DNA binding of the LH28-DA154 protein was also affected by the redox state of the Fe-S center, since protein exposed to oxygen bound 1/10th as much DNA as the protein reduced anaerobically with dithionite. The observation that DNA binding is enhanced when the Fe-S center is reduced indicates that the redox state of the Fe-S center affects the DNA-binding activity of this protein and suggests a possible mechanism for regulation of the wild-type protein. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7708673

  1. Overexpression of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant proteins renders glioma cells more sensitive to radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichen; Chou, Arthur P; Chen, Weidong; Chen, Ruihuan; Deng, Yuzhong; Phillips, Heidi S; Selfridge, Julia; Zurayk, Mira; Lou, Jerry J; Everson, Richard G; Wu, Kuan-Chung; Faull, Kym F; Cloughesy, Timothy; Liau, Linda M; Lai, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or 2 (IDH2) are found in a subset of gliomas. Among the many phenotypic differences between mutant and wild-type IDH1/2 gliomas, the most salient is that IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients demonstrate markedly improved survival compared with IDH1/2 wild-type glioma patients. To address the mechanism underlying the superior clinical outcome of IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients, we investigated whether overexpression of the IDH1(R132H) protein could affect response to therapy in the context of an isogenic glioma cell background. Stable clonal U87MG and U373MG cell lines overexpressing IDH1(WT) and IDH1(R132H) were generated, as well as U87MG cell lines overexpressing IDH2(WT) and IDH2(R172K). In vitro experiments were conducted to characterize baseline growth and migration and response to radiation and temozolomide. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured under various conditions. U87MG-IDH1(R132H) cells, U373MG-IDH1(R132H) cells, and U87MG-IDH2(R172K) cells demonstrated increased sensitivity to radiation but not to temozolomide. Radiosensitization of U87MG-IDH1(R132H) cells was accompanied by increased apoptosis and accentuated ROS generation, and this effect was abrogated by the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Interestingly, U87MG-IDH1(R132H) cells also displayed decreased growth at higher cell density and in soft agar, as well as decreased migration. Overexpression of IDH1(R132H) and IDH2(R172K) mutant protein in glioblastoma cells resulted in increased radiation sensitivity and altered ROS metabolism and suppression of growth and migration in vitro. These findings provide insight into possible mechanisms contributing to the improved outcomes observed in patients with IDH1/2 mutant gliomas.

  2. Transmembrane region of wild-type and mutant M13 coat proteins. Conformational role of beta-branched residues.

    PubMed

    Deber, C M; Li, Z; Joensson, C; Glibowicka, M; Xu, G Y

    1992-03-15

    Although transmembrane (TM) segments of integral membrane proteins are putatively alpha-helical in conformation, beta-sheet promoters (Val, Ile, Thr) often account for approximately 40% of TM residue composition. We are examining the conformational role(s) of these residues, using as a model system the major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13. This 50-residue protein, which is located at the Escherichia coli host membrane during phage reproduction, contains a prototypic 19-residue hydrophobic midregion (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI). Using "Eckstein" site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated several viable M13 coat protein mutants with beta-branched amino acid substitutions within their TM region. Mutant coat proteins, including Ile32----Val (I32V) and Ala27----Thr (A27T), were obtained in milligram quantities by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, confirming that these coat proteins are capable of assuming their normal biological function(s) in phage reproduction. Circular dichroism spectroscopy performed in the membrane-mimetic medium of deoxycholate micelles indicated comparable alpha-helical contents of mutants I32V and A27T to wild-type protein. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with mutant A27T demonstrated that the combination of additional beta-branched content and introduction of an -OH substituent induced chemical shift and temperature-dependent changes and influenced the local protein environment at sites up to 12 residues remote from the mutation site. In contrast, mutant I32V (of which a salient feature is a mid-TM pentavaline segment) behaved very similarly to wild-type coat. These findings are interpreted in terms of the range of TM secondary structure and stability which can be accommodated by viable M13 coat protein mutants.

  3. Perturbed Amelogenin Secondary Structure Leads to Uncontrolled Aggregation in Amelogenesis Imperfecta Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Bromley, Keith M.; Lei, Ya-Ping; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in amelogenin sequence result in defective enamel, and the diverse group of genetically altered conditions is collectively known as amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Despite numerous studies, the detailed molecular mechanism of defective enamel formation is still unknown. In this study, we have examined the biophysical properties of a recombinant murine amelogenin (rM180) and two point mutations identified from human DNA sequences in two cases of AI (T21I and P41T). At pH 5.8 and 25 °C, wild type (WT) rM180 and mutant P41T existed as monomers, and mutant T21I formed lower order oligomers. CD, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence studies indicated that rM180 and P41T can be classified as a premolten globule-like subclass protein at 25 °C. Thermal denaturation and refolding monitored by CD ellipticity at 224 nm indicated the presence of a strong hysteresis in mutants compared with WT. Variable temperature tryptophan fluorescence and dynamic light scattering studies showed that WT transformed to a partially folded conformation upon heating and remained stable. The partially folded conformation formed by P41T, however, readily converted into a heterogeneous population of aggregates. T21I existed in an oligomeric state at room temperature and, upon heating, rapidly formed large aggregates over a very narrow temperature range. Thermal denaturation and refolding studies indicated that the mutants are less stable and exhibit poor refolding ability compared with WT rM180. Our results suggest that alterations in self-assembly of amelogenin are a consequence of destabilization of the intrinsic disorder. Therefore, we propose that, like a number of other human diseases, AI appears to be due to the destabilization of the secondary structure as a result of amelogenin mutations. PMID:20929860

  4. Mutant p53 proteins alter cancer cell secretome and tumour microenvironment: Involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Butera, Giovanna; D'Orazi, Gabriella; Scarpa, Aldo; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    An ever-increasing number of studies highlight the role of mutant p53 proteins in the alteration of cancer cell secretome and in the modification of tumour microenvironment, sustaining an invasive phenotype of cancer cell. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between mutant p53 proteins and the microenvironment is becoming fundamental for the identification of both efficient anticancer therapeutic strategies and novel serum biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the novel findings concerning the regulation of secreted molecules by cancer cells bearing mutant TP53 gene. In particular, we highlight data from available literature, suggesting that mutant p53 proteins are able to (i) alter the secretion of enzymes involved in the modulation of extracellular matrix components; (ii) alter the secretion of inflammatory cytokines; (iii) increase the extracellular acidification; and (iv) regulate the crosstalk between cancer and stromal cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Two cellular proteins that bind to wild-type but not mutant p53.

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, K; Bartel, P L; Li, B; Marraccino, R; Fields, S

    1994-01-01

    p53 is a tumor-suppressor protein that can activate and repress transcription. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified two previously uncharacterized human proteins, designated 53BP1 and 53BP2, that bind to p53. 53BP1 shows no significant homology to proteins in available databases, whereas 53BP2 contains two adjacent ankyrin repeats and a Src homology 3 domain. In vitro binding analyses indicate that both of these proteins bind to the central domain of p53 (residues 80-320) required for site-specific DNA binding. Consistent with this finding, p53 cannot bind simultaneously to 53BP1 or 53BP2 and to a DNA fragment containing a consensus p53 binding site. Unlike other cellular proteins whose binding to p53 has been characterized, both 53BP1 and 53BP2 bind to the wild-type but not to two mutant p53 proteins identified in human tumors, suggesting that binding is dependent on p53 conformation. The characteristics of these interactions argue that 53BP1 and 53BP2 are involved in some aspect of p53-mediated tumor suppression. Images PMID:8016121

  6. Regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis in an Escherichia coli mutant missing ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S; Nomura, M

    1981-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli B strain missing ribosomal protein L1, the synthesis rate of L11 is 50% greater than that of other ribosomal proteins. This finding is in agreement with the previous conclusion that L1 regulates synthesis of itself and L11 and indicates that this regulation is important for maintaining the balanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:7009590

  7. A Dictyostelium mutant lacking an F-actin cross-linking protein, the 120-kD gelation factor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins are known to regulate in vitro the assembly of actin into supramolecular structures, but evidence for their activities in living nonmuscle cells is scarce. Amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum are nonmuscle cells in which mutants defective in several actin-binding proteins have been described. Here we characterize a mutant deficient in the 120-kD gelation factor, one of the most abundant F-actin cross- linking proteins of D. discoideum cells. No F-actin cross-linking activity attributable to the 120-kD protein was detected in mutant cell extracts, and antibodies recognizing different epitopes on the polypeptide showed the entire protein was lacking. Under the conditions used, elimination of the gelation factor did not substantially alter growth, shape, motility, or chemotactic orientation of the cells towards a cAMP source. Aggregates of the mutant developed into fruiting bodies consisting of normally differentiated spores and stalk cells. In cytoskeleton preparations a dense network of actin filaments as typical of the cell cortex, and bundles as they extend along the axis of filopods, were recognized. A significant alteration found was an enhanced accumulation of actin in cytoskeletons of the mutant when cells were stimulated with cyclic AMP. Our results indicate that control of cell shape and motility does not require the fine-tuned interactions of all proteins that have been identified as actin-binding proteins by in vitro assays. PMID:1698791

  8. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  9. Synthesis of outer membrane proteins in cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, J; Sambucetti, L; Silverman, P M

    1983-01-01

    Two major proteins, the murein lipoprotein and the OmpF matrix porin, are deficient in the outer membrane of cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We present evidence that the cpx mutations prevent or retard the translocation of these proteins to the outer membrane. The mutations had no effect on the rate of lipoprotein synthesis. Mutant cells labeled for 5 min with radioactive arginine accumulated as much lipoprotein as otherwise isogenic cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. This lipoprotein accumulated as such; no material synthesized in mutant cells and reactive with antilipoprotein antibodies had the electrophoretic mobility of prolipoprotein. Hence, the initial stages of prolipoprotein insertion into the inner membrane leading to its cleavage to lipoprotein appeared normal. However, after a long labeling interval, mutant cells were deficient in free lipoprotein and lacked lipoprotein covalently bound to peptidoglycan, suggesting that little if any of the lipoprotein synthesized in mutant cells reaches the outer membrane. Immunoreactive OmpF protein could also be detected in extracts of mutant cells labeled for 5 min, but the amount that accumulated was severalfold less in mutant cells than in cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. Analysis of beta-galactosidase synthesis from ompF-lacZ fusion genes showed this difference to be the result of a reduced rate of ompF transcription in mutant cells. Even so, little or none of the ompF protein synthesized in mutant cells was incorporated into the outer membrane. Images PMID:6339479

  10. Loss of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase rescues spore development in G protein mutant in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Schwebs, David J; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Miller, Jamison A; Hadwiger, Jeffrey A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule for many G protein-mediated signaling pathways but the specificity of cAMP signaling in cells with multiple signaling pathways is not well-understood. In Dictyostelium, at least two different G protein signaling pathways, mediated by the Gα2 and Gα4 subunits, are involved with cAMP accumulation, spore production, and chemotaxis and the stimulation of these pathways results in the activation of ERK2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that can down regulate the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase RegA. The regA gene was disrupted in gα2(−) and gα4(−) cells to determine if the absence of this phosphodiesterase rescues the development of these G protein mutants as it does for erk2(−) mutants. There gA(−) mutation had no major effects on developmental morphology but enriched the distribution of the Gα mutant cells to the prespore/prestalk border in chimeric aggregates. The loss of RegA function had no effect on Gα4- mediated folate chemotaxis. However, the regA gene disruption in gα4(−) cells, but not in gα2(−) cells, resulted in a substantial rescue and acceleration of spore production. This rescue in sporulation required cell autonomous signaling because the precocious sporulation could not be induced through intercellular signaling in chimeric aggregates. However, intercellular signals from regA(−) strains increased the expression of the prestalk gene ecmB and accelerated the vacuolization of stalk cells. Intercellular signaling from the gα4(−)regA(−) strain did not induce ecmA gene expression indicating cell-type specificity in the promotion of prestalk cell development. regA gene disruption in a Gα4(HC) (Gα4 overexpression) strain did not result in precocious sporulation or stalk cell development indicating that elevated Gα4 subunit expression can mask regA(−) associated phenotypes even when provided with wild-type intercellular signaling. These findings indicate that

  11. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis.

  12. Enhanced gravi- and phototropism in plant mdr mutants mislocalizing the auxin efflux protein PIN1.

    PubMed

    Noh, Bosl; Bandyopadhyay, Anindita; Peer, Wendy Ann; Spalding, Edgar P; Murphy, Angus S

    2003-06-26

    Many aspects of plant growth and development are dependent on the flow of the hormone auxin down the plant from the growing shoot tip where it is synthesized. The direction of auxin transport in stems is believed to result from the basal localization within cells of the PIN1 membrane protein, which controls the efflux of the auxin anion. Mutations in two genes homologous to those encoding the P-glycoprotein ABC transporters that are especially abundant in multidrug-resistant tumour cells in animals were recently shown to block polar auxin transport in the hypocotyls of Arabidopsis seedlings. Here we show that the mdr mutants display faster and greater gravitropism and enhanced phototropism instead of the impaired curvature development expected in mutants lacking polar auxin transport. We find that these phenotypes result from a disruption of the normal accumulation of PIN1 protein along the basal end of hypocotyl cells associated with basipetal auxin flow. Lateral auxin conductance becomes relatively larger as a result, enhancing the growth differentials responsible for tropic responses.

  13. Pyridones as NNRTIs against HIV-1 mutants: 3D-QSAR and protein informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Utsab; Verma, Saroj; Jain, Surabhi; Katti, Setu B.; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S.

    2013-07-01

    CoMFA and CoMSIA based 3D-QSAR of HIV-1 RT wild and mutant (K103, Y181C, and Y188L) inhibitory activities of 4-benzyl/benzoyl pyridin-2-ones followed by protein informatics of corresponding non-nucleoside inhibitors' binding pockets from pdbs 2BAN, 3MED, 1JKH, and 2YNF were analysed to discover consensus features of the compounds for broad-spectrum activity. The CoMFA/CoMSIA models indicated that compounds with groups which lend steric-cum-electropositive fields in the vicinity of C5, hydrophobic field in the vicinity of C3 of pyridone region and steric field in aryl region produce broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 RT activity. Also, a linker rendering electronegative field between pyridone and aryl moieties is common requirement for the activities. The protein informatics showed considerable alteration in residues 181 and 188 characteristics on mutation. Also, mutants' isoelectric points shifted in acidic direction. The study offered fresh avenues for broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 agents through designing new molecules seeded with groups satisfying common molecular fields and concerns of mutating residues.

  14. Protein engineering of conger eel galectins by tracing of molecular evolution using probable ancestral mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conger eel galectins, congerin I (ConI) and congerin II (ConII), show the different molecular characteristics resulting from accelerating evolution. We recently reconstructed a probable ancestral form of congerins, Con-anc. It showed properties similar to those of ConII in terms of thermostability and carbohydrate recognition specificity, although it shares a higher sequence similarity with ConI than ConII. Results In this study, we have focused on the different amino acid residues between Con-anc and ConI, and have performed the protein engineering of Con-anc through site-directed mutagenesis, followed by the molecular evolution analysis of the mutants. This approach revealed the functional importance of loop structures of congerins: (1) N- and C-terminal and loop 5 regions that are involved in conferring a high thermostability to ConI; (2) loops 3, 5, and 6 that are responsible for stronger binding of ConI to most sugars; and (3) loops 5 and 6, and Thr38 residue in loop 3 contribute the specificity of ConI toward lacto-N-fucopentaose-containing sugars. Conclusions Thus, this methodology, with tracing of the molecular evolution using ancestral mutants, is a powerful tool for the analysis of not only the molecular evolutionary process, but also the structural elements of a protein responsible for its various functions. PMID:20152053

  15. Dictyostelium mutants lacking the cytoskeletal protein coronin are defective in cytokinesis and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Coronin is an actin-binding protein in Dictyostelium discoideum that is enriched at the leading edge of the cells and in projections of the cell surface called crowns. The polypeptide sequence of coronin is distinguished by its similarities to the beta-subunits of trimeric G proteins (E. L. de Hostos, B. Bradtke, F. Lottspeich, R. Guggenheim, and G. Gerisch, 1991. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 10:4097-4104). To elucidate the in vivo function of coronin, null mutants have been generated by gene replacement. The mutant cells lacking coronin grow and migrate more slowly than wild-type cells. When these cor- cells grow in liquid medium they become multinucleate, indicating a role of coronin in cytokinesis. To explore this role, coronin has been localized in mitotic wild-type cells by immunofluorescence labeling. During separation of the daughter cells, coronin is strongly accumulated at their distal portions including the leading edges. This contrasts with the localization of myosin II in the cleavage furrow and suggests that coronin functions independently of the conventional myosin in facilitating cytokinesis. PMID:8380174

  16. Protein Aggregation in a Mutant Deficient in YajL, the Bacterial Homolog of the Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1

    PubMed Central

    Kthiri, Fatoum; Le, Hai-Tuong; Gautier, Valérie; Caldas, Teresa; Malki, Abderrahim; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Bohn, Chantal; Bouloc, Philippe; Richarme, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    YajL is the closest prokaryotic homolog of the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 (40% sequence identity and similar three-dimensional structure), a protein of unknown function involved in the cellular response to oxidative stress. We report here that a yajL mutant of Escherichia coli displays an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. It also exhibits a protein aggregation phenotype in aerobiosis, but not in anaerobiosis or in aerobic cells overexpressing superoxide dismutase, suggesting that protein aggregation depends on the presence of reactive oxygen species produced by respiratory chains. The protein aggregation phenotype of the yajL mutant, which can be rescued by the wild-type yajL gene, but not by the corresponding cysteine 106 mutant allele, is similar to that of multiple mutants deficient in superoxide dismutases and catalases, although intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels were not increased in the yajL mutant, suggesting that protein aggregation in this strain does not result from a hydrogen peroxide detoxification defect. Aggregation-prone proteins included 17 ribosomal proteins, the ATP synthase β subunit, flagellin, and the outer membrane proteins OmpA and PAL; all of them are part of multiprotein complexes, suggesting that YajL might be involved in optimal expression of these complexes, especially during oxidative stress. YajL stimulated the renaturation of urea-unfolded citrate synthase and the solubilization of the urea-unfolded ribosomal proteins S1 and L3 and was more efficient as a chaperone in its oxidized form than in its reduced form. The mRNA levels of several aggregated proteins of the yajL mutant were severely affected, suggesting that YajL also acts at the level of gene expression. These two functions of YajL might explain the protein aggregation phenotype of the yajL mutant. PMID:20124404

  17. Identification of a contractile deficit in adult cardiac myocytes expressing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy–associated mutant troponin T proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Elizabeth M.; Albayya, Faris P.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    The direct effects of expressing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy–associated (HCM-associated) mutant troponin T (TnT) proteins on the force generation of single adult cardiac myocytes have not been established. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vectors were generated for gene transfer of HCM-associated I79N and R92Q mutant cardiac TnT cDNAs into fully differentiated adult cardiac myocytes in primary culture. We tested the hypothesis that the mutant TnT proteins would be expressed and incorporated into the cardiac sarcomere and would behave as dominant-negative proteins to directly alter calcium-activated force generation at the level of the single cardiac myocyte. Interestingly, under identical experimental conditions, the ectopic expression of the mutant TnTs was significantly less (∼8% of total) than that obtained with expression of wild-type TnT (∼35%) in the myocytes. Confocal imaging of immunolabeled TnT showed a regular periodic pattern of localization of ectopic mutant TnT that was not different than that in normal controls, suggesting that mutant TnT incorporation had no deleterious effects on sarcomeric architecture. Direct measurements of isometric force production in single cardiac myocytes demonstrated marked desensitization of submaximal calcium-activated tension, with unchanged maximum tension generation in mutant TnT–expressing myocytes compared with control myocytes. Collectively, these results demonstrate an impaired expression of the mutant protein and a disabling of cardiac contraction in the submaximal range of myoplasmic calcium concentrations. Our functional results suggest that development of new pharmacological, chemical, or genetic approaches to sensitize the thin-filament regulatory protein system could ameliorate force deficits associated with expression of I79N and R92Q in adult cardiac myocytes. PMID:10330428

  18. Cellular Targets of Functional and Dysfunctional Mutants of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Fused to Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vitaly; van der Laak, Jessica; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Suslova, Elena; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Heinlein, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Intercellular transport of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA involves the accumulation of virus-encoded movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (Pd), in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived inclusion bodies, and on microtubules. The functional significance of these interactions in viral RNA (vRNA) movement was tested in planta and in protoplasts with TMV derivatives expressing N- and C-terminal deletion mutants of MP fused to the green fluorescent protein. Deletion of 55 amino acids from the C terminus of MP did not interfere with the vRNA transport function of MP:GFP but abolished its accumulation in inclusion bodies, indicating that accumulation of MP at these ER-derived sites is not a requirement for function in vRNA intercellular movement. Deletion of 66 amino acids from the C terminus of MP inactivated the protein, and viral infection occurred only upon complementation in plants transgenic for MP. The functional deficiency of the mutant protein correlated with its inability to associate with microtubules and, independently, with its absence from Pd at the leading edge of infection. Inactivation of MP by N-terminal deletions was correlated with the inability of the protein to target Pd throughout the infection site, whereas its associations with microtubules and inclusion bodies were unaffected. The observations support a role of MP-interacting microtubules in TMV RNA movement and indicate that MP targets microtubules and Pd by independent mechanisms. Moreover, accumulation of MP in Pd late in infection is insufficient to support viral movement, confirming that intercellular transport of vRNA relies on the presence of MP in Pd at the leading edge of infection. PMID:11070034

  19. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  20. Conformation-dependent Recognition of Mutant HTT (huntingtin) Proteins by Selective Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yuhua; Pan, Yuyin; Lu, Boxun

    2017-10-04

    Protein misfolding is the common theme for neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's Disease (HD), which is mainly caused by cytotoxicity of the mutant HTT (huntingtin) protein (mHTT). The soluble mHTT has an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch that may adopt multiple conformations, among which the one recognized by the polyQ antibody 3B5H10 is the most toxic due to unknown mechanisms. In a recent study, we showed that the 3B5H10-recognized mHTT species has a slower degradation rate due to its resistance to selective macroautophagy/autophagy. In HD mouse brain tissues as well as HD patient fibroblasts and post-mortem brain tissues, the 3B5H10-recognized mHTT species lacks Lys63-polyubiquitination and SQSTM1/p62 interaction, which are essential for cargo recognition by selective autophagy. Collectively, we discovered that the mHTT protein is subject to conformation-dependent recognition by selective autophagy, which is more selective than what we perceived: the process can be selective among different conformations of the same protein, leading to conformation-dependent differences in protein degradation and toxicity.

  1. Expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and spectroscopic characterization of two mutant Bet v 1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M; Rösch, P

    1997-07-01

    Bet v 1 is the major birch pollen allergen. A highly efficient expression and purification scheme for mutant forms of this protein was developed on the basis of the pET expression system in order to provide the high quantities of protein needed for spectroscopic and structural work. Bet v 1 (M139L) protein could be purified at high yield (approx. 30 mg from 1 liter of LB medium) in a two-step procedure by the use of metal-affinity chromatography. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography demonstrate the homogeneity and purity of the prepared protein. Spectroscopic methods were used to show that Bet v 1 (M139L) is structurally similar to wild type Bet v 1. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of the nature of amino acid 139 on the thermodynamic behaviour of the protein by replacing the leucine residue by alanine. While there appears to be no global structural effect of this mutation, the thermostability of Bet v 1 is greatly decreased.

  2. Chemical Chaperones Improve Protein Secretion and Rescue Mutant Factor VIII in Mice with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Milanov, Peter; Abriss, Daniela; Ungerer, Christopher; Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pepperkok, Rainer; Seifried, Erhard; Tonn, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Inefficient intracellular protein trafficking is a critical issue in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and in recombinant protein production. Here we investigated the trafficking of factor VIII (FVIII), which is affected in the coagulation disorder hemophilia A. We hypothesized that chemical chaperones may be useful to enhance folding and processing of FVIII in recombinant protein production, and as a therapeutic approach in patients with impaired FVIII secretion. A tagged B-domain-deleted version of human FVIII was expressed in cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to mimic the industrial production of this important protein. Of several chemical chaperones tested, the addition of betaine resulted in increased secretion of FVIII, by increasing solubility of intracellular FVIII aggregates and improving transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Similar results were obtained in experiments monitoring recombinant full-length FVIII. Oral betaine administration also increased FVIII and factor IX (FIX) plasma levels in FVIII or FIX knockout mice following gene transfer. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo applications of betaine were also able to rescue a trafficking-defective FVIII mutant (FVIIIQ305P). We conclude that chemical chaperones such as betaine might represent a useful treatment concept for hemophilia and other diseases caused by deficient intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:22973456

  3. Boat, an AXH domain protein, suppresses the cytotoxicity of mutant ataxin-1.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Akifumi; Wang, Lei; Rajan, Harini; Vig, Parminder J S; Alaynick, William A; Thaler, Joshua P; Tsai, Chih-Cheng

    2005-09-21

    Ataxin-1 is a neurodegenerative disorder protein whose glutamine-repeat expanded form causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in humans and exerts cytotoxicity in Drosophila and mouse. We report here that the cytotoxicity caused by ataxin-1 is modulated by association with a related protein, Brother of ataxin-1 (Boat). Boat and ataxin-1 share a conserved AXH (ataxin-1 and HMG-box protein 1) domain, which is essential for both proteins' interactions with the transcriptional corepressor SMRT and its Drosophila homolog, SMRTER. The Boat-ataxin-1 interaction is mediated through multiple regions in both proteins, including a newly identified NBA (N-terminal region of Boat and ataxin-1) domain. We investigated the physiological relevance of the Boat-ataxin-1 interaction in Drosophila and discovered that a mutant ataxin-1-mediated eye defect is suppressed by ataxin-1's association with Boat. Correspondingly, in transgenic SCA1 mouse, Boat expression is greatly reduced in Purkinje cells, the primary targets of SCA1. Our study thus establishes that Boat is an in vivo binding partner of ataxin-1 whose altered expression in Purkinje cells may contribute to their degeneration in SCA1 animals.

  4. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome. PMID:321423

  5. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-03-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome.

  6. v-mos proteins encoded by myeloproliferative sarcoma virus and its ts159 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Stocking, C; Walker, R; Yang, Y D; Ostertag, W; Arlinghaus, R B

    1992-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) v-mos protein was predicted to be identical in size to p39c-mos because of an observed one-base deletion in the seventh codon of the env-mos open reading frame, which would allow translation to initiate at the methionine equivalent to codon 32 of the env-mos gene. On the basis of published results, p39c-mos is known to have greatly reduced in vitro protein kinase activity compared with p37env-mos encoded by Moloney murine sarcoma virus. Unexpectedly, the relative activity of the MPSV v-mos protein kinase was comparable to that of p37env-mos. Consistent with this finding, the size of MPSV v-mos protein was found to be similar to the size of p37env-mos. Moreover, the pattern and sizes of phosphorylated bands produced by autophosphorylation of the MPSV v-mos protein were similar to those of p37env-mos. These results were confirmed by in vitro transcription-translation of the MPSV v-mos gene. Resequencing portions of the MPSV mos gene failed to show the deletion within codon 7. Except for the codon 262 deletion, other mutations characteristic of MPSV and temperature-sensitive MPSV v-mos genes were confirmed. A glycine-to-arginine mutation at residue 338 of the MPSV env-mos sequence, previously shown to cause thermosensitivity of the mutant virus (termed ts159) transforming function, yielded a v-mos protein that had significantly reduced protein kinase activity in vitro. These findings indicate that MPSV, like other Moloney murine sarcoma virus strains, also encodes a functional env-mos protein. Images PMID:1309903

  7. Rescue of αB Crystallin (HSPB5) Mutants Associated Protein Aggregation by Co-Expression of HSPB5 Partners.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Rasha M; Benjamin, Ivor J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2015-01-01

    HSPB5 (also called αB-crystallin) is a ubiquitously expressed small heat shock protein. Mutations in HSPB5 have been found to cause cataract, but are also associated with a subgroup of myofibrillar myopathies. Cells expressing each of these HSPB5 mutants are characterized by the appearance of protein aggregates of primarily the mutant HSPB5. Like several members of the HSPB family, HSPB5 can form both homo-oligomeric and hetero-oligomeric complexes. Previous studies showed that co-expression of HSPB1 and HSPB8 can prevent the aggregation associated with the HSPB5 (R120G) mutant in cardiomyocytes and in transgenic mice. In this study, we systematically compared the effect of co-expression of each of the members of the human HSPB family (HSPB1-10) on the aggregation of three different HSPB5 mutants (R120G, 450 Δ A, 464 Δ CT). Of all members, co-expression of HSPB1, HSPB4 and HSPB5 itself, most effectively prevent the aggregation of these 3 HSPB5 mutants. HSPB6 and HSPB8 were also active but less, whilst the other 5 HSPB members were ineffective. Co-expression of Hsp70 did not reduce the aggregation of the HSPB5 mutants, suggesting that aggregate formation is most likely not related to a toxic gain of function of the mutants per se, but rather related to a loss of chaperone function of the oligomeric complexes containing the HSPB5 mutants (dominant negative effects). Our data suggest that the rescue of aggregation associated with the HSPB5 mutants is due to competitive incorporation of its partners into hetero-oligomers hereby negating the dominant negative effects of the mutant on the functioning of the hetero-oligomer.

  8. Proteome Analysis of Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Mutants Reveals Differentially Induced Proteins during Brown Planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Yolanda, H. Chen; Kaur, Jatinder; Khan, Wajahatullah; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Alanazi, Mohammed S.; Mills, Aaron; Adalla, Candida B.; Bennett, John; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan; Jahn, Gary C.; Leung, Hei

    2013-01-01

    Although rice resistance plays an important role in controlling the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, not all varieties have the same level of protection against BPH infestation. Understanding the molecular interactions in rice defense response is an important tool to help to reveal unexplained processes that underlie rice resistance to BPH. A proteomics approach was used to explore how wild type IR64 and near-isogenic rice mutants with gain and loss of resistance to BPH respond during infestation. A total of 65 proteins were found markedly altered in wild type IR64 during BPH infestation. Fifty-two proteins associated with 11 functional categories were identified using mass spectrometry. Protein abundance was less altered at 2 and 14 days after infestation (DAI) (T1, T2, respectively), whereas higher protein levels were observed at 28 DAI (T3). This trend diminished at 34 DAI (T4). Comparative analysis of IR64 with mutants showed 22 proteins that may be potentially associated with rice resistance to the brown planthopper (BPH). Ten proteins were altered in susceptible mutant (D1131) whereas abundance of 12 proteins including S-like RNase, Glyoxalase I, EFTu1 and Salt stress root protein “RS1” was differentially changed in resistant mutant (D518). S-like RNase was found in greater quantities in D518 after BPH infestation but remained unchanged in IR64 and decreased in D1131. Taken together, this study shows a noticeable level of protein abundance in the resistant mutant D518 compared to the susceptible mutant D1131 that may be involved in rendering enhanced level of resistance against BPH. PMID:23434671

  9. Sensitivity of prostate tumors to wild type and M protein mutant vesicular stomatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maryam; Cramer, Scott D; Lyles, Douglas S

    2004-12-05

    Because of its potent ability to induce apoptosis, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an attractive candidate as an oncolytic virus for tumor therapy. Previous studies have suggested that VSV selectively infects tumor cells due to defects in their antiviral responses making them more susceptible to VSV infection than normal cells. We tested this hypothesis in the prostate tumor system by comparing LNCaP and PC-3 prostate tumor cells to benign human prostatic epithelial cells from patient prostatectomy specimens. We compared the cell killing ability of a recombinant virus containing a wild-type (wt) M protein (rwt) and an isogenic M protein mutant virus (rM51R-M) that induces interferon (IFN) in infected cells and should display a greater selectivity for tumor cells. Our results showed that in single-cycle infection experiments, LNCaP cells were sensitive to killing by both wt and mutant viruses, while PC-3 cells were highly resistant to VSV-induced cell killing. LNCaP and benign prostate cells were similarly susceptible to both viruses, indicating that normal prostate cells are not inherently resistant to killing by VSV. In each of the cell lines, the rM51R-M virus induced similar levels of apoptosis to rwt virus, showing that the M protein does not play a significant role in apoptosis induction by VSV in these cells. In multiple-cycle infection experiments, LNCaP cells were more sensitive than benign prostatic epithelial cells to virus-induced cell killing by rM51R-M virus, but not rwt virus. Both viruses were equally effective at reducing LNCaP tumor volume in vivo following intratumoral and intravenous inoculation in nude mice, while PC-3 tumors were resistant to VSV treatment. None of the mice treated with rM51R-M virus died as a result of virus infection, while 50-71% of mice treated with rwt virus succumbed to virus infection. Similarly, when inoculated by the more sensitive intranasal route, the rM51R-M virus was less pathogenic than the rwt virus from

  10. Heat shock protein 70 chaperone overexpression ameliorates phenotypes of the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mouse model by reducing nuclear-localized mutant androgen receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Sang, Chen; Pagoulatos, Gerassimos; Angelidis, Charalampos; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2003-03-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR). The nuclear inclusions consisting of the mutant AR protein are characteristic and combine with many components of ubiquitin-proteasome and molecular chaperone pathways, raising the possibility that misfolding and altered degradation of mutant AR may be involved in the pathogenesis. We have reported that the overexpression of heat shock protein (HSP) chaperones reduces mutant AR aggregation and cell death in a neuronal cell model (Kobayashi et al., 2000). To determine whether increasing the expression level of chaperone improves the phenotype in a mouse model, we cross-bred SBMA transgenic mice with mice overexpressing the inducible form of human HSP70. We demonstrated that high expression of HSP70 markedly ameliorated the motor function of the SBMA model mice. In double-transgenic mice, the nuclear-localized mutant AR protein, particularly that of the large complex form, was significantly reduced. Monomeric mutant AR was also reduced in amount by HSP70 overexpression, suggesting the enhanced degradation of mutant AR. These findings suggest that HSP70 overexpression ameliorates SBMA phenotypes in mice by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR, probably caused by enhanced mutant AR degradation. Our study may provide the basis for the development of an HSP70-related therapy for SBMA and other polyQ diseases.

  11. Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function from Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0506 TITLE: Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function From Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary...Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0506 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Bruce Zuraw, M.D. 5d...HAE is autosomal dominant. Cells, heterozygous for the SERPING1 mutation, express both mutant and WT C1INH proteins . HAE is clearly a loss-of

  12. Altered chlorplast ribosomal proteins associated with erythromycin-resistant mutants in two genetic systems of Chlamydomonas reinhardi.

    PubMed

    Mets, L; Bogorad, L

    1972-12-01

    The phenotype of several erythromycin-resistant mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardi was further characterized in terms of the electrophoretic properties of their chloroplast ribosomal proteins. In mutant ery-M2d a single protein of the large (52 S) subunit has altered properties, which probably result from a change in its primary sequence. This mutation is inherited in a Meudelian manner. In mutant ery-U1a, which is inherited in a uniparental manner, a different single protein of the 52 S subunit is altered. This change might result from a change in either the primary sequence of the protein or in some form of secondary modification. These results indicate that these two distinct genetic systems must cooperate in the production of chloroplast ribosomes.

  13. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-05

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation.

  14. Membrane Interactions of the Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus Matrix Protein and Its Budding Deficient Mutants.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Langerová, Hana; Doležal, Michal; Prchal, Jan; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Hunter, Eric; Rumlová, Michaela; Hrabal, Richard; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-11-20

    Matrix proteins (MAs) play a key role in the transport of retroviral proteins inside infected cells and in the interaction with cellular membranes. In most retroviruses, retroviral MAs are N-terminally myristoylated. This modification serves as a membrane targeting signal and also as an anchor for membrane interaction. The aim of this work was to characterize the interactions anchoring retroviral MA at the plasma membrane of infected cell. To address this issue, we compared the structures and membrane affinity of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) wild-type MA with its two budding deficient double mutants, that is, T41I/T78I and Y28F/Y67F. The structures of the mutants were determined using solution NMR spectroscopy, and their interactions with water-soluble phospholipids were studied. Water-soluble phospholipids are widely used models for studying membrane interactions by solution NMR spectroscopy. However, this approach might lead to artificial results due to unnatural hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, we used a new approach based on the measurement of the loss of the (1)H NMR signal intensity of the protein sample induced by the addition of the liposomes containing phospholipids with naturally long fatty acids. HIV-1 MA was used as a positive control because its ability to interact with liposomes has already been described. We found that in contrast to HIV-1, the M-PMV MA interacted with the liposomes differently and much weaker. In our invivo experiments, the M-PMV MA did not co-localize with lipid rafts. Therefore, we concluded that M-PMV might adopt a different membrane binding mechanism than HIV-1.

  15. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies.

  16. Novel Mutant AAV2 Rep Proteins Support AAV2 Replication without Blocking HSV-1 Helpervirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; de Oliveira, Anna-Paula; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Vogt, Bernd; Büning, Hildegard; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    As their names imply, parvoviruses of the genus Dependovirus rely for their efficient replication on the concurrent presence of a helpervirus, such as herpesvirus, adenovirus, or papilloma virus. Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is such an example, which in turn can efficiently inhibit the replication of each helpervirus by distinct mechanisms. In a previous study we have shown that expression of the AAV2 rep gene is not compatible with efficient replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In particular, the combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities of the Rep68/78 proteins have been shown to exert opposite effects on the replication of AAV2 and HSV-1. While essential for AAV2 DNA replication these protein activities account for the Rep-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 replication. Here, we describe a novel Rep mutant (Rep-D371Y), which displayed an unexpected phenotype. Rep-D371Y did not block HSV-1 replication, but still supported efficient AAV2 replication, at least when a double-stranded AAV2 genome template was used. We also found that the capacity of Rep-D371Y to induce apoptosis and a Rep-specific DNA damage response was significantly reduced compared to wild-type Rep. These findings suggest that AAV2 Rep-helicase subdomains exert diverging activities, which contribute to distinct steps of the AAV2 life cycle. More important, the novel AAV2 mutant Rep-D371Y may allow deciphering yet unsolved activities of the AAV2 Rep proteins such as DNA second-strand synthesis, genomic integration or packaging, which all involve the Rep-helicase activity. PMID:28125695

  17. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Angela M; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian; Kalb, Robert G

    2015-10-21

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as "anti-chaperones" uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514286-21$15.00/0.

  18. Nonsense Mediated Decay Resistant Mutations Are a Source of Expressed Mutant Proteins in Colon Cancer Cell Lines with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David S.; Bird, Matthew J.; Jorissen, Robert N.; Yu, Yen Lin; Walker, Franscesa; Zhang, Hui Hua; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High) colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. Methods Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS) by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. Results Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK), but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3). Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12) were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45%) of the MSI-High cell lines tested. Conclusion NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific immunological

  19. Genetic mapping and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants defective in the formation of extracellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wretlind, B; Pavlovskis, O R

    1984-01-01

    We isolated 15 mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO which were defective in the formation of certain extracellular proteins, such as elastase, staphylolytic enzyme, and lipase ( Xcp mutants). The mutations were mapped on the chromosome by conjugation and transduction. The locations were xcp -1 near 0', with the gene order cys-59- xcp -1- proB , and loci xcp -2, xcp -3, and xcp -31 at 35', with the gene order trpC , D- xcp -3/ xcp -31- xcp -2- argC . Loci xcp -4 and xcp -41 through xcp -44 were cotransducible with proA at 40'; loci xcp -5, xcp -51, xcp -52, and xcp53 were located at 55', with the gene order leu-10- trpF -met-9010- xcp -53- xcp -5/ xcp -51/ xcp+ ++-52, and xcp -6 was located at 65' to 70', between catA and mtu-9002. Nine mutations ( xcp -2, xcp -3, xcp -31, xcp -4, and xcp -41 through xcp -45) caused decreased production of extracellular enzymes. Six strains with mutations xcp -1, xcp -5, xcp -51, xcp -52, xcp -53, and xcp -6 produced cell-bound exoproteins and had defective release mechanisms. The regulation of production of alkaline phosphatase and phospholipase C is different from other exoproteins , such as elastase, but they all seem to share a common release mechanism. Alkaline protease had separate mechanisms for regulation and release, since this protease was found in culture supernatants of all but one of the mutants, and none of the strains had cell-bound enzyme. PMID:6427194

  20. Mutant p53 proteins bind DNA in a DNA structure-selective mode

    PubMed Central

    Göhler, Thomas; Jäger, Stefan; Warnecke, Gabriele; Yasuda, Hideyo; Kim, Ella; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Despite the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding, mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins can induce or repress transcription of mutp53-specific target genes. To date, the molecular basis for transcriptional modulation by mutp53 is not understood, but increasing evidence points to the possibility that specific interactions of mutp53 with DNA play an important role. So far, the lack of a common denominator for mutp53 DNA binding, i.e. the existence of common sequence elements, has hampered further characterization of mutp53 DNA binding. Emanating from our previous discovery that DNA structure is an important determinant of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding, we analyzed the binding of various mutp53 proteins to oligonucleotides mimicking non-B DNA structures. Using various DNA-binding assays we show that mutp53 proteins bind selectively and with high affinity to non-B DNA. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, mutp53 DNA binding to non-B DNA is solely dependent on the stereo-specific configuration of the DNA, and not on DNA sequence. We propose that DNA structure-selective binding of mutp53 proteins is the basis for the well-documented interaction of mutp53 with MAR elements and for transcriptional activities mediates by mutp53. PMID:15722483

  1. PROXiMATE: a database of mutant protein-protein complex thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jemimah, Sherlyn; Yugandhar, K; Michael Gromiha, M

    2017-09-01

    We have developed PROXiMATE, a database of thermodynamic data for more than 6000 missense mutations in 174 heterodimeric protein-protein complexes, supplemented with interaction network data from STRING database, solvent accessibility, sequence, structural and functional information, experimental conditions and literature information. Additional features include complex structure visualization, search and display options, download options and a provision for users to upload their data. The database is freely available at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/PROXiMATE/ . The website is implemented in Python, and supports recent versions of major browsers such as IE10, Firefox, Chrome and Opera. gromiha@iitm.ac.in. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Plasma mutant α-galactosidase A protein and globotriaosylsphingosine level in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukimura, Takahiro; Nakano, Sachie; Togawa, Tadayasu; Tanaka, Toshie; Saito, Seiji; Ohno, Kazuki; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (GLA) and accumulation of glycolipids, and various GLA gene mutations lead to a wide range of clinical phenotypes from the classic form to the later-onset one. To investigate the biochemical heterogeneity and elucidate the basis of the disease using available clinical samples, we measured GLA activity, GLA protein and accumulated globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-Gb3), a biomarker of this disease, in plasma samples from Fabry patients. The analysis revealed that both the enzyme activity and the protein level were apparently decreased, and the enzyme activity was well correlated with the protein level in many Fabry patients. In these cases, a defect of biosynthesis or excessive degradation of mutant GLAs should be involved in the pathogenesis, and the residual protein level would determine the accumulation of Lyso-Gb3 and the severity of the disease. However, there are some exceptional cases, i.e., ones harboring p.C142Y, p.R112H and p.M296I, who exhibit a considerable amount of GLA protein. Especially, a subset of Fabry patients with p.R112H or p.M296I has been attracted interest because the patients exhibit almost normal plasma Lyso-Gb3 concentration. Structural analysis revealed that C142Y causes a structural change at the entrance of the active site. It will lead to a complete enzyme activity deficiency, resulting in a high level of plasma Lyso-Gb3 and the classic Fabry disease. On the other hand, it is thought that R112H causes a relatively large structural change on the molecular surface, and M296I a small one in a restricted region from the core to the surface, both the structural changes being far from the active site. These changes will cause not only partial degradation but also degeneration of the mutant GLA proteins, and the degenerated enzymes exhibiting small and residual activity remain and probably facilitate degradation of Lyso-Gb3 in plasma, leading

  3. Characterization of mutant histidine-containing proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Waygood, E.B.; Reiche, B.; Hengstenberg, W.; Lee, J.S.

    1987-06-01

    Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) is common to all of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, except the fructose-specific PTS. Strains which lack HPr activity (ptsH) have been characterized in the past, and it has proved difficult to delineate between tight and leaky mutants. In this study four different parameters of ptsH strains were measured: in vitro sugar phosphorylation activity of the mutant HPr; detection of /sup 32/P-labeled P-HPr; ability of monoclonal antibodies to bind mutant HPr; and sensitivity of ptsH strains to fosfomycin. Tight ptsH strains could be defined; they were fosfomycin resistant and produced no HPr protein or completely inactive mutant HPr. All leaky ptsH strains were fosfomycin sensitive, Usually produced normal amounts of mutant HPr protein, and had low but measurable activity, and HPr was detectable as a phosphoprotein. This indicates that the regulatory functions of the PTS require a very low level of HPr activity (about 1%). The antibodies used to detect mutant HPr in crude extracts were two monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibodies Jel42 and Jel44. Both antibodies, which have different pIs, inhibited PTS sugar phosphorylation assays, but the antibody-JPr complex could still be phosphorylated by enzyme I. Preliminary evidence suggests that the antibodies bind to two different epitopes which are in part located in a ..beta..-sheet structure.

  4. Systematic generation of in vivo G protein-coupled receptor mutants in the rat

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, R; Vroling, B; Toonen, P; Nijman, I J; van Roekel, H; Verheul, M; Baakman, C; Guryev, V; Vriend, G; Cuppen, E

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of cell surface receptors that are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, and are targets for many therapeutic interventions. However, genetic models in the rat, one of the most widely used model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, are largely lacking. Here, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis to generate an in vivo GPCR mutant collection in the rat. A pre-selected panel of 250 human GPCR homologs was screened for mutations in 813 rats, resulting in the identification of 131 non-synonymous mutations. From these, seven novel potential rat gene knockouts were established as well as 45 lines carrying missense mutations in various genes associated with or involved in human diseases. We provide extensive in silico modeling results of the missense mutations and show experimental data, suggesting loss-of-function phenotypes for several models, including Mc4r and Lpar1. Taken together, the approach used resulted not only in a set of novel gene knockouts, but also in allelic series of more subtle amino acid variants, similar as commonly observed in human disease. The mutants presented here may greatly benefit studies to understand specific GPCR function and support the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20531371

  5. Systematic generation of in vivo G protein-coupled receptor mutants in the rat.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, R; Vroling, B; Toonen, P; Nijman, I J; van Roekel, H; Verheul, M; Baakman, C; Guryev, V; Vriend, G; Cuppen, E

    2011-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of cell surface receptors that are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, and are targets for many therapeutic interventions. However, genetic models in the rat, one of the most widely used model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, are largely lacking. Here, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis to generate an in vivo GPCR mutant collection in the rat. A pre-selected panel of 250 human GPCR homologs was screened for mutations in 813 rats, resulting in the identification of 131 non-synonymous mutations. From these, seven novel potential rat gene knockouts were established as well as 45 lines carrying missense mutations in various genes associated with or involved in human diseases. We provide extensive in silico modeling results of the missense mutations and show experimental data, suggesting loss-of-function phenotypes for several models, including Mc4r and Lpar1. Taken together, the approach used resulted not only in a set of novel gene knockouts, but also in allelic series of more subtle amino acid variants, similar as commonly observed in human disease. The mutants presented here may greatly benefit studies to understand specific GPCR function and support the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Integrated analysis of transcriptome and metabolome of Arabidopsis albino or pale green mutants with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Satou, Masakazu; Enoki, Harumi; Oikawa, Akira; Ohta, Daisaku; Saito, Kazunori; Hachiya, Takushi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Saito, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Nagata, Noriko; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Motohashi, Reiko

    2014-07-01

    We used four mutants having albino or pale green phenotypes with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins to analyze the regulatory system of metabolites in chloroplast. We performed an integrated analyses of transcriptomes and metabolomes of the four mutants. Transcriptome analysis was carried out using the Agilent Arabidopsis 2 Oligo Microarray, and metabolome analysis with two mass spectrometers; a direct-infusion Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR/MS) and a gas chromatograph-time of flight mass spectrometer. Among approximately 200 known metabolites detected by the FT-ICR/MS, 71 metabolites showed significant changes in the mutants when compared with controls (Ds donor plants). Significant accumulation of several amino acids (glutamine, glutamate and asparagine) was observed in the albino and pale green mutants. Transcriptome analysis revealed altered expressions of genes in several metabolic pathways. For example, genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated. These results suggest that nitrogen assimilation is constitutively promoted in the albino and pale green mutants. The accumulation of ammonium ions in the albino and pale green mutants was consistently higher than in Ds donor lines. Furthermore, genes related to pyridoxin accumulation and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated, which may have occurred as a result of the accumulation of glutamine in the albino and pale green mutants. The difference in metabolic profiles seems to be correlated with the disruption of chloroplast internal membrane structures in the mutants. In albino mutants, the alteration of metabolites accumulation and genes expression is stronger than pale green mutants.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-06-21

    VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

  8. Kinetics of the E46Q mutant of photoactive yellow protein investigated by transient grating spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Kim, Youngmin; Choi, Jungkweon; Lee, Sang Jin; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2017-09-01

    To elucidate the role of internal proton transfer in the photodynamics of photoactive yellow protein (PYP), the photocycle of the Glu46Gln mutant of PYP (E46Q-PYP) is investigated by transient grating (TG) spectroscopy. Compared with wild-type PYP (wt-PYP), the first spectrally blue-shifted intermediate of E46Q-PYP is formed more slowly, which is consistent with the absence of direct protonation from Glu46 residue, if the parallel kinetic model for wt-PYP is invoked. The smaller conformational change in E46Q-PYP, as manifested by the smaller change in the diffusion coefficient, mainly arises from the relatively larger volume of the ground state E46Q-PYP than wt-PYP rather than from the smaller volume of the pB state.

  9. Photophysics of ANS. I. Protein-ANS complexes: Intestinal fatty acid binding protein and single-trp mutants.

    PubMed

    Klimtchuk, Elena; Venyaminov, Sergei; Kurian, Elizabeth; Wessels, William; Kirk, William; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2007-01-01

    We continue investigations into the physical chemistry of intestinal fatty acid binding protein, I-FABP, and its interaction with ANS and other ligands [cf references [Kirk, W., E. Kurian, and F. Prendergast. 1996. Characterization of the sources of protein-ligand affinity: 1-sulfonato-8-anilinonaphthalene binding to intestinal fatty acid binding protein. Biophys. J. 70: 69-83., Kurian, E., W. Kirk, and F. Prendergast. 1996. Affinity of fatty acid for rRat intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Further examination. Biochemistry. 35:3865-74]. The photophysics of the wt protein is compared with that in two mutants which lack respectively one or the other of two trp moieties, one of which, trp 82, is located near the binding region for the polar head group of ligands. These studies afford a look into how the fluorescence of the wt protein is established, that is, as an almost direct sum of the fluorescence of the two individual trp residues, and how this fluorescence is quenched upon binding to ANS. Though we have access to all the relevant spectroscopic and geometric information necessary to specify in detail the Foerster-Dexter energy transfer model, the quenching process is not explicable in terms of very-weak coupling, as is usually assumed in fluorescence studies in protein systems, but in terms of a stronger effect which goes beyond the simple very-weak dipole:dipole formalism. The quenching of trp emission by bound ANS is not as great as that anticipated by ordinary resonance energy transfer, neither is the quenching observed in the reduced lifetimes of the trp emission upon ANS binding as great as that observed in steady-state intensity. However the observed steady-state quenching is explicable in terms derived from the lifetime measurements, together with observed spectral band shifts, by the exciton coupling model we invoke here.

  10. Neurotoxic Mutants of the Prion Protein Induce Spontaneous Ionic Currents in Cultured Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Isaac H.; Huettner, James E.; Harris, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which prions kill neurons and the role of the cellular prion protein in this process are enigmatic. Insight into these questions is provided by the neurodegenerative phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) molecules with deletions of conserved amino acids in the central region. We report here that expression in transfected cells of the most toxic of these PrP deletion mutants (Δ105–125) induces large, spontaneous ionic currents that can be detected by patch-clamping techniques. These currents are produced by relatively non-selective, cation-permeable channels or pores in the cell membrane and can be silenced by overexpression of wild-type PrP, as well as by treatment with a sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Similar currents are induced by PrP molecules carrying several different point mutations in the central region that cause familial prion diseases in humans. The ionic currents described here are distinct from those produced in artificial lipid membranes by synthetic peptides derived from the PrP sequence because they are induced by membrane-anchored forms of PrP that are synthesized by cells and that are found in vivo. Our results indicate that the neurotoxicity of some mutant forms of PrP is attributable to enhanced ion channel activity and that wild-type PrP possesses a channel-silencing activity. Drugs that block PrP-associated channels or pores may therefore represent novel therapeutic agents for treatment of patients with prion diseases. PMID:20573963

  11. Effect of Cysteamine on Mutant ASL Proteins with Cysteine for Arginine Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Inauen, Corinne; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Pandey, Amit V; Hu, Liyan; Blom, Henk; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Cysteamine is used to treat cystinosis via the modification of cysteine residues substituting arginine in mutant proteins. We investigated the effect of cysteamine on mutant argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), the second most common defect in the urea cycle. In an established mammalian expression system, 293T cell lysates were produced after transfection with all known cysteine for arginine mutations in the ASL gene (p.Arg94Cys, p.Arg95Cys, p.Arg168Cys, p.Arg379Cys, and p.Arg385Cys), allowing testing of the effect of cysteamine over 48 h in the culture medium as well as for 1 h immediately prior to the enzyme assay. Cysteamine at low concentrations showed no effect on 293T cell viability, ASL protein expression, or ASL activity when applied during cell culture. However, incubation of transfected cells with 0.05 mM cysteamine immediately before the enzyme assay resulted in increased ASL activity of p.Arg94Cys, p.Arg379Cys, and p.Arg385Cys by 64, 20, and 197 %, respectively, and this result was significant (p < 0.01). Cell lysates carrying p.Arg385Cys and treated with cysteamine recover enzyme activity that is similar to the untreated designed mutation p.Arg385Lys, providing circumstantial evidence for the assumed cysteamine-induced change of a cysteine to a lysine analogue. Since 12 % of all known genotypes in ASL deficiency are affected by a cysteine for arginine mutation, we conclude that the potential of cysteamine or of related substances as remedy for this disease should be investigated further.

  12. Glycosaminoglycan Sulphation Affects the Seeded Misfolding of a Mutant Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Victoria A.; Lumicisi, Brooke; Welton, Jeremy; Machalek, Dorothy; Gouramanis, Katrina; Klemm, Helen M.; Stewart, James D.; Masters, Colin L.; Hoke, David E.; Collins, Steven J.; Hill, Andrew F.

    2010-01-01

    Background The accumulation of protease resistant conformers of the prion protein (PrPres) is a key pathological feature of prion diseases. Polyanions, including RNA and glycosaminoglycans have been identified as factors that contribute to the propagation, transmission and pathogenesis of prion disease. Recent studies have suggested that the contribution of these cofactors to prion propagation may be species specific. Methodology/Principal Finding In this study a cell-free assay was used to investigate the molecular basis of polyanion stimulated PrPres formation using brain tissue or cell line derived murine PrP. Enzymatic depletion of endogenous nucleic acids or heparan sulphate (HS) from the PrPC substrate was found to specifically prevent PrPres formation seeded by mouse derived PrPSc. Modification of the negative charge afforded by the sulphation of glycosaminoglycans increased the ability of a familial PrP mutant to act as a substrate for PrPres formation, while having no effect on PrPres formed by wildtype PrP. This difference may be due to the observed differences in the binding of wild type and mutant PrP for glycosaminoglycans. Conclusions/Significance Cofactor requirements for PrPres formation are host species and prion strain specific and affected by disease associated mutations of the prion protein. This may explain both species and strain dependent propagation characteristics and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of familial prion disease. It further highlights the challenge of designing effective therapeutics against a disease which effects a range of mammalian species, caused by range of aetiologies and prion strains. PMID:20808809

  13. Activity of mutant sigma F proteins truncated near the C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Min, K T; Yudkin, M D

    1992-01-01

    sigma F, the product of the spoIIAC gene of Bacillus subtilis, is homologous in amino acid sequence throughout most of its length with several other sigma factors of B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, 8 residues from the C terminus the homology abruptly breaks down, suggesting that the C-terminal tail of the protein may be dispensable. It is known that an amber mutation at the 11th codon (wild-type glutamine 245) from the C terminus abolishes the function of the sigma factor. We have now placed chain-terminating codons at the ninth codon (wild-type lysine 247), the eighth codon (wild-type valine 248), or the seventh codon (wild-type glutamine 249) from the C terminus. We have tested the resulting mutants for their capacity to sporulate and for their ability to transcribe from a promoter (spoIIIG) that is normally read by RNA polymerase bound to sigma F (E sigma F). The results indicate that a mutant sigma F lacking the terminal 7 residues functions almost normally, which suggests that glutamine 249 is dispensable. By contrast, lysine 247 is crucial for the activity of sigma F: deletion of the 9 C-terminal residues totally inactivates the protein. When the terminal 8 residues were deleted, placing lysine 247 at the C terminus, the transcriptional activity of the factor is reduced by about 80%: we attribute this effect to neutralization of the positive charge of lysine 247 by formation of a salt bridge with the -COO- terminus. Images PMID:1429437

  14. Selection and characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus escape mutants resistant to a polyclonal antiserum raised against the F protein.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Lorena; Frabasile, Sandra; Candia, Claudia; Pittini, Alvaro; Farina, Natalia; Melero, José Antonio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-06-01

    A human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) neutralization escape mutant was obtained after 56 serial passages in the presence of a polyclonal antiserum raised against the F protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this escape mutant virus revealed two amino acid substitutions: Asn268Ile and Val533Met. When this virus was allowed to grow in the absence of the anti-F polyclonal serum, only the mutation Asn268Ile was stably maintained. Both the double and single escape mutant viruses lost reactivity with mAbs belonging to antigenic site II of the fusion protein of RSV. Mutation Asn268Ile has already been reported in RS viruses that are resistant to mAbs 47F and 11 and palivizumab (PZ). We have thus identified a novel mutation (Val533Met) in the transmembrane domain of the F protein that was selected under immune pressure.

  15. Paradoxical gain-of-function mutant of the G-protein-coupled receptor PROKR2 promotes early puberty.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Suzuki, Erina; Izumi, Yoko; Torii, Tomohiro; Narumi, Satoshi; Igarashi, Maki; Miyado, Mami; Katsumi, Momori; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Umezawa, Akihiro; Matsubara, Yoichi; Yamauchi, Junji; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2017-03-24

    The human genome encodes ~750 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2) involved in the regulation of sexual maturation. Previously reported pathogenic gain-of-function mutations of GPCR genes invariably encoded aberrant receptors with excessive signal transduction activity. Although in vitro assays demonstrated that an artificially created inactive mutant of PROKR2 exerted paradoxical gain-of-function effects when co-transfected with wild-type proteins, such a phenomenon has not been observed in vivo. Here, we report a heterozygous frameshift mutation of PROKR2 identified in a 3.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty. The mutant mRNA escaped nonsense-mediated decay and generated a GPCR lacking two transmembrane domains and the carboxyl-terminal tail. The mutant protein had no in vitro signal transduction activity; however, cells co-expressing the mutant and wild-type PROKR2 exhibited markedly exaggerated ligand-induced Ca(2+) responses. The results indicate that certain inactive PROKR2 mutants can cause early puberty by enhancing the functional property of coexisting wild-type proteins. Considering the structural similarity among GPCRs, this paradoxical gain-of-function mechanism may underlie various human disorders.

  16. Rapid site-specific DNA inversion in Escherichia coli mutants lacking the histonelike protein H-NS.

    PubMed Central

    Kawula, T H; Orndorff, P E

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli pilG mutants are thought to have a dramatically higher DNA inversion rate as measured by the site-specific DNA inversion of the type 1 pili pilA promoter. DNA sequence of the pilG gene confirmed its identity to the gene encoding the bacterial histonelike protein H-NS. Unlike other histonelike protein complexes that enhance site-specific DNA recombination, the H-NS protein inhibited this process. This inhibition was indicated by the increased inversion rate of the pilA promoter region effected by two different mutant pilG alleles. One of these alleles, pilG1, conferred a mutant phenotype only at low temperature attributable to a T-to-G transversion in the -35 sequence of the pilG promoter. The other allele, pilG2-tetR, was an insertion mutation in the pilG coding region that conferred the mutant phenotype independent of temperature. We measured an approximately 100-fold-increased pilA promoter inversion rate in the mutant by exploiting the temperature-dependent expression of pilG1 and using a novel rapid-population-sampling method. Contrary to one current view on how the H-NS protein might act to increase DNA inversion rate, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that DNA supercoiling affected pilA promoter inversion. Images PMID:1648076

  17. A chlorophyll-protein complex lacking in photosystem I mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chua, N. H.; Matlin, K.; Bennoun, P.

    1975-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of unheated, detergent-solubilized thylakoid membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gives two chlorophyll-protein complexes. Chlorophyll-protein complex I (CP I) is the blue-green in color and can be dissociated by heat into "free" chlorophyll and a constituent polypeptide (polypeptide 2; mol wt 66,000). Similar experiments with spinach and Chinese cabbage show that the higher plant CP I contains an equivalent polypeptide but of slightly lower molecular weight (64,000). Both polypeptide 2 and its counterpart in spinach are soluble in a 2:1 (vol/vol) mixture of chloroform-methanol. Chemical analysis reveals that C. reinhardtii CP I has a chlorophyll a to b weight ratio of about 5 and that it contains approximately 5% of the total chlorophyll and 8-9% of the total protein of the thylakoid membranes. Thus, it can be calculated that each constituent polypeptide chain is associated with eight to nine chlorophyll molecules. Attempts to measure the molecular weight of CP I by calibrated SDS gels were unsuccessul since the complex migrates anomalously in such gels. Two Mendelian mutants of C. reinhardtii, F1 and F14, which lack P700 but have normal photosystem I activity, do not contain CP I or the 66,000-dalton polypeptide in their thylakoid membranes. Our results suggest that CP I is essential for photosystem I reaction center activity and that P700 may be associated with the 66,000-dalton polypeptide. PMID:1194353

  18. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Delia

    2016-01-01

    MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques. PMID:27340829

  19. Low dietary protein content alleviates motor symptoms in mice with mutant dynactin/dynein-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Diana; Sinniger, Jérome; Henriques, Alexandre; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Müller, Hans-Peter; Rasche, Volker; Ferger, Boris; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Soylu-Kucharz, Rana; Petersén, Asa; Walther, Paul; Linkus, Birgit; Kassubek, Jan; Wong, Philip C.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Dupuis, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in components of the molecular motor dynein/dynactin lead to neurodegenerative diseases of the motor system or atypical parkinsonism. These mutations are associated with prominent accumulation of vesicles involved in autophagy and lysosomal pathways, and with protein inclusions. Whether alleviating these defects would affect motor symptoms remain unknown. Here, we show that a mouse model expressing low levels of disease linked-G59S mutant dynactin p150Glued develops motor dysfunction >8 months before loss of motor neurons or dopaminergic degeneration is observed. Abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes and protein inclusions were efficiently corrected by lowering dietary protein content, and this was associated with transcriptional upregulations of key players in autophagy. Most importantly this dietary modification partially rescued overall neurological symptoms in these mice after onset. Similar observations were made in another mouse strain carrying a point mutation in the dynein heavy chain gene. Collectively, our data suggest that stimulating the autophagy/lysosomal system through appropriate nutritional intervention has significant beneficial effects on motor symptoms of dynein/dynactin diseases even after symptom onset. PMID:25552654

  20. Characterization of two pathogenic mutations in cystathionine beta-synthase: different intracellular locations for wild-type and mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Casique, L; Kabil, O; Banerjee, R; Martinez, J C; De Lucca, M

    2013-11-15

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine to generate cystathionine. Homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder commonly caused by a deficiency of CBS activity. Here, we characterized a novel CBS mutation (c.260C>A (p.T87N)) and a previously reported variant (c.700G>A (p.D234N)) found in Venezuelan homocystinuric patients, one nonresponsive and one responsive to vitamin B6. Both mutant proteins were expressed in vitro in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, finding lower soluble expression in HEK-293 cells (19% T87N and 23% D234N) compared to wild-type CBS. Residual activities obtained for the mutant proteins were 3.5% T87N and 43% D234N. Gel exclusion chromatography demonstrated a tendency of the T87N mutant to aggregate while the distribution of the D234N mutant was similar to wild-type enzyme. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, an unexpected difference in intracellular localization was observed between the wild-type and mutant proteins. While the T87N mutant exhibited a punctate appearance, the wild-type protein was homogeneously distributed inside the cell. Interestingly, the D234N protein showed both distributions. This study demonstrates that the pathogenic CBS mutations generate unstable proteins that are unable (T87N) or partially unable (D234N) to assemble into a functional enzyme, implying that these mutations might be responsible for the homocystinuria phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracellular Transport, Assembly, and Degradation of Wild-Type and Disease-linked Mutant Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    VanSlyke, Judy K.; Deschenes, Suzanne M.; Musil, Linda S.

    2000-01-01

    More than 130 different mutations in the gap junction integral plasma membrane protein connexin32 (Cx32) have been linked to the human peripheral neuropathy X-linked Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMTX). How these various mutants are processed by the cell and the mechanism(s) by which they cause CMTX are unknown. To address these issues, we have studied the intracellular transport, assembly, and degradation of three CMTX-linked Cx32 mutants stably expressed in PC12 cells. Each mutant had a distinct fate: E208K Cx32 appeared to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas both the E186K and R142W mutants were transported to perinuclear compartments from which they trafficked either to lysosomes (R142W Cx32) or back to the ER (E186K Cx32). Despite these differences, each mutant was soluble in nonionic detergent but unable to assemble into homomeric connexons. Degradation of both mutant and wild-type connexins was rapid (t1/2 < 3 h) and took place at least in part in the ER by a process sensitive to proteasome inhibitors. The mutants studied are therefore unlikely to cause disease by accumulating in degradation-resistant aggregates but instead are efficiently cleared from the cell by quality control processes that prevent abnormal connexin molecules from traversing the secretory pathway. PMID:10848620

  2. A subset of yeast vacuolar protein sorting mutants is blocked in one branch of the exocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2002-01-21

    Exocytic vesicles that accumulate in a temperature-sensitive sec6 mutant at a restrictive temperature can be separated into at least two populations with different buoyant densities and unique cargo molecules. Using a sec6 mutant background to isolate vesicles, we have found that vacuolar protein sorting mutants that block an endosome-mediated route to the vacuole, including vps1, pep12, vps4, and a temperature-sensitive clathrin mutant, missort cargo normally transported by dense exocytic vesicles, such as invertase, into light exocytic vesicles, whereas transport of cargo specific to the light exocytic vesicles appears unaffected. Immunoisolation experiments confirm that missorting, rather than a changed property of the normally dense vesicles, is responsible for the altered density gradient fractionation profile. The vps41Delta and apl6Delta mutants, which block transport of only the subset of vacuolar proteins that bypasses endosomes, sort exocytic cargo normally. Furthermore, a vps10Delta sec6 mutant, which lacks the sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), accumulates both invertase and CPY in dense vesicles. These results suggest that at least one branch of the yeast exocytic pathway transits through endosomes before reaching the cell surface. Consistent with this possibility, we show that immunoisolated clathrin-coated vesicles contain invertase.

  3. Thermolabile in vivo DNA-binding activity associated with a protein encoded by mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Knipe, D M

    1983-01-01

    The major DNA-binding protein encoded by several temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 was thermolabile for binding to intracellular viral DNA. The ability of DNase I to release this protein from isolated nuclei was used as a measure of the amount of protein bound to viral DNA. This assay was based upon our previous observation that the fraction of herpesviral DNA-binding protein which can be eluted from nuclei with DNase I represents proteins associated with progeny viral DNA (D. M. Knipe and A. E. Spang, J. Virol. 43:314-324, 1982). In this study, we found that several temperature-sensitive mutants encoded proteins which rapidly chased from a DNase I-sensitive to a DNase I-resistant nuclear form upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. We interpret this change in DNase I sensitivity to represent the denaturation of the DNA-binding site at the nonpermissive temperature and the association with the nuclear framework via a second site on the protein. The DNA-binding activity measured by the DNase I sensitivity assay represents an important function of the protein in viral replication because three of five mutants tested were thermolabile for this activity. A fourth mutant encoded a protein which did not associate with the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature and therefore would not be available for DNA binding in the nucleus. We also present supportive evidence for the binding of the wild-type protein to intracellular viral DNA by showing that a monoclonal antibody coprecipitated virus-specific DNA sequences with the major DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:6304350

  4. A mutant Tat protein inhibits infection of human cells by strains from diverse HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rustanti, Lina; Jin, Hongping; Lor, Mary; Lin, Min Hsuan; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David

    2017-03-14

    Nullbasic is a mutant HIV-1 Tat protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication via three independent mechanisms that disrupts 1) reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a DNA copy, 2) HIV-1 Rev protein function required for viral mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and 3) HIV-1 mRNA transcription by RNA Polymerase II. The Nullbasic protein is derived from the subtype B strain HIV-1BH10 and has only been tested against other HIV-1 subtype B strains. However, subtype B strains only account for ~10% of HIV-1 infections globally and HIV-1 Tat sequences vary between subtypes especially for subtype C, which is responsible for ~50% HIV-1 infection worldwide. These differences could influence the ability of Tat to interact with RNA and cellular proteins and thus could affect the antiviral activity of Nullbasic. Therefore, Nullbasic was tested against representative HIV-1 strains from subtypes C, D and A/D recombinant to determine if it can inhibit their replication. Nullbasic was delivered to human cells using a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retroviral system. We evaluated Nullbasic-mCherry (NB-mCh) fusion protein activity against the HIV-1 strains in TZM-bl cell lines for inhibition of transactivation and virus replication. We also examined antiviral activity of Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein against the same strains in primary CD4(+) T cells. The Nullbasic expression was monitored by western blot and flow cytometry. The effects of Nullbasic on primary CD4(+) T cells cytotoxicity, proliferation and apoptosis were also examined. The results show that Nullbasic inhibits Tat-mediated transactivation and virus replication of all the HIV-1 strains tested in TZM-bl cells. Importantly, Nullbasic inhibits replication of the HIV-1 strains in primary CD4(+) T cells without affecting cell proliferation, cytotoxicity or level of apoptotic cells. A SIN-based γ-retroviral vector used to express Nullbasic fusion proteins improved protein expression

  5. The induction levels of heat shock protein 70 differentiate the vulnerabilities to mutant huntingtin among neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Marubuchi, Shigeki; Qi, Mei-Ling; Enokido, Yasushi; Tamura, Takuya; Inagaki, Reina; Murata, Miho; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Wanker, Erich E; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2007-01-24

    The reason why vulnerabilities to mutant polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins are different among neuronal subtypes is mostly unknown. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of three types of primary neurons expressing huntingtin (htt) or ataxin-1. We found that heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), a well known chaperone molecule protecting neurons in the polyQ pathology, was dramatically upregulated only by mutant htt and selectively in the granule cells of the cerebellum. Granule cells, which are insensitive to degeneration in the human Huntington's disease (HD) pathology, lost their resistance by suppressing hsp70 with siRNA, whereas cortical neurons, affected in human HD, gained resistance by overexpressing hsp70. This indicates that induction levels of hsp70 are a critical factor for determining vulnerabilities to mutant htt among neuronal subtypes. CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) assays showed that CBF (CCAAT box binding factor, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein zeta) activated, but p53 repressed transcription of the hsp70 gene in granule cells. Basal and mutant htt-induced expression levels of p53 were remarkably lower in granule cells than in cortical neurons, suggesting that different magnitudes of p53 are linked to distinct induction levels of hsp70. Surprisingly, however, heat shock factor 1 was not activated in granule cells by mutant htt. Collectively, different levels of hsp70 among neuronal subtypes might be involved in selective neuronal death in the HD pathology.

  6. NEDL1, a novel ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase for dishevelled-1, targets mutant superoxide dismutase-1.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kou; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Ozaki, Toshinori; Kato, Chiaki; Kurose, Yuka; Sakamoto, Maya; Kato, Shinsuke; Goto, Takeshi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Aoki, Masashi; Nakagawara, Akira

    2004-03-19

    Approximately 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) arises from germ-line mutations in the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the process have been elusive. Here, we show that a neuronal homologous to E6AP carboxyl terminus (HECT)-type ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (NEDL1) physically binds translocon-associated protein-delta and also binds and ubiquitinates mutant (but not wild-type) SOD1 proportionately to the disease severity caused by that particular mutant. Immunohistochemically, NEDL1 is present in the central region of the Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions in the spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons of both FALS patients and mutant SOD1 transgenic mice. Two-hybrid screening for the physiological targets of NEDL1 has identified Dishevelled-1, one of the key transducers in the Wnt signaling pathway. Mutant SOD1 also interacted with Dishevelled-1 in the presence of NEDL1 and caused its dysfunction. Thus, our results suggest that an adverse interaction among misfolded SOD1, NEDL1, translocon-associated protein-delta, and Dishevelled-1 forms a ubiquitinated protein complex that is included in potentially cytotoxic protein aggregates and that mutually affects their functions, leading to motor neuron death in FALS.

  7. Biophysical characterization of wild-type and mutant bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in the virion and in detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1996-08-13

    Interactions between the filamentous bacteriophage major coat protein and its environment differ markedly between the membrane-bound assembly intermediate which spans the lipid bilayer and the phage coat protein which makes up the capsid of the virion. Nonetheless, both reflect successful strategies to sequester the hydrophobic regions of the coat protein away from the aqueous milieu. To characterize the roles of individual residues in the conformation, stability, and oligomerization of the coat protein in both the virion and in detergent micelles, wild-type IKe and M13 coat proteins, together with a library of over 40 IKe coat protein mutants, were studied using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. The largely helical conformations of coat protein in IKe wild-type and mutant virions were found to be very similar by CD, demonstrating that the overall organization of the phage can accommodate a diverse range of amino acid substitutions in the major coat protein. Intrinsic Trp fluorescence showed that the polarity of the Trp 29 environment in the virion was modulated by residues within one helical turn of this locus. Characterization of IKe phage growth and plaquing properties highlighted the importance of Pro 30 in maintaining viability. As well, the Pro 30 mutants were the only substitutions which rendered the detergent-solubilized coat protein less thermostable and additionally altered the polarity of the Trp 29 environment. The Pro 30 Gly mutant exhibited numerous 1H and 15N chemical shift changes between residues Ile 25 and Ala 38 in the 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectrum in myristoyllysophosphatidylglycerol (MPG) micelles, demonstrating that the effect of the substitution is propagated beyond adjacent residues. The overall results highlight the stabilizing effect of Pro in the first turn of a transmembrane helix and the importance of hydrophobicity in modulating the oligomerization and stability of coat

  8. An in vitro perspective on the molecular mechanisms underlying mutant huntingtin protein toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cisbani, G; Cicchetti, F

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder whose main hallmark is brain atrophy. However, several peripheral organs are considerably affected and their symptoms may, in fact, manifest before those resulting from brain pathology. HD is of genetic origin and caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene. The mutated protein has detrimental effects on cell survival, but whether the mutation leads to a gain of toxic function or a loss of function of the altered protein is still highly controversial. Most currently used in vitro models have been designed, to a large extent, to investigate the effects of the aggregation process in neuronal-like cells. However, as the pathology involves several other organs, new in vitro models are critically needed to take into account the deleterious effects of mutant huntingtin in peripheral tissues, and thus to identify new targets that could lead to more effective clinical interventions in the early course of the disease. This review aims to present current in vitro models of HD pathology and to discuss the knowledge that has been gained from these studies as well as the new in vitro tools that have been developed, which should reflect the more global view that we now have of the disease. PMID:22932724

  9. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Ltp3 showed delayed germination and reduced germination frequency. Seedling growth appeared reduced in the mutant but this growth restriction was rescued by the addition of an exogenous carbon supply, suggesting a defective oil mobilization. Lipid breakdown analysis during seedling growth revealed a differential profile in the mutant compared to the wild type. The involvement of LTP3 in germination and seedling growth and its relationship with the lipid transfer ability of this protein is discussed. PMID:26479260

  10. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Ltp3 showed delayed germination and reduced germination frequency. Seedling growth appeared reduced in the mutant but this growth restriction was rescued by the addition of an exogenous carbon supply, suggesting a defective oil mobilization. Lipid breakdown analysis during seedling growth revealed a differential profile in the mutant compared to the wild type. The involvement of LTP3 in germination and seedling growth and its relationship with the lipid transfer ability of this protein is discussed.

  11. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties. PMID:26497062

  12. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-26

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  13. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  14. Fusion-defective mutants of mouse hepatitis virus A59 contain a mutation in the spike protein cleavage signal.

    PubMed Central

    Gombold, J L; Hingley, S T; Weiss, S R

    1993-01-01

    Infection of primary mouse glial cell cultures with mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 results in a productive, persistent infection, but without any obvious cytopathic effect. Mutant viruses isolated from infected glial cultures 16 to 18 weeks postinfection replicate with kinetics similar to those of wild-type virus but produce small plaques on fibroblasts and cause only minimal levels of cell-to-cell fusion under conditions in which wild type causes nearly complete cell fusion. However, since extensive fusion is present in mutant-infected cells at late times postinfection, the defect is actually a delay in kinetics rather than an absolute block in activity. Addition of trypsin to mutant-infected fibroblast cultures enhanced cell fusion a small (two- to fivefold) but significant degree, indicating that the defect could be due to a lack of cleavage of the viral spike (fusion) protein. Sequencing of portions of the spike genes of six fusion-defective mutants revealed that all contained the same single nucleotide mutation resulting in a substitution of aspartic acid for histidine in the spike cleavage signal. Mutant virions contained only the 180-kDa form of spike protein, suggesting that this mutation prevented the normal proteolytic cleavage of the 180-kDa protein into the 90-kDa subunits. Examination of revertants of the mutants supports this hypothesis. Acquisition of fusion competence correlates with the replacement of the negatively charged aspartic acid with either the wild-type histidine or a nonpolar amino acid and the restoration of spike protein cleavage. These data confirm and extend previous reports concluding cleavage of S is required for efficient cell-cell fusion by mouse hepatitis virus but not for virus-cell fusion (infectivity). Images PMID:8392595

  15. Flat cells come full sphere: Are mutant cytoskeletal-related proteins oncoprotein-monsters or useful immunogens?

    PubMed

    Parry, Michele L; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is inherited as a dominant disease because if one allele is mutated, it contributes a mutant, destructive subunit polypeptide to collagen, which requires many subunits to form normal, polymeric, collagenous structures. Recent cancer genome atlas (TCGA) data indicate that cytoskeletal-related proteins are among the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancers, in distinct mutation frequency groups, i.e., including low mutation frequency groups. Part of the explanation for this observation is likely to be the fact that many of the coding regions for these proteins are very large, and indeed, it is likely these coding regions are mutated in many cells that never become cancerous. However, it would not be surprising if mutations in cytoskeletal proteins, when combined with oncoprotein or tumor suppressor protein mutations, had significant impacts on cancer development, for a number of reasons, including results obtained almost 5 decades ago indicating that well-spread cells in tissue culture, with well-formed cytoskeletons, were less tumorigenic than spherical cells with disrupted cytoskeletons. This raises the question, are mutant cytoskeletal proteins, which would likely interfere with polymer formation, a new class of oncoproteins, in particular, dominant negative oncoproteins? If these proteins are so commonly mutant, could they be the bases for common cancer vaccines?

  16. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi80 cya+ and phi80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants. Images PMID:173710

  17. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  18. Special AT-rich Binding Protein-2 (SATB2) Differentially Affects Disease-causing p63 Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Grant, R. Ian; Kaplan, David R.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2011-01-01

    p63, a p53 family member, is critical for proper skin and limb development and directly regulates gene expression in the ectoderm. Mice lacking p63 exhibit skin and craniofacial defects including cleft palate. In humans p63 mutations are associated with several distinct developmental syndromes. p63 sterile-α-motif domain, AEC (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting)-associated mutations are associated with a high prevalence of orofacial clefting disorders, which are less common in EEC (ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting) patients with DNA binding domain p63 mutations. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations differentially influence p63 function remain unclear, and interactions with other proteins implicated in craniofacial development have not been identified. Here, we show that AEC p63 mutations affect the ability of the p63 protein to interact with special AT-rich binding protein-2 (SATB2), which has recently also been implicated in the development of cleft palate. p63 and SATB2 are co-expressed early in development in the ectoderm of the first and second branchial arches, two essential sites where signaling is required for craniofacial patterning. SATB2 attenuates p63-mediated gene expression of perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a critical downstream target gene during development, and specifically decreases p63 perp promoter binding. Interestingly, AEC but not EEC p63 mutations affect the ability of p63 to interact with SATB2 and the inhibitory effects of SATB2 on p63 transactivation of perp are most pronounced for AEC-associated p63 mutations. Our findings reveal a novel gain-of-function property of AEC-causing p63 mutations and identify SATB2 as the first p63 binding partner that differentially influences AEC and EEC p63 mutant proteins. PMID:21965674

  19. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  20. Delayed degradation of chlorophylls and photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis autophagy mutants during stress-induced leaf yellowing.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Ye-Sol; Park, Ohkmae K; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2014-07-01

    Plant autophagy, one of the essential proteolysis systems, balances proteome and nutrient levels in cells of the whole plant. Autophagy has been studied by analysing Arabidopsis thaliana autophagy-defective atg mutants, but the relationship between autophagy and chlorophyll (Chl) breakdown during stress-induced leaf yellowing remains unclear. During natural senescence or under abiotic-stress conditions, extensive cell death and early yellowing occurs in the leaves of atg mutants. A new finding is revealed that atg5 and atg7 mutants exhibit a functional stay-green phenotype under mild abiotic-stress conditions, but leaf yellowing proceeds normally in wild-type leaves under these conditions. Under mild salt stress, atg5 leaves retained high levels of Chls and all photosystem proteins and maintained a normal chloroplast structure. Furthermore, a double mutant of atg5 and non-functional stay-green nonyellowing1-1 (atg5 nye1-1) showed a much stronger stay-green phenotype than either single mutant. Taking these results together, it is proposed that autophagy functions in the non-selective catabolism of Chls and photosynthetic proteins during stress-induced leaf yellowing, in addition to the selective degradation of Chl-apoprotein complexes in the chloroplasts through the senescence-induced STAY-GREEN1/NYE1 and Chl catabolic enzymes.

  1. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-04-01

    Val57 point mutants of human cystatin C, which were designed to assess the influence of changes in the properties of the L1 loop on the dimerization propensity, were structurally characterized. Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations.

  2. A Dictyostelium mutant deficient in severin, an F-actin fragmenting protein, shows normal motility and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A severin deficient mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum has been isolated by the use of colony immunoblotting after chemical mutagenesis. In homogenates of wild-type cells, severin is easily detected as a very active F-actin fragmenting protein. Tests for severin in the mutant, HG1132, included viscometry for the assay of F- actin fragmentation in fractions from DEAE-cellulose columns, labeling of blots with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and immunofluorescent-labeling of cryosections. Severin could not be detected in the mutant using these methods. The mutation in HG1132 is recessive and has been mapped to linkage group VII. The mutant failed to produce the normal severin mRNA, but small amounts of a transcript that was approximately 100 bases larger than the wild-type mRNA were detected in the mutant throughout all stages of development. On the DNA level a new Mbo II restriction site was found in the mutant within the coding region of the severin gene. The severin deficient mutant cells grew at an approximately normal rate, aggregated and formed fruiting bodies with viable spores. By the use of an image processing system, speed of cell movement, turning rates, and precision of chemotactic orientation in a stable gradient of cyclic AMP were quantitated, and no significant differences between wild-type and mutant cells were found. Thus, under the culture conditions used, severin proved to be neither essential for growth of D. discoideum nor for any cell function that is important for aggregation or later development. PMID:2537840

  3. Mutant surfactant A2 proteins associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer induce TGF-β1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Cano, Christopher A.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the lung surfactant proteins are found in patients with interstitial lung disease and lung cancer, but their pathologic mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans heterozygous for a missense mutation in the gene encoding surfactant protein (SP)-A2 (SFTPA2) contains more TGF-β1 than control samples. Expression of mutant SP-A2 in lung epithelial cells leads to secretion of latent TGF-β1, which is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling. TGF-β1 secretion is not observed in lung epithelial cells expressing the common SP-A2 variants or other misfolded proteins capable of increasing cellular endoplasmic reticulum stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response is necessary for maximal TGF-β1 secretion because gene silencing of the unfolded protein response transducers leads to an ∼50% decrease in mutant SP-A2–mediated TGF-β1 secretion. Expression of the mutant SP-A2 proteins leads to the coordinated increase in gene expression of TGF-β1 and two TGF-β1–binding proteins, LTBP-1 and LTBP-4; expression of the latter is necessary for secretion of this cytokine. Inhibition of the TGF-β autocrine positive feedback loop by a pan–TGF-β–neutralizing antibody, a TGF-β receptor antagonist, or LTBP gene silencing results in the reversal of TGF-β–mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell death. Because secretion of latent TGF-β1 is induced specifically by mutant SP-A2 proteins, therapeutics targeted to block this pathway may be especially beneficial for this molecularly defined subgroup of patients. PMID:23223528

  4. Mutant surfactant A2 proteins associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer induce TGF-β1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Cano, Christopher A; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-12-18

    Mutations in the genes encoding the lung surfactant proteins are found in patients with interstitial lung disease and lung cancer, but their pathologic mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans heterozygous for a missense mutation in the gene encoding surfactant protein (SP)-A2 (SFTPA2) contains more TGF-β1 than control samples. Expression of mutant SP-A2 in lung epithelial cells leads to secretion of latent TGF-β1, which is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling. TGF-β1 secretion is not observed in lung epithelial cells expressing the common SP-A2 variants or other misfolded proteins capable of increasing cellular endoplasmic reticulum stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response is necessary for maximal TGF-β1 secretion because gene silencing of the unfolded protein response transducers leads to an ∼50% decrease in mutant SP-A2-mediated TGF-β1 secretion. Expression of the mutant SP-A2 proteins leads to the coordinated increase in gene expression of TGF-β1 and two TGF-β1-binding proteins, LTBP-1 and LTBP-4; expression of the latter is necessary for secretion of this cytokine. Inhibition of the TGF-β autocrine positive feedback loop by a pan-TGF-β-neutralizing antibody, a TGF-β receptor antagonist, or LTBP gene silencing results in the reversal of TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell death. Because secretion of latent TGF-β1 is induced specifically by mutant SP-A2 proteins, therapeutics targeted to block this pathway may be especially beneficial for this molecularly defined subgroup of patients.

  5. A poliovirus 2A(pro) mutant unable to cleave 3CD shows inefficient viral protein synthesis and transactivation defects.

    PubMed Central

    Ventoso, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-01-01

    Four poliovirus mutants with modifications of tyrosine 88 in 2A(pro) were generated and introduced into the cloned poliovirus genome. Mutants Y88P and Y88L were nonviable, mutant Y88F showed a wild-type (WT) phenotype, and mutant Y88S showed a delayed cytopathic effect and formed small plaques in HeLa cells. Growth of Y88S in HeLa cells was restricted, giving rise to about 20% of the PFU production of the WT poliovirus. The 2A (Y88S) mutant synthesized significantly lower levels of viral proteins in HeLa cells than did the WT poliovirus, while the kinetics of p220 cleavage were identical for both viruses. Strikingly, the 2A (Y88S) mutant was unable to cleave 3CD, as shown by analysis of poliovirus proteins labeled with [35S]methionine or immunoblotted with a specific anti-3C serum. The ability of the Y88S mutant to form infectious virus and cleave 3CD can be complemented by the WT poliovirus. Synthesis of viral RNA was diminished in the Y88S mutant but less than the inhibition of translation of viral RNA. Experiments in which guanidine was used to inhibit poliovirus RNA synthesis suggest that the primary defect of the Y88S mutant virus is at the level of poliovirus RNA translation, while viral genome replication is much less affected. Transfection of HeLa cells infected with the WT poliovirus with a luciferase mRNA containing the poliovirus 5' untranslated sequence gives rise to a severalfold increase in luciferase activity. This enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA was not observed when the transfected cells were infected with the 2A (Y88S) mutant. Moreover, cotransfection with mRNA encoding WT poliovirus 2A(pro) enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA. This enhancement was much lower upon transfection with mRNA encoding 2A(Y88S), 2A(Y88L), or 2A(Y88P). These findings support the view that 2A(pro) itself, rather than the 3C' and/or 3D' products, is necessary for efficient translation of poliovirus RNA in HeLa cells. PMID:7666528

  6. Analysis of in vitro activities of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL42 mutant proteins: correlation with in vivo function.

    PubMed

    Thornton, K E; Chaudhuri, M; Monahan, S J; Grinstead, L A; Parris, D S

    2000-09-30

    The DNA polymerase (pol) catalytic subunit of herpes simplex virus type 1, encoded by UL30, and its accessory factor, UL42 protein, are both essential for the replication of the virus. Because the stable interaction between UL42 and pol renders the pol fully processive for replicative DNA synthesis, disruption of this interaction represents a potential goal in the development of novel antiviral compounds. To better compare the effects of mutations in UL42 protein on its known in vitro functions, mutations were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusions and the fusion proteins used in affinity chromatography. In this report, we demonstrate the relationship between the abilities of mutant UL42 fusion proteins to bind pol and to stimulate pol activity in vitro, and the abilities of nonfusion mutant proteins to function in viral replication. The pol stimulation assay using GST fusion proteins was found to be a more accurate and sensitive measure of the ability of the UL42 protein to function in vitro than the pol binding assay using the fusion proteins linked to a solid matrix. We also found an excellent correlation between the ability of purified GST fusion proteins to stimulate pol activity in vitro and the ability of full-length nonfusion UL42 mutant genes to support DNA replication in infected cells. Our results demonstrate that two noncontiguous stretches of amino acids, from 137 to 142 and from 274 to 282, are essential for UL42 function in vivo and in vitro. Although mutant d241-261 exhibited close to wild-type abilities to stimulate pol activity in vitro, it was not capable of complementing the replication of a UL42 null mutant virus. The region of UL42 protein within or close to 241-261 may serve to hinge the essential regions within the N- and C-terminal portions of the protein which are thought to interdigitate. It is hypothesized that reduction in the length of the hinge region could alter the ability of UL42, and/or its complex with pol, to

  7. Reversible symptoms and clearance of mutant prion protein in an inducible model of a genetic prion disease in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Murali, A; Maue, R A; Dolph, P J

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are progressive disorders that affect the central nervous system leading to memory loss, personality changes, ataxia and neurodegeneration. In humans, these disorders include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru and Gerstmann-Straüssler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, the latter being a dominantly inherited prion disease associated with missense mutations in the gene that codes for the prion protein. The exact mechanism by which mutant prion proteins affect the central nervous system and cause neurological disease is not well understood. We have generated an inducible model of GSS disease in Drosophila melanogaster by temporally expressing a misfolded form of the murine prion protein in cholinergic neurons. Flies accumulating this mutant protein develop motor abnormalities which are associated with electrophysiological defects in cholinergic neurons. We find that, upon blocking the expression of the mutant protein, both behavioral and electrophysiological defects can be reversed. This represents the first case of reversibility reported in a model of genetic prion disease. Additionally, we observe that endogenous mechanisms exist within Drosophila that are capable of clearing the accumulated prion protein.

  8. Genetic studies of an Escherichia coli K-12 temperature-sensitive mutant defective in membrane protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Ohki, M; Yura, T; Ito, K

    1979-01-01

    The mutant divE42(Ts) of Escherichia coli K-12, defective in the synthesis of membrane proteins and in the transcription of the lac operon at high temperature, has been further characterized. It was found that a mutation (divE42) located at about min 22 on the E. coli chromosome map is responsible for the Lac- phenotype and temperature-sensitive growth. The mutation could be contransduced with serC, pyrD, or pyrC by phage P1 at a frequency of 4, 16, or 0.5%, respectively, the gene order being serC-pyrD-ompA-sulA-divE-pyrC. Examination of temperature-independent revertants and Pyr+ transductants revealed that all the mutant phenotypes examined (deficiencies in the increase of activities of some membrane enzymes, expression of the lac operon, and synthesis of several other proteins) are due to a single mutation (divE42) which is recessive to the wild-type (divE+) allele. Protein synthesis in the mutant was also analyzed by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of a number of proteins, including membrane proteins, was found to decrease significantly, whereas that of an elongation factor, EF-Tu, increased upon transfer of a log-phase culture to high temperature (42 degrees C). These effects of temperature shift-up on protein synthesis were evident within 5 min under the conditions used. Images PMID:374381

  9. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  10. Aggregation of mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase proteins in a culture model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Durham, H D; Roy, J; Dong, L; Figlewicz, D A

    1997-05-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) gene underlie some familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of cortical, brainstem, and spinal motor neurons. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of mutant enzyme, SOD-1 cDNAs bearing mutations found in FALS patients (mSOD) were expressed in cultured spinal motor neurons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and hippocampal neurons. Many features of motor neuron disease seen in humans with FALS and in transgenic mouse models were reproduced, including preferential susceptibility of motor neurons to toxicity of mSOD. Abnormal cytoplasmic aggregation of mSOD protein was observed in mSOD-expressing motor neurons, but never in neurons expressing SODwt enzyme, and was followed by evidence of apoptotic cell death. Such aggregates were not observed in nonvulnerable neuronal populations expressing mSOD (DRG or hippocampal neurons). Aggregation of SOD-1 may contribute significantly to the death of motor neurons expressing mutations associated with FALS-1 and the mechanisms leading to aggregation may pertain to the specific vulnerability of motor neurons in this disease.

  11. Functional Reconstitution and Channel Activity Measurements of Purified Wildtype and Mutant CFTR Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eckford, Paul D. W.; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  12. Kinetic Detection of Orthogonal Protein and Chemical Coordinates in Enzyme Catalysis: Double Mutants of Soybean Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Klinman, Judith P

    2015-09-08

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) is a paradigmatic enzyme system for studying the contribution of hydrogen tunneling to enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer processes. In this study, the impact of pairs of double mutants on the properties of SLO-1 is presented. Steady-state rates and their deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been measured for the bimolecular reaction of enzyme with free substrate (kcat/Km) and compared to the unimolecular rate constant, kcat. A key kinetic finding is that the competitive KIEs on the second-order rate constant (kcat/Km) are all reduced from (D)kcat and, despite large changes in rate and activation parameters, remain essentially unaltered under a variety of conditions. These data implicate a protein reaction coordinate that is orthogonal to the chemical reaction coordinate and controls the concentration of the active enzyme. This study introduces a new means to interrogate the alteration of conformational landscapes that can occur following site-specific mutagenesis.

  13. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Wild, Edward J; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R C; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington's disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. Not applicable. CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees Trust; Swedish Research Council; and Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  14. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  15. A MUTANT OF YEAST APPARENTLY DEFECTIVE IN THE INITIATION OF PROTEIN SYNTHESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Hartwell, Leland H.; McLaughlin, Calvin S.

    1969-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant of yeast, ts-187, which is apparently unable to initiate the synthesis of new polypeptide chains after a short incubation at the restrictive temperature, is described. The existence of this mutant demonstrates that in eucaryotic cells, as in procaryotic cells, there are processes unique to the initiation of polypeptide chains. PMID:5256225

  16. Over-production of proteins in Escherichia coli: mutant hosts that allow synthesis of some membrane proteins and globular proteins at high levels.

    PubMed

    Miroux, B; Walker, J E

    1996-07-19

    We have investigated the over-production of seven membrane proteins in an Escherichia coli-bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase expression system. In all seven cases, when expression of the target membrane protein was induced, most of the BL21(DE3) host cells died. Similar effects were also observed with expression vectors for ten globular proteins. Therefore, protein over-production in this expression system is either limited or prevented by bacterial cell death. From the few survivors of BL21(DE3) expressing the oxoglutarate-malate carrier protein from mitochondrial membranes, a mutant host C41(DE3) was selected that grew to high saturation cell density, and produced the protein as inclusion bodies at an elevated level without toxic effect. Some proteins that were expressed poorly in BL21(DE3), and others where the toxicity of the expression plasmids prevented transformation into this host, were also over-produced successfully in C41(DE3). The examples include globular proteins as well as membrane proteins, and therefore, strain C41(DE3) is generally superior to BL21(DE3) as a host for protein over-expression. However, the toxicity of over-expression of some of the membrane proteins persisted partially in strain C41(DE3). Therefore, a double mutant host C43(DE3) was selected from C41(DE3) cells containing the expression plasmid for subunit b of bacterial F-ATPase. In strain C43(DE3), both subunits b and c of the F-ATPase, an alanine-H(+) symporter, and the ADP/ATP and the phosphate carriers from mitochondria were all over-produced. The transcription of the gene for the OGCP and subunit b was lower in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3), respectively, than in BL21(DE3). In C43(DE3), the onset of transcription of the gene for subunit b was delayed after induction, and the over-produced protein was incorporated into the membrane. The procedure used for selection of C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) could be employed to tailor expression hosts in order to overcome other toxic effects associated

  17. DNA breakage and induction of DNA damage response proteins precede the appearance of visible mutant huntingtin aggregates.

    PubMed

    Illuzzi, Jennifer; Yerkes, Sarah; Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Kmiec, Eric B

    2009-02-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. The pathogenesis of the disease depends on the degree of expansion of triplet (CAG) repeats located in the first exon on the gene. An expanded polyglutamine tract within the protein huntingtin (Htt) enables a gain-of-function phenotype that is often exhibited by a dysfunctional oligomerization process and the formation of protein aggregates. How this process leads to neurodegeneration remains undefined. We report that expression of a Htt-fragment containing an expanded glutamine tract induces DNA damage and activates the DNA damage response pathway. Both single-strand and double-strand breaks are observed as the mutant protein accumulates in the cell; these breaks precede the appearance of detectable protein aggregates containing mutant Htt. We also observe activation of H2AX, ATM, and p53 in cells expressing mutant Htt, a predictable response in cells containing chromosomal breakage. Expression of wild-type Htt does not affect the integrity of DNA, nor does it activate the same pathway. Furthermore, DNA damage and activated H2AX are present in HD transgenic mice before the formation of mutant Htt aggregates and HD pathogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the expression of mutant Htt causes an accumulation of DNA breaks that activates the DNA damage response pathway, a process that can disable cell function. Because these events can lead to apoptosis, it is possible that the DNA damage response pathway activated by single- and double-strand breaks that we found contributes to neurodegeneration.

  18. In vitro and molecular modeling analysis of two mutant desert hedgehog proteins associated with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Josué Joram; Méndez, Juan Pablo; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin Antonio; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo; Benítez-Granados, Jesús; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Canto, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of Desert hedgehog (DHH) have been associated to 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (PGD) and to mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD); however, there have been no functional studies of mutations described in DHH. To determine if mutations p.L162P and Δ1086delG yield functional impairment, we performed in vitro and in silico analysis of both DHH mutants. In complementary DNA of DHH, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Protein extracts were obtained from HEK293cells transfected with different constructs and analyzed by Western blot; besides, densitometric analysis of chemiluminescent signals was performed. In addition, the structure of the wt-DHH and its two mutant proteins was inferred using in silico protein molecular modeling. In the Western blot analysis, we observed the absence of signal for p.L162P in DHH-N and a diminished signal for Δ1086delG in DHH-C, when compared to wt-DHH. Protein modeling showed notable conformational changes for the side chains of p.L162P, while the secondary structure was drastically modified in Δ1086delG, when compared to wt-DHH. To our knowledge, this is the first study focused to determine by in vitro studies, the effect of two specific mutations in DHH associated with 46,XY PGD and MGD. Our results suggest that both mutations have a deleterious effect on the expression of the DHH mutant proteins.

  19. In Vitro and Molecular Modeling Analysis of Two Mutant Desert Hedgehog Proteins Associated with 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Josué Joram; Méndez, Juan Pablo; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin Antonio; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo; Benítez-Granados, Jesús; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of Desert hedgehog (DHH) have been associated to 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (PGD) and to mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD); however, there have been no functional studies of mutations described in DHH. To determine if mutations p.L162P and Δ1086delG yield functional impairment, we performed in vitro and in silico analysis of both DHH mutants. In complementary DNA of DHH, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Protein extracts were obtained from HEK293cells transfected with different constructs and analyzed by Western blot; besides, densitometric analysis of chemiluminescent signals was performed. In addition, the structure of the wt-DHH and its two mutant proteins was inferred using in silico protein molecular modeling. In the Western blot analysis, we observed the absence of signal for p.L162P in DHH-N and a diminished signal for Δ1086delG in DHH-C, when compared to wt-DHH. Protein modeling showed notable conformational changes for the side chains of p.L162P, while the secondary structure was drastically modified in Δ1086delG, when compared to wt-DHH. To our knowledge, this is the first study focused to determine by in vitro studies, the effect of two specific mutations in DHH associated with 46,XY PGD and MGD. Our results suggest that both mutations have a deleterious effect on the expression of the DHH mutant proteins. PMID:23786321

  20. Surveying the lipogenesis landscape in Yarrowia lipolytica through understanding the function of a Mga2p regulatory protein mutant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leqian; Markham, Kelly; Blazeck, John; Zhou, Nijia; Leon, Dacia; Otoupal, Peter; Alper, Hal S

    2015-09-01

    Lipogenic organisms represent great starting points for metabolic engineering of oleochemical production. While previous engineering efforts were able to significantly improve lipid production in Yarrowia lipolytica, the lipogenesis landscape, especially with respect to regulatory elements, has not been fully explored. Through a comparative genomics and transcriptomics approach, we identified and validated a mutant mga2 protein that serves as a regulator of desaturase gene expression and potent lipogenesis factor. The resulting strain is enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Comparing the underlying mechanism of this mutant to other previously engineered strains suggests that creating an imbalance between glycolysis and the TCA cycle can serve as a driving force for lipogenesis when combined with fatty acid catabolism overexpressions. Further comparative transcriptomics analysis revealed both distinct and convergent rewiring associated with these different genotypes. Finally, by combining metabolic engineering targets, it is possible to further engineer a strain containing the mutant mga2 gene to a lipid production titer of 25g/L.

  1. [Physical-chemical properties of the mutant (protein) form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein GGBP/H152C with an attached fluorescent dye BADAN].

    PubMed

    Fonin, A V; Stepanenko, O V; Povarova, O I; Volova, E A; Filippova, E M; Bublikov, G S; Kuznetsova, I M; Demchenko, A P; Turoverov, K K

    2013-01-01

    The influence of various factors on the physico-chemical characteristics and complexation of glucose with a mutant form of D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein which can be regarded as a sensor of the glucometer, namely the protein GGBP/H152C with solvatochromic dye BADAN attached to the cysteine residue Cys 152, has been investigated. The point mutation His 152Cys and attaching BADAN reduced the affinity of the mutant form GGBP/H152C to glucose more than 8-fold compared to the wild type protein. This allows using this mutant for the determination of sugar content in biological fluids extracted by transdermal technologies. Sufficiently rapid complexation of GGBP/H152C with glucose (the time of protein-glucose complex formation is not more than three seconds even in solutions with a viscosity of 4 cP) provides timely monitoring changes in the concentration of sugar. The changes of ionic strength and pH within the physiological range of values of these variables do not have significant influence on fluorescent characteristics of GGBP/H152C-BADAN. At acidic pH, (see symbol) some of the molecules GGBP/H152C is in the unfolded state. It has been shown that mutant form GGBP/H152C has relatively low resistance to guanidine hydrochloride denaturing effects. This result indicates the need for more stable proteins to create a sensor for glucose biosensor system.

  2. Insights on the structural perturbations in human MTHFR Ala222Val mutant by protein modeling and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abhinand, P A; Shaikh, Faraz; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Radadiya, Ashish; Bhaskar, L V K S; Shah, Anamik; Ragunath, P K

    2016-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) protein catalyzes the only biochemical reaction which produces methyltetrahydrofolate, the active form of folic acid essential for several molecular functions. The Ala222Val polymorphism of human MTHFR encodes a thermolabile protein associated with increased risk of neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. Experimental studies have shown that the mutation does not affect the kinetic properties of MTHFR, but inactivates the protein by increasing flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) loss. The lack of completely solved crystal structure of MTHFR is an impediment in understanding the structural perturbations caused by the Ala222Val mutation; computational modeling provides a suitable alternative. The three-dimensional structure of human MTHFR protein was obtained through homology modeling, by taking the MTHFR structures from Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus as templates. Subsequently, the modeled structure was docked with FAD using Glide, which revealed a very good binding affinity, authenticated by a Glide XP score of -10.3983 (kcal mol(-1)). The MTHFR was mutated by changing Alanine 222 to Valine. The wild-type MTHFR-FAD complex and the Ala222Val mutant MTHFR-FAD complex were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation over 50 ns period. The average difference in backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) between wild and mutant variant was found to be ~.11 Å. The greater degree of fluctuations in the mutant protein translates to increased conformational stability as a result of mutation. The FAD-binding ability of the mutant MTHFR was also found to be significantly lowered as a result of decreased protein grip caused by increased conformational flexibility. The study provides insights into the Ala222Val mutation of human MTHFR that induces major conformational changes in the tertiary structure, causing a significant reduction in the FAD-binding affinity.

  3. Preclinical efficacy of a RAF inhibitor that evades paradoxical MAPK pathway activation in protein kinase BRAF-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Ross A; Lin, Luping; Olivas, Victor; Chan, Elton; Markegard, Evan; Rymar, Andrey; Neel, Dana; Chen, Xiao; Hemmati, Golzar; Bollag, Gideon; Bivona, Trever G

    2016-11-22

    Oncogenic activation of protein kinase BRAF drives tumor growth by promoting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling. Because oncogenic mutations in BRAF occur in ∼2-7% of lung adenocarcinoma (LA), BRAF-mutant LA is the most frequent cause of BRAF-mutant cancer mortality worldwide. Whereas most tumor types harbor predominantly the BRAF(V600E)-mutant allele, the spectrum of BRAF mutations in LA includes BRAF(V600E) (∼60% of cases) and non-V600E mutant alleles (∼40% of cases) such as BRAF(G469A) and BRAF(G466V) The presence of BRAF(V600E) in LA has prompted clinical trials testing selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E)-mutant patients. Despite promising clinical efficacy, both innate and acquired resistance often result from reactivation of MAPK pathway signaling, thus limiting durable responses to the current BRAF inhibitors. Further, the optimal therapeutic strategy to block non-V600E BRAF-mutant LA remains unclear. Here, we report the efficacy of the Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase (RAF) inhibitor, PLX8394, that evades MAPK pathway reactivation in BRAF-mutant LA models. We show that PLX8394 treatment is effective in both BRAF(V600E) and certain non-V600 LA models, in vitro and in vivo. PLX8394 was effective against treatment-naive BRAF-mutant LAs and those with acquired vemurafenib resistance caused by an alternatively spliced, truncated BRAF(V600E) that promotes vemurafenib-insensitive MAPK pathway signaling. We further show that acquired PLX8394 resistance occurs via EGFR-mediated RAS-mTOR signaling and is prevented by upfront combination therapy with PLX8394 and either an EGFR or mTOR inhibitor. Our study provides a biological rationale and potential polytherapy strategy to aid the deployment of PLX8394 in lung cancer patients.

  4. Golgi and vacuolar membrane proteins reach the vacuole in vps1 mutant yeast cells via the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Nothwehr, S F; Conibear, E; Stevens, T H

    1995-04-01

    The Vps1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an 80-kD GTPase associated with the Golgi apparatus. Vps1p appears to play a direct role in the retention of late Golgi membrane proteins, which are mislocalized to the vacuolar membrane in its absence. The pathway by which late Golgi and vacuolar membrane proteins reach the vacuole in vps1 delta mutants was investigated by analyzing transport of these proteins in vps1 delta cells that also contained temperature sensitive mutations in either the SEC4 or END4 genes, which are required for a late step in secretion and the internalization step of endocytosis, respectively. Not only was vacuolar transport of a Golgi membrane protein blocked in the vps1 delta sec4-ts and vps1 delta end4-ts double mutant cells at the non-permissive temperature but vacuolar delivery of the vacuolar membrane protein, alkaline phosphatase was also blocked in these cells. Moreover, both proteins expressed in the vps1 delta end4-ts cells at the elevated temperature could be detected on the plasma membrane by a protease digestion assay indicating that these proteins are transported to the vacuole via the plasma membrane in vps1 mutant cells. These data strongly suggest that a loss of Vps1p function causes all membrane traffic departing from the late Golgi normally destined for the prevacuolar compartment to instead be diverted to the plasma membrane. We propose a model in which Vps1p is required for formation of vesicles from the late Golgi apparatus that carry vacuolar and Golgi membrane proteins bound for the prevacuolar compartment.

  5. The flagellar motility of Chlamydomonas pf25 mutant lacking an AKAP-binding protein is overtly sensitive to medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen

    2006-01-01

    Radial spokes are a conserved axonemal structural complex postulated to regulate the motility of 9 + 2 cilia and flagella via a network of phosphoenzymes and regulatory proteins. Consistently, a Chlamydomonas radial spoke protein, RSP3, has been identified by RII overlays as an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that localizes the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) holoenzyme by binding to the RIIa domain of PKA RII subunit. However, the highly conserved docking domain of PKA is also found in the N termini of several AKAP-binding proteins unrelated to PKA as well as a 24-kDa novel spoke protein, RSP11. Here, we report that RSP11 binds to RSP3 directly in vitro and colocalizes with RSP3 toward the spoke base near outer doublets and dynein motors in axonemes. Importantly, RSP11 mutant pf25 displays a spectrum of motility, from paralysis with flaccid or twitching flagella as other spoke mutants to wildtype-like swimming. The wide range of motility changes reversibly depending on the condition of liquid media without replacing defective proteins. We postulate that radial spokes use the RIIa/AKAP module to regulate ciliary and flagellar beating; absence of the spoke RIIa protein exposes a medium-sensitive regulatory mechanism that is not obvious in wild-type Chlamydomonas.

  6. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering—A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Laulumaa, Saara; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtimäki, Mari; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Koza, Michael M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS). The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations. PMID:26068118

  7. Deglycosylation of the NS1 protein of dengue 2 virus, strain 16681: construction and characterization of mutant viruses.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, M B; Kinney, R M; Miller, B R

    2005-04-01

    The dengue 2 virus (DENV-2) NS1 glycoprotein contains two potential sites for N-linked glycosylation at Asn-130 and Asn-207. NS1 produced in infected cells is glycosylated at both of these sites. We used site-directed mutagenesis of a DENV-2, strain 16681, full length infectious clone to create mutant viruses lacking the Asn-130, Asn-207 or both of these NS1 glycosylation sites in order to investigate the effects of deglycosylation. Ablation of both NS1 glycosylation sites resulted in unstable viruses that acquired numerous additional mutations; these viruses were not further characterized. Viruses altered at the Asn-130 site exhibited growth characteristics similar to the wild-type (WT) 16681 virus in LLC-MK(2) cells and reduced growth in C6/36 cells. Viruses mutated at the Asn-207 site achieved similar titers in LLC-MK(2) cells compared to WT, however, the appearance of cytopathic effect was delayed and growth of these viruses in C6/36 cells was also reduced compared to WT virus. The plaque size of mutant viruses altered at the Asn-130 site did not differ from that of the WT virus, while mutants altered at the Asn-207 site exhibited a reduced and mixed plaque size. Temperature sensitivity studies comparing the growth of the viruses at 37 degrees C and 39 degrees C showed no significant differences compared to the WT virus. Immunofluorescent antibody staining of infected cells showed that for WT 16681 virus or the Asn-130 site mutant viruses NS1 was located throughout the cytoplasm, however, Asn-207 site mutant virus NS1 protein appeared to be localized to the perinuclear region. Viruses deglycosylated at either site exhibited a significant reduction in mouse neurovirulence compared to the WT virus. The results of our studies indicate that glycosylation of the DENV-2 virus NS1 protein may influence NS1 protein processing/transport as well as the pathogenicity of the virus.

  8. Design of Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Mutant Vaccines That Do Not Bind Human Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates. PMID:22615247

  9. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  10. Allelic differences in Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD mutants correlate with their encoded proteins' transport activities in planta.

    PubMed

    Salehin, Mohammad; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Bagchi, Rammyani; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD gene, required for symbiotic nitrogen fixing nodule and root architecture development, encodes a member of the NRT1(PTR) family that demonstrates high-affinity nitrate transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Of three Mtnip/latd mutant proteins, one retains high-affinity nitrate transport in oocytes, while the other two are nitrate-transport defective. To further examine the mutant proteins' transport properties, the missense Mtnip/latd alleles were expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana chl1-5, resistant to the herbicide chlorate because of a deletion spanning the nitrate transporter AtNRT1.1(CHL1) gene. Mtnip-3 expression restored chlorate sensitivity in the Atchl1-5 mutant, similar to wild type MtNIP/LATD, while Mtnip-1 expression did not. The high-affinity nitrate transporter AtNRT2.1 gene was expressed in Mtnip-1 mutant roots; it did not complement, which could be caused by several factors. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that MtNIP/LATD may have another biochemical activity.

  11. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  12. Phenotype, virulence and immunogenicity of Edwardsiella ictaluri cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) mutants in catfish host.

    PubMed

    Santander, Javier; Mitra, Arindam; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-12-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is an Enterobacteriaceae that causes lethal enteric septicemia in catfish. Being a mucosal facultative intracellular pathogen, this bacterium is an excellent candidate to develop immersion-oral live attenuated vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry. Deletion of the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) receptor protein (crp) gene in several Enterobacteriaceae has been utilized in live attenuated vaccines for mammals and birds. Here we characterize the crp gene and report the effect of a crp deletion in E. ictaluri. The E. ictaluri crp gene and encoded protein are similar to other Enterobacteriaceae family members, complementing Salmonella enterica Δcrp mutants in a cAMP-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 in-frame deletion mutant demonstrated growth defects, loss of maltose utilization, and lack of flagella synthesis. We found that the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant was attenuated, colonized lymphoid tissues, and conferred immune protection against E. ictaluri infection to zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Evaluation of the IgM titers indicated that bath immunization with the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant triggered systemic and skin immune responses in catfish. We propose that deletion of the crp gene in E. ictaluri is an effective strategy to develop immersion live attenuated antibiotic-sensitive vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry.

  13. Proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants uncovers novel proteins potentially involved in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    de Luna-Valdez, L A; Martínez-Batallar, A G; Hernández-Ortiz, M; Encarnación-Guevara, S; Ramos-Vega, M; López-Bucio, J S; León, P; Guevara-García, A A

    2014-12-05

    Plant cells outstand for their ability to generate biomass from inorganic sources, this phenomenon takes place within the chloroplasts. The enzymatic machinery and developmental processes of chloroplasts have been subject of research for several decades, and this has resulted in the identification of a plethora of proteins that are essential for their development and function. Mutant lines for the genes that code for those proteins, often display pigment-accumulation defects (e.g., albino phenotypes). Here, we present a comparative proteomic analysis of four chloroplast-biogenesis affected mutants (cla1-1, clb2, clb5, clb19) aiming to identify novel proteins involved in the regulation of chloroplast development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We performed 2D-PAGE separation of the protein samples. These samples were then analyzed by computational processing of gel images in order to select protein spots with abundance shifts of at least twofold, statistically significant according to Student's t-test (P<0.01). These spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry for protein identification. This process resulted in the discovery of three novel proteins potentially involved in the development of A. thaliana chloroplasts, as their associated mutant lines segregate pigment-deficient plants with abnormal chloroplasts, and altered mRNA accumulation of chloroplast-development marker genes. This report highlights the potential of using a comparative proteomics strategy for the study of biological processes. Particularly, we compared the proteomes of wild-type seedlings and four mutant lines of A. thaliana affected in chloroplast biogenesis. From this proteomic analysis it was possible to detect common mechanisms in the mutants to respond to stress and cope with heterotrophy. Notably, it was possible to identify three novel proteins potentially involved in the development or functioning of chloroplasts, also it was demonstrated that plants annotated to carry T-DNA insertions

  14. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E; Mark Ensor, C; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-06-05

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  15. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E.; Mark Ensor, C.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  16. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E.; Mark Ensor, C.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  17. A protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1) is one of several novel proteins stably associating with two inactive mutants of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Ogris, E; Du, X; Nelson, K C; Mak, E K; Yu, X X; Lane, W S; Pallas, D C

    1999-05-14

    Carboxymethylation of proteins is a highly conserved means of regulation in eukaryotic cells. The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic (C) subunit is reversibly methylated at its carboxyl terminus by specific methyltransferase and methylesterase enzymes which have been purified, but not cloned. Carboxymethylation affects PP2A activity and varies during the cell cycle. Here, we report that substitution of glutamine for either of two putative active site histidines in the PP2A C subunit results in inactivation of PP2A and formation of stable complexes between PP2A and several cellular proteins. One of these cellular proteins, herein named protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1), was purified and microsequenced, and its cDNA was cloned. PME-1 is conserved from yeast to human and contains a motif found in lipases having a catalytic triad-activated serine as their active site nucleophile. Bacterially expressed PME-1 demethylated PP2A C subunit in vitro, and okadaic acid, a known inhibitor of the PP2A methylesterase, inhibited this reaction. To our knowledge, PME-1 represents the first mammalian protein methylesterase to be cloned. Several lines of evidence indicate that, although there appears to be a role for C subunit carboxyl-terminal amino acids in PME-1 binding, amino acids other than those at the extreme carboxyl terminus of the C subunit also play an important role in PME-1 binding to a catalytically inactive mutant.

  18. Crystal Structures of a Cysteine-modified Mutant in Loop D of Acetylcholine-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Brams, Marijke; Gay, Elaine A.; Sáez, José Colón; Guskov, Albert; van Elk, René; van der Schors, Roel C.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Smit, August B.; Yakel, Jerrel L.; Ulens, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Covalent modification of α7 W55C nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) with the cysteine-modifying reagent [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSET+) produces receptors that are unresponsive to acetylcholine, whereas methyl methanethiolsulfonate (MMTS) produces enhanced acetylcholine-gated currents. Here, we investigate structural changes that underlie the opposite effects of MTSET+ and MMTS using acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP), a homolog of the extracellular domain of the nAChR. Crystal structures of Y53C AChBP show that MTSET+-modification stabilizes loop C in an extended conformation that resembles the antagonist-bound state, which parallels our observation that MTSET+ produces unresponsive W55C nAChRs. The MMTS-modified mutant in complex with acetylcholine is characterized by a contracted C-loop, similar to other agonist-bound complexes. Surprisingly, we find two acetylcholine molecules bound in the ligand-binding site, which might explain the potentiating effect of MMTS modification in W55C nAChRs. Unexpectedly, we observed in the MMTS-Y53C structure that ten phosphate ions arranged in two rings at adjacent sites are bound in the vestibule of AChBP. We mutated homologous residues in the vestibule of α1 GlyR and observed a reduction in the single channel conductance, suggesting a role of this site in ion permeation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that targeted modification of a conserved aromatic residue in loop D is sufficient for a conformational switch of AChBP and that a defined region in the vestibule of the extracellular domain contributes to ion conduction in anion-selective Cys-loop receptors. PMID:21115477

  19. Expression and properties of wild-type and mutant forms of the Drosophila sex comb on midleg (SCM) repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, D; Miller, E; Simon, J

    1998-10-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) gene encodes a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Here we show that SCM protein is nuclear and that its expression is widespread during fly development. SCM protein contains a C-terminal domain, termed the SPM domain, which mediates protein-protein interactions. The biochemical function of another domain consisting of two 100-amino-acid-long repeats, termed "mbt" repeats, is unknown. We have determined the molecular lesions of nine Scm mutant alleles, which identify functional requirements for specific domains. The Scm alleles were tested for genetic interactions with mutations in other PcG genes. Intriguingly, three hypomorphic Scm mutations, which map within an mbt repeat, interact with PcG mutations more strongly than do Scm null alleles. The strongest interactions produce partial synthetic lethality that affects doubly heterozygous females more severely than males. We show that mbt repeat alleles produce stable SCM proteins that associate with normal sites in polytene chromosomes. We also analyzed progeny from Scm mutant germline clones to compare the effects of an mbt repeat mutation during embryonic vs. pupal development. We suggest that the mbt repeat alleles produce altered SCM proteins that incorporate into and impair function of PcG protein complexes.

  20. A novel method for the sensitive detection of mutant proteins using a covalent-bonding tube-based proximity ligation assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuecheng; Zhou, Lixiao; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Huixia; Chen, Zhixiong; Shi, Feng; Zhu, Chenggang

    2014-09-02

    Tumorigenesis is the cumulative result of multiple gene mutations. The mutant proteins that are expressed by mutant genes in cancer cells are secreted into the blood and are useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. However, some difficulties exist; for example, the same gene will express different protein mutants in different patients, and early tumors secrete only small amounts of mutant protein. Thus, the presence of mutant proteins in plasma has not previously been exploited for the early diagnosis of cancer. Proximity ligation assay is a protein-detection method that has been developed in recent years and has been widely used because of its high sensitivity. However, this approach still suffers from some shortcomings that should be addressed. In this paper, we develop a covalent-bonding tube-based proximity ligation assay (TB-PLA). The limit of detection of TB-PLA for 0.001pM, and the method exhibited a broad dynamic range of up to seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we coupled the conformation-specific antibody PAb240 of p53 mutants to PCR tubes for TB-PLA. The assay was capable of detecting an approximately 500-fold lower concentration of mutant p53 in serum compared with sandwich ELISA. Thus, we demonstrate TB-PLA to be a highly sensitive and effective approach that is suitable for the early clinical diagnosis of cancer using the conformation-specific antibodies of protein mutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired secretion of the elongated mutant of protein C (protein C-Nagoya). Molecular and cellular basis for hereditary protein C deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Tanimoto, M; Emi, N; Matsushita, T; Takamatsu, J; Saito, H

    1992-01-01

    Genetic analysis of a heterozygous protein C-deficient patient revealed a novel deletion of a single guanine residue (8857G) among four consecutive guanine nucleotides [380Trp(TGG)-381Gly(GGT)] in exon IX, which encodes the carboxyl-terminal region of protein C. This deletion results in a frameshift mutation and substitution of the last 39 amino acids (381Gly-419Pro) with 81 abnormal amino acid residues, and we have designated this elongated variant as Protein C-Nagoya. A mutagenic primer was designed which replaced the third guanine residue upstream from the deletion with cytosine, thereby creating a new AvaI site in an otherwise normal allele. Analysis of the polymerase chain reaction products derived from this mutagenic primer showed that the abnormal allele has been inherited in this family. To elucidate how this molecular abnormality leads to protein C deficiency, an expression plasmid containing this mutation was transfected into COS 7, BHK, and psi-2 cells, and the secretory process of the expressed Protein C-Nagoya was analyzed. ELISA and immunoprecipitation analysis with [35S]methionine labeling indicated that the mutant protein C, which was larger in size than normal, was mostly retained within the cells, and only a small portion of it was secreted into the medium. These results suggest that most of Protein C-Nagoya undergoes degradation within the producing cells, and this frameshift mutation apparently leads to protein C deficiency by impairment of secretion of the elongated protein C into plasma. Images PMID:1469096

  2. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Edward J.; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R.C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R.; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. METHODS: We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. RESULTS: This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable. FUNDING: CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees

  3. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  4. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  6. Single cell protein production from yacon extract using a highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant of the marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Tong; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The intracellular protein in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant can be easily released when they are incubated both in the low-osmolarity water and at the non-permissive temperature (usually 37 degrees C). After the mutant was grown in the yacon extract for 45 h, the crude protein content in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant Z114 was 59.1% and over 61% of the total protein could be released from the cells treated at 37 degrees C. The mutant cells grown in the yacon extract still contained high level of essential amino acids and other nutrients. This means that the yacon extract could be used as the medium for growth of the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant which contained high content of crude protein.

  7. Penicillin-binding protein 2 is essential in wild-type Escherichia coli but not in lov or cya mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, T; Bouloc, P; Niki, H; D'Ari, R; Hiraga, S; Jaffé, A

    1989-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2), target of the beta-lactam mecillinam, is required for rod morphology and cell wall elongation in Escherichia coli. A new temperature-sensitive PBP2 allele and an in vitro-constructed insertion deletion allele were shown to be lethal in wild-type strains, establishing that the activity of this protein is essential. Mutations in the lov or cya genes, conferring mecillinam resistance, compensated for the deleterious effect of the absence of PBP2. The resulting double mutants grew as spheres. In a cya mutant lacking PBP2, the restoration of a Cya+ phenotype by addition of cyclic AMP caused lethality and a block in cell division. These results show that in wild-type cells, PBP2 is essential for growth and division. PMID:2656638

  8. Dithiol-based compounds maintain expression of antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 1 that counteracts toxicity of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Andrea; Dailey, Kyle; Newington, Jordan T; Chien, Andrew; Arseneault, Robert; Cann, Tyler; Thompson, Leslie M; Cumming, Robert C

    2012-06-29

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated reactive oxygen species are strongly implicated in both aging and various neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease (HD). Because reactive oxygen species can promote the selective oxidation of protein cysteine sulfhydryl groups to disulfide bonds we examined the spectrum of disulfide-bonded proteins that were specifically altered in a HD context. Protein extracts from PC12 cells overexpressing the amino-terminal fragment of the Huntingtin (Htt) protein with either a nonpathogenic or pathogenic polyglutamine repeat (Htt-103Q) were resolved by redox two-dimensional PAGE followed by mass spectrometry analysis. Several antioxidant proteins were identified that exhibited changes in disulfide bonding unique to Htt-103Q expressing cells. In particular, the antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) exhibited both decreased expression and hyperoxidation in response to mutant Htt expressed in either PC12 cells or immortalized striatal cells exposed to 3-nitropropionic acid. Ectopic expression of Prx1 in PC12 cells attenuated mutant Htt-induced toxicity. In contrast, short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Prx1 potentiated mHtt toxicity. Furthermore, treatment with the dithiol-based compounds dimercaptopropanol and dimercaptosuccinic acid suppressed toxicity in both HD cell models, whereas monothiol compounds were relatively ineffective. Dimercaptopropanol treatment also prevented mutant Htt-induced loss of Prx1 expression in both cell models. Our studies reveal for the first time that pathogenic Htt can affect the expression and redox state of antioxidant proteins; an event countered by specific dithiol-based compounds. These findings should provide a catalyst to explore the use of dithiol-based drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Probing the relation between protein-protein interactions and DNA binding for a linker mutant of the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS.

    PubMed

    Giangrossi, Mara; Wintraecken, Kathelijne; Spurio, Roberto; de Vries, Renko

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between oligomerization in solution and DNA binding for the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS. This was done by comparing oligomerization and DNA binding of H-NS with that of a H-NS D68V-D71V linker mutant. The double linker mutation D68V-D71V, that makes the linker significantly more hydrophobic, leads to a dramatically enhanced and strongly temperature-dependent H-NS oligomerization in solution, as detected by dynamic light scattering. The DNA binding affinity of H-NS D68V-D71V for the hns promoter region is lower and has stronger temperature dependence than that of H-NS. DNase I footprinting experiments show that at high concentrations, regions protected by H-NS D68V-D71V are larger and less defined than for H-NS. In vitro transcription assays show that the enhanced protection also leads to enhanced transcriptional repression. Whereas the lower affinity of the H-NS D68V-D71V for DNA could be caused by competition between oligomerization in solution and oligomerization on DNA, the larger size of protected regions clearly confirms the notion that cooperative binding of H-NS to DNA is related to protein-protein interactions. These results emphasize the relative contributions of protein-protein interactions and substrate-dependent oligomerization in the control of gene repression operated by H-NS.

  10. Isolation and characterization of mutant Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 proteins with altered responses to luteolin.

    PubMed

    Peck, Melicent C; Fisher, Robert F; Bliss, Robert; Long, Sharon R

    2013-08-01

    NodD1, a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs), mediates nodulation (nod) gene expression in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti in response to the plant-secreted flavonoid luteolin. We used genetic screens and targeted approaches to identify NodD1 residues that show altered responses to luteolin during the activation of nod gene transcription. Here we report four types of NodD1 mutants. Type I (NodD1 L69F, S104L, D134N, and M193I mutants) displays reduced or no activation of nod gene expression. Type II (NodD1 K205N) is constitutively active but repressed by luteolin. Type III (NodD1 L280F) demonstrates enhanced activity with luteolin compared to that of wild-type NodD1. Type IV (NodD1 D284N) shows moderate constitutive activity yet can still be induced by luteolin. In the absence of luteolin, many mutants display a low binding affinity for nod gene promoter DNA in vitro. Several mutants also show, as does wild-type NodD1, increased affinity for nod gene promoters with added luteolin. All of the NodD1 mutant proteins can homodimerize and heterodimerize with wild-type NodD1. Based on these data and the crystal structures of several LTTRs, we present a structural model of wild-type NodD1, identifying residues important for inducer binding, protein multimerization, and interaction with RNA polymerase at nod gene promoters.

  11. PTH1R Mutants Found in Patients with Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption Disrupt G-Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Rukoyatkina, Natalia; Sturm, Julia; Gambaryan, Stepan; Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Eigenthaler, Martin; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Aim Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is causally linked to heterozygous mutations of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) gene. The mutants described so far lead to exchange of amino acids or truncation of the protein that may result in structural changes of the expressed PTH1R. However, functional effects of these mutations have not been investigated yet. Materials and Methods In HEK293 cells, PTH1R wild type was co-transfected with selected PTH1R mutants identified in patients with PFE. The effects on activation of PTH-regulated intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed by ELISA and Western immunoblotting. Differential effects of wild type and mutated PTH1R on TRESK ion channel regulation were analyzed by electrophysiological recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Results In HEK293 cells, activation of PTH1R wild type increases cAMP and in response activates cAMP-stimulated protein kinase as detected by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). In contrast, the PTH1R mutants are functionally inactive and mutant PTH1R/Gly452Glu has a dominant negative effect on the signaling of PTH1R wild type. Confocal imaging revealed that wild type PTH1R is expressed on the cell surface, whereas PTH1R/Gly452Glu mutant is mostly retained inside the cell. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type PTH1R which substantially augmented K+ currents of TRESK channels, coupling of mutated PTH1R to TRESK channels was completely abolished. Conclusions PTH1R mutations affect intracellular PTH-regulated signaling in vitro. In patients with primary failure of tooth eruption defective signaling of PTH1R mutations is suggested to occur in dento-alveolar cells and thus may lead to impaired tooth movement. PMID:27898723

  12. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome.

  13. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mailliot, Justine; de Loubresse, Nicolas Garreau; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D.; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a “WT-like” configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome. PMID:26906928

  14. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  15. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N; Stum, Morgane; Jaiswal, Sumit; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-07-03

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNA(Gly) aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT.

  16. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 Is Required for Efficient Manganese Uptake at the Thylakoid Membrane in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei; Gandini, Chiara; Labs, Mathias; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Geimer, Stefan; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren; Spetea, Cornelia; Leister, Dario

    2016-01-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid lumen remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 (PAM71) is an integral thylakoid membrane protein involved in Mn2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis in chloroplasts. This protein is required for normal operation of the oxygen-evolving complex (as evidenced by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn2+ and Ca2+ ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca2+ enriched in pam71 thylakoids relative to the wild type. The changes in Ca2+ homeostasis were accompanied by an increased contribution of the transmembrane electrical potential to the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane. PSII activity in pam71 plants and the corresponding Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant cgld1 was restored by supplementation with Mn2+, but not Ca2+. Furthermore, PAM71 suppressed the Mn2+-sensitive phenotype of the yeast mutant Δpmr1. Therefore, PAM71 presumably functions in Mn2+ uptake into thylakoids to ensure optimal PSII performance. PMID:27020959

  17. Soya bean Gα proteins with distinct biochemical properties exhibit differential ability to complement Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpa1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Wang, Yuqi; Pandey, Sona

    2014-07-01

    Signalling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-proteins are common to all eukaryotes. Plants have a limited number of each of the G-protein subunits, with the most elaborate G-protein network discovered so far in soya bean (Glycine max, also known as soybean) which has four Gα, four Gβ and ten Gγ proteins. Biochemical characterization of Gα proteins from plants suggests significant variation in their properties compared with the well-characterized non-plant proteins. Furthermore, the four soya bean Gα (GmGα) proteins exhibit distinct biochemical activities among themselves, but the extent to which such biochemical differences contribute to their in vivo function is also not known. We used the yeast gpa1 mutant which displays constitutive signalling and growth arrest in the pheromone-response pathway as an in vivo model to evaluate the effect of distinct biochemical activities of GmGα proteins. We showed that specific GmGα proteins can be activated during pheromone-dependent receptor-mediated signalling in yeast and they display different strengths towards complementation of yeast gpa1 phenotypes. We also identified amino acids that are responsible for differential complementation abilities of specific Gα proteins. These data establish that specific plant Gα proteins are functional in the receptor-mediated pheromone-response pathway in yeast and that the subtle biochemical differences in their activity are physiologically relevant.

  18. Wheat streak mosaic virus Coat Protein Deletion Mutants Elicit More Severe Symptoms than Wild-Type Virus in Multiple Cereal Hosts.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; ELowsky, Christian; Graybosch, Robert

    2017-08-25

    Previously, we reported that coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) tolerates deletion of amino acids 36 to 84 for efficient systemic infection of wheat. In this study, we demonstrated that WSMV mutants with deletion of CP amino acids 58 to 84, but not 36 to 57, induced severe chlorotic streaks and spots, followed by acute chlorosis in wheat, maize, barley, and rye compared to mild to moderate chlorotic streaks and mosaic symptoms by wild-type virus. Deletion of CP amino acids 58 to 84 from WSMV genome accelerated cell-to-cell movement with increased accumulation of genomic RNAs and CP compared to wild-type virus. Microscopic examination of wheat tissues infected by GFP-tagged mutants revealed that infection by mutants lacking CP amino acids 58 to 84 caused degradation of chloroplasts, resulting in acute macroscopic chlorosis. The profile of CP-specific proteins was altered in wheat infected by mutants causing acute chlorosis compared to mutants eliciting wild-type symptoms. All deletion mutants accumulated CP-specific major protein similar to wild-type virus; however, mutants that elicit acute chlorosis failed to accumulate a 31-kDa minor protein compared to wild-type virus or mutants lacking amino acids 36 to 57. Taken together, these data suggest that deletion of CP amino acids 58 to 84 from WSMV genome enhanced accumulation of CP and genomic RNA, altered CP-specific protein profiles, and caused severe symptom phenotypes in multiple cereal hosts.

  19. Trafficking of androgen receptor mutants fused to green fluorescent protein: a new investigation of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Georget, V; Térouanne, B; Lumbroso, S; Nicolas, J C; Sultan, C

    1998-10-01

    The naturally occurring mutations of the androgen receptor (AR), detected in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), are currently analyzed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, these assays do not always permit the demonstration of a direct relationship between the in vitro activity of the receptor and the severity of the phenotype (in particular, for mutations detected in patients with partial AIS). We recently studied the trafficking of wild-type AR, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in living cells. In the present study, we applied this method for the analysis of AR mutants to find out whether it could be a complementary method of investigation of AIS. After construction of the GFP-AR mutant fusion proteins, the androgen-binding characteristics, nuclear transfer capacities, and transcriptional activities were evaluated. The nuclear transfer was quantified in the presence of various concentrations of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). We studied two mutants associated with partial AIS: G743V and R840C. The androgen-binding characteristics of both mutants were affected, in comparison with normal AR. Although the affinities were similar, the dissociation rate of GFP-AR-G743V was twice that of GFP-AR-R840C. In transcriptional assay, both mutants were active only at high concentrations of androgen. The nuclear trafficking of the mutants was evaluated by two parameters: 1) the rate of nuclear transfer; and 2) the maximal amount of receptors imported into the nucleus. At 10(-6) mol/L DHT, the GFP-AR mutants entered into the nucleus in a fashion similar to that of GFP-AR-wt. At 10(-7) mol/L DHT, the rate and maximal degree of nuclear import were both reduced, even more, for GFP-AR-G743V. The difference between mutants was more pronounced at 10(-9) mol/L DHT, because GFP-AR-G743V entered into the nucleus with even slower kinetics. Though the androgen-binding affinity and transcriptional activity assays did not reveal major differences between mutants, the

  20. Identification of a 34 kDa protein altered in the LF-1 mutant as the herbicide-binding D1 protein of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, J.; Pakrasi, H.; Seibert, M.; Arntzen, C.

    1986-04-01

    The LF-1 mutant of Scenedesmus has a complete block on the oxidizing side of its PSII reaction center. However, the reaction center as well as the reducing side of PSII is fully functional in this mutant. Compared to the wildtype (WT) the only detected protein difference in the PSII complex of LF-1 is the change in mobility of a 34 kDa protein to 36 kDa. This protein has been implicated to have a major role in Mn-binding and water-oxidation. The authors have recently shown that photoaffinity labeling of thylakoids with azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine tags the 34 kDa protein in WT and the 36 kDa protein in LF-1. It has been shown that the azido-atrazine labeled protein, called D1, functions in herbicide binding and Q/sub A/ to Q/sub B/ electron transfer on the reducing side of PSII. Polyclonal antibodies directed against the D1 protein of Amaranthus hybridus (Ohad, et al., EMBOJ 1985) were found to recognize the Scenedesmus 34 kDa (WT) and 36 kDa (LF-1) proteins. The implied dual function for the D1 protein on the reducing as well as the oxidizing side of PSII reaction center will be discussed.

  1. Temperature sensitivity of human wild-type and mutant p53 proteins expressed in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ponchel, F.; Milner, J.

    1998-01-01

    p53 is activated in response to DNA damage and functions in the maintenance of genetic integrity. Loss of p53 function because of mutation of the p53 gene is associated with over half all human cancers. Certain human p53 mutants are conformationally flexible in vitro and are temperature sensitive, with partial or complete recovery of wild-type (wt) properties at 32 degrees C. We have now tested the functional capacities of selected p53 mutants in vivo, by transfection into established human cell lines. Unexpectedly, we found that wt p53 can be temperature sensitive for transactivation of a co-transfected target gene in vivo. Flexible mutants retained varying degrees of functional capacity in transfected cells, and the recipient cell line appeared to be a significant determinant of both wt and mutant p53 function; importantly, two p53 null cell lines commonly used to study p53 function (Saos-2 and Hep3B) differed markedly in this latter respect. We also show that the p53 mutant V272M, which exhibits sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro, is nonetheless defective for transactivation and is unable to induce apoptosis in vivo. The valine 272 residue may thus be crucial for properties (other than sequence-specific DNA binding) that are important for p53 function(s) in vivo. Images Figure 4 PMID:9635828

  2. Sodium Orthovanadate-Resistant Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Show Defects in Golgi-Mediated Protein Glycosylation, Sporulation and Detergent Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C.; Montalvo, E.; Neff, N.

    1995-01-01

    Orthovanadate is a small toxic molecule that competes with the biologically important oxyanion orthophosphate. Orthovanadate resistance arises spontaneously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells by mutation in a number of genes. Mutations selected at 3 mM sodium orthovanadate have different degrees of vanadate resistance, hygromycin sensitivity, detergent sensitivity and sporulation defects. Recessive vanadate-resistant mutants belong to at least six genetic loci. Most mutants are defective in outer chain glycosylation of secreted invertase (van1, van2, van4, van5, van6, VAN7-116 and others), a phenotype found in some MNN or VRG mutants. The phenotypes of these vanadate-resistant mutants are consistent with an alteration in the permeability or specificity of the Golgi apparatus. The previously published VAN1 gene product has a 200 amino acid domain with 40% identity with the MNN9 gene product and 70% identity with the ANP1 gene product. Cells containing the van1-18, mnn9 (vrg6) or anp1 mutations have some phenotypic similarities. The VAN2 gene was isolated and its coding region is identified and reported. It is an essential gene on chromosome XV and its translated amino acid sequence predicts a unique 337 amino acid protein with multiple transmembrane domains. PMID:7672592

  3. CHO glycosylation mutants as potential host cells to produce therapeutic proteins with enhanced efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiqing; Chan, Kah Fai; Haryadi, Ryan; Bardor, Muriel; Song, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    CHO glycosylation mutants, pioneered by Stanley and co-workers, have proven to be valuable tools in glycobiology and biopharmaceutical research. Here we aim to provide a summary of our efforts to isolate industrially applicable CHO glycosylation mutants, termed CHO-gmt cells, using cytotoxic lectins and zinc-finger nuclease technology. The genetic defects in the glycosylation machinery in these cells lead to the production of recombinant glycoproteins with consistent and unique glycan structures. In addition, these mutant cells can be easily adapted to serum-free medium in suspension cultures, the condition used by the biotech industry for large-scale production of recombinant therapeutics. In light of the critical impact of glycosylation on biopharmaceutical performances, namely, safety and efficacy, the CHO-gmt lines have enormous potential in producing glycoprotein therapeutics with optimal glycosylation profiles, thus, representing a panel of ideal host cell lines for producing recombinant biopharmaceuticals with improved safety profiles and enhanced efficacy.

  4. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  5. Expression of mutant protein p53 and Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones in cockles Cerastoderma edule affected by neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Cao, A; Villalba, A; Carballal, M J

    2010-07-01

    High prevalence of disseminated neoplasia has been found in cockles Cerastoderma edule of Galicia (NW Spain). Disseminated neoplasia has been associated with high mortalities of various bivalve species. In vertebrates, proteins such as p53 and heat shock proteins (HSPs) play important roles in carcinogenesis. The protein p53 has been detected in neoplastic cells of bivalve molluscs such as Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus, Mya arenaria, Spisula solidissima, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Crassostrea gigas. In this study, western blotting analyses were used to test the expression of Hsp70, Hsp90 and mutant p53 proteins in the cells and plasma of the haemolymph of cockles showing various intensities of neoplasia. Disseminated neoplasia was previously diagnosed by examination of stained haemolymph monolayers with light microscopy. In the present study, mutant p53 was detected in haemolymph cells of cockles diagnosed as affected by moderate and heavy neoplasia intensity, whereas it was not detected in cockles with either no or light neoplasia. The higher the neoplasia intensity, the higher the levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90. These proteins were not found in plasma. The results reveal the possible association between p53 and HSPs in neoplastic cells of cockles, which could prevent p53 from carrying out its functions, as occurs in human cancers.

  6. Interaction of Herbicides and Quinone with the QB-Protein of the Diuron-Resistant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutant Dr2

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Philip; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1987-01-01

    We have used the diuron-resistant Dr2 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is altered in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein at amino acid 219 (valine to isoleucine), to investigate the interactions of herbicides and plastoquinone with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein. The data contained in this report demonstrate that the effects of this mutation are different from those of the more completely characterized mutant which confers extreme resistance to triazines in higher plants. The mutation in C. reinhardtii Dr2 confers only slight resistance to a number of inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Extreme triazine resistance results from an increase in the binding constant of the herbicide with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein, in contrast the diuron binding constant for chloroplasts isolated from wild-type (sensitive) Chlamydomonas and the resistant Dr2 are indistinguishable. We conclude that the altered structure in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein of Dr2 does not directly affect the diuron binding site. This mutation appears to alter the steric properties of the binding protein in such a way that diuron and plastoquinone do not directly compete for binding. This steric perturbation confers mild resistance to other herbicidal inhibitors of photosynthesis and alters the kinetics of QA to QB electron transfer. PMID:16665318

  7. A mutant form of the rho protein can restore stress fibers and adhesion plaques in v-src transformed fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T; Meyer, M; Janning, A; Schiedel, A C; Barnekow, A

    1999-03-25

    The organization of polymerized actin in the mammalian cell is regulated by several members of the rho family. Three rho proteins, cdc42, rac and rho act in a cascade to organize the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. Rho proteins are involved in the formation of actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques in fibroblasts. During transformation of mammalian cells by oncogenes the cytoskeleton is rearranged and stress fibers and adhesion plaques are disintegrated. In this paper we investigate the function of the rho protein in RR1022 rat fibroblasts transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus. Two activated mutants of the rho protein, rho G14V and rho Q63L, and a dominant negative mutant, rho N1171, were stably transfected into RR1022 cells. The resulting cell lines were analysed for the organization of polymerized actin and adhesion plaques. Cells expressing rho Q63L, but not rho wt, rho G14V or rho N1171, showed an altered morphology. These cells displayed a flat, fibroblast like shape when compared with the RR1022 ancestor cells. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques were rearranged in these cells. We conclude from these data that an active rho protein can restore elements of the actin cytoskeleton in transformed cells by overriding the tyrosine kinase phosphorylation induced by the pp60(v-src).

  8. Effective expression of human proteins on bacterial magnetic particles in an anchor gene deletion mutant of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2012-09-14

    Biologically synthesized magnetic particles by magnetotactic bacteria (BacMPs) have promising potential in the area of functional protein display technology for various biotechnological and biomedical applications. Functional proteins fused with an anchor protein, Mms13, have been demonstrated to be an effective and stable method for the display of functional proteins on BacMPs. However, the expression of some human proteins is relatively low. Useful host strains of Escherichia coli have been developed for the enhanced expression of recombinant proteins using a genetic engineering approach. To improve human protein expression level on BacMPs in Magnetospirillummagneticum AMB-1, a mutant strain with a deleted native mms13 gene (Δmms13 strain) was established and evaluated for effective functional protein display technology. As a result, the Δmms13 strain synthesized BacMPs with significantly improved expression of two human proteins, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) and the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) molecules. The Δmms13 strain could therefore be an effective strain for the display of other important human proteins on BacMPs and may be useful for further applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced heterologous protein display on bacterial magnetic particles using a lon protease gene deletion mutant in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) produced by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, are used as magnetic supports or carriers for a variety of biomedical and environmental applications. Although protein expression systems on BacMPs have been established in previous studies, the expression efficiency was dependent on the introduced protein sequences. Recombinant human proteins are often poorly expressed on BacMPs because of proteolytic degradation by endogenous proteases. We constructed a lon protease gene deletion mutant strain (Δlon) of M. magneticum AMB-1 by homologous recombination to increase the efficiency of functional protein display on BacMPs using Δlon host cells. Wild-type and Δlon-M. magneticum AMB-1 cells were transformed using expression plasmids for human proteins, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) and the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) molecules onto BacMPs. Although mRNA expression of both TSHR and MHC II was the same level in the wild-type and Δlon transformants, the protein expression levels in Δlon transformants were significantly increased versus wild-type cells. Furthermore, the amounts of two different human proteins on BacMPs were successfully improved. This phenomenon could be due to the reduction of the degradation of target proteins in the Δlon strain. This is the first report to construct a protease deletion mutant in magnetotactic bacteria. The Δlon strain is a useful host to provide BacMPs displaying target proteins for various experimental, and ultimately, clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactive enzymatic mutant proteins (phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase) as sugar binders for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration reactors.

    PubMed

    De, Debojyoti; Dutta, Debajyoti; Kundu, Moloy; Mahato, Sourav; Schiavone, Marc T; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-02-02

    BACKGROUND: Carbon dioxide fixation bioprocess in reactors necessitates recycling of D-ribulose1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) for continuous operation. A radically new close loop of RuBP regenerating reactor design has been proposed that will harbor enzyme-complexes instead of purified enzymes. These reactors will need binders enabling selective capture and release of sugar and intermediate metabolites enabling specific conversions during regeneration. In the current manuscript we describe properties of proteins that will act as potential binders in RuBP regeneration reactors. RESULTS: We demonstrate specific binding of 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA) and 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (3PGAL) from sugar mixtures by inactive mutant of yeast enzymes phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase. The reversibility in binding with respect to pH and EDTA has also been shown. No chemical conversion of incubated sugars or sugar intermediate metabolites were found by the inactive enzymatic proteins. The dissociation constants for sugar metabolites are in the micromolar range, both proteins showed lower dissociation constant (Kd) for 3-phosphoglycerate (655-796 muM) compared to 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (822-966 muM) indicating higher affinity for 3PGA. The proteins did not show binding to glucose, sucrose or fructose within the sensitivity limits of detection. Phosphoglycerate mutase showed slightly lower stability on repeated use than enolase mutants. CONCLUSIONS: The sugar and their intermediate metabolite binders may have a useful role in RuBP regeneration reactors. The reversibility of binding with respect to changes in physicochemical factors and stability when subjected to repeated changes in these conditions are expected to make the mutant proteins candidates for in-situ removal of sugar intermediate metabolites for forward driving of specific reactions in enzyme-complex reactors.

  11. Inactive enzymatic mutant proteins (phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase) as sugar binders for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration reactors

    PubMed Central

    De, Debojyoti; Dutta, Debajyoti; Kundu, Moloy; Mahato, Sourav; Schiavone, Marc T; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    Background Carbon dioxide fixation bioprocess in reactors necessitates recycling of D-ribulose1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) for continuous operation. A radically new close loop of RuBP regenerating reactor design has been proposed that will harbor enzyme-complexes instead of purified enzymes. These reactors will need binders enabling selective capture and release of sugar and intermediate metabolites enabling specific conversions during regeneration. In the current manuscript we describe properties of proteins that will act as potential binders in RuBP regeneration reactors. Results We demonstrate specific binding of 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA) and 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (3PGAL) from sugar mixtures by inactive mutant of yeast enzymes phosphoglycerate mutase and enolase. The reversibility in binding with respect to pH and EDTA has also been shown. No chemical conversion of incubated sugars or sugar intermediate metabolites were found by the inactive enzymatic proteins. The dissociation constants for sugar metabolites are in the micromolar range, both proteins showed lower dissociation constant (Kd) for 3-phosphoglycerate (655–796 μM) compared to 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (822–966 μM) indicating higher affinity for 3PGA. The proteins did not show binding to glucose, sucrose or fructose within the sensitivity limits of detection. Phosphoglycerate mutase showed slightly lower stability on repeated use than enolase mutants. Conclusions The sugar and their intermediate metabolite binders may have a useful role in RuBP regeneration reactors. The reversibility of binding with respect to changes in physicochemical factors and stability when subjected to repeated changes in these conditions are expected to make the mutant proteins candidates for in-situ removal of sugar intermediate metabolites for forward driving of specific reactions in enzyme-complex reactors. PMID:15689239

  12. Changes in patterns of ADP-ribosylated proteins during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and its development mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Shima, J; Penyige, A; Ochi, K

    1996-01-01

    Mutants resistant to 3-aminobenzamide, a known inhibitor of ADP-ribosyltransferase, were obtained from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). One (strain 27) was analyzed in detail. Mutant 27 had a reduced ADP-ribosyl-transferase activity, exhibited substantial changes from the wild type in ADP-ribosylated protein profile during cell aging, and was defective in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics. A 92-kDa ADP-ribosylated protein disappeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but was present in mutant 27. Four ADP-ribosylated proteins (39, 41, 43, and 46 kDa) appeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but were missing in mutant 27. Failure to ADP-ribosylate these four proteins was detected when the parent strain was grown in the presence of subinhibitory amounts of 3-aminobenzamide. Genetic analysis showed that the mutation, named brgA, conferring resistance to 3-aminobenzamide, cosegregated with the altered phenotypes (i.e., defects in ADP-ribosylation and aerial mycelium formation) and was mapped to a new locus near uraA. The brgA mutants were nonconditionally deficient in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics, as determined by using various media, and had a morphological and physiological phenotype quite different from that of a bldG mutant carrying a mutation which was previously mapped near uraA. Among the known bld mutants, bldA, bldD, and bldG mutants exhibited a ADP-ribosylated protein profile similar to that of the wild type, while like mutant 27, bldB, bldC, and bldH mutants failed to ADP-ribosylate certain proteins. PMID:8682781

  13. Changes in patterns of ADP-ribosylated proteins during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and its development mutants.

    PubMed

    Shima, J; Penyige, A; Ochi, K

    1996-07-01

    Mutants resistant to 3-aminobenzamide, a known inhibitor of ADP-ribosyltransferase, were obtained from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). One (strain 27) was analyzed in detail. Mutant 27 had a reduced ADP-ribosyl-transferase activity, exhibited substantial changes from the wild type in ADP-ribosylated protein profile during cell aging, and was defective in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics. A 92-kDa ADP-ribosylated protein disappeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but was present in mutant 27. Four ADP-ribosylated proteins (39, 41, 43, and 46 kDa) appeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but were missing in mutant 27. Failure to ADP-ribosylate these four proteins was detected when the parent strain was grown in the presence of subinhibitory amounts of 3-aminobenzamide. Genetic analysis showed that the mutation, named brgA, conferring resistance to 3-aminobenzamide, cosegregated with the altered phenotypes (i.e., defects in ADP-ribosylation and aerial mycelium formation) and was mapped to a new locus near uraA. The brgA mutants were nonconditionally deficient in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics, as determined by using various media, and had a morphological and physiological phenotype quite different from that of a bldG mutant carrying a mutation which was previously mapped near uraA. Among the known bld mutants, bldA, bldD, and bldG mutants exhibited a ADP-ribosylated protein profile similar to that of the wild type, while like mutant 27, bldB, bldC, and bldH mutants failed to ADP-ribosylate certain proteins.

  14. The workflow for quantitative proteome analysis of chloroplast development and differentiation, chloroplast mutants, and protein interactions by spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Friso, Giulia; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines a quantitative proteomics workflow using a label-free spectral counting technique. The workflow has been tested on different aspects of chloroplast biology in maize and Arabidopsis, including chloroplast mutant analysis, cell-type specific chloroplast differentiation, and the proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. The workflow involves one-dimensional SDS-PAGE of the proteomes of leaves or chloroplast subfractions, tryptic digestions, online LC-MS/MS using a mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy and duty cycle, followed by semiautomatic data processing. The bioinformatics analysis can effectively select best gene models and deals with quantification of closely related proteins; the workflow avoids overidentification of proteins and results in more accurate protein quantification. The final output includes pairwise comparative quantitative analysis, as well as hierarchical clustering for discovery of temporal and spatial patterns of protein accumulation. A brief discussion about potential pitfalls, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of spectral counting, is provided.

  15. Inhibition of NIH 3T3 cell proliferation by a mutant ras protein with preferential affinity for GDP.

    PubMed Central

    Feig, L A; Cooper, G M

    1988-01-01

    Substitution of asparagine for serine at position 17 decreased the affinity of rasH p21 for GTP 20- to 40-fold without significantly affecting its affinity for GDP. Transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a mammalian expression vector containing the Asn-17 rasH gene and a Neor gene under the control of the same promoter yielded only a small fraction of the expected number of G418-resistant colonies, indicating that expression of Asn-17 p21 inhibited cell proliferation. The inhibitory effect of Asn-17 p21 required its localization to the plasma membrane and was reversed by coexpression of an activated ras gene, indicating that the mutant p21 blocked the endogenous ras function required for NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. NIH 3T3 cells transformed by v-mos and v-raf, but not v-src, were resistant to inhibition by Asn-17 p21, indicating that the requirement for normal ras function can be bypassed by these cytoplasmic oncogenes. The Asn-17 mutant represents a novel reagent for the study of ras function by virtue of its ability to inhibit cellular ras activity in vivo. Since this phenotype is likely associated with the preferential affinity of the mutant protein for GDP, analogous mutations might also yield inhibitors of other proteins whose activities are regulated by guanine nucleotide binding. Images PMID:3145408

  16. Overexpression of the autophagic beclin-1 protein clears mutant ataxin-3 and alleviates Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Auregan, Gwennaëlle; Onofre, Isabel; Alves, Sandro; Dufour, Noëlle; Colomer Gould, Veronica F; Koeppen, Arnulf; Déglon, Nicole; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2011-05-01

    Machado-Joseph disease, also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, is the most common of the dominantly inherited ataxias worldwide and is characterized by mutant ataxin-3 misfolding, intracellular accumulation of aggregates and neuronal degeneration. Here we investigated the implication of autophagy, the major pathway for organelle and protein turnover, in the accumulation of mutant ataxin-3 aggregates and neurodegeneration found in Machado-Joseph disease and we assessed whether specific stimulation of this pathway could mitigate the disease. Using tissue from patients with Machado-Joseph disease, transgenic mice and a lentiviral-based rat model, we found an abnormal expression of endogenous autophagic markers, accumulation of autophagosomes and decreased levels of beclin-1, a crucial protein in the early nucleation step of autophagy. Lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of beclin-1 led to stimulation of autophagic flux, mutant ataxin-3 clearance and overall neuroprotective effects in neuronal cultures and in a lentiviral-based rat model of Machado-Joseph disease. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a key degradation pathway, with beclin-1 playing a significant role in alleviating Machado-Joseph disease pathogenesis.

  17. Partial complementation of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacA mutant phenotypes by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis BacA protein.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M F F; Haag, A F; Capewell, S; Boshoff, H I; James, E K; McDonald, R; Mair, I; Mitchell, A M; Kerscher, B; Mitchell, T J; Mergaert, P; Barry, C E; Scocchi, M; Zanda, M; Campopiano, D J; Ferguson, G P

    2013-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti BacA ABC transporter protein plays an important role in its nodulating symbiosis with the legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The Mycobacterium tuberculosis BacA homolog was found to be important for the maintenance of chronic murine infections, yet its in vivo function is unknown. In the legume plant as well as in the mammalian host, bacteria encounter host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We found that the M. tuberculosis BacA protein was able to partially complement the symbiotic defect of an S. meliloti BacA-deficient mutant on alfalfa plants and to protect this mutant in vitro from the antimicrobial activity of a synthetic legume peptide, NCR247, and a recombinant human β-defensin 2 (HBD2). This finding was also confirmed using an M. tuberculosis insertion mutant. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis BacA-mediated protection of the legume symbiont S. meliloti against legume defensins as well as HBD2 is dependent on its attached ATPase domain. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis BacA mediates peptide uptake of the truncated bovine AMP, Bac7(1-16). This process required a functional ATPase domain. We therefore suggest that M. tuberculosis BacA is important for the transport of peptides across the cytoplasmic membrane and is part of a complete ABC transporter. Hence, BacA-mediated protection against host AMPs might be important for the maintenance of latent infections.

  18. Neferine attenuates the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin in PC-12 cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Wu, An Guo; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-02-18

    Mutant huntingtin aggregation is highly associated with the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, an adult-onset autosomal dominant disorder, which leads to a loss of motor control and decline in cognitive function. Recent literature has revealed the protective role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases through degradation of mutant toxic proteins, including huntingtin or a-synuclein. Through the GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we have  identified  neferine,  isolated  from  the  lotus  seed  embryo  of Nelumbo nucifera, which is able to induce autophagy through an AMPK-mTOR-dependent pathway. Furthermore, by overexpressing huntingtin with 74 CAG repeats (EGFP-HTT 74) in PC-12 cells, neferine reduces both the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin through an autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent mechanism. With the variety of novel active compounds present in medicinal herbs, our current study suggests the possible protective mechanism of an autophagy inducer isolated from Chinese herbal medicine, which is crucial for its further development into a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders in the future.

  19. Surface translocation and tri-iodothyronine uptake of mutant MCT8 proteins are cell type-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kinne, Anita; Roth, Stephan; Biebermann, Heike; Köhrle, Josef; Grüters, Annette; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the thyroid hormone transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), underlie severe mental retardation. We wanted to understand the functional consequences of a series of missense mutations in MCT8 in order to identify therapeutic options for affected patients. We established cell lines stably expressing 12 MCT8 variants in JEG1 and MDCK1 cells. The cell lines were characterized according to MCT8 mRNA and protein expression, tri-iodothyronine (T(3)) transport activity, substrate K(M) characteristics, surface expression, and responsiveness to T(3) preincubation and chemical chaperones. Functional activities of ins235V and L568P MCT8 mutants depend on the cell type in which they are expressed. These mutants and R271H exhibited considerable transport activity when present at the cell surface as verified by surface biotinylation and kinetic analysis. Most mutants, however, were inactive in T(3) transport even when present at the cell surface (e.g. S194F, A224V, DeltaF230, L512P). Preincubation of G558D with T(3) increased T(3) uptake in MDCK1 cells to a small, but significant, extent. Chemical chaperones were ineffective. The finding that the cell type determines surface expression and T(3) transport activities of missense mutants in MCT8 may be important to understand phenotypic variability among carriers of different mutations. In particular, the clinical observation that the severity of derangements of thyroid hormone levels does not correlate with mental impairments of the patients may be based on different residual activity of mutant MCT8 in different cell types.

  20. Abnormalities of male-specific FRU protein and serotonin expression in the CNS of fruitless mutants in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Hall, J C

    2001-01-15

    The fruitless gene in Drosophila produces male-specific protein (FRU(M)) involved in the control of courtship. FRU(M) spatial and temporal patterns were examined in fru mutants that exhibit aberrant male courtship. Chromosome breakpoints at the locus eliminated FRU(M). Homozygous viable mutants exhibited an intriguing array of defects. In fru(1) males, there were absences of FRU(M)-expressing neuronal clusters or stained cells within certain clusters, reductions of signal intensities in others, and ectopic FRU(M) expression in novel cells. fru(2) males exhibited an overall decrement of FRU(M) expression in all neurons normally expressing the gene. fru(4) and fru(sat) mutants only produced FRU(M) in small numbers of neurons at extremely low levels, and no FRU(M) signals were detected in fru(3) males. This array of abnormalities was inferred to correlate with the varying behavioral defects exhibited by these mutants. Such abnormalities include courtship among males, which has been hypothesized to involve anomalies of serotonin (5-HT) function in the brain. However, double-labeling uncovered no coexpression of FRU(M) and 5-HT in brain neurons. Yet, a newly identified set of sexually dimorphic FRU(M)/5-HT-positive neurons was identified in the abdominal ganglion of adult males. These sexually dimorphic neurons (s-Abg) project toward regions of the abdomen involved in male reproduction. The s-Abg neurons and the proximal extents of their axons were unstained or absent in wild-type females and exhibited subnormal or no 5-HT immunoreactivity in certain fru-mutant males, indicating that fruitless controls the formation of these cells or 5-HT production in them.

  1. The Rice Mutant esp2 Greatly Accumulates the Glutelin Precursor and Deletes the Protein Disulfide Isomerase1

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Yoko; Coughlan, Sean J.; Okita, Thomas W.; Satoh, Hikaru; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kumamaru, Toshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) accumulates prolamins and glutelins as storage proteins. The latter storage protein is synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a 57-kD proglutelin precursor, which is then processed into acidic and basic subunits in the protein storage vacuole. Three esp2 mutants, CM1787, EM44, and EM747, contain larger amounts of the 57-kD polypeptide and corresponding lower levels of acidic and basic glutelin subunits than normal. Electron microscopic observation revealed that esp2 contained normal-appearing glutelin-containing protein bodies (PB-II), but lacked the normal prolamin-containing PB (PB-I). Instead, numerous small ER-derived PBs of uniform size (0.5 μm in diameter) and low electron density were readily observed. Immunoblot analysis of purified subcellular fractions and immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopy level showed that these new PBs contained the 57-kD proglutelin precursor and prolamin polypeptides. The 57-kD proglutelin was extracted with 1% (v/v) lactic acid solution only after removal of cysteine-rich prolamin polypeptides, suggesting that these proteins form glutelin-prolamin aggregates via interchain disulfide bonds within the ER lumen. The endosperm of esp2 mutants contains the lumenal chaperones, binding protein and calnexin, but lacks protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) at the protein and RNA levels. The transcript of PDI was expressed in the seed only during the early stage of seed development in the wild type. These results suggest that PDI plays an essential role in the segregation of proglutelin and prolamin polypeptides within the ER lumen. PMID:11950970

  2. [Comparative proteomics analysis of extracellular proteins from Listeria monocytogenes and its isogenic prfA deletion mutant].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuelan; Bai, Chunguang; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Yanyan; Qu, Jin; Fu, Hong; Gao, Yunfei; Jiao, Xin'an

    2013-04-04

    Positive regulatory factor A (PrfA) protein plays a key role in the pathogenicity of Listeria monocytogenes by regulating the expression of virulence genes. We studied the regulation functions of PrfA and its role in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) virulence. Extracellular proteins were obtained from the supernatants of parental strain LM4 and mutant strain LM4deltaprfA cultured in minimal medium. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix associated laser dissociation/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI- TOF-MS) to analyze the differences of secreted proteins between LM4 and LM4deltaprfA. The electrophoresis results show that 31 different spots, 19 spots corresponding 12 proteins were identified by MALDI- TOF-MS. Some virulence related proteins were verified, such as InlC, ActA and LLO. Some new proteins that are regulated by PrfA include D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase, dipeptide Glycine and Trytophan (GW) repeat-containing surface protein, transcriptional regulator and some hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Real-time quantitative PCR was conducted to verify the proteomics results. The mRNA expression level of hly, actA and inlC gene was significantly reduced, and that of D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and GW repeat-containing surface protein's synthesis also had a reduction in LM4deltaprfA strain. PrfA plays key roles on the regulation of genes in LIPI- I and LIPI- II.

  3. Valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97) inhibitors relieve Mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial defects due to VCP disease mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Mishra, Prashant; Hay, Bruce A; Chan, David; Guo, Ming

    2017-03-21

    Missense mutations of valosin-containing protein (VCP) cause an autosomal dominant disease known as inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease with frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The pathological mechanism of IBMPFD is not clear and there is no treatment. We show that endogenous VCP negatively regulates Mitofusin, which is required for outer mitochondrial membrane fusion. Because 90% of IBMPFD patients have myopathy, we generated an in vivo IBMPFD model in adult Drosophila muscle, which recapitulates disease pathologies. We show that common VCP disease mutants act as hyperactive alleles with respect to regulation of Mitofusin. Importantly, VCP inhibitors suppress mitochondrial defects, muscle tissue damage and cell death associated with IBMPFD models in Drosophila. These inhibitors also suppress mitochondrial fusion and respiratory defects in IBMPFD patient fibroblasts. These results suggest that VCP disease mutants cause IBMPFD through a gain-of-function mechanism, and that VCP inhibitors have therapeutic value.

  4. Insertional Inactivation of Genes Encoding the Crystalline Inclusion Proteins of Photorhabdus luminescens Results in Mutants with Pleiotropic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bintrim, Scott B.; Ensign, Jerald C.

    1998-01-01

    The entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens exhibits phase variation when cultured in vitro. The variant forms of P. luminescens are pleiotropic and are designated phase I and phase II variants. One of the characteristic phenotypes of phase I cells is the production of two types of intracellular protein inclusions. The genes encoding the protein monomers that form these inclusions, designated cipA and cipB, were cloned and characterized. cipA and cipB encode hydrophobic proteins of 11,648 and 11,308 Da, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of CipA and CipB have no significant amino acid sequence similarity to any other known protein but have 25% identity and 49% similarity to each other. Insertional inactivation of cipA or cipB in phase I cells of P. luminescens produced mutants that differ from phase I cells in bioluminescence, the pattern and activities of extracellular products, biochemical traits, adsorption of dyes, and ability to support nematode growth and reproduction. In general, the cip mutants were phenotypically more similar to each other than to either phase I or phase II variants. PMID:9495767

  5. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  6. Dominant-negative mutants of a yeast G-protein beta subunit identify two functional regions involved in pheromone signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Hougan, L; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    1992-01-01

    The STE4 gene, which encodes the beta subunit of the mating response G-protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was subjected to a saturation mutagenesis using 'doped' oligodeoxynucleotides. We employed a genetic screen to select dominant-negative STE4 mutants, which when overexpressed from the GAL1 promoter, interfered with the signalling function of the wild type protein. The identified inhibitory amino acid alterations define two small regions that are crucially involved in transmitting the mating signal from G beta to downstream components of the signalling pathway. These results underline the positive signalling role of yeast G beta and assign for the first time the positive signalling function of a G-protein beta subunit to specific structural features. Images PMID:1464310

  7. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus I tax protein sensitizes p53-mutant cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Valia T; Green, Allison M; Khurgel, Moshe; Semmes, Oliver J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2008-06-15

    Mutations in p53 are a common cause of resistance of cancers to standard chemotherapy and, thus, treatment failure. Reports have shown that Tax, a human T-cell leukemia virus type I encoded protein that has been associated with genomic instability and perturbation of transcription and cell cycle, sensitizes HeLa cells to UV treatment. The extent to which Tax can sensitize cells and the mechanism by which it exerts its effect are unknown. In this study, we show that Tax sensitizes p53-mutant cells to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents, including mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylator, etoposide, a topoisomerase II drug, and UV light, but not ionizing radiation, a double-strand break agent, or vinblastine, a tubulin poison. Tax caused hypersensitivity in all p53-deleted cell lines and several, but not all, mutant-expressed p53-containing cell lines, while unexpectedly being protective in p53 wild-type (wt) cells. The effect observed in p53-deleted lines could be reversed for this by transfection of wt p53. We also show that Tax activates a p53-independent proapoptotic program through decreased expression of the retinoblastoma protein and subsequent increased E2F1 expression. The expression of several proapoptotic proteins was also induced by Tax, including Puma and Noxa, culminating in a substantial increase in Bax dimerization. Our results show that Tax can sensitize p53-mutant cells to DNA damage while protecting p53 wt cells, a side benefit that might result in reduced toxicity in normal cells. Such studies hold the promise of a novel adjunctive therapy that could make cancer chemotherapy more effective.

  9. Che-1/AATF: A Critical Cofactor for Both Wild-Type- and Mutant-p53 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Tiziana; Iezzi, Simona; Fanciulli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The p53 protein is a key player in a wide range of protein networks that allow the state of “good health” of the cell. Not surprisingly, mutations of the TP53 gene are one of the most common alterations associated to cancer cells. Mutated forms of p53 (mtp53) not only lose the ability to protect the integrity of the genetic heritage of the cell but also acquire pro-oncogenic functions, behaving like dangerous accelerators of transformation and tumor progression. In recent years, many studies focused on investigating possible strategies aiming to counteract this mutant p53 “gain of function” but the results have not always been satisfactory. Che-1/AATF is a nuclear protein that binds to RNA polymerase II and plays a role in multiple fundamental processes, including control of transcription, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and apoptosis. Several studies showed Che-1/AATF as an important endogenous regulator of p53 expression and activity in a variety of biological processes. Notably, this same regulation was more recently observed also on mtp53. The depletion of Che-1/AATF strongly reduces the expression of mutant p53 in several tumors in vitro and in vivo, making the cells an easier target for chemotherapy treatments. In this mini review, we report an overview of Che-1/AATF functions and discuss a possible role of Che-1/AATF in cancer therapy, with particular regard to its action on p53/mtp53. PMID:26913241

  10. Expression of the Brazil nut methionine-rich protein and mutants with increased methionine in transgenic potato.

    PubMed

    Tu, H M; Godfrey, L W; Sun, S S

    1998-07-01

    A cDNA encoding the methionine-rich (19 mol% Met) protein in Brazil nut was placed under the regulation of CaMV 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator and introduced into the potato cultivar Russet Burbank via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To further enhance the Met content in the transgenic plants, chimeric genes containing four mutant constructs, BoxIa (with 5 additional Met), BoxIIa (2 additional Met), BoxIaIIa (7 additional Met), and BoxIIa2 (7 additional Met), were also generated by sequence modifications of the cDNA and transferred into potato. Analysis of the microtubers and leaves of the transgenic potato plants revealed, in general, with the exception of the BoxIIa2, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the expected size and the correctly processed Met-rich 9 kDa subunit polypeptides. The expression levels in the leaves among the various constructs and individual transgenic plants varied between <0.01% and 0.2% of total protein. The corresponding expression in the tubers was usually 2- to 4-fold lower than in leaves. In the case of BoxIIa2, which contains two tandem repeats of the BoxIIa mutant sequence, a larger (10.5-11 kDa) polypeptide was detected. These findings demonstrated that it is feasible to exploit the variable region of the Brazil Nut 2S protein for enhanced Met contents and perhaps for other desirable properties.

  11. Metabolic Parameters and Emotionality Are Little Affected in G-Protein Coupled Receptor 12 (Gpr12) Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Elisabeth; Wu, Yizhen; Piyaratna, Naomi; Body, William James; Snikeris, Peta; South, Timothy; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Bjursell, Mikael; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Storlien, Leonard; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background G-protein coupled receptors (GPR) bear the potential to serve as yet unidentified drug targets for psychiatric and metabolic disorders. GPR12 is of major interest given its putative role in metabolic function and its unique brain distribution, which suggests a role in emotionality and affect. We tested Gpr12 deficient mice in a series of metabolic and behavioural tests and subjected them to a well-established high-fat diet feeding protocol. Methodology/Principal Findings Comparing the mutant mice with wild type littermates, no significant differences were seen in body weight, fatness or weight gain induced by a high-fat diet. The Gpr12 mutant mice displayed a modest but significant lowering of energy expenditure and a trend to lower food intake on a chow diet, but no other metabolic parameters, including respiratory rate, were altered. No emotionality-related behaviours (assessed by light-dark box, tail suspension, and open field tests) were affected by the Gpr12 gene mutation. Conclusions/Significance Studying metabolic and emotionality parameters in Gpr12 mutant mice did not reveal a major phenotypic impact of the gene mutation. Compared to previous results showing a metabolic phenotype in Gpr12 mice with a mixed 129 and C57Bl6 background, we suggest that a more pure C57Bl/6 background due to further backcrossing might have reduced the phenotypic penetrance. PMID:22879962

  12. High Throughput Sequencing Identifies Misregulated Genes in the Drosophila Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein (hephaestus) Mutant Defective in Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Vinod; Heimiller, Joseph; Robida, Mark D; Singh, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (dmPTB or hephaestus) plays an important role during spermatogenesis. The heph2 mutation in this gene results in a specific defect in spermatogenesis, causing aberrant spermatid individualization and male sterility. However, the array of molecular defects in the mutant remains uncharacterized. Using an unbiased high throughput sequencing approach, we have identified transcripts that are misregulated in this mutant. Aberrant transcripts show altered expression levels, exon skipping, and alternative 5' ends. We independently verified these findings by reverse-transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Our analysis shows misregulation of transcripts that have been connected to spermatogenesis, including components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus. We show, for example, that the Myosin light chain 1 (Mlc1) transcript is aberrantly spliced. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis reveals that Mlc1 contains a high affinity binding site(s) for dmPTB and that the site is conserved in many Drosophila species. We discuss that Mlc1 and other components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus offer important molecular links between the loss of dmPTB function and the observed developmental defect in spermatogenesis. This study provides the first comprehensive list of genes misregulated in vivo in the heph2 mutant in Drosophila and offers insight into the role of dmPTB during spermatogenesis.

  13. High Throughput Sequencing Identifies Misregulated Genes in the Drosophila Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein (hephaestus) Mutant Defective in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vinod; Heimiller, Joseph; Robida, Mark D.; Singh, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (dmPTB or hephaestus) plays an important role during spermatogenesis. The heph2 mutation in this gene results in a specific defect in spermatogenesis, causing aberrant spermatid individualization and male sterility. However, the array of molecular defects in the mutant remains uncharacterized. Using an unbiased high throughput sequencing approach, we have identified transcripts that are misregulated in this mutant. Aberrant transcripts show altered expression levels, exon skipping, and alternative 5’ ends. We independently verified these findings by reverse-transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Our analysis shows misregulation of transcripts that have been connected to spermatogenesis, including components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus. We show, for example, that the Myosin light chain 1 (Mlc1) transcript is aberrantly spliced. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis reveals that Mlc1 contains a high affinity binding site(s) for dmPTB and that the site is conserved in many Drosophila species. We discuss that Mlc1 and other components of the actomyosin cytoskeletal apparatus offer important molecular links between the loss of dmPTB function and the observed developmental defect in spermatogenesis. This study provides the first comprehensive list of genes misregulated in vivo in the heph2 mutant in Drosophila and offers insight into the role of dmPTB during spermatogenesis. PMID:26942929

  14. Protein-RNA Networks Regulated by Normal and ALS-Associated Mutant HNRNPA2B1 in the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando J; Pratt, Gabriel A; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Batra, Ranjan; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Freese, Peter; Chun, Seung J; Ling, Karen; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea; Fijany, Layla; Wang, Harrison C; Nussbacher, Julia K; Broski, Sara M; Kim, Hong Joo; Lardelli, Rea; Sundararaman, Balaji; Donohue, John P; Javaherian, Ashkan; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Finkbeiner, Steven; Bennett, C Frank; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Taylor, J Paul; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-11-23

    HnRNPA2B1 encodes an RNA binding protein associated with neurodegeneration. However, its function in the nervous system is unclear. Transcriptome-wide crosslinking and immunoprecipitation in mouse spinal cord discover UAGG motifs enriched within ∼2,500 hnRNP A2/B1 binding sites and an unexpected role for hnRNP A2/B1 in alternative polyadenylation. HnRNP A2/B1 loss results in alternative splicing (AS), including skipping of an exon in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-associated D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) that reduces D-serine metabolism. ALS-associated hnRNP A2/B1 D290V mutant patient fibroblasts and motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MNs) demonstrate abnormal splicing changes, likely due to increased nuclear-insoluble hnRNP A2/B1. Mutant iPSC-MNs display decreased survival in long-term culture and exhibit hnRNP A2/B1 localization to cytoplasmic granules as well as exacerbated changes in gene expression and splicing upon cellular stress. Our findings provide a cellular resource and reveal RNA networks relevant to neurodegeneration, regulated by normal and mutant hnRNP A2/B1. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  15. Co-activation of STAT3 and YES-Associated Protein 1 (YAP1) Pathway in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Chaib, Imane; Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Codony Servat, Jordi; Cai, Xueting; Li, Xuefei; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Servat, Carles Codony; Yang, Jie; Hu, Chunping; Cardona, Andres Felipe; Vivanco, Guillermo Lopez; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sanchez, Jose Miguel; Provencio, Mariano; de Marinis, Filipo; Passaro, Antonio; Carcereny, Enric; Reguart, Noemi; Campelo, Charo Garcia; Teixido, Christina; Sperduti, Isabella; Rodriguez, Sonia; Lazzari, Chiara; Verlicchi, Alberto; de Aguirre, Itziar; Queralt, Cristina; Wei, Jia; Estrada, Roger; Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Ramirez, Jose Luis; Jacobson, Kirstine; Ditzel, Henrik J; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Molina, Migual Angel; Zhou, Caicun; Cao, Peng; Ma, Patrick C; Bivona, Trever G; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limited by adaptive activation of cell survival signals. We hypothesized that both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Src-YES-associated protein 1 (YAP1) signaling are dually activated during EGFR TKI treatment to limit therapeutic response. We used MTT and clonogenic assays, immunoblotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR TKI alone and in combination with STAT3 and Src inhibition in three EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell lines. The Chou-Talalay method was used for the quantitative determination of drug interaction. We examined tumor growth inhibition in one EGFR-mutant NSCLC xenograft model (n = 4 mice per group). STAT3 and YAP1 expression was evaluated in tumors from 119 EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients (64 in an initial cohort and 55 in a validation cohort) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the correlation between survival and gene expression. All statistical tests were two-sided. We discovered that lung cancer cells survive initial EGFR inhibitor treatment through activation of not only STAT3 but also Src-YAP1 signaling. Cotargeting EGFR, STAT3, and Src was synergistic in two EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell lines with a combination index of 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54 to 0.63) for the PC-9 and 0.59 (95% CI = 0.54 to 0.63) for the H1975 cell line. High expression of STAT3 or YAP1 predicted worse progression-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.54 to 5.93, P = .001, and HR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.30 to 5.09, P = .007, respectively) in an initial cohort of 64 EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients treated with firstline EGFR TKIs. Similar results were observed in a validation cohort. Our study uncovers a coordinated signaling network centered on both STAT3 and Src-YAP signaling

  16. Directed evolution of bright mutants of an oxygen-independent flavin-binding fluorescent protein from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescent reporter proteins have revolutionized our understanding of cellular bioprocesses by enabling live cell imaging with exquisite spatio-temporal resolution. Existing fluorescent proteins are predominantly based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related analogs. However, GFP-family proteins strictly require molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which precludes their application for investigating biological processes in low-oxygen environments. A new class of oxygen-independent fluorescent reporter proteins was recently reported based on flavin-binding photosensors from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. However, flavin-binding fluorescent proteins show very limited brightness, which restricts their utility as biological imaging probes. Results In this work, we report the discovery of bright mutants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein from P. putida using directed evolution by site saturation mutagenesis. We discovered two mutations at a chromophore-proximal amino acid (F37S and F37T) that confer a twofold enhancement in brightness relative to the wild type fluorescent protein through improvements in quantum yield and holoprotein fraction. In addition, we observed that substitution with other aromatic amino acids at this residue (F37Y and F37W) severely diminishes fluorescence emission. Therefore, we identify F37 as a key amino acid residue in determining fluorescence. Conclusions To increase the scope and utility of flavin-binding fluorescent proteins as practical fluorescent reporters, there is a strong need for improved variants of the wild type protein. Our work reports on the application of site saturation mutagenesis to isolate brighter variants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein, which is a first-of-its-kind approach. Overall, we anticipate that the improved variants will find pervasive use as fluorescent reporters for biological studies in low-oxygen environments. PMID:23095243

  17. The gravitropism defective 2 mutants of Arabidopsis are deficient in a protein implicated in endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Silady, Rebecca A; Kato, Takehide; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Sieber, Patrick; Tasaka, Masao; Somerville, Chris R

    2004-10-01

    The gravitropism defective 2 (grv2) mutants of Arabidopsis show reduced shoot phototropism and gravitropism. Amyloplasts in the shoot endodermal cells of grv2 do not sediment to the same degree as in wild type. The GRV2 gene encodes a 277-kD polypeptide that is 42% similar to the Caenorhabditis elegans RME-8 protein, which is required for endocytosis. We hypothesize that a defect in endocytosis may affect both the initial gravity sensing via amyloplasts sedimentation and the subsequent more general tropic growth response.

  18. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R.; Fersht, Alan R.; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be ‘rescued’ and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. PMID:27503952

  19. Production of viable seeds from the seedling lethal mutant ppi2-2 lacking the atToc159 chloroplast protein import receptor using plastic containers, and characterization of the homozygous mutant progeny.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akari; Adachi, Fumi; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Inaba, Takehito

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of chloroplasts is essential for plant growth and development. A number of homozygous mutants lacking a chloroplast protein exhibit an albino phenotype. In general, it is challenging to grow albino Arabidopsis plants on soil until they set seeds. Homozygous albino mutants are usually obtained as progenies of heterozygous parents. Here, we describe a method of recovering seeds from the seedling lethal Arabidopsis mutant ppi2-2, which lacks the atToc159 protein import receptor at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplast. Using plastic containers, we were able to grow homozygous ppi2-2 plants until these set seed. Although the germination rate of the harvested seeds was relatively low, it was still sufficient to allow us to further analyze the ppi2-2 progeny. Using ppi2-2 homozygous seeds, we were able to analyze the role of plastid protein import in the light-regulated induction of nuclear genes. We propose that this method be applied to other seedling lethal Arabidopsis mutants to obtain homozygous seeds, helping us further investigate the roles of plastid proteins in plant growth and development.

  20. Temperature control of growth and productivity in mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells synthesizing a recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, N; Hovey, A

    1993-11-05

    The use of a temperature switch to control the growth and productivity of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants was investigated to extend the productive life span of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in batch culture. Bromodeoxyuridine was used at 39 degrees C to select mutagenized CHO-K1 cells, which resulted in the isolation of 31 temperature-sensitive mutants that were growth inhibited at 39 degrees C. Two of these mutants were successfully transfected with the gene for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) using glutamine synthetase amplification, and a permanent recombinant cell line established (5G1-B1) that maintains the ts phenotype.Continuous exposure to the nonpermissive temperature (npt) of 39 degrees C led to a rapid decline in cell viability. However, a temperature regime using alternating incubations at 34 degrees C and 39 degrees C arrested the 5G1-B1 cells while retaining a high cell viability for up to 170 h in culture. The specific production rate of the growth-arrested cells was 3-4 times that of control cultures maintained at a constant 34 degrees C over the crucial 72-130-h period of culture, which resulted in a 35% increase in the maximum product yield. Glucose uptake and lactate production both decreased in arrested cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 5G1-B1 cells arrested in the G(1) or G(0) phase of the cell cycle, and no major structural damage was caused to these cells by the alternating temperature regime.These results demonstrate that growth-arrested ts CHO cells have increased productivity compared to growing cultures and maintain viability for longer periods. The system offers the prospect of enhancing the productivity of recombinant mammalian cells grown in simple batch fermentors.

  1. GALT protein database, a bioinformatics resource for the management and analysis of structural features of a galactosemia-related protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    d'Acierno, Antonio; Facchiano, Angelo; Marabotti, Anna

    2009-06-01

    We describe the GALT-Prot database and its related web-based application that have been developed to collect information about the structural and functional effects of mutations on the human enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) involved in the genetic disease named galactosemia type I. Besides a list of missense mutations at gene and protein sequence levels, GALT-Prot reports the analysis results of mutant GALT structures. In addition to the structural information about the wild-type enzyme, the database also includes structures of over 100 single point mutants simulated by means of a computational procedure, and the analysis to each mutant was made with several bioinformatics programs in order to investigate the effect of the mutations. The web-based interface allows querying of the database, and several links are also provided in order to guarantee a high integration with other resources already present on the web. Moreover, the architecture of the database and the web application is flexible and can be easily adapted to store data related to other proteins with point mutations. GALT-Prot is freely available at http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/GALT/.

  2. Reduced heat resistance of mutant spores after cloning and mutagenesis of the Bacillus subtilis gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 5.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, J A; Roberts, A N; Johnstone, K; Piggot, P J; Winter, G; Ellar, D J

    1986-01-01

    Part of the gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 5 from Bacillus subtilis 168 was cloned in Escherichia coli with a synthetic oligonucleotide as a hybridization probe. The gene was designated dacA by analogy with E. coli. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the predicted molecular mass was 45,594 daltons (412 amino acids). A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence with that of the E. coli penicillin-binding protein 5 indicated that these enzymes showed about 25% identity. The B. subtilis dacA gene was mutated by integration of a plasmid into the structural gene by homologous recombination. A comparison of the mutant and control strains revealed that (i) the mutant lacked detectable penicillin-binding protein 5, (ii) the D-alanine carboxypeptidase activity of membranes isolated from the mutant was only 5% of that measured in membranes from the control strain, (iii) the mutant cells showed apparently normal morphology only during exponential growth, and after the end of exponential phase the cells became progressively shorter, (iv) the mutant sporulated normally except that the forespore occupied about two-thirds of the mother cell cytoplasm and, during its development, migrated towards the center of the mother cell, and (v) purified mutant spores were 10-fold less heat resistant but possessed normal refractility and morphology. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that the structure of the cortex of the mutant was different. Images PMID:3087956

  3. The Role of Protein Denaturation Energetics and Molecular Chaperones in the Aggregation and Mistargeting of Mutants Causing Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Riverol, Debora; Yunta, Cristina; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L.

    2013-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is a conformational disease which result in the loss of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) function. The study of AGT has important implications for protein folding and trafficking because PH1 mutants may cause protein aggregation and mitochondrial mistargeting. We herein describe a multidisciplinary study aimed to understand the molecular basis of protein aggregation and mistargeting in PH1 by studying twelve AGT variants. Expression studies in cell cultures reveal strong protein folding defects in PH1 causing mutants leading to enhanced aggregation, and in two cases, mitochondrial mistargeting. Immunoprecipitation studies in a cell-free system reveal that most mutants enhance the interactions with Hsc70 chaperones along their folding process, while in vitro binding experiments show no changes in the interaction of folded AGT dimers with the peroxisomal receptor Pex5p. Thermal denaturation studies by calorimetry support that PH1 causing mutants often kinetically destabilize the folded apo-protein through significant changes in the denaturation free energy barrier, whereas coenzyme binding overcomes this destabilization. Modeling of the mutations on a 1.9 Å crystal structure suggests that PH1 causing mutants perturb locally the native structure. Our work support that a misbalance between denaturation energetics and interactions with chaperones underlie aggregation and mistargeting in PH1, suggesting that native state stabilizers and protein homeostasis modulators are potential drugs to restore the complex and delicate balance of AGT protein homeostasis in PH1. PMID:24205397

  4. Different misfolding mechanisms converge on common conformational changes: human prion protein pathogenic mutants Y218N and E196K.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin Jung; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by misfolding and aggregation of the prion protein (PrP). Pathogenic mutations such as Y218N and E196K are known to cause Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, respectively. Here we describe molecular dynamics simulations of these mutant proteins to better characterize the detailed conformational effects of these sequence substitutions. Our results indicate that the mutations disrupt the wild-type native PrP(C) structure and cause misfolding. Y218N reduced hydrophobic packing around the X-loop (residues 165-171), and E196K abolished an important wild-type salt bridge. While differences in the mutation site led PrP mutants to misfold along different pathways, we observed multiple traits of misfolding that were common to both mutants. Common traits of misfolding included: 1) detachment of the short helix (HA) from the PrP core; 2) exposure of side chain F198; and 3) formation of a nonnative strand at the N-terminus. The effect of the E196K mutation directly abolished the wild-type salt bridge E196-R156, which further destabilized the F198 hydrophobic pocket and HA. The Y218N mutation propagated its effect by increasing the HB-HC interhelical angle, which in turn disrupted the packing around F198. Furthermore, a nonnative contact formed between E221 and S132 on the S1-HA loop, which offered a direct mechanism for disrupting the hydrophobic packing between the S1-HA loop and HC. While there were common misfolding features shared between Y218N and E196K, the differences in the orientation of HB and HC and the X-loop conformation might provide a structural basis for identifying different prion strains.

  5. Monkey electrophysiological and human psychophysical responses to mutants of the sweet protein brazzein: delineating brazzein sweetness.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zheyuan; Danilova, Vicktoria; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Markley, John L; Hellekant, Göran

    2003-07-01

    Responses to brazzein, 25 brazzein mutants and two forms of monellin were studied in two types of experiments: electrophysiological recordings from chorda tympani S fibers of the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta, and psychophysical experiments. We found that different mutations at position 29 (changing Asp29 to Ala, Lys or Asn) made the molecule significantly sweeter than brazzein, while mutations at positions 30 or 33 (Lys30Asp or Arg33Ala) removed all sweetness. The same pattern occurred again at the beta-turn region, where Glu41Lys gave the highest sweetness score among the mutants tested, whereas a mutation two residues distant (Arg43Ala) abolished the sweetness. The effects of charge and side chain size were examined at two locations, namely positions 29 and 36. The findings indicate that charge is important for eliciting sweetness, whereas the length of the side-chain plays a lesser role. We also found that the N- and C-termini are important for the sweetness of brazzein. The close correlation (r = 0.78) between the results of the above two methods corroborates our hypothesis that S fibers convey sweet taste in primates.

  6. Methyl jasmonate inhibition of root growth and induction of a leaf protein are decreased in an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Staswick, P E; Su, W; Howell, S H

    1992-01-01

    Jasmonic acid and its methyl ester, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), are plant signaling molecules that affect plant growth and gene expression. Primary root growth of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings was inhibited 50% when seedlings were grown on agar medium containing 0.1 M MeJA. An ethyl methanesulfonate mutant (jar1) with decreased sensitivity to MeJA inhibition of root elongation was isolated and characterized. Genetic data indicated the trait was recessive and controlled by a single Mendelian factor. MeJA-induced polypeptides were detected in Arabidopsis leaves by antiserum to a MeJA-inducible vegetative storage protein from soybean. The induction of these proteins by MeJA in the mutant was at least 4-fold less in jar1 compared to wild type. In contrast, seeds of jar1 plants were more sensitive than wild type to inhibition of germination by abscisic acid. These results suggest that the defect in jar1 affects a general jasmonate response pathway, which may regulate multiple genes in different plant organs. Images PMID:11607311

  7. Constitutive activation of oncogenic PDGFRα-mutant proteins occurring in GIST patients induces receptor mislocalisation and alters PDGFRα signalling characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bahlawane, Christelle; Eulenfeld, René; Wiesinger, Monique Y; Wang, Jiali; Muller, Arnaud; Girod, Andreas; Nazarov, Petr V; Felsch, Kathrin; Vallar, Laurent; Sauter, Thomas; Satagopam, Venkata P; Haan, Serge

    2015-03-31

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are mainly characterised by the presence of activating mutations in either of the two receptor tyrosine kinases c-KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα). Most mechanistic studies dealing with GIST mutations have focused on c-KIT and far less is known about the signalling characteristics of the mutated PDGFRα proteins. Here, we study the signalling capacities and corresponding transcriptional responses of the different PDGFRα proteins under comparable genomic conditions. We demonstrate that the constitutive signalling via the oncogenic PDGFRα mutants favours a mislocalisation of the receptors and that this modifies the signalling characteristics of the mutated receptors. We show that signalling via the oncogenic PDGFRα mutants is not solely characterised by a constitutive activation of the conventional PDGFRα signalling pathways. In contrast to wild-type PDGFRα signal transduction, the activation of STAT factors (STAT1, STAT3 and STAT5) is an integral part of signalling mediated via mutated PDGF-receptors. Furthermore, this unconventional STAT activation by mutated PDGFRα is already initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum whereas the conventional signalling pathways rather require cell surface expression of the receptor. Finally, we demonstrate that the activation of STAT factors also translates into a biologic response as highlighted by the induction of STAT target genes. We show that the overall oncogenic response is the result of different signatures emanating from different cellular compartments. Furthermore, STAT mediated responses are an integral part of mutated PDGFRα signalling.

  8. Severe impairment of growth and differentiation in a Neurospora crassa mutant lacking all heterotrimeric G alpha proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kays, Ann M; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G alpha proteins play a critical role in regulating growth and differentiation in filamentous fungi. No systematic analysis of functional relationships between subunits has been investigated. This study explores the relative contributions of Neurospora crassa G alpha subunits, gna-1, gna-2, and gna-3, in directing development by analyzing strains deleted for various combinations of these genes. Although viable, mutants lacking all G alpha subunits or gna-1 and gna-3 are severely restricted in apical growth, forming small colonies. These strains form little aerial hyphae during asexual development on solid medium and exhibit inappropriate sporulation in submerged cultures. Similar to all strains carrying the Delta gna-1 mutation, these mutants are female sterile. Defects attributed to gna-2 are observed only in conjunction with the loss of gna-1 or gna-3, suggesting a minor role for this G alpha in N. crassa biology. Results from analysis of adenylyl cyclase and epistatic studies with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit (mcb) indicate separate functions for GNA-1 and GNA-3 in cAMP metabolism and additional cAMP-independent roles for GNA-1. These studies indicate that although G alpha subunits are not essential for viability in filamentous fungi, their loss results in an organism that cannot effectively forage for nutrients or undergo asexual or sexual reproduction. PMID:15082543

  9. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR structures of rabbit prion protein wild type and mutants: surface electrostatic charge distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yuanli

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer and elk, and humans. But for rabbits, studies have shown that they have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases. This paper does molecular dynamics (MD) studies of rabbit NMR structures (of the wild type and its two mutants of two surface residues), in order to understand the specific mechanism of rabbit prion proteins (RaPrP(C)). Protein surface electrostatic charge distributions are specially focused to analyze the MD trajectories. This paper can conclude that surface electrostatic charge distributions indeed contribute to the structural stability of wild-type RaPrP(C); this may be useful for the medicinal treatment of prion diseases.

  10. Altered protein expression pattern in skin fibroblasts from parkin-mutant early-onset Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Pacelli, Consiglia; Ferretta, Anna; Mazzeo, Maria Fiorella; Scacco, Salvatore; Papa, Francesco; Gaballo, Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Claudia; De Mari, Michele; Papa, Sergio; Cocco, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder caused primarily by selective degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. In this work the proteomes extracted from primary fibroblasts of two unrelated, hereditary cases of PD patients, with different parkin mutations, were compared with the proteomes extracted from commercial adult normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and primary fibroblasts from the healthy mother of one of the two patients. The results show that the fibroblasts from the two different cases of parkin-mutant patients display analogous alterations in the expression level of proteins involved in different cellular functions, like cytoskeleton structure-dynamics, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress response, protein and RNA processing.

  11. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  12. Siderophore production of a periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene defective mutant of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Calugay, Ronie J; Okamura, Yoshiko; Wahyudi, Aris Tri; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2004-10-22

    A non-magnetic mutant, NMA61, of the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 was generated by transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in magnetosome synthesis. The genomic region of NMA61 interrupted by a Mini-Tn5 transposon was analyzed. The transposon was inserted in an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene homologue. Three adjacent ORFs and a promoter were identified upstream, indicating that the sequences comprised an operon. Phenotype characterizations showed that the growth inhibition imposed by the exogenous non-assimilable iron chelator nitrilotriacetate was relieved in wild type but not in NMA61, by the addition of the isolated wild type siderophore. Higher concentration of siderophores accumulated in the culture medium of NMA61 than in wild type. These data suggest that the interrupted periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene homologue is required for siderophore transport into M. magneticum AMB-1.

  13. A Mutant of Escherichia coli with Temperature-Sensitive Streptomycin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soo-Sang

    1970-01-01

    The temperature-sensitive mutation in our Escherichia coli strain C1714 appears to be in a ribosomal protein. The mutation maps at the streptomycin locus. Protein synthesis in intact cells stops immediately when the temperature is shifted from 30 to 42°C. Analysis of polyribosome distributions after shift-up suggests that initiation of protein synthesis is defective at the high temperature. In vitro protein synthesis in extracts from C1714 is temperature sensitive when directed by natural mRNA, but not when directed by poly U. PMID:4910848

  14. A DDB2 mutant protein unable to interact with PCNA promotes cell cycle progression of human transformed embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Paola; Sommatis, Sabrina; Mocchi, Roberto; Prosperi, Ennio; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Cazzalini, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) is a protein involved in the early step of DNA damage recognition of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. Recently, it has been suggested that DDB2 may play a role in DNA replication, based on its ability to promote cell proliferation. We have previously shown that DDB2 binds PCNA during NER, but also in the absence of DNA damage; however, whether and how this interaction influences cell proliferation is not known. In this study, we have addressed this question by using HEK293 cell clones stably expressing DDB2(Wt) protein, or a mutant form (DDB2(Mut)) unable to interact with PCNA. We report that overexpression of the DDB2(Mut) protein provides a proliferative advantage over the wild type form, by influencing cell cycle progression. In particular, an increase in the number of S-phase cells, together with a reduction in p21(CDKN1A) protein level, and a shorter cell cycle length, has been observed in the DDB2(Mut) cells. These results suggest that DDB2 influences cell cycle progression thanks to its interaction with PCNA.

  15. Proteome and phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-associated proteins from normal maize and mutants affected in starch biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Florent; Rogniaux, Hélène; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M; Planchot, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the exclusively granule-bound starch synthase GBSSI, starch granules also bind significant proportions of other starch biosynthetic enzymes, particularly starch synthases (SS) SSI and SSIIa, and starch branching enzyme (BE) BEIIb. Whether this association is a functional aspect of starch biosynthesis, or results from non-specific entrapment during amylopectin crystallization, is not known. This study utilized genetic, immunological, and proteomic approaches to investigate comprehensively the proteome and phosphoproteome of Zea mays endosperm starch granules. SSIII, BEI, BEIIa, and starch phosphorylase were identified as internal granule-associated proteins in maize endosperm, along with the previously identified proteins GBSS, SSI, SSIIa, and BEIIb. Genetic analyses revealed three instances in which granule association of one protein is affected by the absence of another biosynthetic enzyme. First, eliminating SSIIa caused reduced granule association of SSI and BEIIb, without affecting GBSS abundance. Second, eliminating SSIII caused the appearance of two distinct electrophoretic mobility forms of BEIIb, whereas only a single migration form of BEIIb was observed in wild type or any other mutant granules examined. Third, eliminating BEIIb caused significant increases in the abundance of BEI, BEIIa, SSIII, and starch phosphorylase in the granule, without affecting SSI or SSIIa. Analysis of the granule phosphoproteome with a phosphorylation-specific dye indicated that GBSS, BEIIb, and starch phosphorylase are all phosphorylated as they occur in the granule. These results suggest the possibility that starch metabolic enzymes located in granules are regulated by post-translational modification and/or protein-protein interactions.

  16. Analysis of the differential gene and protein expression profile of the rolled leaf mutant of transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiuqiang; Yu, Shuguang; Chen, Guanshui; Ke, Lanlan; Pan, Daren

    2017-01-01

    The importance of leaf rolling in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been widely recognized. Although several studies have investigated rice leaf rolling and identified some related genes, knowledge of the molecular mechanism underlying rice leaf rolling, especially outward leaf rolling, is limited. Therefore, in this study, differential proteomics and gene expression profiling were used to analyze rolled leaf mutant of transgenic rice in order to investigate differentially expressed genes and proteins related to rice leaf rolling. To this end, 28 differentially expressed proteins related to rolling leaf traits were isolated and identified. Digital expression profiling detected 10 genes related to rice leaf rolling. Some of the proteins and genes detected are involved in lipid metabolism, which is related to the development of bulliform cells, such as phosphoinositide phospholipase C, Mgll gene, and At4g26790 gene. The "omics"-level techniques were useful for simultaneously isolating several proteins and genes related to rice leaf rolling. In addition, the results of the analysis of differentially expressed proteins and genes were closely consistent with those from a corresponding functional analysis of cellular mechanisms; our study findings might form the basis for further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying rice leaf rolling.

  17. Lack of the D2 protein in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii psbD mutant affects photosystem II stability and D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jeanne M.; Rahire, Michéle; Malnoë, Pia; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Pierre, Yves; Bennoun, Pierre; Rochaix, Jean-David

    1986-01-01

    D1 and D2, two chloroplast proteins with apparent mol. wt of 32 000-34 000, play an important role in the photosynthetic reactions mediated by the membrane-bound protein complex of photosystem II (PSII). We have isolated and characterized an uniparental, non-photosynthetic mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and show that the mutation is in the chloroplast gene psbD, coding for D2. A 46 bp direct DNA duplication in the coding region of the mutant gene causes a frame-shift which results in a psbD transcript coding for 186 amino acid residues instead of the normal 352. The truncated D2 peptide is never seen, even after pulse-labeling, suggesting that the mutant protein is very unstable. In addition, little or no D1 protein is detected in this mutant although the gene and normal levels of mRNA for D1 are present in mutant cells. All other core PSII proteins are synthesized and inserted into the membrane fraction, but never accumulate. These results suggest that D2 contributes not only to the stabilization of the PSII complex in the membrane, but also may play a specific role in the regulation of the D1 protein, either at the translational or post-translational level. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 6. PMID:16453694

  18. Accelerating the clearance of mutant huntingtin protein aggregates through autophagy induction by europium hydroxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Yi; Man, Na; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Xu, Jing; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Wen, Long-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the well-known pathways to accelerate the clearance of protein aggregates, which contributes to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Although there are numerous reports that demonstrate the induction of autophagy with small molecules including rapamycin, trehalose and lithium, however, there are few reports mentioning the clearance of aggregate-prone proteins through autophagy induction by nanoparticles. In the present article, we have demonstrated that europium hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can reduce huntingtin protein aggregation (EGFP-tagged huntingtin protein with 74 polyQ repeats), responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. Again, we have found that these nanorods induce authentic autophagy flux in different cell lines (Neuro 2a, PC12 and HeLa cells) through the expression of higher levels of characteristic autophagy marker protein LC3-II and degradation of selective autophagy substrate/cargo receptor p62/SQSTM1. Furthermore, depression of protein aggregation clearance through the autophagy blockade has also been observed by using specific inhibitors (wortmannin and chloroquine), indicating that autophagy is involved in the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation. Since [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can enhance the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation via autophagy induction, we strongly believe that these nanorods would be useful for the development of therapeutic treatment strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases in near future using nanomedicine approach.

  19. Folding and aggregation of export-defective mutants of the maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Betton, Jean-Michel; Phichith, Denis; Hunke, Sabine

    2002-09-01

    We previously characterized a defective-folding variant of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, MalE31. To examine the alternative folding pathways open to the MalE31 precursor, we have analyzed the cellular fates of this aggregation-prone protein carrying altered signal sequences. Our results are most easily interpreted by a kinetic competition between exportation, folding, and degradation.

  20. The CamSol method of rational design of protein mutants with enhanced solubility.

    PubMed

    Sormanni, Pietro; Aprile, Francesco A; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-30

    Protein solubility is often an essential requirement in biotechnological and biomedical applications. Great advances in understanding the principles that determine this specific property of proteins have been made during the past decade, in particular concerning the physicochemical characteristics of their constituent amino acids. By exploiting these advances, we present the CamSol method for the rational design of protein variants with enhanced solubility. The method works by performing a rapid computational screening of tens of thousand of mutations to identify those with the greatest impact on the solubility of the target protein while maintaining its native state and biological activity. The application to a single-domain antibody that targets the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide demonstrates that the method predicts with great accuracy solubility changes upon mutation, thus offering a cost-effective strategy to help the production of soluble proteins for academic and industrial purposes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Induction of expression and co-localization of heat shock polypeptides with the polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 after chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qishan Bag, Jnanankur

    2008-05-23

    Formation of nuclear inclusions consisting of aggregates of a polyalanine expansion mutant of nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1) is the hallmark of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). OPMD is a late onset autosomal dominant disease. Patients with this disorder exhibit progressive swallowing difficulty and drooping of their eye lids, which starts around the age of 50. Previously we have shown that treatment of cells expressing the mutant PABPN1 with a number of chemicals such as ibuprofen, indomethacin, ZnSO{sub 4}, and 8-hydroxy-quinoline induces HSP70 expression and reduces PABPN1 aggregation. In these studies we have shown that expression of additional HSPs including HSP27, HSP40, and HSP105 were induced in mutant PABPN1 expressing cells following exposure to the chemicals mentioned above. Furthermore, all three additional HSPs were translocated to the nucleus and probably helped to properly fold the mutant PABPN1 by co-localizing with this protein.

  2. A fast method for analyzing essential protein mutants in human cells.

    PubMed

    Dietsch, Frank; Donzeau, Mariel; Cordonnier, Agnes M; Weiss, Etienne; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Here we developed a complementation method for the study of essential genes in live human cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Proteins encoded by essential genes were expressed using a derivative of the pCEP4 compensating plasmid in combination with Cas9 endonuclease targeting of the chromosomal genes. We show that this strategy can be applied to essential genes, such as those coding for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and DNA polymerase delta subunit 2 (POLD2). As demonstrated for the PCNA protein, our method allows mutational analysis of essential protein-coding sequences in live cells.

  3. The Peripheral Neuropathy-Linked Trembler and Trembler-J Mutant Forms of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 are Folding-Destabilized†

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Mobley, Charles K.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are known to result in peripheral neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A (CMT1A) disease via mechanisms that appear to be closely linked to misfolding of PMP22 in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To characterize the molecular defects in PMP22, we examined the structure and folding stability of two human disease mutant forms of PMP22 that are also the basis for mouse models of peripheral neuropathies: G150D (Trembler phenotype), and L16P (Trembler-J phenotype). Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopic studies indicated that, when folded, the 3-D structures of these disease-linked mutants are similar to the folded wild type protein. However, the folded forms of the mutants were observed to be destabilized relative to the wild type protein, with the L16P mutant being particularly unstable. The rate of refolding from an unfolded state was observed to be very slow for the wild type protein, and no refolding was observed for either mutant. These results lead to the hypothesis that ER quality control recognizes the G150D and L16P mutant forms of PMP22 as defective through mechanisms closely related to their conformational instability and/or slow folding. It was also seen that wild type PMP22 binds Zn(II) and Cu(II) with micromolar affinity, a property that may be important to the stability and function of this protein. Zn(II) was able to rescue the stability defect of the Tr mutant. PMID:18795802

  4. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bacillus citri Changed the Protein Content of the Nigerian Oryza sativa variety “Igbimo” during Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boboye, Bolatito E; Adeleke, Mutiat A; Olawale, Anthony O

    2012-01-01

    Effect of mutation on protein production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bacillus citri, the best protein producing yeast and bacterium isolated during a previous natural fermentation of a Nigerian rice (“Igbimo”). The two microorganisms were grown to logarithmic phase and mutagenized separately using ethylmethyl sulphonate (EMS). The wild-types and variants were inoculated individually into sterile “Igbimo” rice. Fermentation was allowed to take place at 27°C for 7 days after which protein released into the rice was quantified using the Biuret reagent method. The data obtained showed that the mutants are different from each other. Some mutants did form the protein at lower concentrations, others at the same and higher concentrations than the mother strains. The parental strains of S. cerevisiae and B. citri synthesized 0.89 mg/mL and 0.36 mg/mL protein respectively. Four groups of the mutants are recognized: classes I, II, III and IV which are the Poor, Average, Good and Super Protein Producers with 0-0.20, 0.21-0.50, 0.51-1.0 and 1.0 mg/mL protein respectively The yeast mutants produced higher amounts of protein than those of the bacterium. PMID:23166568

  5. Fragile X-like behaviors and abnormal cortical dendritic spines in cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihoon; Chen, Hogmei; Gennarino, Vincenzo A; Richman, Ronald; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene and loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) cause fragile X syndrome (FXS), a genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and autistic behaviors. FMRP is an mRNA-binding protein regulating neuronal translation of target mRNAs. Abnormalities in actin-rich dendritic spines are major neuronal features in FXS, but the molecular mechanism and identity of FMRP targets mediating this phenotype remain largely unknown. Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) was identified as an interactor of FMRP, and its mRNA is a highly ranked FMRP target in mouse brain. Importantly, Cyfip2 is a component of WAVE regulatory complex, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that Cyfip2 could be implicated in the dendritic spine phenotype of FXS. Here, we generated and characterized Cyfip2-mutant (Cyfip2(+/-)) mice. We found that Cyfip2(+/-) mice exhibited behavioral phenotypes similar to Fmr1-null (Fmr1(-/y)) mice, an animal model of FXS. Synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines were normal in Cyfip2(+/-) hippocampus. However, dendritic spines were altered in Cyfip2(+/-) cortex, and the dendritic spine phenotype of Fmr1(-/y) cortex was aggravated in Fmr1(-/y); Cyfip2(+/-) double-mutant mice. In addition to the spine changes at basal state, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced dendritic spine regulation was impaired in both Fmr1(-/y) and Cyfip2(+/-) cortical neurons. Mechanistically, mGluR activation induced mRNA translation-dependent increase of Cyfip2 in wild-type cortical neurons, but not in Fmr1(-/y) or Cyfip2(+/-) neurons. These results suggest that misregulation of Cyfip2 function and its mGluR-induced expression contribute to the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS.

  6. Alpha-Synuclein Proteins Promote Pro-Inflammatory Cascades in Microglia: Stronger Effects of the A53T Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hoenen, Claire; Gustin, Audrey; Birck, Cindy; Kirchmeyer, Mélanie; Beaume, Nicolas; Felten, Paul; Grandbarbe, Luc; Heuschling, Paul; Heurtaux, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is histologically described by the deposition of α-synuclein, whose accumulation in Lewy bodies causes dopaminergic neuronal death. Although most of PD cases are sporadic, point mutations of the gene encoding the α-synuclein protein cause inherited forms of PD. There are currently six known point mutations that result in familial PD. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have also been described as early events associated with dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in PD. Though it is known that microglia are activated by wild-type α-synuclein, little is known about its mutated forms and the signaling cascades responsible for this microglial activation. The present study was designed to investigate consequences of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein (A53T, A30P and E46K) exposure on microglial reactivity. Interestingly, we described that α-synuclein-induced microglial reactivity appeared to be peptide-dependent. Indeed, the A53T protein activated more strongly microglia than the wild-type α-synuclein and other mutants. This A53T-induced microglial reactivity mechanism was found to depend on phosphorylation mechanisms mediated by MAPKs and on successive NFkB/AP-1/Nrf2 pathways activation. These results suggest that the microgliosis intensity during PD might depend on the type of α-synuclein protein implicated. Indeed, mutated forms are more potent microglial stimulators than wild-type α-synuclein. Based on these data, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic strategies may be valid in order to reduce microgliosis but also to subsequently slow down PD progression, especially in familial cases. PMID:27622765

  7. Altered expression of several genes in IIIManL-defective mutants of Streptococcus salivarius demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Frenette, M; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1993-05-01

    Mannose, glucose and fructose are transported in Streptococcus salivarius by a phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) which consists of a membrane-bound Enzyme II (EII) and two forms of IIIMan having molecular weights of 38,900 (IIIManH) and 35,200 (IIIManL), respectively. We have previously reported the isolation of spontaneous mutants lacking IIIManL and showed that they exhibit higher beta-galactosidase activity than the parental strain after growth on glucose, and that some of them constitutively express a fructose PTS which is induced by fructose in the parental strain. In an attempt to determine whether the expression of other genes is affected by the mutation and what the physiological link is between them, we examined three S. salivarius IIIManL-defective mutants (strains A37, B31 and G29) and the parental strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after growth of the cells on a variety of sugars. After growth on glucose, five new proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the three mutants. Two of these proteins were induced in the parental strain by galactose or oligosaccharides containing galactose, and one was specifically induced by melibiose. The other two proteins were not detected in the parental strain under any of the growth conditions tested. Two other proteins were only detected in glucose-grown cells of mutant A37, and a protein associated with the metabolism of fructose was constitutively expressed in mutants B31 and G29. Moreover, we have found that under identical growth conditions the amounts of several other proteins which were detected in the parental strain were either increased or decreased in the mutants. Globally, our results have indicated that (1) the expression of several genes was affected in the spontaneous IIIManL-defective mutants; (2) some of the proteins abnormally produced in the mutants were specifically induced in the parental strain by sugars; (3) the phenotypic modifications observed in the

  8. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  9. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) interacts with androgen receptor (AR) and suppresses SBMA-mutant-AR-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Yukio; Fujinaga, Ryutaro; Zhao, Changjiu; Yanai, Akie; Shinoda, Koh

    2006-08-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1), an interactor of huntingtin, has been known as an essential component of the stigmoid body (STB) and recently reported to play a protective role against neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). In the present study, subcellular association between HAP1 and androgen receptor (AR) with a long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) derived from spinal-and-bulbar-muscular-atrophy (SBMA) was examined using HEp-2 cells cotransfected with HAP1 and/or normal ARQ25, SBMA-mutant ARQ65 or deletion-mutant AR cDNAs. The results provided the first clear evidence that HAP1 interacts with AR through its ligand-binding domain in a polyQ-length-dependent manner and forms prominent inclusions sequestering polyQ-AR, and that addition of dihydrotestosterone reduces the association strength of HAP1 with ARQ25 more dramatically than that with ARQ65. Furthermore, SBMA-mutant-ARQ65-induced apoptosis was suppressed by cotransfection with HAP1. Our findings strongly suggest that HAP1/STB is relevant to polyQ-length-dependent modification on subcellular AR functions and critically involved in pathogenesis of not only HD but also SBMA as an important intrinsic neuroprotectant determining the threshold for cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. Taking together with previous reports that HAP1/STB is selectively expressed in the brain regions spared from degenerative targets in HD and SBMA, the current study might explain the region-specific occurrence of neurodegeneration in both diseases, shedding light on common aspects of their molecular pathological mechanism and yet-to-be-uncovered diagnostic or therapeutic applications for HD and SBMA patients.

  10. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  11. iTRAQ protein profile analysis of tomato green-ripe mutant reveals new aspects critical for fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Zhu, Hongliang; Chen, Yuexi; Tian, Huiqin; Luo, Yunbo; Fu, Daqi

    2014-04-04

    Green-ripe (Gr) tomato carries a dominant mutation and yields a nonripening fruit phenotype. The mutation results from a 334 bp deletion in a gene of unknown function at the Gr locus. The putative influence of Gr gene-deletion mutation on biochemical changes underlying the nonripening phenotype remains largely unknown. Respiration of Gr fruit was found to be reduced at mature green and breaker stage of ripening, while the fruit softening was dramatically prolonged. We studied the proteome of Gr mutant fruit using high-throughput iTRAQ and high-resolution mass spectrometry and identified 43 proteins representing 43 individual genes as potential influence-targets of Gr mutated fruit. The identified proteins are involved in several ripening-related pathways including cell-wall metabolism, photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism, protein synthesis, and processing. Affected protein levels are correlated with the corresponding gene transcript levels. The modulation in the accumulation levels of PI(U1)P, PGIP, and PG2 supported the delayed softening phenotype of the Gr fruit. Further investigation in GR gene-silencing fruit ascertained the doubtless modulation of these targets by the deletion mutation of GR gene.

  12. Dynamics of mitochondrial RNA-binding protein complex in Trypanosoma brucei and its petite mutant under optimized immobilization conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Kaltenbrunner, Sabine; Šimková, Eva; Stanĕk, David; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    There are a variety of complex metabolic processes ongoing simultaneously in the single, large mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei. Understanding the organellar environment and dynamics of mitochondrial proteins requires quantitative measurement in vivo. In this study, we have validated a method for immobilizing both procyclic stage (PS) and bloodstream stage (BS) T. brucei brucei with a high level of cell viability over several hours and verified its suitability for undertaking fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), with mitochondrion-targeted yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Next, we used this method for comparative analysis of the translational diffusion of mitochondrial RNA-binding protein 1 (MRP1) in the BS and in T. b. evansi. The latter flagellate is like petite mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae because it lacks organelle-encoded nucleic acids. FRAP measurement of YFP-tagged MRP1 in both cell lines illuminated from a new perspective how the absence or presence of RNA affects proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. This work represents the first attempt to examine this process in live trypanosomes. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Inhibition of Mutant αB Crystallin-Induced Protein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Bitan, Gal; Schrader, Thomas; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Osinska, Hanna; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2017-08-08

    Compromised protein quality control causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and intracellular aggregates, contributing to cardiac disease and heart failure. The development of therapeutics directed at proteotoxicity-based pathology in heart disease is just beginning. The molecular tweezer CLR01 is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of abnormal self-assembly of amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein, tau, and α-synuclein. This small molecule interferes with aggregation by binding selectively to lysine side chains, changing the charge distribution of aggregation-prone proteins and thereby disrupting aggregate formation. However, the effects of CLR01 in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress have not been explored. Here we assess whether CLR01 can decrease cardiac protein aggregation catalyzed by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of mutated αB-crystallin (CryAB(R)(120G)). A proteotoxic model of desmin-related cardiomyopathy caused by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of CryAB(R)(120G) was used to test the efficacy of CLR01 therapy in the heart. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were infected with adenovirus expressing either wild-type CryAB or CryAB(R)(120G). Subsequently, the cells were treated with different doses of CLR01 or a closely related but inactive derivative, CLR03. CLR01 decreased aggregate accumulation and attenuated cytotoxicity caused by CryAB(R)(120G) expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CLR03 had no effect. Ubiquitin-proteasome system function was analyzed using a ubiquitin-proteasome system reporter protein consisting of a short degron, CL1, fused to the COOH-terminus of green fluorescent protein. CLR01 improved proteasomal function in CryAB(R)(120G) cardiomyocytes but did not alter autophagic flux. In vivo, CLR01 administration also resulted in reduced protein aggregates in CryAB(R)(120G) transgenic mice. CLR01 can inhibit CryAB(R)(120G) aggregate formation and decrease cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic

  14. Valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97) inhibitors relieve Mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial defects due to VCP disease mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Mishra, Prashant; Hay, Bruce A; Chan, David; Guo, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Missense mutations of valosin-containing protein (VCP) cause an autosomal dominant disease known as inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease with frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The pathological mechanism of IBMPFD is not clear and there is no treatment. We show that endogenous VCP negatively regulates Mitofusin, which is required for outer mitochondrial membrane fusion. Because 90% of IBMPFD patients have myopathy, we generated an in vivo IBMPFD model in adult Drosophila muscle, which recapitulates disease pathologies. We show that common VCP disease mutants act as hyperactive alleles with respect to regulation of Mitofusin. Importantly, VCP inhibitors suppress mitochondrial defects, muscle tissue damage and cell death associated with IBMPFD models in Drosophila. These inhibitors also suppress mitochondrial fusion and respiratory defects in IBMPFD patient fibroblasts. These results suggest that VCP disease mutants cause IBMPFD through a gain-of-function mechanism, and that VCP inhibitors have therapeutic value. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17834.001 PMID:28322724

  15. An antibody raised against a pathogenic serpin variant induces mutant-like behaviour in the wild-type protein

    PubMed Central

    Irving, James A.; Miranda, Elena; Haq, Imran; Perez, Juan; Kotov, Vadim R.; Faull, Sarah V.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Lomas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to a transient intermediate may act as a catalyst for the corresponding reaction; here we show this principle can extend on a macro molecular scale to the induction of mutant-like oligomerization in a wild-type protein. Using the common pathogenic E342K (Z) variant of α1-antitrypsin as antigen–whose native state is susceptible to the formation of a proto-oligomeric intermediate–we have produced a mAb (5E3) that increases the rate of oligomerization of the wild-type (M) variant. Employing ELISA, gel shift, thermal stability and FRET time-course experiments, we show that mAb5E3 does not bind to the native state of α1-antitrypsin, but recognizes a cryptic epitope in the vicinity of the post-helix A loop and strand 4C that is revealed upon transition to the polymerization intermediate, and which persists in the ensuing oligomer. This epitope is not shared by loop-inserted monomeric conformations. We show the increased amenity to polymerization by either the pathogenic E342K mutation or the binding of mAb5E3 occurs without affecting the energetic barrier to polymerization. As mAb5E3 also does not alter the relative stability of the monomer to intermediate, it acts in a manner similar to the E342K mutant, by facilitating the conformational interchange between these two states. PMID:25738741

  16. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Importance of mutant position in Ramachandran plot for predicting protein stability of surface mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Oobatake, Motohisa; Kono, Hidetoshi; Uedaira, Hatsuho; Sarai, Akinori

    2002-08-05

    Understanding the mechanisms by which mutations affect protein stability is one of the most important problems in molecular biology. In this work, we analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by surface mutations and changes in 49 physicochemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues. We found that the hydration entropy was the major contributor to the stability of surface mutations in helical segments; other properties responsible for size and volume of molecule also correlated significantly with stability. Classification of coil mutations based on their locations in the (phi-psi) map improved the correlation significantly, demonstrating the existence of a relationship between stability and strain energy, which indicates that the role of strain energy is very important for the stability of surface mutations. We observed that the inclusion of sequence and structural information raised the correlation, indicating the influence of surrounding residues on the stability of surface mutations. Further, we examined the previously reported "inverse relationship" between stability and hydrophobicity, and observed that the inverse hydrophobic effect was generally applicable only to coil mutations. The present study leads to a simple method for predicting protein stability changes caused by amino acid substitutions, which will be useful for protein engineering in designing novel proteins with increased stability and altered function.

  18. Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus with intact or mutant transcriptional activator proteins: complexity of cotton leaf curl disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Gunapati, Samatha; Alok, Anshu; Lalit, Adarsh; Gadre, Rekha; Sharma, Naresh C; Roy, Joy K; Singh, Sudhir P

    2015-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is a serious disease of cotton on the Indian subcontinent. In the present study, three cotton leaf curl viruses, cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV), cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV) and cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), and their associated satellites, cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) and cotton leaf curl Multan alphasatellite (CLCuMA), were detected. CLCuBuV with either intact (CLCuBuV-1) or mutant (CLCuBuV-2) transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) were detected in different plants. Agroinoculation with CLCuBuV-1 or CLCuBuV-2 together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, resulted in typical leaf curling and stunting of tobacco plants. Inoculation with CLCuKoV or an isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-2), together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, induced severe leaf curling, while the other isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-1), which was recombinant in origin, showed mild leaf curling in tobacco. To investigate the effect of intact or mutant TrAP and also the recombination events, CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2, CLCuMV-1 or CLCuMV-2 together with the satellites (CLCuMA and CLCuMB) were transferred to cotton via whitefly-mediated transmission. Cotton plants containing CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2 or CLCuMV-2 together with satellites showed curling and stunting, whereas the plants having CLCuMV-1 and the satellites showed only mild and indistinguishable symptoms. CLCuBuV-1 (intact TrAP) showed severe symptoms in comparison to CLCuBuV-2 (mutant TrAP). The present study reveals that two types of CLCuBuV, one with an intact TrAP and the other with a mutant TrAP, exist in natural infection of cotton in India. Additionally, CLCuMuV-1, which has a recombinant origin, induces mild symptoms in comparison to the other CLCuMV isolates.

  19. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  20. Mutant huntingtin's interaction with mitochondrial protein Drp1 impairs mitochondrial biogenesis and causes defective axonal transport and synaptic degeneration in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Shirendeb, Ulziibat P; Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Anekonda, Vishwanath; Dufour, Brett; McBride, Jodi L; Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the link between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and neuronal damage in relation to mitochondria in Huntington's disease (HD). In an earlier study, we determined the relationship between mutant Htt and mitochondrial dynamics/synaptic viability in HD patients. We found mitochondrial loss, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and mutant Htt association with mitochondria in HD patients. In the current study, we sought to expand on our previous findings and further elucidate the relationship between mutant Htt and mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies. We hypothesized that mutant Htt, in association with mitochondria, alters mitochondrial dynamics, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation and defective axonal transport of mitochondria in HD neurons. In this study, using postmortem HD brains and primary neurons from transgenic BACHD mice, we identified mutant Htt interaction with the mitochondrial protein Drp1 and factors that cause abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, including GTPase Drp1 enzymatic activity. Further, using primary neurons from BACHD mice, for the first time, we studied axonal transport of mitochondria and synaptic degeneration. We also investigated the effect of mutant Htt aggregates and oligomers in synaptic and mitochondrial deficiencies in postmortem HD brains and primary neurons from BACHD mice. We found that mutant Htt interacts with Drp1, elevates GTPase Drp1 enzymatic activity, increases abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and results in defective anterograde mitochondrial movement and synaptic deficiencies. These observations support our hypothesis and provide data that can be utilized to develop therapeutic targets that are capable of inhibiting mutant Htt interaction with Drp1, decreasing mitochondrial fragmentation, enhancing axonal transport of mitochondria and protecting synapses from toxic insults caused by mutant Htt.

  1. Room temperature crystal structure of the fast switching M159T mutant of the fluorescent protein dronpa.

    PubMed

    Kaucikas, Marius; Fitzpatrick, Ann; Bryan, Elana; Struve, Abelone; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Srajer, Vukica; Groenhof, Gerrit; Van Thor, Jasper J

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent protein Dronpa undergoes reversible photoswitching reactions between the bright "on" and dark "off" states via photoisomerization and proton transfer reactions. We report the room temperature crystal structure of the fast switching Met159Thr mutant of Dronpa at 2.0-Å resolution in the bright on state. Structural differences with the wild type include shifted backbone positions of strand β8 containing Thr159 as well as an altered A-C dimer interface involving strands β7, β8, β10, and β11. The Met159Thr mutation increases the cavity volume for the p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolinone chromophore as a result of both the side chain difference and the backbone positional differences.

  2. Two Subclasses of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycle Promoters Distinguished by Open Reading Frame 50 Mutant Proteins That Are Deficient in Binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jκ in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jκ protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jκ cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein. PMID:15994769

  3. Two subclasses of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycle promoters distinguished by open reading frame 50 mutant proteins that are deficient in binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Miller, George

    2005-07-01

    A transcriptional activator encoded in open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome initiates the viral lytic cycle. Here we classify four lytic cycle genes on the basis of several characteristics of the ORF50 response elements (ORF50 REs) in their promoters: nucleotide sequence homology, the capacity to bind ORF50 protein in vitro, the ability to bind the cellular protein RBP-Jkappa in vitro, and the capacity to confer activation by DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein. ORF50 expressed in human cells binds the promoters of PAN and K12 but does not bind ORF57 or vMIP-1 promoters. Conversely, the RBP-Jkappa protein binds ORF57 and vMIP-1 but not PAN or K12 promoters. DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein differentiate these two subclasses of promoters in reporter assays; the PAN and K12 promoters cannot be activated, while the ORF57 and vMIP-1 promoters are responsive. Although DNA binding-deficient mutants of ORF50 protein are defective in activating direct targets, they are nonetheless capable of activating the lytic cascade of KSHV. Significantly, DNA binding-deficient ORF50 mutants are competent to autostimulate expression of endogenous ORF50 and to autoactivate ORF50 promoter reporters. The experiments show that ORF50 protein activates downstream targets by at least two distinct mechanisms: one involves direct binding of ORF50 REs in promoter DNA; the other mechanism employs interactions with the RBP-Jkappa cellular protein bound to promoter DNA in the region of the ORF50 RE. The DNA binding-deficient mutants allow classification of ORF50-responsive genes and will facilitate study of the several distinct mechanisms of activation of KSHV lytic cycle genes that are under the control of ORF50 protein.

  4. Phenotypic differences in PFIC2 and BRIC2 correlate with protein stability of mutant Bsep and impaired taurocholate secretion in MDCK II cells.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Tatehiro; Watanabe, Norihito; Mochizuki, Kaori; Numari, Asano; Ikeno, Yoshie; Itoh, Johbu; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Arias, Irwin M; Mine, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC) 2 and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) 2 are caused by mutations in the bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) gene; however, their prognosis differs. PFIC2 progresses to cirrhosis and requires liver transplantation, whereas BRIC2 is clinically benign. To identify the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for the phenotypic differences, eight PFIC2 and two BRIC2 mutations were introduced in rat Bsep, which was transfected in MDCK II cells. Taurocholate transport activity, protein expression, and subcellular distribution of these mutant proteins were studied in a polarized MDCK II monolayer. The taurocholate transport activity was approximately half of the wild-type (WT) in BRIC2 mutants (A570T and R1050C), was substantially less in two PFIC2 mutants (D482G and E297G), and was almost abolished in six other PFIC2 mutants (K461E, G982R, R1153C, R1268Q, 3767-3768insC, and R1057X). Bsep protein expression levels correlated closely with transport activity, except for R1057X. The half-life of the D482G mutant was shorter than that of the WT (1.35 h vs. 3.49 h in the mature form). BRIC2 mutants and three PFIC mutants (D482G, E297G, and R1057X) were predominantly distributed in the apical membrane. The other PFIC2 mutants remained intracellular. The R1057X mutant protein was stably expressed and trafficked to the apical membrane, suggesting that the COOH-terminal tail is required for transport activity but not for correct targeting. In conclusion, taurocholate transport function was impaired in proportion to rapid degradation of Bsep protein in the mutants, which were aligned in the following order: A570T and R1050C > D482G > E297G > K461E, G982R, R1153C, R1268Q, 3767-3768insC, and R1057X. These results may explain the phenotypic difference between BRIC2 and PFIC2.

  5. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles. PMID:26925228

  6. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  7. Dataset of differentially regulated proteins in HUVECs challenged with wild type and UGM1 mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gabriela Westerlund Peixoto; Curty, Nathália; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula Helena; Fontaine, Thierry; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Cunha, Marcel Lyra; Goldman, Gustavo H; Beauvais, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2016-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is the primary opportunistic invasive fungal infection described in neutropenic hematologic patients, caused by the angioinvasive pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The molecular mechanisms associated with A. fumigatus infection in the vascular endothelium are poorly understood. In this context, we used a high-throughput proteomic approach to unveil the proteins modulated in HUVECs after interaction with a wild type strain and the UGM1 mutant (Δugm1) of A. fumigatus. The proteomic analysis was also performed in HUVECs challenged with a galactosaminogalactan (GAG) purified from A. fumigatus cell wall. The dataset presented here correspond to all proteins identified that fit a 2-fold change criteria (log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or ≤ -1), disregarding the statistical validation cut off, in order to supplement the research article entitled "Modifications to the composition of the hyphal outer layer of Aspergillus fumigatus modulates the HUVEC proteins associated with inflammatory and stress responses" (G.W.P. Neves, N.A. Curty, P.H. Kubitschek-Barreira, T. Fontaine, G.H.M.F. Souza, M. Lyra Cunha, G.H. Goldman, A. Beauvais, J.P. Latgé, L.M. Lopes-Bezerra, 2016) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomic data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002823.

  8. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) C4408R Mutant Promotes Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) α-Cleavage in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huayan; Habib, Ahsan; Zi, Dan; Tian, Kathy; Tian, Jun; Giunta, Brian; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2017-06-13

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) plays conflicting roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, clearing β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain while also enhancing APP endocytosis and resultant amyloidogenic processing. We have recently discovered that co-expression of mutant LRP1 C-terminal domain (LRP1-CT C4408R) with Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells decreases Aβ production, while also increasing sAPPα and APP α-C-terminal fragment (α-CTF), compared with CHO cells expressing APPswe alone. Surprisingly, the location of this mutation on LRP1 corresponded with the α-secretase cleavage site of APP. Further experimentation confirmed that in CHO cells expressing APPswe or wild-type APP (APPwt), co-expression of LRP1-CT C4408R decreases Aβ and increases sAPPα and α-CTF compared with co-expression of wild-type LRP1-CT. In addition, LRP1-CT C4408R enhanced the unglycosylated form of LRP1-CT and reduced APP endocytosis as determined by flow cytometry. This finding identifies a point mutation in LRP1 which slows LRP1-CT-mediated APP endocytosis and amyloidogenic processing, while enhancing APP α-secretase cleavage, thus demonstrating a potential novel target for slowing AD pathogenesis.

  9. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors Sensitize GNAQ Mutant Uveal Melanoma Cells to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cerne, Jasmina Ziva; Hartig, Sean Michael; Hamilton, Mark Patrick; Chew, Sue Anne; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Poulaki, Vassiliki; McGuire, Sean Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Uveal melanoma (UM) tumors require large doses of radiation therapy (RT) to achieve tumor ablation, which frequently results in damage to adjacent normal tissues, leading to vision-threatening complications. Approximately 50% of UM patients present with activating somatic mutations in the gene encoding for G protein αq-subunit (GNAQ), which lead to constitutive activation of downstream pathways, including protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, we investigated the impact of small-molecule PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (BIM) and sotrastaurin (AEB071), combined with ionizing radiation (IR), on survival in melanoma cell lines. Methods. Cellular radiosensitivity was determined by using a combination of proliferation, viability, and clonogenic assays. Cell-cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling were performed by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse-phase protein array analysis, and immunofluorescence. Results. We found that the PKC inhibitors combined with IR significantly decreased the viability, proliferation, and clonogenic potential of GNAQmt, but not GNAQwt/BRAFmt cells, compared with IR alone. Combined treatment increased the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of IR in GNAQmt cells through delayed DNA-damage resolution and enhanced induction of proteins involved in cell-cycle arrest, cell-growth arrest, and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our preclinical results suggest that combined modality treatment may allow for reductions in the total RT dose and/or fraction size, which may lead to better functional organ preservation in the treatment of primary GNAQmt UM. These findings suggest future clinical trials combining PKC inhibitors with RT in GNAQmt UM warrant consideration. PMID:24595385

  10. Blue light is required for survival of the tomato phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant and the expression of four nuclear genes coding for plastidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E

    1991-02-01

    When dark-grown aurea mutant tomato seedlings which lack more than 95% of the phytochrome present in isogenic wild-type seedlings are kept in white or blue light, four nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for plastidic proteins (the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of photosystem I and II [cab-PSII], plastocyanin and subunit 2 of photosystem I) are present in comparable amounts. These transcript levels in red light are strongly reduced in aurea seedlings when compared with those of wild type. Thus, blue light is required for normal expression of these genes in the mutant, while red light alone is not sufficient. Red light-grown aurea seedlings are very sensitive to blue light, even 10 minutes of blue light every day suffices to cause a measurable increase in cab-PSII transcript level. The action of blue light on the expression of cab-PSII in the mutant is under phytochrome control. After 8 days of blue light, phytochrome is almost as effective in inducing cab-PSII mRNA as in the isogenic wild type, whereas after 8 days of red light, only a small phytochrome response was observed in the mutant. It is concluded that blue light sensitizes the mutant to the residual phytochrome which allows normal gene expression and survival of the mutant under daylight conditions.

  11. Resolution of Holliday junction recombination intermediates by wild-type and mutant IntDOT proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyeun; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    2011-03-01

    CTnDOT encodes an integrase that is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. The recombination reaction proceeds by sequential sets of genetic exchanges between the attDOT site in CTnDOT and an attB site in the chromosome. The exchanges are separated by 7 base pairs in each site. Unlike most tyrosine recombinases, IntDOT exchanges sites that contain different DNA sequences between the exchange sites to generate Holliday junctions (HJs) that contain mismatched bases. We demonstrate that IntDOT resolves synthetic HJs in vitro. Holliday junctions that contain identical sequences between the exchange sites are resolved into both substrates and products, while HJs that contain mismatches are resolved only to substrates. This result implies that resolution of HJs to products requires the formation of a higher-order nucleoprotein complex with natural sites containing IntDOT. We also found that proteins with substitutions of residues (V95, K94, and K96) in a putative alpha helix at the junction of the N and CB domains (coupler region) were defective in resolving HJs. Mutational analysis of charged residues in the coupler and the N terminus of the protein did not provide evidence for a charge interaction between the regions of the protein. V95 may participate in a hydrophobic interaction with another region of IntDOT.

  12. Differential expression of proteins in the wild type and 7B-1 male-sterile mutant anthers of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum): a proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Inder S; Ross, Andrew R S; Olson, Douglas J H; Sawhney, Vipen K

    2009-01-30

    In the 7B-1 male-sterile mutant of tomato, pollen development breaks down prior to meiosis in microspore mother cells (MMCs). We have used the proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed proteins in the wild type (WT) and mutant anthers with the objective of analyzing their roles in normal pollen development and in male sterility. By using 2-DE and DIGE technologies, over 1800 spots were detected and of these 215 spots showed 1.5-fold or higher volume ratio in either WT or 7B-1 anthers. Seventy spots, either up-regulated in WT, or in 7B-1, were subjected to mass spectrometry and 59 spots representing 48 distinct proteins were identified. The proteins up-regulated in WT anthers included proteases, e.g., subtilase, proteasome subunits, and 5B-protein with potential roles in tapetum degeneration, FtsZ protein, leucine-rich repeat proteins, translational and transcription factors. In 7B-1 anthers, aspartic protease, superoxide dismutase, ACP reductase, ribonucleoprotein and diphosphate kinase were up-regulated. Also, cystatin inhibitory activity was high in the mutant and correlated with the expression of male sterility. Other proteins including calreticulin, Heat shock protein 70, glucoside hydrolase, and ATPase, were present in both genotypes. The function of identified proteins in tapetum and normal pollen development, and in male sterility is discussed.

  13. A hyperfusogenic F protein enhances the oncolytic potency of a paramyxovirus simian virus 5 P/V mutant without compromising sensitivity to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Maria D; Manuse, Mary J; Parks, Griffith D

    2008-10-01

    Viral fusogenic membrane proteins have been proposed as tools to increase the potency of oncolytic viruses, but there is a need for mechanisms to control the spread of fusogenic viruses in normal versus tumor cells. We have previously shown that a mutant of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that harbors mutations in the P/V gene from the canine parainfluenza virus (P/V-CPI(-)) is a potent inducer of type I interferon (IFN) and apoptosis and is restricted for spread through normal but not tumor cells in vitro. Here, we have used the cytopathic P/V-CPI(-) as a backbone vector to test the hypothesis that a virus expressing a hyperfusogenic glycoprotein will be a more effective oncolytic vector but will retain sensitivity to IFN. A P/V mutant virus expressing an F protein with a glycine-to-alanine substitution in the fusion peptide (P/V-CPI(-)-G3A) was more fusogenic than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant. In two model prostate tumor cell lines which are defective in IFN production (LNCaP and DU145), the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant had normal growth properties at low multiplicities of infection and was more effective than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant at cell killing in vitro. However, in PC3 cells which produce and respond to IFN, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was attenuated for growth and spread. Killing of PC3 cells was equivalent between the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant and the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant. In a nude mouse model using LNCaP cells, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was more effective than P/V-CPI(-) at reducing tumor burden. In the case of DU145 tumors, the two vectors based on P/V-CPI(-) were equally effective at limiting tumor growth. Together, our results provide proof of principle that a cytopathic SV5 P/V mutant can serve as an oncolytic virus and that the oncolytic effectiveness of P/V mutants can be enhanced by a fusogenic membrane protein without compromising sensitivity to IFN. The potential advantages of

  14. Amino acid sequence autocorrelation vectors and Bayesian-regularized genetic neural networks for modeling protein conformational stability: gene V protein mutants.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Leyden; Caballero, Julio; Abreu, José Ignacio; Fernández, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Development of novel computational approaches for modeling protein properties from their primary structure is the main goal in applied proteomics. In this work, we reported the extension of the autocorrelation vector formalism to amino acid sequences for encoding protein structural information with modeling purposes. Amino acid sequence autocorrelation (AASA) vectors were calculated by measuring the autocorrelations at sequence lags ranging from 1 to 15 on the protein primary structure of 48 amino acid/residue properties selected from the AAindex data base. A total of 720 AASA descriptors were tested for building predictive models of the change of thermal unfolding Gibbs free energy change (delta deltaG) of gene V protein upon mutation. In this sense, ensembles of Bayesian-regularized genetic neural networks (BRGNNs) were used for obtaining an optimum nonlinear model for the conformational stability. The ensemble predictor described about 88% and 66% variance of the data in training and test sets respectively. Furthermore, the optimum AASA vector subset not only helped to successfully model unfolding stability but also well distributed wild-type and gene V protein mutants on a stability self-organized map (SOM), when used for unsupervised training of competitive neurons. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  16. Accumulation of mutant alpha1-antitrypsin Z in the endoplasmic reticulum activates caspases-4 and -12, NFkappaB, and BAP31 but not the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Schmidt, Bela Z; Hale, Pamela; Perlmutter, David H

    2005-11-25

    In alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, a polymerogenic mutant form of the secretory glycoprotein alpha1AT, alpha1ATZ, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells. It is not yet known how this results in liver injury in a subgroup of deficient individuals and how the remainder of deficient individuals escapes liver disease. One possible explanation is that the "susceptible" subgroup is unable to mount the appropriate protective cellular responses. Here we examined the effect of mutant alpha1ATZ on several potential protective signaling pathways by using cell lines with inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT as well as liver from transgenic mice with liver-specific inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT. The results show that ER retention of polymerogenic mutant alpha1ATZ does not result in an unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR can be induced in the presence of alpha1ATZ by tunicamycin excluding the possibility that the pathway has been disabled. In striking contrast, ER retention of nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants does induce the UPR. These results indicate that the machinery responsible for activation of the UPR can distinguish the physical characteristics of proteins that accumulate in the ER in such a way that it can respond to misfolded but not relatively ordered polymeric structures. Accumulation of mutant alpha1ATZ does activate specific signaling pathways, including caspase-12 in mouse, caspase-4 in human, NFkappaB, and BAP31, a profile that was distinct from that activated by nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants.

  17. Use of a mutant OGA for detecting O-GlcNAc modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    In the previous issue of Biochemical Journal Mariappa et al. [(2015) Biochem J. 470,: 255-262] demonstrate a new method for visualizing O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modified proteins by making use of a catalytically dead version of the enzyme that normally removes this modification. They show their approach has broader specificity than current antibody-based techniques and higher specificity than lectin and chemical biology-based labelling approaches. This commentary discusses methods for O-GlcNAc detection and the significance of this work for characterizing this common, but currently poorly understood regulatory modification.

  18. Structural analysis of site-directed mutants of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II addresses the relationship between structural integrity and ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Vaezeslami, Soheila; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H.

    2008-12-01

    A water network stabilizes the structure of cellular retionic acid binding protein II. The structural integrity of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII) has been investigated using the crystal structures of CRABPII mutants. The overall fold was well maintained by these CRABPII mutants, each of which carried multiple different mutations. A water-mediated network is found to be present across the large binding cavity, extending from Arg111 deep inside the cavity to the α2 helix at its entrance. This chain of interactions acts as a ‘pillar’ that maintains the integrity of the protein. The disruption of the water network upon loss of Arg111 leads to decreased structural integrity of the protein. A water-mediated network can be re-established by introducing the hydrophilic Glu121 inside the cavity, which results in a rigid protein with the α2 helix adopting an altered conformation compared with wild-type CRABPII.

  19. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

  20. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  1. Inhibition of TCR/CD3-mediated signaling by a mutant of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Stanners, J; Kabouridis, P; Han, H; Tsoukas, C D

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated the role of the hematopoietically expressed G16 GTP-binding protein on T cell activation. We constructed transfectants of Jurkat T cells that express a function-deficient mutant of G alpha 16 predicted to prevent activation of this G protein. Upon stimulation with anti-CD3 epsilon antibodies, mutant G alpha 16 transfectants display a profound defect in the production of IL-2 and IL-10, as well as in the expression of CD69. In contrast, the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced IL-10 production and CD69 expression, and the ionomycin plus PMA-induced IL-2 production are not affected. Consistent with the reduction in cytokine production is the inhibition of early signaling events in the mutant G alpha 16-expressing cells. There are significant reductions in anti-epsilon-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of zeta, epsilon, ZAP-70, and phospholipase C gamma 1, as well as in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. In accordance with the effects on tyrosine phosphorylation is the reduction of TCR/CD3-mediated Fyn and Lck activities in G alpha 16 mutant cells. Even though the mechanism through which the G alpha 16 mutant mediates inhibition of T cell activation is not known, the data suggest a model where G proteins become activated upon TCR/CD3 engagement and regulate the activation of tyrosine kinases and subsequent downstream signaling events that lead to the activation of cytokine genes.

  2. Suppression of the novel ER protein Maxer by mutant ataxin-1 in Bergman glia contributes to non-cell-autonomous toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Tamura, Takuya; Sone, Masaki; Ogishima, Soichi; Watase, Kei; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous effect of mutant proteins expressed in glia has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, whereas molecules mediating the toxicity are currently not known. We identified a novel molecule named multiple α-helix protein located at ER (Maxer) downregulated by mutant ataxin-1 (Atx1) in Bergmann glia. Maxer is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein interacting with CDK5RAP3. Maxer anchors CDK5RAP3 to the ER and inhibits its function of Cyclin D1 transcription repression in the nucleus. The loss of Maxer eventually induces cell accumulation at G1 phase. It was also shown that mutant Atx1 represses Maxer and inhibits proliferation of Bergmann glia in vitro. Consistently, Bergmann glia are reduced in the cerebellum of mutant Atx1 knockin mice before onset. Glutamate-aspartate transporter reduction in Bergmann glia by mutant Atx1 and vulnerability of Purkinje cell to glutamate are both strengthened by Maxer knockdown in Bergmann glia, whereas Maxer overexpression rescues them. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of Maxer mediates functional deficiency of Bergmann glia, and might contribute to the non-cell-autonomous pathology of SCA1. PMID:20531390

  3. Suppression of the novel ER protein Maxer by mutant ataxin-1 in Bergman glia contributes to non-cell-autonomous toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Tamura, Takuya; Sone, Masaki; Ogishima, Soichi; Watase, Kei; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2010-07-21

    Non-cell-autonomous effect of mutant proteins expressed in glia has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, whereas molecules mediating the toxicity are currently not known. We identified a novel molecule named multiple alpha-helix protein located at ER (Maxer) downregulated by mutant ataxin-1 (Atx1) in Bergmann glia. Maxer is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein interacting with CDK5RAP3. Maxer anchors CDK5RAP3 to the ER and inhibits its function of Cyclin D1 transcription repression in the nucleus. The loss of Maxer eventually induces cell accumulation at G1 phase. It was also shown that mutant Atx1 represses Maxer and inhibits proliferation of Bergmann glia in vitro. Consistently, Bergmann glia are reduced in the cerebellum of mutant Atx1 knockin mice before onset. Glutamate-aspartate transporter reduction in Bergmann glia by mutant Atx1 and vulnerability of Purkinje cell to glutamate are both strengthened by Maxer knockdown in Bergmann glia, whereas Maxer overexpression rescues them. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of Maxer mediates functional deficiency of Bergmann glia, and might contribute to the non-cell-autonomous pathology of SCA1.

  4. Active photosynthesis in cyanobacterial mutants with directed modifications in the ligands for two iron-sulfur clusters on the PsaC protein of photosystem I.

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, R M; He, W Z; Metzger, S U; Whitmarsh, J; Malkin, R; Pakrasi, H B

    1996-01-01

    The PsaC protein of the Photosystem I (PSI) complex in thylakoid membranes coordinates two [4Fe-4S] clusters, FA and FB. Although it is known that PsaC participates in electron transfer to ferredoxin, the pathway of electrons through this protein is unknown. To elucidate the roles of FA and FB, we created two site-directed mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. In one mutant, cysteine 13, a ligand for FB was replaced by an aspartic acid (C13D); in the other mutant, cysteine 50, a ligand for FA was modified similarly (C50D). Low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance studies demonstrated that the C50D mutant has a normal FB center and a modified FA center. In contrast, the C13D strain has normal FA, but failed to reveal any signal from FB. Room-temperature optical studies showed that C13D has only one functional electron acceptor in PsaC, whereas two such acceptors are functional in the C50D and wild-type strains. Although both mutants grow under photoautotrophic conditions, the rate of PSI-mediated electron transfer in C13D under low light levels is about half that of C50D or wild type. These data show that (i) FB is not essential for the assembly of the PsaC protein in PSI and (ii) FB is not absolutely required for electron transfer from the PSI reaction center to ferredoxin. PMID:8617228

  5. An Arabidopsis mutant able to green after extended dark periods shows decreased transcripts of seed protein genes and altered sensitivity to abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Mun-Kit; Sullivan, James A.; Theobald, Julian C.; Davies, William J.; Gray, John C.

    2008-01-01

    An Arabidopsis mutant showing an altered ability to green on illumination after extended periods of darkness has been isolated in a screen for genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Following illumination for 24 h, 10-day-old dark-grown mutant seedlings accumulated five times more chlorophyll than wild-type seedlings and this was correlated with differences in plastid morphology observed by transmission electron microscopy. The mutant has been named greening after extended darkness 1 (ged1). Microarray analysis showed much lower amounts of transcripts of genes encoding seed storage proteins, oleosins, and late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins in 7-day-old seedlings of ged1 compared with the wild type. RNA gel-blot analyses confirmed very low levels of transcripts of seed protein genes in ged1 seedlings grown for 2–10 d in the dark, and showed higher amounts of transcripts of photosynthesis-related genes in illuminated 10-day-old dark-grown ged1 seedlings compared with the wild type. Consensus elements similar to abscisic acid (ABA) response elements (ABREs) were detected in the upstream regions of all genes highly affected in ged1. Germination of ged1 seeds was hypersensitive to ABA, although no differences in ABA content were detected in 7-day-old seedlings. This suggests the mutant may have an altered responsiveness to ABA, affecting expression of ABA-responsive genes and plastid development during extended darkness. PMID:18931353

  6. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  7. The role of cavities in protein dynamics: crystal structure of a photolytic intermediate of a mutant myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Brunori, M; Vallone, B; Cutruzzola, F; Travaglini-Allocatelli, C; Berendzen, J; Chu, K; Sweet, R M; Schlichting, I

    2000-02-29

    We determined the structure of the photolytic intermediate of a sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant called Mb-YQR [Leu-(B10)-->Tyr; His(E7)-->Gln; Thr(E10)-->Arg] to 1.4-A resolution by ultra-low temperature (20 K) x-ray diffraction. Starting with the CO complex, illumination leads to photolysis of the Fe-CO bond, and migration of the photolyzed carbon monoxide (CO*) to a niche in the protein 8.1 A from the heme iron; this cavity corresponds to that hosting an atom of Xe when the crystal is equilibrated with xenon gas at 7 atmospheres [Tilton, R. F., Jr., Kuntz, I. D. & Petsko, G. A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2849-2857]. The site occupied by CO* corresponds to that predicted by molecular dynamics simulations previously carried out to account for the NO geminate rebinding of Mb-YQR observed in laser photolysis experiments at room temperature. This secondary docking site differs from the primary docking site identified by previous crystallographic studies on the photolyzed intermediate of wild-type sperm whale Mb performed at cryogenic temperatures [Teng et al. (1994) Nat. Struct. Biol. 1, 701-705] and room temperature [Srajer et al. (1996) Science 274, 1726-1729]. Our experiment shows that the pathway of a small molecule in its trajectory through a protein may be modified by site-directed mutagenesis, and that migration within the protein matrix to the active site involves a limited number of pre-existing cavities identified in the interior space of the protein.

  8. Release of the repressive activity of rice DELLA protein SLR1 by gibberellin does not require SLR1 degradation in the gid2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Hirano, Ko; Hasegawa, Yasuko; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2008-09-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) DELLA protein SLR1 acts as a repressor of gibberellin (GA) signaling. GA perception by GID1 causes SLR1 protein degradation involving the F-box protein GID2; this triggers GA-associated responses such as shoot elongation and seed germination. In GA-insensitive and GA biosynthesis mutants, SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1) accumulates to high levels, and the severity of dwarfism is usually correlated with the level of SLR1 accumulation. An exception is the GA-insensitive F-box mutant gid2, which shows milder dwarfism than mutants such as gid1 and cps even though it accumulates higher levels of SLR1. The level of SLR1 protein in gid2 was decreased by loss of GID1 function or treatment with a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, and dwarfism was enhanced. Conversely, overproduction of GID1 or treatment with GA(3) increased the SLR1 level in gid2 and reduced dwarfism. These results indicate that derepression of SLR1 repressive activity can be accomplished by GA and GID1 alone and does not require F-box (GID2) function. Evidence for GA signaling without GID2 was also provided by the expression behavior of GA-regulated genes such as GA-20oxidase1, GID1, and SLR1 in the gid2 mutant. Based on these observations, we propose a model for the release of GA suppression that does not require DELLA protein degradation.

  9. Functional characterization of Escherichia coli GlpG and additional rhomboid proteins using an aarA mutant of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Clemmer, Katy M; Sturgill, Gwen M; Veenstra, Alexander; Rather, Philip N

    2006-05-01

    The Providencia stuartii AarA protein is a member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases and required for the production of an extracellular signaling molecule that regulates cellular functions including peptidoglycan acetylation, methionine transport, and cysteine biosynthesis. Additional aarA-dependent phenotypes include (i) loss of an extracellular yellow pigment, (ii) inability to grow on MacConkey agar, and (iii) abnormal cell division. Since these phenotypes are easily assayed, the P. stuartii aarA mutant serves as a useful host system to investigate rhomboid function. The Escherichia coli GlpG protein was shown to be functionally similar to AarA and rescued the above aarA-dependent phenotypes in P. stuartii. GlpG proteins containing single alanine substitutions at the highly conserved catalytic triad of asparagine (N154A), serine (S201A), or histidine (H254A) residues were nonfunctional. The P. stuartii aarA mutant was also used as a biosensor to demonstrate that proteins from a variety of diverse sources exhibited rhomboid activity. In an effort to further investigate the role of a rhomboid protein in cell physiology, a glpG mutant of E. coli was constructed. In phenotype microarray experiments, the glpG mutant exhibited a slight increase in resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotic cefotaxime.

  10. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases.

  11. Piperlongumine exerts cytotoxic effects against cancer cells with mutant p53 proteins at least in part by restoring the biological functions of the tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Basak, Debasish; Punganuru, Surendra R; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S

    2016-04-01

    Piperlongumine (PL), a small molecule alkaloid present in black pepper (Piper longum), has been reported to kill tumor cells irrespective of their p53 gene status, however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Since p53 is a redox-sensitive protein, we hypothesized that the redox imbalance induced by PL may affect the structure and/or function of the mutant p53 protein and promote cell death. We used two human colon cancer cell lines, the HT29 and SW620 which harbor the R273H DNA contact abrogatory mutation in p53. PL treatment induced significant ROS production and protein glutathionylation with a concomitant increase in Nrf-2 expression in both cell lines. Surprisingly, immunoprecipitation with wt-p53 specific antibodies (PAb1620) or direct western blotting showed a progressive generation of wild-type-like p53 protein along with a loss of its mutant counterpart in PL-treated HT29 and SW620 cells. Moreover, the EMSA and DNA-affinity blotting revealed a time-dependent restoration of DNA-binding for the mutant p53, which was accompanied by the induction of p53 target genes, MDM2 and Bax. PL, while cytotoxic by itself, also increased the cell killing by many anticancer drugs. In nude mice bearing the HT29 tumors, PL alone (7.5 mg/kg daily) produced a 40% decrease in tumor volume, which was accompanied by diminished intratumoral mutant p53 protein levels. The antitumor efficacy of BCNU or doxorubicin in HT29 xenografts was highly potentiated by PL, followed by expression of apoptotic proteins. These clinically-relevant findings suggest that PL-induced oxidative milieu facilitates a weak functional restoration of mutant p53 through protein glutathionylation and contributes to the increased drug sensitivity.

  12. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Rossom, Sofie; Op de Beeck, Ken; Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin; Schepers, Anne; Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina; Van Camp, Guy; Winderickx, Joris

    2012-01-01

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2-6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  13. Opposing effects of cancer-type-specific SPOP mutants on BET protein degradation and sensitivity to BET inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Janouskova, Hana; El Tekle, Geniver; Bellini, Elisa; Udeshi, Namrata D; Rinaldi, Anna; Ulbricht, Anna; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Civenni, Gianluca; Losa, Marco; Svinkina, Tanya; Bielski, Craig M; Kryukov, Gregory V; Cascione, Luciano; Napoli, Sara; Enchev, Radoslav I; Mutch, David G; Carney, Michael E; Berchuck, Andrew; Winterhoff, Boris J N; Broaddus, Russell R; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Bertoni, Francesco; Catapano, Carlo V; Peter, Matthias; Carr, Steven A; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe P

    2017-08-14

    It is generally assumed that recurrent mutations within a given cancer driver gene elicit similar drug responses. Cancer genome studies have identified recurrent but divergent missense mutations affecting the substrate-recognition domain of the ubiquitin ligase adaptor SPOP in endometrial and prostate cancers. The therapeutic implications of these mutations remain incompletely understood. Here we analyzed changes in the ubiquitin landscape induced by endometrial cancer-associated SPOP mutations and identified BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 proteins (BETs) as SPOP-CUL3 substrates that are preferentially degraded by endometrial cancer-associated SPOP mutants. The resulting reduction of BET protein levels sensitized cancer cells to BET inhibitors. Conversely, prostate cancer-specific SPOP mutations resulted in impaired degradation of BETs, promoting their resistance to pharmacologic inhibition. These results uncover an oncogenomics paradox, whereby mutations mapping to the same domain evoke opposing drug susceptibilities. Specifically, we provide a molecular rationale for the use of BET inhibitors to treat patients with endometrial but not prostate cancer who harbor SPOP mutations.

  14. Pathology associated memory deficits in Swedish mutant genome-based amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hock, Brian J; Lattal, K Matthew; Kulnane, Laura Shapiro; Abel, Ted; Lamb, Bruce T

    2009-12-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between pathological alterations and memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic animal models have been generated containing familial AD mutations. The most commonly utilized method involves a cDNA-based approach, utilizing heterologous promoters to drive expression of specific APP isoforms. As a result of the assumptions inherent in the design of each model, the different cDNA-based transgenic mouse models have revealed different relationships between the biochemical, pathological and behavioral alterations observed in these models. Here we provide further characterization of a genomic-based, amyloid precursor protein yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of AD, R1.40, that makes few assumptions regarding disease pathogenesis to study the relationship between brain pathology and altered behavior. Aged R1.40 transgenic and control mice were tested for learning and memory in the Morris water maze and for working memory in the Y maze. Results from the water maze demonstrated intact learning in the both control and R1.40 mice, but impairments in the long-term retention of this information in the transgenic mice, but not controls. Interestingly, however, long-term memory deficits did not correlate with the presence of Abeta deposits within the group of animals examined. By contrast, age-related working memory impairments were also observed in the Y maze in the R1.40 mice, and these deficits correlated with the presence of Abeta deposits. Our results demonstrate unique behavioral alterations in the R1.40 mouse model of AD that are likely both dependent and independent of Abeta deposition.

  15. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongping; Li, Dongsheng; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lor, Mary; Rustanti, Lina; Cloonan, Nicole; Wani, Shivangi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein by the eEF1α promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JQ1 had no effect, while suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) modestly stimulated virus production but at levels 300-fold lower than those seen in HIV-1-infected Jurkat-ZSG1 cells. Virus replication was not recovered by coculture of HIV-1-infected Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells with uninfected Jurkat cells. Latently infected Jurkat latent 6.3 and ACH2 cells treated with latency-reversing agents produced measurable viral capsid (CA), but little or none was made when they expressed NB-ZSG1. When Jurkat cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were transduced with lentiviral virus-like particles conveying NB-ZSG1, a >3-log reduction in CA production was observed. Addition of PMA increased virus CA production but at levels 500-fold lower than those seen in nontransduced Jurkat cells. Transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed that HIV-1 mRNA was strongly inhibited by NB-ZSG1 but indicated that full-length viral mRNA was made. Analysis of HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells expressing NB-ZSG1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that recruitment of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation were inhibited. The reduction of HIV-1 promoter-associated RNAPII and epigenetic changes in viral nucleosomes indicate that Nullbasic can inhibit HIV-1 replication by enforcing viral silencing in cells. PMID:27381288

  16. Isolation of timeless by PER protein interaction: defective interaction between timeless protein and long-period mutant PERL.

    PubMed

    Gekakis, N; Saez, L; Delahaye-Brown, A M; Myers, M P; Sehgal, A; Young, M W; Weitz, C J

    1995-11-03

    The period (per) gene likely encodes a component of the Drosophila circadian clock. Circadian oscillations in the abundance of per messenger RNA and per protein (PER) are thought to arise from negative feedback control of per gene transcription by PER. A recently identified second clock locus, timeless (tim), apparently regulates entry of PER into the nucleus. Reported here are the cloning of complementary DNAs derived from the tim gene in a two-hybrid screen for PER-interacting proteins and the demonstration of a physical interaction between the tim protein (TIM) and PER in vitro. A restricted segment of TIM binds directly to a part of the PER dimerization domain PAS. PERL, a mutation that causes a temperature-sensitive lengthening of circadian period and a temperature-sensitive delay in PER nuclear entry, exhibits a temperature-sensitive defect in binding to TIM. These results suggest that the interaction between TIM and PER determines the timing of PER nuclear entry and therefore the duration of part of the circadian cycle.

  17. Transformation-defective mutant of avian myeloblastosis virus that is temperature sensitive for production of transforming protein p45v-myb.

    PubMed Central

    Moscovici, M G; Klempnauer, K H; Symonds, G; Bishop, J M; Moscovici, C

    1985-01-01

    We have characterized a mutant of avian myeloblastosis virus (strain GA907/7) that shows a reduced capacity to transform myelomonocytic cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Myeloblasts transformed by this mutant suffer a substantial decrease in the amount of the transforming protein p45v-myb when shifted from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature. We presume that the 5- to 10-fold decrease in the amount of p45v-myb causes the loss of the transformed phenotype. The decrease is due to a reduction in the level of v-myb mRNA. Mutant GA907/7 thus provides genetic evidence that p45v-myb is the transforming protein of avian myeloblastosis virus and apparently represents an unusual defect in the production or stability of mRNA. Images PMID:3018515

  18. A MUTANT PRION PROTEIN SENSITIZES NEURONS TO GLUTAMATE-INDUCED EXCITOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Biasini, Emiliano; Unterberger, Ursula; Solomon, Isaac H.; Massignan, Tania; Senatore, Assunta; Bian, Hejiao; Voigtlaender, Till; Bowman, Frederick P.; Bonetto, Valentina; Chiesa, Roberto; Luebke, Jennifer; Toselli, Paul; Harris, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a physiological activity of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) plays a crucial role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including prion and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, how the functional activity of PrPC is subverted to deliver neurotoxic signals remains uncertain. Transgenic mice expressing PrP with a deletion of residues 105–125 in the central region (referred to as ΔCR PrP) provide important insights into this problem. Tg(ΔCR) mice exhibit neonatal lethality and massive degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons, a phenotype that is dose-dependently suppressed by the presence of wild-type PrP. When expressed in cultured cells, ΔCR PrP induces large, ionic currents that can be detected by patch-clamping techniques. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that abnormal ion channel activity underlies the neuronal death seen in Tg(ΔCR) mice. We find that ΔCR PrP induces abnormal ionic currents in neurons in culture and in cerebellar slices, and that this activity sensitizes the neurons to glutamate-induced, calcium-mediated death. In combination with ultrastructural and biochemical analyses, these results demonstrate a role for glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in PrP-mediated neurodegeneration. A similar mechanism may operate in other neurodegenerative disorders due to toxic, β-rich oligomers that bind to PrPC. PMID:23392670

  19. A mutant prion protein sensitizes neurons to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Biasini, Emiliano; Unterberger, Ursula; Solomon, Isaac H; Massignan, Tania; Senatore, Assunta; Bian, Hejiao; Voigtlaender, Till; Bowman, Frederick P; Bonetto, Valentina; Chiesa, Roberto; Luebke, Jennifer; Toselli, Paul; Harris, David A

    2013-02-06

    Growing evidence suggests that a physiological activity of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) plays a crucial role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including prion and Alzheimer's diseases. However, how the functional activity of PrP(C) is subverted to deliver neurotoxic signals remains uncertain. Transgenic (Tg) mice expressing PrP with a deletion of residues 105-125 in the central region (referred to as ΔCR PrP) provide important insights into this problem. Tg(ΔCR) mice exhibit neonatal lethality and massive degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons, a phenotype that is dose dependently suppressed by the presence of wild-type PrP. When expressed in cultured cells, ΔCR PrP induces large, ionic currents that can be detected by patch-clamping techniques. Here, we tested the hypothesis that abnormal ion channel activity underlies the neuronal death seen in Tg(ΔCR) mice. We find that ΔCR PrP induces abnormal ionic currents in neurons in culture and in cerebellar slices and that this activity sensitizes the neurons to glutamate-induced, calcium-mediated death. In combination with ultrastructural and biochemical analyses, these results demonstrate a role for glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in PrP-mediated neurodegeneration. A similar mechanism may operate in other neurodegenerative disorders attributable to toxic, β-rich oligomers that bind to PrP(C).

  20. Rapamycin reverses cellular phenotypes and enhances mutant protein clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kan; Graziotto, John J; Blair, Cecilia D; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Erdos, Michael R; Krainc, Dimitri; Collins, Francis S

    2011-06-29

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging. HGPS is most commonly caused by a de novo single-nucleotide substitution in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that partially activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, producing an abnormal lamin A protein termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin in dividing cells adversely affects the integrity of the nuclear scaffold and leads to nuclear blebbing in cultured cells. Progerin is also produced in normal cells, increasing in abundance as senescence approaches. Here, we report the effect of rapamycin, a macrolide antibiotic that has been implicated in slowing cellular and organismal aging, on the cellular phenotypes of HGPS fibroblasts. Treatment with rapamycin abolished nuclear blebbing, delayed the onset of cellular senescence, and enhanced the degradation of progerin in HGPS cells. Rapamycin also decreased the formation of insoluble progerin aggregates and induced clearance through autophagic mechanisms in normal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest an additional mechanism for the beneficial effects of rapamycin on longevity and encourage the hypothesis that rapamycin treatment could provide clinical benefit for children with HGPS.

  1. Alterations in Gene Expression in Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Lacking Niemann-Pick Type C1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Mahua; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer’s disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-derived β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg) mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet), Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and APP

  2. Mini-F plasmid mutants able to replicate in the absence of sigma 32: mutations in the repE coding region producing hyperactive initiator protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Y; Wada, C; Yura, T

    1991-01-01

    Mini-F plasmids cannot replicate in Escherichia coli strains (delta rpoH) lacking sigma 32, presumably because transcription of the repE gene encoding the replication initiator protein (RepE protein) depends mostly on RNA polymerase containing sigma 32. We have isolated and characterized mini-F mutants able to replicate in delta rpoH cells. Contrary to the initial expectation, five mutants with mutations in the repE coding region that produce altered RepE proteins were obtained. The mutations caused replacement of a single amino acid: the 92nd glutamic acid was replaced by lysine (repE10, repE16, and repE25) or glycine (repE22) or the 109th glutamic acid was replaced by lysine (repE26). These plasmids overproduced RepE protein and exhibited very high copy numbers. Two major activities of mutated RepE proteins have been determined in vivo; the autogenous repressor activity was significantly reduced, whereas the initiator activity was much enhanced in all mutants. These results indicate the importance of a small central region of RepE protein for both initiator and repressor activities. Thus the decreased repE transcription in delta rpoH cells can be compensated for by an increased initiator activity and a decreased repressor activity of RepE, resulting in the increased synthesis of hyperactive RepE protein. Images PMID:1991708

  3. The cold sensitivity of a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 is suppressed by loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Schilke, B; Forster, J; Davis, J; James, P; Walter, W; Laloraya, S; Johnson, J; Miao, B; Craig, E

    1996-08-01

    SSH1, a newly identified member of the heat shock protein (hsp70) multigene family of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a protein localized to the mitochondrial matrix. Deletion of the SSH1 gene results in extremely slow growth at 23 degrees C or 30 degrees C, but nearly wild-type growth at 37 degrees C. The matrix of the mitochondria contains another hsp70, Ssc1, which is essential for growth and required for translocation of proteins into mitochondria. Unlike SSC1 mutants, an SSH1 mutant showed no detectable defects in import of several proteins from the cytosol to the matrix compared to wild type. Increased expression of Ssc1 partially suppressed the cold-sensitive growth defect of the SSH1 mutant, suggesting that when present in increased amounts, Ssc1 can at least partially carry out the normal functions of Ssh1. Spontaneous suppressors of the cold-sensitive phenotype of an SSH1 null mutant were obtained at a high frequency at 23 degrees C, and were all found to be respiration deficient. 15 of 16 suppressors that were analyzed lacked mitochondrial DNA, while the 16th had reduced amounts. We suggest that Ssh1 is required for normal mitochondrial DNA replication, and that disruption of this process in ssh1 cells results in a defect in mitochondrial function at low temperatures.

  4. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as “spa-types”, based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as “non-typeable”. Results We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated “non-typeable” using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. Conclusions This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments. PMID:24621342

  5. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire.

    PubMed

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Fung, Rowena; Miller, Ruth R; Knox, Kyle; Godwin, Heather; Wyllie, David H; Bowden, Rory; Crook, Derrick W; Walker, A Sarah

    2014-03-12

    Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as "spa-types", based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as "non-typeable". We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated "non-typeable" using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments.

  6. Resonance assignments of the myristoylated Y28F/Y67F mutant of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hrabal, Richard; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    The matrix protein (MA) of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) plays a key role in the transport and budding of immature retroviral particles from the host cell. Natural N-terminal myristoylation of MA is essential for the targeting of the particles to the plasma membrane and participates in the interaction of MA with membranes phospholipids. The mutation Y28F/Y67F in MA reduces budding and thus causes the accumulation of viral particles under the cytoplasmic membrane. To investigate the impact of Y28F/Y67F mutation on the structure of MA, we prepared this protein in amount and quality suitable for NMR spectroscopy. We report backbone, side-chain and myristoyl residue assignments of the Y28F/Y67F mutant of the M-PMV matrix protein, which will be used to study the interaction with membrane phospholipids and to determine the structure of the mutant matrix protein.

  7. Structural analysis of site-directed mutants of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II addresses the relationship between structural integrity and ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Vaezeslami, Soheila; Jia, Xiaofei; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H.

    2009-09-02

    The structural integrity of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII) has been investigated using the crystal structures of CRABPII mutants. The overall fold was well maintained by these CRABPII mutants, each of which carried multiple different mutations. A water-mediated network is found to be present across the large binding cavity, extending from Arg111 deep inside the cavity to the {alpha} 2 helix at its entrance. This chain of interactions acts as a 'pillar' that maintains the integrity of the protein. The disruption of the water network upon loss of Arg111 leads to decreased structural integrity of the protein. A water-mediated network can be re-established by introducing the hydrophilic Glu121 inside the cavity, which results in a rigid protein with the {alpha}2 helix adopting an altered conformation compared with wild-type CRABPII.

  8. Comparisons of protein, lipid, phenolics, γ-oryzanol, vitamin E, and mineral contents in bran layer of sodium azide-induced red rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Toong Long; Ho, Pei Tzu; Shih, Yi Ju; Lai, Chia Chi; Wu, Min Tze; Sung, Jih Min

    2011-06-01

    The bran part of red rice grain is concentrated with many phytochemicals, including proanthocyanidins, oryzanol and vitamin E, that exert beneficial effects on human health, but it contains low levels of essential minerals such as Fe and Zn. In the present study, the protein, lipid, phytochemicals and mineral contents in bran samples were compared among red rice SA-586 and its NaN₃-induced mutants. The plant heights of NaN₃-induced mutants were decreased. The contents of protein, lipid, total phenolics, total flavonoids, total anthocyanins, total proanthocyanidins, total γ-oryzanol, total tocopherols and total tocotrienols also varied among the tested mutants. The brans of mutants M-18, M-56 and M-50 contained more proanthocyanidins, γ-oryzanol, vitamin E than that of SA-586, respectively. M-54 accumulated more Fe content (588.7 mg kg⁻¹ bran dry weight) than SA-586 (100.1 mg kg⁻¹ bran dry weight). The brans of M-18, M-50 and M-56 are good sources of proanthocyanidins, vitamin E and γ-oryzanol, respectively, while the bran of M-54 is rich in Fe. Thus these mutants could be used to produce high-value phytochemicals or Fe byproducts from bran during rice grain milling or as genetic resources for rice improvement programs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Detection of receptor ligands by monitoring selective stabilization of a Renilla luciferase-tagged, constitutively active mutant, G-protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Douglas; Bevan, Nicola; Rees, Stephen; Milligan, Graeme

    2001-01-01

    The wild-type β2-adrenoceptor and a constitutively active mutant of this receptor were C-terminally tagged with luciferase from the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. C-terminal addition of Renilla luciferase did not substantially alter the levels of expression of either form of the receptor, the elevated constitutive activity of the mutant β2-adrenoceptor nor the capacity of isoprenaline to elevate cyclic AMP levels in intact cells expressing these constructs. Treatment of cells expressing constitutively active mutant β2-adrenoceptor-Renilla luciferase with antagonist/inverse agonist ligands resulted in upregulation of levels of this polypeptide which could be monitored by the elevated luciferase activity. The pEC50 for ligand-induced luciferase upregulation and ligand affinity to bind the receptor were highly correlated. Similar upregulation could be observed following sustained treatment with agonist ligands. These effects were only observed at a constitutively active mutant of the β2-adrenoceptor. Co-expression of the wild-type β2-adrenoceptor C-terminally tagged with the luciferase from Photinus pyralis did not result in ligand-induced upregulation of the levels of activity of this luciferase. Co-expression of the constitutively active mutant β2-adrenoceptor-Renilla luciferase and an equivalent mutant of the α1b-adrenoceptor C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein allowed pharmacological selectivity of adrenoceptor antagonists to be demonstrated. This approach offers a sensitive and convenient means, which is amenable to high throughput analysis, to monitor ligand binding to a constitutively active mutant receptor. As no prior knowledge of receptor ligands is required this approach may be suitable to identify ligands at orphan G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:11350868

  10. Location of functional regions of the Escherichia coli RecA protein by DNA sequence analysis of RecA protease-constitutive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W B; Tessman, E S

    1986-01-01

    In previous work (E. S. Tessman and P. K. Peterson, J. Bacteriol. 163:677-687 and 688-695, 1985), we isolated many novel protease-constitutive (Prtc) recA mutants, i.e., mutants in which the RecA protein was always in the protease state without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Most Prtc mutants were recombinase positive and were designated Prtc Rec+; only a few Prtc mutants were recombinase negative, and those were designated Prtc Rec-. We report changes in DNA sequence of the recA gene for several of these mutants. The mutational changes clustered at three regions on the linear RecA polypeptide. Region 1 includes amino acid residues 25 through 39, region 2 includes amino acid residues 157 through 184, and region 3 includes amino acid residues 298 through 301. The in vivo response of these Prtc mutants to different effectors suggests that the RecA effector-binding sites have been altered. In particular we propose that the mutations may define single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains of RecA, that polypeptide regions 1 and 3 comprise part of the single-stranded DNA-binding domain, and that polypeptide regions 2 and 3 comprise part of the nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain. The overlapping of single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains in region 3 can explain previously known complex allosteric effects. Each of four Prtc Rec- mutants sequenced was found to contain a single amino acid change, showing that the change of just one amino acid can affect both the protease and recombinase activities and indicating that the functional domains for these two activities of RecA overlap. A recA promoter-down mutation was isolated by its ability to suppress the RecA protease activity of one of our strong Prtc mutants. PMID:3536864

  11. The Structure of a Mutant Insulin Uncouples Receptor Binding from Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhu-li; Huang, Kun; Hu, Shi-Quan; Whittaker, Jonathan; Weiss, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The zinc insulin hexamer undergoes allosteric reorganization among three conformational states, designated T6, \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{T}}_{3}{\\mathrm{R}}_{3}^{{\\mathrm{f}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}, and R6. Although the free monomer in solution (the active species) resembles the classical T-state, an R-like conformational change is proposed to occur upon receptor binding. Here, we distinguish between the conformational requirements of receptor binding and the crystallographic TR transition by design of an active variant refractory to such reorganization. Our strategy exploits the contrasting environments of HisB5 in wild-type structures: on the T6 surface but within an intersubunit crevice in R-containing hexamers. The TR transition is associated with a marked reduction in HisB5 pKa, in turn predicting that a positive charge at this site would destabilize the R-specific crevice. Remarkably, substitution of HisB5 (conserved among eutherian mammals) by Arg (occasionally observed among other vertebrates) blocks the TR transition, as probed in solution by optical spectroscopy. Similarly, crystallization of ArgB5-insulin in the presence of phenol (ordinarily a potent inducer of the TR transition) yields T6 hexamers rather than R6 as obtained in control studies of wild-type insulin. The variant structure, determined at a resolution of 1.3Å, closely resembles the wild-type T6 hexamer. Whereas ArgB5 is exposed on the protein surface, its side chain participates in a solvent-stabilized network of contacts similar to those involving HisB5 in wild-type T-states. The substantial receptor-binding activity of ArgB5-insulin (40% relative to wild type) demonstrates that the function of an insulin

  12. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  13. Structures and free energy landscapes of the wild-type and A30P mutant-type α-synuclein proteins with dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wise-Scira, Olivia; Aloglu, Ahmet Kemal; Dunn, Aquila; Sakallioglu, Isin Tuna; Coskuner, Orkid

    2013-03-20

    The genetic missense A30P mutation of the wild-type α-synuclein protein results in the replacement of the 30th amino acid residue from alanine (Ala) to proline (Pro) and was initially found in the members of a German family who developed Parkinson's disease. Even though the structures of these proteins have been measured before, detailed understanding about the structures and their relationships with free energy landscapes is lacking, which is of interest to provide insights into the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease. We report the secondary and tertiary structures and conformational free energy landscapes of the wild-type and A30P mutant-type α-synuclein proteins in an aqueous solution environment via extensive parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, we present the residual secondary structure component transition stabilities at the atomic level with dynamics in terms of free energy change calculations using a new strategy that we reported most recently. Our studies yield new interesting results; for instance, we find that the A30P mutation has local as well as long-range effects on the structural properties of the wild-type α-synuclein protein. The helical content at Ala18-Gly31 is less prominent in comparison to the wild-type α-synuclein protein. The β-sheet structure abundance decreases in the N-terminal region upon A30P mutation of the wild-type α-synuclein, whereas the NAC and C-terminal regions possess larger tendencies for β-sheet structure formation. Long-range intramolecular protein interactions are less abundant upon A30P mutation, especially between the NAC and C-terminal regions, which is linked to the less compact and less stable structures of the A30P mutant-type rather than the wild-type α-synuclein protein. Results including the usage of our new strategy for secondary structure transition stabilities show that the A30P mutant-type α-synuclein tendency toward

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed genes and proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking chloroplastic 1 and cytosolic FBPases reveals several levels of metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Soto-Suárez, Mauricio; Serrato, Antonio J; Rojas-González, José A; Bautista, Rocío; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2016-12-01

    During the photosynthesis, two isoforms of the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), the chloroplastidial (cFBP1) and the cytosolic (cyFBP), catalyse the first irreversible step during the conversion of triose phosphates (TP) to starch or sucrose, respectively. Deficiency in cyFBP and cFBP1 isoforms provokes an imbalance of the starch/sucrose ratio, causing a dramatic effect on plant development when the plastidial enzyme is lacking. We study the correlation between the transcriptome and proteome profile in rosettes and roots when cFBP1 or cyFBP genes are disrupted in Arabidopsis thaliana knock-out mutants. By using a 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing the genome of Arabidopsis we were able to identify 1067 and 1243 genes whose expressions are altered in the rosettes and roots of the cfbp1 mutant respectively; whilst in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant 1068 and 1079 genes are being up- or down-regulated respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR validated 100% of a set of 14 selected genes differentially expressed according to our microarray analysis. Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis revealed quantitative differences in 36 and 26 proteins regulated in rosettes and roots of cfbp1, respectively, whereas the 18 and 48 others were regulated in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant, respectively. The genes differentially expressed and the proteins more or less abundant revealed changes in protein metabolism, RNA regulation, cell signalling and organization, carbon metabolism, redox regulation, and transport together with biotic and abiotic stress. Notably, a significant set (25%) of the proteins identified were also found to be regulated at a transcriptional level. This transcriptomic and proteomic analysis is the first comprehensive and comparative study of the gene/protein re-adjustment that occurs in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs of Arabidopsis mutants lacking FBPase isoforms.

  15. Reduced Sweetness of a Monellin (MNEI) Mutant Results from Increased Protein Flexibility and Disruption of a Distant Poly-(L-Proline) II Helix

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Catherine M.; Ostovar pour, Saeideh; Hobbs, Jeanette R.; Blanch, Ewan W.; Munger, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Monellin is a highly potent sweet-tasting protein but relatively little is known about how it interacts with the sweet taste receptor. We determined X-ray crystal structures of 3 single-chain monellin (MNEI) proteins with alterations at 2 core residues (G16A, V37A, and G16A/V37A) that induce 2- to 10-fold reductions in sweetness relative to the wild-type protein. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the global protein fold or the positions of surface amino acids important for MNEI sweetness that could explain these differences in protein activity. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that while the thermal stability of each mutant MNEI was reduced, the least sweet mutant, G16A-MNEI, was not the least stable protein. In contrast, solution spectroscopic measurements revealed that changes in protein flexibility and the C-terminal structure correlate directly with protein activity. G16A mutation-induced disorder in the protein core is propagated via changes to hydrophobic interactions that disrupt the formation and/or position of a critical C-terminal poly-(L-proline) II helix. These findings suggest that MNEI interaction with the sweet taste receptor is highly sensitive to the relative positions of key residues across its protein surface and that loss of sweetness in G16A-MNEI may result from an increased entropic cost of binding. PMID:21343241

  16. Computational diagnosis of protein conformational diseases: short molecular dynamics simulations reveal a fast unfolding of r-LDL mutants that cause familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-López, S; Falo, F; Sancho, J

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of conformational diseases frequently resides in mutant proteins constituting a subset of the vast mutational space. While the subtleties of protein structure point to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques as promising tools for an efficient exploration of such a space, the average size of proteins and the time scale of unfolding events make this goal difficult with present computational capabilities. We show here, nevertheless, that an efficient approach is already feasible for modular proteins. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a conformational disease linked to mutations in the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor. A high percentage of these mutations has been found in the seven small modular binding repeats of the receptor. Taking advantage of its small size, we have performed an in depth MD study of the fifth binding repeat. Fast unfolding dynamics have been observed in the absence of a structural bound calcium ion, which agrees with its reported essential role in the stability of the module. In addition, several mutations detected in FH patients have been analyzed, starting from the native conformation. Our results indicate that in contrast with the wild type protein and an innocuous control mutant, disease-related mutants experience, in short simulation times (2-8 ns), gross departures from the native state that lead to unfolded conformations and, in some cases, to binding site desorganization deriving in calcium release. Computational diagnosis of mutations leading to conformational diseases seems thus feasible, at least for small or modular pathogenic proteins.

  17. Blue-light mediated accumulation of nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for proteins of the thylakoid membrane is absent in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    PubMed

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E; Briggs, W R

    1989-08-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against pea phytochrome detect 2 protein bands (about 116 and 120 kDa) on blots of crude protein extracts and protein of microsomal preparations of dark-grown tomato seedlings. Both protein bands are undetectable in Western blots of the aurea mutant extracts. Neither protein band is detectable after isogenic wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light, either in the crude extract or in the membrane fraction of the irradiated seedlings; this result is consistent with the hypothesis that both bands are phytochrome. When dark-grown wild-type seedlings are illuminated with 3 h of red light or blue light against a red light background, the transcript levels for chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of photosystem I and II, plastocyanin, and the subunit II of photosystem I increase. In all cases, the same fluence rate of blue light is much more effective than red light alone, a result that indicates the involvement of a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor in addition to the involvement of the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome, Pfr. The aurea mutant responds neither to red light nor to blue light. Thus, no Pfr-independent induction of the four transcripts by a blue/UV-A light photoreceptor can be measured in the aurea mutant.

  18. Mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, disrupts the recruitment of SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy protein to nuclear Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Shingo; Re, Diane B; Jacquier, Arnaud; Nelson, Katelyn; Przedborski, Serge; Monani, Umrao R

    2012-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are among the most common motor neuron diseases to afflict the human population. A deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein causes SMA and is also reported to be an exacerbating factor in the development of ALS. However, pathways linking the two diseases have yet to be defined and it is not clear precisely how the pathology of ALS is aggravated by reduced SMN or whether mutant proteins underlying familial forms of ALS interfere with SMN-related biochemical pathways to exacerbate the neurodegenerative process. In this study, we show that mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), a cause of familial ALS, profoundly alters the sub-cellular localization of the SMN protein, preventing the formation of nuclear 'gems' by disrupting the recruitment of the protein to Cajal bodies. Overexpressing the SMN protein in mutant SOD1 mice, a model of familial ALS, alleviates this phenomenon, most likely in a cell-autonomous manner, and significantly mitigates the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and in culture dishes. In the mice, the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype is delayed and motor function enhanced, suggestive of a therapeutic benefit for ALS patients treated with agents that augment the SMN protein. Nevertheless, this finding is tempered by an inability to prolong survival, a limitation most likely imposed by the inexorable denervation that characterizes ALS and eventually disrupts the neuromuscular synapses even in the presence of increased SMN.

  19. Compensatory role of PspA, a member of the phage shock protein operon, in rpoE mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lynne A; Bang, Iel-Soo; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Fang, Ferric C

    2005-05-01

    Sigma(E) is an alternative sigma factor that responds to and ameliorates extracytoplasmic stress. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), sigma(E) is required for oxidative stress resistance, stationary-phase survival and virulence in mice. Microarray analysis of stationary-phase gene expression in rpoE mutant bacteria revealed a dramatic increase in expression of pspA, a member of the phage shock protein (psp) operon. The psp operon can be induced by filamentous bacteriophages or by perturbations of protein secretion, and is believed to facilitate the maintenance of proton motive force (PMF). We hypothesized that increased pspA expression may represent a compensatory response to the loss of sigma(E) function. Increased pspA expression was confirmed in rpoE mutant Salmonella and also observed in a mutant lacking the F(1)F(0) ATPase. Alternatively, expression of pspA could be induced by exposure to CCCP, a protonophore that disrupts PMF. An rpoE pspA double mutant strain was found to have a stationary-phase survival defect more pronounced than that of isogenic strains harbouring single mutations. The double mutant strains were also more susceptible to killing by CCCP or by a bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI)-derived anti-microbial peptide. Using fluorescence ratio imaging, differences were observed in the Deltapsi of wild-type and rpoE or pspA mutant bacteria. These findings suggest that pspA expression in S. Typhimurium is induced by alterations in PMF and a functional sigma(E) regulon is essential for the maintenance of PMF.

  20. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  1. Histone H3 Ser10 Phosphorylation-Independent Function of Snf1 and Reg1 Proteins Rescues a gcn5− Mutant in HIS3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Xinjing; Singh-Rodriguez, Soumya; Zhao, Yan; Kuo, Min-Hao

    2005-01-01

    Gcn5 protein is a prototypical histone acetyltransferase that controls transcription of multiple yeast genes. To identify molecular functions that act downstream of or in parallel with Gcn5 protein, we screened for suppressors that rescue the transcriptional defects of HIS3 caused by a catalytically inactive mutant Gcn5, the E173H mutant. One bypass of Gcn5 requirement gene (BGR) suppressor was mapped to the REG1 locus that encodes a semidominant mutant truncated after amino acid 740. Reg1(1-740) protein does not rescue the complete knockout of GCN5, nor does it suppress other gcn5− defects, including the inability to utilize nonglucose carbon sources. Reg1(1-740) enhances HIS3 transcription while HIS3 promoter remains hypoacetylated, indicating that a noncatalytic function of Gcn5 is targeted by this suppressor protein. Reg1 protein is a major regulator of Snf1 kinase that phosphorylates Ser10 of histone H3. However, whereas Snf1 protein is important for HIS3 expression, replacing Ser10 of H3 with alanine or glutamate neither attenuates nor augments the BGR phenotypes. Overproduction of Snf1 protein also preferentially rescues the E173H allele. Biochemically, both Snf1 and Reg1(1-740) proteins copurify with Gcn5 protein. Snf1 can phosphorylate recombinant Gcn5 in vitro. Together, these data suggest that Reg1 and Snf1 proteins function in an H3 phosphorylation-independent pathway that also involves a noncatalytic role played by Gcn5 protein. PMID:16287868

  2. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies on wild type and mutant chromatium vinosum high potential iron proteins: holo- and apo-forms.

    PubMed Central

    Sau, A K; Chen, C A; Cowan, J A; Mazumdar, S; Mitra, S

    2001-01-01

    Detailed circular dichroism (CD), steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence studies on the holo- and apo- forms of high potential iron protein (HiPIP) from Chromatium vinosum and its mutant protein have been carried out to investigate conformational properties of the protein. CD studies showed that the protein does not have any significant secondary structure elements in the holo- or apo- HiPIP, indicating that the metal cluster does not have any effect on formation of secondary structure in the protein. Steady-state fluorescence quenching studies however, suggested that removal of the iron-sulfur ([Fe(4)S(4)](3+)) cluster from the protein leads to an increase in the solvent accessibility of tryptophans, indicating change in the tertiary structure of the protein. CD studies on the holo- and apo- HiPIP also showed that removal of the metal prosthetic group drastically affects the tertiary structure of the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence decay of the wild type protein was fitted to a four-exponentials model and that of the W80N mutant was fitted to a three-exponentials model. The time-resolved fluorescence decay was also analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The results of the MEM analysis agreed with those obtained from discrete exponentials model analysis. Studies on the wild type and mutants helped to assign the fast picosecond lifetime component to the W80 residue, which exhibits fast fluorescence energy transfer to the [Fe(4)S(4)](3+) cluster of the protein. Decay-associated fluorescence spectra of each tryptophan residues were calculated from the time-resolved fluorescence results at different emission wavelengths. The results suggested that W80 is in the hydrophobic core of the protein, but W60 and W76 are partially or completely exposed to the solvent. PMID:11566801

  3. Systematic lipidomic analysis of yeast protein kinase and phosphatase mutants reveals novel insights into regulation of lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira dos Santos, Aline Xavier; Riezman, Isabelle; Aguilera-Romero, Maria-Auxiliadora; David, Fabrice; Piccolis, Manuele; Loewith, Robbie; Schaad, Olivier; Riezman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory pathways required to maintain eukaryotic lipid homeostasis are largely unknown. We developed a systematic approach to uncover new players in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Through an unbiased mass spectrometry–based lipidomic screening, we quantified hundreds of lipid species, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols, from a collection of 129 mutants in protein kinase and phosphatase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our approach successfully identified known kinases involved in lipid homeostasis and uncovered new ones. By clustering analysis, we found connections between nutrient-sensing pathways and regulation of glycerophospholipids. Deletion of members of glucose- and nitrogen-sensing pathways showed reciprocal changes in glycerophospholipid acyl chain lengths. We also found several new candidates for the regulation of sphingolipid homeostasis, including a connection between inositol pyrophosphate metabolism and complex sphingolipid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of AUR1 and SUR1. This robust, systematic lipidomic approach constitutes a rich, new source of biological information and can be used to identify novel gene associations and function. PMID:25143408

  4. Mutations in dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) affect eumelanin/pheomelanin synthesis, but do not affect intracellular trafficking of the mutant protein

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) is a type I membrane protein and an important regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of melanin and in the rapid metabolism of its toxic intermediates. Dct-mutant melanocytes carrying the slaty or slaty light mutations were derived from the skin of newborn congenic C57BL/6J non-agouti black mice and were used to study the effect(s) of these mutations on the intracellular trafficking of Dct and on the pigmentation of the cells. Dct activity is 3-fold lower in slaty cells compared with non-agouti black melanocytes, whereas slaty light melanocytes have a surprisingly 28-fold lower Dct activity. Homology modelling of the active site of Dct suggests that the slaty mutation [R194Q (Arg194→Gln)] is located in the active site and may alter the ability of the enzyme to transform the substrate. Transmembrane prediction methods indicate that the slaty light mutation [G486R (Gly486→Arg)] may result in the sliding of the transmembrane domain towards the N-terminus, thus interfering with Dct function. Chemical analysis showed that both Dct mutations increase pheomelanin and reduce eumelanin produced by melanocytes in culture. Thus the enzymatic activity of Dct may play a role in determining whether the eumelanin or pheomelanin pathway is preferred for pigment biosynthesis. PMID:15960609

  5. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Rana, Sandeep; McMurray, Cynthia T; Hua, Duy H

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP) compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD. PMID:19586540

  6. Apoptotic mechanisms during competition of ribosomal protein mutant cells: roles of the initiator caspases Dronc and Dream/Strica

    PubMed Central

    Kale, A; Li, W; Lee, C-H; Baker, N E

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygosity for mutations in ribosomal protein genes frequently leads to a dominant phenotype of retarded growth and small adult bristles in Drosophila (the Minute phenotype). Cells with Minute genotypes are subject to cell competition, characterized by their selective apoptosis and removal in mosaic tissues that contain wild-type cells. Competitive apoptosis was found to depend on the pro-apoptotic reaper, grim and head involution defective genes but was independent of p53. Rp/+ cells are protected by anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 expression but lacked the usual hallmarks of ‘undead' cells. They lacked Dronc activity, and neither expression of dominant-negative Dronc nor dronc knockdown by dsRNA prevented competitive apoptosis, which also continued in dronc null mutant cells or in the absence of the initiator caspases dredd and dream/strica. Only simultaneous knockdown of dronc and dream/strica by dsRNA was sufficient to protect Rp/+ cells from competition. By contrast, Rp/Rp cells were also protected by baculovirus p35, but Rp/Rp death was dronc-dependent, and undead Rp/Rp cells exhibited typical dronc-dependent expression of Wingless. Independence of p53 and unusual dependence on Dream/Strica distinguish competitive cell death from noncompetitive apoptosis of Rp/Rp cells and from many other examples of cell death. PMID:25613379

  7. Apoptotic mechanisms during competition of ribosomal protein mutant cells: roles of the initiator caspases Dronc and Dream/Strica.

    PubMed

    Kale, A; Li, W; Lee, C-H; Baker, N E

    2015-08-01

    Heterozygosity for mutations in ribosomal protein genes frequently leads to a dominant phenotype of retarded growth and small adult bristles in Drosophila (the Minute phenotype). Cells with Minute genotypes are subject to cell competition, characterized by their selective apoptosis and removal in mosaic tissues that contain wild-type cells. Competitive apoptosis was found to depend on the pro-apoptotic reaper, grim and head involution defective genes but was independent of p53. Rp/+ cells are protected by anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 expression but lacked the usual hallmarks of 'undead' cells. They lacked Dronc activity, and neither expression of dominant-negative Dronc nor dronc knockdown by dsRNA prevented competitive apoptosis, which also continued in dronc null mutant cells or in the absence of the initiator caspases dredd and dream/strica. Only simultaneous knockdown of dronc and dream/strica by dsRNA was sufficient to protect Rp/+ cells from competition. By contrast, Rp/Rp cells were also protected by baculovirus p35, but Rp/Rp death was dronc-dependent, and undead Rp/Rp cells exhibited typical dronc-dependent expression of Wingless. Independence of p53 and unusual dependence on Dream/Strica distinguish competitive cell death from noncompetitive apoptosis of Rp/Rp cells and from many other examples of cell death.

  8. The origin of replication, oriC, and the dnaA protein are dispensable in stable DNA replication (sdrA) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Kogoma, T; von Meyenburg, K

    1983-01-01

    The sdrA224 mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, capable of continued DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis (stable DNA replication), tolerate inactivation of the dnaA gene by insertion of transposon Tn10. Furthermore, oriC, the origin of E. coli chromosome replication, can be deleted from the chromosome of sdrA mutants without loss of viability. The results suggest the presence of a second, normally repressed, initiation system for chromosome replication alternative to the 'normal' dnaA+ oriC+-dependent initiation mechanism.

  9. The origin of replication, oriC, and the dnaA protein are dispensable in stable DNA replication (sdrA) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kogoma, T; von Meyenburg, K

    1983-01-01

    The sdrA224 mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, capable of continued DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis (stable DNA replication), tolerate inactivation of the dnaA gene by insertion of transposon Tn10. Furthermore, oriC, the origin of E. coli chromosome replication, can be deleted from the chromosome of sdrA mutants without loss of viability. The results suggest the presence of a second, normally repressed, initiation system for chromosome replication alternative to the 'normal' dnaA+ oriC+-dependent initiation mechanism. Images Fig. 2. PMID:11894964

  10. Loss of actomyosin regulation in distal arthrogryposis myopathy due to mutant myosin binding protein-C slow

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Maegen A.; Patel, Puja D.; Valenti, Jane; Takagi, Yasuharu; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R.; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2013-01-01

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) is expressed in striated muscles, where it plays key roles in the modulation of actomyosin cross-bridges. Slow MyBP-C (sMyBP-C) consists of multiple variants sharing common domains but also containing unique segments within the NH2 and COOH termini. Two missense mutations in the NH2 terminus (W236R) and COOH terminus (Y856H) of sMyBP-C have been causally linked to the development of distal arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1), a severe skeletal muscle disorder. Using a combination of in vitro binding and motility assays, we show that the COOH terminus mediates binding of sMyBP-C to thick filaments, while the NH2 terminus modulates the formation of actomyosin cross-bridges in a variant-specific manner. Consistent with this, a recombinant NH2-terminal peptide that excludes residues 34–59 reduces the sliding velocity of actin filaments past myosin heads from 9.0 ± 1.3 to 5.7 ± 1.0 μm/s at 0.1 μM, while a recombinant peptide that excludes residues 21–59 fails to do so. Notably, the actomyosin regulatory properties of sMyBP-C are completely abolished by the presence of the DA-1 mutations. In summary, our studies are the first to show that the NH2 and COOH termini of sMyBP-C have distinct functions, which are regulated by differential splicing, and are compromized by the presence of missense point mutations linked to muscle disease.—Ackermann, M. A., Patel, P. D., Valenti, J., Takagi, Y., Homsher, E., Sellers, J. R., Kontrogiannni-Konstantopoulos, A. Loss of actomyosin regulation in distal arthrogryposis myopathy due to mutant myosin binding protein-C slow. PMID:23657818

  11. Phenotypic analysis of newly isolated short-lifespan Neurospora crassa mutant deficient in a high mobility group box protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Li, ZhengHao; Ishimori, Keisuke; Kuwabara, Kazuki; Hatakeyama, Shin; Tanaka, Shuuitsu

    2017-08-01

    To elucidate genetic mechanisms affecting the lifespan of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we attempted to identify a gene of which a defect causes a short-lifespan. By screening a Neurospora knockout library, provided by the Fungal Genetics Stock Center at Kansas State University, several KO strains with a short-lifespan were isolated. FGSC#11693 is one of these, which shows similar phenotypes to known Neurospora short-lifespan mutants as follows: 1) hyphal growth ceases after about 2weeks of cultivation, despite that of the wild-type continuing for over 2years, 2) viability of conidia is lower than that of the wild-type, and 3) high sensitivity to mutagens such as methyl methanesulfonate, ultraviolet radiation, and hydroxyl urea is exhibited. The NCU number of the knocked-out gene in the KO strain is NCU02695, and recovery from the short-lifespan and mutagen sensitivity was achieved by the introduction of this gene from the wild-type. The putative amino acid sequence of the knocked-out gene contains two high mobility group box domains and a mitochondrial localization signal is found at the N-terminal of this sequence. Upon analyzing the subcellular localization of the gene product fused with GFP, GFP signals were detected in mitochondria. From these observations, the gene and KO strain were named mitochondrial high mobility group box protein 1 (MHG1) and mhg1(KO) strain, respectively. The amount of mtDNA relative to the nuclear amount was lower in the mhg1(KO) strain than in the wild-type. mtDNA aberration was also observed in the mhg1(KO) strain. These results suggest that the MHG1 protein plays an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA, and mitochondrial abnormality caused by mtDNA aberration is responsible for the short-lifespan of the mhg1(KO) strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur . E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca

    2006-02-17

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including {alpha}-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis.

  13. ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib promotes degradation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D

    2017-01-24

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most prevalent genetic events in human Her2-positive breast cancer and are associated with poor prognosis and survival. Human clinical data and our in vitro and in vivo studies strongly suggest potent oncogenic cooperation between mutant p53 and Her2 (ErbB2). Yet, the translational significance of mutant p53 in Her2 positive breast cancer, especially with respect to Her2-targeted therapies, has not been evaluated. Our previous work identified novel oncogenic activity of mutant p53 whereby mutp53 amplifies ErbB2 signaling via the mutp53-HSF1-ErbB2 feed-forward loop. Here we report that pharmacological interception of this circuit by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib downregulates mutant p53 in vitro and in vivo. We found that ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib inhibits transcription factor HSF1, and its target Hsp90, followed by mutant p53 degradation in MDM2 dependent manner. Thus, our data suggest that mutant p53 sensitizes cancer cells to lapatinib via two complementary mechanisms: mutant p53 mediated amplification of ErbB2 signaling, and simultaneous annihilation of both potent oncogenic drivers, ErbB2 and mutant p53. Hence, our study could provide valuable information for the optimization of therapeutic protocols to achieve superior clinical effects in the treatment of Her2 positive breast cancer.

  14. ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib promotes degradation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most prevalent genetic events in human Her2-positive breast cancer and are associated with poor prognosis and survival. Human clinical data and our in vitro and in vivo studies strongly suggest potent oncogenic cooperation between mutant p53 and Her2 (ErbB2). Yet, the translational significance of mutant p53 in Her2 positive breast cancer, especially with respect to Her2-targeted therapies, has not been evaluated. Our previous work identified novel oncogenic activity of mutant p53 whereby mutp53 amplifies ErbB2 signaling via the mutp53-HSF1-ErbB2 feed-forward loop. Here we report that pharmacological interception of this circuit by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib downregulates mutant p53 in vitro and in vivo. We found that ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib inhibits transcription factor HSF1, and its target Hsp90, followed by mutant p53 degradation in MDM2 dependent manner. Thus, our data suggest that mutant p53 sensitizes cancer cells to lapatinib via two complementary mechanisms: mutant p53 mediated amplification of ErbB2 signaling, and simultaneous annihilation of both potent oncogenic drivers, ErbB2 and mutant p53. Hence, our study could provide valuable information for the optimization of therapeutic protocols to achieve superior clinical effects in the treatment of Her2 positive breast cancer. PMID:27791982

  15. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruikang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzymes and cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 catalyze successive steps in mRNA degradation and prevent double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) accumulation, whereas the viral E3 protein can bind dsRNA. We showed that dsRNA and E3 colocalized within cytoplasmic viral factories in cells infected with a decapping enzyme mutant as well as with wild-type VACV and that they coprecipitated with antibody. An E3 deletion mutant induced protein kinase R (PKR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation earlier and more strongly than a decapping enzyme mutant even though less dsRNA was made, leading to more profound effects on viral gene expression. Human HAP1 and A549 cells were genetically modified by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) to determine whether the same pathways restrict E3 and decapping mutants. The E3 mutant replicated in PKR knockout (KO) HAP1 cells in which RNase L is intrinsically inactive but only with a double knockout (DKO) of PKR and RNase L in A549 cells, indicating that both pathways decreased replication equivalently and that no additional dsRNA pathway was crucial. In contrast, replication of the decapping enzyme mutant increased significantly (though less than that of wild-type virus) in DKO A549 cells but not in DKO HAP1 cells where a smaller increase in viral protein synthesis occurred. Xrn1 KO A549 cells were viable but nonpermissive for VACV; however, wild-type and mutant viruses replicated in triple-KO cells in which RNase L and PKR were also inactivated. Since KO of PKR and RNase L was sufficient to enable VACV replication in the absence of E3 or Xrn1, the poor replication of the decapping mutant, particularly in HAP1 DKO, cells indicated additional translational defects. IMPORTANCE Viruses have evolved ways of preventing or counteracting the cascade of antiviral responses that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers in host cells. We showed that

  16. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruikang; Moss, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzymes and cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 catalyze successive steps in mRNA degradation and prevent double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) accumulation, whereas the viral E3 protein can bind dsRNA. We showed that dsRNA and E3 colocalized within cytoplasmic viral factories in cells infected with a decapping enzyme mutant as well as with wild-type VACV and that they coprecipitated with antibody. An E3 deletion mutant induced protein kinase R (PKR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation earlier and more strongly than a decapping enzyme mutant even though less dsRNA was made, leading to more profound effects on viral gene expression. Human HAP1 and A549 cells were genetically modified by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) to determine whether the same pathways restrict E3 and decapping mutants. The E3 mutant replicated in PKR knockout (KO) HAP1 cells in which RNase L is intrinsically inactive but only with a double knockout (DKO) of PKR and RNase L in A549 cells, indicating that both pathways decreased replication equivalently and that no additional dsRNA pathway was crucial. In contrast, replication of the decapping enzyme mutant increased significantly (though less than that of wild-type virus) in DKO A549 cells but not in DKO HAP1 cells where a smaller increase in viral protein synthesis occurred. Xrn1 KO A549 cells were viable but nonpermissive for VACV; however, wild-type and mutant viruses replicated in triple-KO cells in which RNase L and PKR were also inactivated. Since KO of PKR and RNase L was sufficient to enable VACV replication in the absence of E3 or Xrn1, the poor replication of the decapping mutant, particularly in HAP1 DKO, cells indicated additional translational defects. Viruses have evolved ways of preventing or counteracting the cascade of antiviral responses that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers in host cells. We showed that the dsRNA produced in

  17. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated in

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2–4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (<10x), cell surface expression (20x) and chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD–exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27935997

  19. Spontaneous nisin-resistant Listeria monocytogenes mutants with increased expression of a putative penicillin-binding protein and their sensitivity to various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gravesen, A; Sørensen, K; Aarestrup, F M; Knøchel, S

    2001-01-01

    A concern regarding the use of bacteriocins, as for example the lantibiotic nisin, for biopreservation of certain food products is the possibility of resistance development and potential cross-resistance to antibiotics in the target organism. The genetic basis for nisin resistance development is as yet unknown. We analyzed changes in gene expression following nisin resistance development in Listeria monocytogenes 412 by restriction fragment differential display. The mutant had increased expression of a protein with strong homology to the glycosyltransferase domain of high-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), a histidine protein kinase, a protein of unknown function, and ClpB (putative functions from homology). The three former proteins had increased expression in a total of six out of 10 independent mutants originating from five different wild-type strains, indicating a prevalent nisin resistance mechanism under the employed isolation conditions. Increased expression of the putative PBP may affect the cell wall composition and thereby alter the sensitivity to cell wall-targeting compounds. The mutants had an isolate-specific increase in sensitivity to different beta-lactams and a slight decrease in sensitivity to another lantibiotic, mersacidin. A model incorporating these observations is proposed based on current knowledge of nisin's mode of action.

  20. Analysis of a sugar response mutant of Arabidopsis identified a novel B3 domain protein that functions as an active transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Saijo, Takanori; Shibata, Daisuke; Morikami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2005-06-01

    A recessive mutation hsi2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing luciferase (LUC) under control of a short promoter derived from a sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamin gene (Spo(min)LUC) caused enhanced LUC expression under both low- and high-sugar conditions, which was not due to increased level of abscisic acid. The hsi2 mutant contained a nonsense mutation in a gene encoding a protein with B3 DNA-binding domain. HSI2 and two other Arabidopsis proteins appear to constitute a novel subfamily of B3 domain proteins distinct from ABI3, FUS3, and LEC2, which are transcription activators involved in seed development. The C-terminal part of HSI2 subfamily proteins contained a sequence similar to the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. Deletion of the C-terminal portion of HSI2 lost in the hsi2 mutant caused reduced nuclear targeting of HSI2. Null allele of HSI2 showed even higher Spo(min)LUC expression than the hsi2 mutant, whereas overexpression of HSI2 reduced the LUC expression. Transient coexpression of 35SHSI2 with Spo(min)LUC in protoplasts repressed the expression of LUC activity, and deletion or mutation of the EAR motif significantly reduced the repression activity of HSI2. These results indicate that HSI2 and related proteins are B3 domain-EAR motif active transcription repressors.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Humaira; Zhang, Zhenbo; Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2-4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (<10x), cell surface expression (20x) and chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD-exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases.

  2. Erwinia carotovora DsbA mutants: evidence for a periplasmic-stress signal transduction system affecting transcription of genes encoding secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Sealy, L V; Thomas, J D; Commander, P; Salmond, G P

    1999-08-01

    The dsbA genes, which encode major periplasmic disulfide-bond-forming proteins, were isolated from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca), and the dsbC gene, encoding another periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase was isolated from Ecc. All three genes were sequenced and mutants deficient in these genes were created by marker exchange mutagenesis. The Ecc mutants were severely affected in activity and secretion of pectate lyase, probably due to the absence of functional PelC, which is predicted to require disulfide bond formation to achieve its correct conformation prior to secretion across the outer membrane. Similarly, endopolygalacturonase, also predicted to possess disulfide bonds, displayed reduced activity. The major Ecc cellulase (CelV) does not contain cysteine residues and was still secreted in dsbA-deficient strains. This observation demonstrated unequivocally that the localization and activity of the individual components of the Out apparatus are independent of disulfide bond formation. Surprisingly, cellulase activity was shown to be increased approximately two- to threefold in the DsbA mutant. This phenomenon resulted from transcriptional up-regulation of celV gene expression. In contrast, transcription of both pelC and peh were down-regulated in dsbA-deficient strains when compared to the wild-type. Protease (Prt) activity and secretion were unaffected in the Ecc dsbA mutant. Prt activity was considerably reduced in the double dsbA dsbC mutant. However Prt was secreted normally in this strain. The Eca dsbA mutant was found to be non-motile, suggesting that disulfide bond formation is essential for motility in this strain. All of the dsb mutants showed reduced tissue maceration in planta. These results suggest that a feedback regulation system operates in Ecc. In this system, defects in periplasmic disulfide bond formation act as a signal which is relayed to the transcription machinery regulating gene

  3. Characterization of mutants of a highly cross-reactive calcium-binding protein from Brassica pollen for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Swoboda, Ines; Twardosz-Kropfmüller, Anna; Dall'antonia, Fabio; Keller, Walter; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L; Okada, Takashi; Toriyama, Kinya; Weber, Milena; Ghannadan, Minoo; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Blatt, Katharina; Valent, Peter; Klein, Brigitte; Niederberger, Verena; Curin, Mirela; Balic, Nadja; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The major turnip (Brassica rapa) pollen allergen, belongs to a family of calcium-binding proteins (i.e., two EF-hand proteins), which occur as highly cross-reactive allergens in pollen of weeds, grasses and trees. In this study, the IgE binding capacity and allergenic activity of three recombinant allergen variants containing mutations in their calcium-binding sites were analyzed in sensitized patients with the aim to identify the most suitable hypoallergenic molecule for specific immunotherapy. Analysis of the wildtype allergen and the mutants regarding IgE reactivity and activation of basophils in allergic patients indicated that the allergen derivative mutated in both calcium-binding domains had the lowest allergenic activity. Gel filtration and circular dichroism experiments showed that both, the wildtype and the double mutant, occurred as dimers in solution and assumed alpha-helical fold, respectively. However, both fold and thermal stability were considerably reduced in the double mutant. The use of bioinformatic tools for evaluation of the solvent accessibility and charge distribution suggested that the reduced IgE reactivity and different structural properties of the double mutant may be due to a loss of negatively charged amino acids on the surface. Interestingly, immunization of rabbits showed that only the double mutant but not the wildtype allergen induced IgG antibodies which recognized the allergen and blocked binding of allergic patients IgE. Due to the extensive structural similarity and cross-reactivity between c